The East Carolinian, November 20, 1984






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
8 Pages
( irculation 12.(MM)
Legislature Passes Resolution
�giis�5555555Ss5� Urging Mascot Name Change
F.ighteen Mac
Achievement
k St
NEIL JOHNSON - ECU �hofo Lab
Achievement A wards
udents received awards for academic excellence during the first -annual Omega Psi Phi
irds Program Sunday. See storj page three.
Nf�� hdllur
The SGA Legislature passed by
acclamation a resolution urging
that the ECU Department of
Athletics give "serious considera-
tion" to changing the name of
Pee Dee, the Pirate mascot.
The resolution was passed at
Monday's SGA meeting and also
stressed the fact that a majority
of those voting in the recent SGA
election expressed dissatisfaction
with the name of the mascot.
Prior to passage of the resolu-
tion. Director of Athletics Ken
karr spoke on the history of the
name Pee Dee and the reasons for
its selection.
Karr pointed out that when he
became athletic director in 1980,
the athletic program was
operating under a deficit. "Part
of the problem" with his job, he
said, "is identifying and max-
imizing revenue
The athletic budget is approx-
imately S3.2 million. Kan
over $1 million ot which is
taincd through student fees
'The Department has the
privilege of generating $2.2
million more
Following the distribution
student football tickets, 25,000
more tickets must be
"marketed Karr said, and to
this end a marketing strategy ha
been developed.
"Developing a new logo was
part of the marketing strategy
Karr said. "We must com
people it's a good thing to come
to Ficklen
Concerning the name ot Pee
Dee. Karr -aid, "we needed to .
the attention of the little one
Thus, area schoolchildren helped
select the name for the mascot.
"It seemed to lend itself to wl
we needed to achieve with tl
children.
"The mascot, by any name.
has gone
achi . . hat we
wanted I K
want people thinking in pos I
The matl i changing the
name is K trr's
hand. "1 ma) end up cl
the name h "We
by
naming the Pii
ned
ticip .
-
25,00
Ho

Political Science Professor Predicts Possible Realignment
By (.RFC. RIIH.Ol 1 forum on the 1984 elections soon- The last dramatic realiunmpnt mi-un h� r, �� AtK�r ff�r � � .
By GREG RIDEOU1
Minikins (jli
W e may be undergoing a
gradual realignment ;n our
pel system, ng to
UN
There are arguments both for
dramati fi in our
em, but Prysby believes if any
realignmen- - Kxun ng it is a
.
The ns expert made his
comments Thursday evening
along with W. Lee Johnston, a
specialist on North Carolina
politics, a : three-part
forum on the 1984 elections spon
sored by the political science and
history departments with funding
from the NC. Humanities Com-
mission and the National Endow-
ment for the Humanities.
Prysby said there isn't enough
available data to thoroughly
e the vote, but two inter-
pretations are discernible. "One
view (for no realignment) is that
Reagan's victory is largely an in-
dividual triumph he said. The
other iew is that "Reagan's vic-
tory is part of an emerging
realignment, one thai is beginn-
ing to occur now
The last dramatic realignment
was in the 1930s when the
Democrats took control under
the New Deal. Prysby beliees
that if a realignment is occurring,
it's not the 1930s type.
Republican success at the
presidential level, erosion of the
New Deal coalition. Republican
strength in growing areas of the
country, shifts in the way people
view the parties and an increase
of young people identifying with
the GOP are all arguments for a
shit! in the system. Arguments
against tins iheor point out that
presidential success has not
trickled down to other offices.
Shifts in how people perceive par-
ties are based on the economy
and therefore not fundamental.
The evidence is better, pro-
ponents of this theory say, for a
deahgnment
Prysby does see a definite
realignment occurring in Texas
and North Carolina. Johnston
concurs, saying this state's con-
servative values and God-fearing
attitudes are now translating into
votes for Republicans, where
before they put conservative
Democrats in office.
The Republican party in the
Outstanding Loans Top S2,500
Legislature Plans To Recoup Loss
Bv HAROLDJOYNhR
M�c�nsr�. t-diii
1 a set:oilect
outstanding emerge dent
the.dent
. ; ha. tem-
porary progra
the S2.500 l
"Students art - have to
pay p or el d k;rk
Shelley, speaker oi the ECU stu-
dent legislat has been a
concern ol are for
some time he said, "and we
had to do som . to help try
- the m nav.k No
:e loans are being given out
because there ;rv ro more funds
e proj i. If the situa-
tior tret edied, the program
may be cancelled, Shelley said.
Approximately 100 students at
EC have outstanding $25 loans.
Shelley said the first warning let-
ters have been sent, informing the
students they have to repay the
loans If there is no response, a
second letter will be sent, inform-
ing them they are required to
meet with Ronald Speier,
ociate dean and director of
student services.
"If the student fails to show
up Shelley said, "they face the
possibility of being barred from
their classes and this could really
jeopardize their exam schedule
AKo, the student may have to ap-
pear in front of the Honor Board
and be tried for the offense of not
repaying the loan.
Last year, according to
Shelley, attempts were made to
collect outstanding loans by filing
suit against the student.
However, "we fell it was not
worth the trouble just to collect
$25. Therefore, the new system
was implemented and we feel it
will be more effective and a
cheaper wa of retrieving the
outstanding loans Shelley said.
Another problem in collecting
loans has been the fact that
students who know they will not
be returning to school the follow-
ing semester take advantage of
the loan program, Shelley said.
"This poses more problems and
we hope to solve them by having
the student's transcripts tagged,
making them unavailable upon
request.
"It really is a shame that this
small group of people are making
it impossible for people who
really need the loans Shelley
said. "I'm not saying they didn't
need it at the time, but by them
not paying it back, they are plac-
ing an inconvenience on other
people who do need the money
and can't get it because it hasn't
been replenished
A proposal has been made to
the student legislature to make
this a long-term policy. It is on
the agenda for Dec. 3, the last
SGA meeting of the semester,
Shellev said-
Local Groups Prepare For Holiday
B HAROLDJOINKR
- . - l-ditor
Witl ksgiving just around
the many ECU and
Greer, organizations are
donat od ancj services to
help th fortunate enjoy a
happy Tl anl giving.
Cind Fairbanks, president of
the Panhellenic Council, said all
the sororaies are participating in
a drive to collect canned goods.
-This is where the sorority col-
lects canned goods and
distributes them to needy
families she said. Their ad-
visor, Laura Sweet, will allocate
the food through her church.
Fairbanks noted this drive will
also help families at Christmas.
Inter-Fraternity Council Presi-
dent Glenn Conway said each
campus fraternity would be
working on its own project to
provide food for the needy.
In the Greenville area, the
Salvation Army is having its an-
nual Thanksgiving church service
and dinner. "We've had many re-
quests from people wanting to
help said Maj. Ronald Davis,
commanding officer and
minister. "We are seeing that
these people's needs are met
Davis added that the Thanksgiv-
ing program is open to anyone
who wishes to attend.
Faculty, Staff, or graduate
students who are not able to go
home may attend an "Orphan's
Potluck" at Mindy Machanic's
home. Machanic.an innructor in
the School of Ait said, "Since I
am new in town, and it really is
an annoyance for someone to go
so far away at Thanksgiving, I
thought I would offer a place for
people to go on Thanksgiving
At St. Gabriel's Catholic
Church, the doors will open at
noon Thanksgiving Day allowing
anyone who wants a good meal
and fellowship to do so. Accor-
ding to Sister Joseph, "anyone,
be they poor or rich, lame or
healthy, can come join us for our
Thanksgiving dinner. They don't
have to bring anything, but if
they'd like to bring a dish, it will
be perfectly all right
"We really expect it to be a big
success, because last year we had
over 300 people attending the
dinner she said.
Sister Joseph said the dinner
will last until 4 p.m. and will be
made possible through St.
Gabriel's and The Tabernacle
Prayer church. St. Gabriel's is
located at 1100 Ward St. in
Greenville.
UNC System Presidency Not Option For Hunt
RALEIGH (UPI) Gov.
James Hunt has no intention of
seeking the presidency of the
University of North Carolina
system when William Friday
retires, a sP�keswoman said
Monday.
"The governor believes that
that position ?s so crucial to the
future of the state and needs a
person who can devote many
years to it spokeswoman Lynne
Garrison said. "But he is not
willing at this point to commit the
rest of his life to that job
"He has not made a decision
about his future yet said Gar-
rison, who spoke with Hunt
Monday.
Hunt, who lost a bid to unseat
Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C, in the
Nov. 6 election, has two months
left in his second four-year
gubernatorial term.
Friday, president of the
16-campus university system
since 1956, announced in
September he will retire by
mid-1986 and he could leave of-
fice as eaily as next July when he
turns 65.
Hunt's choices for the future
include returning to private life as
a lawyer, seeking the chairman-
ship of the Democratic National
Committee or running against
Sen. John East, R-N.C, in 1986.
Phil Carlton, a top Hunt ad-
viser and longtime friend, said
the governor has not ruled out
any option, including a campaign
against East.
But Carlton added, "I think
anybody with any sense about
North Carolina politics would
know better than to start a cam-
paign for anything right now
state is in touch with the state'
values, and they portray their op-
ponents as against these. "If you
can make Robert Morgan in 1980
running against John East a
liberal, you can make Jim Hunt a
homosexual. All's it takes is a lit-
tle bit of money and a little bit of
expertise
Johnston said Reagan's coat-
tails helped Sen. Jesse Helms and
Rep. James Martin tremendous-
ly, as was the case, he pointed
out, in 1972. "You had the same
basic variables as you have in
�4 including a good economy
and a popular president
Jim
Th
Hunt and Helm- was a ;
fight waged at an emotional It
Johnston said. "It was tl
fica � going at
it toe-to-toe 15 round
the electorate has spoken
et, Helms recer- . ut the
� he
Jia in 1972 and 1978
Johnston thinks, a rockbed
servatism in the state. "
Carolina will continue to lead the
Southern conservative South and
in that will he based on the moral
and ec ; ' ic thai Helms
aks
NEIL JOHNSON � ECU Plvoto L�b
Party Time
Students' resolve to study tends to vanish in the face of tempiations
such as last week's Phi kappa Tati all-campus partv.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features5
Classifieds6
Sports7
�There will be a film survey of
all the campuses in the L niver-
sit of North Carolina system
at 6:30 p.m. on Tuesda. Dec.
4 in Hendrix Theatre. UNC
system President William Fri-
day will he present. All
students and faculty are in-
vited to attend.
