The East Carolinian, November 8, 1984






v
�he
Carolinian
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since V25
(�I.S�) No.22
rhursdaj Novembers, 1984
Greenville, N.C
12 Panes
( irculation 12.IMK
ECU Professors Discuss Election Results
B JENNIFER JEN DRASI K
As is the norm. Election Da caused n
changes throughout the . North
Carolina, a Republican governoi was elected to a
position that has been a Democratic si nghold,
while one oi the most expensive Senate races in
history came to an end E( I faculty members had
varying reactions concerning the winners and the
ramifications of their victories
Most faculty members contacted agreed Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan's reelection ,iv no surprise
and is indicative ol the conserval ve attitude oi
many voters. "The majorit ol the electorate feels
Reagan accomplished important thing: during his
first term and should be given a chance to build on
them said Maurice Simon, cl I ! Oi the
Department oi Political Science.
"It was not a question ol whethei Reagan
would win, but bv how mu
said ngel
Volpe. v ice chancellor for academic affairs V
said Reagan's reelection is "a sign of tl
that the genera! population wan! see the
government taking
Volpe aKo said he is hop peo-
ple have suggested, Reagan will coi . ��
history" during his se : term ai
the federal defi( do�
meni in the foreign affairs climate
On the state level, the outcome of the long,
highly-publicized Senate race between Sen. Jesse
Helms, R-N.C, and Gov. James Hunt was less
predictable.
Simon attributed Helms' win in part to
Reagan's victory in North Carolina. ECU
Chancellor John Howell concurred, saying, "The
sie of Reagan's support was the margin of victory-
tor Helms. If Reagan's margin in the state had
been 51 percent to 49 percent for Walter Mondale,
Hunt probably would have won
Howell said he didn't think the victories of
Helms or Republican James Martin, who defeated
Democrat Rufus Edmisten in the N.C. guber-
natorial race, were unexpected. "A lot of people
in North Carolina, when they realized Reagan's
support was beginning to grow as the election
grew near, began to realize Helms and Martin
would probably win he said.
Simon said he would predict a "moderate
owth" in Republicanism in North Carolina
following Martin's victory, but the extent oi the
iwth "depends on what happens with the
economy
fad thai Martin is a former college pro-
: was stressed b Volpe when discussing the
ts ol the election outcome on higher educa-
Newly-Elected Republicans
Consolidate Future Plans
(L PI) Presideni Reagan
riding the cres I a record land-
slide reelection victory, says
"America's best days lie ahead
and you ain't seen noi g yet
The jubilant preside resorted
to his favorite campaign slogan
when he appeared a; a rictorj
celebration Iuesda nighi
his crushing defeat oi Democ �
opponent Waiter fndae.
W'�i �� percent of vYc vote
counted nationwide, R
5180.290 or 59 percent to Mon-
day's 35,903,848 or 41 per
Reagan won 525 electoral votes
from 49 states. Mondale captured
13 electoral votes by winning his
home state of Minnesota and the
District of Columbia.
The 73-year-old president ap-
peared anxious to emphasize that
he Mews his overwhelming man-
date as a signal to continue his
-ervative policies and the
"revolution of the right
"Tonight is the end of nothing.
It's the beginning of everything
he said Tuesday.
Reagan also indicated he was
ready to meet with Soviet Presi-
dent Konstantin Chernenko at
the summit, saying, "It's time for
us to get together and talk about
a great many things and try to
clear the air and suspicions bet-
ween us so we can get down to the
business of reducing, particulary
nuclear weapons
Exultant Vice President
George Bush said President
Reagan's "magnificent victory"
gives the Republicans a mandate
to represent all Americans.
Bush appealed for bipartisan
unity, saying, "now, in the
American tradition after every
election, let's come together as
people united and individuals to
share a common purpose to
realize the dream held by all
Americans regardless of partv,
the universal goal of peace and
;perin and opportunity for
all
Mondale appeared
� K pe ple in the St.
Pan! Civic Center to make his
concession speech after the West
Coa 'I uesda)
e with the
I gave it
-aid Tm confident history will
ronorably. Tonight let
us be determined to tight on.
"Let us continue to seek an
merica that is just and fair he
: speaking of the poor, the
unemployed and the helpless.
"My Candida.v has said the
days oi discrimination are
numbered Geraldine Ferraro
said Tuesday night. "American
women will never again be second
class citizens
"We are bursting with pride at
the magnificent performance of a
woman from Queens, a great
Democrat and a great
An. in said her patron New
York Gov. Mario Cuomo.
Ferraro said Reagan and Bush
"ran a skillful, spirited campaign
and today they have achieved an
impressive victory. The race is
over. This is not a moment for
partisan statements. It is a mo-
ment to celebrate our
democracy
Republicans retained control
of the Senate, but their 55-45
majoritv was reduced by two to
53-47.
Sen. Jesse Helms. R-N.C,
who defeated Gov. James Hunt
in the N.C . Senate race, vowed to
lead a crusade for "the Christian
people
Helms, champion of the con-
servative New Right, beat back
Hunt's challenge with a little
more than 51 percent of the vote
Tuesday and pledged "love and
faithfulness to the principles that
deserve to survive.
"Especially to the Christian
people, I say an unashamed and
unblemished, God bless you a
beaming Helms told 600 cheering
supporters in his victory speech.
Hunt's campaign said the
governor offered the "last best
hope" of ousting Helms, 63, who
hns te-i ooriNorsnf is c- causcf favor-
ing school prayer and opposing
abortion during his two terms in
the Senate.
Hunt, 47, refused to concede
defeat until after midnight
despite Helms' strong showing.
The governor finally told his sup-
porters, "I may be beaten but I
am unbowed. The people of
North Carolina have made their
choice. While we may disagree,
we must respect it
Helms had trailed Hunt by as
much as 20 percentage points in
statewide popularity polls but
gained ground late in the cam-
paign, outspending the governor
nearly 2-to-l by drawing on a
vast network of supporters across
the nation.
In the governor's races,
Republicans appeared to make a
net gain of two, even though
GOP incumbents were defeated
in Washington and North
Dakota. Overall, Republicans
won eight of the 13 governor's
races.
Rep. James Martin, who
defeated Democrat Rufus Ed-
misten in a come-from-behind
victory, pledged to "settle down
and work for all the people" as
the state's second Republican
governor this century.
Martin met with Edmisten
after he was declared the winner,
but said he had not spoken with
state Sen. Robert Jordan,
See MARTIN, Page 6
"The success of education doesn't depend that
much on who is governor Howell said. He add-
ed that Martin's power would be enhanced it he-
were working with a Republican, rather than a
Democratic, state General Assembly. "I don't
think there will be a great deal oi difference as tar
as education is concerned Howell said.
The N.C. governor has the power to select four
members of the ECU Board of Trustees. The
Board o' Governors for the University of North
Carolina system is selected by the state legislature,
however.
"The university has always worked well with all
the governors, and I'm sure we will continue to do
this said William I aupus, dean of the ECU
School of Medicine.
Vice Chancellor for Student Life Elmer Meyer
said it will be "interesting to watch the next two or
three years to see what happens to higher educa-
tion Meyer added that there is enough of a
"check-and-balance" system to ensure that educa-
tional funding will not suiter greatlv.
This year's races, especially the Hum-Helms
race, showed the effect of money on the election
process, Simon said. "Those races which were
close show the power oi monev in American
politics he said. "It seems disconcerting that
you can bin a two or three percent margin if you
have enough money and are nasty enough
I.aupus said the Hum-Helms rac � � ttei
and unpleasant campaign whuh most ol u
of. It makes you wonder what all thi
amounted to Laupus pointed out that tl
results "were just about the same a
taken in August" despite "the length and tl
tensity of the campaign
Concerning the possibility ol Helms in
the position of chairman of the Senate !
Relations Committee, an event made mi
by the defeat of its current chairman Sen (
Percy, R-IU Simon said there is a "i ftv I
chance of this happening
Helms has "national aspirations"
terested in foreign policy Simon said H
that, if Helms were to assume the p -
would be more "difficulty in
foreign policy. It would also be har lei I
to move towards the center
Howell said he is unsure ol 1 u
but said "any chair of the Foreign Relal
mittee can have considerable infl
he's in a position to block the pres .
things
"Overall, it was a convincing ,
wide and in the state for Repub
said.
�'ON JORDAN
ECU PKr.
By Student Residence Association
Dorm Solicitation Banned
B HAROLD JOYNER
Mslant Nr. tditor
The Student R e s i d e nc e
Association passed an amend-
ment Monday afternoon pro-
hibiting anv campus organiza-
tions from soliciting door to
door.
"The old rule said SR
president Debbie Gembicki,
"allowed door to door campaign-
ing from the Student Govern-
ment and SRA candidates.
However, other organizations
may contest that rule, and the
university would be obligated to
let them do it
Carolyn Fulghum, director and
associate dean for residence life,
said N.C. State University recent-
ly had the same problem oi door
to door soliciting in the residence
halls. "A campus organization
that was not associated with the
student government or residence
council wanted to solicit religious
messages. They were not allowed
to do this, so the organization
took the issue to court and the
UNC General Admistration at-
torney decided that if one group
was allowed to solicit door to
door, everyone else could, too
Current residence hall rules
prohibit anv one visiting residence
halls without being associated
with the university. The amended
rule, which was passed by a ma-
joritv vine, will be in addition to
the current one.
Students will still get their
share oi campaigning and other
solicitation, only now it will be in
the lobby oi dorms. Gembicki
said. "When a campus organiza-
tion gets permission to solicit at
the dorms, there will be an
assigned area in the lobby for
them to set up a display or
table Gembicki said.
The SRA will also submit a
proposal to Dr. Elmer Meyer,
vice chancellor for student life,
putting the quiet dorm proposal
on hold for one year. According
to last year's proposal, two floors
would be set aside in Slay dorm
for exclusive quiet hours.
Pam Bunch, vice-president of
Slay said the idea of "warning"
incoming freshmen oi the pro-
posal would be a good idea. "It
wouldn't be right for them to
choose to live in Slav and not
know it might be a quiet dorm
she said. "I've talked to several
of this year's freshmen in Slay
and all of them are very happy
with the set quiet hours now
"The mam reason the SK
decided to propose warring a yeai
before making a decisioni(
bicki said, "was so we wi
have enough time to see
fects oi new apa
plexes and condominiums b
built in Greenv
nother proposal bv the SR
would let tudei
their own rooms In
residence hails, furniture pei
manentlv affixed to the a i
floor.
Gembicki sard sc w tici
to see the current rules .
and let the residents "create I
own room. Of course she i
"there would be a limit
far we could let them do their
own decorating 1 think it would
help in keeping the student
residence halls. But right n a
we're just tossing ideas around.
An informal surve was done
b Marcie Green ol Belk dorm.
"Eighty percent of the residents
wanted to fix their own rooms b
moving beds and desks she
said. Another resident wl
in Aycock dorm said everyone on
his floor would lrke :o move
furniture.
Alumni Drive Exceeds Goal
By ELAINE PERRY
suff wm�
The ECU Alumni National
Telefund raised $82,398 this
semester, surpassing its goal of
$80,000. This year's total sur-
passed the amount raised in 1983
by $18,000, according to Cindy
Kittrell, alumni Field director.
"This was the best telefund
we've ever had Kittrell said. "I
was impressed with the callers �
they had professionalism, en-
thusiasm and comradeship
Volunteer callers began contac-
ting alumni every evening at 7 in
order to raise the funds. Money
from the telefund is used to help
better ECU in many ways.
The week of Oct. 22-24 was
designated all-star week. Callers
who had raised the most money
in previous weeks were invited
back for a final contest, calling
for a grand prize which included
dinner at the house of ECU
Chancellor John Howell and
tickets located in the chancellor's
box at Saturday's football game.
This year's winner was Elizabeth
Frazzele from Jones dorai.
Specific items provided
through the monev raised are
merit scholarships and research
assistance for ECU faculty.
The number of new donors this
year totaled 568, an increase oi
235 from 1983. Kittrell attributed
the increase to the "caliber of the
callers. They urged people who
had never given to give and in-
creased interest in ECU
"The student leaders projected
the feeling that East Carolina is
important and the monev was im-
portant for the growth of ECU
she said.

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TR� EAST CAROL INIAN
NOVEMBER 8, 1984


