The East Carolinian, November 15, 1984






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(ftarnltntatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.24
Thursday November 15, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
Prop Malfunction
Causes Theater Fire
Bs HAROLD JOYNKR
A prop malfunction caused a
101 fire Tuesday night at
Auditorium, interrup-
he show Ozma of Oz: A
� Of Time for approximately
minutes.
defective prop, a fog-
du g machine, ignited and
e oi burlap scenery on
iccording to Scotl Parker,
al manager of the
"As soon as the
� n caught fire Parker
age curtain im-
. el came down and the
row extinguished the
n 30 seconds
500 people
i lated from the theatre.
'here was no im-
"I. was stan-
I re Parker said.
have an extensive fire
e and I must sav
� smooth 1 com-
ge crew for putting
I so quickly Exhaust
turned on and the
riich was covered with
er material, was
rvf, Paiker
ired, the au-
litted into the
er explained
He assured
thing would
� would
who were
onstage when the fire was being
extinguished, received injuries
from the chemicals in the fire ex-
tinguisher. Ginger Oxendine,
head of props, suffered eye irrita-
tions from the chemical fog. Julie
Ziesler, a member of the running
crew, inhaled a small amount of
the chemical agent and complain-
ed of congestion and coughing.
Both were treated in Pitt County
Memorial Hospital Emergency
Room and released, Oxendine
said. "There was so much of the
chemical in the air she said,
"and Julie had an allergic reac-
tion to it
House Manager Tracy Delius
said she was not sure at first if the
fire was a part of the play. "I
knew something was wrong,
though. So, 1 called backstage
and they instructed me to call the
Greenville Fire Department she
said. Ushers Chris Bridges and
Betty Liverman also thought the
fire was in the play, but when the
alarms went off, they helped
escort the audience outside in an
orderly fashion. "Everything
went really smooth Bridges
said.
The company which manufac-
tures this particular prop would
be contacted Parker said. "This
is something we're not taking
lightly at all. We have pulled all
special effects from the for-
thcoming plays, so there will not
be any more problems
This was the first incident of
this sort at McGinnis since its re-
cent renovation, Parker noted.
eport Warns Of
"iu cation Pitfalls
t promi-
bnnging the
from shortfalls in
ind high schools,
! a report warning
education has serious
ging from high
seriously
lildings and
ts abandon-
learning, curricular
quality of
,iorale and
no longer
to our expectations
mel's repo said.
prepared for
ation Secretary T.H. Bell,
resigned, and the
nstitute oi Education,
panel called for drastic
higher education, in-
D full vears of liberal
for all bachelor's
: ecipients, even if it means
ng undergraduate pro-
eyond the usual four
tnel also recommended
faculty and resources
en and sophomores,
g advisement for
and creating ways to
ients' learning.
ng signals" of the
. ng conditions of higher
include declining stu-
� rmance from 1964 to
I in il of 15 major subject
. of the Graduate Records
minations, especially in areas
liring high verbal skills such
history, political science,
ion and English literature.
e cannot blame these
ds entirely on the decline in
preparation of entering col-
ge students the report said.
Part of the problem is what
ippens to students after they
itriculate in college
The report, "Involvement in
I. earning: Realizing the Potential
of American Higher Education
prepared by the Study Group
the Conditions of Excellence
American Higher Education,
chairman, Kenneth P. Mor-
er, is professor of higher
education and public administra-
tion at Pennsylvania State
University.
The panel recommended two
full years of liberal education to
strengthen undergraduate degree
programs. "Students are not like-
ly to accumulate in four years
both the generalized and special
knowledge necessary for first-
rate performance as profes-
sionals the report said.
Another "warning signal" the
panel found was that only half of
the students who start college
ever receive bachelor's degrees.
The panel also said that "one out
of eight highly able high school
seniors does not choose to attend
college
The panel sees the increasing
number of undergraduates ma-
joring in narrow specialities and
the decreasing number of
bachelor's degrees awarded in
arts and sciences as problems.
The percentage of students ma-
joring in the arts and sciences fell
from 49 percent in 1971 to 36 per-
cent in 1982. The report said
nearly half of the 1,100 majors
offered by American colleges and
universities are in occupational
fields.
The panel recommended that
liberal education be the central
core in undergraduate education,
a shift from the specialization
now prominent. "College cur-
riculum has become excessively
vocational in its orientation, and
the bachelor's degree has lost its
potential to foster the shared
values and knowledge that bind
us together as a society
The percentage of freshmen in-
tending to become professors
plummeted from 1.8 percent of
entering students in 1966 to 0.2
percent in 1982. "This 89 percent
decline bodes ill for the future of
higher education the report
said.
The report criticized schools
for favoring assertive students
when they should give more at-
tention to passive students. That
passivity, the report said, is a
warning sign of a lack of involve-
ment. The panel recommended
that student involvement be in-
creased.
The goals and objectives
students should achieve in college
should be outlined clearly, the
report said. "If we want students
See STUDENTS, Page 3
12 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Registration Proof
Requirements Relax
ECU Photo Lab
He'll Get You Every time
(old weather certainlv does not keep thisampus Policeman from
finding secret illegal parking places on campus, such as this one
behind the Theatre Arts Building.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newi Ullof
When the Solomon Amend-
ment, which requires men to pro-
duce proof of draft registration
before receiving financial aid.
became law, it caused a great deal
of controversy, as well as
headaches for college financial
aid administrators.
Initially, colleges and univer-
sities were required to verify that
students had registered for the
draft before distributing financial
aid.
Students are currently required
to sign a form stating they have
registered or are exempt from
registering, as is the case with
females or those who are not in
the specified age category.
The Department of Education
had initially planned on enforc-
ing stricter policies during the
1985-86 school year, requiring
financial aid offices to prose that
only those men registered for the
draft had received financial aid.
However, because a recent
AmongJW.C. Farmers
survey by the Department of
Education shows that most stu-
dents signing the forms provide
correct information, it was decid-
ed that stricter enforcement of
the rule was unnecessary.
"We have to do it this sear,
but we won't have to do it for the
next two years, after that the
government will be making
periodic checks said Robert
Boudreaux, director of Student
Financial Aid at ECU.
Boudreaux said that, although
the process of certifying draft
registration has been time-
consuming, there have not been
any real problems at ECU.
"We've never had a student
refuse to sign he said,
"although we have had two com-
plaints, one of which was from a
female
Boudreaux added that,
although the problem of certify-
ing registration will no longer rest
on the university, male student
will still have to prove registra-
tion to the government before
receiving financial aid.
Chairmanship Plans Cause Concern
RALEIGH (UPI) � North
Carolina tobacco and peanut
farmers say they are worried Sen.
Jesse Helms, R-N.C, will break
his campaign promise to stay on
as chairman of the Senate
Agriculture Committee.
Helms has refused comment
since his reelection on speculation
that he will leave the agriculture
post to take the Foreign Relations
Committee chairmanship. His
aides say he has not mentioned
any change in his plan to stay on
the Agriculture Committee.
Farmers worried about losing
Helms' clout on the committee
have deluged at least two state
farming organizations with
telephone calls, officials said
Wednesday.
"Helms made a promise that
he would stav in the Senate
Agriculture Committee and that
was a factor in my voting deci-
sion said T. Carlton Blalock,
executive vice president of the
North Carolina Tobacco
Grower's Association.
W.B. Jenkins, assistant to the
president of the state Farm
bureau Federation, said he trusts.
Helms will remember North
Carolina farmers in making a
decision.
"We do feel if he or the ad-
ministration feel that it was in the
best interest of the country that a
move did come about, he would
resist it until he was sure the
Senate Agriculture Committee
still had someone there who sup-
ports our philosophy, including
himself Jenkins said.
"If Sen. Helms continued to
stay on the committee and still
have an active role, then the con-
cern would not be as great if these
programs were turned over to a
chairman" who doesn't support
tobacco and peanut programs, he
said.
Some political observers have
speculated that Helms might take
over the Foreign Relations Com-
mittee and create a tobacco sub-
committee he would head.
"That's one alternative that's
more acceptable than simply-
leaving the Senate Agriculture
Committee completely. It would
be a new precedent Blalock
said.
Since Senators can serve as
chairman of onl) one committee,
Helms has come under mounting
pressure from New Right groups
to take the powerful foreign rela-
tions post.
Helms has reportedly said he
would lake the foreign relations
job rather tnan see it go to a
moderate such as Sen. Charles
Mathias, R-Mc
Helms is vacationing until the
Nov. 28 Senate Republican
Caucus, when the committee
leadership issuewill be decided .an
aide said.
Significant Pell Grant Errors Revealed
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Vt�l Htlor
According to a recent report in
The Chronicle of Higher Educa-
tion, the Department of Educa-
tion is planning to release a
survey revealing that approx-
imately $600 million in errors
have been made in awarding S2.4
billion in Pell Grants.
The survey concentrates on
students during the 1982-83
school year and says more
students were overpaid than
underpaid. Some of the errors
were due to incorrect financial
status information on the grant
application, the report stated.
The study is especially signifi-
cant because the law authorizing
the program will expire in 1985,
and is therefore undergoing
rev iew.
A 1982 study stated that almost
30 percent of the grants
disuibuted in 1980-81 wefe incor-
rectly awarded, and almost 70
percent of all recipients received
incorrect awards.
"The concern for quality con-
trol in the Pell Grant program
has increased with its extraor-
dinary growth in both dollar
volume and student participation
levels the report said.
"A lot of students are putting
false information on the forms
said ECU Director of Student
Financial Aid Robert Boudreaux,
who said he belies es the figure of
70 percent is correct.
Boudreaux added that valida-
tion of selected applications has
been required during the last
several vears, and this "s
things down terrifically" in the
financial aid office.
The government routinely
audits applications, requiring
students to provide signed copies
of their parents" tax returns. a
well as their own.
In addition, Bondreaux said,
"we question it if something
doesn't look right. It slows the
process down, but I don't know
of any better way to do it
Can 7 Let Go
BRYAN HUMBERT � ECU Photo Lao
A new trend of fall tanning has begun on campus even though summer
has left Greenville. But this student doesn't care and the tunes of
beach music continue to play in her head.

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I Ml EAST CAROLINIAN SOW MM R 15. IW4

