The East Carolinian, November 13, 1984






(Ulit �aat (Earnltttian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.23
Tuesday November 13, 1984
Greenville, N.C
10 Pages
Circulation 12,(MM)
Where The Action Isn't
JON jobdan - ecu Photo L�t
Guess what, folks? Its Monday night in downtown Greenville and that even manv of the beer-drinking diehards stav in to stud lust wail
doesn i mean a whole lot of action. As finals draw inevitably nearer, until Friday.
'85 Rebel Announces Contest Winners
By HAROLDJOYNER
vOl�m Nfw Editor
The winners of the 1985 Rebel
Literary Art annual contest
were announcfd Fritay af a
reception held at the Art and
Camera Galler.
In the -rose competition,
Horace Mc( ormick Jr. won first
place for his short story, H inters
on the Reservoir. Gary Bryant
won second place for his work,
Tremors.
"The judges had a hard time
ng the winners said Ellen
re, Rebel editor, "but 1 feel
judges made the right
.oices Chrystal Fray's The
Mother's On The Bus Go Hush
Hush won third place.
Poetry winners for 1985 in-
clude: First place, Peppermint
Rust, Laurilyn McDonald; se-
cond place, Fireflies, Deanya
Lattimore-Cobb; third place. The
Conception Company, J.T.
Pietrzak.
"The money for the art and
writing contests will be provided
by the Attic and Budweiser dur-
ing a January fundraiser. We're
expecting to raise approximately
$775 to reimburse the Rebel ac-
counts Moore said.
George McKim received the
Best in Show art award for his
abstract painting, Tone Poem for
Arnold Palmer.
In other art competition,
Moore said over 157 entries were
received from 82 people. The
winners include: Drawing,
William Leidenthal, Geologic
Time dumber 26, Mixed Media.
Kara,Hammond, For Barb; Pain-
ting, William Leidenthal. Sum-
mer Rain At Twilight, Design,
Phillip Dismuke, Seek Piece,
Photography, Joe Champagne,
un titled.
Ceramics, V. Jane Tucker, Tea
Pot Crazy, Sculpture, Carolyn
Capps.JMjri oj Bird 1,11, Print-
making, Joe Champagne, untitl-
ed and Illustration, Todd
Coats Imagination.
Judges for the Prose and
Poetry contests, Moore said,
were Jean Morgan and Judith
Suther, both faculty members
from UNC�Charlotte. The art
judges were Randy Osman.
curator for Gray Gallery,
Margaret Georgiann, visiting art
instructor, Joan Moment,
visiting artist and Chuck
Chamberlain, chairman of design
department in the School of Fine
Arts.
"Winners in all contests will
have their work published in the
1985 Rebels Moore said. "Also,
finalists who did not win the con-
tests win be published. We
still accepting literature through
the end of November
The art work is on view for the
general public through Friday,
Nov. 16 at the Art and Camnera
Gallery located on Cotanche
street. Moore said, "1 encourage
everyone to stop by and look at
the work submitted by the
students
The Rebel will be ready next
semester after spring break. "We
will have 4,500 copies of the
Rebel, which is a little more than
we have had in the past. We plan
to keep the same format
Moore said.
SGA Opens Coffers, Approves Printer
By GREG RIDEOl T
Managing hdtlor
The SGA Legislature ap-
propriated the bucks Monday
night to buy students a printer
will cough out letter-quality
resumes. The printer will be at-
tached to a computer in the
;ness lab in Rawl Building,
ss from the Student Supply
Store.
By consent, the Legislature
gave the Graduate Business
Association $1,920.28 to buy the
printer for the school. The group
plans on having a sign-up sheet
where all students can indicate an
hour in which they wish to use the
computer. The printer can also be
used for cover letters but not
term papers.
Students, the group argued,
spend more than $7,000 each year
at a local copying agency for
resumes. The school and the
GBA will maintain the equipment
and help students use the com-
puter.
The Legislature also gave the
International Language
Organization $240 to help pay the
bills tallied up during its annual
Oktoberfest. The money will be
used to pay part of a $418 Ser-
vomation charge for catering the
affair.
Bachelor's Degree
Waits For Approval
The bill came out of the Ap-
propriations Committee without
a recommendation to the
legislators because of a rule ad-
vising the Legislature not to give
money for food purchases. An
amendment to the bill cut the
$4'8 to $240, which would have
covered band and hall rental
costs had the ILO come to the
Legislature before the
Oktoberfest.
TOMkV;
By HAROLDJOYNER
iat(aal Newt Editor
A recommendation to establish
a new baccalaureate degree at
ECU was submitted by the
Education Planning and Policy
Committee of the University of
North Carolina Board of Gover-
nors at their meeting last Thurs-
day. The issue is on the Board of
Governors' agenda for their
January meeting.
Angelo Volpe, vice chancellor
for Academic Affairs said,
"ECU officials are very op-
timistic that the program will be
forthcoming soon Student in-
terest in careers in the field of
communication at ECU has been
very high, Volpe said. "In a re-
cent student survey at ECU, 80
percent of 186 students showed
an interest in a communications
major, especially elec-
tronicbroadcasting
journalism he said.
"The recommendation submit-
ted by the Planning Committee
will not receive final approval un-
til January, when the Board of
Governors meets Volpe said.
"This has been in the workings
for several years (at ECU) and I
feel once it has been approved,
the program will be implemented
in the Fall of 1985
Resources from the Depart-
ments of English and Theatre
Arts will be combined, making it
possible for ECU to offer a
Bachelor of Science in Com-
munications, Volpe said. "Right
now, all ECU has to offer in the
field of journalism is a Bachelor
of Arts minor he said. "If this
program is implemented, we will
be able to offer a major in the
print and broadcast media
Currently, similiar programs
are offered at Appalachian State
University, UNC�Chapel Hill,
UNC�Asheville and
Winston�Salem State Universi-
ty.
The Pirate Blues
f JOKOAM -
ECU Photo Lab
Brains Top Brawn
In Mating Game
By MIKE HAMER
Slaff wm�
Students at ECU choose their
mates according to their in-
telligence, a recent survey shows.
Surveys taken at universities in
the '60s and '70s did not find
these same results � education
and intelligence were found to be
relatively important in previous
studies.
The survey was conducted by
Hal Daniel, Robert McCabe and
Sissy Quinter from the Depart-
ment of Speech, Language and
Auditory Pathology, and Kevin
O'Brien from the department of
Biostatistics and Epidemiology.
The survey was initially conced-
ed of as a way of seeing if men
and women perceived the impor-
tance of the human voice in mate
selection
"We expected the results of the
survey to show that males and
females placed an importance on
the voice when they were selec-
ting a mate, but the voice was
rated last and next to last. The
males ranked the importance of
the voice higher than females did.
That was entirely different from
what was expected McCabe
said.
In the future, the group will be
doing specific research looking at
the effects of different vocal
characteristics in mate selection.
McCabe said, "In future research
we will be looking at varying
female vocal characteristics such
as pitch, intensity and quality in
the terrp r which ' :ir:3!e is
more important relative to the
males' mate selection process
The study will be published in
the Spring issues of the College
Student Journal.
Commenting on the results of
the survey, Daniel said, "We owe
a lot to the students who rated in-
telligence highK i is a credit to
the students at ECU that this was
discovered
Besides intelligence, ECU
students rated physical attrac-
tiveness and sense of humor
higher than did previous reports
on mate selection that were done
in the '60s and '70s. The
researchers also found that sen-
sitivity remains an important trait
when considering a relationship
Ambition was also found to be
relatively important.
The group found male and
female respondents differed in
their rankings of physical attrac-
tiveness, voice, sense of humor
and employment. Males ranked
physical attractiveness and voice
as being more important, while
ECU women ranked a - e of
humor and employment as more
important qualities.
"It is possible I
"that today's college students
desire partners who are more
likely to succeed in a visual,
seemingly narcissistic ety. An
intelligent, sensitive, physically-
attractive mate with a good sense
of humor and a moderate
amount of ambition appears to
be a good candidate for success in
finding a mate
Quinter commented on the fac
that ECU women ranked a sense
of humor third in their criteria
for choosing a mate "Women
are in a transition place in socie-
ty she said.
"I was really surprised that
males rated intelligence of
women over physical attrac-
tiveness; that wa a pleasant sur-
prise Quinter added.
Republicans Prepared
To Avoid Fighting
(UPI) � In the aftermath of
their victories last week.
Republicans say they are better
prepared than they were in 192
to avoid political infighting and
hold on'o the gains they made in
North Carolina politics.
Tom Ellis, chairman of the
conservative National Congres-
sional Club, and other
Republicans said they are intent
on avoiding the intra-party
squabbling that followed Presi-
dent Nixon's 1972 landslide over
George McGovern. The victory-
helped elect North Carolina's
first Republican governor and
senator this century � moderate
Jim Holshouser and conservative
Jesse Helms.
But skirmishes flared in the
mid-1970s over control of the
state Republican Party between
the party's moderate and conser-
vative wings.
Ellis said his Congressional
Club, aligned with right-wing
organizations, would "do
everything we can to be helpful"
to Govelect James Martin. The
six-term conservative con-
gressman had distanced his
political campaign from the PAC
to become the state's second
GOP governor this century.
"What's the old saying? Those
who don't learn from history are
forced to repeat it said Robert
Hunter, a Greensboro lawyer and
GOP moderate.
David Flaherty, chairman of
the state Republican Party, said
the discord following the 1972
election hurt the party
"disastrously
"Instead of working on unity,
we just had cat fights he said.
"People aren't going to reregister
from Democrat to Republican
when there's a cat fight goinc
on
Republican Democrats and
political anaiy have said North
Carolina is moving toward a
competi'ive two-party system
that GOP leaders hope will cut
into the Democrats' nearly 3-to-l
advantage in registration in
North Carolina.
"I think that white people in
North Carolina are clearly sens-
ing that the national Democratic
Party is leaving them said Ellis,
a longtime political adviser to
Helms.
"It does not represent the
values and the sentiments of the
people of North Carolina he
said. "This is a nationwide trend.
It isn't just true for North
Carolina
Other political observers
agreed with Ellis' survey of voter
distaste for Northern Liberal
presidential candidates as
another reason for the sweeping
Republican triumph in North
Carolina.
"The last national Democrat
the whites voted for in North
Carolina was in 1960 said
Merle Black, a political science
professor at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill.
That year, John Kennedy
defeated Nixon by a statewide
margin of 52 percent to 48 per-
cent.
"A Democrat perceived to be a
liberal is a losing proposition in
this state Black said. "Even if
Mondale had run a great cam-
paign, it wouldn't have made any
difference
Saturday's football game has most of the ECU campus singing the
blues.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features6
Classifieds7
Sports8
�The Pirates closed their foot-
ball season Saturday with a
loss to the Eagles of Southern
Mississippi. Sports Editor
Randy Mews takes a look at
the season, as well as a look
ahead to next year. See Sports,
page 8.