l
Omega Psi Phi
Omeaa Pj, Phl Frat )nc i$ recoflnlllnB aM
black sludnts who have accumlated a gpa
0,30 �r a&ove You win be given a cer
flficate of achievement during our ach eve
ment aay awards ceremonoy on Nov IB at
3 00 It you have the qualifications write
Omeua Psi Phi p o Box 30U. Greenville
N C 27834
Allied Health Professions
The Aii.ed Health Professions Admission
Test will be offered at East Car ,una Univer
sity on Saturday Jan 12. I9S5 Application
blanks are to be completed and mailed to the
Psychological Corp 7500 Old oak Blvd .
Cleveland Ohio 44130 to arrive by Dec ,1$,
i984 Applications may be obtained from the
ECO Testing Center room 105 Speight
Building
Graduate Management
The Graduate Management Admission Test
GMATJ will be offered at East Carolina
university -at Jan 26. 1985 Application
blanks ar. tc je completed and mailed to
GMAT Eaucafional Testing Service Box
�66 R Princeton. N J 08540 Applications
-nust te postmarned no later than Dec 24.
i�84 Applications may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center. Room 105. Speight
Building Greenville N C 27834
Student Union Special Concerts
Jdent un.on Special Concerts Com
He meet on Thursday Nov 8. 1984, at
4 00 pm in room ;38 of Mendenhall Student
Center All members and interested
students a e u. gea to attend
PhiTaus
his weekend will be the ultimate jam Fri
starts outs with lappv hour at the Attic
Decision will be there to rock! Sat
�ftet ioon attei the P,rates k.ck ass. we will
� ae that maior munch with a pig pic'n and
aiithefmns Sun wu. crank up at noon with
the UltlmateTrim Party Party beverage
� ne prov.oeo wh.ie we all knock out some
'��e sisters are expected to be there
Brothers This is your chance to knock it
Hem fax are we going
Motorcycle Club
t Hariey Davidson and Frog Level
Motorcycle Club are sopnsormg the 2nd an
nual toy run Sat nov 17 Rendeivous9 30
am a' J ano E Hariey Davidson 1008 Dickin
son Ave Free Eats and drinks Departure
. 00 pm on a 5 mile parade route Con
buttons go to the Salvation Army and
10 a' donations to the Ronald McDonald
House AH Bikers mv.ted. bring a toy
The Holiday Project
e hoi.da, Proiect Is a non profit public
orporation Ihal IS working toward raising
financial ass stance with the funds raised
volunteers the Holiday Project will pro
ae g,t�s at Christmas for people m area
id normally be without If
'Ou are interested In contributing either
�oluntani- or financially please contact Dee
Pre -Season Basketball
tgister now tor one of 'he most successful
ntramura events of the fall Registration
the tournament sponsored by Miller High
fe s on No 26 27 Play begins the 30th
�tme to let it dn out before exams
Register In room 204 menonal gym or call
'57 6387
Gamma Beta Phi
,i Be- pi �ee- usda Nov 15
' � the B gy Build -g 103
ECU Mens Invitational Flag
�ee s SIS 00 and the event will be
'8 of Nov Register this
"amural office room
Men a g The tournament is spon
sorea By All Campus champs
Bombsquad and will use 'he money to
cover expenses or, tne.r v.p to the National
Collegiate Flag Football Tournament
N.C.I.O.
The North Caroi'na Internship Office pro-
ses ca c
13 73 per
June
summer mtern positions tor
ri S"a'e Government Positions
- " a .are'y of agencies located
he s'aV S'udents will Be paid
. aurmg the period of
August 1
Christmas Vacation
Zao Natonal Underwater
� � 'aBL ous Ke, Largo Tne Flor.aa
.evs are the only natural coral reef in the
' ental u S This five day trip. Dec
uoes lodging and two dive boat
'�" T;jiks Backpack ano weight
elts a-e provided Cost is SI75 00 per per
son two to a room occupancy and 210 00 per
- 4 to a room occupancy For further
nformat on Ra, Schart, Director of Ac
jua'ics 757 6441
Sigma Theta Tau
ne Beta Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau.
�ne National Honor Society of Nursing, w.li
noid Its fall educational meet.ng on Thurs
day. Nov 15. I984at6pm at the Ramada Inn
m Greenville The program presented By
Dr Ann Belcher rn, PhD Is entitled,
'The ten ear p,an implications for On'
coiog, Nursmg Or Belcher is director of
Nurs.r.g Staff Deveiopement at the Umversi
ty of ALatama Hospital in Birmingham
AiaBama Colleagues s'udents, spouses and
Friends are cordially mv.ted For further In
�ormation. contac lou Everett at the School
Nursing 757 401
Free Throw Contest
There will be a free throw contest he'd for all
.ou expert hoopsters Nov 13 This in
'ramurai sponsored event will be held in
Memorial Gym To register come by room
204 Memorial Gym or call 757 6387 Par
'icipate rather than specfafe
NASA
'erested in international Policy and
Regulations affecting high technology expor
�mg� if so. this position may be for you.
NASA will be interviewing on compus in
nov tor Sprmg, 1985 Contact the
Cooperative Education Office 313 Rawl
Building as soon as possible
Surfing Club
There will no' be a meeting this week but a
�earn surf off is sheduied tor this Sunday at
Emerald Isle Everyone interested should
meet at theisiander Motel parking lot at
9 00am Sunda The contest may be moved
somewhere else if conditions are better
HEY BKA!
Didn't we nave fun Thanks to everyone who
was able to make II to Wilson, for those who
didn't boy did you miss out Our next
meeting is going to be Thursday, Nov 15
See ya there
American Marketing Association
The American Marketing Association will be
sponsoring a marketing profile of Anheuser
BuschonNov 15th at 4 00 at Mendenhall 244
All AMA members and anyone interested
are invited to attend
Kappa Alpha Psi
The brothers of the Kappa Alpha Psi frater
nify, inc would like to announce that they
are having a happy hour this Thurs night
Nov 8 from 10 until at the Wii Bus
transportation will begin at Mendenhall at
10 30 and then to the hill at 10 45 Cost is SI 50
student and $2 00 non student There will be
free beer , so come on out and party with the
nupes!
LOVE
Is something missing in your life right now
but you iust can't put your finger on If
Everyone needs love and understanding
You can fill this empty space by making an
Encounter with Christ Weekend Nov 15 18
Meet students within N C and enjoy a relax
ing weekend with people who really care
about you I For more info contact Fr. Terry
at 752 4216 or Colleen Pirone at 752 4975 it
promises to be a fantastic experience!
Announcements
ECU Peace Committee
Amnesty international finds new dedication
to human rights In Greenville with the bud
ding of a local chapter The first public
meeting will be held Tues . Nov 20, 1984 in
the Belk Building, room 101 at I 00pm , and
will feature a film entitled Prisoner of Cons
clence Susan Carpenter, the Regional Pro
gram Coordinator for Amnesty Interna
tlonal, will discuss the goals of Ai and ideas
on organizing to work effectively to gain
release of "prisoners of conscience" all over
the world
Ai does not support or oppose any goverm
nent but works for the international protec
tion of human rights It advocates the
release of people everywhere detained for
their beliefs, color, sex, ethnic background,
language, or religion, so long as they do not
participate in or condone violence It seeks
fair and prompt trials for all political
prisoners and aids those people detained
without being charged or tried. It opposes
cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment, tor
ture and the death penalty tor all prisoners
without exception All are welcome to at
tend
SPAN
The Student Planning Association
NetworkiSPAN) is sponsoring a series of
alumni panels during 1984 85 to celebrate the
completion of twenty years of
undergraduate planning education at ECU
The first of these panels will be held on Nov
14th m Brewster Building room D 208, from
12 00 to 1 30pm The panel will discuss plan
ning education in terms of public sector
employment opportunities within the plann
mg profession
The panelists are Lee Downie, Director
of Community Development, Roanoke
Rapids N C Wat Brown, Director of Town
Planning, Tarboro. N C Beth Shields. Plan
ning director Nash county. N C Gene
Thomas Annexation Coordinator and Plan
ner II, Goldsboro. N C Bill Richardson,
county Manager Currituck county, N C
All interested persons are invited to at
tend For additional information contact
Mike Walker SPAN President or Pro
fessors Hankms or VvuOneh a' 757 6465
The Usuals
Fri , Nov 9, The Usuals will play in Multi
purpose room from 8 30 10 30pm Free piz
2a compliments of Pizza Transit Authority
Sponsored By the Student union Coffeehouse
Committee
ECU Acquatics Center
On Tuesday evening, Nov 13, 1984 at 7 30pm
ECU Acquatics and the Rum Runner Ocean
Atlantic Dive Club will sponsor a dry suit
demonstration at the Minges Coliseum
Aquatic Center diving Pool The demonstra
tion will be presented by Mr Larry Richard
son of the Off Shore diving Equipment Com
pany
Dry suits are not only utilized by divers for
cold water diving but can also be utilized By
police fire and rescue units as well as by
sailors, boaters, fisherman or anone who
works in. on or near the water
The Off Shore Nautilus dry suit is an
ultralight ory suit and weighs only 3' lbs
Not only does II keep you dry and warm, but
is very tough to rip and is aBrasion resistant
In this type of enviornmen it is important
Ihal you Be comtortaBle with the aBility to
move without restriction This can be ac
complished with the Off Shore dry suit as it
is very flexible and does not restrict move
ment It takes less than one minute to put on
and take off
There Is no admission charge for this
demonstration If you have a need for or are
interested in this type of protective equip
ment. you are invited to attend this
demonstration
Psi Chi
There will be a meeting for all Psi Chi
members on Thurs Nov 8, at 5 00pm Mee'
m the library on 2nd floor Speight All
members urged to attend.
Conservation Film
Thefilm Garden of Eden will be shown by
'he Pamlico Tar R.ver Foundation a' 7pm
Mon. Nov 19 m the auditorium of the Wilhs
Building ECU Regional Development in
stitute) The f.lm. produced by the Nature
Conservancy, makes a case for preservation
of natural environments and the earth's gene
pool The showing is free and open to the
PUBliC
MSO
MSO will hold it's weekly meeting Thurs at
4 30, m room 248 Mendenhall All minority
students please come out and ge' .nvoived
this afternoon1!
Alapha Phi Big Brothers
The next meeting will be Sun, Nov 18th at
9 00pm at the house All money (t shirtsand
dues) will be expected on that date Con
gratulations to the h g brother volleyball
team who won last week agams' the Sig Eps
and will play tonight at 10 45
Kappa Alpha Psi
Come on out and really party with the
brothers of Kappa Alapha Psi this Sat night
Nov 10 from 10 until After the last home
football game at the Cultural Center adm is
$ 75 for students and $1 00 non students The
others had their chance but now it is really
time to Jam!
PPHA
Pre Professional Health Alliance will hold a
special meeting Thursday Nov 8. 1984 at 5 30
pm in room 244 in the Mendenhall Student
Center The guest speaker will be Dr
Marion Phillips, Associate Dean of Minority
Affairs at UNC CH School of Medicine This
meeting will be very mfromative so all
members and interested guests are strongly
encouraged to attend
The Sport Club
The Sport Club council meeting for Nov 21,
1984 has been changed to Nov 13, 1984 at 4 00
in Brewster B 103 Attendance at the
meeting is mandatory We look forward see
ing you there
All Campus Party! �
ECU Students The date has been set! Chill
Thrill 1984 will be held friday, Nov 16th from
3 7pm at the Phi Tau house Come rock to
the sounds of Domino as they warm up for
their appearance at the Attic Golden
Beverage will Be plentiful and serious party
ing is a requ.rement Another West Campus
Throwdown!
Americas in Transition
An academy award winning PBS film will be
shown Nov 8 m Joyner Library downstairs
m the Media room at 7pm Please join us
Campus Service
The Fountain of Life Christian Fellowship
will be sponsoring a morning church service
this Sun ,11 at II 00am in Jenkins
Auditorium it you haven't been to a campus
service before, make this Sun your first of
the many more church services to attend
Everyone is invited to be a part of this event
As you come, purpose in your heart to make
Nov II, 1984 your day It's yours for the ask
ing!
Gong show starting at 8 00 Then "B" team
volleyball plays at 10 45 Thur , our little
sisters will be having a happy hour at Grum
py's Everyone come out and support our lit
tie sisters
Fashion Show
A benefit fashion show for the ECU Gospel
Choir will be given by Carel's Unlimited inc
Nov the 11th at 5 00pm in Hendrix Theatre,
tickets for ECU students will be $2 and the
general public $3 The purchase of tickets
will be in Mendenhall Student Center on the
following days Mon thru Fri
Fashion Show
A benefit fashion show for the E C U Gospel
Choir will be given by Carel's Unlimited Inc
Nov the 11th at 5 00pm in Hendrix Theatre,
tickets for EC U students will be $2 and the
general public S3 The purchase of tickets
will be in Mendenhall Student Center on the
following days Mon thru Fri
Gong show starting at 8 00 Then "B" team
volleyball plays at 10 45 Thur . our little
sisters will be having a happy hour at Grum
py's Everyone come out and support our lit
tie sisters
Fashion Show
A benefit fashion show for the ECU Gospel
Choir will be given by Carel's Unlimited Inc
Nov the 11th at 5 00pm in Hendrix Theatre,
tickets for E C U students will be S2 and the
general public S3 The purchase of tickets
will be in Mendenhall Student Center on the
following days Mon thru Fn
Psi Chi
There will be a meeting of all Psi Chi
members on Thur , Nov 8th at 5 00pm in the
Psi Chi library, Speight 202 T shirts and
new member certificates will be discussed
and presented All members are urged to at
tend
Ept
A scholarship will be awarded to an outstan
omg member of Epsilon Pi Tau during the
Spring semester of 1985 Interested memoers
should contact Dr Leith in Flanagan 209
The deadline for applicants is Dec 1 Also
the initiation Banquet for new members will
be held at 5 00pm on Nov 29 at the Western
Steer on 'Oth st
Marauder members
There will be an important meeting for all
Marauder members on Wed Nov 14 at 7 30
m the coffee house located In the basement of
Mendenhall Student Center Upcoming
events will be discussed
Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society
Those persons interested in iom.ng the Gam
ma Be'a Phi Honor Society who have a GPA
of 3 0 or better are urged to come to an or.en
tation meeting at 6 00pm Thurs Nov 8 in
room 221 Mendenhall
Fencing Club
The Fencing Club would like to invite anyone
interested to a'tend our meetings every Wed
at Memorial Gym, room 102 at 7 30
Art Contest
Design a I shirt depicting your interpreta
tion of aerobics and win free semester of
aerodic classes Enter your design in room
204 Memorial Gm By Fn Nov 30
Count Basie
Mon Nov 12th. a' 7 00. A7.MB. 91 3 FM will
feature a tull hour on the music and lite of
Count Basie Tune m for an entertaining
eventing with the sounds of Jazz ano Count
Bas.e
College Republicans
The College Republicans will continue
their triumphal season ton.ght at 7 00 m
the Mendtrnnaii Coffeehouse We will give
directions to a victory party for all those
CR s who contriButed to our smashing sue
cess
BLOCK PARTY
KA's. Kappa Sigs, TKE's and AZD' present
'he second annual all campus post game
block party featuring the sounds of S T A
Express The party starts Nov 10 at 5 30 at
the KA house Bring your coolers and flasks
Kappa Alpha Psi
Come on out and really party with the
brothers of Kappa Alpha Psi this Sat night
Nov loth from 10 until after the last home
football game at the Cultural Center Adm
is75 for students and SI 00 non students
The others had their chance but now it Is
really time to iam!
Sport Club
The Sport Club Council meeting for Nov 21.
1984 has been changed to Nov 13. 1984 at 4 00
m Brewster B 103 Attendance at the
meeting is mandatory We iv forward see
mg you there
Non-violence Training
"Sensitizing and Depolarizing Peace Work
a workshop in non violent assertion Is
scheduled for Sat 8 12 and I 3 In Mendenhall
Coffeeshop on the ECU campus
The three areas the workshop will cover
are peace In our own lives, non violence In
interaction with other individuals, and non
violence in the larger policfical world
The trainer is Herbert Walters of Burn
sville. N C He is the founding editor of
RSVP (Rural Southern Voice for Peace) and
a member of the national speakers bureau of
the Fellowship of Reconciliation He is an
experienced trainer
The workshop is sponsored by the ECU
Peace Committee For more information,
call Carroll or Edith Webber at 758 4806
Alpha Phi Alpha
The brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha are spon
soring a victory party after the football
game sat at The Unlimited Touch Happy
hour prices until 11 00pm
Applications
are now being accepted for students wishing
to serve on University Committees for
1984 1985 school year Twenty one(21) stu
dent positions are open Committees with
vacancies are Alcohol and Drug Education
Committee! 1), Committee on Canvassing
and Soliciting on Campusd), Committee on
Residence Life(l) Committee on Status of
Minorities (4), Committee on Status of
Women (2). Committee on Student Health
Services (1), Housing appeals (off campus
student) (1). Parking and Traffic Committee
(1). Scholars Weekend Committee (1), Ad
missions Committeei 1). Career Education
Committee (1). Course Drop Appeals Com
mittee (1), Faculty Computer Committee
(1), Teaching Effectiveness Committee (2)
Applications are availavle at the following
locations Office of the Vice Chancellor for
Student Life. 204 Whichard Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Information Desk, SGA Office,
Mendenhall student center Office of
intramural Recreational Services,
Memorial Gym and Residence Hall Direc
tors Offices
The University greatly appreciates the ef
forts of those students who have served in
the past and hope that students will continue
their interest and participation Questions
about university Committees and member
ships may be director to the Office of the
Vice Chancelor for Student Life (757 6541)
Submit your applications now'
Christmas Vacation
Dive Penny Camp National Underwater
Park m fabulous Key Largo The Florida
Keys are the only natural coral reef in the
Continental U S This five day trip. Dec
16 21st includes lodging and two dive boat
trips dail.y Tanks backpack and weight
belts are provided Cost is $175 00 per per
son. two to a room occupancy and 210 00 per
P�r�on. 4 to a room occupancy. For furthor
information Ray Scharf, Director of Ac
quatics 757 6441
Sigma Theta Tau
The Beta Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau.
'he National Honor Society of Nursing, will
hold its fall educational meeting on Thurs
day. Nov 15, 1984 at 6pm at the Ramada Inn
in Greenville The program, presented by
Dr Ann Belcher. RN, Ph D . is entitled,
"The ten year plan and dues) will be ex
pected on that date Congratulations to the
big brother volleyball team who won last
week against the Sig Eps and will play
tomght at 10 45
Fencing Club
The Fencing Club would like to invite anyone
interested to attend our meetings every Wed
at Memorial Gym, room 102 at 7 X
WE PAY
CASH f
FOR
Class Rings Diamond Rings
Gold & Silver Jeweriy
Silver Coins
WEtUY&SEU
r.V's, stereo's, cameras, video, microwave ovens,
Ncycles, watches, binoculars, walkmans portable
M-FM, cassette, heaters, good furniture, china 4
crystal, typewriters, etc.
CQM�JC�4�
400 EVANS, "on cue corner
Downtown Greenville
752-3966
WISHING VOU L1VEV AT THE TOWERS? VOU STILL CAN WE HAVE A
rlnlSnmUAELE f�R �CCUmCV WINNING SEC0NVSe7sTER
CALL FOR DETAILS 0k RENTAL OR PURCHASE. 7S6-UWOR 355-5I5i
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus
East Carolina University
RinCffoId Development Co lac
10) Commerce Street
P O Drawer 568
Greenville. NC 27854
(919) 355-2698
Pi Kappa Phi
Tonight at Grumpys our little sisters will be
having a happy hour, the fun begins at 9 00
ALSO "A" team volleyball plays at 10 00
Next Mon , "B" team volleyball will play at
10 45 All right guy's little sister apprecia
tion week Is coming up Mon the 12th and
Tues the 13th are the days lers do
something nice, They deserve It
A scholarship will be awarded to an outstan
ding member of Epsilon PI Tau during the
Spring semester of 1985 Interested
members should contact Or Leith in
Flanagan 209 The deadline for applicants is
Dec 1 Also the initiation banquet for new
members will be held at 5 00pm on Nov 29
at the Western Steer on 10th st
Marauder members
There will be an important meeting for all
Marauder members on Wed , Nov 14 at 7 30
in the cotfee house located in the basement of
Mendenhall Student Center Upcoming
events will be discussed
Gamma Beta Phi Honor Society
Those persons interested in loinmg the Gam
ma Beta Phi Honor Society who have a GPA
ot 3.0 or better are urged to come to an orien
tation meeting at 6 00pm Thurs Nov 8 In
room 22! Mendenball
Art Contest
Design a t shirt depicting your interpreta
tion a aerobics and win free semester of
aerobic classes Enter your design in room
204 Memorial Gym by Fn Nov 30
Count Basie
Mon . Nov 12th, a: 7 00 WMB 91 3 FM wu
feature a full hour on the music and nt� of
Count Basie Tune m tor an entertaining
eventing with the sounds ot Jail and Coun'
Basie
College Republicans
The College Republicans win continue tne r
triumphal season tonight at 7 00 m the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse We will give direr
tions to a victory party for an those CR s wnc
contributed to our smashing success
BLOCK PARTY
KA's. kappa Sigs THE s and A2D preset-
the second annual all campus pos game
block party featuring the sounds of S T A
Express The par� starts Nov 10 a'5 30 a'
the K A house Bring your coolers and tias�s
East Carolinian advertising
call 757-6366
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Sunday Specials
Daily Specials - $2.25 pins tax
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Procter & Gamble
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Sears. Roebuck
SSC&B Linus Worldwide
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Yankelovwh, SkelK & V�"hite
Young & RubKam
The Ln.vers.ty of Georgia's Master of Marketing Research Program is
truh -unique It 1S governed by a Board of Ad v.sors drawn from the leaders
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As you would expect, adm.ss.on is select.ve and competinon is stiff
Scholarships are available for qualifying applicants
Professor Fred D. Reynolds ' "
122 Brooks Hall
University of Georgia
Athens, Georgia 30602
Dear Sir:
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ECU Ar
ECL Nw Bureau
A unique theory that places the
site of Sir Waiter Raleigh's 16th
century settlement underwater
rather than on land will undergo
some tests next spring by an
underwater archaeologist at
ECU.
Gordon Watts, a history pro-
fessor and the co-director of
ECU's program in maritime
history and underwater research,
plans to take himself, students,
scuba diving gear and an array of
sophisticated, underwater sensing
devices into the waters that sur-
round Roanoke Island. He hopes
to find evidence that the site of
the nation's first English settle-
ment
Soun
itselt
searcl
main;
men
r xd
small
exped
1585.
settler
site w!
is as
famoi
I
donee I
only
I
then
Hypertension
Among ECU
Health
Column
crease
smok
.
I
751 � -��
Hypertension, or high blood
pressure, is a maj. h �'
blem in eastern North v
and is now becoming a common
problem for the ECU stud
Dopulation. Some cases ma.
due to underlying problerm
as heart, kidney or blood vc
defects. Others may not be
tributed to any particular ca
heredity may be a factor in these
cases. Many elcauons in blood
pressure can be reversed
changing habits and lifestyle.
Smoking leads to rises in BP
since nicotine causes restriction
of blood vessels. The core:
arteries are affected tahicl
lead to heart attacks. A rise in BP
can be detected after just one j
cigarette. Pulse and respirators
rates also increase, which pro-
bably accounts for the �'high
Resulting bronchitis and em-
physema place more demands on
the heart, lungs and blood
vessels.
Caffeine acts as a rfmufam
and causes rises in BP. It is found
in coffee, tea, chocolate, soft
drinks and oer-the-counter
medications. Other stimulants
are decongestants in cold and
allergy medications and ingre-
dients in diet pills. Examples are
pseudoephedrine (Sudafed, Con-
tac), phenylpropanolamine
(Comtrex, Dexatrim. Sinutab).
and phenylephrine (Dimetane.
Dnstan).
Obesity, as well as being
moderately overweight, also con-
tributes to hypertension. The
heart works harder to pump
blood through a greater body
mass. Restricting refined car-
bohydrates, particularly
cholesterol and saturated fats,
helps prevent plaque formation
in blood vessels. Using polyun-
saturated fats and complex car-
bohydrates (fruits, vegetables.
nuts, grains) helps prevent pla-
que. Regular exercise, particular-
ly aerobic types, lowers pulse and
respiratory rates as well as BP
Oral contraceptives also cause 0
elevations in BP. even those �
the lowest doses of the hormones.
There is a high correlation bet- �
ween the pill and cardiovascular 9
disorders (heart attacks, stroke 0
Fund Drive �
Surpasses I
ECU Goal !
By JENNIFER JENDR ASl Ak
SmMlH
Both the ECU main campus
and the School of Medicine sur-
passed their fundraising goals in
the 1984-85 United Way cam-
paign, Main Campus Chairman
Mimi Quick announced Wednes-
day.
On the main campus. $24,411
was raised, exceeding the goal of
$23,000. The School of Medicine
had a goal of $12,000 and sur-
passed that amount by $7,367.
The campaign began Sept. 13
with a kick-off breakfast. ECU
helped to attain the Pitt County
goal of $681,325. Funds raised in
this drive are used to provide
various services throughout the
county.
'f
�'� f-oflE�' m m "
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836
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IHf 1 AM ' KOi INIAN
rising
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4.1 1 1
J
ECU Archaeologists Look For Lost Colony
Sr"M ' mem is submerged in Roanoke evidence to substantiate .�� - c�
A unique theor that pla.es the
Site of Sit Walter Raleigh's 16th
century settlement underwatei
rathet than on land will undergo
some tests next spring b an
under water archaeologist at
Gordon Waits, a history pro
fessoi and the co directoi oi
ECU's program in maritime
history and underwatei reseai
plans to lake himself, students,
scuba diving geai and an array ol
sophisticated, underwater sensing
devices into the waters that sui
round Roanoke Island He hopes
to find evidence thai the site ol
the nation's first English settle
mem is submerged in Roanoke
Sound rather than on the island
itselt where archaeologists have
searched without ;uccess foi re-
mains ot the 400 yeai old settle-
ment site'
I xcepi tor the discovery oi a
small earthworks fort built In an
expedition led by Ralph I ane in
1585, all traces ol the domestic
settlement have vanished I he
site where the first colonists lived
is as much as mystery as the
famous "I ostolony " oi 1 587
whose people mysteriously ab
doned then settlement leaving
only the word "CROATOAN"
carved into a tree .is a clue to
theii abouts.
It we can find some phy
Hypertension Common
Among ECU Students
Health
Column
ke an
i . .
Hyperw
pres
rn Nor11
i
lii.
as 1
Ma
be reversed K
! i i d �
s king lead? n HI'
luses re
: �
BP
-
mes the BP