Announcements
BKA
Will Hold a mandatory meeting tor all
members Thurs Nov 15 at 3pm n Raw I 101
it you are unable to attend contact Lynn at
757 O'Av or Michael at '57 1613
International Student ASSOC
Aftenon members There will be a very
�mpor'anf mee'ng on Sat Nov 17th at 6
p m room Mendenhaii Student center
Be 'hee'
Rho Lambda Meeting
AM members ot Rho Lambda GreeK Honor
Soc ety have a meeting Thurs Nov 15 at
4 30 .aura Sweets oftice in Cotton dorm
Plans tor the house mother s fea a ill be
discussed See you there'
Lama Visits
The Venerable K henpo ?.�"�' Rinpoche
. vef,reepubic,aiksnGeenv ue nexT
week On Sun Nov 18. in room 2a ol
sAendenhal S'u.iem ,pn!pi a' 1 30 p m Me
a o'esent parf of The Four Noce
rruttw Pa � tne talk bethefc �
g n phi a' 'he same I me and p a I
es Nov 20 a' 7 30 p m a the A son
Aces Ciub House he a give, rteditation n
stn ' m rttroduction �o'he Mear of Bud
Wllsl Pra lice Retuge aid Empowerment
se es a a so be announced B.
easv 1 oe' k nenpo Rinpocnehas OH a
. eceiveo fne title Cnocje Lama � superior
0"aa Tiastei Me s p-ece-1 . abot ol
the Karma r r v a -a Dh ar m ac h ak r e
sAonas'e n Woodstock N
Happy Hour
A members shoepresent
-� -me on ou � Bea. stonjhtl -
gea' � me De 'a Ze'a w r-�?se hfl
�� � - the p g p . � n on Sa' atBea s
. el s ge' all he Grees -geer l' a a
d� "s � me!
Happy Hour
The hi athers jl Anna S gma Pn are having
a happy h0u' a' Grumpy s 'on.gnt The par
tv nfl commences a' ' p m So come t0
Gf jmpy s '0' al' n gn- rapo, hour pr ces on
c tellers anc scper mugs
NC Internship Program
- ' es are a.a ar hM s
�ymen1 a �- Norm Car- -a State
Agencies A a ce ar e o cos is foi
a ma ors are aa atye s'a'e 3e �
plications shou a be impieted by ear , De
Contact the Cooperal �� � itioi ��
Raw' 313 tor nto'ma'ion 'egarc inj tti s pi
gram
Poetry Forum
The p?e'r- F rum � � eel Tht rs
j'io ' - -� :8 Ve-aea � � I
bi "g :oc es -� 'he r poems
Pi Kappa Phi
- Brothers a'e eminoea ,f,a' r-e�-
� a be Mon a' Me-n.ena a'
5c m " here will be ne " e s s'er anc pieoge
� ee1 -g in s Son but a brothers anc ttle
s se's anc pieoges are rem - jec ol 'ne r
brethe- dinner -nis Tues n.gn- "p m a' tne
Kingston Place Clubhouse, all � 'tie SiSters
ana pledges are asked to bring something
The ne�' ftle s s'er p.eoge meet "g will be
Sun Nov 25th at �p.m a"c the nexl fit-
sister meetinfl a ce Su- Dec : a' t t �
CADP
There w be a CADP mee' nfl T-ls Nov
15 at 4 p m - E'w " rrr 211 A n-eres'ec
piease a"enc
ECU Men's Flag football
' e Fee s 115 and ne een a pe he : -
the 16 '6 ot Nov Regis'er th s week a"c ne�'
- 'he htramura OH ce room 204 Ver a
3ym The lournamenl s sponsored by a
campus :famps
Beta Kappa Alpha Chapter
The Be'a Kappa A,pna Chapter ot P na -i
Va-ager-en' Assoc a'ion will hold a Geneva
B-s ness meeting on TnurSday Nov 15 at 3
p m in Raw '01 Dues will be collected sc
have four neckoook nanoy
Turkey Shoot
AH ECu S'udents lacu'tr staH. and their
dependents are welcome to enter the Turkey
Shoot In bowing sponsored 0 the Studen"
Union Recrea'ion Commttee on Thurs Nov
15 from 7 10 p m n Vendenhan Studen
Cen'er doa -g anes Entree tee 'S $2 per
person Only 1 tyrkey per person me be
won Get details trom the recreation centers
m Mendenhall or call 757 611 ex's 239 or
267
Alpha Phi Big Brothers
AM big brothers are reminded of our next
meeting this Sun night at the house star'mg
at 9 All money s due on th,s date T shirts
are in and will be sold at this meeting
Everone det n tev needs to try to attend
this one so we can plan our party with the
girls also little Sisters will be announced
UGSC
The united Greek and Social Counc.i would
like to announce that they are having a nap
py hour this Thurs night Nov 15, from
9 until at the z Bus transportation will
begm �� v 30 a' Menoenhaii. and on the hin
at 9 45 Cost i) tl 50 for students with i D. S2
nonstudents there will oe F REE oeer trom 9
mtil 12 Come and support the UGSC
Phi Beta Lambda
Phi Beta LambcM will hold its regular
meeting on Wed Nov 14 at 4 p m m raw!
341 Please plan to attend. Tom Wat mer
chandise will be distributed
Happy Hour
The Delta Sigma Phi fraternity will be
holding happy hour at Grumpy's on Nov 16
from 9pm to 1 a m All happy hour prices
Come party with the best
Sign Language Club
We w'H be having a silent dinner this Thurs
Nov 15 at the New Deli at 7 p m So come on
out an enjoy a really great s.lent meal with
us1 Hope to see you there
Conservation film
The film Garden of Eden, ' will be shown by
thePamlico Tar River Foundation at 7 p m ,
Mon, Nov 19 in the auditorium of the Willis
Building (ECU Regional Development In
stltute) The film, produced by the Nature
Conservancy, makes a case for preservation
of natural environments and the earth's gene
pool The showing is free and open to the
public
NCIO
The North Carolina Internship Office pro
vdes paid summer intern positions for
students with State Government Positions
are available m a varet, of agent ies ick ated
throughout the state Students will be paid
13 73 per hour working during the period ot
June 1 until Aug 1 These positions require
early application and interested students
should vontact the Co op office ear iy m Nov
NASA
interested in international Policy and
Regulations AHectmg High Technology Ex
porting' if so this position may be tor you
NASA will be nterviewing on campus in
Nov for Sprmg 1985 Contact the
Cooperative Education Office 313 Rawi
Building as soon as Possible
Health and Human Services
Opening tor spring semester n Atv
DC Health anc Human Services Ott , �
'he Secretary Polii . and New n I II yes
D v son for studen' with g id typing sk s
a ' P"� ess ng desired bul I
S'uden' will be ra neo to use woro pi n iss
ng equipment if needed Tuition ar �
paid the semester following ea- I
issigmenl Salary approx matei, V,
000
ASPA
The Amernan Society for Personnel Ad
ministra'ion will hold a meeting Thurs
Nov 15 at 3 30 in Raw! 102 Guest speaker
will be Joe High Human Resoure Manager
from TRW E ver yone welcome1
Delta Sigme Phi
Just a reminder to all brothers, sisters, and
pledges about our Thanksgiving dinner Sun
Nm 18 at 6 30 p m at the house Come with
a good appetite'
Dance Contest
Fri Nov 16 (984 Pi S gma Pi National
Honor Fraternity and Papa Kat present the
3rd annual dance contest All proceeds from
Ihe 'a � i mtesl will go to United Cerebal
Pa s. There will b e a spe ,ai happy hour
from 8 30 10 OO Please i ome on out ion us
� or the fun
Phi Kappa Tau
All campus party w be Fi N . 16 ti
pm Golden Beveragi a be I a an
Domino wiibeiamrrnn SI donal be
bougn II jny brother � s � � v 'he
door Come by and party at the Pn Tau
S�ta Kappa Alpha Chapter
The tVrta Kappa Alpha Chapter of Financial
Management Association win hold a General
Butine meeting on Thursday Nov 15 at 3
p m in Rawl 101 Dues will be collected so
have your checkbook handy
Fall Graduates
Caps and Gowns should be picked up in the
Student Supply Store. Wright Building. Nov
14 16
These keepsake gowns are yours to keep,
providing the graduation fee has been paid
For those receiving the Masters Degree the
fee pays for your cap and gown, but there is
an extra fee of Sn 95 tor your hood
ECU Surf Team
The team surf off was not held last Sun due
to bad weather Another surf off is scheduled
for this sun Meet at the islander Motel at
9a m m Emerald Isle if you want to par
ticipate There is a meeting this Thurs at
8 30 m the Mendenhaii Coffeehouse Slides of
the Fall Break trip to Hatteras will be
shown Final plans will be made for the
Thanksgiving trip to Florida also
S4.00
S4.00
PIG PICKW
at
BEAU'S
W the Delta Zeta's
SAT. NOV. 17th
1:00-7:00
Partial Proceeds to Help lhe v.allaiulel School t-r the Deal
Omega Psi Phi
upsiion 2ta Chapter of Omega Ps PI
fraternity at ECU will present t's tin .
nua achievement da, program Sen a'
Menoenhaii Student Center
Chapter P'eS'rtent Ca- Puree � s.i I
the program s ntencft II
s'udents and s � ichieve
menl anc spec as �
The Nov 18 3 : g � � , anc
open v the pub � ' � �� sa : Mi
the Ups ; ,
fund racing pro e
anc se'v ce " ga- 1 n s, I
Phi Sigma Tau
will be a Pi
Club meeting this M No 19, at
tbe � rr.e .t t � ns- Marsca 100 f Third
he tor, I discussioi �
ers k ar a'az
� A 'K. ' S
BYOI
Law Society
am those nteresteo � i a
the Judicial branch of � �
led � � � . � � a
meeting C eaki
.ucge J n" Ma' I
re- � a � a . . � � �. Ige's
roie in the Jud - ten a. a
. i at 7
feehouse located n Mendenhaii For more
n can Mike Gardner 7S8 1640
anon
PROGRAM
NObOdY CISC lliakGS � Proqrammed automation
Fine photography . �2SZ�2L�r
thlS SimpIC? plus mdnua m�de
s- -n � fully automatic flash with
optional Speedlite 188A
� Optional Power Winders A?
and Motor Drive MA availably
' f rapid sequence shoe1 ,
� � ides Canon USA In
e ,t r mited warranty
�� ; itral " : :
IMPORTED
CAR PARTS
105 Greenville Blvd
Across from Union Carbide,
Greenville, NC,
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE
OF OEM PARTS
& ACCESS.
-v
V
Students 10 Percent Off
With Th,s AS
Quality Parts at a Reasonable Price
$219.9
artcofeicro hop
,18 SO�ITH COTAMCMe STRtt
GR�ENVIHE. H C 1T93
r2 0688
This Way Up
In Downtown Greenville
Free Concert
Cross
Saturday Nov. 17
Doors Open At 8:00 '
Concert At 9:00
Custom crafting
&
Jewlery Repairs
fair prices
guaranteed work
Brm. This Ad for
1 2 Off
14K C ham Repairs
by Lcrs Jewlaty
120 E. 5 th Street
758-2127 10-5 TuesSat.
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 urecnnlk Blvd
m-MD U HR
24 hour Towing Scmce
I -Haul Rentals
AaUiMc
ECl"
Panhellenic Counc
presents
Ugliest Bartender Contest
teatunny your favorite fron
Sponsors:
D any Is
Grumpy s
Pantama s
Chicos
Tree House
hi bo Room
Attic
Beau s
Papa Katz
Opnj House
Grog s
C.urrian s
Vote At:
Your favorite Bar
Contest will run
from Nov. 19th
thru Dec. 3rd
r
If Killian's Irish Red
is a ten,
German beer is a nein.
Now don't get us
wrong The Crcrmans
make some pretty fine
beers But none of
them slow roast their
malt like we do
So no German beer
can boast the color,
the character, the rich,
incredibly smooth taste
of'Killian's Red Ale
So the next time
you're about to order
your favorite German
beer, try a Killian's
Red, instead
And go from a nein
to a ten
"fljK
Thill lAYVll
k , j .�
Something That You Will
Always Treasure!
Low Prices Available
.9
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&H!
sr
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rvlnnraroD
Cl�t XnltKawl omrmm Cr���� �l40i h.�. F�� li fcn S�n W71
5S
Your Official ECU Class Ring
Date Nov. is Time: 9:B� - 4.oo
Place
Yale Student:
White Collar
NEW HAVEN, Conn (I PI)
A group of students begar
a boycott of classes Vednesda
in ar attempt to force a
settlement between striking
htc-eollar workers and Yale
University administrators.
"We're sick of this student
Daniel Froomkin said of the
seven-week strike "We're suffer-
ing The quality of our education
has been lowered. Garbage is pil-
ing up. There is tension on the
campus
"This is not the Yale we came
here for Froomkin said.
While both sides met today in
their third negotiating session of
the week at an off-campus hotel,
a dozen students said they ex-
pected 1,000 colleagues to par-
ticipate in the moratorium
Vale j
Giamatt!
ting themv�
Some
students s
with the uni
tion of L
but m( a
away be I
with the
stnke-boun
Life a
since
cieri. a
won 9m
dispute o
The �
on the ba!
der.
men
Integrity Board
If a faculty member feels a
dent has cheated on a test or
presented false material, ne may
choose two ways of handling
Law Society
Helps Plan
Law Careers
Three long, arduous years of
intense, stimulating study
develop skills in logic, anai
organization, oral and writi
communications and probiem-
solving � that is a glimpse of aw
school.
In order to help students
prepare for law school, ECU
established the ECL" Law Socie-
ty, David Stevens, uniersit at-
torney, is the faculty advisor for
the society. Student officers in-
clude: Michael Gardner, presi
dent; Douglas Cohn, vice presi-
dent and Georgia Mooring
secretary treasurer.
The Law Societ equ p
students with catalogue, re:
sonal letters and descriptive
pamphleiv from various sctaools
around the nation Tn addition.
road trips to differer sck
and to the L.S. Supreme C
are planned.
In addition, the society spon-
sors guest speakers each month.
They may include local lawyers,
judicial clerks, law educa-
faculty members and distrid
judges.
Judge Jim Martin will be
speaking at the next mee: .
Monday, No . 19 at " p.m. in the
Mendenhaii Coffeehouse. Martin
will speak on "The Judge's Role
in the Judicial System
Law Society meetings are open
to the general public.
fa
i
Students
Abandon
Liberal Arts Jff
Continued From Page 1
to become more responsible
-learning, then colleges must be
more articulate in preserv .
their exit standards " Rescarc"
suggests that clearly com-
municated, detailed statements
help students achieve more, il
said.
To increase credibility of
degrees offered, the panel rev
mended proficiency assessments
in liberal education and the stu-
dent's major before degrees are
given, "to provide a warrantv fot
postsecondary credentials and
hence increase their value for
students These would also help
institutions evaluate their pro-
grams.
Faculty problems include a 20
percent loss of purchasing power
in the last decade The panel
recommended that faculty wages
be increased at a rate higher than
inflation.
The percentage of part-time
faculty has increased from 2?
percent in 1966 to 41 percent in
1980, the report said. More part-
time faculty cause difficulty in
maintaining high contact with
students and continuity and
coherence in instruction, the
panel said, and recommended
reducing the number of pan-time
professors.
AL1
� ��
r
I
,1






