The East Carolinian, November 6, 1984






�he
(Earuttntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
fuesday November 6, 1984
Greenville, N.C
10 Pages
Circulation 12,(MM)
Observers Sent To State Polls
WASHINGTON (UPI) - The
Justice Department said Monday
358 federal observers will be sta-
tioned at polling places in four
Southern states today, with most
going to Mississippi.
The observers are being assign-
ed to make sure voters have a fair
chance to cast their ballots, the
department said. A spokesman
said that in most instances, local
officials requested the aid.
There will be 307 observers sta-
tioned in Mississippi, the largest
number ever sent to that state.
Eleven will be in Alabama, 18 in
Georgia and 22 in North
Carolina, the first time observers
are being sent to that state.
Justice Department spokesman
John Wilson said Mississippi was
getting a lot of observers because
of problems anticipated by local
election officials and minority
community leaders.
He said the decision to send
observers to 11 Mississippi coun-
ties also was based on reports
from federal observers in
previous elections.
While Wilson declined to com-
ment on specific problems in the
Mississippi counties, every one in
which observers are stationed has
a black-white contest for Con-
gress, county office of the local
school board.
Ten of the 11 counties fall in
the 2nd District where veteran
state Rep. Robert Clark, a black
Democrat, is challenging Rep.
Webb Franklin, a white
Republican. The race is a
rematch of a 1982 contest bet-
ween the two men. Since the last
race, the district has been
redrawn by a federal court.
Blacks now comprise 53 percent
of the population, compared with
48 percent before.
The previous record for federal
observers in Mississippi was 244
in 1968, the first presidential elec-
tion covered by the Voting Rights
Act. There were 201 observers
sent to Mississippi in the 1980
election, according to Wilson.
Mississippi has had a long
history of voting rights problems.
Last year civil rights activist Jesse
Jackson persuaded William
Bradford Reynolds, head of the
Justice Department's Civil Rights
Division, to make a fact-finding
trip to the state to see the pro-
blems first hand.
The observers will watch and
record the election process during
voting hours and also will
observe the tabulation of the vote
after polls close.
In addition, special telephone
numbers are available to receive
complaints about racially
discriminatory voting practices.
The numbers in North Carolina
are: (919) 832-2131 or (919) 832-
2416.
Race Closes With Commercial Blitz
MARK BARBER - ECU Phofo Lab
Helms Speaks
N.C. Sen. Jesse Helms made one last campaign stop in (,reenillt
Saturday at a rally at Cannon's warehouse. Helms spoke to a
crowd of over 1.000 and voiced his support for the state's tobacco
program.
RALEIGH (UPI)-Sen. Jesse
Helms and Gov. James Hunt
closed their rough-and-tumble
Senate contest with a blitz of
television commercials � 7.000
between Oct. 1 and Monday.
Hunt ran hundreds of 10 30-
and 60-second spots during the
final weekend of the campaign.
And now the two-term governor
bought air time for a half-hour
documentary.
Helms has been running ads
throughout each day, including
hundreds of less expensive
10-second spots.
The 7,(XX) television commer-
cials that the two candidates ran
between Oct. 1 and Monday, the
eve of the election cost more than
$2 million
In the losing weeks of the
race. Helms' ads were expected to
appear at least 5,259 times, to
2.536 for Hunt.
Helms outspent Hunt on
advertising in the final month of
the campaign. The most recent
campaign finance records in-
dicate Helms has spent nearly
New General Manager Named
By HAROLD JOYNER
uuiidi Sr�� Mri.f
The ECU Media Board Mon-
day selected 1 om Norton as the
new general manager of the East
Carolinian. He will succeed
Hunter Fisher, who is resigning
effective Dec. 31.
"I'm glad to be chosen Nor-
said. "I really look forward
to assuming Hunter's position.
Ht has done a fine job as general
manager
Norton has worked for the
East Carolinian since Sept. 1983
and has been the paper's credit
manager since Dec. 1983.
Media Board Chairman Glenn
Con way said Norton presented
excellent proposals to the board.
"The board's decision was a dif-
ficult one to make Conway
said, "but I feel Tom's
managerial skills, which he has
exhibited as Credit Manager
made him mosl qualified for the
job
"1 think lorn wax an excellent
candidate for the position of
general manager. Not only does
he have a fine academic record
and the support of the East
Carolinian staff, he also has the
experience necessary to fulfill this
position said Rudolph Alex-
ander, associate dean and direc-
tor of university unions.
Norton, 22, is a senior accoun-
ting major. He said his plans for
the East Carolinian include ex-
tending Fisher's current projects
and expanding coverage of cam-
pus events. "Right now, I feel the
present coverage of campus
events is adequate, but there is
always room tor improvement.
Norton said.
Fisher said he expects the tran-
sition to be smooth. "Tom U very
qualified for the position
Fisher said, "and I feel he has a
good working relationship with
the staff and superb managerial
skills, which will enable him to
adequately persue programs I've
established during my tenure as
general manager. I am glad the
board chose such a qualified can-
didate.
"I am also pleased with the
fine staff I have had the oppor-
tunity to work with. All of them
should be commended for their
dedicated labor, committment
and patience for the paper. They
have all been very helpful and I
am grateful to have had the op-
portunity to work with them
Norton
Fisher said.
Norton said he felt privileged
to obtain the position of
general manager. "The East
Carolinian has always been a
first-class paper produced
through the work of many
dedicated and hardworking
students. I hope to continue mak-
ing The East Carolinian a first-
rate organization
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Hey, This Isn V The Locker Room
�J c "�linian photographer Jon Jordan proves once again that have the view of some workers high atop Memorial Gym
pnotOKraphers have a different perspective on the world. Here we
Honors Program Offers Spring Seminars
B ELAINE PERRY
���ff Writer
The Honors Program, under the
direction 0f Dr. David Sanders,
will offer a variety of seminars
durmg the spring semester.
I ne honors program began
ottny 20 years ago when a group
of students asked faculty
members to meet with them to
discuss great books. The group
met informally until it gradually
became incorporated into a credit
system. The program has become
coordinated during the last five
years under Sanders.
Most departments have upper
level courses for the honors stu-
dent. Practicums also are honors
kinds of courses. Sanders wants
to "encourage more departments
to develop upper level honors
courses
The seminars sponsored by the
honors program are an alternate
to regular General College
courses. They "offer all the
general education requirements
to exceptional students and offer
honors sections at regular
courses" said Sanders.
The seminars provide small
classes for the exceptional stu-
dent. Several of the faculty in-
cluding Dr. Holly Matthews, An-
thropology, Dr. Marie Farr,
English and Dr. Robert Gowen,
See HONORS, Page 5
$1.1 million and Hunt, about
S967.000.
"That is just an incredible
amount of time and money for a
five-week period said Rick
Silver of Chernoff, Silver and
Associates, which places ads
across the Southeast. "I can't
think of anything to compare it
to
Since the candidates started
running ads last year, Helms has
outspent Hunt on TV b a 2-to-l
margin, according to a studv by
The es and Observer of
Raleigh
"I'm sure they're still a
us said Hunt spokesman Will
Marshall. "The, ai I iting
us with ads
The candid � night about
v" 10,000 in comn i
Charlotte, the state's largest
television market, beca is�
area is considered thick with
undecided voters.
"The Piedmont is critic
said Marshall. "That's where 4
percent ol the people live It's an
area ol opportunity
NC Student Leaders
Support Jim Hunt
By HAROLD JOYNER
AMfetaai Srwi Mltor
Student leaders across North
Carolina showed their support
last Friday for Gov. Jim Hunt's
committment to educational pro-
grams and loans at the college
level.
ECU student David Brooks,
chairman of Students for Hunt
spoke on the governor's committ-
ment to universities. "Education
has been the centerpiece of Jim
Hunt's two terms as governor
and will continue to be one of his
key priorities as a U.S. Senator
Brooks said.
Brooks pointed out that
federal government plays a
significant role in assisting more
than 90,000 N.C. college students
with aid and loans. "At ECU
he said, "there are 4,600 reci-
pients of federal assistance pro-
grams or loans this year. That
means approximately one-third
of the student body is benefitting
from Mni help in some wa
"EdiStdonal officials say bet-
ween 20,000 to 40,000 college
students would be forced to drop
out if federal assistance was
eliminated, as Sen. Helms pro-
posed in a recent debate with
Hunt
Also speaking on Hunt's
educatior program was Scott
Wharton, a UNC-Chapel Hill
student who is involved with
Hunt's press office. "Hunt calls
for strengthening student loan
programs. Annually, state college
students receive S147 million in
federal assistance and loans. The
federal government provides
$268 million for collegiate
research and $2 million of sup-
port for the state's eiementarv
and secondary public schools.