i
a
evidence to substantiate our
theory that the site is underwat
this could tuin into om ol the
most sophisticated underv,
excavations to take place in this
hemisphere says Watts, whose
work is being funded tin. uj
research contract with the
American Quadricentennial I
poration. The agenc; supports
research and other activities
relating to the 400th annivei
ol the first English settlement
Wail theory take- int(
couni some new interpretations
ol early colonial settleme
terns m North America as w
evidence oi environmej
changes :aV ing place on R
Island.
i he Engli . .
iditionally built
tlenients n i
ild hav
their only escape routt
hostile fndi � d it is unlik
they would have built theii
men . here ex
the shoreline
-
ke Isla

R 11 ' . �
-
show that soil erosion
� ' i rise in sea level
iway .i much as
1.50 lint on the
tnd here the
dly built their
I
ntury colony
tld have ex
' tte a the
�' odstock
hore oi the
a part
Waterway,
town
' lunda-
� struc-
ttom.
induct
May
h i g I ibi 1 i t y
Roanoke
ientified
.
ental
will utilize
: � � :�
l
the artifacts should be in relative-
ly good condition because he says
'�preservation is frequently be
underwater than on land "
" I here are a number oi th .
that could have survived the I
sitional process from a terrestrial
environment to a water environ-
ment he saw
"We know thev were in the
process ot making hrik and thev
brought with them from Eng
such things as glass, ceran
iron says Watts, notii .
historical sources relating � I
White's return to the colony
1590 indicate that mai . I the
structures and a lot ol equipn
remained at the site despite
disappearance ot the coloi
In his three years at the he n I
the 1(1 underwater resea
program and previously a- the
underwater archaeologist for I
state oi North Carolina, W u
conducted researcl i
number ot historically impo:
shipwrecks ranging from vol.
fen � f war. H
water include the d
� .
�� � I SS 1nnitn,
IV"1 some 16 mile
Cai � : ear Cape I
I
min
� - ��
Monitor But
Ra .
ire ui �

Be-
-
'
11
o
o
I
i
I

Res
. �
.
i essels
i .����- i � . , tirmilam
BP. It i

ilani
I gestant old
medical ngn
I
pse . Irine (Sudafed
I, ph(
mtrex Dexatrin s
and pi
Drisi
�� . ' C
eht, al :on
I
rl
through a greatei I I
Rest rict i n j
irai

� i

"57 f,s �

fac
OAKWOOD HOMES
PROUDLY SUPPORTS
THE PIRATES AND
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY

NOW OPENING
Gourmet International's
GOURMET COFFEE SHOP
O
"GO PIRATES"
t � �
O
HOMES
(�r��it pldco to meet your friends rH,i uith a up
of Gourmet C offce and a wiru-tv. of muffins that arv
b,iktti frosh daik
752-341 1
117 1
f-ifth St
ouiirmc
i
Ml
8:3 r:30
Sal
1 JO-5 10
n
626 VV Gi
IO
J
Spice of Life Mini Mill
This Way Up
In Downtown Greenvilli
Free Concert
Priority
� Saturday Nov. 10
Doors Open At 8:00 As
Concert At 8:55
-
md d fats,
ps prevent ;
id vessel . , n
trated fats and complex
bohydrates (fruits, vegetables,
nuts, grains) helps previ
Reg ilai exei :ise, panic .
bic t pes, towers pulse a
piratory rates as well as BP.
Oral contraceptives also cause
ations in BP. even those with
� Ic es oi the hormones.
ere is a high correlation he!
�see the pill and cardiovascular
rders (heart attacks, stroke
Fund Drive
Surpasses
ECU Goal
Bv JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Sf�i l-dltor
Both the ECU main campu-
and the School of Medicine sur-
ed their fundraising goals in
the 1984-85 United Way cam-
gn, Main Campus Chairman
Mimi Quick announced Wednes-
d a
( n the main campus, $24,411
was raised, exceeding the goal oi
$23,000. The School of Medicine
had a goal of $12,000 and sur-
passed that amount by $7,367.
The campaign began Sept. 13
with a kick-off breakfast. E I
helped to attain the Pitt Count"
goal of $681,325. Funds raised in
this drive are used to provide
various services throughout the
count v

eat
Cightclub
presents
Thursday Night
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Happy Hour 9:00
for $1 Off Admission
' : : . SOCDraft
piichers
Friday Night
E( I Cheerleaders present
Pre Game Victory Party
also
Greek Night with the
Lambda Chi's
. raIIbo � : �"
� l ills
Phone 756 6401
ror
1 jted in Carolina I asiemu-
�H��MIMl All MU Pmriu H.Mtnnl� ,h.
.ut-sts Are Welcome