�The Man-O-Stick cartoon is
not being run in this issue, but
will run twice next week.
-V��. I Mg

���
V
i

61





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 20, 1984
Announcements
Fall Graduates
Caps and Gowns should b� picked up in the
Student Supply Store, Wrloht Building, Nov
Kit
These keepsake gowns are yours to keep,
providing the graduation fee has been paid
For those receiving the Masters Degree the
tee pays tor your cap and gown, but there Is
an extra tee of 111 95 for your hood
Health and Human Services
Opening tor spring semester in Washington,
DC. Health and Human Services. Office of
the Secretary Policy and New initiatives
Division, for student with good typing skills
Word processing desired but not required
Student will be trained to use word process
mg equipment if needed Tuition and books
paid the semester following each Co op
assigment Salary approximately SI.000
month Contact the Co op office in Raw 313
immediately
Good Humour
Anyone who thinks they have a good sense of
humour and would like to do stand up com
edy Please contact Ed at 752 2524
Tree Trimming Party
The Student Union Productions Committee
is hav-ng a tree trimming party on Mon
Nov 26 m Mendenhall Student Center a'
4pm All are invited! At 1 p m the ECU choir
will perform Refreshments will be served
NC Internship Program
Opportunities are available for summer
employment with North Carolina State
Agencies A wide variety of positions for
many majors are available statewide Ap
plications should be completed by early Dec
Contact the Cooperative Education Office in
Rawl 313 for information regarding this pro
gram
Pre-Season Basketball
Register now tor one of the most successful
intramural events of the Pall Registration
for the turnament, sponsored by Miller High
Lite. Is on Nov 2A 27 Play begins the 30th
iust in time to let it all out before exams
Register in room 20-4 memorial gym or call
757 6387
Thanksgiving away from home&
You are invited to enjoy a traditional
Thanksgiving dinner and fellowship with
friends Make it a special day Call P J. Kl
mger 75S3411 University Friends
Fellowship
Yiddish Literature
Tues .Nov 27, 1984 7 30 p m In Mendenhall
Student Center Coffee House All are cordial
ly invited A reception follows There is no
admission charge
Fear of Finals
The ECU Counseling Center is offering a free
"Preparing For Finals" Workshop to assist
students who experience high levels of stress
which interfere with test performance
Methods of relaxation will be taught and
practiced, and strategies for taking various
types of finals will be covered The workshop
will meet on Nov 28. Dec 3. Dec 5, 3 4 p m
305 Wright Annex Since the workshop will
involve skill building, students should plan to
attend all sessions For more information
Call the ECU Counseling Center at 757 66�1
or stop oy 307 Wright Annex
All Greek's
Pi Kappa Phi lil sis pledges will sponser a
most eligible bachelor contest Come by and
vote in front of the Student Supply Store on
Mon. Nov 26 and Tues Nov 27 The winner
will be announced Tues Nov 27 at Beau's
Happy hour starting at 8 p m Wear your let
ters
Christmas Vacation
Oive Penny Camp National Underwater
Park In fabulous Key Largo The Floride
Keys are the only natural coral reef in the
Continental US This five day trip. Dec
16 21 includes lodging and two dive boat
trips daily Tanks, backpacks and weight
belts are provided Cost is S175 per person,
two to a room occupancy and S210 per per
son,four to a room occupancy For further
information ray scharf. Director of Ac
quatics 757 6441
Phi Kappa Tau
Brothers and pledges There will be a man
datory meeting Thurs . Nov 29 at 7 p m. in
the party room See Todd for more details!
Amnesty International
Amnesty International finds new dedication
to human rights with the budding of a local
chapter The first public meeting will be held
Tues . Nov 20. 1984 in Belk Building, room
101 at 8 p m Speakers will be Susan
Carpenter Regional Program Coordinator
tor Amnesty International and Ann Jenns,
Coordinator of the East Africa group in the
USA
Ms Carpenter will discuss the goals of Al
and ideas on organizing to work effectively
to gam release of prisoners of conscience all
over the world
ECU Biology Club
The ECU biology club will have it's next
meeting on Nov 28 1984 Pieose note that
this meeting will be on 6 30 p m Wed in
stead of our usual meeting time of 7 p m Dr
Nancy Rich from NX State University will
be speaking on the use of live animals for
wound lab research Dr Rich is the director
of the North Carolina Network For animals
Members Please do not forget to bring the
drawing tickets you have sold to this
meeting These tickets are due on Fn . Nov
30 All animal lovers and interested persons
are encouraged to attend this interesting and
informative meeting
I rates
There will be a meeting at 9 p m tonight in
room 248 at MSC Topics to be discussed.
Pres and vice Pre elections for next
semester and the date for our end of the
semester bash
NCIO INFO
Dr Donald Ensley will be speaking about the
NC Summer Internships at the Co op Intor
mation Seminars on Thurs Nov 29 at noon,
and Wed Dec 5 at noon in room 306. Rawl
Bldg Please plan to attend and hear about
this exciting way to spend your summer ear
ning and learning!
Phye Majors
All students who plan to declare physical
education as a major should report to
Minges coliseum at 10 a m . Thurs. Dec 6.
for a motor and physical fitness test
Satisfactory performance on this test is re
quired as a prerequisite for offical admit
tance to the physical education maor pro
gram More detailed information is
available by calling 757 6441 or 6442
Any student with a medical condition that
wouldcontraindicate participation in the
testing program should contact Dr Israel at
757 6497 Examples would include heart mur
murs, congenital heart disease, respiratory
disorders or significant musculoskeletal pro
blems If you should have any significant
medical conditions, please notify Dr Israel
if you plan to be tested
Happy Hour
The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi and Sigma Phi
Epsilon Along with their little sisters will be
having a happy hour at Pantana Bob's the
Mon we get back from Thanksgiving
Remember, Mon Nov 26, 9 Until we get roll
ed out, everyone is invited and membe-ships
to Pantana's win be sold for half price
Alpha Phi Big Brothers
The t shirt will ba in mis week and can be
picked up Mon , Nov 26 at 3 at the house we
will also be having an informal meeting at
that time and everyone is urged to attend
Blood Drive
West Area Residence Council will be hosting
a Blood Drive, Thurs , Nov 29 from 12 6 p m
in the lobby of Clement Dorm Prizes to be
given away
Ph'E'�S.9m.
Ph, Eta Sigma, ,� fc, r
�J l1 �'��. Th. meeting
m U Hr all you can
� b. Dr Wes.morena � subeC o
Crer Planmng A� m.r,
to �tteo3
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
�Cleaning done by the doctor
�Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert Cargill
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenville, NC
758-4927
Medical Students Seek
Better Instruction
(USPS) � Think of yourself as
a pre-med student. Think of
endless all-nighters and equally
endless hours locked in science
labs. Think of days spent cramm-
ing for organic chemistry exam.
And you'll think there has to be a
better way.
The Panel on the General Pro-
fessional Education of the Physi-
cian and College Preparations for
Medicine thinks so, too. The
19-member panel recently pro-
duced Physicians for the Twenty-
First Century, a 48-page report
evaluating the effectiveness of
current medical school educa-
tion. After three years of inter-
viewing educators and students
the panel found an urgent need
for improvement in current
medical education.
"We perceive a continuing ero-
sion of general education for
physicians, an erosion that has
not been arrested but is instead
accelerating said Dr. Steven
Muller, chairman of the panel
and president of Johns Hopkins
University and its affiliated
hospital.
In particular, the panel recom-
mended placing more emphasis
on a broad general education for
per-med or medical students. The
panel also advised that medical
faculty develop closer personal
contact with students, and that
med school curriculum be design-
ed to encourage more indepen-
dent learning.
"The panel judges that the pre-
sent system of general profes-
sional education for medicine will
become increasingly inadequate
unless it is revised the report
said.
Medical students need a
broader general education so they
might be better prepared for life
in a rapidly changing profession,
the panel found. Premed students
currently face an unceasing bar-
rage of technical courses which
monopolize their time and stuff
them with information soon to be
outdated while doing little to
develop their ability to learn.
However, it is precisely this
abilitiy to learn that the rush of
innovation in modern medicine
has made far more important
than the ability to cram.
The report suggests that
technical courses be limited to a
core group of basic sciences so
premeds might be free to take
more classes in humanities and
social studies. Extra courses in
the liberal arts would help
premeds to become "indepen-
dent, lifelong learners" ready for
a profession driven by constant
innovation.
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
�10
nt-NP-MHM
24 hour Towing Serviot
L-Hial Reatab
Al
The panel also encouraged
medical school admissions com-
mittees not to use the Medical
College Admissions Test as the
sole criteria for admission. In-
stead, the report urged admis-
sions committees to evaluate
medical school candidates "using
criteria that appraise the
student's abilities to learn in-
dependently, to acquire critical
analytical skills, to develop the
values and attitudes essential for
members of a caring profession,
and to contribute to the society of
which they are a part
Less emphasis on the MCAT
scores would reduce the pressure
on undergraduate students trying
to get into medical school, accor-
ding to the report. One medical
school moving in this direction is
the University of Wisconsin.
Wisconsin's med school
guarantees 20 high school seniors
placement after college gradua-
tion, reducing pressure on these
students to gain acceptance into
medical school and allowing
them to enroll in a broader selec-
tion of undergraduate courses.
Other recommendations by the
panel include minimizing stifling
memorization of rote facts by
students and reducing the
number of lecture classes in both
undergraduate and medical
school education.
The report criticized medical
school faculty for their lack of
personal relationships with
students. "Faculty members
should have the time and oppor-
tunity to establish a mentor rela-
tionship with individual
students the report concluded.
Hargett Drug Store
Home Health Center
Prescription pick up & delivery's
� Charge Accounts with authorization from parents
"PT Photo Finishing Service
"W Genera Drugs & itamins - As well as brand names
10� o Discount with Student ID
Across from Carriage House Apts.
on 43 South 756-3344
Pizza inn
Buffet
Mon-fri Uam-2pm Soon Bufffi 09
All the pizza,
spaghetti and Just
salad you can eat! 3.
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
Night
6:00 till 8:00pm
For pizza out it's Pizza Inn .m
Greenville BKd. 58-6266
Family Eyevvear
Our new family eyewear selection consists of
over 200 fashion frames for the entire family
from just $12 95 to $29 95. Choose from functional
to fantastic and save!
Bring your family m for a complete eye exam-
ination by our Doctor of Optometry. You'll save
money and know your family's eyes are well
cared for at the Eye Care Center.