"Economists believe that sub-
sidizing education for those who
can not afford it and are
qualified pays off with greater
social opportunities Wharton
said Stan Broadway, executive
director of the N.C. Educational
Assistance Authority, believes
the removal of federal money
would have absolutely disastrous
effects for the state's colleges and
universities and there would be
significant enrollment declines
Saying Hunt's track record on
education has been nationally
hailed. Brooks listed Hunt's con-
tributions to education. "Not on-
ly did Hunt begin the competencv
test program, but there are 5,000
less high school dropouts this
vear
Record Voter
Turnout
Expected
The 1984 election season
will officially end tomorrow
when millions of voters arrive
at polling places to select their
candidates.
In North Carolina, a record
voter turnout is expected. As
of Oct. 8, 3,270,933 North
Carolinians had registered to
vote in the general election.
This number is 18 percent
higher than the number
registered in 1980.
State Elections Chairman
Alex Brock said he expects
most state polls to be extreme-
ly busy. "I would ask the
voters to just consider the fact
that we all have to stand in line
to buy license tags and to pay
taxes Brock said.
Polls in Pitt County will be
open until 8:30 p.m. to accom-
modate the large number of
voters.
OFFICIAL PRESIDENTIAL
BALLOT
FOR PRESIDENT
and VICE-PRESIDENT
OF THE UNITED STATES
GENERAL ELECTION
PITT COUNTY N C
hi i �
���$�� CTtotrS to
FOB PRESIDENT �ND
VICE PRESIDENT OF THE U S
� - . .
DEMOCRATIC
��-�-
REPUBLICAN
GEOR �
LIBERTARIAN
m - . an
�� - M ��
SOCIALIST "fCWtRS
�rttfcfc &ONZALES
j � I a

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 6, 1984
Announcements
Christmas Vacation
Dive Penny Camp National Underwater
Park in fabulous Key Largo The Florida
Keys are the only natural coral reet In the
Continental US. This five day trip. Dec
It 21st Includes lodging and two dive boat
trips dally Tanks backpack and weight
belts are provided Cost Is $175 00 per per
son. two to a room occupancy and 210 00 per
person, 4 to a room occupancy For further
Information Rav Schart Director of Ac
quatlcs 757 6441
Sigma Theta Tau
The Beta Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau.
th� National Honor Society of Nursing, will
hold its fall educational meeting on Thurs
day Nov 15 I9�4at6pm at the Ramada inn
m Greenville The program, presented by
Dr Ann Belcher RN. Ph D Is entitled.
The ten year plan implications for On
cology Nursing " Dr Belcher is director of
Nursmg Staff Developement at the Universl
ty of ALabama Hospital in Birmingham
Alabama Colleagues, students, spouses and
friends are cordially invited For further in
formation, contact Lou Everett at the School
of Nursing (757 6061)
Fencing Club
The Fencing Club of East Carol ina would
like to invite anyone interested to attend oc
meetings every Wed at 30 in Memonal
Gym room 102
Student Union Visual Arts
Committee
The Student Union Visual Arts Committee
will meet on Thursday. Nov 1, I9S4, at
3 00pm .n room 238 of Mendenhall Student
Center All members and Interested
students are urged to attend
Special Events Committee
The Student Union Special Events Commit
tee will meet on Tuesday. Nov 6. IVtU, at 5 30
pm in room 242 of Mendenhall Student
Center All members and interested
studen-s are urged to attend
Free Throw Contest
There w.ll be a tree throw contest held for ail
you expert hoopsters Nov 13 This in
tramural sponsored event will be held in
Memorial Gym To register come by room
204 Memorial Gym or call 757 6387 Par
ticipate ra'her than spectate
NASA
interested In international Policy and
Regulations affect,ng high technology expor
ting if so. this position may be for you
NASA will be interviewing on compus in
Nov for Spring 1985 Contact the
Cooperative Education Office 313 Rawi
Building as soon as possible
Careers
NOAA The National Oceanic and At
mospheric Administration will have a
representative on campus on Nov 5. 1984
ECU students who might like a career study
ng the seas or the atmosphere may come
and listen to a short presentation and film in
Brewster D 202 at 1 30pm Please mark
your calendars if interested! Majors in
Ma�h Chem.s'ry, Biology. Physics,
Geography or Marine Studies are especially
encouraged to attend
Surfing Club
There will not be a meeting this week but a
�earn surf off is sneduied for this Sunday at
Emerald isle Everyone interested should
mee' a' tneisianoer Motel parking lot at
9 00am Sunday The contest may be moved
somewhere else if conations are better
Beta Kappa Alpha
The Beta Kappa Alpha Chapter of Financial
Management Association will hold a General
Business meeting or, Thursday, Nov
15.3 00pm in Rawl '01 Dues will be col
lected so have your checkbook handy
HEY BKA!
D'dn t we have tun Thanks to everyone who
was able to make it to Wilson for those who
didn't boy did you miss out Our next
meeting U going to ae Thursday, Nov 15
See ya there
ZBT
"hank ou Sue tor the Halloween Party A
Dig Congrats to all who helped with our fun
draiser We sold enough mugs to hold a few
legs A reminder that Wed 6 15 pm
Brothers are needed at Mendenhall Please
te on t.me Congrats to Ann C as Lit Sis
Secretary Have a Good Day1
Ambassadors
Ae will have a dinner meeting this week at
'ne Western Steer Restaurant on Tenth St
Meet at the Mendenhall Muiti purpose rm at
5 00pm on Wed Nov 7 and we will go to the
-estaurant from there Rides w.n be provid
ed for those who need one See you all there
Alpha Omicron Pi
A reminder that Alpha Omicron Pi is having
nformal rush this week with happy hour
tonight at Elbo and Wed night cookout For
nformation and rides call 757 0769
Law School
if you have considered Law School, then in
�erested students may talk with an Admis
sions rpresentative from Duke University
who will be on compus on Wed afternoon,
Nov 7, at the Career Planning and Place
ment Service Please call or come by the
Bioxton House before noon on Wed for an
appointment
American Marketing Association
The American Marketing Association will be
sponsoring a marketing profile of Anheuser
BuschonNov 15th at 4 00 at Mendenhall 244
All AMA members and anyone interested
are invited to attend
Phi Eta sigma
Phi Eta Sigma will be having a meeting
Tuesday Nov 6 at 5 15 in Mendenhall stu
dent Center Don't forget your walk a thon
pledge money
Kappa Alpha Psi
The brothers of the Kappa Alpha Psi frater
nity, inc would like to announce that they
are having a happy hour this Thurs night
Nov 8 from lOuntii at the Wli Bus
transportation will begin at Mendenhall at
10 X and then to the hill at 10 45 CostlsSI.50
student and S2 00 non student There will be
free beer so come on out and party with the
nupes1
Kappa Alpha Psi
Come on out and really party with the
brothers of Kappa Alapha Psi this Sat night
Nov 10 from lf until After the last home
football game at the Cultural Center adm Is
$ 75 for students and �l 00 non students. The
others had their chance but now it is really
time to Jam!
PPHA
Pre Professional Health Alliance will hold a
special meeting Thursday Nov 8,19fUat5:M
pm in room 244 In the Mendenhall Student
Center The guest speaker will be Dr
Marion Phillips. Associate Dean of Minority
Affairs at UNC CH School of Medicine. This
meeting will be very infromatlve so all
members and Interested guests are strongly
encouraged to attend
The Sport Club
The Sport Club council meeting for Nov 21,
1984 has been changed to Nov 13, 1984 at 4:00
in Brewster B 103 Attendance at the
meeting is mandatory We look forward see
ing you there
Pi Kappa Phi
Brothers, pledges and little sisters are
reminded of the events coming up this week
tonight, "B" team soccer at 400, "A" team
soccer at 7 00 and "A" team volleyball at
M) 45 Wed . brother pledges will be presert
ting the fall WtUGong show starting at � 00
Then "B" team volleyball plays at 10.45.
Thur our little sisters will be having a hap
PV hour at Grumpy's Everyone come out
and support our little sisters.
Fashion Show
A benefit fashion show for the E C.U Gospel
Choir will be given by Caret's Unlimited Inc
Nov the Uth at 5 00pm In Hendrlx Theatre,
tickets for E C U students will be S2 and the
general public S3 The purchase of tickets
will be In Mendenhall Student Center on the
following days Mon thru Fri
BSU
Prayer and Peace will present 'Outreach In
Kenya' a slide presentation by Bobby
Medlln on Wed . Nov 7, at 8 � at the Baptist
Student Union
Occupational Therapy
Anyone interested in OT Is invited to the OT
club meeting Tuesday at 5 45pm In room 203
of the Allied Health building That's tonight
LSS Meeting
Tuesday Nov 6. 7 00pm Mendenhall
Multipurppose room Don't forget to bring
something tor the pot luck supper
School of Arts
The School of Art is offering 2 scholar
shlpsfor art students of lunlor. senior, and
graduate rank These scholarships are In
the amount of J250 00 renewable and S353 00
renewable and are to be awarded shortly
after the 1st of Jan To qualify, a student
must have an overall grade point average of
3 0 Included with the application there must
be a resume giving honors, awards, and or
other evidence of scholarly and artistic pro
wess. ano a portfolil of at least 5 slides of cur
rent work Forms may be obtained from the
School of Art Office The deadline tor all
completed applications is Dec 5, 1984
Sign Language Club
Anyone interested In participating in our
Christmas Fantasy Performance Sun Dec
2nd, 84, There will be a meeting Tues . Nov
6th at 9 00pm in Mendenhall. room 247 We
will be deciding rehersal times and selecting
songs Also, there will be a club meeting this
Thurs Nov 8th at 7 00pm in Mendenhall
room 221 at 7 00! Hope to see you there
All Campus Party
ECU Students The date has been set! Chill
Thrill 1984 will be held frlday, Nov 16fh from
3 7pm at the Phi Tau house Come rock to
the sounds of Domino as they warm up tor
their appearance at the Attic Golden
Beverage will be plentiful and serious party
mg is a requirement Another West Campus
Throwdown!