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 13. 1984
Announcements
Why Do Communist
"Church H
m



Omega Psi Phi
Omega Pi Pht Frat, Inc Is recognizing ail
black students who have accumulated a gpa
of 3 0 or above You will be given a cer
tiflcate of achievement during our achieve
ment day awards ceremonoy on Nov It at
3 00 if you have the qualifications write
Omega Psi Phi, P O Box 3014. Greenville,
N C 27S34
Allied Health Professions
Admission Test
The Aihed Health Professions Admission
Test wilt be offered Saturday, Jan 12, 1985
Application blanks are to be completed and
mailed to the Psychological Corp 7500 Old
oak Blvd Cleveland Ohio 44130 to arrive by
Dec 15 1984 Applications may be obtained
from the ECU Testing Center, room 105,
Speight Building
Graduate Management
Admission Test
The Gradua'e Management Admission Test
,GMAT' will be offered Sat , Jan 26. 1985
Application blanks are to be completed and
mailed to GMAT Educational Testing Ser
vice Box 96 R Princeton N J 08540 Ap
plications must be postmarked no later than
Dec 24 1984 Applications n �y be obtained
from the ECU Testing Center. Room 105,
Spegnt Building
Episcopal Worship
A stuoen' Episcopal service of Holy Commu
nion will be celebrated on Tuesday evening,
Nov. 13 in the chapel of St Paul's Episcopal
Church 406 4th st (one block from Garrett
Dorm) The service will be at 5 30pm with
the Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev Bill Had
den. celebrating Supper will follow
Surf Club
The team surf off was not held last Sun due
to bad weather Another surf off is scheduled
for this Sun Meet at the Islander Motel at 9
am in Emerald isle it you want to par
ticipate There is a meeting this Thurs at
8 "3 p m in the Mendenhail Coffeehouse
Slides of the fall break trip to Hatteras will
be shown Final plans will be made for the
Thannsgiving trip to Florida also
Fall Semester Graduates
Caps and Gowns should be picked up in the
Student Supply Store. Wright Building, Nov
14 16
These keepsake gowns are yours to keep
providing the graduation fee has been paid
LOVE
is something missing in your life right now
but you just can't put your finger on it
Everyone needs love and understanding
You can fill this empty space by making an
Encounter with Christ Weekend Nov 15 18
Meet students within N C and enjoy a relax
ng weekend with pecole who really care
about you! For more into, contact Fr Terry
at 752 4216 or Colleen Pirone at 752 4975 it
promises to be a fantastic experience'
Beta Kappa Alpha
Tie Beta Kappa Alpha Chapter of Financial
Management Association will hold a General
Business meeting on Thurs , Nov 15 at
3 00pm in Rawi 101 Dues will be collected
so have your checkbook handy
Student Union Public Relations
The c,udent union Public Relations and Pro
n � Committee will meet on Tues , Nov
13. 1984 a 5 OOp m in room 238 Of
Menoenhail Student Center AH members
are urged 0 attend
Student union Recreation
Committee
The S'udent union Recreation Committee s
sponsoring a Bingo ice Cream Party at 7
cm m the Menoenhail Student Center
Mu't' Purppose room All ECU students
? acuity staf the r dependents ana guests
are welcome Admission is only 25 cents
Play 8 different oingo games and win pruts
Bring a friend or Tues . Nov 13 and enjoy
rhe funJ
Pre-Season Basketball
Register now for one of the most successful
mtramurai events of the fall Registration
for the tournament sponsored by Mille' High
Lite is on Nov 26 27 Play begins the 30th
us1 m time to let it an out before exams
Register in room 204 menorial gym or call
757 6387
ECU Mens Invitational Flag
Football
Tne entry tee is $15 and the event will Lie held
on the 16,17,18 of Nov Register this week and
next in the intramural office room 204
Memorial gym The tournament is spon
sored by All Campus champs
Bombsquad The money will be used to
cover expenses on their trip to the National
Collegiate Flag Football Tournament
N.C.I.O.
The North Carolina Internship Office pro
vides paid summer intern positions for
studenrs with State Government Positions
are available in a variety of agencies located
throughout the state Students will be paid
S3 73 per hour working during the period of
June 1 until August 1
Comedy
Anyone who thinks they have a good sense of
humour and would like to do stand up com
edy. Please contact Ed at 752 2524.
Health and Human Services
Opening for spring semester in Washington,
DC, Health and Human Services, Office of
'he Secretary, Policy and New initiatives
Division, for student with good typing skills.
Word processing desired but not required
Student will be trained to use word process
mg equipment if needed Tuition and books
paid the semester following each Coop
assignment Salary approximately 11,000
month Contact the Co op office in Rawi 313
immediately
North Carolina Internship
Program
Opportunities are available for summer
employment with North Carolina State agen
cies A wide variety of positions for many
majors are available statewide Applies
tions should be completed by early
December Contact the Cooperative Educa
tion Office in Rawi 313 for information
reguarding this program
Gamma Beta Phi
Gamma Bet Phi will meet Thursday Nov 15
at 7 p m in the Biology Building 103
Christmas Vacation
Dive Penny Camp National Underwater
Park in fabulous Key Largo The Florida
Keys are the only natural coral reef in the
Continental US This five day trip, Dec
16 2lst includes lodging and two dive boat
trips dail.y Tanks backpack and weight
belts are provided Cost is $175 per person,
two to a room occupancy and $210 per per
son, 4 to a room occupancy For further in
formation: Ray Scharf, Director of Ac
quatics 757 6441
Sigma Theta Tau
The Beta Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau,
the National Honor Society of Nursing, will
hold its fall educational meeting on Thurs
day, Nov. 15, 1984 at 6 p.m at the Ramada
inn in Greenville The program, presented
by Dr. Ann Belcher, rn. PhD, is entitled,
"The ten year plan implications for On
cology Nursing " Dr Belcher is director of
Nursing Staff Development at the Unlversi
ty of Alabama Hospital in Birmingham, Ala.
Colleagues, students, spouses and friends
are cordially invited For further inform
tlon, contact Lou Everett at the School of
Nursing (757 60411
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Gre�llle Blvd.
TS8-JKJ - U HXS
24 hour Towing Service
L-HmI Reatab
Free Throw Contest
There will be a free throw contest held for all
you expert hoopsters Nov 13 This in
tramural sponsored event will be held in
Memorial Gym To register come by room
204 Memorial Gym or call 757 6387 Par
ticipate rather than spectate
NASA
Interested In international Policy and
Regulations affecting high technology expor
ting If so, this position may be for you
NASA will be Interviewing on compus in
Nov for Spring, 1985 Contact the
Cooperative Education Office, 313 Rawi
Building as soon as possible
Turkey Shoot in Bowling
The Student Union Recreation Committee is
sponsoring a turkey shoot in bowling on
Thurs Nov 15 1984 from 7 p m until 10 p m
in Mendenhail Student Center $2 entry fee,
ECU I D s required Come win a turkey
BSU
The Baptist Student Union invites you to
witness for Peace with Mike Hamer, ECU
faculty at 8 30 Wed Nov 14 at the BSU The
program will also include vocal and guitar
music
Tree Trimming Party
The Student Union Productions Committee
is having a free trimming party on Mon .
Nov 26 m Mendenhail student Center at 4
p m All are invited1 At 1 p m the ECU choir
will perform Refreshments will be served
Happy Hour
The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi fraternity
would like to mvite everyone out to the Elbo
room tonight during Pi Kapp happy hour
starting at 9 p m Let's all get together and
jam before those tests start up
Alpha Phi big brothers
The next big brother meeting will be Sun
night at the house starting at 9 00 All money
dues and t shirts) is due that night T shirts
nave been ordered and will be in by the
meeting Also big brother volleyball plays
WED night at 10 p m Lets get out and sup
port the big brothers of Alpha Phi Sorority
Oxfam America Fast
The annual Oxfam America Fast for World
Harvest will take place on Thurs . Nov 15
Students, faculty, and staff are asked to fast
for one or two meals and donate the money
that would have been spent for tnose meals
Money win be collected at a table outside the
Student Supply Store on Thurs Oxfam
America channels it's money to promote
self help projects in several disadvantaged
areas of tne world
Lama Visits
The Venerabei Khenpo Kartrtar Rmpoche
will give tnree public 'alks m Greenville next
week On Sun, Nov 18. In room 244 of
Mendenhail Student Center, at 7 30 p m , he
will present Part I of "The Four Noble
Truths ' Part 2 of the talk will be the follow
ing night at the same time and place On
Tues , Nov 20. at 7 30 p m at the Wilson
Acres Club House he will have meditation in
structlon- "introduction to the Heart of Bud
dhist Practice " Refuge and Empowerment
services win also be announced Born m
eastern Tibet, Khenpc Rmpoche has official
I y recei ved the title
Choeie Lama "(superior Dharma masteri
He is presently abbot of the Karma Triyana
Dharmachakra Monastery in Woodstock,
NY
Early Childhood Education Club
ECU is having a meeting today at 4 30 in
speight building room 129 We are honored to
have as a guest speaker, the principal from
Sadie Saulter Elementary School Members
please bring a company's address to share
for professional files and dues are $3
Everyone is welcome!
Rho Lambda Meeting
All members of Rho Lambda Greek Honor
Society have a meeting Thurs , Nov 15 at
4 30. Laura Sweet's office in Cotton dorm
Plans for the house mothers tea will be
discussed See you there1
International Student Association
Attention members There will be a very im
portant meeting on Sat Nov 17th at 6 p m
room 221, Mendenhail student Center Be
there'
Racquetball Club
ECU'S Racquetball Club will hold an
organizational meeting on Wed Nov. U,at 5
pm in Memoral Gym, Rm 105. All
members and anyone intrested are
welcome
AMA
The American Marketing Association will be
sponsoring a marketing profile of Anheuser
Bush on Nov 15th at 4 p m at Mendenhail
244 All AMA members and anyone in
terested are invited to attend
Applications
are now being accepted for students wishing
to serve on University Committees tor the
1984 1985 school year Twenty one(21) stu
dent positions are open Committees with
vacancies are Alcohol and Drug Education
Commlttee(l). Committee on Canvassing
and Soliciting on Campusd), Committee on
Residence Life(l) Committee on Status of
Minorities (4), Committee on Status of
Women (2). Committee on Student Health
Services (1), Housing appeals (off campus
student) (1). Parking and Traffic Committee
(1), Scholars Weekend Committee (1), Ad
missions Commlttee(l), Career Education
Committee (1). Course Drop Appeals Com
mitte (1), Faculty Computer Committee
(1), Teaching Effectiveness Committee (2)
Applications are availavle at the following
locations Office of the Vice Chancellor for
Student Life. 204 Whichard, Mendenhail Stu
dent Center Information Desk. SGA Office,
Mendenhail student center. Office of
Intramural Recreational Services,
Memorial Gym and Residence Hall Direc
tors' Offices
The University greatly appreciates the ef
torts of those students who have served in
the past and hope that students will continue
their interest and participation Questions
about University Committees and member
ships may be director to the Office of the
Vice Chancelor for Student Life (757 6541)
Submit your applications now!
Happy Hour
Everyone come on out to Beaus Thurs night
for a great Happy hour Delta Zeta will be
selling Tickets for the pig picking at Beaus
this Sat See you Thurs at Beaus!
Pre-iMed
Aft Officers, Members and Pledges There
will be a meeting Tues Nov 13 In Flanagan
307 at 7 30 The speaker will be Dr Baughan.
Family practice His topic will be the Sym
poslum All are invited at 7 p m there will be
an executive meeting in Conf room Also at 7
p m there will be a mandatory pledge
meeilng in 307
Delta Zeta
Parents week end was a great success
Thanks Lori and Tina for all your hard work!
Reminder too sisters and pledges of all our
events this week Tues Is the Coke Castle at
King and Queen North, Wed night is our
happy hour at Elbo and Thurs party at
Beaus Also, don't forget Renee needs your
money for the pig picking no later than Tues
It's going to be a fantastic week of
togetherness!
Marauder members
There will be an important meeting for all
Marauder members on Wed , Nov 14 at 7 30
p m in the coffee house located in the base
ment of Mendenhail Student Center Upcom
ing events will be discussed
Conservation Film
The film "Garden of Eden will be shown by
the Pamlico Tar River Foundation at 7 p.m ,
Mon, Nov 19 in the auditorium of the Willis
Bulldlng(ECU Regional Development In
stitute) The film, produced by the Nature
Conservancy, makes a case tor preservation
of natural environments and the earth's gene
pool The showing is free and open to the
public
SPAN
The Student Planning Association Network
(SPAN) Is sponsoring a series of alumni
panels during 1984 85 to celebrate the com
pletion of 20 years of undergraduate plann
Ing education at ECU The first of these
panels will be held on Nov 14 In Brewster
Building, room D 208, from 12 00 to 1 30pm
The panel will discuss planning education m
terms of public sector employment oppor
tunltles within the planning profession
The panelists are Lee Downie, Director of
Community Development, Roanoke Rapids,
N.C Wat Brown, Director of Town Plann
ing, Tarboro, N C . Beth Shields. Planning
director, Nash county, N C , Gene Thomas
Annexation Coordinator and Panner II.
Goldsboro, N C , Bill Richardson, county
Manager, Currltuck county, N C
All interested persons are invited to at
tend For additional information contact
Mike Walker, SPAN President, or Pro
fessors Hank ins or Wubneh at 757 6465
Delta Sigma Phi
Just a reminder to all brothers, sisters, and
pledges about our Thanksgiving Dinner sun ,
Nov IB at 6 30 pm at the house Come with
a good appetite!
Law Society
Ail those interested m Knowing more about
the Judicai branch of our government are
invited to attend the next ECU law society
meeting Our guest speaker ,s district court
iudge Jim Martin (of the 3rd jud.cai
District) who will talk about the Judges
Role m the judicial System' we win oe
meeting on Nov 19(Mondar I at 7 p m m th�
Coffee House located m Menoenhail For
more information, call Mike Gardner
758 1640
ASPA
The American society tor Personnel Ao
ministration will hold a meeting Thuri
Nov 15 at 3 30 in Rawi 102 Gues' spr���
will be Joe High, Human Resource Manager
from TRW Everyone welcome'
Dance Contest
Fri. Nov 16,1984, Pi Sigma P. Nat.ca
Honor fraternity ana Papa Ka�z prev �-?
3rd annual Dance contest An proceeds from
the dance contest win go to United Cfrcj
Palsy There will be a specai fapc. I
from 8 10 p m Please come on ou' ar �
us for tne fun
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B JENNIFER JI SDRAM K
Church-state relations in t
Poland were the su-
ture given at ECU last Thurs :
b Dr Dieter Bii g
Federal Institute for I
pean and International Studies
Cologi Germa
The lecture w a
"Re. i
Pa f le i ��� v. � Relij
rated in One of the I
mun; (
'jsored b the Depart mv I
g cn said
oikhurch I
ke role in the ev
Poland H(
in the
"renew
patriotism and .
Since the I970's, B .
-jpable of
in Poland
at i :
"huma
valuer
which "the
Thc
more influei
Solid '
Dual Career M
Discussed At
Dua
par
phenoir
the
typi
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The
tior.
5 p i
Greei boro:
-
Famih R
author f 1 �
numerous articles . and Dr c ,
MacKinnon. :i�am professor
f cl I U