We care for your eyes.
omcwEmc
CYC CARE COffCR?
Drs. Hol'is and Scibal
The Tipton Annex�228 Greenville Blvd - 756-9404
A
Thanksgiving card is
food for the heart
Shan your feelings this holiday with tnefkis
and family near or far with an
American (.actings Thanksgiving card
VI right Building

AMERICAN GREETINGS
Pirates!
Get the Fresh Alternative. Enjoy
a fn'sh salGor jndwkh, made
one-at-a-time. Eotn though the world
is going "plastic"�you don't havz to eat it.
Stamp out styrofood at Subway.
Get Tk Siesi-lfawitioe
m
II. 5th St
7�-7y79
�UBIUU)fflV
Sandwiches & Salads ,
2M
E. 5th St.
7M-77t
WE BAKE OUR OWN BREAD1
Looking for a place to live ?
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus �East Carolina University
WISHING V0U LJVEV AT THE TOWERS? VOU STJLL CAN. WE HAVE A F� mm
AVAILABLE FOR OCCUPANCY BEGINNING SECONV SEMESTER. CALL FOR Static
ON RENTAL OR PURCHASE. (919) 355-269 OR (979) 756-8410 AUi
Residence Hall Stu
Do
The ,h- ' - master keys
from the rooms of two S,
dorm student stafl member, has
created concern for campu.
public safetj �� Wlth the
Thank. . .
proacr
"Tk " I I have
always rjccnal
break
Lt. GencMcAbee, crime preven-
u�" '� �� � theDepartriH
of P rfet) �'Thelarcen. I
these f .
cor � e safetv
studer- - - m Scott "dorm
dir
11 - - McAbee,
de: ittempt to in-
crease pan nthe area ol :
ar-day hre, I
he al "no studer
P Pen form is safe fr
the key. are
'ered He suggested
of Scott dorrr
ereo systems, camera
and other ai
home with them.
Reward in theamc- I I
have -een offered by the dep
meni and the dorm H
for information leading I
arrest and conviction
perpetrator, of the crime "The
then � master key- no
no matter what the int�
el -vas initially. If they
identified, they will be
secuted McAbee .a:d.
I other crime new a
true which was reported
on Nov. 12 a� recovei
p x in Rock) Mount V tl
time, no arrest, ha
in connection with the incid
Campu. crimes reported fi
Nov. 12 � Nov. 18 were:
Nov. 12, 6:50p.m. �At
Black Students
Win Academic
A wards
Eighteen black students were
cited for academic achievement
by Omega Psi Phi social
ty during it first annual Achieve
ment Day Program Sunday al
noon. The student, were
certificate congratulating
tor having gpa I : I Of tx
The awards cere
ceived by fraternity pi
Carl Purcell Jr -fl
recognized as Omega Psi
of the year during
Paul Wood, an insti
the School of Educa' d a
fraternity brother,
students that "nothing of val
ever accomplished
discipline He told then
the four tenets of the fraten
� manhood. sch
perserverance and uplift. VA
urged black student, to w
hard to achieve and ca
that black Americans are "neve-
free until all are uplifted" fi n
economic despair.
Special recognition wa- givei
to Hazel Morgan in the School
Nursing and Dr. Clinton D m
ing from the School of Educa'
for service to the university
Students James Eennel. Stacev
Heath and Rodney Sessom. were
recognized from the School ol
Medicine.
The 18 students citec I
academic achievement were
Cassandra F. McLeod. Dapk
Dunston. Caroline Havne
3eatrice R. Vines, Teresa D. Sim-
�nons, Sherrie L. Graham. Ja
M Hall. Connie A. Shelt
Charles E. Mackey. Wiima E
( Tase. Cedric L. Adderley. Willie
L King Jr Kecia L. Dav.
� ifelvajcw Eason, Veronica C
9 Vrrders, Barbara L William
jt ;ivman Norfleet and Debra
r, �ams.
of hot 1 Ae0 onro Group
lidC s Vision
yowt Nantucket
$urprii c. John West
AYoices
��
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Phi Eta �
c,a Sigma
'84 �' 6 JO
nO a T,et.riQ i
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meed a carine.
denUst?
b the doctor
corative dentistry
i argiil
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nville, NC
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curd is
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ITS
AILS
B�jllStudents Warned
I HI i r -K� II IN
NOW MHi R2(
I he- theft of
lo master keys
f. ���� of two scot,
udent MaH� members has
'tic af?Cern tor �mpus
c.saf� officers with the
in.ks8�ving holidays ap
preaching. l
Thanksgiving holidays have
�-1SS bn a had �me for us tor
ea-�ns of dorm rooms said
Ue"e Abee, crime preven-
Officer with the Department
Publ�c Safety. "The larceny of
�e two keys only increases our
lcer" tor the safety of
Dorm Key Theft Causes Concern
tudent;
Property in Scott dorm
ur'ng the holidays.
According to McAbee, the
department will attempt to in-
crease patrols in the area of Scott
dorm over the four-day break but
he stressed that "no student's
Property in the dorm is safe from
lheft until the keys are
recovered He suggested
residents of Scot, dorm take
valuable stereo systems, cameras,
televisions and other articles
home with them.
Rewards in the amount of $150
have been offered by the depart-
ment and the dorm House Coun-
cil ,or information leading to the
arres, and conviction ol the
perpetrators of the crime. "The
theft of master key Is no joke,
no matter what the intent i �
thief was initially. If thev are
identified, thev will be pro-
secuted McAbee said.
In other crime news, a state
truck which was reported stolen
on Nov. 12 was recovered bv
police in Rocky Mount At this
time, no arrests have been made
in connection with the incident.
Campus crimes reported from
Nov .12 � No. 18 were:
Vov. 12, 6:50p.m. � A book
Black Students
Win Academic
A Hards
Fighreen black students uere
d tor academic achievement
bv Omega Psi Phi social fraterni-
ty during its first annual Achieve
ment Dav Program Sunday after-
noon. The students were given a
certificate congratulating them
tor having gpa's of 3.0 or better.
The awards ceremony was con-
ceived bv fraternity president
Carl Purcel! Jr who was
recognized as Omega Psi Phi man
' the year during the program.
Paul Wood, an instructor in
fhe School of Education and a
fraternity brother, told black
students that "nothing of value is
ever accomplished without
discipline He told them to heed
'he four tenets of the fraternity
manhood, scholarship,
erverance and uplift. Wood
urged black students to work
: to achieve and cautioned
it black Americans are "never
until all are uplifted" from
nomic despair.
:al recognition was given
H izel Morgan in the School of
ng and Dr. Clinton Down-
' �- " om the School of Education
service to the university.
Si .dents James Fennel. Stacey
Heath and Rodney Sessoms were
recognized from the School of
Medicine.
The g students cited for
academic achievement were:
Cassandra F. Mcleod. Daphne
A. Dunston, Caroline Haynes,
Beatrice R Vines, Teresa D. Sim-
mons. Sherrie T. Graham, Janet
M Ha I, Connie A. Shelton,
Charie Mackey, Wilma E.
Case. Cedric I . Adder ley, Willie
L. King Jr Kecia L. Davis,
Melvajean Eason, Veronica C.
Borders, Barbara L. Williams,
Clayman Norfleet and Debra
Williams
ATTIC
Wed Control Group
Thurs Vision
frj Nantucket
5at. John West
& Voices
was reported stolen from a room
on the ninth floor of Tyler dorm.
7:30 p.m. break-in and
larceny was reported at a room
on the ninth floor of Tyler dorm.
8:30 p.m. James Spinelli of
335 Umstead dorm was arrested
tor larceny on a warrant drawn
under the jurisdiction of the Pitt
County Sheriff's Department. 6
p.m. A sweatshirt was
reported stolen from the 10th
floor of White dorm. 8 p.m. �
Several articles of clothing were
reported stolen from the ninth
floor laundry room of Tyler
dorm.
Vov. 14, 10:15 a.m. - bicy-
cle was reported stolen from the
bicycle rack north of Tyler dorm.
4:04 p.m. � A report was receiv-
ed of an attempted larceny of a
state-owned vehicle from the
Meam plant parking lot in central
campus.6;45 p.m. A bicycle
was reported stolen from the
bicycle shed west of Belk dorm.
8:30 p.m. � Joseph Turner of
Tulia, Texas, was arrested for
solicitation of magazines on cam-
pus.
Vov. 15, 1:40 p.m. � A
larceny of two master keys was
reported in Scott dorm. 3:30p.m.
� A set of louvres was reported
stolen from a vehicle parked in
the parking lot south of Scot!
dorm. 4 p.m. A set of louvres
was reported stolen from a vehi-
cle parked east of I instead dorm.
Nov. 16, 1:25 a.m. Alfred
Pickerel of Greensboro was ar-
rested for DWI and driving with
a revoked license. 8:30a.m. � A
camera was reported stolen from
the eighth floor of Greene dorm.
10:30 a.m. � A class ring was
reported stolen from the fourth
floor bathroom of Jones dorm.
2:30 p.m. , vandalism to a
vehicle was reported in the park-
ing lot north of Tyler dorm. 2:30
pm a vandalism
was reported in I
west oi Aycock don �
A break in and
reported at a room i
flooi ol Aycock dorm i
- A bicycle was reported stole
from the bicycle rack so
ol Jarvis dorm 4 p m I w
vehicles were reported vandalize.
1,1 the 14th m si
freshmen lots.
No I 2:40 . m Michael
r�ne ol ha h tt iville, a
was arrested for DWI
�V1' hael Straine oi 46 i
dorm a id �r,ih,�i
126 Jones dorm were arrested fi
tampering with a parked el
on the south side ol lone d
)l!U
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M?e ISaflt (Earnlinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hi ter Fisher, gm �,
Greg Rideoi t. vmwi&h��
Jennifer Jendrasiak. w� e J.T. Pietrzak. o� w
Randy Mews, cam Anthony Martin. �� ����
Tina Maroschak. knuw &�� Tom Norton, m ���
Bill Austin, okk�� mum bii i Dawson, �,�.��� v,
Doris Raskins, s�. Mike Mayo, 1 r�
November 20. 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Pee Dee
Karr Posturing Unacceptable
It would seem the ECU Depart-
ment of Athletics needs a good
lesson in the intricacies of cause
and effect relationships.
After listening to Athletic Direc-
tor Ken Karr address the SGA
Legislature Monday, we find it
hard to think that, as Karr would
have us believe, the future of the
athletic and academic programs at
ECU rests on the retention of Pee
Dee as the name of ECU's official
mascot.