A

M?e Eaat (Earolinton
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. HUNTFR FlSHFR. OmI Manager
GRFC RlDEOUT, wtmm�rmm
Jennifer Jendrasiak, �. euw J.T. Piftrzak. ���� !����
Randy Mews, sr� &�� Anthony Martin, ���Mm
Tina Maroschak, fiMMaanw Tom Norton, rn-rf.r wnngn
Bn i Austin, cimdttfouiuttt MiKt Mayo, -wmm mruh
November 8, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Reagan Wins
77?e Supreme Court Next?
With a sweeping landslide,
Ronald Reagan has been
catapulted back to Washington for
another four years. And as he
glides over North Carolina, he'll
stop to let Sen. Jesse Helms hitch a
ride on his coattails. But that is
behind us; our immediate worry is
not what those men will do, but in-
stead we worry about a group of
nine old men who sit atop the na-
tion's judicial system.
The Supreme Court. The men
who breath life into the browned
pages of the Constitution. They
are the keepers of the law who pro-
tect those of low station and high
from having their rights callously
trampled on. But the wind that
swept Reagan back into office in
the biggest electoral win ever
(besides George Washington's),
may be blowing the Court
rightward, as five of the justices
approach the time to leave and five
new ones get ready to come in.
lr�. Reagan now has the chance
to influence the policies of this
country for more than 20 years
after he is dead and gone. For
those who value equal protection
under the law and the recent inter-
pretations of the Constitution, the
horror has as yet not unfolded.
The drift of the Court rightward
could begin to anchor itself firmly
in a conservative port.
Pretty soon we will see the ero-
sion of the barrier between church
and state. Those who would force
everyone's children to pray in
school will be sitting in the highest
judicial chairs in the land and
won't blink an eye as the ban on
school prayer is lifted and God is
thrust into the classroom.
Roe v. Wade has a good chance
of being overturned. The legaliza-
tion of abortion has been
anathema to Reagan and the new-
righters from the very minute the
1974 decision was announced. He
and the people he will appoint do
not believe women should have a
choice. Abortion is murder, they
say, and tons of illegal, unsafe
clinics will open once again.
Many procedural safeguards for
the accused will fall prey to the
law-and-order mentality of those
who inhabit the Reagan ad-
ministration. Some have already
been weakened by the present
Court. Will due process and right
to a fair trial be thrown out the
window in an effort to crack down
on the seedier side of our society?
If these vanguards of our Constitu-
tion are destroyed, our country
itself may be next.
The Supreme Court was last a
major issue during the Nixon cam-
paign of 1968. He was for a law-
and-order court that would spare
no mercy on the due process tradi-
tion of our society. Ironic that he
turned out to be someone who
needed a little due process himself.
It is also a twist of fate that his ap-
pointees turned against him in the
Pentagon Papers case.
Don't give up hope. People have
been appointed to the Court
because presidents thought they
would vote one way and they end-
ed up voting another. Ask
Eisenhower about Earl Warren.
But, to be sure, let's just hope
some of the present, more liberal
judges live to be healthy oc-
togenarians.
"Campus Forum
Plank Cartoon Blasphemous
I, along with several of my friends,
feel that what was printed under the ti-
tle of "Walkin' the Plank" in the
Tuesday edition of The East Caroli-
nian was outright blasphemy!
This comic strip depicts Jesus as a
silly, pointless imbecile (with a poor
sense of humor), and even goes as far
as having him use profanity
("helluva i.e. "hell of a uses the
word "hell" as a vain expression and
fits most people's definition of pro-
fanity). You have made the greatest
and one of the most important men in
the history of the world look like a
moron in your eight-frame strip, offen-
ding several people in the process.
Christ is not some myth or literary
figure, but the Son of God, who died
for the sins of the world.
Not that Christ is above going into
Krispy Kreme or talking with a guy like
Nick (but I think he is above that old
joke) � or even a bit of humor. In
fact, Christ was often known for his
sharp wit in dealing with the Pharisees,
but in an honest matter, not with cheap
one-liners like those used in your strip.
I also think Christ was (is) above going
to a party celebrating Halloween, a
holiday created by a pagan religion.
I do not know if Alan Guy shares my
beliefs in Christianity, but regardless, I
think he should show respect for my
beliefs and the beliefs of Christians
everywhere.
Richard Glosser
Sophomore, Fine Arts
Doonesbury
JEEP&tS, THIS IS UPSeTTING 11
cant believe i slept through
the election1 twas registerep
this time 11 hap a stakb'
V
EVER SINCE I HEARD THE PRESIDENT
TALK ABOUT SAVING HIGHUiAYl AND
MAU8U FOR KIPS '00 YEARS FROMNOU,
TVE BEEN PSYCHED IUAS GOING TO
r GO FOR IT, FINALLY
) f U� ACTUKEARE5P0N-
SJBLEAPULT'
UNTHINKABLE
THINKABLE
Congress Screws Around
By JACOB M. SCHLESINGES
Tto New Rrpabttr
The Senate floor on the afternoon of
Friday, Oct. 5, 1984, was awash in big
names. Ted Kennedy traded com-
pliments with Strom Thurmond. Barry
Goldwater argued with Jennings Ran-
dolph. Howard Baker chatted strategy
with Bob Dole.
Then, at about 5 p.m. in the back of
the chamber, Daniel Patrick Moynihan
stepped to the portable lectern and
began lecturing � as if to
undergraduates. As his glasses migrated
from his face to his hands to his breast
pocket and back to his face, the senior
senator from New York berated his col-
leagues for their faults.
"What has happened to Congress?"
he asked. "Why can it not do its work?"
It was an all-too-pertinent query, cap-
ping as it did an incredibly embarrassing
week for the nation's lawmakers. Con-
gress had originally planned to adjourn
by Thursday, Oct. 4, to give its members
a month to campaign for re-election.
Trying to meet the deadline, the Senate
pulled two near all-nighters and rammed
through several important measures.
But a civil rights bill with overwhelm-
ing support in both Houses got lost in
the shuffle because there wasn't enough
time. Ditto the genocide treaty and an
environmental cleanup bill. Even so.
Congress failed to adjourn on time
because it had failed to fulfill its most
basic responsibility � approving a
government budget.
Moynihan's question was difficult to
answer. No one controls the sprawling
legislative process, yet everyone assesses
blame. President Reagan, explaining his
decision to shut down the federal
bureaucracy without a budget, said,
"You can lay this right on the majority
party of the House of Representatives
That one was too ludicrous to let pass
� the Democratic House had, in fact,
approved a temporary funding exten-
sion, and the Republican Senate had
not. House Majority Leader Jim Wright
stormed to the press gallery to issue a
refutation.
"It's inaccurate; it's untrue, and he
repeatedly does this Wright said. "He
lives in a fantasy world, as if he states it
and then it's so I'm sick and tired of
my colleagues being whipping boys for
his policy failures
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
thatSit-hit
HWWN ONE STEP
C I AT A TIMS
YOU Vf GOT THE SENSITIVITY OF A
LUG WRENCH, KNOWTHAT, JJ?I'VE
JUST MSSEP MY FIRST-EVER CHANCE
,T0VOreANDALlY0UCANQ0ISRE
MNPMB I
�j iX STILL PONT
Cc 3k HAVE A JOB'
rSSF
WEIL, I PONT HAVE TO
TAKE THIS ABUSE' I'M GOOD
GOING INTO TOWN 70 PLAN.Z
SEE A MOVIE' HAVE A
�I NICE TIME
THANK YOU, MIKE BY
THE WAY, CAN I HAVE
MY ALLOWANCE BEFORE
I GO7
r
SHE SURE IS BEING
A RHYMES-WITH
WITCH TODAY
ITt JUST
AFEiAJ
BUCKS, J.J
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The House, for its part, blamed the
Senate. Rep. Silvio Conte, D-Mass
delivered the most stinging attack in his
"Ode to a Hundred Neros
"Last night I had the strangest dream
as I lay in bed. I saw a lovely chamber
decked in gold, blue, white and red.
Ninety-nine men and women sat and
played their violins. But instead of a
conductor stood a man in stripes and
pins, 'ft's only a billion bucks he cried,
and pleaded for their votes. The or-
chestra found harmony and put it in
their notes. Each player took a turn with
an amendment as baton. Each move-
ment ever louder as the piece dragged on
and on. Then suddenly the drapes
caught fire and flames shot up the wall.
And soon the room was full of smoke
and busts began to fall. The pillars
cracked � the orchestra responded right
on key. Ignoring all around them, not
resisting any spree. What happended
next, I do not know. Gad saved me. I
awoke. But one-half of the Capitol was
left in dust and smoke. The symphony
composed last night would put Mozart
to shame. But the orchestra's a
laughingstock, and gluttony's to
blame. "
At 6 p.m. Thursday, the House-
Senate conference committee crammed
into Room S-207 to try and come up
with a budget for fiscal 1985. In the cor-
ridors outside the room one could see at
least part of the reason for the fiscal
paralysis.
As Reagan prepared to shut down the
government Thursday morning, the hot
topic on the House floor was a proposal
to underwrite $33 million in interest
payments owed b the Kennedy. (
for the Performing Arts. Eight mei
rose to denounce the debtor R
Gerald Solomon of New York wo
rhetorical battle with his conden
of the "moonlight raid on the fe I
treasury by bandits wearing black
and ball gowns" in "the most expci
and silliest night at the opera since tl
Marx brothers
Rep. Toby Roth of Wisconsin
rupted the indignation to declare.
the blue, that "in the next session I i
tend to press forward with my I
point (farm) export proposal " Indiai
Republican Rep. Dan Burton rose l
claim the Congressional golf tr p
had won from Illinois Democrat M
Russo. And as the budget conferees I
gled into the night, the House debate
resolution from Bill Goodhng oi 1
sylvania to make William Penn a I 5
citizen.
After a moving tribute to the
of his home state. Goodling vieldec I
questions from the floor. In a sad
unintentional parody of Congress lacl
of fiscal discipline throughout the weel
Romano L. Mazzoh of Kentucky r
ask if any costs would be incurl
through benefits to Penn's descend i
or other provisions He was ass
there would be none, and the moi
passed unanimously.
The government remained shut, an
Congress kept talking. Bui Wi
Penn is, at last, an American.
(Jacob Schlesinger is a reporter '
The Sew Republic.j
ict. I'M I mlrd teaturr �vndittr lot
Things I Thought Of
ByGREGRIDEOl 1
You know it's been a helluva long time since the last tune 1 brought
zany zingers and ludicrous laughs. I believe the election supplied those in m
absence. But now that it's over and the people have made their mistakes, once
again the time has come for "Things I Thought Of
Why does the toilet paper dispenser in a public rest room not roll1 Do they
expect you to get up and sort of glide against it? I guess it's so you won use
so many sheets at once, but if you're like the rest of us, you unravel the d
thing, do your business and never go back to that darn stall again.
.4 poem (to the tune of Red Ridinghood or some such slum: Over tht
river and through the woods to Jesse's house we go, hut ir you 're "laik
you better stay back or you'll be shining shoes. And it vou 're preunant
or gay, Jesse regulates your day. But'if you've not toxic wtjstc. dor
make haste, he '11 see you anytime.
I know where socks go when they escape the washer or drver (You know
what I mean, where the two have a domestic quarrel and one leaves the othei
to go it alone in the big, bad boot world.) Well, argyles go to Minnesota, but
all others, including smelly sweatsocks, go to Arnie's Meatpa,kers on the cor-
ner of 57th and Broadway in lower Manhattan. There, they're sorted, shred
ed and made into McDonalds' uniforms.
I saw a dinasaur on the third floor of Brewster the other dav. I think he was
looking for his advisor, something about having trouble with a stats class Oh
well.
Rumor: Ronald Reagan had to be awakened Wednesday morning and told
he had won the election. He immediately said he had not been sleeping with
Nancy so he couldn't possibly have an election. Then, without even pausing.
he dozed back off.
News Flash: Walter Mondale arrived in New York City Thursdav morning
after being blown off the map by Ronald Reagan on Tuesday. The former vice
president was rushed quickly to Mercy Hospital in Queens where he underwent
emergency surgery to remove a dullness growth at the base of his brain.
A toy-making facility in Upper Volta has been raided by the CIA and more
than 3,500 cabbage patch whores have been confiscated. The dolls were
reportedly being shipped to cities in the United States, where thev were auc-
tioned off in red-light districts.
Did you notice that most gay whales who spout Christian beliefs voted for
Jesse Helms, hoping to get nuked after WWII1 starts because the Senate
Foreign Relations Committee decided Idi Amin is a cool dude. Reallv Look at
the exit polls.
Jim Hunt may have lost, but not a hair was out of place. A credit to his
long-time friend and hairdresser, Marky. He looked marvelous, but 1 didn't
quite understand why he came out against busing now. Was that why he had
the windshield wiper?
Now that it's finally cold, maybe we don't have to look at those darn boxer
shorts sticking out of frat boys' shorts. The only thing more disgusting is the
guy in front of me in Econ who smells like warm fish.
Who decided where the letters should go on a typewriter. I'm tired of the
way they are, so fjkwoi skkds jfueie iiwsaqm irmqww.
And remember, vote.
tmmmmm
Fatal Injuries A t Universith
Hazing Beco
(USPS) � These are good
times for college fraternities.
After two decades of decline,
membership in fraternities has
gone way up. But as more and
more students have joined, the
hazing of new pledges has
become a serious problem.
Hazing may seem like harmless
fun, but it can often cause
physical harm, mental distress,
discomfort and embarassment.
And it can sometimes lead to
death.
Common causes of hazing
deaths include alcohol poisoning,
heart attack, suffocation and
drowning. New state laws pro-
hibit hazing, but dangerous in-
itiation rites are still widespread
"In the next few years, you're
going to see a larger number of
deaths from hazing Jack
levin, sociology professor at
N .neastern University, said.
Eileen Stevens is fighting to
keep this prediction from coming
true. After her son Chuck died in
a hazing incident five years d.
she founded the Committee to
Halt Useless College Killings,
cal'ed CHUCK in memory of her
son and others who met senseless
deaths in fraternity mitiati
Stevens' von died pledging the
Klan Alpine fraternity at Alfred
University. During February in
upstate New York, he was locked
in a car trunk and told he could
not come out until he had con-
sumed huge amounts of whiskev .
wine and beer. He died &e
hours later of acute
poisoning and exp reez-
mg temperatures
Stevens was upset wher
university informed her that her
son had died from an "overdose
of alcohol at a party but she
was outraged when she
discovered the truth about the
hazing incident. Later Stevens
learned "the college did not ever.
discipline" the fraternity
members involved. She has car
paigned against hazing ever since
When Stevens first started her
organization, only five states
outlawed hazing. Today, eigh-
NAACP
Active In
Area Voting
By HAROI DJOYNER
4uviati! Sf� Mit'�f
The ECU Chapter of the N
tional Association tor the Ad-
vancement
continuing to reach goals set
earlier this year, according to Jef-
frey Canady. publicity chairman
for" the ECl NAACP char
"One our main
secure a free ballot for ev.
qualified American cil
Canadv said. "We were able
apply that goal in ty's
election. The ECU chapter worl
ed with voter reg
absentee ballots and I real'tv d
think it affected the large turr
of Pitt County voters Canadv
also noted several ECU NAACP
members helped at the polling
precincts. "We had several
members hand out candidate in-
formation leaflets, gave vo
rides to the polls.
registered voters to remind them
of the election and
assistance to voters who co
not read their ballot
Other plans for the NAACP
include celebrating Martin
Luther King Jr Dav in Januarv
and acknowledging Black
History Month in Fcbruar) c
hope to get the ECU chap:cr
more involved with local and na-
tional affairs he said "We
want to keep the students inform-
ed of what's going
nationally
The current officers of the
ECl NAACP include W
Case, president; Herward
Manley. vice president. Connie
Shelton, assistant secret
Monieuh Womble, treasurer.
and Jeffrev Canadv. publicity
chairman.
"The ECL chapter has been
here since 1981 We are continu-
ing to make progress and this is a
great chance for minoritj
students to voice their opinions
through the NAACP. We want to
get everyone involved and make
things happen Canadv said.
teen states
hazing, and
eight other
testimony a
and her anti-
forts, Steven
ed, either dirl
in having law
"These ial
hands of coll
Stevens
was treated
slap on the wj
again, the
incidents qui(
few repercusj
will involv
pena. � i
Since '
tion. Steverij
on
puses. Stev
mes
anti-ha
"7 �
ed mv -
very .
nities
"1 �
going I
tion o'
the Nationa
ference
The N I
� �i0 frater
ruses.
:ethec
ed in 1909
AM
have a:
books m all 5
haz
I'm i
anyrhir.j
Steven
make the
There are
I
.
"The j
i
educate eacr
such incident!
Steven
the
cidents
ing
T7!
Fl
MtembTBt
I
V I

i





round
l Centei
nembers
Rep
� i ork won the
ndemnation
" e federal
- black ties
�si expensi1
: ra since
isconsin intei
declare, out i �
. : session I in
� fOUl
Indiana
rose i
ph he
- Dt rat Mar:
� ' erees ha
W
Pe
a U.S
�de
�r 1yielded t n a sadh
�beress's lack a ee k k s rose t( incurred rscendanb assured le mot ion
Buishut, and William