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Law Society
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a M,ke Gardner,
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NOW MBi RB.I �
Why Do Communists Have Religion?
Church Relations Intensify
ccmt risiuts fHf � 6A m fi � �
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nf�� fdllor
Church-state relations in
Poland were the subject of a lec-
ture given at ECU last Thursday
by Dr. Dieter Bingen of the
Federal Institute for last Euro-
pean and International Studies in
Cologne, West Germany.
The lecture was titled
"Religion is the Opiate of the
People; Yet Why is Religion
Tolerated in One of the Com-
munist Countries1" and was
sponsored h the Departments of
Political Science and Philosophy.
Bingen said the Roman
Catholic Church has "played a
key role in the evolution of
Poland He said the current
situation in the country has
"renewed the symbiosis t
patriotism and Catholicism
Since the 1970's, Bingen said,
the church has become the "sole
independent large organization
capable of opposing Comm mism
in Poland
This has been due to
that the church has been exeri
"humanist, moralist a
patriotic" values contrary I
values of the government
which "the people do '1
The church has as
more influence sii
Solidarity in tht
said. "In 1980-81, the church
acted repeatedly as a fire brigade
to stop threatening confronta-
tions between Solidarity and
political leaders.
"The partv had lost all means
ol directly influencing the
masses he said.
He added that while the church
was in great demand as an ad-
isor to both the Communist Par-
ty and the trade unions, the im-
position of martial law in
December, 1981, was "a sign of
the failure of the Catholic
Church in moderating conflicts in
Poland
Despite this. Bingen said, the
church had shown its power,
"not as the opiate of the people,
hut as a real political force
Bingen said that, following the
position of martial law, a
"common formula for com-
promise was sought, one in which
cither the church or the Com-
munist Party would lose face
He said the visit of Pope John
Paul II in 1983, "strengthened
the conviction of the conpatnots
their convictions had been
hwhile.
'He gave the society
psychological relaxation but no
concrete hope for change
Dingen said.
ears of real
. m Poland, the Catholic
Church is not perceived as an
opiate of the people by the
government or society he said.
"It has not defeated the Marxist
� Leninist political party on the
labor field because as a
-anscendentalist political entity
it doesn't enter into that field
directly � it has an influence on
the awareness of the individual
Dingen added that the church
is "the most important source of
Polish self-identity" and is grow-
ing in "moral strength and in-
direct political influence.
"It is not an opiate but a real
political and societal force which
has to be recognized by the
government and Communist Par-
ty as a political factor which
plays a dynamic role and brings
new discussions on the behalf of
democratization and liberaliza-
tion
HI 'rs' M

a.
A ' irH A CRIME.
�4 w �
I � �
� 7 . �: �� �. -TT
ROM " � ' foO
��'�' Bi m �

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� 4 ?:�: titLK zos. J
S0NM e� nd