Alpha Phi Alpha
The brothers of ALPha Phi Alpha are spon
soring a Victory party after the football
game sat at The Unlimited Touch Happy
hour prices until I! 00pm
Campus Service
The Fountain of Life Christian Fellowship
will be sponsoring a morning church service
this Sun .11 at II 00am in Jenkins
Auditorium If you haven't been to a campus
service before, make this Sun your first of
the many more church services to attend
Everyone is invited to be a part of this event
As you come purpose in your heart to make
Nov 11, 1984 your day It's yours for the ask
ing i
Student Union Special Concerts
Committee
The Student Union Special Concerts Com
m.tfee will meet on Thursday. Nov 8, 1984 a'
4 00 pm m room 238 erf Mendenhall Student
Center All members and interes'd
students are urged to attend
Omega Psi Phi
Omega Psi Phi Frat. Inc Is recognlilng all
black students who have accumlated a gpa
of 3.0 or above You will be given a cer
tlflcate of achievement during our achieve
ment day awards ceremonoy on Nov 18 at
3 00. If you have the qualifications write
Omega Psi Phi, P O Box 3014, Greenville,
NX 27834
Allied Health Professions
The Allied Health Professions Admission
Test will be offered at East Carolina Unlver
slty on Saturday. Jan 12. 1985 Application
blanks are to be completed and mailed to the
Psychological Corp, 7500 Old oak Blvd ,
Cleveland, Ohio 44130 to arrive by Dec ,15,
!984 Applications may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center, room 105, Speight
Building.
Graduate Management
The Graduate Management Admission Test
(GMAT) will be offered at East Carolina
University on Sat , Jan 26, 1985 Application
blanks are to be completed and mailed to
GMAT, Educational Testing Service, Box
966 R, Princeton, N J 08540 Applications
must be postmarked no later than Dec 24,
1984 Applications may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center, Room 105, Speight
Building, Greenville. N C 27834
Art Contest
Entry date for the REBEL art contest Is
Wea. November 7, 1984 Bring your work by
the Grey art gallery during the hours of 10 5
Entry fee Is SI per work, and all work must
be framed or matted and ready for hanging
3 D works must be self supporting
Categories are Painting, Sculpture,
Ceramics. Photography Design(wood.
metals, fibers). Graphic art. Illustration,
Drawing, Mixed media Best in show award
ed $100, $25 awarded in each category
Phi Eta Sigma
Phi Eta Sigma will be having a general
business meeting Tuesday, Nov 6, 1984 at
5 15 pm in Mendenhall Ask information
desk for room
KYF
The King Youth Fellowship sponsored by the
Pentecostal Holiness Church will have a Bi
ble Study (Genesis 4 9) Tuesday, Nov 6 at
8 00 pm In 243 Mendenhall For more infor
matlon contact Jack at 752 8660 or Kevin
758 9190
ICE HOCKEY
There will be a practice for all members of
the Ice hockey team on Tues Nov. 6 at 10:15
at the Daniel Boone Ice Rink In
Hliisborough This will be to prepare for the
NC State game on Nov ,8 and the UNC CH
game on Nov 13 The time hascome for us
to defeat the ACC teams All those in
terested should contact George at 752 8525 as
soon as possible
Pre Med Students
The Biology Club will have Its next meeting
on Wed Nov ,7 1984. The meeting will be
held In room BN 102 In the Biology Complex
at 7 00pm Representatives from the
Stanley H Kaplan Course will be speaking
to us about their program This course Is
designed to aid In study and preparedness
for the Medical College Admissions Test
(MCAT) They will also be administering a
one hour simulated Kaplan Course to
demonstrate the benefits that the course of
fers Pre med students who must take the
MCAT before applying to the Medical
School(s) of their choice All persons In
terested In this course or anyone interested
in the medical field is urged to attend
Student Dietetic Association
Don't Forget! The Student Dietetic Assocla
tlon will meet on Tuesday, Nov 6at530pm
in the Dining Hall of the Home Economics
Building If you were not able to participate
In our great "Fruit and vegetable float dur
ing Homecoming then don't miss becoming
active In the other exciting activities SDA
will planl Several feature protects will be
discussed during the meeting Everyone is
invited to attend! Please come1
Meditation
The Buddhist Meditation and Study Group
will meet Tuesday. Nov 6, at 7pm In room
212 ofMendenhall Student center After
meditation basic beliefs from Buddhism will
be discussed
The Holiday Project
The Holiday Project is a non profit public
corporation that is working toward raising
financial assistance With the funds raised
by volunteers the Holiday Prolect will pro
vide gifts at Christmas for people in area
facilities who would normally be without if
you are interested in contributing either
voluntarily or financially please contact Dee
at 757 0212
0
O
OAKWOOD HOMES
PROUDLY SUPPORTS
THE PIRATES AND
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
Just like ECU Oakwood Homes has been
a part of the growth of Greenvie and eastern I
North Carolina for years Quality and service
- the hallmark of two great institutions ' Both
helping friends to a better hie
"GO PIRATES"
o

ft i
HOMES
p o
626 W Greenylie Blvd 756 5434 Mil
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
�Cleaning done by the doctor
Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert Cargill
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenville, NC
758-4927
Banquets
Luncheons
Receptions
Coffee Breaks
east Carolina dining services
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Nightclub0
presents
Wednesday Night
Greenville's Newest Ladies
Lock Out
Free Draft & Wine
75CHighballs
9:00 to 10:30
After 10:30 First 50 guys get in for $1.00
11:30 Female Chug-a-lug Contest
1st place $25
2nd place $15
3rd place $10
Complimentary bottle of champagne to all contestants.
Beau's is a private club for members A guests only
All ABC Permits. Memberships available at the door.
1
12
PRICE
Frame Clearance Sale
Over 300 frames to choose
including frames by Optyl, Christian Dior, Playboy,
Menrad, Logo, Safilo and Other Designer Frames.
Athletic Rec Spec Goggles
Excellent for Racquet Sports,
Football and Basketball WRx lenses
Larceny
Crime
Report
larcenies continued to
dominate police reports for the
� �, Marked increases were
arcenies from vehicles
m the freshmen parking
lois and larcenies from dorm
rooms Ten reports of larcenies
� Torr, dorm rooms were received
b the ECU Department of
Public Safety during the period
beginning Oct. 4 and ending I
to addition, there were five
es from vehicles Bk .
ere down, however
24, 12:10 a n
nathan Martin of Southern
- � arrested for DW1
:c 8:18a.m � Alar,
ne as reported from the
� Clinic at the Bi
" � 7:00 p.m � A pa
a as reported stolen
Athletic Field 3. Up m
gh school class ring was
rep ed stolen from a roon
TARLANDING
6-� Combination
55
jr
�AiAMtA
Shrimp,
FF or Bat
Cole Sia
105 Airport Rooo
Your No.
tM
MON - TL F
For Only
$3.29
FLAMEKISTSTLAK
f �
S
THE ORIGINAL FAmiJ
95

COMPLETE
All Sunglasses in stock
Ray Ban Metal & Wayfarer
Plastic Included
30
OFF
OFFER GOOD THRU Nov. 16, 1984
Greenville Store Only-No Other Discounts On Set Frames
MUST PRESENT AD WITH PURCHASE
WED. NOVEMBER 7TH
Advance Tickets $6.00
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 6, 1984
Larceny Tops Campus Crimes
O
HOMES
PPORTS
S AND
(OUNA
IT V
O
Co
o
f
Crime
Report
Larcenies continued to
dominate police reports for the
past week. Marked increases were
noted in larcenies from vehicles
Parked in the freshmen parking
lots and larcenies from dorm
rooms. Ten reports of larcenies
from dorm rooms were received
by the ECU Department of
Public Safety during the period
beginning Oct. 4 and ending Nov.
5. In addition, there were five
larcenies from vehicles. Bicycles
thefts were down, however.
Oct. 24, 12:10 a.m. �
Jonathan Martin of Southern
Pines was arrested for DWI.