Karr gave a history Monday
night of the financial problems
which have plagued the football
program and outlined the necessity
of developing a successful
marketing campaign to eliminate
the deficit. So far, so good.
The fact that student fees con-
stitute 33 percent of the total
athletic budget of $3.2 million is a
valid point � but not in favor of
Karr's argument � a third of a few
million is a lot of money. Karr
does have the "privilege as he
said, of obtaining the other 66 per-
cent from private sources.
Developing a marketing strategy
stressing the school's image to
generate the extra bucks is a good
idea. The point is, though, how
relevant is the name of the Pirate
mascot to this strategy? Or, for
that matter, how important is the
football program in projecting
what ECU is really all about?
Karr, in discussing the unveiling
of the mascot at last year's ECU-
SC. State game, would like to im-
ply that the mascot had something
to do with the victory. It just ain't
so.
The logo was named in an at-
tempt to get the attention of the
"little ones those children bet-
ween the ages of six and 10, Karr
said. This makes them the latest
victims of target marketing.
We believe children are impor-
tant; they are the future. However,
is it really necessary to have people
who still believe in Santa Claus and
the Easter Bunny dictating the
choice of a name for a college
mascot?
Furthermore, these children will
grow up. In all probability they
will be somewhat like us, and a
representative sample of us dislike
the name, so in all probability
these "little ones" will grow out of
it, too.
An athletic program and a
mascot name certainly help to pro-
ject the image of the university,
but let's not forget we're here for
an education. If the children who
will become students make their
choice solely on the basis of their
feelings about the ECU mascot,
they really aren't the kind of
students we want here.
An obvious flaw in Karr's logic
came when he mentioned that
ticket sales doubled last year, when
ECU had a nationally ranked foot-
ball team. Coincidentally, this was
the year the new Pirate mascot was
introduced � a quirk of fate.
Following the team's performance
this year, ticket sales may drop
next year. We can't say this will be
due to Pee Dee? Can we?.
A representative sample of ECU
students showed overwhelming
disapproval of the name during
SGA elections. Karr seems to think
10 percent of the students wasn't a
good sample. Tell that to the
presidential pollsters who correctly
projected the election's outcome.
The success of ECU's football
program does not hinge on the
name of the Pirate mascot, nor
does ECU's future as an academic
institution. We feel Karr should
take the name out of the purgatory
where he has placed it and act for
the student good � the students
who are this institution.
Doonesbury
Campus Forum
'Can You Say Landslide?9
Hi boys and girls! What a wonderful
day in the neighborhood! Can you say
Republican? 1 knew you could. Can
you say landslide? I knew you could.
Can you say Democrat? I knew you
wouldn't. Boys and girls, guess what
song President Reagan and Sen. Helms
have been singing lately? "I'm Back in
the Saddle Again
Well, I hate to say that I am a sore
winner, but why not? Being a young
Democrat for President Reagan, Sen.
Helms and Gov. Martin, I think I have
earned that privilege. How could
anyone in their right mind possibly
have thought that Walter (Mr. Elec-
tricity) Mondale and Mrs. Zaccaro
could whip our great president? The
only good things ever to come from
Minnesota were Prince and Mary Tyler
Moore. And do you really want to
know where Jim stands now? On the
side of the road trying to thumb a ride
with Jesse back to Washington!
Seriously though, I commend the
liberal Democrats for putting up such a
valiant effort. But I hope they have
learned their lesson. But if they haven't
and they want some more, bring it on.
We'll show em' our Bush in 1988!
David Matthews
Soph, General College
Commies Discussed
On Nov. 3,1979, five members of the
Communist Workers Party were gunn-
ed down as they prepared to march and
rally against the Klan and Nazis in
Greensboro. It took onlv 88 seconds
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
are the students
all lined up for
the academic
procession. dean
HONEY9'
AS MANY
ASHUECOULD
FIND, YES.
SIR
AS MANY
as you
COULD
FtNP
UlbiL. SIR th� HURRICANE
LAST WEEK CAUSED SOME
BG SWELLS ONTHE NORTH
SHORE ALOT0FMSTU-
.DENTS ARE SURHNE
SURFIN67 THE. MORNING OF MY
INAUGURATION DAMM.T XAnhonEt
1 MILL NOT TOLERATE THIS KIND
OF DISRESPECT TOulARD THE OFFICE
OF -VB PRES- '
l UJAMT THEM
ZXPEUSP1
even last
MOTHBR'S
50N' '
VU CANT DO THAI
SiR YOU PIT HiR
TUITION INTO FIVE
iEAR BONDS
m
AND AS MfinZ OF PORT-
ALPRINCE, I'M HONORED
TO PRESENT YOU WITH THIS
IRADfTKMLHATIAN GAR
.LAND'
THIS IS GREAT CHItp, OARUCANPEUCA
REALLYGREAT WHAT LYPWS LEAVES
THE HELLS IN IT7 IT IT MAWS OFF
STINKS TO HIGH EVIL SPIRITS.
HEAVEN
off, POSSIBLE LABOR DtSWRB -
SPIRITS? ANCES, POWER FAILURES
WHAT EVIL LAPSES OF POLICE PROTEC
SPIRITS? WN, THAT SORTOF THING
AND YOU'RE
6IVIN6 ME
THIS?
LEASING IT, ACTUALLY
ILL SO LOOK FORM�
TO YOUR EXPRESSION
OF GRATITUDE
BEfORE I INTRODUCE THE INAU6URAL
SPEAKER, A FQtWORPS. IN THE MONTHS
AHEAP YOU WILL AH STUDY MEDICINE.
YOU WILL PLAY GOLF YOU WILL LEARN
ABOUT 1XXSHEL-
TERS IN SHORT,
YOU Mil BECOME
DOCTORS1
BUTQ�f FEBRUARY, LADIES AND'GEN
TLEMEN. YOUIUILL DO THE MOST IMPORTANT
THIN6 YOtLL EVER DO IN YOUR LIVES'YOU
IUILL MEET ST GEORES IN GRENADA,
AW YOU WILL
PeSTROYTHEM
INVOUSYBALL!
6R�HAM
SUCKS E66SI � THEY SURE
6RBNAQA SPR�AP HAVE A
SUCKS pvyi WOF
6B6SI - 9s, SCHOOL
an 2rv-iT SPIRIT
SIP.
for the Klan and Nazis to do their
work.
Regardless of the Communist
Workers Party politics, they were
andor are American Citizens pro-
tected under our Constitution. Why
has the government refused for five
years to take direct, forceful action
against these murderers?
When political people are killed in
other countries, our government calls
attention to the acts and presents
rhetoric about the atrocities. In this
case, our government has brushed the
issue under the rug. Can we allow this?
For if our government has chosen to
overlook these murders, what else
might they choose to overlook?
Our country is special, a refuge for
the oppressed of the world. We believe
in freedom of speech, peaceful
assembly and most importantly the
right to hold differing political Mews.
Without these rights, our country
would be no better than the Soviet
Union. The choice belongs to us. If we
are to continue to have these rights, we
must be willing to fight to protect
them, for that is the only way we will
be assured of their continuation.
I urge the people to remember the
Nov. 3 massacre and also to remember
that no country is infallible, especially
when it begins to take its freedom for
granted.
Lysa Hieber
Greenville
We No Nazis
David Beard has little insight into
the political process of Germany in
1933 or the United States in 1984. His
ignorance is further displayed by the
absence of logical fact.
First of all, during 1933 in Germany,
Adolf Hitler came to power as reich
chancellor by President von Hinden-
burg's appointment. He was not
elected by any fashion even closely
resembling that of our system. Also,
Beard is apparently comparing our
president to Adolf Hitler. That is a
great injustice to democracy and a slap
in the face to every democratic-loving
person. Adolf Hitler was not elected to
his office, let alone by more than 53
million voters as our president was
Our economic recovery from its state
in 1980 is a remarkable one. Thank-
largely to President Reagan and the
Congress, we are well on our way to
more improvement. When Hit.?-
became reich chancellor, Germany was
in a state of disorder worse than at .
event in American history, with the ex-
ception of the Civil War. In 1935 vt
President on Hindenburg died. H
proclaimed himself in total charge of
Germany. He used the people's bad
situation to turn them into the war
machine they became. In 1945. then
situation was worse than before
It is true that with the increased
economic growth and the feeling
patriotism, a sense of nationalism
sweeps the country, but to insinuate e
will evolve as a Nazi Germany is
ludicrous and idiotic. Germany's na-
tionalism was founded of fear hate,
revenge and war. Germany's na-
tionalism was falsely injected to try to
achieve economic recover Our na-
tionalism comes as a re . I our
economic recovery.
Beard has very doqueni . "a:ed
misconception and distorted truths a
his facts. I think he is only retaliai rig
against the election on Nov. 6 and its
victors. 1 disagree with his clever re
agery and find his conclusion insulting
To even imply our system is com-
parable to that of the Third Reich is
founded demagoguery in the highesi
form. Beard's negative outlook a: out
nation calls to mind the words ol
Rudyard Kipling: "Borrow trouble for
yourself, if that's your nature, but
don't lend it to your neighbors "
Whether Beard wants to admit it or
not, his principles are all together, and
I agree with his right to express them.
A freedom no one had in Nazi Ger-
many.
Beard can pretend he's living during
1933 Germany. But for me, the year:
1984. The place: The United States of
America. Don't just think about it,
reason it!
George R. Far four
Freshman, Pols
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view.
Things Thinking
Just Christmas Listing
By GREG R1DEOUT
Geez, seeing how there's only 35 days until St. Nick slides into Greenville, 1
thought I better give you The East Carolinian's Christmas list so all you guys
out there can flood our offices with presents. SomeThing I Thought Of that 1
should do, okay?
We need earmuffs and Koala bear gloves. Seems ECU's powers-that-be
don't think we students of the journalistic persuasion are entitled to heat. But
freezing us will not break our spirit nor stifle our thirst forbeer. (Yes
after all we're college students first and reporters second.)
Those who occupy the news desk would like a dictionary. Now, they're not
asking for an expensive deal, just something that spells the darn words right
And maybe a poster of Ronald Reagan asleep, so they can remember him the
way he is so much of the time.
The features desk would like some nude photographs of Burt Reynolds and
Don Rickles. You see, their walls have been bare ever since the public safetv
department forced them to remove the stuffed boa constrictor. If thev don't
get the pix of Burt and Don in their birthday suits, I hear it's going to be a
watercolor of the Special Attractions Committee chairman in drag.