Advertise
Dual Career Marriages
Discussed At Seminar
Dua gig
par md other
phenomena which have affected
the structure and dynan .
typical i family i
discussed at ECl 's 25th annual
Family ife Conference Nov. 13.
The event will feature prese
tions by two noted family
specialists from L NC-
Greensboi i Dt 3 anzoni,
1 he L Nc -G
! amily Re �.�. h Center and
author of 10 books and
numerous articles, .imi )r Carol
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ECU'S annual Family Life
(. onference is a project of an in-
terdepartmental committee of
faculty members and students.
Dr. Dawd Knox, ECL' sociologist
: family Lie specialist, is chair
ol the committee.
" -
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I
&z feuBt (EuralMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hi ntfr Fisher.cmm
GREG RlDEOUT, nriiiimiin ruinm
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK. mm � J.T. P.ETRZAK. �.��
Randy Mews. �, e, Anthony Martin. ����, Wanu
Tina Maroschak. am ��.� ToN1 Norton, c, m���
Bn i Austin, cmmmm, mm, bu i Daw son, ��� ���-
Jon Jordan. p MlKE: MAm 4i
November 13, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Vietnam
Let's Honor Soldiers, Okay?
A day honoring men and women
who have fought in wars has been
a mainstay for countries
throughout time. Roman
gladiators, medieval crusaders and
WWI trench warriors all have been
remembered for their heroic ef-
forts. Monday, we honored our
War heroes. We not only paused to
say thanks to those veterans who
are still living, we also bowed to
thank the dead. By doing so, we
showed our appreciation to those
who gave their lives for our coun-
try during wartime dating back to
the Revolutionary War.
But Monday was a little bit more
significant for one group. Vietnam
veterans. For on the day before,
Sunday, President Reagan ac-
cepted the Vietnam Veterans
Memorial on behalf of the nation,
telling those who waited more than
10 years to hear such words,
"thanks for your courage
The memorial not only includes
the 500-foot black granite wall in-
scribed with the names of the
58,022 Americans who gave their
lives in Southeast Asia, but now a
statue of three soldiers has been
added to honor the more than 2.7
million Americans who fought in
the nation's longest and most un-
popular war. Today, finally, all
servicemen who were called to duty
in Vietnam are welcomed home.
We would like to say thanks to
those (no longer) young men who
fought and died. Their honor is
not tarnished because of old politi-
cians who handled the war ineptly
and wrongly. You did not lose the
war; we know of your heroics �
saving a downed buddy as lead
whistled through the air, or help-
ing a peasant family whose village
was destroyed by bombs and
tanks. The war was lost by men in
blue suits who sat behind desks pil-
ed with papers full of wrong deci-
sions. The war was lost because the
leadership did not lead, and then
did not leave when the time had
come to go home.
Vietnam does have a lesson to
teach us. Not the one that people j
claim, though � that of avoiding a
similar war. Vietnam reinforces
our tradition of tolerance and
understanding. We must
remember that all stories have
more than one side. In this case, all
had right on their side: protestor,
draft-dodger and soldier. All did
what they thought was right. One
saw an unjust war, the other
declined to participate in an unjust
war and the third went to fight in
that war because "it was the right
thing to do
Today, as 1984 comes to a close,
we should come to grips with the
splintering of our people that oc-
curred in the '60s and '70s over
Vietnam. We should be tolerant of
those who fought, which we
weren't before, and tolerant of
those who didn't, which we suspect
many today would look down
upon. Each had a reason for doing
what they did that was embedded
just as deep as the other's in
American philosophy. The right to
question government and the duty
to fight for democracy � each can
be seen when looking at the Viet-
nam experience.
You might question honoring
those who never gazed upon the
landscape of Vietnam. We say it is
in the American character to honor
all points of view whether we agree
or not. So today, we honor not on-
ly the soldier of Vietnam, but the
society that was so tragically scar-
red by it. The war is over, but the
lessons are still being learned.
Thanks to all of you for making
America better.
Instructor E
OK, RONNIE, QAICg MORE, ,igUT7HlS VMS WITH miW.
Press Becomes Passive
Doonesbury
TRB
Tht N� Republic
Ten years after Watergate, the
American press seems to be losing its ap-
petite for scandal.
The first-ever indictment of a sitting
Cabinet member, Ray Donovan, has
stirred little interest. Curiosity about Ed
Meese's financial peccadilloes, a matter
of obsessive concern just a few months
ago, has been snuffed out by the deci-
sion of an "independent counsel" not to
seek an indictment. Most other papers
have recoiled from following The en
York Post and The Hall Street Journal
into the recesses of Geraldine Ferraro's
genealogy.
Here in Washington, our Post has
shown an amazing reticence about pur-
suing charges of possible cocaine use by
our mayor, Marion Barry. It's been a
long time since an important grand jury
has been allowed to go about its business
so utterly unmolested by the Post, which
in the good oJd days could keep allega-
tions of a minor congressman's unpaid
parking tickets on the front page for a
week.
The Barry story crept onto the bottom
of page one for a single Saturday when
the mayor (who is married) put out an
official statement explaining that his
regular visits to the home of a female
former aide and convicted cocaine
dealer were merely part of "a personal
relationship and not to buy drugs.
Then it disappeared. No "news
analysis no leaks, no editorials, no
follow-ups.
The Ferraro case seems to be a
turning point for the press. The Hall
Street Journal argues that this simply
proves a double standard: Journalists,
with their left-wing bias, apply their in-
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
MICHAEL. W'VE GOT
TO TALK TO HIM I
WONT PUT UP WITH
JJZONK
JUSTNEEPS
THS ANY LONGER'
a little morl
time 10 sort
HIS UFt OUT
SORT HIS LIFE OUT"
All H5 DOES IS LIE JJ 1
AROUND AND EAT'ITS PEALLY THINK
LIKE LIVING WITHA rWRZOVER-
TEENAGL REACTING
SON
IAMNOT0VBRR5-
ACTING1 ITSetGIN-
NING TO AFFECT
Ei'ER)' THING, MIKE -
OUR WORK OUR
MARJZIAGE, EVEN
OUR SEX LIFE'
PONT YOU
OF COURSE,
I CARS1
HEY. COUU? YOU
KEEP IT POUN IN
HERE? I'M�TRYING
TO WATCH TV
I'LL TALK TO
HIM IN THE
MORNING
NO IT CANT KEEP, ZONK
I'VE PUT THIS OFF TOO
LONG AS IT IS ITHASNT
BEEN FAIR TO ANY OF US
4r
I'M NOT SURE HOW TO SAY HCT
THIS, OLBUPPY. IDONTWAW
YOU TO TAKE IT THE WRONG
mtVrVtf
sou orf
we WERE
WONDERING
ABOUT YOUR i
PLANS
1
GOAHEAP,
ZONKERTELL
JJ. WHATYOU
JUSTT0LPMb
JJ.YVLM WORRIES
AREOVER.I'VEDE-
CIDBPTDGOWMEP
SCHOOL
' OH-HUH
AND I'M
JOINING HE
BOLSHOI.

vestigative skills and their pun?anicai
standards to conservatives, but let
liberals off the hook.
To correct that alleged imbalance, the
Journal editorial page has been conduc-
ting a parody of a Woodward-and-
Bernstein-style investigation of Ms Fer-
raro, fearlessu exposing shady business
practices by deceased relatives of her
husband, and suchlike matters, and
meanwhile opining unctuously that if
this sours people on the whole post-
Watergate morality, that is fine with The
H all Street Journal.
Clearly a double standard of some
sort is involved in the Post handling of
Barry. If he weren't black, and if the
Post hadn't promoted him from the ear-
ly days of his career, his troubles would
be getting more ink. But I sense that
cases like Ms. Ferraro's, and Meese's
too, have genuinely given journalists
pause.
They are unnerved by their own abili-
ty to plunge someone overnight into a
maelstrom of unwanted publicity and
legal expense. The renewed vigor of libel
plaintiffs, like Gen. William
Westmoreland and Sen. Paul I.axalt.
R-Nev has added worries of a more
practical sort as well. Even winning a
libel case can be an impoverishing "ex-
perience.
Aren't politicians entitled to some
privacy? Aren't some matters � sexual
habits, in-laws' improprieties � irrele-
vant to their official duties0 Aren't
others � a misstatement on page six,
line 17 of some form � a bit overblown'1'
Isn't there a danger of convktion-by-
newspaper, of trivializing the political
discourse, of driving interesting people
from public life and leaving us to be rul-
ed by antiseptic nerds?
Oh, sure. But you can get carried
away with restraint and discretion, too
Take, for example, the notion that
Meese has been "cleared" because an in-
dependent counsel appointed bv the at-
torney general decided not to indict him
President Reagan said this, adding that
the "baseless charges" against Meese
were "revealed as having no foundation
in fact The press seems to agree- the
story has died.
Jacob Stein, the independent counsel
ordinarily makes his living as a criminal
defense lawyer. The fact that a man who
spends most of his davs dreaming up
reasons why people aren't guiltv saw
nothing in the Meese case worth an in-
dictment doesn't mean the charges were
"baseless
As Stein emphasizes in his report, a
decision to indict depends on other fac-
tors besides whether a crime has been
committed. Subjective judgements
about the severity of the offense and the
difficulty of a conviction also play a
Campus Forum
Steiri rep - tke . zt
let that Meese did violate the I
disclosure laws in a fair!)
(not worth an
cepl "in the most egreg
EU1 not -
beyond able d a
finaiu .
seeking federa
More important, even if M
nothing criminal, � . csn I n
did nothing wrong. Stein i stenta
refuses to pass judgemei vl
ethics His J85-pagc i
Meese as, at the verv least, a m u
monumentally incurious ab i
perfect strangers are ea
favors. That is something �
sidering, surely, before all
become attornev genera!
Some might desci be ' I
as "�he appearance
But this hoary formula!
struck me as an unfair vop-o
accusation itself � when picl
the national media � is re-
appearance. If an official
anvthing actually wrong, he
be pilloried or punished. On
hand, if he has � and Mees
shouldn't be able to bej Ff b
ing an apology for crea ng
appearance.
The hang-up about il egalii
even the most excited
the press. Often the
what's illegal, but whu
largely, in a nostalgic
high Watergate style
persecuting the head
Emergency Management �
caught him attend s
fundraiser courtes) FEMA
suiting firm, which la
cv tor the cost. He a
with him, first class,
to conferences in Rom
Tel Avi and Mexico (
What I wonder is u
firm can charge you and 52.00
entertain a public scrvani
seems to spend half his
class to world glamoui
parently that's perfectly OK.
it's not a political fundraisc
leaves his wife at home
Don't lose heart, sleazemongers Nc
one is forced to become a p
no politician asserts his right
when the local paper shows up
photograph him leaving church ii
family. Of course investigative ze
go too far. But there's more dangei
it won't go far enough, denying us
information we need to hold our lei
to account and � not incidentally - de
nying us the innocent pleasure of wal
ching the mighty brought low
�. I�4. I nurd hnimm s��lK�ie Ik
I'M SERJOUS, JJ -tVE APPLIEP
TO THE BABY POC COLLEGE OF
PHYSICIANS, THE FINEST NEWMEP
SCHOOL IN All OF HAITI'
AND I PONT WANT TO SOUNP
COCKY OR ANYTHING, BUT I HAVE
EVERY REASON TO BELIEVE THAT
tM A SHOO-IN I
IP0N7
KWU.SR
I'VE NEVER
SEEN6RA0ES
UKE THESE
IDONT CARE, DEAN
HONEY UENEEP HIM
TDSHORE UP THE
VOLLEYBALL SQUmO'

V
What Year Is It?
Well, the elections are over, the
ballots have all been cast and the duly
elected government is solidly entrench-
ed with popular support. The country
is glowing with a growing sense of
patriotism and national pride.
The government leaders see a man-
date from the people to elevate the
country's position in world politics.
Plans are being formulated to regain
political control of neighboring coun-
tries which are in the hands of their
enemies.
There is a growing militarism stem-
ming from the humiliating results of
past adventures and a "we're tired of
being pushed around" mentality. The
youth of the nation who are too young
to remember the horrors of war sup-
port this idea in increasing numbers.
The Christian clergy are taking a
growing role in politics. Officials and
private citizens alike are having their
religious leanings scrutinized
Even the normally enlightened en-
vironment of universitv campuses is
swept up m the fervor as students
eagerly embrace the regime and its
ideals.
The year. 1933. The place: Germany,
trunk about it.
David Beard
Graduate, Maritime History
and Underwater Research
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building.