Oct. 25, 8:18 a.m. � A larceny
of money was reported from the
Outpatient Clinic at the Brody
Building. 7:00 p.m. � A pair of
soccer shoes was reported stolen
from Athletic Field 3. 11 p.m. �
A high school class ring was
reported stolen from a room on
the first floor of Aycock dorm.
Oct. 26, 2:40 a.m. � An
assault was reported in Fletcher
dorm. 10:30 a.m. � A mirror
was reported stolen from a vehi-
cle parked in the 5th and Rcade
St. parking lot. a.m. � A
vehicle was reported vandalized
while parked in the College Hill
day lot. 1:40p.m. � A book bag
was reported stolen from the se-
cond floor of Fletcher Music
Building.
Oct. 27, 9 a.m. � A battery
was reported stolen from a vehi-
cle parked in the 5th and Reade
St. lot. II a.m. � A larceny of
personal property was reported
from a room on the third floor of
Garrett dorm. 2:10 p.m. � A
bicycle was reported stolen from
the southeast side of Aycock
dorm. 11 p.m. � Michael Arnold
of Ayden was issued a citation
for careless and reckless driving.
11:50 p.m. � Jeffrey Kinsey of
Greenville was arrested for
trespassing.
Oct. 28, 2 a.m. � An assault
with a vehicle was reported near
Gotten dorm. 2:20p.m. � Twen-
ty dollars was reported stolen
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2601 East 10th Street
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from a room on the third floor of
Umstead dorm. 10:22 p.m. � A
breaking and entering of a room
was reported on the first floor of
Garrett dorm.
Oct. 29, 7:45 a.m. � Five bat-
teries and a permanent license
plate were reported stolen from
state-owned vehicles parked
north of the old steam plant. 5
p.m. � Break-ins and larcenies
were reported at four rooms on
the first floor of Garrett dorm.
Oct. 30, 1:45p.m. � A bicycle
was reported stolen from the
south side of Greene dorm. 4
p.m. � A purse was reported
stolen from a practice room on
the second floor of Fletcher
Music Building. 9:40 p.m. � A
break-in was reported in a room
on the third floor of Jones dorm.
Oct. 31, 12:40 a.m. � Michael
Bunton and Gavin Inson of 142
Aycock dorm were arrested for
larceny of bicycles. 7:40p.m. �
Edward Moore of Greenville was
arrested for trespassing.
Nov. 1, 1:30 a.m. � Albert
Colwell of Rocky Mount was ar-
rested for DWI north of Greene
dorm. 8:25 a.m. Four vehicles
were found vandalized while
parked in the staff lots near
Austin building. 2 p.m. � A
wheel was stolen from a bicycle
parked near Aycock dorm. 11:30
p.m. � A vehicle was found van-
dalized on the southeast side of
Aycock dorm.
Nov. 2, 12:20 a.m. � A
camera and case were stolen from
a room on the third floor of
Greene dorm. 12:15 p.m. � A
wallet was stolen from the dining
room at Jones Cafeteria. 1 p.m.
� Two vehicles were found
damaged in the 14th and Berkley
lot. Both vehicles had stereo
equipment stolen from them.
4:18p.m. � Money was reported
stolen from a wallet in the
hallway in the Drama building.
One juvenile and one local resi-
dent were apprehended and the
money was recovered. Both
suspects were banned from cam-
pus.
Nov. 4, 11:45 a.m. � Chris-
tian Riddle of Greenville was
issued a citation for operating left
of center.
Don't Forget
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It Could Make A Difference!
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(Ml iEaat aTarolinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. �Tfamm
Greg Rideout. ini�nfm rmm
Jennifer Jendrasiak. n. m j.T. Pietrzak. mm. �, �15��
Randy Mews, �� ��, Anthony Martin. �.��,� ���,�
Tina Maroschak. am w�� Tom Norton. o� r�
Bill Austin. o�w. m Mikf Mayo, wnhj mm.
November 6. 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Vote
Go To The Polls Today
Once every four years
Americans have their say. Today is
that day. Election Day. And as
university students, your right to
vote should be turned by you into
an obligation. As both Democrats
and Republicans have been saying
all year, never has the choice been
so clear for the American public.
Students from North Carolina
have a chance to shift or not shift
our state's views on three different
levels. It is important to make that
choice.
Vote. You, as students, above
all should value and cherish the
privilege to pick your nation's
leaders. Our country began
because of a cry for representative
government. We believed in the
people ruling the people, not a
monarch with supposed God-given
rights who tell other men what to
do. Our founding fathers had the
wisdom and confidence that we
could govern ourselves. So they let
us have a vote.
Today democracy is still a
minority form of government in
the world. Most people live u. der
dictators or Communist-type
regimes. We are the world's bas-
tion of freedom, telling the peoples
of every land to have faith and
hope; believe, we tell them, you
can � if given the chance �
govern yourselves.
Over the years, suffrage has
been expanded in our country to
cover everyone over the age of 18.
That includes you � the college
student. Our heritage demands
that you use your freedom to
choose who you want to represent
you as your governor, senator,
state legislator, representative,
president, etc. Pick who decides
how your army is used and how
your laws are drafted. If one
chooses not to choose, then you
are forgetting the words of Jeffer-
son, Paine and Lincoln.
Their words tell us to decide in
this most decisive of years. Now
more than ever before there are op-
posite ends of a political spectrum
lined up against each other in our
nation's presidential contest. The
incumbent, Ronald Reagan, has
shown us that he can be true
almost all of the time to his conser-
vative beliefs. He represents less
government, a strong military,
reduced spending on social pro-
grams and morality imposed by
law. The challenger, former Vice
President Walter B. Mondale, is
liberal. He calls for a government
with less defense spending, more
social spending, a reduced deficit
and one that sees an activist role
for government.
The choice is one of the clearest
ever. You must decide. But above
all do decide. Send who you think
is best able to bring this country in-
to the 21st century. If a conser-
vative government is in order, then
by all means give us one, but if one
with more action by government is
needed, send that one instead.
In our U.S. Senate race another
major decision is in order. Does
our state want to keep our
maverick senator, Jesse Helms,
whose votes are among the most
conservative in Congress. Or do
you want a change and wish to opt
for Gov. James B. Hunt, a
moderate southern Democrat who
represents the progressive South.
There is clearly a distinction.
Choose one.
The chore in the governor's race
is less distinct but important in the
appearance of who we want to run
our state. Will we opt for a pro-
gressive conservative, Rep. James
Martin, or do we wish to stick with
the traditional Democrat, At-
torney General Rufus Edmisten?
Do we wish to show the rest of the
country a Democrat or
Republican? The choice is yours.
Consider the issues. Read about
the candidate's positions. And
Vote Today
AMSKAfSftHL REAGAN IS WWMQiWJS
MciMsimi
�m�Mtxie$
ARE 6R&fcPRSPPKS
Switch Before Debt Derailment
Doonesbury
By CHARLES SUNE
The issue is not just that Ronald
Reagan has signed up for $850 billion of
debt or that on his watch he is giving us a
debt that will be equal to that of all past
presidents before him combined. The
issue is not just that the debt will ap-
proach or exceed $200 billion a year for
as far as the eye can see or that the in-
terest alone on the debt will exceed $200
billion by the year 1989. The real issue is
that he doesn 't think we have a problem.
� Sen. Paul Tsongas, D-Mass.
The presidential election of 1984 is
perhaps the critical election of our
lifetime. Never before has the choice
been as clear-cut and have the conse-
quences of our decision been more pro-
found. Young people � like no other
voting group � have the most at stake in
this election, for it is we who will suffer
the long-term dire consequences of the
Reagan debt. The issue is not "Are we
better off today than we were four years
ago but rather, "will we be better off
four years from now?"
In spite of Ronald Reagan's pledge to
balance the federal budget, we have the
most out of baJance budget in our
history. What is more significant is the
impact this will have on our future pro-
sperity and more importantly, what im-
pact this will have on young people as
they enter the job market. Martin Felds-
tein, formally President Reagan's chair-
man of the Council of Economic Ad-
visers (CEA), said recently, "The longer
the deficits are allowed to persist, the
greater are the risks to our economy
So why has the deficit become such a
hindrance to economic growth seeming-
ly overnight? After all, we have lived
with deficits before. The answer lies in
the size of the deficits and the effect its
enormous size has on real interest rates.
The size is not only increasing in
nominal terms, but is increasing in real
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
MR BUSH, WHY DID
you peapb to place
YOUR MANHOOD IN A
blinp trust insteap
of someujhere else?
fTT
weu. nms really the
PRESIDENTS iPEA HE'S VERY
MUCH IN CONTROL OF THIS
WONDERFUL ADMINISTRATION,
ANPI RESPECT AND
ADMIRE HIM FOR IT'
r
UHERE TO KEEP The VICE PRES
IDENT5 MANHOOD IS JUST ONB
OF THE T0U6H DeClSIONS A
PRESIDENT HAS TDMAK5 LSI,
m INSTANCE. USE? TD KEEP
HUBERT HUMPHREY'S MAN
HOOP IN HIS POCKET
PIP MR
REAGAN
CONSlPER
THAT?
f
YES.BUTUJE
AGREED A
BLINP TRUST
HAS MORE
DIGNIFIEP
IT'S MORNING IN AMERICA
FOLKS HAVING COFFEE.