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G P1CKIW
eta's
NO 1 Mh
toi i ht- Deaf
bide.
i
-ETE LINE
I PARTS
ESS
f
� v
y
Percent Off
il le Price
c
nder Contest
1
I:
At:
our favorite Bar
Contest will run
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hat You Will
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rices Available
li's
s Ring
00

Yale Students Boycott Classes;
White Collar Workers Bargin
IHEEAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 13. �9M 3
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (UPI)
A group of students began
a boycott of classes Wednesday
in an attempt to force a
settlement between striking
white-collar workers and Yale
University administrators.
"We're sick of this student
Daniel Froomkin said of the
seven-week strike. "We're suffer-
ing. The quality of our education
has been lowered. Garbage is pil-
ing up. There is tension on the
campus
"This is not the Yale we came
here for Froomkin said.
While both sides met today in
their third negotiating session of
the week at an off-campus hotel,
a dozen students said they ex-
pected 1,000 colleagues to par-
ticipate in the moratorium.
Yale President A. Bartlett
Giamatti said they're only hur-
ting themselves.
Some of the boycotting
students said they sympathized
with the union, Local 34, Federa-
tion of University Employees,
but most said they are staying
away because they are frustrated
with the inconvenience on the
strike-bound campus.
Life at Yale has been disrupted
since Sept. 26, when 1,600
clerical workers, most of them
women, walked off their jobs in a
dispute over a first contract.
They charged Yale discriminates
on the basis of sex, a claim Yale
denied.
Their protest was exacerbated
by the refusal of about 1,000
members of an affiliate union to
cross the picket lines at many of
Yale's 200 buildings. Dining halls
have been closed, library hours
curtailed, trash has piled up, and
dormitories, some with faulty
toilets and smelly bathrooms,
were described as "filthy" by law
and management graduate
students.
Giamatti said the moratorium
was part of an effort to disrupt
the campus and said the only way
the strike was going to end was
through negotiations between the
administration and the union.
"The people who deny their
own opportunity to go to class
aren't putting pressure on the
union Giamatti said. "All
they're doing is denying
themselves an opportunity for an
education
Integrity Board Handles Violations
If a faculty member feels a stu-
dent has cheated on a test or
presented false material, he may
choose two ways of handling the
Law Society
Helps Plan
Law Careers
Three long, arduous years of
intense, stimulating study to
develop skills in logic, analysis,
organization, oral and written
communications and problem-
solving � that is a glimpse of law
school.
In order to help students
prepare for law school, ECU has
established the ECU Law Socie-
ty. David Stevens, university at-
torney, is the faculty advisor for
the society. Student officers in-
clude: Michael Gardner, presi-
dent; Douglas Conn, vice presi-
dent and Georgia Mooring,
secretary treasurer.
The Law Societv equips
students with catalogues, per-
sonal letters and descriptive
pamphlet? from various schools
around the nation. In addition,
road trips to different schools
and to the U.S. Supreme Court
are planned.
In addition, the society spon-
sors guest speakers each month.
They may include local lawyers,
judicial clerks, law education
faculty members and district
judges.
Judge Jim Martin will be
speaking at the next meeting,
Monday. Nov. 19 at 7 p.m. in the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse. Martin
will speak on "The Judge's Role
in the Judicial System
Law Society meetings are open
to the general public.
Students
Abandon
Liberal Arts
Continued From Page 1
to become more responsible for
-learning, then colleges must be
more articulate in presenting
their exit standards Research
suggests that clearly com-
municated, detailed statements
help students achieve more, it
said.
To increase credibility of
degrees offered, the panel recom-
mended proficiency assessments
in liberal education and the stu-
dent's major before degrees are
given, "to provide a warranty for
postsecondary credentials and
hence increase their value for
students These would also help
institutions evaluate their pro-
grams.
Faculty problems include a 20
percent loss of purchasing power
in the last decade. The panel
recommended that faculty wages
be increased at a rate higher than
inflation.
The percentage of part-time
faculty has increased from 23
percent in 1966 to 41 percent in
1980, the report said. More part-
time faculty cause difficulty in
maintaining high contact with
students and continuity and
coherence in instruction, the
panel said, and recommended
reducing the number of part-time
professors.
1'
situation, according to Scott
Sutker, ECU attorney general.
Violations that may warrant a
faculty member to hold a con-
ference with the student include:
cheating, plagiarism, falsification
or attempts to commit an
Jemic violation.
The first option is for the
faculty member to hold a
preliminary conference with the
student. The instructor has the
right to give the student a failing
grade or he may waive that right
and bring the case to the
Academic Integrity Board, after
a preliminary conference is held
with the student involved.
The Academic Integrity Board
consists of four faculty members
and three students. One of the
faculty members is chairman and
votes only in a tie. The students
are nominated by the SGA ex-
ecutive council and elected by the
legislature. The student has the
right to appeal the Board's deci-
sion at any time, Sutker said, and
he may also appeal to the vice
chancellor for Academic Affairs.
"However, the faculty member
must contact the student and
hold a preliminary conference
within three days of the
incident Sutker said. "After
that, the student cannot be accus-
ed of the incident and cannot be
brought to the Board he said.
O:
OAKWOOD HOMES
PROUDLY SUPPORTS
THE PIRATES AND
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Visr like tCU Oakwood Homes has been
o port of the growth of Greenville and eastern
North Carolina for years Qualify and service
wte hollmark of two great institutions I Both
helping friends to a beffer life
"GO PIRATES"
@
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HOMES
o o
jl 626 W Greenville Blvd 756-5434
IO
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We Buy Gold & Silver
Buy - Sell - Trade
752 - 0322
Hour�: 9:0O�m.6:UOrm Mon-S
eau
Nightclub
presents
Friday Night
Greek Night
with
Lambda Chi's
and
Alpha Delta Pi
ALL ECU STUDENTS WELCOME
2 For I Highballs
7 5 (Tallboys tilll 1:00
$2.00 Pitchers
featuring Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayworth
Playing the best Party and Dance Music in Town.
7S6-6401
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Cttl FOR DETAILS ON RENTAL OR PURCHASE. 756-J4I0 OR 3SS69t
RINGCOLD TOWERS
At The Campus
East Carolina University
Co Uc
lttt C�� itnm
f O Dnw, X�
Grenmik, NC 27th
(919) 35V26M
Presents
Cliill
Thrill
Featuring
DOMINO
� Free Bus Service: Begins at 2:30;
Pick up and return from College
Hillfthe last bus will go to the
apartment complexes). DO NOT
DRIVE
�Free Draft Beer:
�Raffle: Choice of Peugeot Crusier
or a Motobecane Nomade 10 Speed
�Ticket Available: At the Phi Tau
House or see any Brother or Little
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also gets you in for band
OKT HOUSE
409 Elizabeth St.
DATE - NOV. 16th
TIME - 3 - UNTIL
f
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v. I
i






tttye East (ttarnlmfcm
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. am
Greg Hideout, ihnijiijai
Jt NNIFER JENDRASIAK, ����, J.T. PlETRZAK. �� �M�t,
Randi Mew s, �, w��, Anthony Martin, bus, mm
TIN A M ROSCHAK. Rmm e�n. TOM NORTON, rr� �����
Bli l Al ST1N, Imtao. UMT BILL DAWSON. Product� Manager
Doris Rankins. s�. mike Mayo. ��, r�,
Novembci 15. 14
Opinion
Page 4
Everyone
Evaluations Important
So, it's teacher evaluation time
again. Now is the chance for all
students to evaluate their pro-
fessors and let the administrators
know how you think the people
educating you are doing. And
although it only happens once a
vear instead of each semester like it
should, the rating of profs is
something that should be taken
ery seriously. Everyone involved
the students, teachers and ad-
ministrators � must realize that
what we, the students, think is im-
portant.
Students, be objective. Just
because you are failing a course,
don't feel that it's necessary to
:ake revenge on the teacher. Miss-
ing class and failing to do
assignments are your fault, not the
professor's. Did he present lecture
material coherently? Was he
organized? Did he care whether or
not you were learning the subject?
These are questions which must be
answered by you � no matter
what grade you have at present.
What you say matters. Don't
haphazardly throw down answers
just to hurry up and get out of
.iass five minutes early. What you
think about a prof's performance
will be studied by department
chairmen and used when
evaluating teachers on a broader
scale. Think about each question.
Taking proper care to do a good
job on the evaluations may help
the professor see the error of his
ways, and the next student who
lakes his class may get a better
break.
Professors, lecturers and grad
students, please understand that
teaching is the main reason you are
here. We know that research and
service to your academic discipline
is important, and we aren't
underestimating the value of both
of these. Yet, your students should
come first. Don't look at this pro-
cess as a necessary evil, a chore
that must be done every year. Take
the time to study the results. If
you're doing a good job, believe
us, it will be reflected in the survey.
Most students do appreciate a
teacher who does his or her best to
educate them.
We know some students will in-
evitably try to get even for a bad
grade. But most will do their best
to show you the error or good of
your ways. When giving out the
op-scan sheets, take the time to ex-
plain what the evaluations are used
for. Impart on each class member
the seriousness of doing the job
right. And when looking over the
results, take the them to heart.
Remember why you're here.
Administrators and department
chairmen, please don't let bad
evaluations slide by. Talk to the
person who got a bad one and
make him or her use the results to
improve on the technique used in
the classroom. Professors who
continually receive bad marks
should suffer the consequences,
just as their students must. On the
other hand, those professors with
high grades should be rewarded.
They are the ones who are suc-
cessfully passing on the tradition
of higher education � knowledge
through compassion and
understanding.
Yes, this is important. Everyone
involved must think about the
meaning of these evaluations. The
high standing of a university
depends on it.
Campus Forum
Go Pirates, Catch A Wave
After four years of attending ECU
sports activities, I can remember no
finer show of sportsmanship and stu-
dent participation than in the ECU-
Southern Mississippi football game.
It is such displays that makes one
"proud to be a Pirate The only thing
that can improve such a performance is
to have it carry over to the basketball
season, which could be a great boost to
the basketball program. Even though
winning is important, there comes a
time when winning becomes secondary
because fans are, in my opinion, just as
much a part of a game as the players.
I know that it is a lot to ask of the
student body, but why not try to ac-
complish "the wave" (or at least a
splash) in Minges? Really, however,
let's support ECU basketball this
season � enthusiasm never hurt
anyone.
Randy Mizelle
Senior, PsycBus
Frat Talk
Doonesbury
It seems everytime I open a
newspaper or magazine lately, there
seems to be some article about fraterni-
ty hazing and incidents of sexual
harassment by fraternity members.
The articles I read create the illusion
that fraternity members are nothing
more than insensitive, drunk, sex
fiends who care about nothing except
getting drunk, getting wild and getting
laid. These articles threw dirt in the
faces of fraternities across the country,
and I'm sure they scare quite a few
parents to death, especially when their
freshman son comes home during fall
break with the news that he's joined a
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
O0n V
M SHOULD
; IGNORE h 3
GRADES.
� s
QBfik HONEY. TRUST MB
ON THIS ONE ZONKBR
has wwam&me
QUAL TIES:
BESIDES, WHENI FOUNDED TUB
BABY DOC COLLEGE OF PHYSICIANS,
i made a amnrnirwoFfmne
FINEST IN OFF SHORE
EDUCATION ID ANYONE
WITH 12,000'
I CANT RENEGE ON THAT COMMIT-
MENT, DEAN HONEY. THIS COLLEGES'
OPEN ADMISSIONS POLICY HAS A
PROUD TRADITION THAT
GOES ALL THB UJAY
BACKTO.TV-
LAST
THURSDAY
RJ6HT. BY THE
UJAY HAS THAT
SHIPMENT OF IVY
SHOWN UP YET?
I've been
LOOKING ALL
OVER FOR
YOU
youPcKr
m to .
sckam, Hi
HOt&l
SORRY SIR. BUT ITS OH. RI6HT
INAUGURATION MY I GIVE MB A
DONT THINK YOwANT MINUTE TO
TO MISS YOUR OWN Cm THROUGH
SHEARING THEC0BUB65.
IN OKAY?
W6REXXJUNDER
ETHERTHEUHOLE
NIGHT, SIR?