rm
B ELAINE PERU!
vff Vknwr
It's time to whip out
Number 2 pencil and critiJ
your favorite professor. J
structor evaluations for
1984-85 school year are
ducted this eek
A-cording to Angel
inceUor for Acaden
fairs, the evaluations are
valuable experience for both
Resolutl
By JENNIFER JENDRASIA1
The Student C

irolina ii
i
sion � Nicaraf
The resolul
Chape. H kU!
ed and fl u
mast it an inv
e. It pa
�v " '
Students As
To Aid VVorl
By JENNIFER JENDRASM
s.� �

hu: gi
during the annual I
America Fa j
I
ccording Mil Ha
coordina-
ticipants fas t
me
they -
Oxfam America.
Hamei
Amet
vide self-he.p -J
countries and aic in r-
as digging wells, mal
countries "indcpendei
thar dcp�ndcm on forcer 2
Money 1 fast w

Post-Mortei
Forum
Scheduled
Election Dav
Thi. m. at a "Pv
I
the Departme:
Science and Historv The
� � m
Charles P
fessoi � p
I Nv re sboro, an
Johns
political science a vs
Wilm b
A look a -
Election Da '
Thursd.i
Morten lie N ind N
tional Elections" ed b
the Departments of P.
Science and History The
will be the as
forums
Charles P:
lessor of pohtica
I NC-Greenshoro. and v
Johnston, ass. ssot
political
Wilmington, will ia:rne
broad
Republican
and the
OtTlFT CUTLET OUTLET OU
1
a Belvoir
S Factory Outlel
c
5 & Fi
Get reach for
PANA1
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g church with his
stigative zeal can
s more danger that
igh, denying us the
ed to hold our leaders
identally � de-
� pleasure of wat-
ight low.
nra sndMair. la
ar Is It?
�'e in politics. Officials and
alike are having their
pous leanings scrutinized.
the normally enlightened en-
nment of un.versitv campuses is
1f- up in the fervor as students
eagerly embrace the regime and its
The vear: 1933. The place: Germany.
Think about it.
David Beard
Graduate, Maritime History
and Underwater Research
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Publica-
tions Building.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 13, 1S�84
Instructor Evaluations This Week
Where Do You Stand, Prof?
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff V rtlCf
It's time to whip out the
Number 2 pencil and critique
your favorite professor, as in-
structor evaluations for the
1984 85 school year are con-
ducted this week.
According to Angelo Volpe,
vice chancellor for Academic Af-
fairs, the evaluations are "a
valuable experience for both the
students and the teachers
The students are given the
chance to an opinion concerning
classroom instruction while the
instructor is given important
feedback on lectures. "It is a way
for the instructor to be made
aware of things Volpe said.
The evaluations are used as one
piece of the total faculty evalua-
tion process. Volpe said "after
running the evaluation five or six
times, you get a general
baseline However, he also
stressed that "other data" is im-
portant when making personnel
decisions.
Only individual professors and
department chairmen receive the
results of the evaluation.
The Teacher of the Year
awards are given based solely on
the evaluations. The two pro-
fessors receiving the highest
evaluation are given the award.
Last year's recipients were Holly
Matthews, Anthropology and
Don Biehn, Theatre Arts.
The Teaching Effectiveness
Committee, headed by Belinda
Lee, School of Nursing, is in the
process of looking at the evalua-
tion form and the possibility of
modifying it.
The evaluation forms are
distributed every year, alter-
nating spring and fall semesters.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
SI90 Abortion from 13 to 18 ecks at addi-
tional cost Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling For fur-
ther information call 832-0535 (Toll Free
Number 1-800-532-5384) between 9AM and
5PM weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
f17WMtMof�o�Sr.
Resolution Passed Concerning Invasion
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nt�s f dllor
The Student Government
legislature at the University of
North Carolina in Chapel Hill
passed a resolution last week pro-
posing that classes be called off in
the event of a United States inva-
sion of Nicaragua.
The resolution also asked for
Chapel Hill businesses to be clos-
ed and flags to be flown at half-
mast if an invasion were to take
place. It passed by a vote of 11-0,
with two members abstaining.
The 25-member council re-
quires a minimum of 13 students
for quorom. Five members left
the council meeting in an attempt
to break the quorom, but the
members remaining were suffi-
cient for the resolution to pass.
ECU SGA President John
Rainey said the vote was discuss-
ed at this weekend's meeting of
the University of North Carolina
Association of Student Govern-
ments in Chapel Hill. He said
several members of the UN-
CASG, which is composed of
SGA presidents from the 16
schools in the UNC system, felt
they would have protests on their
campuses in the event of an inva-
sion, but nothing on a "big
scale
"My personal feeling is that
when the chief executive of this
country does something, we have
to support him in most cases
Rainey said.
"I don't agree with that (the
resolution). You need to look at
the whole picture before you start
making statements like thaj he
added.
Students Asked To Fast
To Aid World Hunger
Supply Store between 10 a.m.
and 3 p.m. Thursday. In addi-
tion, a table will be set up
Wednesday to provide informa-
tion about the fast and Oxfam
America. Donations will also be
taken at that time.
Hamer added that a group of
campus ministers will be holding
a campus-wide fast at the same
time to provide money for those
suffering from the drought in
Ethiopia.
"The fast is scheduled so close
to Thanksgiving for a reason
Hamer said. "We need to be
mindful of a lot of people who
don't have enough to eat
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Sc�! Ha .i
ECU students are being asked
to help provide food for the
hungry through their own fasting
during the annual Oxfam
America Fast for World Hunger
this Thursday.
According to Mike Hamer,
coordinator for the fast, par-
ticipants fast for one or two
meals and then donate the money
the would have spent on food to
Oxfam America.
Hamer said the money Oxfam
America receives is used to pro-
vide self-help in many different
countries and aid in projects such
as digging wells, making the
countries "independent rather
than dependent on foreign aid
Money for the fast will be col-
lected in front of the Student
Post-Mortem
Forum
Scheduled
A look at what happened on
Flection Day will be discussed
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at a "Post
Mortem on the N.C. and Na-
tional Elections" sponsored by
the Departments of Political
Science and History. The forum
will be the last in a series of three
forums.
Charles Prsyby, associate pro-
fessor of political science at
IN(-Greensboro, and W. Lee
Johnston, associate professor of
political science at UNC-
Wilmington
A look at what happened on
Flection Day will be discussed
Thursday at 7:30 p.m. at a "Post
Mortem on the N.C. and Na-
tional Elections" sponsored by
the Departments of Political
Science and History. The forum
w ill be the last in a series of three
forums.
Charles Prsyby, associate pro-
fessor of political science at
UNC-Greensboro, and W. Lee
Johnston, associate professor of
political science at UNC-
Wilmington, will examine the
broad implications of the
Republican landslide in the state
and the nation.
OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUT O
H
O

H
O
Miss M.S.O. Pageant
There will be a meeting of all you ladies in-
terested in becoming contestants for the Miss
M.S.O. Pageant. The meeting will be held on
Wednesday Nov. 14, 1984 in Mendenhall Room
242. Crowning of Pageant Queen will take place
at the 1st Annual Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Ball,
on January 12, 1985. The winner will repre-
sent the M.S.O. for such events as Balls,
Homecoming, etc. All serious minded young ladies
please come out and support an organization thats
working for you!
SSQghtclub
presents
Wednesday Night
Greenville's Newest Ladies
Lock Out
All Ladies Free
Free Draft & Wine
75CHighballs
9:00 to 10:30
After 10:30 First 50 guys get in for $1.00
Added Attraction:
The Female Dorm With The Most Members Present
At 12:00 Wins A Free Social With All The Trimm-
ings.
Beau's is a private dub for members A guests only
All ABC Permits. Memberships available at the door.
LAMES
The ECU
RUGBY TEAM
will serui ou
free DRAFT
VMM
until KPM
AM)
There is free
VAN PICK UP
75X
Ever Wed.
TWO,(cowl them) 2 KEGS
will be given away to the
Sororit with the biggest-
turnout!
557Q
I6p4() Rock
Funk&
Beach
DRAWING COMING SOON!
for SlOO gift certificate AND a $50 certificate
must be present to win from Vil
Virginia
CraRree
Dont Forget! Evm TWvkv tM.KC and the C.O.H. hnn� voo FREE BKF.R ALL NIGHT plus H
FREE TR ANSR R I ATION! Call us (� mow mto. 758-5570. I I
PMA'f CLUB FOfl Mt Mb H 4 GufcSIS
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Thurs & Fr. M
loms sTbqo �
SPOUTS WCAN lr & �VA �'WCAU
Located BcMMMfl B�1h�l & Tarhoro on Hny 64
Hours 9 S Mon Sat We Accept Vrva & Mastercard
We Also Wholesale
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PANAMA JACK ORGINAL'S
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HA VE YOU VISITED OUR NEW STORE ON HWY. 64
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OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET OUTLET
KINGSTON
PLACE
The most exclusive address in Greenville.
Completely furnished and accessorized
with the finest interior appointments and
exceptional amenities for the serious stu-
dent.
It's a very special condominium com-
munity. Private, convenient, and available
now for rent or purchase.
� Rent: $150.00 per month per student
(75Cmore per day than the dorm)
� Purchase: Under $60,000 about Vi the price per
square foot than the other student
condominiums.
Please stop by our office at
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Call 757-1971 for more information
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i