KIPS PILING INTO STATION
UJA60NS MILKMEN PEUV-
ERJNG GLASS BOTTLES AND
SMILES' QJ0C!
f &�
r
ft
yOU
VBS, ITS MORNING IN
RONALD REAGANS AMER-
ICA THE ALTERNATIVE7
LETS' TAKE A LOOK. Its
MORNING IN UJALTER
MONPALES AMBRJCA t
hohk!
HONK I
rmBuag
e&r.eiLL1 1W
)StfSOf I'MOFF
COKE7 FOR W
ABORTION,
'MORNING. EVERY-
BODY' BIG PAY
TODAY' IS THAT
1 Ccsv RJ6HT?
YOU BETTER BELIEVE IT' ITS
SUCTION PAY' AND GUESS
UMTS FINALLY RE6ISTEREP
THIS YEAR i
. ANPUUTH'THEPOLLS
CLOSED AND 89 OF
THE VOTE COUNTED. ITS
sk REAGAN IN A
C jaA LANPSUPE'
Z'VdQOTTO
STARTGETTING
UP EARLIER
ANDMHAT
A VOTER
TURN-OUT
m HAP, TOM'
mmmm
terms. Congressional Budget Office
(CBO) analysts project the deficit to
comprise five percent of the gross na-
tional product (GNP) by the end of the
decade unless present spending is curtail-
ed andor government revenues are in-
creased. This compares with deficits
which in previous decades comprised
between two to three percent of the
GNP. Similarly, the CBO notes that if
no tax laws had been changed during the
Reagan years, the budget would be in an
$11 billion surplus by 1989, instead of
the current projected deficit of $240
billion. In nominal terms, the
cumulative deficit will have increased
from one trillion in 1980 to 2.3 trillion in
1989 by Reagan's optimistic projections.
Reagan, in eight years, will have more
than doubled the deficit.
As government finances the eer-
increasing deficit, real interest rates, (in-
terest rates minus inflation) will grow
higher than ever. The cost of borrowing
funds, in real terms, has already risen
significantly, in some cases three to four
percent, and there is a consensus among
economists, both conservative and
liberal, that this is due to current high
deficits. As Time noted recently, there is
fear among moneymen that the
Government will borrow so heavily that
less funds will be available for con-
sumers and business In other words,
when consumers borrow mone
will be paying more for that
because of higher deficits. Wha:
more concerning is that these h
rates show no sign of coming
"Real net-of-infiation interest rate
remain high as long as there i
traordinary pressure for credit
finance the huge federal deficit
Martin and Kathleen Feldstem in The
Washington Post recently.
As we analyze the costs of the R
deficit we must realize oo tha- the
deficits have aggravated the alrea
blematic trade deficit. Feldstem ha
only contended that deficits force ip - -
terest rates, but additionally cau
U.S. dollar to be overvalued
tionallv.
Jane Bryant Quinn put ever.
to perspective in a recent fnt(-
umn: "Record inflation has g
to record budget deficits, rec rd trade
deficits, federal spending on u
more Olympian scale and a i i -biting
burden of real interest rates .
people, students in particular, deckle
who to support in this electiot tbe fect-
sion can be reduced to a
economic imperative: Can we . rd
risk our future with Ronald Reagai
Campus Forum
Peace Thanks Republicans
We would like to thank the College
Republicans and SGA for bringing
Mr. Solomon to ECU to present his
views on the Grenada invasion during
Central America Awareness Week.
As many people know, the College
Republicans and the ECU Peace
Committee have differing views on
many issues, and certainly U.S.
policy is one example in which we
hold different opinions.
Our primary goal was and is to
make people more aware of what is
happening in Central America so they
can more informatively make their
own decisions about U.S. Foreign
Policy in that region.
"Americas in Transition an
academy award-winning PBS film,
will be shown Nov. 8 in Joyner
Library, downstairs in the Media
Board Room at 7 p.m. We ask
anyone who would like to join us for
the film and discussion to please do
so as only through dialogue can we
hope to find a solution to our pro-
blems in Central America and other
troubled sections of the world.
ECU Peace Committee
Hey, Bern
In response to Bern McGrady's let-
ter to the editor of Nov. 1, I would
like to show Bern just who has been
asleep lately. Throughout the past ad-
ministration, the "stronghold" of the
U.S. government in various areas has
been severely lessened and the true
leadership has been brought back to a
realistic level. This can be accredited
to President Reagan's placing of im-
portance upon an individual's
perspective and unique right. If one
were to study the U.S. government
during the administration of James
Carter and Walter Mondale, they
would see very clearly that the impor-
tance of governmental strength was
placed on the chiefs and directors of
various organizations in the govern-
ment. Ronald Reagan has gotten us
away from the waste that can be at-
tributed solely to these directors and
chiefs by terminating their jobs
because of lack of zeal and com-
petence.
Bern, you said that Preside
Reagan will have to "raise taxes:
to reduce the deficit This statement
is so utterly ridiculous and is typical
of a Democratic liberal. If you recall.
during the Carter administration, in-
flation was at a sizeable double-digit
rate. Since that time. President
Reagan has reduced inflation to a
very low single-digit. What do you at-
tribute this to? Luck? On the con-
trary. This administration has created
numerous new jobs and various tax
cuts which has enabled the inflation
rate to fall drastically. These same
new jobs and tax cuts have created a
renewed spirit of partiotism and a
love for the United States. People are
now beginning to make their
"breaks" because the "land of op-
portunity" has been re-established,
and they are once again able to "see
the light at the end of the tunnel
In reference to Mr. McGrady's
view of our peace force in Lebanon, 1
would just like to have him look at
the situation from the point of view
of a Lebanese citizen looking for
peace. The peace force has enabled
them to see that the United States tru-
ly cares about the outcome of their in-
cumbent problems and that we are
willing to give our lives for them. Yes
that means me also.
Lastly, I would like to address
Bern's obnoxious comment which
was addressed toward Jerry Falwell.
Who gives you the right to make such
a severe comment in calling Falwell a
"religious fanatic?" Jerry Falwell is a
man trying to work towards a cause.
He feels Ronald Reagan is the best
candidate and thus endorses him.
Why bring in his so called
"fanaticism?"
On Nov. 6, the United States will
be voting for the office of president.
As it appears due to present polls!
Ronald Reagan is firmly ahead. This
just shows the intelligence of the ma-
jority of people in this country. 1 just
thank God that Reagan will, as Bern
so bluntly put it, "kick ass
Steve Vutsinas
Freshman, Music
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redit (
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ending
Kat Fifth
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un b r s
Uaska,
THERE
BECOMING
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system
career a
not the
on the right means vou
earning a BSN. w-nte
Clifton. NJ 07015
ARMY NURSE
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KONOMV fS
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 6, 1984
7t"
tor mmes
i I merit
a
ey, ihey
al money
it is even
interes
doun:
.lies will
is an ex-
edii to
noted
stein in The
the Reagan
o that the
i read) pro-
has not
force up m-
cause the
cd interna-
r -thing in-
vm m seek co-
given a
record trade
an even
naii-bitmg
s young
. ar, decide
.the deci-
a leN el of
Aic afford to
I Reagan0
epublicans
-
e Lni
President
n taxes to try
statement
. and is typical
� you recall,
ration, in-
:uble-digit
President
ion to a
� hat do you at-
On the con-
n has created
d anous tax
abled the inflation
:ally. These same
have created a
not ism and a
People are
make their
� land of op-
een re-established,
again able to "see
he end of the tunnel
reference to Mr. McGradv's
� of our peace force in Lebanon, I
I like to have him look at
I ituation from the point of view
banese citizen looking for
ice The peace force has enabled
m to see that the United States tru
ares about the outcome of their in-
kmbent problems and that we are
llisng to give our lives for them. Yes,
lat means me also.
Lastly, I would like to address
rn's obnoxious comment which
addressed toward Jerry Falwell
ho gives you the right to make such
severe comment in calling Falwell a
etigious fanatic?" Jerry Falwell iS a
in trying to work towards a cause.
feels Ronald Reagan is the best
ldidate and thus endorses him.
jhy bring in his so called
fanaticism?"
On Nov. 6, the United States will
noting for the office of president.
it appears due to present polls,
bnald Reagan is firmly ahead. This
st shows the intelligence of the ma-
hty of people in this country. I just
ink God that Reagan will, as Bern
bluntly put it, "kick ass
h Vutsinas
jshman, Music
red it Card Theft Increases
Crime
Column
March 7, 1982, a coed's
stolen from her car
parked in the 5th and
freshmen lot. The
a credit card
company From
of that year
d I the thief
mile, three
three times
e times in
New Bern,
rtt, once in
i Morehead
ponse to a
the E-iT
i i
hich
"in a majoi oi
until lune 2
1 " u used
me in Grt
�� illiamsto
bo r o t h
ith

Finally, in r
Department of Public Safety to
other law enforcement agencies
in eastern North Carolina, the
card was recovered at a gas sta-
tion in Plymouth.