YEAH , I
COULDN'T
SLEEP. TOO
NERVOUS
A30UTMY
'SPEECH
Wgbizah.
46BETTER HURfir,2R HE CAN MIT.
THE MAYOR OF PORT- I PAY HIM
AMPRINCE IS ALREADY ENOUGH HAS
j HERE TO SWEAR YOU THEINAUGURA
'IN' WN SPEAKER
SHOWS? YET?

YES.SIR LATE
LAST NIGHT A
CIGARETTE
30ATPROPPED
HIM OFF AT
, THE MARINA
THAT
SOUNDS
LIKE BOBBY,
ALL RIGHT
EVER SINCE UJE
ROOMED TOGETHER
IN COLLEGE, BOBBY'S
ALWAYS HATED BEING
THECENTEROF ATTENTION
X41
SIR, WHO
EXACTLYIS
ROBERT VESCO?
KIND OF A
CARIBBEAN
JQHNPELOREAN
THE KIDS WILL
EATHIMUP'
fraternity.
A fraternity is nothing of the sort,
and the national organizations of many
of these fraternities take a very firm
stand on the conduct of its members.
For example, on Oct. 26, 1984, the Na-
tional Council of Pi Kappa Phi passed
a resolution that was prompted by the
increased incidences of sexual harass-
ment and sexually-related disturbances
on campuses across the country. The
fraternity began to formulate a policy
to express its opposition to the ill-
treatment of individuals in general and
women in particular. The resolution is,
in effect, an educational program for
each chapter of Pi Kappa Phi to follow
to maintain a climate of healthy rela-
tionships between men and women and
brings to the forefront the growing
issue of sexual abuse, which can range
from abusive, offensive language to
criminal offenses such as rape. The
resolution also instills the "pride in be-
ing a gentleman" into its members.
Not just Pi Kappa Phi, but many other
fraternities take a serious stand on the
conduct of its members and will not
hesitate to bring immediate
disciplinary action against the officers
andor members of a chapter which
engage in any form of sexual harass-
ment or hazing.
I am very proud to be a fraternity
member and get disgusted everytime I
see an article written about how evil
fraternities and their members are. The
fraternity experience is one of dignity
and pride, and I feel that more young
men should meet the challenge of join-
ing one. I, of course, am not making
fraternities out to be bible study groups
� hell, fraternities have some of the
wildest parties a campus can ever ex-
perience but, there is a time for parties
and a time for commitment, and most
fraternities know the difference.
It is not the parties, the house,
badge, emblem or songs that make up
a fraternity. It is the unseen things �
friendship, brotherhood, character,
good citizenship, honor, trust, ideals
� these make the fraternity and the
man.
Bob Schultz
Senior, Ind. Tech.
We Had A Rev
Drum rolls and bugle calls � it ap-
pears that the American people are be-
ing prepared for some sort of in-
evitable invasion of Nicaragua for the
purpose of maintaining the atmosphere
of democracy in Central America. This
could be the most serious mistake that
we ever allow our government to com-
mit.
There are those among our govern-
ment and our electorate who feel that it
is essential that the Marxist element be
eliminated from our continent. These
individuals fear that if the Nicaraguan
experiment is allowed to continue, then
there exists the possibility of a
repressive state such as exists in Russia.
This is a legitimate concern.
However, I feel that these in-
dividuals are losing sight of the reality
of the situation in Nicaragua. First of
all, neither the Nicaraguan people nor
the Sandinista government is interested
in becoming closely tied to Russia, as
Russia is not trusted by Nicaraguans.
Many in the Sandinista government
were educated in the United States;
American goods and American culture
are popular there, and Nicaragua alone
among the Central American countries
shares the United States' passion for
baseball. Secondly, we must realize
that Nicaragua shares a religious
heritage with this country; many of the
priests, nuns, ministers and lay
religious people in Nicaragua are U.S.
citizens. Third, we must not lose sight
of the fact that our own country was
born from a revolution. Why then can
we not sympathize with a revolution
that is trying to reverse the poverty let-
by 50 years of dictatorship under the
Somoza family? If we allow
government to invade Nicaragua, e
shall face a guilt and a war that will
carry much more sadness than we ever
accumulated in Vietnam. Le us learn
from our mistakes.
Mike Hamer
Grad, English
Jesus! Stop!
Enough is enough. I really mu' -
ject to your continuous slanderr .
Jesus Christ in the cartoon "Walk
the Plank What type of sick mind
would draw a cartoon which wou!j be
sure to raise such controvert"1 .�
theme for the past three weeks de
with religion is, in my view, m
poor taste and has no place in any
newspaper. If you find such a car
funny that is fine, but too man p.
are offended by such "humor I
many other people, wish that this type
of caijoon is never seen anywtvr in
your newspaper again.
Jamie Brewster
Freshman, Music
Band Boogying
The ECU marching band b far is
one of the most talented and exciting
bands on the East Coast and probab
the nation. However, the recent trip to
South Carolina and seeing as well a-
hearing the USC marching band made
me realize that marching bands can
play modern or popular music. We
were sitting in the stands when USC's
band came on the field, and I said,
"Hey, I recognize that song ECU's
band did out perform South Carolina
even though they were out numbered
probably 2 to 1, but it was so nice to
finally here something other than
"music-major" music at the football
games.
It is my belief that if ECU went with
popular music, they would get much
better crowd response as well as more
enthusiasm within the band and
perhaps a larger membership. I am in
no way putting down the ECU Mir-
ching Pirates, just merely suggesting a
possible way to improve the relation-
ship between the band and the non-
music majors in the stands.
Something else I really liked about
USC's band is that their half-time
show and pre-game show was plaved to
both sides (press box side and student
side), whereas here, pre-game is done
to the pressbox side and half-time is
done to the student side. From the peo-
ple I have spoken with, no one has
disagreed with any of my points. As I
stated earlier, this band is one of the
best marching bands in the country and
my suggestions are designed for the
sole purpose of improving this great
organization.
Hats off to the Marching Pirates; we
know that the members put in
countless hours of practice, and this
year's edition, from what I've seen and
heard from others, is the best group
ECU has ever had. Congrats on
copywriting your version of "The Star
Spangled Banner It still gives me
chill bumps every time I hear it.
DR. Edwards III
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing alt points of view.
More Crimes In October
Campus Larc
Crime
Report
Four motor vehicle thefts and a
drastic increase in the number of
stolen bicycles nearly doubled the
value of property reported stolen
on campus during the month of
October over the amount
reported during September, ac-
cording to statistics released by
'he ECU Department of Public
Safety this week. In September,
S7.387 in property was reported
stolen. The value of property
stolen during the month of Oc-
tober totaled $13,437.
Bicycle larcenies increased
from eight in September to 20 in
October. Larcenies not involving
bicycles, burglaries and motor
vehicle thefts were down.
Arrests made by Campus
Public Safety officers were up
from 28 in September to 42 in Oc-
tober. Driving while impaired ar-
rests were down from 12 to seven
"We are 85 case numbers
ar.ead of where we were at this
same time last year said Lt.
Gene McAbee, crime prevention
officer for the Department of
Public Safety. "This indicates an
increase in our activity level over
the previous year where making
arrests and taking crime reports
are concerned. October was an
extremely hectic month for us
and it appears that the trend
toward increased crime is conti-
nuing into November
Crimes reported for the week
of Nov. 6 through Nov. 13 were:
Sow 6, 8:40p.m. � A battery
was reported stolen from a vehi-
cle parked in the Third and Reade
freshman lot. 9 p.m. � A break-
in and larceny was reported at a
room on the eighth floor of
Greene dorm.
Pop Singer's
Influence Bad
These are rough
'n' rollback in the
(USPS) �
times for rock
USSR.
First an official state-run
Soviet newspaper accused
.American pop megastar Michael
Jackson of contaminating South
.America. And now the official
journal of the Young Communist
League has warned Soviet
citizens to be on their guard
against the subversive influence
of American music.
"The Jacksonmania virus
launched from North America in-
to South America has one aim �
to squeeze as much gold juice as
possible out of the country said
the newspaper Leninskae
Znamye, or "Lenin's Banner
"Michael Jackson is more
widely popularized in Argentina
than local singers and groups
the newspaper went on. The
paper also complained that South
American youngsters waste their
time trying to imitate Jackson's
style of dress and mannerisms.
The article was only the latest
in a series of attacks on Michael
Jackson by the heavily censored
and rigidly controlled state
media. Other articles have charg-
ed that Jackson sold his black
soul for white profit, that his
music is nothing but plastic, and
that his mesmerizing music keeps
millions of Americans from
thinking about serious topics like
racial violence in Miami.
Another article in the official
Komsomolskaya Pravda said that
the West is using subversive
music to "cook up a so-called
rock culture, imbuing it with pro-
paganda of a certain indepen-
dent, aggressive lifestyle inherent
in only one group of people, the
young
"A culture which preaches
primitive pleasure, amusement,
political passivity and which gives
illusions instead of reality is
unacceptable to the Soviet peo-
ple according to the article
Soviet citizens should watch out
for these "musical intrigues of
Western propaganda
The article made specific men-
tion of several songs recorded by
an underground group in Len-
ingrad and broadcast into the
Soviet Union by the BBC World
Service. These songs "preach
alcoholic themes ovei
loutishness, hooliganism, and
enraptured descriptions of 'the
sweet life' and then end with
overt religious propaganda the
paper said.
Nov. 7, 10:3
was reported
side of Garret!
� A bicycle wj
from the soutl
dorm 2 p.m.
reported stoU
tramural off I
Gymnasiun.
Nov. 9, 2
Repeta of Joi
rested for larc
12:15 p.m.
reported stolen
Camaro parked
Berkley freshnj
� A vehicie
dalized w
Greene d
louvre was
second vehicle
and Berkl
' � 10, I I
Wordsworth
was arreste
� A brea
reported on t
Scott d
Bauman c �
arrested for
and reckle- !
control of his
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More Crin, � Qctobr
5J
Wave
a revolution
vert left
J inder the
allow our
N aragua, we
'hat will
�s than we eer
US learn
Jesus! Stop!
ally must ob-
andenng of
n "Walkin'
' sick mind
" ould he
�rsy? Your
Its dealing
, in very
ice in any
l cartoon
ti) people
' " I. and
his type
�n any�. here in
Band Boogying
b) far is
and exciting
robably
. recent trip to
g av vell as
g hand made
rig bands can
i music. We
! a hen L'SC's
d, and I said,
ai song ECU'S
Carolina
� numbered
' as so nice to
i other than
e football
' ECU went with
- d get much
ell as more
the band and
hip. 1 am in
the ECU Mir-
- jggesting a
e the relation-
ind and the non-
uids.
iiked about
ritl half-time
� was played to
side and student
pre-game is done
ere.
side and half-time is
student side From the peo-
Ken with, no one has
ed with any of my points. As I
earlier, this band is one of the
� ands in the country and
ggestions are designed for the
purpose of improving this great
n.
e Marching Pirates; we
'hat the members put in
ours of practice, and this
n. from what Ie seen and
om others, is the best group
has ever had Congrats on
writing your version of "The Star
ngled Banner It still gives me
II bumps every time 1 hear it.
r Edwards III
I