I HI EAS1 CAROI INKS
Entertainment
NOVEMBER 13.1�W '�t
Classifieds
Columbia Spends X-mas In India
SALE
James Fox and Jud Dais in a scene from A Passage to India, a deepl personal slorj of love and class struggle in 1928 India.
Columbia Pictures heralds the
1984 season with the long-awaited
return of a master filmmaker to
the screen, with the arrival of a
kindly alien to our planet and with
the reunion of a pair of talents
who promise ten times the laughs
this Christmas.
Oscar-winner David Lean
returns to filmmaking after a
14-year absence with A Passage to
India, an emotional and deeply
personal story of love and class
struggle in 1928 India. Based on
the classic novel by E.M. Forster,
Judy Davis stars as a young
English woman caught between
the allure of the exotic India
lifestyle and her own strict upbr-
inging. Written and directed by
Lean and shot on location in India
and England, the film also stars
Dame Peggy Ashcroft, Sir Alec
Guinnes, Victor Banerjee and
James Fox. John Brabourne and
Richard Goodwin produced. A
Passage to India premiers in three
cities on Dec. 14 and opens in ad-
ditional markets throughout Jan.
Also opening on Dec. 14 is
John Carpenter's Starman, a
romantic adventure with Jeff
Bridges starring as an alien who
comes to earth and clones the
form of the recently deceased hus-
band of an attractive young
widow, played by Karen Allen.
The tv.o embark on a cross
country chase, pursued by oern-
ment officials and end up, much
to their surprise, falling deeply in
love. Directed by John Carpenter,
the film also stars Charles Martin
Smith and Richard Jaeckel. Larry
J Franco produced and Barry
Bernardi co-produced from a
screenplay by Bruce A Lans and
R a y n o 1 d Gideon. Michael
Douglas is execume producer.
Then, on Dec. 21, Dudley
Moore and director Blake Ed-
wards reunite for the romantic
comedy Micki & Maude The
team who last scored such a huge
hit with 10 no join to tell the
story of one man's frenied at-
tempt to have the best of both
worlds as his wife and his
girlfriend become pregnant at the
same time. Ann Reinking stars as
Moore's wife, a successful lawyer
who is too busy to give him the
one thing he desperately wants
a child. Amy Irving stars as the
sweet and vulnerable cellist vuh
whom Moore has an affair anj
ends up marryingalso. Richard
Mulligan also stars in the film,
produced by Tony Adams from a
screenplay by Jonathan Reynolds
Jonathan D. Krane and Lou An-
tonio are executive producers.
Vacations: Coping With Eating Disorders
B LEIGH COHN
Mom students look forward to holiday vacations as a joyful time
foi reunions and large family meals; but, for people with eating
disorders, these instead may be times for confrontations, lies, and
painful anxiety. Bulimia, which is characterized b binge purge
behavior, and anorexia nervosa, a less common but related condi-
tion of self-siarvation, are dangerous epidemics affecting between
2 to 33 percent of college-aged women (also man) men). Lnder or-
dinary circumstances, their lives are dominated by low self-esteem,
g.nerahed fear, and obsessive thoughts about food. During the
holidays, however, these feelings are intensified. With a wetl-
ihought-oul plan and plenty of motivation, these individuals can
use this time ot: to start a program tor recoverv.
Although the underlving causes varv, eating disorders typically
begin tor psychological reasons and become addictive. Most cases
women with unrealistically high expectations of achievement,
especially concerning their own appearance and weight. The initial
bingo might be triggered by specific events, such as moving away
from home, rejection by a lover, or family pressures. The behavior
�arts as a way of dieting or in reaction to a failed diet. It
becomes a numbing, drug-like coping mechanism that provides ins-
tant relief for emotional pain or boredom. Bulimics often binge on
eeral thousand calories after eating what they feel to be one bite
too many at a meal. Since they have eaten more than they
"should" anyway, they go ahead and binge, knowing that they will
later force themselves to vomit or abuse laxatives. These purges
confuse body signals causing extremely low blood sugar levels, elec-
trolyte imbalances, and cravings for more sugary foods. This cycle
perpetuates itself, dangerously upsets normal digestion, and fur-
ther complicates the original psychological reasons for hinging.
Lindsev Hall, who cured herself after nine years of bulimia, has
co-written three booklets on this subject, which ate used in more
than 500 colleges and universities She writes in her first booklet,
Eat Without hear, "1 hinged up to foul and five times a dav after
the third year. IThere were very few days �� ru My vision
often became blunv and 1 had intense he i . What used to be
passing dizziness and weakness al ime walking
into doorjams and exhaustion vl. � r and I was
often constipated. I arge blood I appeared in the back oi mv
mouth. Mv teeth were a rness ' The rcseai I in which her
third booklet. Heating Bulimia. i based, documents other bulimics
who were hospitalized, had miscarriages, and � ent more than 20
years struggling ith t�vd. Between seven and nine die due to car
diac arrest, kidney failure, r in paired metaboli
Dr. lean Rubel. president ol Anorexia N. : Related
Eating Disorders (ANRED), a non-profit oi ation which
serves as a national clearing-house oi infoi d re! rrals,
observes that college students comm til fal I fo
pro-
blems, "Students are vulnerable to a cycl of stress i nt in the
structure of the school year rhere is a se ' m home and
all that is familiar, anxiety resulting from having to make new
friends and learn one's wav round campus, plus classwork and
studies which pile pressure on top ol stress. I1 the while women
are being vigilant about presenting to the world an immaculate,
thin appearance. Many students resort to disordered eating in ef-
forts to gam some peace and release.
"That student returns home, perhaps still preoccupied with pro-
blems at school, to find a different set of pressures and expecta-
tions awaiting. To further complicate matters, holidays are tradi-
tionally times of feasting. Foi someone who is already tcnitied of
weight gain, who is craving rich food after a period of dieting, the
prospect of spending time around large amounts of easily available
food is frightening indeed
Students with food obsessions can use the holiday break from
school to begin to get better, though recovery is rarelv quick or
easy. Dr. Rubel recommends that students be aware of the
pressures awaiting them at home and make detailed plans for how
to cope with them. They should set reasonable goals foi
themselves, such as planning non-food related activities, perhaps
by setting a limit for weight gain, or avoiding specific incidents that
may trigger binges. She adds, "If you do slip back into a food
behavior, remind yourself it does not mean vour plan is not effec-
tive. It merely shows you a place to make some revisions so you can
more easily achieve your goals
Most who are cured find that the commicment to ecrtme hefrer is
made easier with the important first step of confiding in someone
who can help. Vacation lime may provide the perfect setting
getting support from friends or family members, who are often
understanding and compassionate, despite the sufferer's fears ol
rejection. However, even with the help of loved ones, overcoming
bulimia or anorexia nervosa may require professional therapy and
medical treatment. Without proper attention, the behavior does
not suddenly end and can continue for a lifetime.
Lindsev Hall's bulimia developed into a daily habit during her
college years, and now she regularly speaks to students who are
struggling with food. She emphasizes her success at overcoming
bulimia rather than dwelling on her suffering, "I am now able to
enjoy growing, touching, tasting, smelling, and eating food
without the temptation to binge Ms. Hall asserts, "the best
Christmas present that people with eating disorders can give
themselves is to make a devoted effort to end their food
obsessions
Lei$M C ihn hj pu?il nrrr bookieti jnd tt:urea titn .f . - - � a
Theatre Festival Opens
On Friday and Saturday, Nov.
16 and 17, the ECU Department
if Theatre Arts will host Region I
of the North Carolina Secondary
School Theatre Festival in
McGinnis Theatre.
Twelve one-act plays will be
presented throughout the two
days. Immediately following each
performance there will be a criti-
que by two adjudicators. At the
conclusion of the festival on
Saturday a number of awards will
be presented, including Best Ac-
tor and Actress, Distinguished
Achievement in Directing, and
two plays will be selected to go on
to the state-wide festival set for
December in Greensboro.
The production schedule for
Friday, Nov. 16, is:
2 p.m. Plymouth High School �
"Mike's Case"
3 p.m. Garner Senior High
School � "The Passion of
Amoroso"
4 p.m. South I enoir High School
� "Hospital"
5 p.m. Plymouth High School �
"Crawling Arnold"
The production schedule for
Saturday, Nov. 17, is:
9 a.m. Williamston High School
� "Identity Crisis"
10 a.m. Beddingfield High
School � "Cowboy's Capers"
11 a.m. John T. Hoggard High
School � "Take Five"
3 p.m. Beddingfield High School
� "Roomers"
4 p.m. John T. Hoggard High
School � "The Martydom of
Peter Ohey"
5 p.m. West Brunswick High
School � TBA
The general public is invited to
attend all activities throughout
the festival and admission is free.
For further information, call
757-6390.
Ugly Bartender Sought
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Featare Ullor
Ever wonder who the ugliest
bartender in Greenville is? Well,
you will soon have your say in the
matter because beginning Nov.
19, the Panhellenic Council will
be sponsoring ECU's first
"Ugliest Bartender Contest
Panhallenic President Cindy
Fairbanks explained that various
Greenville bars (about 13), will
each sponsor one bartender.
From Nov. 19-21, jars with the
bartenders' pictures will be set up
at the Student Supply Store. On
Nov. 25 they will be moved to the
various bars until Dec. 3. For a
donation, you can cast your vote.
Jars will be collected on Dec. 3
and the winner will be announced
after votes are tabulated.
All proceeds are going to
Muscular Dystrophy. When ask-
ed whether the winner would be
offended by the "honor Fair-
banks replied that the contest is
"just a fun thing. This is free
publicity for the guys as well
she added.
The winner will be announced
in the Dec. 4 issue of The East
Carolinian.
Fialkowska
Pianist Visiting Campus
Janina Fialkowska
The ECU Artists Series Com-
mittee continues its 1984-1985
season with the appearance of
one of the few female pianists of
the new generation with an inter-
national career. Janina
Fialkowska will perform her con-
cert in Wright Auditorium on
Monday, Nov. 19 at 8 p.m.
Fialkowska is fast becoming
the standard by which other
youthful pianists are measured.
She was a top prize winner in the
First International Arthur
Rubenstein Master Piano Com-
petition in September 1974 in
Israel. Among the world-
renowned pianists who judged
the competition was Arthur
Rubenstein himself. Maestro
Rubenstein was so impressed
with Miss Fialkowska's masterful
playing that he became her men-
tor, and subsequently advisor
and friend.
Since the Rubenstein competi-
tion, the Canadian-born pianist
has appeared with a great number
of orchestras across Canada,
Mexico and the United States.
She also played extensively in
Europe and Israel.
Born to a Canadian mother
and a Polish father in Montreal,
Fialkowska started studying the
piano with her mother at the age
of five. Eventually she entered
the Ecole Musique Vincent d'ln-
dy, studying under the tutelage of
Mile. Yvonne Hubert. The
University of Montreal awarded
her both Bachelor and Master of
Music degrees by the time she was
17.
The next year, 1969, her career
was jolted by two events: winning
first prize in the Radio Canada
National Talent Festival and her
journey to Paris to study with
Yvonne Lefebure.
In 1970 she entered the
Juilliard School of Music in New
York, where she studied with
Sascha Gorodnitzki and has since
become his assistant.
Aside from her successful
recital and orchestral perfor-
mances, Fialkowska has made
two highly acclaimed recordings
for RCA Records: an all-Lizst
record and an all-Chopin record.
The Lizst record prompted the
critic from Grammophone
Magazine to remark, "she is a
pianist in several thousand
Tickets for the Janina
Fialkowska concert are available
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center;
telephone 757-6611, ext. 266. The
Ticket Office is open Monday-
Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Ticket
prices are $4 for ECU students
and a guest, $4 for Youth (age 14
and under), $8 for ECU faculty
and staff and $8 for the public.
All tickets will be $8 at the door.
Group rates are also available.
CABBAGE PATCH DOLL FOR
SALE Girl doll not an in ra1
SI25 Call 758 9516 or 758 9691
FOR RENT: 2 bedroom apt
from ECU $310 per month ana I
deposit Aa laoie Dec I 758
after 4 p ��
FOR SALE: CuSton
table $2 K - ig s ze -vaterped
$200 Call 758 0668 after 5
FOR SALE Elecl
case rea Fender pi
Pre &'� $350 C
after 5p "�
ME
WANTED
MALE NEEDS ROOMMATE
snare furn shed I
washer drfer Pi
bath, 5 min .
mor"
nights
ROOMMATE WANTED
Preferably gr-
mature a JuH
Two bedroom I
and jl � es Ca
757 9965
FEMALE ROOMMATE vVANTED
Rent $150 a
utilities G&
Prefer someone for
mer sessions Ca
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
to share I
'ownhouse, SI62 5C r,
Available Jan 1 Ca
ROOMMATE WANTED
room in ver co-
located across Strer- -
� " - split 5 ways C
758 747C
THANKSGIVING IN K E A Yi
See A Chorus L re C
Call 752 4013 0' 756 -
"LOWEST PRICES II
OneY
Warra
Against Factory De
Parts Of The
Spring Hinge
Metal Spring Hinge FRAMES I
With Single Vision Lenses
irVith Line Bifocals
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India
ka v Mien
ark �" a cross
ed b govern-
, much
ng deeph in
v penter,
Cha es Ma
r a :ck i ai s
Barn
a
Bru� I ans and
aie
A Mit Hit
ai
Mh
- is
rders
wska
ting Campus
Hubert The
� si mtreal awarded
noth Bachelor and Master oi
leg le time she was
The ear, 1969, her career
edl two events: winning
firs' prize in the Radio Canada
National Talenr Festival and her
irne tc Paris to studv with
nne Lefebure.
�"0 she entered the
Juilliard School of Music in New
le York, where she studied with
r Sascha Gorodnitzki and has since
become his assistant.
Aside from her successful
recital and orchestral perfor-
mances, Fialkowska has made
two highly acclaimed recordings
for RCA Records, an all-Lizsi
record and an all-Chopin record.
The Lust record prompted the
critic from Grammophone
Magazine to remark, "she is a
pianist in several thousand "
Tickets for the Janma
Fialkowska concert are available
at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center;
telephone 757-661 l.ext. 266. The
Ticket Office is open Monday-
Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Ticket
prices are $4 for ECU students
and a guest, $4 for Youth (age 14
and under), $8 for ECU faculty
and staff and $8 for the public
All tickets will be $8 at the door
Group rates are also available