During the same school year,
two freshmen coeds from Greene
dorm stole several purses from
unlocked rooms in the dorm. One
of the purses contained a credit
card which was used at several
stores in Greenville before it was
recovered. The suspects were ar-
rested by campus investigators
and prosecuted.
Credit and bank card frauds
are a steadily increasing crime on
college campuses. Students are
especially susceptible to this
crime because thieves know that
students are not likely to take
normal precautions against the
theft and use of their cards.
ICU Honor Programs
h ate From Norm
intinu) i . rom Page 1
.
i ved the
ard. On-
highest
he award.
i .isists oi
According
end to be
ted, and
i ual
: n
he list ot
Some of
Brain,
hought,
isi ns of
Accor-
rs, and
Coming of Age in the Modern
South.
The Honors Department will
sponsor a variety of seminars in
all areas of general college with
the exception of Math. Courses
being offered are: The Crisis of
Hero in 20th Century Fiction,
The Horrific, The Holy and The
Heroic in American Popular and
Folkloreulture, Utopia: A
Quest foi an Ideal, Japanese
a omen American women. Gay
Ueishas, Militant Mothers, and
"Damned Scribbling Women, In-
tro to Anthropology and Intro
to Sociology.
Common mistakes which lead
to the theft of credit cards include
leaving room doors unlocked,
even for "just a minute and
leaving purses inside the
passenger compartment of
vehicles. Account numbers of al!
credit cards should be recorded
and the phone number of the
credit card company should be
readily available. In case of theft,
the victim should immediately
notify the credit card company
and file a report with the police.
Most credit card companies will
hold the victim responsible for
purchases made on the card from
the time of theft until the time of
the report. Many require that the
victim be responsible for the first
$50 in charges against the card
after the theft, even if a report is
made.
Along with credit card fraud,
automatic teller cards have
become a source of easy income
for thieves. Up to $200 per day
can be removed from an account
with an automatic teller card. If
the card is used to draw on a
checking account, chances are
that the victim will find checks
bouncing before realizing that
money is missing from the ac-
count.
Automatic teller fraud can be
easily prevented. The cards can
only be used by keying in an in-
dividual code assigned to the card
owner by the banking institution.
If the code is protected by the
card owner, the card is worthless
to a thief. However, in five cases
of automatic teller card fraud
reported to public safety in-
vestigators within the past two
years, the victim allowed the thief
access to the code. In two cases.
the code was written on a piece of
paper which was carried in a
purse of wallet with the card. In
one case, the code was kept in a
desk drawer in a dorm room and
was stolen at the same time as the
wallet containing the card was
stolen. In another case, the victim
allowed several persons to watch
as she keyed the code into the
machine; and in one case, the vic-
tim had written the code on the
back of the card.
On several occasions, the cards
have been used by roommates or
friends and returned to the vic-
tim's room before they were
missed. The victims learned of
the crimes only after receiving
their bank statements.
Automatic teller card codes
should be memorized. They
should not be written down and
kept anywhere. The owner of the
card should never allow anyone,
not even close friends, to watch
automatic teller transactions. If a
card is stolen, the victim should
make an immediate report to the
banking institution and file a
police report.
Penalties for credit card fraud
and credit card larceny have been
stiffened in recent years in an at-
tempt to cope with the increase in
reported incidents. Credit card
fraud is punishable under North
Carolina law with a maximum of
a $1,000 fine and one year in
prison. The larceny of a credit
card is a felony and is punishable
by up to three years in prison or a
fine at the discretion of the court
or both.
Entry Date Nov. 7th
Grey Art Gallery, 10-5
Categories are Painting, Sculpture,
Ceramics, Photography, Design
(metals, wood, fibers), Graphic Art, Il-
lustration, Drawing, and Mixed Media.
Entry fee $1 per work, limit 3 pieces per
student. For more info, contact the
Rebel office at 757-6502. A copy of the
rules is posted on the Rebel office 2nd
floor publications building. Prize
money donated by the Attic and
Budweiser.
N h
Kail
t
j "�'�2
mi
ding
fth
n Nation
olina ranks
. ei capita
ition, ac-
ublished this
t Higher
. figures
iti n pro-
� I niversity,
ant 8th na-
. foi col-
ling to the
( hambers,
� ropriated
5160.70
16 public col-
i ii' ges and
I in aid to
North
nl behind
Hawaii and
ka pent
il : on higher
n mitoi ed state
. . i education for
u - His study
1984-83 t hool
appropriated
Mr college
operating ex-
loes not in-
Mt capital
money from
; federal and local
ranked fourth
lut ation spen-
apita income,
I behind only
imins and New Mex-
PAPA KATZ
In Its Original Location Behind Putt Putt
WEDNESDAY NITE
Greenville's First
Ladies Lock-Out
Is Back
8:30-10:00
Free Draft & Wine


Paca Kaiz is A Private CluD
For Memoers & Guests
We Have All ABC Permits
10th St Ext
At RiverDiuft Rd
Men Allowed In At 10:00
Happy Hour For the Men
10:00 until 11:00
Will Receive A Free 3-Keg Social
At Papa Katz
1 r
II
The Sorority With The Most Members r The Girls Dorm With The Most Members 3
ovemDer 7th and November 14th s6 November 7th and November 14th fr
Will Receive A Free 3-Keg Social
At Papa Katz
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
iECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
.��� not the exception. The gold bar .
n the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, " n
Clifton, N 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU
w
KINGSTON
PLACE
The most exclusive address in Greenville.
Completely furnished and accessorized
with the finest interior appointments and
exceptional amenities for the serious stu-
dent.
It's a very special condominium com-
munity. Private, convenient, and available
now for rent or purchase.
� Rent: $150.00 per month per student
(75Cmore per day than the dorm)
� Purchase: Under $60,000 about Vi the price per
square foot than the other student
condominiums.
Please stop by our office at
2820 E. 10th St. anytime
between 9am-6pm MonFri.
10am-5pm Sat.
Call for an evening or Sunday appointment.
Call 757-1971 for more information
ALL units are 2 bedrooms, 2 and 2 Vi baths. OT a F1Cle
1088 square feet, 2 floor plans available.
C
v)

v�2Z
as
�Vo1
2X
f a1
.
' i r � ��- 1 � '
' .
mmmmmmmmmmm
H
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-






i
THE EAST CAROI.INJAN
Style
NOVEMBER 6, 1984
Page 6
Playhouse Plans
'Ozma Of Oz'
The East Carolina Youth
Playhouse will present the
delightful children's classic Ozma
of Oz: A Tale of Time on Nov. 13
at 7:15 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre. Loosely based on the
zany characters and improbable
situations of L. Frank Baum's
book of the same title, Ozma of
Oz explores the relationship bet-
ween teenaged Dorothy and her
elderly but magnificantly spirited
Uncle Henry.
The curtain rises to find
Dorothy and Uncle Henry on
board an old and rusty cargo
freighter bound for Australia.
Soon, a large storm approaches
and Dorothy and her uncle are
swept off the boat and whirled
away on an adventure of
discovery in the wild and dazzling
Land of Oz. Along the way they
encounter Bill, a giant wisecrack-
ing chicken, the wacky Wheelers,
the vain and vivacious
Langwidere, and finally, the
superstrong and wonderfully wise
Ozma.
"We try to pull out all the
stops for Youth Playhouse pro-
ductions explains Director
Doug Ray. "The costumes and
lights are of bright colors, the
scenery is from the world of fan-
tasy and the mood is one of en-
chantment � everything that will
help capture the enthusiasm of
our young audience and reinforce
the theme, which, in this case, is
one of caring and understanding
between children and adults
There are other performances
of Ozma of Oz; however, Tues-
day evening, Nov. 13, is the only
show which has not already sold
out. All tickets are $2 and may be
purchased at the McGinnis
Theatre Box Office. The box of-
fice is open Monday through Fri-
day, from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m.
Telephone reservations are also
accepted by calling 757-6390.
Brian Cottle, Hall Wells and Christ! Garrison prepare for the playhouse production of Ozma of Oz.
The Challange: Quit Smoking For A Day
"1 dont know why smokers wait until New Years
to stop smoking, when they receive nation-wide sup-
port November 15th during the Great American
Smokeout said Joan Boudreaux, Pitt County
Chairperson of the American Cancer Society's yearly
event.
Preparing for Pitt County's fourth (America's
eighth) annual Smokeout, Boudreaux said that in
spite of the tobacco economy in Pitt County, the
response to the 24-hour cold turkey from cigarettes
has gained momentum during the four years she has
chaired the event.