�'(trier for
eht Of
.
e in mj
- es. once
1 Do thej
a m 1 use
� be darn
' . , r r
�. at k
. nant
Jon 7
. know
be other
Minnesota, but
� � n the cor-
shred-
a � 1 think he va
. i . Oh
. and told
eeping with
: i istng,
1 morning
The former vice
A .ere he underwent
theh,his brain. eIA and more
1I hedolls were
Aherethey were auc-
�uthristian beliefs oted for
starts because the Senate
a :ool dude. Really. Look at
?ui ol place A credit to his
ked marvelous, but I didn't
ang now Was that wh he had
Ifine to look at those darn boxer
nly thing more disgusting is the
irm fish.
a typewriter. I'm tired of the
Ti irmqwu
Fatal Injuries A t Universities
Hazing Becomes
Problem
(USPS) - These are good
times for college fraternities.
After two decades of decline,
membership in fra'ernities has
gone way up. But as more and
more students have joined, the
hazing of new pledges has
become a serious problem.
Hazing may seem like harmless
fun, but it can often cause
physical harm, mental distress,
discomfort and embarassment.
And it can sometimes lead to
death.
Common causes of hazing
deaths include alcohol poisoning,
heart attack, suffocation and
drowning. New state laws pro-
hibit hazing, but dangerous in-
itiation rites are still widespread.
"In the next few years, you're
going to see a larger number of
deaths from hazing Jack
Levin, sociology professor at
Northeastern University, said.
Eileen Stevens is fighting to
keep this prediction from coming
true. After her son Chuck died in
a hazing incident five years ago,
she founded the Committee to
Halt Useless College Killings,
called CHUCK in memory of her
son and others who met senseless
deaths in fraternity initiations.
Stevens' son died pledging the
Klan Alpine fraternity at Alfred
University. During February in
upstate New York, he was locked
in a car trunk and told he could
not come out until he had con-
sumed huge amounts of whiskey,
wine and beer. He died several
hours later of acute alcohol
poisoning and exposure to freez-
ing temperatures.
Stevens was upset when the
university informed her that her
son had died from an "overdose
of alcohol at a party but she
was outraged when she
discovered the truth about the
hazing incident. Later Stevens
learned "the college did not even
discipline" the fraternity
members involved. She has cam-
paigned against hazing ever since.
When Stevens first started her
organization, only five states
outlawed hazing. Today, eigh-
NAACP
Active In
Area Voting
B HAROLD JOYNEK
Xwivtunt Ne� tdititr
The ECU Chapter of the Na-
tional Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored People is
continuing to reach goals set
earlier this year, according to Jef-
fre Canady, publicity chairman
for the ECU NAACP chapter.
"One our main goals is to
secure a free ballot for every
qualified American citizen
( anady said. "We were able to
applv that goal in yesterday's
election. The ECU chapter work-
ed with voter registration and
absentee ballots and I really do
think it affected the large turnout
oi Pitt County voters Canady
also noted several ECU NAACP
members helped at the polling
precincts. "We had several
members hand out candidate in-
formation leaflets, gave voters
rides to the polls, called
registered voters to remind them
of the election and offered
assistance to voters who could
not read their ballot
Other plans for the NAACP
include celebrating Martin
I uther King Jr Day in January
and acknowledging Black
History Month in February. "We
hope to get the ECU chapter
more involved with local and na-
tional affairs he said. "We also
want to keep the students inform-
ed of what's going on
nationally
The current officers of the
ECU NAACP include Wilma
Case, president; Herward
Manley, vice president; Connie
Shelton, assistant secretary;
Monteith Womble, treasurer;
and Jeffrey Canady, publicity
chairman.
"The ECU chapter has been
here since 1981. We are continu-
ing to make progress and this is a
great chance for minority
students to voice their opinions
through the NAACP. We want to
get everyone involved and make
things happen Canady said.
teen states have laws banning
hazing, and bills are pending in
eight other states. Through her
testimony at legislative hearings
and her anti-hazing lobbying ef-
forts, Stevens "has been involv-
ed, either directly or indirectly
in having laws passed in 13 states.
"These laws strengthen the
hands of college administrators
Stevens said. "Before, hazing
was treated with probation or a
slap on the wrist. Time and time
again, the colleges tried to keep
incidents quiet. There were very
few repercussions. Now hazing
will involve severe criminal
penalties, as it should
Since founding her organiza-
tion, Stevens has lectured to
students on over 240 college cam-
puses. Stevens stresses her
message is not anti-fraternity, but
anti-hazing.
"The fraternities have embrac-
ed my work Stevens said. "It's
very gratifying to me that frater-
nities have recognized that hazing
is a problem.
"There's a great deal of change
going on, and a lot of positive ac-
tion on the part of students and
the National Interfraternity Con-
ference Stevens said.
The N.I.C which represents
5,000 fraternity chapters on 650
campuses, has opposed hazing
since the organization was found-
ed in 1909.
Although Stevens' goal is to
have anti-hazing laws on the
books in all 50 states, she says the
laws will not succeed in ending
hazing without student support.
I'm not going to change
anything, neither are the laws
Stevens said. "The kids have to
make the change themselves.
There are vows of secrecy and
oaths of silence. That's what has
to change.
"The greatest thing students
can do to prevent hazing is to
educate each other and bring
such incidents out in the open
Stevens said. "They need to have
the courage to report such in-
cidents, becausetoo often, haz-
ing incidents are found out after
the fact, and that's sad
Since 1978, 29 students have
died in hazing incidents. Experts
expect hazing to increase because
of the 67 percent increase in
fraternity membership on
American campuses since 1971.
On August 30, 1984, hazing
claimed its latest victim. Texas
A&M sophomore Bruce Dean
Goodrich, 20, died of heat stroke
after three upperclassmen roused
him from his bed at 2:30 a.m
forced him to run around cam-
pus, and Finally do 87 sit-ups and
push-ups. Goodrich collapsed
shortly after and later died. The
upperclassmen were members of
A&M's Corps of Cadets and
Goodrich, a Webster, New York,
transfer student, was a cadet
recruit. The "motivational exer-
cises" Goodrich endured are
outlawed by the university.
The three cadets, as well as
their unit commander, were in-
dicted on misdemeanor charges
of criminally negligent homicide
and hazing. They were released
on a personal recognizance bond
in early October. Two weeks ago,
the three cadets were suspended
7A
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CoNiiD2J
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AWO MICK THINKS
HE- SMEULJ Or-lfcTHiNG
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 8 l�u 5
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Call Us For Any Additonal Information
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Si