The general manager wants a leisure suit to wear to interviews. You know
one with a flowery shirt and seven chains. He figures it will make a big hit
with the banks during his employment search. He would also like a Big Wh I
so he can go vroooommm, but don't tell anybody. W '
The advertising staff would like, well, basically, some good drugs If th
can't have those, they'll settle for a Mercedes and a peanut butter sand hh
And some chafe. aw men.
Everyone else up here would like a new job.
I personally don't want anything. Well, except mavbe this here chair tWc
all. Well, maybe that lamp and that paddle. And, well, that there U2J
mayonnaise. That's all. Maybe a Frosty. curtain Ml
�" t am mn isi A
Band P
B BRIAN RANGE! t
si�f i H nirr
Ten 'erthedoo-
seat in Wright Auditorium wa I
Fergu n played I , fu
night, dazzling the audience with I
! U O
Th- omplimented 'he -
house Ii$ en, down, tl �
ant; � The band ;
he� - Feet begar
citen Then the a:
"1 adies and genrlemer
plaer in the world, Maynarc:
The audience erupted appla
man walked to center stage, trur:
rig time with the musi 1
introduce himself anc
sa. plaer Dennis D
f erguson for a duet.
Dehlagio turned out I
members of the group B
ranging some of the
played bar
- ; ncert, D
play of the other m .
For Wo
Injuries from ne of
the dead auto batter �cat
take some precaut i
force, says the V
c .ording to f 5
pie were treated in a h
for a battery-related in
13,6"? of rhese. were
resulted from the
starting of automobile
�'Some people .
and cigarette, or a spark fr n i
or charge cable car gnite a battery
Megredx of Cary. safety chairman
Carolina affiliate. "Theexr
acid into the eyes, causing severe bun
sion impairment or even blindness
To minimize this risk, the v
to carry safety goggles in their ca
whenever working around or jump-stai
tery.
"The best way to reduce the risl I a
is to make sure it's in gooa worl
Megredy comments. The following are
tions from the Society that m
assure their car battery's peat perl
� Water level. Water lost thi ig e
charging should be replaced.
� Corrosion. Inspect battei
basis and clean as needed nj c rr
minals should be ren idwitl
water and ammonia tkinf
can be coated with peti
cable terminals t
Benatar
B DANIEI MM Rl R
vu�Tam freaturr lJito
I
Ro.k queen Pal Benatai
reveals yet anothe
her musu
release of her new
Tropico ITi ugh Tropico d
not surpass Benatar pre
endeavors, it s wonderfu
posed and offers s
surprises. The album �
progressie in ts en !
svnthesizers and e
seems to be an expe
tor the band. 1 sav
much of the albur
Playhouse To O
One of the mosi
plays about the stage-s � -
who keep Broadway
lighted is the next ma
tion of the "84 85
season for the East a
Playhouse. This is ge S
Kaufman and Edna Ferbc
ly play, Stage Door, whk
open on Tuesday, Nov :
will continue through Satui
Dec. 1 at 8:15 p.m. each evening
McCnnnis Theatre.
Written by two of Ame
wittiest and most theatre
playwrights. Stage Door tells
alternately funny and touching
story of the hopes and fears, suc-
cesses and heartbreaks of voung.
eager, attractive actresses who
make their headquarters at a
theatrical boarding house in New
York City's West Fifties. The
bravely struggling debutantes oi
the theatre who live at the
Footlights Club are typical of the
aspiring ingenues who descend on
Broadway and the New York
theatre each season. For $12.50 a
week, they get their meals and a
room shared with two other
would-be Lauren Bacalls. Here
they compare notes about their
daily rounds of managers' of-
I
j
A
I

big
talerj
cracl
in a
as '
Brot
tion-
bee-
lder.l
Ced-I
our
for
carei
J
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I
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Entertainment
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Band Plays On, Ferguson Sings The Blues
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leblag.o d.dn I need the .hum, He began imitating ashen evening grav an I i
m trombone to percussion, until about two minu(es rh( I
ded llU a one �'�'� microphone and said. "Thai
lohn Schroede. ai I Mat! ,
M
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: lne nertorn i . , maintained the Hue
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v i t h f t e r a "�
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lorel
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For Women Who Want To Get Jumped
iv even women need a little assistance once in a whileespecially in the rain
JONJOBOiN ECU Phoo lit
Benatar Makes Transition With 'Tropico'
i M ! i MM R i
e

of Passion.
Plahouse To Open 'Stage Door' Nov. 27
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; 'Because th Plavhouse
' '� li been mk h a hus one,
let 1it ha ' been s sible lot the
�! : : � � � I ei Miaul I ai
�'� torh to have access to the large
H 'o u n gtag ol M Gini 1 heal re s �,
k s " f o ithe en!lie sel foi Stage Door has
a bij n, but not enoughbeen designed b Robert Alpers
A � �o that n could be assembled in
a ho lands ane shop and later broken
he ultimately �down and. within a 24 houi
i ml ' it ion ol Ringlingpei iod, be rea .embled in McGin-
ind the Passion Playnis. Said Alpers, "This has been
'On tl hand, the emolike designing and building a
)rl r L haracters havelarge realistic sei to go out on
1 i beei isy for Mir actors totout at ross the country
i lentil vith i direct oi
W'im hell "So man) i 1
1 �l udents have similai goal .Stage Door will be the last
theii own professionalPlay house produt tion until aftei
Bui this show takes pi �the holidav season
Chicago's 17th Proves Successful;
A Very Hard Habit To Break
Bv MM ftw (.11 I s
stiff Wrilrr
In is)fSik a group of talented
musicians formed a hand in 1 os
Kngeles and began to provide
�d music under the name
"Chicago Iransii Authority
Ihe band, now better known as
Hist Chicago, is still around And
alter several gold and platinum
albums and hit singles, it is still
providing good music I heir
songs, from rockers to ballads,
and often featuring a bit ol jazz-
influenced horns and strings, still
bring out that right feeling time
alter time. Fortunately. the feel
ing siill continues even on then
latest Ihicago 17 (on I nil
Moon-Warnei Brothers), which
has already proven to be a ver
worth) hit
Ihe album features several
good songs which use that oi
chesteral flair, including the sti
nigs on "Remember I he
1 eeling" and "You're I he In
l : I
moi beat Mong nes
Won : ��( Hue lr. a
1 ifei v-
I igi
sound '
someone, especially
I I i (on bass
guitai i ai d Bil hamp i
ke boa: ds i I wo oilier
featuring . hicago's
keyboardist, Bobby Lamm p
duce the same eff
pouding hue ballad called "
ou and a song ol �� a
lot or people called "We i
Stop I he Hurl
C hicago also manages to put in
one good "roc ker in "Sta
eh and make il its own. Still,
two songs stand out above all the
hits on this album the frolicking,
fast paced happy sound oi
"Along I omes Woman aA
the very well arranged sound
then tevent hit from the album.
the gut w renching "Hard H �
I 0 Break ' nd as it tut ns

rtplii
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V � k
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K Parag
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emselves
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I �: i ago 17
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ail of us, andhicago 17 sounds
as w p fuv
continue





IHEEASTCAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 20, 1984
Classifieds
Cruise To The Bahamas For Fun And Sun
SALE
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE: Let Greenville Stu-
dent Laundry Service pick up, wash,
dry, fold, hang, as well as deliver
your laundry! Dry Cleaning Too
Call 758 3087
FOR SALE: 1979 Ford Pinto, good
condition, AM FM stereo, $2,000
Call 757 1876.
BUYING: Brokendown, wrecked
cars and trucks. Bring to Aluminum
Recycling Company, 700 North
Green St behind Riverside Oyster
Bar or call 756 5037 nights.
FOR SALE: Used 13 inch black and
white TV. Only I year old. S85 or
best offer. Call 752 6120 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Super size single
waterbed mattress, heater and
frame. Great deal for $100 or best of
fer. Call 758 6667
LADIES: Gowns for holiday occa
sions and pageants. Prices are
reasonable and negotiable. Size 5-7.
Call 758 6437
TYPING NEEDED: If you need
someone to type papers of any kind
for you at reasonable rates, please
call 756 8934 after 5:30 p.m.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICE: Word processing. Spelling
electronically checked. Term
papers and dissertations $1.75 per
page, paper included Call Mark
after 5 at 757 3440
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All typing needs; 758-5488 or
758-8241
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: With 15
veers experience wants fulltime typ
ing at home. IBM typewriter. Call
756 3660
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE: Experience, quality work,
!BM selectric typewriter. Lanie
Shive. 758 5301
PERSONAL
BRYAN Happy 22nd Baby I love
you more than you could know
Queenie
GOLDEN BOY: I'm serious about
the letter, now are youfi. I care about
you more than you think. Were you
serious about what you said Thurs.
night& NO PURPLE�Your flesh
for fantasy.
THANK YOU MIM: For the big Sur
prise. A nice gift from my real
sister. Not so many thanks goes to
Dawson for the Martini's. Also, Bill
is a much better name that Tater.
SAACURH '84 DELEGATES: A late
thanks for showing your spirit for
ECU and SRA. Hey, we're here to
STAY! So, let's "keep our fire bur
nin at NCARH '85 and at our own
conference, "Don't stop believin' in
'86 Love ya, The Pres Deb. G.
P S Odie says to save some turkey
for him
SRA. Hey you guys, this semester
has gone by too fast. Thanks for
making it productive. Have a Happy
Thanksgiving. See you Wed. Nov. 28,
in 212 MSC. Deb G. PSCon
ference people, we are going to do it!
Let's show Lenoir-Rhyne who the
STARS really are!
JILL: Saturday night was a definite
blast I enjoyed going back to the
managers office to wake up! Are you
drinking vodka and water on Dec. 18.
CONGRATULATIONS 1985 Phi
Tau Officers: Brian Wessler, Presi
dent, Tilden Kinlaw, V. President,
James Russo, Treasurer, Jimmy
Herring, Recording Secretary,
Brian Morris, Corresponding
Secretary. Good Luck! SKU
MISSY CAYTON: The Beta Phi
Pledges thank you for your efforts
on our street painting. Phi Tau Fred
never looked so casual.
WANTED
2 BEDROOM APT.Available begin-
ing January at Ringold Towers. Ful-
ly furnished and accessorized.
Spaces are clean and affordable
Call 758 4519.