Classifieds
SALE
CABBAGE PATCH DOLL FOR
SALE: Girl doll not an imitation
v !5 Call 758 9516 or 758 9691
FOR RENT 2 Dedroom apt 2 blocks
from tCti $310 per month and $310
deposit Available Dec I 758 0329
�"er 4pm
FOR SALE: Custom built drawing
�able $200 King size waterbed
$200 Call 758 0868 after 5 p.m.
FOR SALE: Electric bass guitar m
ise red Fender precision special
pre amp $350 Call 758 4807
5pm
WANTED
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ire furnished trailer. Air Cond ,
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ith 5 mmutes from campus $150
u1 i ties included. 756 5I97
ihts
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and utilities Call 757 2884 or
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SECRET POET: Your words did not
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as I revealed myself to you. Noire
Dentelle
TO MY LOVE: Happy Anniversary!
Thirteen is our lucky number
because we are different! I love you!
Diamonds are forever! J'taime!
Pumpkin.
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS:
Thanks to all of you that made it to
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MINESTI
THE PHI TAUS: Would like to thank
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an excellent pig cookin exhibition!
That was good eatin! I think we im
pressed a few of those Northern
Boys too
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and make plans to go see the Red
skins and the Dolphins in the Super
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and watch it with the rest of the
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TRICIA: Drenched by "The Wave
I deserved both the birds and the
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v

I






I HI EASTCAROI 1N1AN
Sports
NOl MBER M. 14
! . �
Southern Miss
Stuns ECU, 31-2 7
Bv RANDVMEWS
Sports Mih.f
Reserve quarterback Andrew Anderson
ompleted seven of 14 passes and two
i, hdowns to lead Southern Miss to a 31-27
cton over ECU Saturday in licklen
adium.
nderson had only completed one pass
re season prior to ECL's season
tie, but aginst the Pirates he connected
with I yneal Alston for scoring strikes,
e ladder being the game winner with 4:28
taining in the fourth quarter.
1 he Pirates dominated everv statistical
tegory, most noticeably accumulating 505
ds worth of total offense compared to on-
216 yards for USM.
EC U, however, was plagued by a school
cord 14 penalties for 106 yards and a costly
turnovers. Return specialist Andrew
ion also added spark to an unimpressive at-
k as he picked up 96 return yards, 66 of
Inch came on a third quarter touchdown
ha! narrowed the margin to 27-17.
Although Emory gave credit to Southern
iss tot what he called a "great comeback
vas obviously upset with the officiating.
ight the officials did a terrible job
ion said. "They were the most prejudic-
ii disciplined group I've ever seen
�' ' ' 's lack lit regard for the rules also
�.disciplined at times, but the
s still seemed to have the game under
when ihev forged to a 24-3 lead with
aining in the first half. Pirate
tick Ron Jones, however, fumbled
ball on his 2S-vard line giving ISM a
�pportunity to add a quick score
t the
n obliged, as it took the budding
� e plays to guide his team into the
! ' mchdown came on Ander-
touchdown pass to Alston, this
17 yards out.
i (ones allowed the Eagles to gel
into the game just before the second
tei had expired, he played a respectable
' ill as he was starting in his first game
irterback since Sept. 8.
got the Pirates moving on thier first
Pirates Set
possession as Jimmy Walden broke loose for
43 yards to quickly move the ball into USM
territory. ECU continued their march
towards the goal line with relative ease until
they were called for holding and confronted
with a thrid and seven. But Walden got free
again, this time ripping off a 21-yard gain
that gave ECU first and goal inside the five
and set up a Reggie Branch touchdown
plunge.
The Pirates got on the board less than a
minute later when Eagle starting quarter-
back Tommy Compton fumbled the ball on
his team's third play from scrimmage. ECU
was unable to pick up a first down, but settl-
ed for a Jeff Heath field goal to make it
10-0.
Mott returned the ensuing kickoff 46
yards, but the Eagles could only manage to
pick up one first down, settling for a field
goal of thier own to narrow the margin to
10-3.
The Pirates then looked invincible as im-
pressive running by senior fullback Reggie
Branch and Walden enabled the Pirates to
drive the length of the field on two con-
secutive possessions and build what looked
like an insurmountable 24-3 lead.
USM's touchdown in the final minutes of
the first half seemed to add life to the
Southern Miss attack as the Eagles scored
two straight touchdowns on Mott's punt
return and a four-play. 74-yard drive that
was highlighted by a 54-yard reception by
Alston on a halfback-option pass.
The Pirates picked up another Heath field
goal along the way, but thai wasn't enough
as another fumble spelled doom for the
Bucs. Bubba Bunn coughed up the ball near
midfieid with about six minutes remaining in
the contest, setting up the Anderson to
Alston game-winning touchdown.
Eagle Coach Jim Carmodv called his
team's victory the greatest comeback in the
history of Sou!hern Miss since he's been
associated with the university, while ECU
closes out an extremely disappointing season
at 2-9 � the worst record for a Pirate foot-
ball team since 1957 when they posted a 1-8
record.
Mlfe
Pirate receiver Ricky Nichols goes up for a pass while being
harrassed b a Southern Mississippi defender.
The Pirates lost a heartbreaker
at Ficklen stadium on Saturdav
Defi
to the Gulden Eagles 31-27
to finish the season 2-9
B RICK McCORMAC
suff Wntrr
�. year Lady Pirate basket-
coach Emily Manwaring
could enjoy considerable success
in her season debut as two ECAC
South all-conference players as
well as five other letter winners
return from last year.
Sylvia Bragg returns for her
junior season after leading the
team with a 13.4 scoring average
The Lady Pirate basketball team is set to defend its ECAC-South title when they swing into action this
month. New head coach Emily Manwaring returns two all-conference players and five lettermen.
and earning all-conference
honors in just her second year.
Bragg was second on the team
in both assists with 54, and steals
with 49. She led the Lady Pirates
in scoring in 13 of 29 games, and
is in 10th place on the career scor-
ing list with 646 points in only
two seasons.
Junior forward Lisa Squirewell
also made all-conference as a
sophomore. She led the Lady
Pirates in rebounding, pulling
down 6.6 rebounds per game. She
also had the highest field goal
percentage on the team at 50.3
percent.
Also returning is senior An-
nette Phillips, who started every
game last year and set a school
record for minutes played with
1,091. Phillips was the team's se-
cond leading rebounder and
played every minute in 12 games.
Letter winner Anita Anderson
also returns for her senior season
after leading the Lady Pirates in
blocked shots last year. AndeF-
son, hampered by injuries last
year, showed what she can do
against James Madison last
season when she scored 21 points
and pulled down 14 rebounds.
Sophomore letter winner Jody
Rodriquez was also bothered by-
injuries during the first half of
last season. But over the last ten
games she averaged 9.3 points-
per-game, and had her best
outing in the championship game
of the ECAC-South tourney
when she poured in a career high
17 points.
Crystal Grier, a sophomore
who started the last three games
of last season, lettered last year
and is an excellent defensive
player. If she doesn't start, she'll
surely be a factor coming off the
bench.
Lorraine Foster also returns
after missing last season. Foster
lettered two seasons ago and is
one of the flashier players on the
team.
Alma Bethea is one of four
freshmen on this years team.
While at Goldsboro, the six-foot
Bethea led her high school team
to the final four all three years,
winning the state championship
her sophomore year. She earned
all-conference honors and was an
honorable mention All-America
her senior year.
Monique Pompih is a 5-10
freshman from Fayettcviile.
Pompih led Reid Ross to the state
championship last year, while be-
ing selected L PI and AP all-state,
as well as honorable mention All-
America.
Freshman Shelly Ridgeway of
Rio Grande, N.J is a 5 guard
who led her Middle Township
High School team to the South
Jersey State Championship. She
letterd all four years in high
school and was a member of the
all-south Jersey and Cape Atlan-
Title
League a
Via iVatras
guard from N
Maine Watras �a
All-An
n in 1984 She
female a:hie:e oi the yeai
Mount Desert Island H -
and was the first p
female to score 1,000
points at her scl
This year's adv. Pirate
should have a very gen
their are a numbei
players, and man ol :r
versatile enough to play
than one posit
ECU Lady Netters
Finish Fall At 5-2
Bv TONY BROWN
sufr Writer
Greatly improved play by the
ECU women's tennis team during
the just concluded fall portion of
the season resulted in a 5-2 dual
meet record, along with a cham-
pionship in the six-team Eastern
Collegiate Invitational Tourna-
ment.
The Lady Pirates have already
gained two more victories than
the entire season last year and
more than doubled last year's fall
season total wins. They are the
only intercollegiate team at ECU
with a winning mark so far this
year.
"Every player greatly improv-
ed said Coach Pat Sherman.
"Everyone played to their full
potential. I'm very, very pleased
with their play
Every player came through the
fall season with a winning singles
record, led by Ann Manderfield
at the number two seed with an
8-2 mark and Janet Russell as the
top seed with a 5-3 record. They
both shared a 6-1 record in
doubles. Kris Sammons was
undefeated in four mat hes as the
number three seed.
Karla Hoyle helped the Pirate
cause in the lower seeds at 7-3,
while Sheila Feeley posted a 5-2
and Ty Myers a 5-3 record as the
third fourth seeded players. Susie
Brown ended a; 4-3 id Susai
Montjov 3-2.
Feeley and Mver- c
for a 6-2 number two d lib .
mark, with Myers adding
more with Karla Hoyle
Janet Russell's 5-3 pel
mance was outstanding i- view
her number one seeded pos
She amassed her wins against the
best competition Ed faced. The
value of her performance mav be
keenly felt in the spring portion
of the '8485 season. "Rusve
may not be able to play in the spr-
ing stated Coach Sherman
"She is in the nursing program
and may find it necessarv to con-
centrate on her studies
"This is one reason the depth
we showed in the fall could really
mean a lot to us in the spring If
Russell is unable to play, each
person will have to move up one
seed
Coach Sherman is looking for
a good spring, but some dark
clouds may have an effect on the
team's play. In addition to
Russell's possible absence, two
players previously expected to re-
join the team after academic dif-
ficulties will not be elgibte in the
spring.
"We are expecting continued
progress in '85 Sherman said
"The tough schedule will help us
improve for the spring.
�eB�w�
� �ii
r
Third R
B JF ANNETTE RO I H
As fall semester nas headed in-
to the the home stretch, so have
intramural fall activities The
most recent intramural cham-
pionship was held on the football
fields as four co-rec team � �
around for all-campus h
Playing m the fina
game a- season favorite
Regiment and the thrnnjtors.
The Eliminators lived up t
name as they knocked
Spoilers in semit.
Schoonover
HAMPTON
NASCAR Grand N
Terry Schoono � .
his second stax
tracks, uas kille I
wreck during the
500 at v anta
Raceway
NASCAR -r �
W'ilhan laid Sen
Royal Palm Beach. 1
nounced dead
Georgia BaptK H
p.m.
-Tn this pi
hospital listed
massive head
juries Willian
Earnhardt woi
The last drivei
cuit was Rick) �
during a 125-mile qu
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7
V
i