Forum Rules
rhe East Carolinian welcomes letters
-essing all points of view.
?
A
Campus Larcenies Increasing
Crime
Report
Four motor vehicle thefts and a
drastic increase in the number of
stolen bicycles nearly doubled the
value of property reported stolen
on campus during the month of
October over the amount
reported during September, ac-
cording to statistics released by
the ECU Department of Public
Safety this week. In September,
$7,387 in property was reported
stolen. The value of property
stolen during the month of Oc-
tober totaled $13,437.
Bicycle larcenies increased
from eight in September to 20 in
October. Larcenies not involving
bicycles, burglaries and motor
vehicle thefts were down.
Arrests made by Campus
Public Safety officers were up
from 28 in September to 42 in Oc-
tober. Driving while impaired ar-
rests were down from 12 to seven.
"We are 85 case numbers
ahead of where we were at this
same time last year said Lt.
Gene McAbee, crime prevention
officer for the Department of
Public Safety. "This indicates an
increase in our activity level over
the previous year where making
arrests and taking crime reports
are concerned. October was an
extremely hectic month for us
and it appears that the trend
toward increased crime is conti-
nuing into November
Crimes reported for the week
of Nov. 6 through Nov. 13 were:
Nov. 6, 8:40p.m. � A battery
was reported stolen from a vehi-
cle parked in the Third and Reade
freshman lot. 9p.m. � A break-
in and larceny was reported at a
room on the eighth floor of
Greene dorm.
Pop Singer's
Influence Bad
fUSPS) � These are tough
times for rock 'n' rollback in the
USSR.
First an official state-run
Soviet newspaper accused
American pop megastar Michael
Jackson of contaminating South
America. And now the official
journal of the Young Communist
League has warned Soviet
citizens to be on their guard
against the subversive influence
of American music.
'The Jacksonmania virus
launched from North America in-
to South America has one aim �
to squeeze as much gold juice as
possible out of the country said
the newspaper Leninskae
Znamye, or "Lenin's Banner
"Michael Jackson is more
widely popularized in Argentina
than local singers and groups
the newspaper went on. The
paper also complained that South
American youngsters waste their
time trying to imitate Jackson's
style of dress and mannerisms.
The article was only the latest
in a series of attacks on Michael
Jackson by the heavily censored
and rigidly controlled state
media. Other articles have charg-
ed that Jackson sold his black
soul for white profit, that his
music is nothing but plastic, and
that his mesmerizing music keeps
millions of Americans from
thinking about serious topics like
racial violence in Miami.
Another article in the official
Komsomolskaya Pravda said that
the West is using subversive
music to "cook up a so-called
rock culture, imbuing it with pro-
paganda of a certain indepen-
dent, aggressive lifestyle inherent
in only one group of people, the
young
"A culture which preaches
primitive pleasure, amusement,
political passivity and which gives
illusions instead of reality is
unacceptable to the Soviet peo-
ple according to the article.
Soviet citizens should watch out
for these "musical intrigues of
Western propaganda
The article made specific men-
tion of several songs recorded by
an underground group in Len-
ingrad and broadcast into the
Soviet Union by the BBC World
Service. These songs "preach
alcoholic themes over
loutishness, hooliganism, and
enraptured descriptions of 'the
sweet life and then end with
overt religious propaganda the
paper said.
- ' ii ii at UttB
Nov. 7, 10:30a.m. �Abicycle
was reported stolen from the east
side of Garrett dorm. 1:30 p.m.
� A bicycle was reported stolen
from the south side of Fleming
dorm. 2 p.m. � Money was
reported stolen from the In-
tramural office in Memorial
Gymnasium.
Nov. 9, 2:30 a.m. � Michael
Repeta of Jones dorm was ar-
rested for larceny of a bicycle.
12:15 p.m. � A louvre was
reported stolen from a Chevrolet
Camaro parked in the 14th and
Berkley freshman lot. 3:39 p.m.
� A vehicle was reported van-
dalized while parked south of
Greene dorm. 3:05 p.m. � A
louvre was reported stolen from a
second vehicle parked in the 14th
and Berkley freshman lot.
Nov. 10, 1:19 a.m. � Michael
Wordsworth of Rocky Mount
was arrested for DWI. 1:55 a.m.
� A break-in of a vehicle was
reported on the northeast side of
Scott dorm. 7:20 p.m. � Henry
Bauman of 303 Garrett dorm was
arrested for DWI and careless
and reckless driving after he lost
control of his vehicle near Garrett
and struck a tree.
Nov. 11, 12:15 a.m. � A
burglary was reported on the first
floor of Aycock dorm. 1:28p.m.
� A larceny was reported from a
room located on the ninth floor
of Tyler dorm. 8p.m. � A com-
plaint of harassing phone calls
was received from the eighth
floor of Greene dorm.
Nov. 12, 1:50 a.m. � William
Booger of Camp Lejeune was ar-
rested and placed in protective
custody for public inebriation.
1:30p.m. � Two larcenies were
reported from rooms on the ninth
floor of Tyler dorm. A necklace
was stolen from one room and a
cooler was stolen from the other.
3:30 p.m. � A state-owned truck
was reported stolen. 3:30p.m. �
Money and jewelry were reported
stolen from a purse at Minges
Coliseum during cheerleading
practice.
Nov. 13, 1:30 p.m. � A
larceny was reported from the
women's locker room at Minges
Coliseum. 8:15 p.m. � The
Greenville Fire Department
responded to a fire on the stage at
McGinnis Auditorium.
Hargett Drug Store
Home Health Center
"m Prescription pick up & deliverys
� Charge Accounts with authorization from parents
T Photo Finishing Service
General Drugs & Vitamins - As well as brand names
1 0 Discount with Student ID
Across from Carriage House Apts.
on 43 South 756-3344
&
Ce1
Local and Out of Town Newspapers
Magazines
Hardback & paperback Books
Greeting Cards For All Occasions
Located in Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 Days a week 9:30-9:30
"READ A BOOK TODAY
NEW A USED
R�trMd Tiros
J7.00 4 Up
4-CyUnder
S29.95
6 and 8 cylinder
slightly higher
.�� iAH il.r
�� StAVICt NATIONAL ACCOUNTS
HFGoodrich
TIRE CENTER
SATUAOAV
� :MA.MS:�P.M.
' 'Consider us your cars'
J) Home Away From Home " Ai
Coggins Car Care
756-5244
320 West Gnaenvtlle Bhd
unmfmfr.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
EXCISE ME.S.il.rri THe
AftOUJiD? If'5 Tint toft
rr
NOVEMBER 15, 1984
AM AvtHofciZfcD to ui� n,
DOH TO WW.5 Of THi SftU
The Best Prices In Town
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight, 7 Days A Week
9,lnr Located Next to the East 10th St. Pizza Hut
S310 h. 10th Street Greenville, N.C. 752-5222
"If you have to do your own laundry, do it in style at the Wash Pub
KINGSTON
PLACE
The most exclusive address in Greenville.
Completely furnished and accessorized
with the finest interior appointments and
exceptional amenities for the serious stu-
dent.
It's a very special condominium com-
munity. Private, convenient, and available
now for rent or purchase.
� Rent: $150.00 per month per student
(75Cmore per day than the dorm)
� Purchase: Under $60,000 about Vi the price per
square foot than the other student
condominiums.
Please stop by our office at
2820 E. 10th St. anytime
between 9am-6pm MonFri.
10am-5pm Sat.
Call for an evening or Sunday appointment.
Call 757-1971 for more information
MX units are 2 bedrooms, 2 and 2 Vi baths. OT a riCe
1088 square feet, 2 floor plans available.
MAMA

��'
f
I






THl tAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 15, 14
In The York River
Underwater Excavation Continues
K I Nt� Bureau
A flooded cofferdam, its nar-
row outline formed like the hull
of a ship, sits unobtrusively in the
York Rivei connected to the
mainland shore by a wooden pier
of heavy pilings and planks.
From the shore, the only clue to
the activities inside the cor-
rugated steel walls of the dam is a
sign that reads "Yorktown Ship-
wreck Project
On this day, John Broadwater,
director of underwater ar-
chaeology for the state of
Virginia is complaining about the
visibility of the water inside the
dam.
"A week ago there was ten feet
of visibility he says. "Today,
it's not more than three feet" of
visibility at the bottom of the
mer where the remains of a
Revolutionary War vessel,
perhaps one of the best preserved
shipwrecks of the period, are being
excavated from its bed of sand
and silt.
Normally three feet is enough
visibility for archaeologists to
work at the site, but today, Gor-
dari Watts, an underwater ar-
chaeologist and professor at
ECl, and Wes Hall, an ECU
research assistant, are at the site
to make video tape recordings of
the wreck. Watts is anxious to use
a new underwater camera unit
recently acquired for ECU's pro-
gram in Maritime History and
Underwater Research and is un-
Jaunted by Broadwater's descrip-
tion of the storm of suspended
particles restricting visibility
around the shipwreck site.
While assembling the camera
md other gear needed for the
live, the two archaeologists
discuss the merits of "wet" ver-
sus "dry" diving suits. The
"wet" suit is constructed of
neopreme rubber foam that traps
water in its spongy skin which is
then heated by the diver's bodv.
The heated water acts as an in-
sulator. "Dry" suits permit the
diver to wear insulated
undergarments under the suit's
outer layer of rubber or rubberiz-
ed fabric. "Wet" suits are dif-
ficult to remove and don't keep a
diver warm for very long in cold
water. Dry" suits constrict
around a diver's body and can
develop leaks during a dive but
modern technology has introduc-
ed some changes in the design of
the suit and Watts is interested in
its performance.
The temperature this da is
inusually warm. Watts selects
the "wet" suit while Broadwater
.limbs into the "dry" model.
The two divers enter the water
and assistants hand down an
underwater light and the
videocamera unit. The camera is
a self-contained system with
camera and tape deck mounted in
a sleek metal and glass housing.
Watts gently lets the camera sink
beneath the water praying to
himself that the case around the
camera and recorder is water-
tight. He sits the camera on a
submerged platform inside the
cofferdam. There are no bubbles
trickling from the lid of the
camera housing. The seal is tight.
Broadwater switches on the
light and he and Watts, together
with the camera, and breathing
from long yellow hoses connected
to a surface air compressor, sink
out of sight, to the bottom, some
twenty feet below.
The vessel they are recording
dates back to the Revolutionary
War and is one of the many ships
scuttled in the final hours of the
war by General Cornwallis along
'he shore of Yorktown. The
British general had retreated with
his troops to Yorktown in an at-
tempt to link his forces with the
British fleet that was waiting off-
shore. But a blockade of French
and American ships blocked the
movement of the British fleet as
well as Cornwallis' escape. In an
effort to stall surrender, Corn-
wallis ordered that his transport
vessels be lined up and sunk in
order to protect his flank from a
rear attack by French troops.
Following the surrender of
Cornwallis, the scuttled ships
were turned over to the French
who refloated many of them. Of
those left on the bottom, a total
of nine ships have been located.
The ship, being excavated in the
cofferdam, sits upright, buried
under tons of sand and silt.
The unique cofferdam was
constructed around the ship two
years ago to protect it while ar-
chaeologists conduct their slow
excavation. A special Filtration
system was installed at the dam to
help clear the water for better
visibility. The filters haven't
worked as well as expected and in
recent months Broadwater swit-
ched to the use of chemicals that
are poured into the water, clear-
ing it, by taking particles of
suspended materials to the bot-
tom. The water was treated a
week before Watts arrived.
Plant and marine life trapped
inside the steel walls of the dam
are unaffected by their controlled
environment. Fish, trapped in-
side the dam when it was built re-
main. An eel has grown from the
thickness of a pencil to that of a
broomstick. Crabs, with names
grease-penciled on their outer
shell, are familiar pets for the
divers.
The Yorktown Shipwreck Pro-
ject is funded by the National En-
dowment for the Humanities and
is managed by the Virginia
Historic Landmarks Commis-
sion. Broadwater and his assis-
tant Robert Adams are in charge
of most of the work at the wreck
site. They are often directing
teams of volunteer divers who
donate their time to assist with
various aspects of the research.
Watts, the co-chairman of the
ECU underwater research pro-
gram, is called in from time to
time to assist in the work.
Graduate students from ECU
also work at the site as part of the
training. There are currently four
graduate students working with
Broadwater and Adams in
Yorktown.
"They are doing such things as
excavating and mapping and
making drawings of the hull as
the sand is removed from around
it said Watts. "They are help-
ing to document the excavation
of the vessel
To date, the identity of the ship
and its class are unknown, but
clues surface on a regular basis.
With every foot of sand the
divers vacuum away, more pieces
of the puzzle fall into place.
"We know that it had at least
two masts said Watts. "From
the dimensions of the hull, it was
probably square-rigged
"It is unlikely that the vessel
carried armaments because Corn-
wallis stripped most of the vessels
of their cannons and hauled them
up on the hill for the defense of
Yorktown Watts said.
Bob Adams, the assistant
director of the archaeological
work at the Yorktown site, thinks
the vessel may have been
designated as a fireship by the
British. There were several of the
ships that were loaded with wood
at their bow to be set on fire and
sailed into the French blockage as
a diversion for the troops trying
to escape from Yorktown.
"We may be able to narrow the
name of the ship down to four or
five known vessels by the end of
this year's research he said.
But the name of the shipwreck
and its function in the Revolution
may be the least important infor-
mation the archaeologists hope to
uncover in their research.
"It was one of the types of
vessels that weren't very well, if
at all, documented during the
18th Century Watts said.
"We've got artist's representa-
tions of what they looked like but
we don't have much concrete in-
formation about how the ships
were designed or constructed,
especially merchant ships and
transports he says.
On their return to the surface,
the two divers anxiously reviewed
the tape made during their dive.
One of the most intriguing
aspects of the ship was clearly
visible on the small TV screen. It
was a window, its glass panes still
intact, protruding from the sand.
"We didn't know these ships
had windows or how they are
constructed Watts said.
m w���ieji!ira��B�)e�ie��ie
NEED XMAS MONEY?
M
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Female SANTAS HELPERS
at THE PLAZA
$3.50 hr.
M Starts Nov. 23rd - Ends Da 2 Ith
1 lours Flexible - Good. Fun w i to
EARN MONEY for Christmas!
For Into:
Call 756-1748 Ask forhack or Lisa
M
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ft
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5
ft
t
Bag
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NY Cheese
cakes
PEOTIL
LEENC
,ccviq3
ie DeFrance
Croissants
French Bread
Over 550 Wines
Greenville Sq. Shopping Tenter
(Next to Cargo Furniture)
Imported Cheese
756-1889
TAKE A FREE RIDE
to the
FREE ALL NIGHT
KEG PARTY
Opry
� �
PROCESS, PRINTS & ENLARGEMENTS
with this coupon
From 1 10, 126, and 135mm color print film.
14 per print (reg. 29)
$1.24 developing (reg. $2.49)
8x10 enlargement $2.48 (reg. $4.95)
5x7 enlargement $1.25 (reg. $2.50)
Limit one roll or
enlargement per coupon.
Expires
We
use
Thursday, Nov. 15th
with
Developing to strict KODAK standards
I Hour Photo Lab
CAROLINA EAST MALL (near Belk's)
Mori-Sat. 10am-9pm 756-6078 Ec
RADAR
(Rock & Roll and Rhythm & Blues)
Bring your best beer mug � the beer's on us! Unlimited Kegs!
Call us at 758-5570 for a FREE RIDE on the COH
Liberty Van to and from our doorstep.
4M fappv Hour fill 10:30
r Frawiiv & Sororitv with largest turnout over 4 weeks wins
Fn-e Dig Pickin' with unlimited free beer!
NOW YOU KNOW WHERE THE PARTY IS
Sponsored by the Inter-fraternity Council
Private Club - All ABC Permits
A
FISHERMAN'S
BUFFET