ROOMMATE WANTED:
Preferably graduate student or
mature adult. Courtney Sq. Apt. Two
bedroom townhouse. Vi rent and
utilities. Call 757-2884 or 757 9965.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Rent $105 a month plus one-third
utilities. Prefer someone for spring
& summer sessions Tall 7W-A224
SKI
Dec. 16th-2lst
Join 2000 other
college students for a
winter break ski fest at
Killington �from $16908
Call Bob Snuth at 752-9320
(BOO) 368-2006 TO! L FREK
Custom crafting
&
Jewlery Repairs
fair price
Bring This Ad for
l20ff
14K Chain Repairs
byLts J�wtcry
120 E. 5th Strut
759-2127 19-5 Tun.Sm.
FEMALE: Roommate wanted to
share furnished 2-bedroom
townhouse. $162.50 and utilities.
Available Jan I. Call 756 7287
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted to
share 2 bd. apartment close to cam-
pus. $145 a month plus utilities. Can
move in immediately. Nov. rent
already paid, start paying Dec 1st.
Call 756 5847
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed for
spring semester. House. Rent $110
per month plus one sixth the
utilities, l'j blocks from campus.
Call Sharon at 757 0430
MALE ROOMMATE: Needed to
share apartment. Prefer year round
student. Just 5 minutes from ECU.
Call between 8 a.m. and 3 p.m
7566289
ROOMMATE WANTED: Private
room in very comfortable house
located across street from campus.
Utl. split 5 ways. Call after 7
�758 7470
STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM&:
Absolutely "no charge" for repair
estimates at the Tech Shop. Call
757 "nineteen eighty We thought
you'd like to know
SKI KILLINGON: $169 gets you
everything. Dec.1621. Call Bob at
752 9320 for more info.
NEED A ROOM NEXT
SEMESTER?: Your search ends
here. Great Place. Good Price.
Private Room fully equippedkit
chen, washer dryer,one block from
campus free parking. Don't wait.
Call 757 0430, ask for Betty Jo.
ROOMS AVAILABLE: At the
Methodist Student Center for 2nd
semester. Interested persons should
call 758 2030 after 5.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: 1 Year old female brown long
hair tabby. Answers to "Emma
East Third St.Wilson Acres
area�No Collar�call 758 6439 or
757 1614
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Fcalwn EdMor
Are you looking for a
Christmas present to give
yourself? Something exciting,
different and inexpensive? The
ECU Student Union Travel Com-
mittee may have just what you're
looking for � a cruise to the
Bahamas. Over Spring Break,
you and 43 others can enjoy five
sun-filled days and four breezy,
moonlit nights.
The itinerary for the week is as
follows: Sunday, March 3, take a
Trailways Bus to Miami, Fla
Monday, March 4, board ship at
4 p.m. and arrive at Freeport on
Tuesday, March 5; arrive in
Nassau on Wednesday, March 6
and stay through Thursday; Fri-
day, March 8, sail back to
Miami; return to Greenville on
Saturday, March 9.
There are seven twin rooms
and eight quad rooms available
on the ship. The price per person
for a quad room is $449 and the
price per person for a twin room
is $499. This fee includes
everything except spending
money and food during the bus
ride.
The deadline is Jan 9
Chairperson Julie Mohan
this is the first time in about eight
years that the committee has
sponsored the trip �jt got toe
expensive with the gas shortage
but now things have cvcned out
again she said.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$190 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
tional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For fur-
ther information call 832-0535 (Toll Free
Number 1-800-532-5384) between 9A.M and
5P.M. weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 Wart Morgan St.
& PRC Dept.
present
Air Band Contest
Tues. Nov. 20, 1984 8:30 til 1:00 a.m.
Adm.$1.00 I8yrs.$2.00 All cam 80
All entriei imut njr. up at the Elbo. Refistration bef.n. at 8:30. limit 15 frow
nzes
NO ADVANCE REGISTRATION?
1st 100.00 plus 1 years Free pass to the Elbo
2nd 50.00 plus 1 years Free pass to the Elbo
3rd Keg & 10;00 plus 1 year's Free pass to
the Elbo
Sponsored bu:
Miller & Dams Const. Co.
Grumpy ?
Overt on s
P.T.A.
Substation 11
New Del,
C hieo s
Pizza Inn
Golden Dragon
I 'RE
Athletic Club
Theoin fir Ring Mm
( urrytpuenter
Gnodsan A Flanifar Ins Co
W endu i
Panlana Robs
Sports World
Jerry s Sweet Shoppr
Slodium Cleaners
757-1608
Walking Distance
From Campus
4DoEJnrowna After Thanksgiving Break
bring your student I.D. during the week of Nov. 26 -
Dec. 1 and get unlimited workouts for the whole month
of December for ONLY16 or workouts til the 1 5th
for ONLY $10.
"We Want You To Have A Aferru Christmas
and A Happy New Rear"
GORDON'S
Golf, Ski & Tennis Shop
All 1985 skiis and apparel are in
Come See Our Selection of Both:
MENSIZOD SWEATERS Reg. $32.00
Now $21.95
MENS IZOD SPORT SHIRTS Reg. $27.00
Now $14.50
Hours 10-6
MON-SAT
Located beside Parkers Barb-Q on Trade St.
756-1003
Study around the world, visiting Japan. Korea,
Taiwan, Hong Kong, Sri Lanka. India, Egypt,
Turkey, Greece and Spain. Our 100 day voyages
sail in February and September offering 12-15
transferable hours of credit from more than 60 voyage-
related courses.
The S.S. UNIVERSE is an American-built ocean
liner, registered in Liberia Semester at Sea admits
students without regard to color, race or creed.
For details call toll-free: (800) 854-0195
or write:
Semester at Sea
Institute for Shipboard Education
University of Pittsburgh, 2E Forbes Quadrangle
Pittsburgh, PA 15260
You Call
The Shots
With this coupon get
your choice of
�DOUBLE PRINTS or
�$2.00 OFF or a
�FREE 8x10
on your next roll of color
print film brought in for
developing.
Limit one coupon
per customer
Expires: 113084
�8x10 from 110, 126, or
135mm negatives only
EC
1 Hour Photo Lab
CAROUNA EAST MALL (near Belk's)
Moa-Sat. 10am-9pm 756-6078
KINGSTON
PLACE
The most exclusive address in Greenville
Completely furnished and accessorized
with the finest interior appointments and
exceptional amenities for the serious stu-
dent.
It's a very special condominium com-
munity. Private, convenient, and available
now for rent or purchase.
� Rent: $150.00 per month per student
(75Fmore per day than the dorm)
� Purchase: Under $60,000 about Vi the price per
square foot than the other student
condominiums.
Please stop by our office at
2820 E. 10th St. anytime
between 9am-6pm MonFri.
10am-5pm Sat.
Call for an evening or Sunday appointment.
Call 757-1971 for more information
ALL units are 2 bedrooms, 2 and 2i baths.
1088 square feet, 2 floor plans available.
or a ride
I HI 1AM
I
William (,rad scored two of his 16 pa
the Irish National Team in Miftges (
Lady Pi
B RICK Mc( ORMAC
W en the ECU Lady P
ba-ketball tea : ae
teville to op-
against N.C. S N in
the Dogwood i be a
homecoming ol for t�
ECU players.
Sophomore Jod Rodi
and freshman V
both played the
basketball in Fa-
ECU is trying U pi
tournament in the a
"We've spoken t
teville Pirate's Club men fc
have sent fliers out to a-
high schools in the area
their girl's basketball te
tend ECU Coach Em: !
paring sad�
� The Dogwood Cla.�.
ECU" against N.C
opening night, and
night, the Lad P rates m
in-state rival UNC v
Coast Conference
N.C. State comes
nament ranked 19th
Associated Pres- pi
While the Wolpacl
ranked and from the
waring isn't plac t
phasis on this gan c
other.
"We don't need a:
Men Sw
B TONY BROW N
Surf Wnier
The ECU men's swim team
opened the '8485 campaign
Saturday with a crushing 69-40
defeat of UNC Charlotte at
Minges Natatorium. while the
Lady Pirates fell to a powerful
James Madison squad 90-50.
Neither score reflects the true
nature of the contests, however
The men totally dominated
UNCC by winning all 13 event
but after enough points had been
scored to guarantee a win, the re-
maining events were conducted as
exhibitions to avoid running up
the score.
The women's team dropped
one relay by two tenths of a se-
cond and another by one second,
thus losing valuable first place
points to James Madison.
"Those close losses took a lot out
of the team said Coach Rick
Kobe. "Two wins there could
have changed the whole meet
For the men, Bruce
Brockschmidt continued his pre-
season form by capturing the 200
freestyle and the 200
breaststroke, while Pat Brennan
won the 500 freestyle and placed
second in the 200 individual
medley.
Freshman Chris Holman led
the women's team, setting a new
ECU record with a 2:14.17 time
in the 200 backstroke and taking
second in the 200 freestyle. The
backstroke time qualified her for
the NCAA post-season meet and
would have placed her in the top
eight in the NCAA last year.
"I was pleased with the efforts
of both the men and women
said Coach Kobe. "UNCC has a
young team, so we weren't really
surprised at the score. James
Madison's by far the best team in
I
seel
I
Wl
K I
in
ot
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r
f
)r Fun And Sun
looms
�liable
�son
10 the
r Km
des
I
ride
The deadline is jan 9
C hajrperson Julie Moha" -
this is the firs( time.nabou-
vears that the commin� to
sponsored the trip. "i, K0( ty
expensive with the gas ,hoW
but now things have even
again, she said.
PRC Dept.
ent
Band Contest
V cam 80�
- -� � -�; on h?gm� �( 30 limit 15 jroup,
NO APV mREGISTRATTOW!
"ar's Free pas to the Elbo
ar's Free pass to the Elbo
us 1 year's Free pats to
v
514.50
Barb-Q on Trade St.
56-1003
N
ss in Greenville,
d accessorized
ointments and
he serious stu-
� �
ominium com-
t, and available
tudent
the dorm)
�ut Vi the price per
x student
iffice at
:ime
lonFri.
I Sat.
,r Sunday appointment.
r more information
baths. or a ride
Sports
NOVEMBER 20, 1984
Page 7
Turnbill Leads Pirates Over Irish
William
the Irish
Crady scored
National Tea
, �ij� M" ���� - ECO Photo L.b
two of his 16 points on this slam in the Pirates' 79-68 victory over
m in Minges Coliseum last night.
By RANDY MEWS
& SCOTT COOPER
Jack Turnbill poured in 21 points to
lead a fired up ECU basketball squad
to a 79-68 triumph over the Irish Na-
tional Team in Minges Coliseum last
night.