THJ EAS1 CAROl INIAN
NDVIMBIRH, 1W4
Fall, Summer Graduation
Planned For December
Jl'
By ERNEST ROBERTS
V�� W rlln
The ECU Program Committee
recently announced plans for a
program and reception for 1984
summer and fall graduates.
The program is scheduled for
10a.m. Saturday, Dec. l.atHen-
drix Theatre in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. A reception is plan-
ned in Mendenhall lounge follow-
ing the program.
"This program is not a com-
mencement said Melinda
Da is, senior class president.
"And this program won't take
the place of a commencement. It
is a compromise for a formal
December commencement
According to Davis, the pro-
gram is for the graduates and
their friends and family. This
program is funded through
graduation fees.
The idea came from UNC-CH,
which has had successful pro-
grams for about three years, ac-
cording to Davis. The idea of a
program at ECU was introduced
by Lisa Roberts, last year's senior
class president. The coordinator
for the program is C.C. Rowe,
who is also coordinator of Han-
dicapped Student Services. These
people have played an important
part in initiating a program at
ECU, Davis said.
The program will be different
from a formal commencement.
There will be no caps and gowns
and no formal school or depart-
ment seating. "This program is
designed to be more personal
than regular commencement
Davis said. "I think it's a good
idea for summer and fall
graduates
Davis also commented that in-
vitations should be mailed by the
end of the week to summer and
fall graduates.
A
Ail RGHT nLlA,wHO
ARl You sPPovsfcP
to at ?
ffb fa11 itm
YtA Ri&HT And I'rn
�saint fi.it u
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For imat crac rn
�yZj !4iNt You
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Martin Thanks Democrats
Continued From Page 1
D-Montgomery, who defeated
Republican businessman John
Carnngton for lieutenant gover-
nor Jordan said he and Martin
disagree on issues but his
"obligation is to work for the
people
Martin said early Wednesday,
"1 intend to work with the leader-
ship of the General Assembly
�hich is Democraticallv controll-
ed
Martin also thanked
Democrats � who outnumber
Republicans 3-1 in North
Carolina � for supporting the
conservative veteran con-
gressman and prominent
Democratic leaders for cam-
paigning for him.
"We couldn't have done it
without them Martin said.
"They gave a lot of credibility to
our campaign
With 94 percent of the state's
2,354 precincts reporting, Martin
had 1.111,963 votes, or 54 per-
cent, while Edmisten received
936,868 votes, or 46 percent.
A disheartened Edmisten also
thanked his supporters and said
he did not know what the future
held for him.
"May I thank the most
wonderful people in the world
and you know the most precious
possessions you have are your
friends Edmisten said.
��
Read It
In The
Classifieds
Caffeine Hinders More Than It Helps
(l SPS) � Most UllHfnfc Innu ihrw ,nnc nf ff
(I SPS) � Most students know three cups of coffee.
that a little caffeine taken before
or during an exam may give them
a feeling of much-needed energy.
What they don't know, however,
is that the combined effects of
exam-time stress and caffeine can
wreak havoc on their car-
diovascular system.
A new studv found that in-
gesting caffeine immediately
before an exam or a similar
stressful situation raises blood
pressure and intensified the ef-
fects of stress on the heart. Duke
University professor Dr. James
Lane outlined his findings in his
report, "Caffeine Magnifies Car-
diovascular Responses to
Stress
Lane reached his conclusions
by measuring the blood pressure
of 33 male undergraduates as
they took sample 12-minute math
tests. The average blood pressure
wen: up seven millimeters when
students had ingested no caffeine
before the test, but it went up ten
Doints after students had two or
r
The average blood pressure of
the students who had taken no
caffeine was 120 over 65 before
the test and 127 over 72 when the
test was over. But after two cups
of coffee, after-test blood
pressure averaged 135 over 77.
Blood pressure of more than 140
over 90 is considered high.
Lane also found some correla-
tion between hypertension and
unusually large blood pressure in-
creases during stressful situa-
tions. He suggested that further
study of the detrimental effects
of stress and caffeine on the car-
diovascular system could aid in
the "prevention and management
of cardiovascular disease
&&&
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Happy Hour
Olde Town Inn
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Get Your Spring Semester Application in NOW!
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PIEDMONT'S 50 OFF COLLEGE RARE.
Face it,your learning years are not your prime earning
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Through February 28, l985,you can fly anywhere
Piedmont flies for halt fare To LA and New Yrk And to all
kinds of hot spots and hometowns in between
Whats the catch?Well,you must be under26 and have
a valid student ID. Read the tine print below for restrictions
Piedmont's 50 Off College Fare More proof that our
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n rLJwuhibLrmind-tTil)twkrtsrmiMfvfnn fuivcd ,if le�iM vmi jn � n
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Sundayafta 1 pm HMaymmrestnetumsapply yarn n .
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"H
Trivia For Th
w
I eas
-
Mosi
M s
Most c
Mos
:
Be si
Catch The Holiaa
Bv 1 IN M KOM , K
Holidav
Christmas From .
visiting
seem;
special w
io arv.
millions
itions x-
Volunu ��
jeci.
In 1971 t .
dents si ��
' h v delivei a -
Christmas Oav
hospitals ;
program expanded
volunteers Now the H
Pro j e d has t hoi
olunteer who visit mil
People throughout the
States and v
ehristina- and (haniAd' W
�s the Holidav Protect re
about? "People being with p
Pie "
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ANP KINCM
.� � , AND
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jHour
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ov. 8th
10:00
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NOVEMBER 8, 1984
Pngtl
(.reenvilles boys The Usuals, will be appearing at the Coffeehouse in the Mendenhal! Student Center
this Fnda from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m.
Vet Turns Comedian
A Different Way To Get Laughs
Watching A tari Fall
(l PI) - There are creative peo-
and there are business people.
The problem is getting both of
them in the same company, ac-
ding to Scott Cohen, who
chronicled the history of Atari.
It there is a moral to the Atari
story, it ma be that neither
creativity nor business pro-
- at ism is enough to keep a
iwing company healthy,
Cohen said.
"You can onl be creative in
developing a product, and
straight-business in selling it he
-aid. "You have to have that
balance, ano Atari never had it
When Cohen began his Atari
story, it was intended to be a
high-tech success story about the
electronic games company that
c � ild. But Cohen missed his
deadline on the book, and during
the intervening weeks Atari
dn its sudden descent into an
ocean of red ink.
"Being late turned out to be
verv much to mv advantage
c onen said
Published bv McGraw-Hill,
Zap � The Rise and hall of
Atari, is a saga of the Silicon
Valley, an unlovely piece of
California territory that became
the nation's hotbed of high tech.
Most of its pioneers, Cohen
wrote, "put in 12-hour days,
seven days a week, for months,
and ended up depressed, divorced
and drunk, just like the prospec-
tors of California's first Gold
Rush
Atari was founded in 1972 by
Nolan Bushnell, a young engineer
with $500 and an interest in com-
puter games. Its first major pro-
duct, Pong, was a huge success.
But the hotshot engineers and
daring entrepreneurs who could
dream up the games and bet the
store on each new enterprise
could not carry Atari through its
transformation into a major
American business.
"Atari did as well as could be
expected, being run by people
who didn't know how to run a
company Cohen said in a re-
cent interview. "They had the
right product, but they weren't
well-managed. There was a
market there, but there wasn't
enough capital
When Warner Communica-
tions purchased Atari, Cohen
said, "a big company with lots of
money and no ideas bought a lit-
tle company with lots of ideas
and no money
The Warner people who took
over management of Atari "were
selling something they essentially
knew nothing about Cohen
said. When the computer games
sold like hotcakes, "they thought
it was because they were smart,
and they started to bring in more
people of their type
The influx of corporate
salesmen made life uncomfor-
table for the original engineers.
"Guys who were undisciplined
didn't like punching a time
clock Cohen said. "Atari
started losing its creative
people
The exodus began with
Bushnell, who walked off with
$15 million from the $28 milion
sale to Warner.
(UPI) � God knows there was
nothing funny about Vietnam.
Maybe that's why only one stand-
up comedian has emerged from a
war that toppled American
presidents and turned the country
upside down.
Both World Wars and even
Korea produced their share of
funnymen who made their starts
with jokes about misadventures
in the service.
But they were "popular" wars
in that most Americans sup-
ported the country's involve-
ment. There was little humor in-
volving Vietnam at home, but the
GIs, sailors, Marines and airmen
who fought in Southeast Asia liv-
ed with their own black humor.
The sole stand-up comedian to
surface in the wake of Vietnam is
Blake Clark, a broad-shouldered
southerner who looks a little like
Robin Williams but whose humor
has more bite.
Like most Vietnam vets, Blake
has a chip on his shoulder.
Understandably.
A lieutenant and platoon
leader in the 5th Infantry Divi-
sion � nicknamed The Devils in
Baggy Pants � Blake is a tough,
hard man whose sense of humor
has a keen edge.
He gets laughs with the bitter-
funny observations that strike
home with everyone, especially
Nam vets themselves.
Blake often starts his
monologue with a shocker: "Boy
I was really looking forward to a
hero's welcome when 1 came
home from Vietnam after all
those months in combat. I
remembered stories about the
kind of welcome and the ticker
tape parades they gave the
"When they had sold off all
the products developed by the
original people, they had no great
products to introduce because all
the great people had left Cohen
said. The new games ordered up
by the new management, like
"E.T and "Raiders of the Lost
Ark were inspired marketing
decisions, but turned out to be no
fun to play.
veterans of other wars. Even the
Iranian hostages got a ticker tape
parade and an invitation to the
White House. But with us Nam
vets it was different. People spit
on us when we came back. I'll
never forget my own experience
when I got off the plane at the
Atlanta airport. This guy came
up to me and said, 'You're a war-
monger and a murderer So I
killed him
After that opener there is a
stunned beat of silence before the
audience roars with laughter. The
joke is outrageous, cynical and
funny. It also makes a point.
"I'm finding audiences are
responding well because I'm not
bitter Blake said. "I smile a lot
while I'm telling Nam jokes. I've
been on the Johnny Carson show
four times and I get good reac-
tions. What some people don't
know is that some of my jokes
are things that really happened
Blake will join Bob Hope,
Charlton Heston, Ed McMahon,
George Peppard and Robert
Stack Nov. 12 at the Vietnam
Veterans Salute to the USO at
Los Angeles' Century Plaza
Hotel. The banquet for 600, at
$250 a plate, will benefit the Viet-
nam Veterans leadership Pro-
gram
"That program is important to
me because it helps so many Nam
vets who are still trying to get
back into the American
mainstream said Blake.
"A lot of the veterans still have
problems because of the stigma
attached to that war and the men
who fought it. There's still
discrimination against them. The
government and the people still
have a guilt complex about
Nam
"People don't feel right that
we went o.er there and the way
we were treated when we got
back. Hell, we don't want to be
thanked. We just don't want to
be blamed
To lighten the load, to bring a
little more understanding bet-
ween the vets and bodv politic,
Blake bases about a third of his
act on the war and its aftermath.
"One of mv stories involves
bavonet practice at Fort Dix
before mj outfit went to Nam
Blake -aid. grinning. "The drill
instructor had a routine. He'd
yell, 'What are the onlv two kin-
da people on a battlefield?' And
he had to yell back. 'The quick
and the dead?' One day he yelled
that question at me and I hollered
back, 'The minorities and the
poor When he quit laughing he
ordered me to do push-ups for
the rest of the da "
"There was a lot oi gallows
humor in Nam We had to laugh.
It's the onlv thing that kept us
sane sometimes People were
misled about us in pictures like
Apocalypse Sow, showing all the
troops stoned out oi their gourds
all 'he time. It iust wasn't the
truth
"But 1 remember one dark
night in th ingle when I got a
call from an observation post. A
voice on the other end of the line
said, 'Hev, lieutenant, we got
some movement in the bushes! I
asked, 'What does it look like?'
And the voice came back. 'A
giant chocolate chip cookie
"That's how it was sometimes
in Nam
Atari shipped $98 milion worth
of cartridges the week before
Thanksgiving in 1982. A week
and a half later, it shipped none.
Cancellations replaced orders
and Warner closed its 19$? se-
cond quarter losing $283.4
million.
Atari recently was purchased
by Jack Tramiel, a hard-driving
entrepreneur who founded Com-
modore. Atari's chief rival, but
resigned from the company in a
dispute last January.
"If Tramiel brings it back up
so it's a great company once
again, and thev go up against
Commodore, it would be a great
reason to write another book
about it Cohen said.
U
tijjps
EFARE.
ir prime earning
ing offcampus.
i fly anywhere
'vYrk And to all
r een.
jnder26 and have
w for restrictions.
rc proof that our
JSt a loftv ideal.
Trivia For The Day
Best food: Bennington College
Worst food: University of Hawaii
Best party schools: West Virginia University, University of Miami,
University of Wyoming
Most promiscuous: Boston University
I east promiscuous: Oral Roberts University
test students: UC Santa Barbara, Arizona State University
I gliest men: University of Pennsylvania, Indiana University
I gliest women: University of Alaska
Most sorority action: University of Mississippi
Most fraternity action: University of Illinois
Most computers (and nerds): Carnegie-Mellon University
Most political: University of WisconsinMadison
I east political: Rollins College
Most bars per capita: Marquette University, Skidmore College
Best campus bar: The Cafe, Bennington College
Vv orst bars: Brigham Young University (No bars allowed in Provo)
mciest cars: Southern Methodist University-
's! school spirit: Texas A&M, Princeton University
1 cast school spirit: Emory, SUNY Albany
souvenir: Yale's blue bikini underpants that read "Beat
'�ard"
Fro I �a Birnh�. k of I uls
Catch The Holiday Spirit
� 2S1 S72
B TINAMAROSCHAK
rrilim rdilor
Holidays seem to bring out the
best in people, especially around
(hnstmas. From caroling to
visiting nursing homes, the spirit
of giving and sharing always
�eems to be at its best. And for
about 13 years groups of very
�pecial volunteers have brought
and meaning to the lives of
millions of people confined to
hospitals, homes and other in-
stitutions. Who are these people?
Volunteers for the Holiday Pro-
ject.
In 1971 eight San Francisco
residents started the Holiday Pro-
ject by delivering gifts on
Christmas Day to peoPle m
hospitals. Just two years later the
Program expanded to 400
volunteers. Now the Holiday
Project has thousands of
volunteers who visit millions of
people throughout the United
States and Canada each
Christmas and Chanukah. What
8 the Holiday Project really
about? "People being with peo-
ple
Greenville residents and ECU
students now have the opportuni-
ty to be a part of this worthwhile
organization. Headed by Dee
Tropeano, the Greenville Holi-
day Project is in desperate need
of volunteers and money. Accor-
ding to Fundraising Chairperson
Jenny Eckert, there are currently
onlv about 20 volunteers, most of
who are ECU students.
Eckert said that the group
plans on visiting three facilities
on Dec. 6 � Earth (a home for
emotionally disturbed children),
ECVC (East Carolina Vocational
Center) and the Alcohol
Rehabilitation Center. "We need
volunteers and donations of any
kind Eckert said. She explained
that the group raises money and
sends it to National Headquarters
in Washington, D.C. From there,
National Headquarters sends
back unwrapped presents and
wrapping paper. This year the
Holiday Project plans to visit
around 150 people in Greenville.
Volunteers are needed to raise
money, coordinate entertainment
See UNIQUE, Page 8.
Ferguson To Jazz Up ECU
The ECU Special Concerts
Committee will present "An
Evening with Maynard
Ferguson" Wednesday, Nov. 14
at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
Maynard Ferguson is the one
musician in the jazz world who
can truly be labeled "a legend in
his own time He has been refer-
red to as provocative, ingenious,
sophisticated, powerful and col-
ossal.
Ferguson formed his first band
in 1957. Known as the Birdland
Dream Band, this group went on
to win numerous Downbeat and
Playboy )daz polls. The list of
names who came through
Ferguson's band reads like a
who's who of jazz greats � Don
Ellis, Slide Hampton, Bob
James, Clark Terry and Willie
Maiden, just to name a few.
In 1967 Ferguson dissolved his
band and moved to England
where he embarked on a new
phase of his career. His M.F.
Horn album received critical ac-
claim not only from jazz buffs
but also from music fans. With
the release of the theme from
Rocky, Ferguson made the jazz-
pop crossover. This resulted in
his first gold album and the tune
received a Grammy nomination
for the "Best Pop Instrumental"
award.
Constant touring of U.S. col-
leges and concert halls and
several overseas tours confirm
the popularity of Ferguson. This,
coupled with the fact that he has
sold more albums than any other
bandleader since the 1940s,
makes him a "must see attrac-
tion
Tickets for the concert are on
sale at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center.
They are $1.50 for ECU students,
$3 for ECU faculty and staff, and
$5 for the public. All tickets at
the door will be $5. Tickets may
be purchased Monday through
Friday from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
For additional information call
757-6611, ext. 266.
Maynard Ferguson will entertain ECU on Wednesday, No. 14 at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium
"pT
T
!
1

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A Unique Gift
fMAiT WBEK,K1 OLD VArV
�' PRoppp ��AP V A
CAFE AAAA'O'STtCK wS
a, police peye-crfv
OHL-S J-OLP ovR. HEfO
not ro Germvqlvzp. . -
( ontinued From Page 7.
foi the patients, wrap presents,
and n isil the institutions
ccoi ding to a brochure, " 1 he
Holuia Project is foi everyone.
It is an opportunity foi you to
join with thousands of others,
usi like yourself, in a powerful
experience of being with people
v onfined in institutions across the
country. Equal!) important is the
opportunity you provide for the
people you visit to contribute to
you. In allowing yourself to be
deeph tinned and touched bv
these people, you will be giving
them the ultimate gilt the
chance to make a difference in
your life
One volunteei probably summ
ed it up best: "We gave gifts and
sang songs, but it was as it the
songs and the gifts wete just the
excuse we used to be close to each
other. Now I have onlv to touch
m experience ot The Holiday
Project to have the holiday
season be the way 1 always
wanted it to be
v"
fA none.
tf
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gji&w
Classifieds
SALE
- SAI t Used bicycle parts Call
. '5 to discuss further
Ha Cehca
'6.s
� f �
class
TAR Full Size
tai a fh case Need to
Call 758 7489
P ANO fGk SAI E Wanted respon
s . e party to assume small monthly
tents on spmet console piano
b� seen locally Write (include
phone number) Credit Manager
PO box 521 Beckemeyer, It.
MISC
1
old tortie point
Itle Kensi
. D CAKE Single father with
4'j � rs eecis to exchange
fer hours child i:are Prefi
I sami aae ana sex call
��� h yema club
'ea?her watch band
I trim If found
-�� . a S: '791
� � ��
FOUND
lec-
s-i52
A gold ladies ��. H I near
buiic rig - tit ation
Dixie at
REWARD Foi return of antique
silver r mg with light blue stone con
tact Amanda Goodwin 752 7791
51 Kitty roo. calicocat, Female.
rs old Gone smce Oct 15 Lost
Student St and Johnston
��;� Roo phone home1 752 5856
PERSONAL
f v HOUR Tne ttie Sisters of
- appa Ph Fraternty will be hav
ng a ha houi tonight a
s . n e out and party with
�he nttie sisters of Pi Kappa Phi
12 door prizes will be
. . e n a a a , ' ! !
ash The Bob Liddle Birthday
'ash promises to be a real smash
"he Ninth day of November will be a
late to remember So bag exams
and screw school. Happy Hour is the
ule The Blue Aoon is the spot,
sted peopie forget me not! You're
nvited
THIS one is for you! Happy 21st oir
jay S'ai la Rose! ! Be prepared to
elebrate Friday nite Love Linda
OMANCE No Promises
o expectations
Nc obligations
hj don't even have to respond
simply love you - Kluke
KEVIN JARMAN Happy 21st bir
thday I love you your
"qualified little gizmo Lisa
AT THE BAL L It was what's that in
your pocket and where is your car?
Then it was Black surrounding red
surrounding black surrounding red.
Finally it was flesh on flesh after
marathon sex F P
ALL I need is a tooi buzz and a tas
ty waveless water bed and I'm
almost fine
PHI TAU LITTLE SISTERS We
hope you are prepared to party all
weekend starting Friday with happy
hour at the Attic and ending with a
trim party at the house Sunda
Don't forget about the meeting Sun
day at five Special speaker Ha" ,
Johnson
GIN What s up nowa
CHESTER Sunday at 12 sharp' It
you're late were going to auction off
� �
11 � r i I led
C haf k � . ique bi
TOM NORTON Congratulations
from your brothers o your new
posi
LIMPY Zero attenda
cut it1 Get in or get out'
WANTED S e to
P'pe!rne or Motebecane 10 speed
Talk to any Phi Tau mcp
J.T No B I nothing like
a hyj
DAVE goldm � step
Finish
ed Purple Pig candidate for s i
Chi P B The s - p again
They really chafe me Just wait til
the boys from Dallas get their
revenge just like Dunn did to Webb!
Preesh, Foo
CHRISTINE u ve tiee
Doesn't matter Where you are
Touches my fe When we might go
together Touc hes my drea
�� �
GREENVIt.L E STUDENT
LAUNDRYSERVICE:Let
GreenvilleStudent i aundrySer
vice pickup,wash, dry,fold,
hany. asweII as deliveryour
laundry!Dry Cleaning,too!
758 3087
J �
4'tfr
evipeNce WWi
you Svn