i hn Ti "Hgi�i-i
��T� �'�W� I - lev PTlA� La
the Golden Ragles 31-27
tmih ihf season 2t.
Title
a 5-11
1 irl
. reer
more
dy Netters
all At 5-2
M-
ined
ma
lull
sed

Ian
I
lev
the
�i .
mding in . � �
-
1 the
iced The
erformance ma be
Pring rtion
� � �" on. "R .
no? beabletopla.

in the nursing ;
and ma find
ne reason the depth
e showed in the fall could reallv
' us in the spring It
k � ' unable to plav. each
person will have to mi
Sherman is looking for
a good spring, but some dark
clouds may have an effect on the
team's play n addition to
Russell's possible absence t.
players previously expected to re-
join the team after academic dif-
ficulties will not be elgible in the
spring.
"We are expecting continued
progress ,n '85 Sherman said
The tough schedule will help us
improve for the spring.
T
f
Third Regiment Wins Crown
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBI K )� 1984
ByJEANNETTEROTH
JMIWiMa
As fall semester has headed in-
to the the home stretch, so have
intramural fall activities. The
most recent intramural cham-
pionship was held on the football
fields as four co-rec teams kicked
around for all-campus honors.
Playing in the final co-rec
game was season favorite Third
Regiment and the Eliminators.
The Eliminators lived up to their
name as they knocked out the
Spoilers in semifinal action. No.
1 ranked Third Regiment
defeated Chaos, winning their
half of the single elimination
bracket. The final game was
plagued with rough play as
members of both teams sustained
injuries. Third Regiment stan-
dout Ginger Rothermel fell vic-
tim to a broken finger during a
passing play as the competitive
spirit ran high on the field.
Despite these few dark moments,
Third Regiment was still able to
pull the plug on the Eliminators.
The Regiment was able to once
again clinch an IRS champion-
ship in co-rec flag football.
Racquetball closed out its
season crowning open and in-
termediate champions. In the in-
termediate division, David Patten
came out on top with Raymond
Song taking open division top
honors.
In volleyball action, women's
sorority division Sigma Sigma
Sigma lead the league with two
wins. Independent division
Spikers, Destitutes, Figments and
Enforcers, head up the ladies
Schoonover Dies At Atlanta Track
HAMPTON, Ga. (UPI) �
NASCAR Grand National driver
Terry Schoonover, making only
his second start on the major
tracks, was killed Sunday in a
wreck during the Atlanta Journal
500 at Atlanta International
Raceway.
NASCAR spokesman Chip
Williams said Schoonover, 32, of
Royal Palm Beach, Fla was pro-
nounced dead at Atlanta's
Georgia Baptist Hospital at 4:27
p.m.
"In this pronouncement, the
hospital listed the cause as
massive head and internal in-
juries Williams said after Dale
Earnhardt won the 328-lap race.
The last driver to die on the cir-
uit was Ricky Knotts in 1980
during a 125-mile qualifying race
at Daytona International Speed-
way. The last driver to be killed
in a wreck in what NASCAR calls
an official event was Tinv Lund
in 1975 at Talladega, Ala!
Schoonover's death was the
first driver fatality at the 1
12-mile track since it opened in
1960. The only other death at the
speedway occurred March 19,
1979 when Dennis Wade,
jackman for Dave Watson, was
hit on pit road.
The wreck occurred on lap 129
when Schoonover's car smacked
the outside wall after coming off
turn two, careened across the
track, and slammed, driver's side
first, into the inside dirt embank-
ment in turn three. The car's
front end was demolished as
flames briefly flashed from under
s1
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the car.
"They cut the top off the car to
get him out said Bill Gazaway,
NASCAR's vice president for
competition. "His car went out
of control in the second turn and
hit the wall. It probably took 10
minutes to get him out
Gazaway said race day chief in-
spector Joe Gazaway told him
"the car did everything it was
supposed to do
league with 2-0 records. Top
spikers in the fraternity division
include Kappa Sig, Phi Kappa
Tau, Sigma Phi Epsilon and Pi
Kappa Phi. Men's residence hall
307 Spikers and the women's
dorm team Tyler Terrifies also
boast winning records.
While soccer teams continue to
boot it up, some teams experience
more success than others at
reaching their goals. Men in
Booties recently defeated Tried
City Force five goals to one, ad-
ding another win to their column
of four. The Sewer Rats are on
top in their division with a 3-0
record. The "A" squad from
Alpha Sigma Phi booted the men
from Beta Theta Pi 3-1, enlarging
their lead over other league com-
petitors. The ladies of sorority
Chi Omega and dorm Urn stead
Jockettes still lead in their leagues
packing an awesome one-two
punch.
Don't forget to register the
preseason basketball tournament
on Nov. 26-27. The tournament
will be held on the weekend of
Nov. 30-Dec. 2.
ATHLETIC WORLD
rr
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Athletic Shoes Suit In Stock
j Over $29.99 ! Over $49.99 j
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Open Mon-Sat 10am to 9pm
756-7550
d
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Pizza inn
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3.09
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All the pizza,
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Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
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19
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items and Prices
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NOV 17 1984
TETLEY
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KROGER TWIN N
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IM b�o,� m m m-
fl
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I HI l AM (. Roi INIAN
SOW MB! R 13, 1YM
Gamecocks Defeat FSU;
Cavaliers Destroy Wolfpack
B Hill MIKHUI
Milt Wrllrr
Here's hov East Carolina's op-
en! s did in their games on
Saturday
Florida Stale: South Carolina,
iked 5th, defeated the 10th
Iced Seminoles 38-26 to go 9-0.
lie Gamecocks, minus their star
running back Brent Hagood,
built a 31-7 halftime lead, which
i S , even with 19 second half
could never recover from.
ange Bowl scouts are very in-
ssted in the Gamecocks,
possibi pairing them uith 3rd-
iked Nebraska. South
Carolina still has to pla Navy
on, the onlj teams that
n the way of their first ever
red season
temple: The Owls had an open
- week, they play West
axl week.
( entrai Michigan: Bob DeMarco
ichdown passes of 42
yards to split end John
cad the Chippewa's to
7 Mid- American Conference
-ei Ball State. Senior
5 .dams rushed for
and touchdowns of two
ghi yards to take him over
� �� yard career rushing
. win gives Central
1 final record.
day. Quarterback John Congemi
threw two touchdown passes to
Bill Wallace and ran for a third
all in the first half. Tulane had
four turnovers and the Pittsburgh
defense helped turn these into a
victory.
South Carolina: See Florida State
above.
Tulsa: The Golden Hurricanes
defeated Indiana State 24-17 on
Saturday. Bobby Booker had a
great game, rushing for 146 yards
and catching a pass for a
touchdown. Tulsa plays
Southwestern I ouisiana next
week in their last game of the
season.
Fast Tennessee State: Western
Carolina defeated the Buccaneers
31-10 on Saturday. WCU played
super football in the first half and
jumped out to a 21-3 halftime
lead. Then in the first three
minutes ot the second half
Western Carolina Quarterback
Milton Beeck threw a 63-yard
touchdown pass to Eric Rashid
and that took the air out ot Fast
Tennessee State.
Southern Mississippi: See pace
eight.
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(�eorgia Southern:Emory and
ed theEagles 17-10
Saturda 1 elighl) ranked
l-AA . . vut hern team
- il u season at 8-3.
gel a playoff bid.
V( state: l heavaliers rolled
V fpack 45-0 in
on Sat urday.
' 5 . penetrate the
i dline only once, in
linute of the second
?rs field goal
I ester Lyles.
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 13, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 13, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.375
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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