Although Turnbill enjoyed success
in the middle, it was the inside play of
North Carolina native and former
Wake Forest star Alvis Rogers who
kept the team from Ireland close.
Rogers led all scorers with 25 points,
pulled down a game-high nine re-
bounds and had a team-high five
assists.
Rogers was a first-team all-ACC
selection in his Demon Deacon days,
and soon hopes to resume his career in
the United States. He said the fast pace
of international basketball is preparing
him for an NBA tryout later this sum-
mer.
Last year's team leader, Curt
Vanderhorst, was also impressive as he
pumped in 17 points and had a team-
high eight rebounds.
"Curt was shooting the ball with
confidence Pirate head coach
Charlie Harrison said. "It was a big
help to have Scotty (junior college
transfer Scott Hardy) handling the ball
� it allowed Curt more time to find his
shot
William Grady gave the crowd
something to cheer about when he
slammed home two of his 16 points
four minutes into the game. The basket
broke an 8-8 tie and spurred the ECU
transition game.
The Pirates were able to build their
lead to 24-18 on a Keith Sledge lavup
midway through the first half, but
ECU was unable to maintain their lead
as Peter Dam picked up two quick per-
sonal fouls.
Two free throws by Rogers brought
the Irish to within 28-27 with 3:30 left
in the half, but the Pirates' countered
by outscoring the opposition 10-4 in
the final three minutes to take a 38-31
halftime lead.
The debut of seven-footer Peter
Dam was hardly impressive as his first-
half play consisted of one missed field
goal attempt and two personal fouls,
while he finished the game with two
points and four rebounds.
"As Peter said many times before
the start of the season, he's just one of
eleven players Harrison remarked.
"He did show- us some things tonight,
but he'll have to improve. Also, when
Leon Bass returns (sidelined with an in-
jury), it will push Peter that much
harder
The Pirates opened the second half
with a tenacious man-to-man defense,
extending their lead to 44-33 less than
two minutes into the final half of plav
The Irish were once again able to
trim the ECU lead as a Curtis Harkness
layup cut the margin to 50-43 with
14:42 remaining in the game. But the
Pirates put the game out of reach as
they outscored Ireland 24-13 over the
next 10 minutes. In the last three
minutes, the Irish managed to make
the score respectable trimming the final
margin to 79-68.
Coach Harmon substituted freelv
throughout the game. Every plaer saw
action in the contest, while Ro Smith
was the only Pirate to play under
twelve minutes.
With a great team effort, the Pirate-
looked very impressive in defeating a
tough Irish squad. They will officially
open their season Mon. at 7:30 p.m. in
Minges Coliseum against Central Con-
necticut.
B RICK McCORMAC
M�ff Wrtlrr
When the ECU Lady Pirate
basketball team travels to Fayet-
teville to open their season
against N.C. State and UNC in
the Dogwood Classic, it will be a
homecoming of sorts for two
ECU plavers.
Sophomore Jody Rodrique
and freshman Monique Pompili
both played their high school
basketball in Fayetteville, and
ECU is trying to promote the
tournament in the area.
"We've spoken to our Fayet-
teville Pirate's Club members and
have sent fliers out to about 50
high schools in the area to get
their girl's basketball teams to at-
tend ECU Coach Emily Man-
uring said.�- �
� TKe liogwood Classic will pit
ECU against N.C. State the
opening night, and on the second
night, the Lady Pirates will face
in-state rival UNC of the Atlantic
Coast Conference.
N.C . State comes into the tour-
nament ranked 19th in the
Associated Press pre-season poll.
While the Wolpack is nationally
ranked and from the ACC . Man-
waring isn't placing more em-
phasis on this game than any
other.
"We don't need any special in-
Men S
By TONY BROWN
Suff Writer
The ECU men's swim team
"pened the 8485 campaign
Saturday with a crushing 69-40
Jefeat of UNC Charlotte at
Minges Natatorium, while the
Lady Pirates fell to a powerful
James Madison squad 90-50.
Neither score reflects the true
nature of the contests, however.
rhe men totally dominated
UNCC by winning all 13 events,
but after enough points had been
scored to guarantee a win, the re-
maining events were conducted as
exhibitions to avoid running up
the score.
The women's team dropped
one relay by two tenths of a se-
cond and another by one second,
thus losing valuable first place
points to James Madison.
"Those close losses took a lot out
of the team said Coach Rick
Kobe. "Two wins there could
have changed the whole meet
For the men, Bruce
Brockschmidt continued his pre-
season form by capturing the 200
freestyle and the 200
breaststroke, while Pat Brennan
won the 500 freestyle and placed
second in the 200 individual
medley.
Freshman Chris Holman led
the women's team, setting a new
ECU record with a 2:14.17 time
in the 200 backstroke and taking
second in the 200 freestyle. The
backstroke time qualified her for
the NCAA post-season meet and
would have placed her in the top
eight in the NCAA last year.
"I was pleased with the efforts
of both the men and women
said Coach Kobe. "UNCC has'a
young team, so we weren't really
surprised at the score. James
Madison's by far the best team in
centive to play anyone Man-
waring said. "But. we do realize
this is an excellent opportunity
for our program A win in
either of these games early in the
reason will help us not only in
terms ot fan support, but it will
help our players from the con-
fidence standpoint as well
In the first game of the classic,
the Lady Pirates will face the
Wolfpack with their All-America
guard Linda Page.
When asked how her team will
try to contain the high scoring
Page, Manwaring said, "she
can't score if she doesn't have the
ball. We are going to try to denv
her the ball and keep it out of her
hands.
"I think we'll be readv when
we face N.C. Slate Manwaring
continued "We know what we
are capable of � we just have to
go out and do it
Manwaring and the I.adv
Pirates have been practicing since
Sept. 1 and are well prepared to
open their season. "We know all
of our offensive and defensive
patterns, and now all we have to
do is execute them she said.
The center position, a spot that
was suspect at the beginning of
the season, is now starting to
show promise. "The center posi-
tion has really begun to show-
some stability Manwaring said.
Manwaring has also been
pleased by the play of her guards.
"Our two experienced shooting
guards have beeen playing well.
"Loraine Foster and Sylvia
Bragg have been providing a con-
NCSU, UNC In Classic
rk jf A fttlffl MMM t nt A t i . - t n �i � C�-1 r- .
sistent Scoring threat from the
outside
Another player who is perfor-
ming well is junior all-conference
performer Lisa Squirewell. "Lisa
has some really good inside
moves and is continuing to im-
prove on her all-conference per-
formance of last year
In assessing her team's chances
in the Dogwood Classic, Man-
waring said, "I think we have
good talent, we just have to plav
well together.
The Dogwood Classic will be
Played in the Cumberland Coun-
ty Memorial Arena in Fayet-
teville, Nov. 23-24. ECU plays
State at 8 p.m. on the 23rd, and
then takes on the Tar Heels at 6
p.m. on the 24th.
All-ECAC Squirewell Returning Starter
ByTSfOWN 12 times, with one 20-point game. as a nositive factor hv .nr-ii T? ,
By TONY BROWN
luff Wl III I
The play of returning starter
Lisa Squirewell will be an integral
part of the ECU Lady Pirate
basketball team's efforts to re-
bound from a 13-16 record last
season.
Although hampered by ten-
donitis in her knees last year, the
5-11 junior forward shot over 50
percent from the field and
averaged more than nine points a
game. She was a dominant force
on the inside also. With a 6.6 per
game average, Squirewell leads
the returnees in rebounding
averages.
The former Wake Forest-
Rolesville High School center
grabbed an individual game
team-high 15 rebounds for the
Lady Pirates and added a
14-point free throw game,
another high mark for the team.
She also scored in double figures
12 times, with one 20-point game,
before her knee problems put her
on the bench for the last six con-
tests. Despite her injuries, she
was named to the all-ECAC
South squad.
"Lisa is good both defensively
and offensively said new head
coach Emily Manwaring. "She
has a strong inside game and a lot
of finesse, which give her a big
advantage in rebounding and
scoring
Squirewell became a starter
during the latter pan of her
freshman year and has been a po-
tent force in the Pirate game plan
since. She has the ability to score
in double figures, according to
Manwaring, who also sees
Squirewell's quick learning abili-
ty as one of her best traits.
This should be a big plus as the
Lady Pirates make the move
from one coaching style to
another � a change that is seen
as a positive factor by Squirewell.
"Coach Manwaring is consistent
and stays under control she
feels. "The coach last year
(Cathy Andruzzi) got too emo-
tional.
"The transition has been easy.
Coach Manwaring has a different
style all around. It's easier to
learn now, and I think the team's
attitude has improved a lot as a
result. I believe we could win 20
games this year. We have the
talent � we've just got to ex-
ecute.
"We only lost two girls from
last year's team, too. With the in-
creased attention of the coaches,
the practices have become more
positive. Sometimes I get kind of
lazy on defense and the coach
let's me know it, but I keep trying
harder. We're getting the con-
fidence that we need to perform
well
Squirewell's knees remain
question mark. According to the
doctor, her tendonitis was pro-
bably a result of doing too much
running too soon without the
slow building up process which
could have conditioned her knees
to the pounding of the hardwood
floor.
"There's not much 1 can do
about my knees she said.
"They hurt, but I'll just have to
ice them down and use
ultrasonics (deep heating). I'm
trying to strengthen them by lif-
ting weights, too
Those knees will be closely-
monitored as the season pro-
gresses, because they could make
the difference between winning
and losing for the Lady Pirates as
they enter the upcoming season
this Friday at the Dogwood
Classic in Fayetteville.
the ECAC South, but less than a
second and a half faster for us in
the two relays would have made
quite a difference.
"Brockschmidt and Brennan
were outstanding. It was just
complete domination by the men.
We have a lot of freshmen on the
women's team, so this was a good
experience for them.
"The women yo-yo'ed out
Kobe added. "Several swam well'
in one event, but did poorly in
others. We've got to improve our
consistency. We got down after
the relays and we can't afford to
let that happen
The Pirates will be in Raleigh
Tuesday to face N.C. State. The
women's contest starts at 5 p.m.
and the men's portion follows at
7 p.m.
Saturday's results:
Men
400 medley relay: Scott Robin-
son, Lee Hicks, Bruce
Brockschmidt, Jeff Brown
(ECU) 3:41.01.
1000 free: Chema Larranaga
(ECU) 10:01.16; Stratton Smith
(ECU) 10:02.35.