S '
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're Kith repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule
not the exception The gold bar Wlk
on the right means you command respect as an Array offi
earning a BSN write: Army Nurse Opportunities. PO
Clifton, NJ 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS, BE All you CAN
If you're
c 7713,
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT!
Help Yourself To
FISH FILLETS Breaded n S�sooed From
3 Favorite Shonoys Ftodpes
Baked FISH FILLETS
Hot Vegetables.
Seafood Chowder
French Fries
Hushpuppies

Av
EVERY FRIDAY
Only
$4-99
C PM O DILI 5 99wNhSaladftFnjit!
SHOHEYS
A
205 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville, NC 27834
756-2186
2616 E. TENTH ST
758-7676
758-1813
754-1818
Your One Stop Automotive Service Center.
We stock a complete line of automotive parts
and accessories in our parts dept.
tolo I.TENTH ST 758 7676
.
Hohaa
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Mwtork Ni
Visit I i 01
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Equaling I
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decorative gravt �
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Stevenson Ho . 8 !
House (1809) and
House (1885) 1 tal
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fHEEASI . AROUNIAN
NOVEMBER 15, 1984
Classifieds
SALE
CABBAGE PATCH DOLL FOR
SALE: Girl doll not an imitation
SI25 Call 758 9516 or 758 9691
FOR RENT; 2 bedroom apt 2 blocks
from ECU 1310 per month and $310
deposit Available Dec I 758 0329
after 4pm
FOR SALE: Custom built drawing
'able $200 King size waterbed
$200 Call 758 0868 after 5pm
FOR SALE Electric bass guitar in
sse red Fender precision special
pre amp $350 Call 758 4807
S p m
LOST Three gold rings with dia
hips and a class ring on a
oand Lost arouna Mmges or
e Reward Call 752 8883
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
VICE Word processing Spelling
electronically checked Term
papers and dissertations $1 75 a
page, paper included Call Mark
after 5 at 757 3440
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN
DRY SERVICE: Let Greenville Stu
dent Laundry Service pick up, wash,
dry, fold, hang, as well as deliver
your laundry Dry cleaning too
Call 758 3087
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: With 15
years experience wants full time
typing at home IBM typewriter
Call 756 3660
TYPING Of any kind done at home
nightly Call 758 7838 after 5 and
Wea afternoons
PERSONAL
WANTED
E NEEDS ROOMMATE to
? urmshed trailer Air Cond ,
tei dryer Private room and
n � 'es from campus $150
- ' I'ties included. 756 5i97
ROOMMATE WANTED:
ably graduate student or
nature adult Courtney Sq. Apt.
nedroom townhouse ' 3 rent and
' es Call 757 2884 or 757 9965
-EMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
� $50 a month plus one third
' es. Good location low utilities
someone for spring and sum
sessions Call 758 6224
EMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
hare furnished 2 bedroom
Si62 SO 8, ' 7 utilities
1 �� fan 1 . i ! s-s 7287
OMMATE WANTED: Private
� ery comfortable house
.)v.ross street from campus
split 5 ways Call after 7
�"KSGIVING IN NEW YORK?:
� SL nt: Discount tickets
S3 4013 or �" 6398
OMPUTERIZED TYPING SER
CE � � Processing Spelling
c a I , ft -nee! Term
� � �� Hi 1 ssertai cs, $1 75 per
paper included Call Mar
� r 5 at 757 3440
PING NEEDED' ifvouneedso
1 �oe papers of any kind for
�� asonaoie rates please call
34 after 5pm
LP WANTED: $60 per HUN
JAiD tor processing mail at
information, send self
sed, stamped envelope
Ve Box 95. Roseile. New
7203
SESSIONAL TYPING SER
CE Expedience qua1 ty work.
ectr c typewriter Lanie
S8 5301
90FESSI0NAL TYPING SER
� ICE � p r�g needs 758 5488 or
h WENDY'S' Memorial Dr
ition will be accepting applica
s 8. A-ed from 8 to 5 at the
� if Room a Holiday inn on
i D- ve Apply in person
se
i'PING Professional typist with 15
-ars exp wants fulltime typing a'
BMtpewr'ter Call 756 3660
MICHAEL L Congratulations on
your Stats grade1 Maybe you should
start having your own S meeting
before every test! You're a great big
brother! Gladice
STU BABY: Happy 20th Birthdav1
For only you, let us "Make it" BIG!
Your very own Lil Sisters We love
you1 Phll. El and Cane
LYNN: Life's just a cocktail party
Are you ready to live? J.T.
SWEET WILLIAM Start getting
psyched to ski your mug off I'm
speaking to The Go this weekend to
tell him the forcast Snow blind at
Snowshoe in '84 like never before
Zak
SIG TAUS: To the "BIGGEST" and
"BEST" Brothers on campus!
You're top on our list Sig Tau Happy
Thanksgiving We love you all! Your
Lil Sisters Phyllis and Candy
RMH: We think you deserve the
Freddy 'Cuz for a beer you're
always ready To the Alpha Sigs you
may not show it But we on the 9th
floor know if Once again, it's
THURSDAY NIGHT! Let's go to the
Opry House and do it up right G.D.
and S
LYNDA Y You're the best! Sorry
I've been chafin' you, but I'll make it
up to you tomte So get ready to
throw down with your big brother
BAD: Well, the "hex" is broken but
luckily King and Vice still "scare"
me1 (Wonder if flamingos would
make it in DC ?) Lights out Calgon
HEY RDUI: What's the deal playing
the the same songs over and over
and OVER!? Come on ECU
students, doesn't that insult your in
telligence0 Listen to WZMB, ECU'S
totally student run, commercial free
top 40 free alternative FM WZMB
ROCKS! !
GREENVILLE STUDENT
LAUNDRY SERVICE: Let
ireenville Student Laundry Ser
� D'Ck up, wash, dry, fold,
'rz as wen as deliver our
aundry! Dr, Cleaning too Call
758 3087
TEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM?
itely no charge" for repair
ites at the Tech Shop Cai.
teen eighty " we thought
j Ke to know
EOPLE One or Two people needed
ire housing with male, smoker,
- in studen Start;ng Jamjar
rer session. Repl Neil Rent
- ler 207 Wellington Place. Aber
N J , 07747
-EMALE ROOMMATE: Wanted to
1 Dd apartment close to cam
"S $145 a month plus utilities Nov
� � a.read paid, start paying Dec
St Call 756 5847
CEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted to
are furnished 2 bedroom
townhouse, $162 50 8. ' utilities
arable Jan l Call 756 7287
ALE ROOMMATE Needed to
� are apartment Prefer year round
jdent Just 5 minutes from ECU
oetween 8 am and 3pm
- 6289
MALE ONLY: Apartment for lease
one bedroom $170 per month
� aiable December 1st Call
'h 5653 Walking distance to cam
: 15 Carpeted, kitchen, laundry on
chemises Please hurry Moving out
of town
FEMALE ROOMMATE: Needed for
r ng semester House Rent $110
ser month plus one sixth the
ties One and 4 blocks from cam
pus Call Sharon at 757 0430
APT FOR RENT: 2 rooms, kitchen,
hath Near 10th and Evans $125 plus
� ties Lease & deposit 752 2615
weekdays.
TARLANDING SEAFOOD
AjrV Combination Special:
vi F . Shrimp, Trout & Deviled Crab
V. Wfi FF �r Baked Potato,
3LiMffT Co'e Slaw & Hush Puppies - $3,991
105 Airport Rood 758-0327
u
riartHjET
JVC
Wool Ponchos and Shawls
Cotton Turtle Necks and Tights
Wool Hats and Socks
Specializing in Satural Fiber
C lo thing for H omen
116 E. 5th St. Mon-Sat 10:00-5:30
Next Door to Book Barn 757-3944
CHIP.B: Final score was 3 to 2,
you'vjt got some eating of words to
do Slu! Snooka and Ed
PI KAPPA PHI: Congratulates our
new Executive Council for spring of
'85 Archon Bob Canupp, Vice
Archon Exec Kevin Manning, Vice
Archon Revenue Jeff Newsome,
Treasurer Clay Brewer, Secretary
John Paul Lyens, Warden Steve
Laroque, Historian Bill Simmons,
Chaplin Bob Schultz
GRACE: After watching y�u
through your shadeless window I
just had to let you know that your
pink robe and orange knitted pom
pon slippers drive me into a frenz
J S
ADELE G You're the best little
sister m the whole world1 i hope you
can hang with your big bro ths Fr;
day! Foo
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS (We're
looking forward to see'nq every
single one of you Friday afternoon at
the iarnmmest party of lh
semester CHILL THRILL"
MR CHAPPED LIPS Roses are
red Violets are blue Last Sunda
night was fun, but believe it or no
CHEATED TOO1 ! ! Glow �
ALPHA XI DELTAS An girls
read for one hell of a pai1.
with the Pi Kapps? Get ready fot
wild night' � i
ALPHA XI DELTA A , �
a bake sale today from 8 30 to I 30 n
front of the student si
ON THE ROAD WITH F P
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JIM: I'm sorry
you Jennifer
need you I love
v .vn.t

obtAloiA
ewesrAND
9I9YDICKINSON AVF
GREENVILLE NC ZH'M
EASTERN CAROLINA S
COMIC BOOK STORE
10OfT AU Nr�CpMjrs
i
JOHN
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was launched in
inviting all life forms in the universe
tovisitourplanet
Get Ready.
Company Coming.