Sf-
p�. tt y �.o�jt, m e" ' Kow
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lit
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST With 15
.ears wan'sfulltime typing at home
IBM typewriter Call 756 3660
COMPUTERIZED TYPIN SER
VICE Word processing spelling
electronically checked Term
papers and dissertations 1 75 per
page, paper included. Call Mark
after f.ve at 757 3440
("RAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY
Gam valuable marketing experience
while earning money Campus
i s'presentative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida Con
tact Bill Ryan at 1 800 282 6221
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID for pro
-mg ma'1 at home! Information,
! self a tressed, stamped
' : � i tes Box 95,
1
PROFESSIONAL typing service
experience, quality work, IBM
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758 5301
PROFFESiONAL typing service
all typing needs 758 5488 756 8241
HELP WAN! ED Apply at Western
Sizzlm' stk house 2903 E Tenth ST
Cooks ct'Shwasher, waitiesses, and
line girls
ROOMATE
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED: to
share fully furnished trailer � has
washerdryer, microwave, color TV
stereo- $175month utilities includ
ed Call 752 7378 after 6:30 p m
FEMALE Roommate wanted to
share two bedroom apartment close
to campus $145 month plus utilities.
Can move in immediately Nov
Rent already paid, start paying Dec
1 Call 756 5847.
MALE Needs roommate to share
furnished trailer Air cond Washer,
dryer private room and bath five
minutes from campus and $150
month, utilities included 756 5197
nights.
NOW OPEN!
DOWN
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CYCLERY
Full line of Bicvcles
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ONSOLIDATED
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768-3307 � Greenville Square Shopping Center
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Sports
NOVEMBERS. 1984
Page 9
NEIL JOHNSON - ECU Photo Lab
Darrtll speed has started the last seven games ai quarterback for the ECU football team, but in the Pirates'
season finale against Southern Miss, he'll be replaced b redshirt freshman Ron Jones
Heath Third Ail-Time Scorer
B scon COOPKR
suff nlrr
Despite a rough and tumble
formance last year, junior
placekicker Jefi Heath is shining
the Pirate- in "84.
"Jeff's having a great year
special teams coach John Patter-
son -aid. "He's done a great job
coming ofl such an aderse ear
ast year) � it ua simpl) a
'sophomore jinx
The Virginia Beach native has
made 11 of 14 field goal attempts
and is a perfect 20 20 in extra
ni attempts. Heath has scored
53 total points this year, putting
him in third place among ECU's
all-time scoring leaders. He needs
just 22 points to move into se-
cond place, while 40 points would
make him tops in the Pirate
history book.
Heath had an outstanding
freshman season for ECU. He set
a school record tor most field
g aN (16) in a single season. He
broke the school's record for the
longest field goal (58 yards),
which is aKo the longest field
goal by a North Carolina player.
His 16 field goals in 23 attempts
gave him a 69.6 percent accuracy
rate. Also, he was perfect in extra
points (27-27).
Against Texas-Arlington, he
set a school record with four field
goals, while setting an NCAA
record for average distance of the
four kicks (49.5). Heath was the
finest first year kicker in the
history o ECU, and his exploits
earned him second team all-south
independent honors in 1982.
Heath himself can't truly ex-
plain his outstanding freshman
year. "1 didn't really think that
much about it he said. "I just
went out there and did it
Although leading the Pirates in
scoring with 55 points in 1983,
Heath didn't enjoy the success he
had in his freshman year. He
missed three extra point attempts
and only connected on nine of his
21 field goal tries. "1 didn't really
work as hard as I should have
Heath said. "I felt really bad for
the team
Heath really wanted to do well
in his '84 campaign, so he did a
lot of conditioning and lost 25
pounds to ready himself. "It's a
real key to his success Coach
Patterson remarked. "He
deserves a great deal of credit
Heath's conditioning has
helped his kicking game con-
siderably. He also worked on his
mechanical skills as well. "We
went back to the basic fundamen-
tals Coach Patterson said.
"We practiced on drill steps and
getting the ball up
Though last year's perfor-
mance was mediocre, Heath
earned EC AC South first team
honors and was a member of the
greatest team in Pirate football
history. "It was really fun to play
LOU CLIMMONI � �CU MMto Laft
Pirate kicking sensation Jeff Heath is rapidly closing in on Cariester
rum pier as ECU's all-time scoring leader.
for a winning team (8-3 and na-
tionally ranked) Heath com-
mented.
This year the Pirates are strug-
gling with a 2-8 record and Heath
says it gets tough for players to
keep their motivation going dur-
ing such a season. "It's
frustrating for us when our work
just dosen't pay off. I really feel
bad for the coaches, but we've
got one more game, and hopeful-
ly we can finish with a win
Although Heath has enjoyed
considerable success while at
ECU, he was also a star in high
school. He lettered in soccer and
football all three years at First
Colon High School, while be-
ing named all-beach, all-
Tidewater and all-eastern
regional. In his senior year, he
was all-state and all-south
honorable mention.
Heath is an all-around athlete
according to Coach Patterson.
He's very coordinated and runs
the forty in 4.65 seconds. "Jeff's
a good athlete and a free spirited
young man Patterson stated.
"He's a very intense competitor
who's always ready to play
Jeff was not very highly
recruited out of high school.
However, he did receive letters
from Richmond, UNC, N.C.
State, Duke and Appalachain
State. He said he chose ECU
because of the enjoyable at-
mosphere. Also, "the coaching
staff was sincere and seemed to
care about the players
"I think the world of Coach
Emory. Also, the players were
great people and were easy to get
along with
Although this season still has
one game remaining, Heath is
looking forward to next year with
great optimism. "I'm aware of
the all-time scoring record, but I
plan to go out and do my best
Heath said. "We've seen the los-
ing end of college football, but
we're not losers here � we're go-
ing to go out and do our best
"Jeff's a winner and he'll do
whatever's necessary to help the
team Patterson exclaimed.
"He's done everything we've ask-
ed and more (Heath also makes
tackles on kick off returns)
ECU fans can look for Jeff
Heath in Pirate record books,
because barring an injury, he'll
become ECU's all-time leading
scorer.
ECU Awaits Southern Miss
ByBOBUENNERELLI
I Sports laformalloa Director
ECU Head Coach Ed Emory
stressed the importance of this
week's 11th and final game of the
1984 season with the Golden
Eagles of Southern Mississippi at
his weekly press luncheon.
"It is very important that we
close this season on a positive
note said Emory, whose team
enters Saturday's 1:30 p.m.
kickoff in ECU's Ficklen
Stadium at 2-8. "It is important
to the kids that we have
something positive to build on
for the 1985 season.
"But that doesn't mean I am
giving up on the older players
Emory said. "They will all get the
chance to go out one last time
and make ECU a winner. The
seniors have given a lot to this
program, and I'm going to give
them their chance to go out win-
ners
Southern Miss enters the game
at 2-7 and has suffered a year
very similar to ECU's. The
Golden Eagles, always a power
among Southern Independents,
are experiencing their first losing
season since 1976. The Pirates
will be on the short side of the
record for the first time since
1981.
"Southern Miss can play � we
know they can play, and we will
be ready Emory said. "We've
got problems, but hopefully we'll
end this season 3-8. We had pro-
blems last season when we were
8-3, but the problems seem more
evident when you're 2-8
Emory did say he would start
freshman Ron Jones at quarter-
back instead of Darrell Speed,
who has started the last seven
games. Emory said the decision
was based on Jones' play in last
week's 42-24 loss to
Southwestern Louisiana, but also
said that Speed would play a
great deal. Both have alternated
at quarterback the last four
games.
Emory also said sophomore
defensive end Randy Watts was
suspended for this week's game
for missing a Tuesday morning
meeting, while seniors Stefon
Adams (free safety) and Damon
Pope (tight end) have been
suspended for disciplinary
reasons.
Emory also said senior
flanker kick returner Henrv
Williams would miss his last col-
legiate game Saturday because of
a separated shoulder and broken
collarbone he suffered in last
week's loss to Southwestern Loui-
siana.
Inconsistency Plagues Eagles
HATTIESBURG, Miss. (UPI) �
Southern Mississippi Coach Jim
Carmody says the Golden Eagles
have a lot in common with this
week's opponent. East Carolina.
"They are a team much like
us Carmody told reporters at
his weekly news conference.
"They've gone from an 8-3
record and a top 20 ranking a
year ago, to 2-8 this year.
"But also like us, they lost a lot
of seniors off that team last
year he added. "They've had
some injury problems, but this
also is their final game of the
year, and we know they'll be
ready to play
The contest against the Pirates
in Greenville, N.C, marks the
last road game of 1984 for the
Golden Eagles, 2-7. Carmody
said injuries to key players con-
tinue to affect his team heading
into Saturday's game.
USM starting quarterback
Robert Ducksworth has missed
the last two games with a deep
thigh bruise, and he is listed as
questionable for this week.
Backup quarterback Timmy Byrd
is out for the season after
undergoing knee surgery last
week, and starting defensive
tackle Richard Byrd, nursing a
knee injury suffered last week in
practice, is listed as doubtful for
Saturday.
The injuries, combined with
offensive inconsistency plaguing
the Eagles much of the season,
also figured last week, Carmody
said.
In their 22-0 homecoming loss
to Northwestern Louisiana, USM
mounted only 128 yards in total
offense. "I thought the offensive
situation would improve after a
week's work with quarterbacks
Tommy Compton and Andrew
Anderson Carmody said.
"But, we again didn't get the job
done, and it's very disappointing
tO Us
Carmody also was disap-
pointed in USM's defensive
showing last week.
"I thought we plaved a strong
first quarter he said, "but after
they scored that first touchdown.
our efforts seemed to drop off
for the remainder of the game
Carmody said he and his staff
selected tight end Robert Ray
Stallings on offense; linebacker
Greg Haeusler on defense; and
noseguard Steve Hendncks on
special teams as plavers of the
week for Southern Mississippi.
Manwaring A Proven Winner
By RICK McCORMAC
Surf Wrttrr
Emily Manwaring, new Lady
Pirate basketball coach, is a pro-
ven winner in many sports at
many levels of competition.
Manwaring has coached teams
in volleyball and softball as well
as basketball, and led teams into
national tournament competi-
tion, while coaching eleven Ail-
Americans.
She started her coaching career
at Portland High in Michagan,
where she was 45-7 with three
league championships and a state
semi-finalist team.
After three seasons at Portland
High, Manwaring took control of
the Jackson Community College
basketball team and led them to a
55-9 record over three seasons for
a .859 winning percentage.
Manwaring's JCC teams won
three conference titles and finish-
ed second in the nation one of
those years.
She also coached the volleyball
team to a 58-12 overall record,
and led them to two sixth place
finishes in the NJCAA tourna-
ment.
After coaching at JCC, Man-
waring went to San Francisco
State, a Division II school.
In six years of coaching the
Gators basketball team, she won
four consecutive coach-of-the-
year awards in the Northern
California Athletic Conference,
while receiving five consecutive
post-season berths and three
consecutive conference titles.
Manwaring, who has a B.S.
degree in physical education and
a Master's in sports education
from Michagan State, has coach-
ed basketball for twelve years,
winning ten conference cham-
pionships.
During that span, Manwaring
has a 197-72 record. Her record
just in the collegiate ranks is a
sparkling 152-65, with six con-
ference championships and six
nationally ranked teams in only
eight years.
Manwaring, who was suc-
cessful at the Division II level, is
not worried about making the
move up to the Division I level.
"Basketball is basketball at any
level. The biggest difference is the
ability of the players Manwar-
ing said. "My style and
philosophy will remain the
same
Manwaring, who has had
coaching success in many sports,
also enjoys participating in them.
"I've always liked all sports �
bowling, golf, field hockey,
lacrosse and billiards
"I've always played sports just
as something to do. Once I was a
lifeguard and didn't even know
how to swim, so I know I can
handle anything
Manwaring moved all the way
across the country to take the
ECU coaching position. "There
is no comparison geographically
between Greenville and San Fran-
cisco, but that doesn't mean I
don't like it here Manwaring
said.
"I'm in a great situation here,
and it was a great opportunity for
me to move up the coaching lad-
der Manwaring said. "The
thing that really makes the pro-
gram here is the fan support
Manwaring brought assistant
coach Joanne Bly with her from
San Francisco State, while retain-
ing Laurie Sikes as one of Cathy
Andruzzi's assistants.
Bly, in addition to on the floor
coaching, also handles the
scheduling of opponents, trying
to build a Division I schedule.
She played Division I basketball
at Ohio State and Long Beach
State. When Bly was at OSU, the
Buckeyeres were two-time Big
Ten champions and ranked 15th
in the nation.
While at Long Beach State, Bly
played with Olympians Cindy
Nobles and Latanya Pollard in
route to a Western Collegiate
championship and a fifth place
national finish.
Bly, who is 25 years old, and a
native of Woosier, Ohio, who
owns a B.S. degree in Physical
Education and a Masters in
Sports Psychology from the
University of California.
Berkley.
Laurie Sikes, Manwaring's
other assistant, played basketball
at ECU for two years, transferr-
ing to ECU from Peace College.
Sikes, 25, spent a year on
Cathy Andruzzi's staff after
graduating from ECU. Sikes will
serve as an on-the-floor coach,
while also coordinating team
travel.
"She has really been a big
help Manwaring said of Sikes.
"She was here before and really
knows a Division I system in
terms of organization.
"Not only does my staff have a
thorough knowledge of the game
of basketball Manwaring con-
tinued, "they also have the ex-
perience of playing at the Divi-
sion I level
"My playing experience in
three different collegiate sports,
and the fact that I had a military
style coach at Ohio State for two
years, helps me understand what
the players were going through
when we got here Bly said.
"I love the support we have
been getting from the athletic ad-
See MANWARING, Page 10
Christopher Newport
Dumps Booters, 3-2
By SCOTT POWERS
The ECU soccer team played
their fourth match in three days
yesterday and fell to Christopher
Newport in overtime by the score
of 3-2 in the final game of the
1984 season.
The match was also the third
overtime match of the four, and
the fatigue began to show about
midway through the second half
as Christpher Newport, outman-
ned and outplayed throughout
most of the day, began to find
cracks in the ECU defense.
It was another very physical
match for the booters, and as the
game went on, the wear and tear
began to show as the team was
not able to mount many strong
offensives.
The match was tied 1-1 at the
half, with ECU controlling the
tempo of the game throughout
the period.
ECU broke out on top about
midway through the second half
when Brian Colgan, taking a pass
from Mark Hardy, scored for the
Pirates, making the score 2-1.
It looked as if the game would
end that way until Christopher
Newport was awarded a penaltv
try with less than a minute left
and converted after Pirate goalie
Jesse Daugherty had made and
excellent save but lost control for
an easy CN tap-in.
The teams played to a standoff
in the first overtime period as
neither team could capitalize on
the opportunities that arose.
It looked as if the game would
end up in a tie until with just
under five minutes left in the se-
cond overtime a Christopher
Newport score gave them a 3-2
lead. CN then held off a late
ECU charge to seal the victory.
The loss dropped the Pirates to
3-16-2 as they end their season.
?
I
j
i " n

.