The Great American Smokeout is sponsored by the
American Cancer Society every year to encourage
smokers who would like to kick the habit and vow
not to smoke for 24 hours.
"Last year more than one in every three smokers in
the United States (36 percent) participated in the
smokeout. Of these, over eight percent did not smoke
all day. over four percent reported that they were not
smoking still one to 11 days later said Rose
Richards, director of the Pitt County Chapter of the
American Cancer Society. Richards hopes that peo-
ple who smoke will let one of their non-smoking
friends adopt them smokeout day. "They can go by
the American Cancer Society office on 112 Pitt Street
for the adoption papers Richards said. The papers
are to be filled out and signed by both non-smoker
and smoker, the former pledging to help by hiding
the smoker's cigarettes and furnished chewing gum
or fruit; the latter pledging to adhere by following the
suggestions printed on the Adopt-A-Smoker card.
The Alpha Phi Omega fraternity will man a table
at the Student Supply Store Nov. 14, the day before
the smokeout. According to Danny White, president
of the iraternity, the members will aid all those in-
terested in eliminating the weed for 24 hours.
People who are interested in quitting smoking will
be asked to fill out a pledge card agreeing to
"solemnly swear to give up smoking for the Great
American Smokeout, Nov. 15 The pledge
card also requests potential quitters to promise not to
smoke for 24 hours (and maybe longer), or to help a
friend quit.
Those who agree to the 24-hour trial period are
also given various information sheets, bookmarks,
buttons, and a red rubber band (with J.R. Ewing's
picture attached), which is worn on the wrist and is
designed to help the participants quit. "When ever
you want a cigarette, instead of strikin' up a match,
you just snap the band is the advice written on a
card attached to the band, quoting J.R. (Larry
Hagman).
The bookmarks have a quote from the 1984 report
on smoking and health from the Surgeon General's
goal: "A smoke-free society by the year 2000
A fact sheet to be given out the day before the
Great American Smokeout notes that the number of
smokers who have quit is rising steadily from 1.8
million in 1978 to over 33 million in 1983. Of those
Americans who still smoke, nine out of ten polled
claim they would like to quit.
According to Boudreaux, people have a better
chance to quit smoking if they have a "support
group" to help them. Boudreaux, who quit smoking
herself several years ago, sees the American Cancer
Society's campaign as providing such support on the
national level.
"It is an upbeat, good-natured effort on the pan
of the American Cancer Society to encourage
smokers to stop smoking for at least 24 hours
Boudrcaux said. She said that people who choose
should attempt to quit while they have a day of na-
tional support. "If for no other reason, to prove to
themselves they can do it
Boudreaux added that people who choose to keep
smoking, using Pitt County's economy as their ex-
cuse, need to be applauded for their sacrifice. "I
commend North Carolina smokers for being devoted
enough to R.J. Reynolds to give their lives
Local supporters of the Great American Smokeout
are inviting successful quitters to join in the festivities
to help support potential quitters whose thoughts
turn to cold turkey Nov. 15.
If you need an extra boost, call the "KWIT line
a national "900" number which will give 1984
smokeout participants encouragement.
Shakespeare To Join American Smokeout
(UPI) � The American Cancer
Society, sponsor of the "Great
American Smokeout" coming up
Nov. 15, has published a number
of familiar quotations to help
nicotine stained wretches refrain
from lighting up that day.
The citations include Mark
Twain's famous two-liner: "To
cease smoking is the easiest thing
I ever did. I've done it a
thousands times And also Fred
Alleh's zinger: "When you
smoke cigarettes, you're likely to
burn yourself to death
Nowhere did I note any
reference to the author who may
have had the most to say on the
subject. I refer to William
Shakespeare, whose plays, poems
and other writing have helped
millions kick the habit.
As my contributions to this
year's smokeout I hae gone
through Bartlett's and picked out
some the the Immortal Bard's
relevant comments.
If the following "interview"
doesn't make you want to give up
the weed for at least 24 hours,
nothing will:
Q. Mr. Shakespeare, are you
planning to participate in the
Smokeout?
A. "Must I hold a candle to my
shames?"
Q. Not unless you are out of
lighter fluid. I'm merely asking if
you intend to refrain from taking
a puff on Nov. 15.
A. "Sometimes hath the
brightest day a cloud. That's a
day longer than a wonder lasts
Q. It certainly will be a wonder
if you don't smoke all day. But
24 hours is only twice around the
clock. Hardly a lifetime.
A. "What's o'clock? 'Twere
well it were done quickly
Q. Are you looking forward to
the challenge?
A. "It goes much against my
stomach. I had rather be a dog
and bay the moon
Q. How will you and your
fellow smokers spend the day?
A. "From hour to hour we rot
and rot. We'll have a smashing
and a martial outside, as many
other mannish cowards have.
There is no vice so simple but
assumes some mark of virtue on
his outward parts
Q. What happens to a smoker
who fails to make it through the
day?
A. "They'll give him death by-
inches. Men prize the thing
ungain'd nioie than it is. But
screw your courage to the
sticking-place, and
fail
we'll not
Q. Are you taking any steps to
psyche yourself up?
A. "I mean not to sweat ex-
traordinarily. A man can die but
once
Q. Why in the light of all the
statistics do you continue to
smoke?
A. "I am a tainted wether of
the flock. My affection hath an
unknown bottom, like the bay of
Portugal
Q. I understand the bay has
now been sounded, sir. And may
I point out that one day is hardly
a monumental exercise of will
power. Are you sure that is long
enough for a true test?
A. "Enough, with
overmeasure
Q. You mean your resolve is a
bit tentative?
A. "Tetchy and wayward. Like
a drunken sailor on a mast, ready
with every nod to tumble down
Q. I see. Do you have any com-
forting words for the millions
taking part in the Smokeout?
A. "Bid them wash their faces,
and keep their teeth clean. At
least we'll die with harness on our
back
Heyward Moves
On To Better Things
Maynard Ferguson
The Special Concerts Committee is sponsoring a concert by content- the Central Ticket Office and prices are as follows: ECU students,
porary jazz artist Maynard Ferguson and his orchestra on Wednesday, $1.50; ECU faculty and staff, $3; public and at the door, $5. The Cen-
Nov. 14 at 8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. Tickets go on sale Nov. 8 at tral Ticket Office is open Monday through Friday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.
By DAVID WITHERINGTON
Staff Write
North Of A Miracle is Nick
Heyward's first solo album.
Heyward was a member of Hair-
cut One Hundred up until about
six months ago. Now, it's easy
for me to see why Heyward left
the group. Surprisingly, he is a
decent songwriter. The crass bub-
blegum sound of Haircut One
Hundred was holding back his
passion for intelligent pop music.
The bouncy optimism of
Pelican West, his only album
with his former mates, is nowhere
to be found on his solo outing.
Instead, Heyward is portrayed as
an introverted dreamer through a
series of tunes ranging from
upbeat, finger-snapping
melodies, brassy productions,
and Latin jazz.
"Atlantic Monday "The
Kick of Love and "Take That
Situation" are all perfect for the
radio with their carefully struc-
tured pop melodies, and just the
right dosage of rock and roll.
On the other side of the coin,
"The Day It Rained Forever
"Blue Hat for a Blue Day and
the brilliant "Whistle Down the
Wind" are slow lush ballads
embellished by orchestral
maneuvers and a touch of the
blues.
This brings us to "Two Make
It True a number that will
definitely have you on your feet.
This is a midtempo song with an
irresistable hood that grabs and
doesn't let go. The sinewy lyrics
build to a crescendo with a fiery
repitition: "Never giving you
up Always putting you down "
This is an ironic line that often
rings true for so many distraught
lovers.
Not only has Nick Heyward sh
ed the burden of being a member
of a wimpy group like Haircut
One Hundred (whose son Z
even less entertaining than Durari
Duran's boring melodramas) he
has a reputable backing band on
this record. Renowned T �
sionist Morris Pert lends a hand"
as does the ever-present 6ave
Mattacks on drums. The b2
player is Pino PaUadino .
member of Jools HolW
Millionaires. Other n���nd '
dude Steve Nieve on vhlm-
and Tim Renwick on gS�
if you were a bit put off bvu?'
cut One Hundred an? Ha?r"
justifiable, please ' beSLquUe
when I say that Nick HeLf
a new man. This dbumT
worth a second listen.