COLUMBIA PICTURES PRESENTS
A MICHAEL DOUGLAS - LARRY J. FRANCO PR0LX1O10N
JEF BRIDGES KAREN ALLEN
JOHN CARPENTER'S
STARMAN
CHARLES MARTIN SMTTH RICHARD JAECKEL
JACKNniSCHE MICHAEL DOGGLAS
? BRUCE A. EVANS & RAYN0LD GIDEON BARRY BERNARD!
LARRY J. FRANCO JOHN CARPENTER r
PG.WBftH mm sataia
- . ' ' WCMMMNCtwi
OPEMS DECEMBER M AT ATHEATRE NJZAR VOoT
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 15, 1984
Fields Relates Intense Idea In New Flick
By DE1RDRE McENALLY
Sufi Writer
Robert Benton, screenwriter of
Kramer vs. Kramer, came up
with another film of parallel ex-
cellence � Places in the Heart.
Places in the Heart does exactly
what it is supposed to do � make
the audience feel proud to be
American.
The film takes place in Wax
ahachie, Texas, a small town near
Dallas. Benton, who was born
ihere in 1935, interweaves the
town's religious beliefs into a plot
full of greed, disaster, cruelty,
and murder. However, it is not a
story of despair, but one of
courage and triumph.
Sally Fields' brilliant portrayal
oi a young widow struggling to
bring up two small children lends
itself well to the overall produc-
tion, depicting the trials and
tribulations of the depression in
the South.
Mrs. Spalding (Sally Fields) is
faced with an urgent problem.
Her husband suddenly dies and
the payment is due on the land
she now owns. With the help of a
vagrant negro (Danny Glover)
she goes about planting her 40
acres with cottenseed. After ac-
complishing this feat, however
she is faced with a few more
obstacles.
Mrs. Spalding's sister's hus-
band is carrying on with another
man s wife (Amy Madigan). Yet
the audience still senses more
irony in this situation. The two
attend the same church, where
they repent their sins together
(along with the rest of the con-
gregation Ku Klux Klan
members) at the church of holy
ideals.
Through it all, a strong-willed
negro named Moses (Danny
Glover) is coping with the bigotry
and prejudice of the South. There
are some bright moments in his
role, however. He becomes a part
of the Spalding family � a
friend, teacher and companion to
them all. He also learns through
the Spaldings that all southern
whites do not have the same
ideals as the ones persecuting
him.
Truly every person in the au-
dience can relate to the most im-
portant idea behind the plot �
the hypocracy of the church-
goers in Waxahachie, which is the
hypocracy of us all, wherever we
live.
Places in the Heart is playing at
the Buccaneer Movie Theatre.
fAsr Jetr, AFfef seeing
pouce Hpe Zvipemce
AUV-0-SrcM left rue
Cafe. The Qir.l. who
Wmess ere? TkeP&crH
ASKEP OUR HERO For. a
L IK - A4N-0-Sf.Ct
(&R X PQM'T,
E CA6E OF VUt (TfcKP rVNAIvt
�� HhovJ'S A0Ovrr GiVxVG � fc
Buddhist Leader, Khenpo Kathar Rinpoche, Visiting ECU
By Pat McDermoit
Coalrlballni Whirr
For those interested in Buddhist
philosophy, a firsthand oppor-
tunity to learn more about it exists
in the near future. Coming to
1CU next week to relate his
understanding of the true nature
t existence is the venerable Khen-
po Kathar Rinpoche, superior
Dharma master. Rinpoche is
known for his patience, compas-
sion and gentle humor while ex-
emplifying the clarity, dignity and
precision of the Buddhist
teachings.
On Sunday, Nov. 18 and Mon-
day, Nov. 19 at 7:30 p.m Rin-
poche will give talks on "The
Four Noble Truths' at
Mendenhall Student Center,
Room 244.
On Tuesday, Nov. 20 at 7:30
p.m. Rinpoche will give a formal
meditation instruction, "In-
troduction to the Heart of Bud-
dhist Practice" at the Wilson
Acres Clubhouse. All are invited
to attend these events.
Rinpoche was born in Eastern
Tibet in 1925. His formal Buddhist
training began at the age of 12. At
20, he became a fully ordained
monk of the Kagya Lineage.
Subsequently, he devoted five
years of his life to solitary medita-
tion retreat followed by advanced
studies of Buddhist philosophy,
psychology, logic and
metaphysics.
Rinpoche was forced to flee
Tibet in 1959 later to become ab-
bot (superior residing monk) of
Kanglung Monastery in Bhutan,
India. In 1975, he officially receiv-
ed the title of "Choeje-Lama"
(superior Dharma master). Rin-
poche was then asked by His
Holiness, the Gyalwa Karmapa,
to come to the U.S. to establish
and guide His Holiness'
monastery, Karma Triyana Dhar-
machalcra, in Woodstock, N.Y
Since that time, Rinpoche has
traveled extensively throughout
the United States giving lectures.
This will be his third visit to
Greenville.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$190 bortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
Duuai cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For fur-
ther information call 832-0535 (Toll Free
Number 1-800-532-5384) between 9A.M and
5PM. weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 Watt Morgan St.
Raleigh, NC
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
WbQM&YgVL
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
Places In The Heart -PG
4th Fantastic Week
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9.00
"Oh God! You Devil' -PG
2nd NX pek
1:00-3:00-5 on 7-00-9:00
End. Tuesday JMq Small Aff R HT -R
Starts Wed. Nov. 21st
Super Girl -PG
LATE SHOW FRI-SAT
Open at 11:00pm X m.i
Startsat 11:30pm � Half the Action
NO PASSES RAltUX
'WANNA Sfc� t
t&�OApC, fcvtMN
JpiUUfcp ALU OVCVC
Injov�z. Mew wA 5eg, �
Get tht Fresh Alternate Enjoy
a fhsh vg'g- or jnduich. made
one-at-a-nme Ei m though the world
is going plastic "� yt u don i hai? to eat it
Stamp out tf njfood at Subu a
Qrt iPk 3fr4 -l$m itiw
i.0
fc. 5tn SI
75S-797V
208
E. 5th Si
751-797?
"WE BAKE OUR OWNBRI
FREE
BEER
Papa Katz Re-Opening Celebration
Thursday
FREE
November 1 5th
From 8:30-1:00
DRAFT ALL NIGHT LONG
Membership available At The Door For Only1.00
Friday 16th 3:00-7:00
BEAT THE CLOCK
$1.00 Highballs
NO COVER CHARGE
Saturday 17th
John Moore Returns
Papa Kdu k A Pnvate Club
For Members & Guests
We Have All ABC Perrruts
Papa Katz
with
The Best In Beach Music.
Remember
WEDNESDAY NJTE Greenville's First
Ladies I ock-Out Is Back 8:30-10:00
Free Draft & Wirv
- a- � ii
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1VU bASI CAROI INIAN
Sports
N )1 MBt R 1 IW
1985 Schedule Toughest Yet
Director of Athletics Dr. Ken Karr has finalized
the Pirates' 1985 football schedule with the addi-
tion o Southwest Texas State.
The Bobcats are with the newly formed Gulf Star
Conference and will fill the Sept. 14 void on ECU'S
schedule, giving the Pirates five home games for
the first time since the 1981 season. ECU has
played seven of their 11 games on the road the last
three seasons.
The Bobcats are 7-2 in their first season as a
Division 1-AA school. Prior to 1984, Southwest
Texas State was a Division II school and captured
consecutive national titles in 1981 and 1982 under
Coach Jim Wacker, now at TCU.
ECU's 1985 schedule is as follows:
Sept. 7 at North Carolina State
SEpt. 14 SOUTHWEST TEXAS STATE
Sept. 21 at Penn State
Sept. 28 TEMPLE
Oct. 5 MIAMI
Oct. 12 at Southwestern I ouisiana
Oct. 26 South Carolina
No. 2 at Southern Mississippi
No. 9 at Auburn
Nov. 16 rULSA
Dec atLSU
The Pirates' 1985 Homecoming game will be
with 1983 national champion Miami on Oct. 5 in
Ficklen Stadium. Second ranked South Carolina
will also be in Greenville on Oct. 26
five of ECU's 1985 opponents arc ranked
among the nation's Top 20 teams this season, with
all five likely to see post-season bowl action at the
end o the vear. The home schedul
b lar the
ad football Fd Emory will have to rebuild
lie football program against one of the
I si hedules in the countrv in 1985.
strongest and most attractive in the school's
history, while ECU will face traditional powers
Auburn. Penn State and I SU on the road.
MASK BAB BE B
ECU P��oto LD
Ron Jones suffered through a reck Irishman ear at quarterback for the K I foothall team, but next ear
could be just as bad as the Pirates face such teams Miami. Auburn. Penn Mate. I �l and southarolina
Women Face Tough Schedule
dy Reflects On Season
ii POWERS
ins a banner
. but accor-
: . id Steve Brody.
get belter.
: the 19S4
� 16-2 ecord, but
beaten badly
g to Nav
ECU's first-y ear
" ree games.
otalh disap-
ason.
. ab n 1 freshmen
. this eai, arid a lot of
ble r1 r.g time
tied "I hat will
.� in the next
fii : rom
losing
David Pere,
. u d Mark Hardy.
leading goal
team, and
ader as well
� est all-around
vas the closest
n ihe-field
ited "We will
v tr.1
I - hampered
. . ies e en before
Standout
Pea sas lost
game season
irgery.
jffered another
g alkeeper position
first game.
e Greg Brandle
ith a broken hand
h( season.
e Pirates with only
esse Daugherty,
v .vhole season.
Daugherty step-
did a good job for a
wasn't even on the
ame in and improved
. the season
. . "For someone vvho
ivei the way he did,
well

major loss for the
at mid-season when
hman Jeff Kime was
s "It hurt our
lose Jeff when we
ed.
23, is one of the
major college soccer
el S , but feels his
have benefited the
- r hat it helped me
:ould relate to the
i ttei and could better
� here they were com-
is 'he first to admit,
that he still has a lot to
it coaching on the col-
ay you learn with every
If that's the truth, I learned
uva lot this year. But I think
I will be a better coach
f it he stated.
n though the outdoor
ason mav be over, the players
are now preparing for the indoor
season. Brody says that the team
will start practicing sometime
after 1 hanksgiv ing.
"Soccer is an all-year sport
he stated. "As soon as one season
ends, we start another. The
players will get back to vseight
training soon, and we will start
getting ready for next year
Looking back on the season,
one may believe that the soccer
program at ECU may be fading
into the sunset. If you ask Steve
Brody. however, he'd probably
tell you that while they're not
where they want to be now,
they're definitely on the way up.
Despite a losing season in '84. seniors David Pere and Brian Colgan
put forth a great deal of effort.
Bv RICK McCORMAC
Stiff Whlw
In addition to playing 12
ECAC South league games, the
ECU women's basketball team
will also play three nationally
ranked teams, and face two Ail-
Americans.
The Lady Pirates open their
season against N.C. State, the
twelvth ranked team in the
Women's Court pre-season poll.
The Wolfpack has high scoring
All-America Linda Page, one of
the best guards in the country.
Later in the season, traditional
women's power Old Dominion
will come to Minges Coliseum.
The Monarchs were ranked
fourth in the Women's Court
poll, and sport All-America for-
ward Medina Di.xon.
ECU will also face South
Carolina twice this season. Both
the Lady Gamecocks and Lady
Pirates received honorable men-
tion recognition in the Women's
Court poll.
With only eight days left to
prepare for their season opener in
the Dogwood Classic, the Lady
Pirates are working hard on both
the fundamentals and finer
points of the game.
"The girls have to pick up their
intensity said ECU coach Emi-
ly Manwaring. "We only have six
practice days left, and in this
tournament we are going to have
to play as if it were for the cham-
pionship of the world.
"We've been practicing since
Sept. 1 Manwaring said. "We
will have had 45 practice days to
prepare for this game, so we'll be
ready
Although many first-year
coaches might be apprehensie
about playing so many ranked
teams early in the season, Man-
waring feels that the difficult
schedule will help the team.
"The tough schedule will help
prepare is I the conf rence
garner later on Mai
;aid
The I ad P rai �� :
last raj the EC i
South tournam . md will
returning talent and newcomers
they have this year, another tour-
nament championship is well
with . � c'ap
1984 Women's
Basketball Schedule
Nov23N.C State (Fays �
Nos 1N rtl Can ilina (Fayettev- .
Nov28I l I 11A 1111 si AH
Declat UNCCha3 �
Deci -�HOWARD I MVERSITY
DecOI D DOMINION I NIVERSm7:30
Dec.15at SoutlIB
Dec.18ai Moorehead State I niversii �s .
Dec.19at Marshall I niversit- 3
Jan-SOITH CAROI INA- ii
JanIONACOI 1 EGE
Jan.9( -MPBi 1 I I NIVERSm :
Jan.12at w illiarr & Marx;
Jan.14ai RichmondTB-
Jan.19GEORGE MAsoN I NIV1 RSIT7 -
Jan.21AMERICAN UNIVERSITV7:30
Jan.26at Radford I niversii �rBA
Jan.28a: James Madison UniversTB
Jan.31UNC-WII MINGTON7:30
Feb�SOUTH FI ORID
FebsHAMPTON INST1TI U
Eeb9at American I niversity" �
Feb11at George Mason Univers I �5:15
Eeb16WII 1 IAM&MAR7:30
Feb18JAMES MADISON UNIVERSITY" 30
Eeb21at I 'NC-W ilmington7:00
Feb24RICHMOND3:00
Mar. 1-?I (. C -South TournameirBA
Men's Basketball Around Corner
B SCOTT COOPER
staff ritrr
The ECl men's basketball season is less than two
weeks away, and the Pirates appear to be in good
shape for the upcoming campaign.
"We're a year older, we're bigger and stronger and
hopeful)) better assistant coach Tom Barrise said.
Barrise also said that the Pirate's strong point would
be their tenacious defense.
The Pirates' possess good quickness and must
utilize their speed to be successful. "We have good
overall team quickness Barrise said. "We also have
to go out and play hard every night (to be
successful)
ECl must improve in two vital areas, according to
Coach Barrise. Rebounding and free throw shooting
have to improve from last year. Derrick Battle led the
team with 4.6 rebounds per game, while the team's
second leading rebounder was guard Curt
Vanderhorst. He grabbed 3.6 rpg during the '8384
season.
The Pirates had a cold 61.7 percent team free
throw shooting average and were last in the con-
ference. However, throughout spring practice ECU
has upped their average to a very respectable 83 per-
cent .
This year's roster has changed for the better, with
some quality returnees and some bright new faces.
The following is an evaluation of each position.
The center spot was a bit thin last year, but not this
year. Leon Bass, a 6-10, 210-pound sophomore from
Florence, S.C. averaged 2.8 points per game as a
freshman. Bass has put on some weight in the off-
season and is looking more aggressive lately.
A big question mark arises in the import of seven-
foot, 235-pound sophomore Peter Dam. He's from
Haaksbergen, The Netherlands, and will give EC.U
considerable size on the inside.
David Harris, 6-8, 220-pound junior from
Brooklyn, N.Y. will provide inside strength and ex-
perience to the club.
The sole senior on the ECU roster is 6-10,
230-pound David Reicheneker from Niceville, Fla.
His leadership could help the younger players.
The foward position looks to be bright for the
Pirates. Derrick Battle, a 6-6, 190-pound sophomore
from Whitakers, N.C. was a starter last year averag-
ing 6.1 ppg and 4.6 rebounds. Battle possesses the
talent to become a star in the ECAC South according
to Coach Harrison.
Swingman Keith Sledge (6-3 190 sophomore from
Roanoke Rapids) averaged 4.7 ppg as a freshman
and started some games during midseason last year.
He should lend help along the front line as well as on
the inside.
1984 Men's Schedule
Nov. 19IRISH NATIONAL TEAM (exhibition)
Nov. 27CENTRAL CONNECTICUT STATE
Dec. 1VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH
Dec. 4at Drexel
Dec. 8 CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT COLLEGE
Dec. 13at Campbell
Dec. 19at Wake Forest
Dec. 28-29First Tulsa Classic
(ECU, Tulsa, North Texas State, TBA)
Jan. 3BOSTON UNIVERSITY
Jan. 7GEORGE MASON
Jan. 9at Duke
Jan.12WILLIAM & MARY
Jan.19at Richmond
Jan. 21at Howard University
Jan. 26NAVY
Jan.28JAMES MADISON
Feb. 2at George Mason
Feb. 6at UNC-W'ilmington
Feb. 9at William & Mary
Feb. 11AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
Feb. 13WINTHROP COLLEGE
Feb.16RICHMOND
Feb. 18at Navy
Feb.20at American University
Feb. 23UNC-WILMINGTON
Feb. 27CAMPBELL
March 2at James Madison
-h7-9ECAC South Tournament