200 free: Brockschmidt (ECU)
1:46.51; Keith Kaut (ECU)
1:47.74.
50 free: Rolo Fleming (ECU)
22.70; Brown (ECU) 22:98.
200 IM: Chris Pitteli (ECU)
2:02.23; Pat Brennan (ECU)
2:04.02.
1 meter diving: Scott Eagle
(ECU); Paul Durkin (ECU).
200 fly: Gregor Wray (ECU)
2:00.38; no information
(UNCC); Richard Wells (ECU)
2:07.72.
100 free: Kaut (ECU) 48.09;
Pitteli (ECU) 49:11.
200 back: Kevin Hidalgo
(ECU) 2:04.19; Robinson (ECU)
2:09.08; Brian Allen (UNCC)
2:11.98.
(ECU swam remainder as ex-
hibition as a courtesy to UNCC
and Pirate performances dis-
counted in calculating score.)
500 free: Brennan (ECU)
4:54.01; Larranaga (ECU)
4:54.4; Andy Cook (ECU)
4.55.7; David Harman (UNCC)
,5:25.70; Greg Physer (UNCC)
5:40.66.
3 meter diving: Eagle (ECU);
Billy Neal (ECU); not listed
(UNCC).
200 breaststroke:
Brockschmidt (ECU) 2:14.77-
Hicks (ECU) 2:18.1; Fleming
(ECU) 2:22.2; Mike Meunder
(UNCC) 2:35.67; Glenn Mauney
(UNCC) 2:36.66.
400 free relay: Kaut, Brown,
Robinson, Eric Hawkins (ECU)
3:25.1; not listed (UNCC)
3:40.08.
Women
400 medley relay: JM 4:10.03.
1000 free: Scotia Miller (ECU)
11.12.06; Marjie Webb (JM),
11.24.47; Jenni Pierson (ECU)
11:26.67
200 free: Leslie Norton (JM)
1:58.59; Chris Holman (ECU)
1:59.12; Marlene Meyer (JM)
2:01.63
100 back: Caycee Poust (ECU)
1:02.36; Lisa Caswell (JM)
1:03.09; Lori Livingston (ECU)
1:04.24
100 breast: Jess Feinberg
(ECU) 1:11.54; Joelle Ennis
(ECU) 1:12.54; Sue Gervinski
(JM) 1:12.65
200 fly: Leslie Pike (JM)
2:16.99; Beckie D'Andrea (JM)
2:18.43; Annette Burton (ECU)
2:18.9.
50 free: Mary Mumber (JM)
25.57; Jenni Demko (JM) 25.70;
Nancy James (ECU) 26.12.
The ECU � .�� women.s swim spli, heir 5tason.opel��g mM( jn SSST
1 meter diving: Lori Miller
(ECU); not listed (JM); Becky
Kerber (ECU).
100 free: Mumber (JM) 55.50;
Demko (JM) 55.70; Pierson
(ECU) 56.87.
200 back: Holman (ECU)
2:14.17; Poust (ECU) 2:18.09;
D'Andrea (JM) 2:18.94.
200 breast: Caswell (JM)
12:33.11; Cricket Williams (JM)
'2:35.55; Ennis (ECU) 2:38.32.
500 free: Norton (JM) 5:18 95-
S. Miller (ECU) 5:20.06; Meyer
(JM) 5:28.27.
100 fly: Pike (JM) 1:02.61;
Demko (JM) 1:03.66; Jill Goreflo
(ECU) 1:03.81.
3 meter diving: not listed (JM);
L. Miller (ECU); Kerber (ECU).
200 IM: Caswell (JM), D'Andrea
(JM) 2:16.56 (tie).
400 free relay: JM 3:42.0.
1000 free: Chema Larranaga
(ECU) 10:01.16; Stratton Smith
(ECU) 10:02.35.
200 free: Brockschmidt (ECU)
1:46.51; Keith Kaut (ECU)
1:47.74.
50 free: Rolo Fleming (ECU)
22.70; Brown (ECU) 22:98.
200 IM: Chris Pitteli (ECU)
2:02.23; Pat Brennan (ECU)
2:04.02.
1 meter diving: Scott Eagle
(ECU); Paul Durkin (ECU).
200 fly: Gregor Wray (ECU)
2:00.38; no information
(UNCC); Richard Wells (ECU)
2:07.72.
100 free: Kaut (ECU) 48.09;
Pitteli (ECU) 49:11.
200 back: Kevin Hidalgo
(ECU) 2:04.19; Robinson (ECU)
2:09.08; Brian Allen (UNCC)
2:11.98.
�(ECU swam remainder as ex-
hibition as a courtesy to UNCC
and Pirate performances dis-
counted in calculating score.)
500 free: Brennan (ECU)
4:54.01; Larranaga (ECU)
4:54.4; Andy Cook (ECU)
4.55.7; David Harman (UNCC)
5:25.70; Greg Phvser (UNCC)
5:40.66.
3 meter diving: Eagle (ECU);
Billy Neal (ECU); no information
(UNCC).
200 breaststroke:
Brockschmidt (ECU) 2:14.77-
Hicks (ECU) 2:18.1; Fleming
(ECU) 2:22.2; Mike Meunder
(UNCC) 2:35.67; Glenn Mauney
(UNCQ0 2:36.66.
400 free relay: Kaut, Brown,
Robinson, Eric Hawkins (ECU)
3:25.1; names unlisted (UNCC)
3:40.08.
1

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8 THE EAST
CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 20, 1984
Navy Stuns Gamecocks, Duke Upsets State
Bv BILL MITCHELL
Staff Wrtirr
Here's a brief look at how
ECU's football opponents did in
their games on Saturday.
Florida State: Tennessee-
Chattanooga was defeated by the
17th ranked Seminoles 37-0 on
Saturday night. Bobby Bowden's
team, still trying to secure a bowl
bid, ran all over UT-Chattanooga
on offense and stifled them on
defense. The Seminoles play the
Florida Gators on Dec. 1.
Temple: Jim Cooper kicked a
36-yard field goal as time ran out
to help the Owls defeat West
Virgina 19-17. The Mountaineers
led 17-16 with 2:03 left after they
scored on a 43-yard pass from
Kevin White to Willie Drewrev.
After the kick, Temple drove 35
yards to the WVU 45. Jim
Cooper missed his first try, but
West Virgina was called for off-
sides and Cooper got another
chance. Temple evened its record
at 5-5. West Virgina lost its third
straight and is 7-4.
Central Michigan: Toledo won
the Mid-American Conference ti-
tle as they defeated Central
Michigan 14-7. The Rockets
earned a place in the California
Bowl with the win. In an inspir-
ing play, Toledo cornerback
Rodney Tatum blocked Brad
Tabin's punt at the Chippewa 27
and Charles Brewster scooped it
up on the three and scored.
Toledo entered the game with the
nation's eighth ranked defense,
Intramural Action
BvJEANNETTEROTH
Intramural volleyball is turning
into a game of upsets. Both
men's and women's division top
ranked teams and returning
champions were defeated in re-
cent net action. Men's top ranked
Third Regiment fell to the spiking
powers of the Meade Street
Maulers. The returning women's
champion and this season's No.l
ranked team Sig Ep Golden
Hearts, dropped to No.2 as the
Destitutes, previously unranked
and underrated, stole the little
sisters hearts in a close match.
Two new champions were
crowned as the last round of the
IRS racquetball tournament
came to a close. In the open divi-
sion, Raymond Song defeated the
defending champion Al Smith
15-4 and 15-8. David Patton cap-
tured the intermediate division ti-
tle beating Dean Wolford.
Registration for the infamous
Miller pre-season basketball tour-
nament begins Nov. 26-27. Tour-
nament play starts the last day of
the month. Attend the team cap-
tains meeting Nov. 29 at 7 p.m. in
Brewster C-103.
Don't forget to enter your
t-shirt design of aerobic action
and win a free semester o
aerobic classes. Include your
name and telephone number. En-
tries must be turned in by Nov. 30
in room 204 Memorial Gym.
Bowling teams are rolling right
along with impressive victories.
Thunder Balls upset the reigning
champion Powerhouse who
dropped their first game in two
years. Tan Kappa Epsilon has
started off the season with three
straight victories. In women's ac-
tion. Holler's Greene and the in-
dependent Saturals lead by
Tamara Franks, head up the
league while the sorority ladies of
Alpha Phi and Delta Zeta share
the top spot in their division.
Soccer playoff updates along
with the latest in volleyball,
basketball and the free throw
contest headline the news in the
next IRS article.
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A. t "If . i I
and showed why, adding a fum-
ble recovery and an interception
to the blocked punt. The Chip-
pewas finished their season 8-2-1.
Georgia Southern: The Eagles
concluded their season last
weekend.
N.C.State: Ken Harper kicked a
29-yard field goal with 1:56 left in
the game as Duke upset the
Wolfpack 16-13. After the field
goal, Darryl Brunson intercepted
a Tim Esposito pass in the final
minute to seal the victory. The
Devils are 2-8 and play Carolina
next week. State winds up a 3-8
season.
Pittsburgh: The Panthers have an
open date this week.
Tuba: Patrick Brussard hit a
45-yard field goal with no time
left to help Southwestern Loui-
siana defeat Tulsa 18-17. The
field goal capped a 46-yard drive
during the last two minutes.
Tulsa was winning 10-0 at
halftime after SW Louisiana had
only produced 17 first half yards.
But the Cajun's produced 246
yards of offense during the se-
cond half, and scored 11 points in
the final four minutes. The Ca-
jun's ended the season at 6-5, as
did Tulsa.
East Tennessee State: The Buc-
caneers played Marshall,
however a report on the game
was not available.
South Carolina: Navy stunned
the Gamecocks 38-21. Much of
the credit should go to the Mid-
shipmen's defense, which held
the high-powered South Carolina
offense to seven points until the
final quarter. Quarterback Bob
Misch threw two touchdown
passes to Chris Weiler and
halfback Mike Smith scored
twice on short runs. Navy, vvho is
now 4-5-1, upset the Game- '
after losing to Syracuse 7&
week. The Na offense a-3CV,C
to move consistently agai"
USC, especially ,n the third and
fourth quarters when they scored
24 points. However, even lt
the loss, the Gamecocks are still
in the running tor an Orange
Bowl bid.
Southwestern Louisiana: Set
Tulsa above.
Southern Mississippi: The
Golden Eagles played 1 ruisville,
and once again, a game repo1"
was not available
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 20, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 20, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.377
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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