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8, 1984
Pirates Impressive A t Home
The Long And Winding Road:
With last week's 42-24 loss to
Southwestern Louisiana in
Lafayette, La the East Carolina
football team finished the 1984
season with an 0-7 record on the
road, the first time the Pirates
have been winless on the road
since the 1948 season (when ECL
posted an overall record of 0-9).
This season was the third that
head coach Ed Emory had to play
seven games away from Green-
ville, N.C and this ranks as his
worst effort on the road as a head
coach in five seasons. Emory's
four previous road records were
2-4, 2-4, 3-4 and 4-3, with the
1983 season seeing the Pirates
beating Missouri, Southern Miss
and North Carolina State on the
road. The losses came against
Florida State (47-46), Florida
(24-17) and 1983 national cham-
pion Miami-Florida (12-7).
ECU'S worst road mark in re-
cent years before this season was
the 2-5 record the Pirates posted
in 1970 under Mike McGee (ECU
finished that season with an
overall mark of 3-8).
Home Sweet Home: East
Carolina will be trying for its
fourth straight winning season in
Ficklen Stadium Saturday when
the Pirates host the Golden
Eagles of Southern Mississippi.
ECU is an impressive 10-1 over
the last three seasons in the
friendly confines of Ficklen
Stadium, including back-to-back
4-0 campaigns under Emory in
1982 and 1983. This season the
Pirates are 2-1, losing to Temple
17-0 on Sept. 1, beating Georgia
Southern 34-27 on Sept. 22 and
East Tennessee State 24-6 on Oct.
20. In fact, the loss to Temple
snapped an eight-game home
winning streak for the Pirates
that dated back to the 1982
season.
The Pirates are an impressive
15-6 (.714) in Ficklen Stadium
since 1980, Emory's first season
as head coach. The Pirates have
not suffered through a losing
season in Ficklen since 1980 (2-3),
with that season being their only
losing one at home in 14 years.
Before 1980 you have to go back
Manwaring
Continued From Page 9
ministration and the
community Bly added. "I ap-
preciate the team's hard-working
character � it makes it a joy to
come to work
Sikes said she enjoys coaching
more than she did playing, and
that it was time for a coaching
change. "Change is good for
anybody Sikes said. "At first
the players had a hard time ad-
justing to Coach Manwaring
since her coaching philosophy is
so much different than that of
Andruzzi's, but now they've ad-
justed
If Coach Manwaring's past
record is any indication, the Lady
Pirates are going to win many
games in the future, and thanks
to her coaching philosophy, they
should be a team to watch during
the upcoming season.
to 1970, under Mike McGee, to
find the Pirates' last losing
season in Ficklen (1-3).
Nichols Hot: Senior flanker
Ricky Nichols has found himself
a popular target for quarterbacks
the last three weeks.
The 5-10, 170-pound
Chesapeake, VA, native has now
caught 24 passes for 464 yards
and four touchdowns in 1984, his
best season by far as a Pirate.
Prior to 1984, Nichols' most pro-
ductive year was as a sophomore
when he grabbed 13 passes for
265 yards and two touchdowns.
Nichols' 464 yards puts him in
the No. 9 spot on ECU's season
reception yardage list while his
three catches for 69 yards against
Southwestern Louisiana last
week moved him into the No. 3
spot on the school's all-time yar-
dage list. He now has 1,157
career yards, leaving him just 36
yards shy of the No. 2 spot (Tim
Dameron, 1,193 yards) with one
game to play.
Nichols also hooked up with
quarterback Ron Jones for a
53-yard pass play at USL, mark-
ing the third time this season
Nichols has been involved with a
pass play of 50 yards or more.
Prior to LSL, his two other grabs
of 50 or more went for
touchdowns (64 against South
Carolina and 59 against Georgia
Southern).
Nichols also has 61 career
receptions, putting him fourth on
that all-time list. Nichols trails
Dick Corrada (79), Dave
Bumgarner (74) and Terry
Gallaher (72) with one game to
play. Nichols also needs just five
catches for the best season by an
ECU receiver since 1982.
Heath And The Record Book:
Jeff Heath's six points in last
week's game with Southwestern
Louisiana pushed the junior from
Virginia Beach, VA, closer to the
No. 2 spot on ECU's career scor-
ing list.
Heath, with 53 points this
season, has 183 points tor his
three-year career with the Pirates.
He needs only 22 points to pass
Dave Alexander (204 points) lor
the No. 2 spot and 40 points to
become the school's all-time scor-
ing leader. Heath should easily
surpass ECU's all-time leading
scorer, Carlester Grumpier (222
points) before finishing his
eligibility following the 1985
season.
Heath also owns the school's
career field goal mark as he now
has 36 in his three seasons.
Baker (racks Top 10: Junior
tailback Tony Baker, with 452
yards rushing this season, has
broken into ECU's career top 10
rushers.
The High Point, NC, native
now has 1,812 yards in three
years with the Pirates, putting
him in the No. 9 spot behind 1983
graduate Earnest Byner (2,049
yards).
Common Opponents: The
Pirates and Golden Eagles of
Southern Mississippi (2-7) share
only one common opponent dur-
ing the 1984 season. Both have
played the Ragin' Cajuns of
Southwestern I ouisiana with the
same result � a loss. ECU drop-
ped a 42-24 decision to USL last
week in Lafayette, LA, while
Southern Miss was on the short
side oi a 13-7 score two weeks
ago (Oct. 27), also in Lafayette,
LA,
Eagles Limping: Both ECU and
Southern Miss are experiencing
the same problems in 1984 as
both are in the midst o' disap-
pointing seasons.
The Golden Eagles, always a
power among Southern In-
dependents, are suffering
through their first losing season
since 1976 when they posted a 3-8
mark. That season saw the
Golden Eagles 1-8 after nine
games before winning their last
two.
Never in the school's history
has USM won only two games in
a season. Since 1937 the Golden
Eagles' worst record would be
that 3-8 campaign of 1976. In
fact, the Eagles have experienced
only five losing seasons in 47
years of football, counting the
1984 season.
Since that 3-8 season of 1976,
Southern Miss is an impressive
56-41-2.
Speed Moving Up: Since getting
his first start back on Sept. 22,
sophomore quarterback Darrell
Speed has steadily moved up the
statistical ladder.
Speed, who has passed for 782
yards this season, needs just 210
yards against Southern Miss this
week to move into 10th place on
ECU's career yardage list. He
needs only 24 yards passing to
move into 10th place on ECU's
season passing list, 67 to move in-
to No. 9, 160 to move into No. 8,
163 to move into No. 7 and 223 to
move into No. 6.
On the completion lists, Speed
is already No. 10 on the season
list and needs just three to move
into No. 9, four to move into No.
8, six to move into No. 7. 12 to
move into No. 6 and 13 to move
into No. 5. He is No. 9 on the
career completion list with his 60
and needs just 16 to become No.
8.
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SOME IRREGULARS
H
758-5570
Private Club - All ABC Permit
FRIDAY, November 9, 5 p.m9 p.m.
SAT November 10, 9:30 a.m4:00pm
Cash and Personal Checks Only - No Credit Cards
801 West Church Street
Farmville, N.C.
SOUTHERN Mis � M l
LSL at ALABAMA
VANDY at KENTI K
ARMY at BOSTON COLL
VA. TECH atI EMSON
WAKE FOREST at 1)1 KK
GEORGIA at FLORIDA
FLA ST at SOUTH R
GA. TECH at I NC
HOUSTON at EEXAS
MICH ST at IOSN
MARYLAND at MIAMI
MISSOURI at OKI si
N.C. STATE at I A
PlRDl E at Ws ONSIN
WASHINGTON at I s(
TENNESSEE at MEMPHIS
TCI atTK-WIKH
Sport Clu
Bv JEAN El IV ROIH
Amidst the
highlight- oi ntra
tivities, one fa
and the indi
often get i
That progra
man sports d il
although a nc;
the intramural dep
clubs continue I - if
campaign-
Man student
in sports clubs are nevei
ed for the
achievementv T:
members of the ECU F -
were chosen to pan
1984-85 North Carol
age 2?) -eie
Blankenship. Ralph Cam:
and BUI Zimmerman
the team comprise
players within the N -
Rugby Football
men, along v.
nine universities,
several matche- i
coast. CongratuL
three sport club par .
bringing recognition
ECLrand the IRS.
The ECU Women's I
Handball club travels to I
Meade. Md . No . P-18 Tt
attending the tournament in
)Ve�t. Eaint.� Jje Ctf uei
Washington Handball (
Ohio State. Gardt
eW
HO
FOR THE BES
TOWN COME
HOUSE!
14th Street Location
SHONEYS FIS1

A
r
ALL-YOI
Help Yoursetf To
FISH FILLETS Bret
3 Favorite Stoney
Baked FISH FILLET1
Hot Vegetables. �nc
Seafood Chowae
French Fnes
HusHpupps
EVERY FRIDAY
5 pm � 9 PM
SHONEYS

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rUfcfcASI C AROl INIAN
NOVEMBER 8, 1984
11
mi
LILY STEAK HOUSE
iL'zlut hoi
icy Beef Tips
R THE NO 3!


io Fixins Bar
ir Meal -
Call
hots.
boto Lab
- (near Belk's)
m 756-6078
A
Roberts
USE
'b
Ints on
ses, Sweaters
Illy Lined
p.m9 p.m.
a.m4:00pm
h Hit Cards
eet
The Experts Pick The Winners
SOUTHERN MISS at ECU
I SI at ALABAMA
VANDY at KENTUCKY
ARMY at BOSTON COLL
VA. TECH at CLEMSON
WAKE FOREST at DUKE
GEORGIA at FLORIDA
FLA ST at SOUTH CAR.
GA. TECH at UNC
HOUSTON at TEXAS
MICH ST at IOWA
MARYLAND at MIAMI
MISSOURI at OKLA ST
VC. STATE at I A
PURDUE at WISCONSIN
WASHINGTON at USC
TENNESSEE at MEMPHIS ST
TCI at TEXAS TECH
POWERS
So. Miss
LSI!
UK
BC
Clemson
Wake
Florida
FSU
Ga. Tech
Texas
Iowa
Miami
Okla. St.
IV A
Purdue
Washington
UT
TCU
Sport Clubs Active
B JEANETTE ROTH
Staff Whirr
�midst the scores and
highlights o intramural ac-
tivities, one facet of the program,
and the individuals involved,
often get lost in the shuttle.
That program includes the
main sports clubs at ECU, and
although a separate member o
the intramural department, these
clubs continue to wage successful
campaigns.
Main students who participate
in sports clubs are never recogniz-
ed for their outstanding
achievements. This season, three
members of the ECU Rugby Club
were chosen to participate on the
1984-85 North Carolina (under
age 2?) select side team. Alan
Blankenship, Ralph Campano
and Bill Zimmerman will play on
the team comprised of the best
players within the North Carolina
Riikibv Football Union. These
men, along with students from
nine universities, will travel to
several matches along the east
coast. Congratulations to these
three sport club participants for.
bringing recognition to both
ECU and the IRS.
The ECU Women's Team
Handball club travels to Fort
Meade, Md Nov. 17-18. Teams
attending the tournament include
iV�t� fcoini tiie Gceaiei
Washington Handball Club.
Ohio State. Garden Citv and the
Swim and Sport Club. If you
want to witness a fast and ex-
citing sport, come by Memorial
Gym and watch the women play
every Monday from 9-11 p.m.
intramural activities continue
with semi-finals in racquetball
singles. In the open division, four
participants remain and will bat-
tle it out for the championship.
Al Smith will slam against Chris
Houk, while Raymond Song
takes on Barry Scott for a chance
at the finals. Intermediate divi-
sion semi-finalists include Tom
Stapelton, David Patten and
Dean Wool ford.
Although most IRS bowling
teams have only rolled two to
three games, several teams have
unblemished records. In the
women's divisions, residence hall
Wild Ones and sorority Alpha
Phi boast 2-0 records. Tootsie
Bowlers, in the women's
residence hall league, hold a 3-0
lead over opponents.
The men will try to beat the
records of College Hill Crew and
Aycock Pinbusters, framing the
others with 2-0 records.
Co-rec (lag football playoffs
continue as the Love Brokers, Sig
Ep & Friends, Hillbillies and
Chaos, won big beating op-
ponents by a total of 150 to 39
points. Third Regiment, favored
to take the championship, has
not yet played. The finals are
tonight at 7 p.m.
WASH
HOUSE
FOR THE BEST NACHOS IN
TOWN COME BY THE WASH
HOUSE!
14th Street Location
758-6001
5H0NEYS FISHERMAN'S
BUFFET

�-
11 '
fe
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT!
Help Yourself To
� FISH FILLETS Breaded n Seasoned From
3 Favorite Shoney s Recipea
� Baked FISH FILLETS
� Hot Vegetables, including Fried Okra
� Seafood Chowder
it French Fries Qny
� Hushpuppies �y- qq
EVERY FRIDAY
C DM QPU 5�hSeladaFruBar
SHONEYS
MC 27834
7M-21M
SAD SAM
So. Miss
LSU
UK
BC
Clemson
Wake
Florida
FSU
Ga. Tech
Houston
Mich. St.
Miami
Okla. St.
NCSU
Purdue
Washington
UT
TCU
MAROSCHAK
So. Miss
LSU
Vandy
BC
Clemson
Wake
Georgia
South Car.
Ga. Tech
Texas
Iowa
Miami
Okla. St.
UVA
Wisconsin
Washington
UT
TCU
MEWSHIDEOUT
So. MissSo. Miss.
LSULSU
UKVandv
BCBC
ClemsonVa. Tech
WakeDuke
FloridaFlorida
South Car.South Car.
Ga. TechGa. Tech
TexasTexas
IowaMich. St.
MiamiMiami
Okla. St.Okla. St.
UVAUVA
WisconsinWisconsin
WashingtonUSC
UTUT
TCUTexas Tech
JENDRAS1AK
So. Miss
LSU
Vandy
BC
Clemson
Wake
Florida
South Car.
Ga. Tech
Texas
Iowa
Miami
Okla. St.
UVA
Purdue
Washington
UT
TCU
Scott Powers
Sad Sam
Tina Maroschak
Randy Mews
Greg Rideout
Jennifer Jendrasiak
Last
Week
14-4
13-5
15-3
13-5
11-7
11-7
Nears 100
Games
OverallPet.Behind
99-42.702
94-47.6675
93-48.6606
91-50.6458
85-56.60314
84-57.59615
ATTIC
1
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S190 bortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
tional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For fur-
ther information call 832-0535 (Toll Free
Number t-800-532-5384) between 9AM and
5P.M. weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 W�t Morgan St.
RoUigh, NC
Thurs. Nov. 8th
MB I �,�. Niaht
SKIP
CASTRO
11
: 1 I au
4 JO til
SPLIT
DECISION
SAT. NOV. 10th
copyright 198a
Kroger sav on
Ouantity Rignts Reserves
None Sold To Dealers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM POllC
Earn of these advertised 'terns is re
Quired to de readiiv a.aracie tor sale in
each Kroger Sav on e�rept as specimen
iy noted in this ad if we do run out of
an item we win offer you your choice
of a comparable item when avaiiaoie
reflecting tne same savings or a rain
check which win entitle you to pur
chase tne advertised item at the adver
tised price within 50 days Only one ven
dor coupon win oe accepted per ite.n
items na Prices
Effective Ttiru Sat
NOV 10 1C�84
CALIFORNIA CELLARS
REGULAR OR LIGHT CHABLIS
RHINE OR ROSE
Taylor
wines
3 Ltr.
Btl.
LIQUID
Clorox
Bleach
64 Oz.
Jug
LIMIT 2 PLEASE
r
CORNED BEEF, PASTRAMI,
ROAST BEEF OR ITALIAN
BEEF LEAN N TENDER
Gourmet Shaved
Deli Meats
HCLLY FARMS CUT UP MIXED
FRYER PARTS OR GRADE A
whole
Fryers

Lb.
V
LIMIT 3 PKGS PLEASE
?
SAUSAGE & MUSHROOM
PEPPERONI & MUSHROOM,
OR SAUSAGE & PEPPERONI
Thick Crust
Pizza
J
t;rrl
VV.&?
GOLDEN
Ripe
Bananas
WASHINGTON STATE
GOLDEN OR
Red Delicious
Apples
I $128
lag I

?
'
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i






t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBERS, 1984
Show us your student LD. Card
For an Extra 10 Discount
GREENVILLE
South Park Shopping Center
115 E. Red Banks Rd.
�(ONLY ECU STUDENT IDS
QUALIFY FOR 10 DISCOUNT)
756-9502
UJfituuni latwor fttvwuo m
DISCOUNT DOES NOT APPLY TO
ALCOHOL, TOBACCO PRODUCTS FILM
PRODUCTS, MAGAZINES OR SOFT DRINKS
Items available while quantities last
ggevco
DISCOUNT DRUG
Revco reserves the right to limit quantities
��

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Title
The East Carolinian, November 8, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 08, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.374
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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