Sp
ECU Netter
Bv TOM BROWN
Nt�f1 Wrutr
The EC L men's tennis team
narrowly missed a winn:r.�
for the fall portion of
schedule, finishing 4-5-1. but the
caliber of the opposition should
help prepare the team for I
ing competition accord
Coach Pat Sherman.
"We sched .
help us prepare for
South tournamei.
"As a result, the
much improved ar
consolatio:
ment "
Dan LaMont (ial
and David Cr
consolatio:
Treble had a winnii
record, "h
team to be e-
Sherma:
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are de.
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while Grej
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Treble A I
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marks
top six
"Their
paid off I aM
the rr
Althoug
stronger
grounc.
improved evei
��Dav.u Cret
touraamer �
of his life. H
he could
keep his mom imj
really help the team
Dogwood
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Monday N
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be on reserve a
at the c
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will play UN
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Nov. 24. ECL �
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Favettev State a K
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ECU opens their season in less than a week and junior guard
Vanderhorst should provide consistent scoring.
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Cf Netters Finish Season
By TONY BROWN
SUff W niti
The ECU men's tennis team
narrowly missed a winning record
for the fall portion of the
schedule, finishing 4-5-1, but the
caliber of the opposition should
help prepare the team for the spr-
ing competition according to
coach Pat Sherman.
"We scheduled strong teams to
help us prepare for the EC AC
South tournament she said.
"As a result, the team was very
much improved and took several
consolation titles in that tourna-
ment
Han LaMont, Galen Treble
and David Creech each captured
consolation titles, although only
Treble had a winning dual season
record. "By spring I expect the
team to be even more improved
Sherman added. "All the plavcts
are working hard to reach their
potential
Although individual records
ire deceptive because players are
seeded according to ability, sixth
seeded Davis Bagley's 8-2 mark
led the team. Scott Avery finish-
ed in the lower seeds at 5-1-1,
while Greg Loyd was 4-1 and
Kevin Plumb 4-2.
Treble's 4-3 record as the
nber four seed topped the up-
pei half positions, while Dave
rner broke even at 5-5 at the
rd spot. Although Greg Willis
and Dan LaMont had losing
rks, their play as the top two
seeds impressed Coach Sherman.
Neither one was even in the
p s; last year she said.
"Their dedication and hard work
: off. 1 aMont was probably
most impro ed playet.
Although he still needs to get a
stronger volley and serve, his
und strokes were excellent. He
�proved ever) time he plaved.
"David Creech came on at the
tournament with the best tennis
of his life. He began to piA like
could have earlier. It he can
keep his momentum going, it will
ill) help the team this spring
Dogwood
Tickets In
An siudenr interested atten-
ding the Dogwood Classic must
come m !he ticket office in
'finges Coioeum no later titan
M mda) Nov. 19. Leave your
e on the sign-up sheet for
iplimentary tickets. They will
be on reserve at the ticket office
at the Cumberland County
Memorial Arena.
On Nov. 23, Fayetteville State
pla) UNCat6p.m. and FC I
will face N.C. State at 8 p.m. On
Nov. 24. ECU will play UNC at 6
p.m. and N.C. State will play
Fayetteville State at 8 p.m.
The Pirates' weak spot was in
doubles play. Turner and Willis
combined for a 6-4 record, but
the team failed to break even at
any of the other seeded positions.
"We will continue to work dur-
ing the break to improve our
doubles Sherman said. "I
believe we're capable of doing
much better
Assistant Coach Laura Red-
ford has been a valuable teaching
tool, Sherman feels. "We have
twice as much coaching
available she stated. "Her four
years playing for ECU has given
her valuable experience which she
relays to the team.
"I'm pleased with the perfor-
mance of our freshmen also.
Some have the potential to move
up and really help the team, so
I'm expecting us to be on a com-
petitive level with just about
anybody we play this spring
Spring Sports Planned
ByJEANNETTEROTH
Staff Write
If you missed out on the fall in-
tramural events, don't fret, spr-
ing semester is just around the
corner with a new calender of in-
tramural activities. Here's a
month-by-month preview o' the
activities available to all faculty,
staff and students.
in Jan enjoy aerobic exercise
classes with your favorite instruc-
tor. Five-on-five basketball
begins along with co-rec roller
hockey. The IM-SRA video
games tournament will take place
in the Aycock game room. Final
activities of the month include
arm wrestling and racquetball
doubles.
Feb. begins with co-rec bowl-
ing and swim meet registration.
Next, participate in the IM-
lobbies weight lifting meet. In-
tramurals and Domino's Pizza is
sponsoring the annual wrestling
tournament during the middle of
the month. The end of February
marks the beginning of aerobic
exercise registration and its se
cond session of classes.
V hile spring is in the aii. so are
March intramural activities.
Register for tennis doubles and
team handball. The infamous
Miller pre-season softball tourna-
ment adds excitement to the
month. Softball officials should
prepare for the upcoming regular
season by attending clinics held in
Memorial Gym. Co-rec activities
bounce along with registration
deadlines in volleyball and rac-
quetball. Towards the end of the
month, pull along with co-rec
tug-of-war participants. End
your month by marching into the
outdoor recreation backpacking
trip.
April tees off with the IRS golf
classic at Ayden Country Club.
The outdoor recreation center is
ottering a Whitewater rafting
adventure trip on the tenth.
Finish up the semester by enter-
ing the homcrun derby. These are
just the highlights of the semester
to come. All the excitement will
be provided by you.
In recent IRS lane action,
bowlers head for the top pin by
rolling over opponents. Look for
Power House, Thunder Balls,
Tau Kappa Epsilon and Aycock
Pinbusters to take top honors in
the men's divisions. The top
ladies teams at this point in the
season are the Naturals, Alpha
Phi and Bowlers Greene.
Keep up with all the latest in-
tramural action by listening to
the Tennis Shoe Talkshow on
WZMB every Tuesday and
Thursday.
ET
p VILLAGE
DONNA HWAKOS
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Gold Fish 4$ 1.00
(Reduced Prices on Volume Purchases)
Large Selection of Salt Water Fish
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing
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511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE, N.C 27834
PMONT 756 9222
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOW MBl-R 15. 1984 11
s
SAVE � SAVE � SAVE � SAVE � SAVE
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oupon
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I






12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
i

NOVEMBER 15, 1984
The Experts Pick This Week's Winners
POWERS
DUKE at N.C. STATENCSU
UVA at UNCUVA
FLORIDA at KENTUCKYFlorida
GA. TECH at WAKE FORESTGa. Tech
GEORGIA al Al BURNAuburn
SYRACUSE at BOSTON COLLBC
MARYLAND at CLEMSONClemson
IOWA ST. at OKLA. ST.Okla. St.
KANSAS at MISSOURIMizzou
MICHIGAN at OHIO ST.OSU
OKLAHOMA at NEBRASKAOklahoma
PENN ST. at NOTRE DAMEPenn St.
SOUTH CAROLINA at NAVYuse
ISC at UCLAuse
TEXAS at TCITCU
VA. LECH at VANDKRBILTVandv
SANTA CLARA al ST. MARY'SSanta Clara
SAD SAM
NCSU
UVA
Florida
Wake
Georgia
BC
Maryland
Okla St.
Mizzou
OSU
Oklahoma
Notre Dame
use
use
TCU
Va. Tech
Santa Clara
MEWS
NCSU
UVA
Florida
Wake
Auburn
BC
Maryland
Okla. St.
Mizzou
OSU
Nebraska
Penn St.
use
use
TCU
Va. Tech
Santa Clara
MAROSHAK
NCSU
UVA
Florida
Wake
Auburn
BC
Maryland
Okla. St.
Mizzou
OSU
Nabraska
Penn St.
use
use
TCU
Va. Tech
Santa Clara
R1DEOUTJENDRASIAK
NCSUNCSU
UNCI VA
FloridaFlorida
WakeGa. lech
AuburnAuburn
BCBC
MarylandMainland
Okla. St.Okla. S�.
KansasMizzou
OSUOS I
NebraskaNebraska
Notre DameNotre Dame
NavyISC
useILA
TexasTf I
Va. TechVa. lech
St. Mary'sSantaiara

Powers KeepsLead
LastGames
WeekOverallPet.Behind
Scott Powers11-7110-49.691�
Sad Sam12-6106-53.6674
Rand Mews13-5104-55.6546
1 ina Maroschak11-7104-55.6546
dreg Rideout11-796-63.60414
Jennifer Jendrasiak i 11-795-64.59715
Swimmers Optn '84 Season
The ECU swim feam will open
WS-i season Saturday at 1
p.m. in the Minges Natitorium.
The .nen host INC Charlotte,
hile the women take on .lames
Madison.
According to Pirate Coach
k Kobe JMU boasts one of the
litest proerams in the ECAC
South and feels his women will
ave to swim verv well in order to
achieve victory.
The men will face UNCC, and
although much improved over
last year, Kobe feels the 49ers
don't have the talent to seriously
challenge his men's squad.
Both swim teams are coming
of of their finest seasons in the
history of the school, with a com-
bined total of 17 wins.
j? Marty, Mike & James
Fosh.on Cuts For Both Man & Women (919) 752 18t6
By Appointment
EDK�N�
SHIRLEY'S CUT & STYLE
301 E
2nd Floor MM
� riW�. N
r.NC 27834
Kim Shirley
(919)752 7637 Fo�NonCu&P�mw For Both M�no,W
Appointment
�Mt
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AN ALL'STAR BENEFIT
The Greenville Parks and Recrea-
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time youth basketball coaches for the
Winter Program. Applicants must
possess some knowledge of basketball
skills and have patience to work with
youth. Hours are from 3 p.m. to 7
p.m. MonFri. and some nights and
weekends. The program will extend
from Nov. 26 to mid Feb. For infor-
mation call the Greenville Parks and
Recreation Department at 752-41 37
Ext. 248, 220, or 259.
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L







Title
The East Carolinian, November 15, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 15, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.376
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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