Record Bar inColinTLJ
and the Plaza. MtU
Salvati
B ROBIN HAMRICK
Mff �rtl�
The Salvation Army, our
modern day Robin Hood, is
located under the red shield on
Dickinson Avenue. When one
spots the red shield, many thi .
come to mind � a black kettle at
Christmas, a helping hand to
those who need it. and to college
students, a thrift shop full of
everything from a to i These are
all a part of the Salvation Am
but what else does it su
and where did it get started'1
In 1865, William Boot-
Methodist minister, left
church to preach in the slum
London There he found ma
people in need of physical g
as well as spiritual
B
H

I
B(
I
.ej
I
Classified
SALE
SEARS SlLVERTONE STES
PLAYER $25 OIG Zen �- f
parts, $20 Can 758 59 after 6 p
FOR
$2495
SAuE 1976
Call 752 7634
royota
FOR SALE Pea- wt e Eartt
cruiser with rec - ms
cadie lock. Hardi usec �e new
S10C Call Kat 752 0765
PIANO FOR SAE Aaec-esr
sible part to asse sma montr .
payments on sp ne-
Can be seen oca . Hr re
phone number.) Crec Mana
P.O. Box 521 Beceme.
62219.
MISC
LOST: $50 reward for the reti rn o a
four-month oid tori -
himalayan, "Little Kense,
Pat Village at 756 9222
CHILD CARE Sing e father - rr
flirt, 4V� yrv neeos c t�
"after hours" chiic ca'e P
child of same age anc se
758-0947 evenings
PERSONAL
WALLY Dae sa.s e rak
the baiigan-ie e prom se I
stealing h s c rry ags i I �
If it's worth d -aer see a
healthy pa- ol ' s than Sammy
Baugr How aoout you7 T-e -
HOW DO �Co "ave sex with P.J.I
Roll it in ficur a" a m for the re1
spot.
VOTE Toca. -a. be the mosi
portant oav of your
about tc pick "e eace� -ree
world A little scarec arer 1
Well, just use four m nds
FRANKLIN TOV- JEcc5hS;n
WANTED
STEREO System probie At
�Olutely "no charge tor epa r
estimates at me Tec" Sec Ca
7S7Nineteen Eighty Ae thought
you'd like to know
PROFESSIONAL TYPiST a �-
V��rs wants fulltime �ce
IBM typewriter Can '5a 3o6C
ATTRACTIVE FEMALES tOT
W�ltress position anc oartenaer Ac
Biy in person 7 p - E t" ll
Bnus Nightclub
TRAVEL FIELD OP"Oks TX
0in valuable market ng expe ence
While earning oev Campus
representative neeaec mmwtatc �
Hr spring break trip to Florida Con
t�ct Bill Ryan at 1-800 282 6221
K) PER HUNDRED PAiD ?or pro
Gassing mail at home nforraT'on
��nd self addressed s'apeo
�nvelope. Associates Box 95
Roselle, N.j. 07203
EARN EXTRA MONEY The law
school selection service needs a
campus representative Eam.ng
potential great. Work around you
schedule. For additional norma
tion call collect (303) 841 8305
EED A RESUME: CALL 7�-al�9 OR
7SS-�S� AFTER 6.30 P.M. SEMOR
MARRrrmc major �ith
SEVERAL YEARS OF BUSINESS EX-
PERIENCE WILL WRITE RESUME
AND OR COVER LETTERS

� ��- -
n
a





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SOW MB! Hi IVH4
fOz.


mly has Nick Heywardsh-
?urden of being a ma
hmp group like H-
lundred (whose songs are
S entertaining th -
boring melodran
rputabk backing band on
:ord. Renowned p.
(Morns Pert lends a hand
Is the ever-present Dave
Iks on drums. The bass
� f'no Paliadm, .
I of Jools Holland's
laires. Other notables ln
teve Nieve on keyboa ds
�n RenwKk on guitar So
reab,tputoffbvHair:
ic Hundred anri r
te. Please" bJSeqU,te
say that Nick Hevward'to
ran TJs album tt
B-nC,ollnaM

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money
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interest
Jow n:
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r lningst r. e i r Of op-�liv.ed. 0 Nee
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The siiin tor
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an ironic line thatoftenwe
�ue for so mannn.i
Salvation Army Has It All
By ROBIN HAMRRK
"MriTiiiii
The Salvation Armv, our
modern day Robin Hood, is
located under the red shield on
Dickinson Avenue. When one
spots the red shield, many things
come to mind � a black kettle at
Christmas, a helping hand to
(hose who need it, and to college
students, a thrift shop full of
everything from a to z. These are
all a part of the Salvation Army,
but what else does it stand for
and where did it get started?
In 1865, William Booth, a
Methodist minister, left the
church to preach in the slums of
1 ondon. There he found many
people in need of physical goods
as well as spiritual assistance.
Because the people were
somewhat wary of churches,
Booth named his organization
the Salvation Army. The mis-
sionaries were the "corps the
members were "soldiers the
ministers were "officers and
Booth was the "General" of the
army. They held meetings in
tents, wore uniforms, and flew a
?lag to represent their organiza-
tion. The newly established army
began a war against the illnesses
of the society.
In 1880, the Salvation Army
expanded to the U.S. where it put
forth a fight against the poverty
prevelent throughout New York
City. As the Army grew, so did
its reputation. Additions, in-
cluding nurseries, food depots,
and hospitals, emerged from the
Army. During World War II, the
Salvation Army formed the USO.
Today the Army is still serving
people. It now has 10,000 centers
in the U.S. which help anyone in
need of assistance. Its programs
extend from homes for the
retarded to the thrift shop.
The Salvation Army is divided
into three programs � social ser-
vice, church, and thrift � with
each complementing the other.
The most recognized of these
programs is the thrift shop. In
Greenville, the Salvation Army
thrift shop is located directly
behind the church in a tan
warehouse. From here you can
purchase anything from a SI50
suit to a $2 pair of Levi's. If
you're in the market for a motor-
cycle, the thrift shop has one for
$250. Patients, whigs, chairs,
tapes, hookN, clothing, shower
curtains, rugsanything you're
looking foi is probably there. As
Major Ronald Davis said, "In
our shop you can get something
from about every store in town.
We have things from Belks and
Brody's as well as Kmart He
added, "It's a good place for
bargains for people who like big,
dumpy clothes ECU student
Margaret Sydnor said, "I bought
a fun winter coat that I wear all
the time
The Salvation Army, including
the thrift shop, was designed to
help the needy. "We receive
donations from the rich, sell to
the middle class, and give to the
poor Davis concluded.
WANTED:
Responsible Persons to fill
Responsible Positions
Will train to perform certain
news paper tasks
Apply to:
Chrystal Fray or Toni Gibbs at
The Ebony Herald office or see
Kay Smith (Media Board
Secritary), in the Publications
Building accross from Joyner
Library. Writers-Typists
Advertising Reps.
HAPPY BELA TED BIRTHDA Y JENNIFER
Chico's � Wednesday, Nov. 8 (4:59 p.m.)
Mark it in your appointment book.
Classifieds
tanon
SALE
SEARS SILVERTONE STEREO
PLAYER $25. Old Zenith TV, for
parts, $20. Call 758 1598 after 6pm
FOR
S2495
SALE 1976
Call 752 7636
Toyota Celica
FOR SALE Pearl white Earth
cruiser with red rims � includes
cabie lock Hardly used. Like new
$100 Call Kathy 752 0765.
PIANO FOR SALE Wanted respon
sible party to assume small monthly
payments on spinetconsole piano
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THE EAST CAROl IN1AN
Sports
South C
NOVEMBER 6. 184 Page 8
Rajin9 Cajuns
Stomp ECU
Southwestern I ousiana quart, r' . I. Don Wallace destroyed the Pirate secondary last Ss�,
for 214 yards and two touchdowns
By RANDY MEWS
SporU Mm.c
LAFAYETTE, La. � Southwestern Lou-
siana quarterback Don Wallace completed 14
passes for 214 yards and two touchdowns as
the Ragin' Cajuns rolled past ECU 42-20
Saturday.
The loss was the seventh straight the
Pirates' have suffered on the road this year,
marking the first time since 1948 an ECU
football team has gone winless away from
home.
"Wallace picked us apart Pirate Coach
Ed Emory said. "We haven't been very good
with the pass rush or pass coverage this year,
and he took advantage of that
Wallace got the Cajuns moving on thier
first series as he drove his team 77 yards in 14
plays. He connected on four passes during
the drive, while also successfully completing
all three third down opportunities. Thomas
Jackson carried the ball in from six yards out
for the score, while Patrick Broussard added
the extra point to give USL a 7-0 lead with
8:53 left in the first quarter.
Wallace went to work again on SV Lou-
siana's second possession connecting with
Welton Morgan for 13 yards and Pierre
Perkins for 15. Then, on second and seven
from ECU's 46 yard-line, Perkins burned
Calvin Adams into the endzone to give I SI
their second score and a 14-0 lead.
After an exchange in possessions, ECU
committed the first of five fumbles when
Pirate quarterback Darrell Speed threw a bad
pitch to tailback Jimmy Walden. Rennick
Tuck recovered the ball just 19 yards from
neil johnson - ecu p��oto L.t the endzone, and then it took the Cajuns just
l;i as he completed 14 passes three plays to make it 21-0 midway through
the second quarter.
Pirates Improve During Fall
After the two teams traded fumbk away,
ECU finally got their offense in!
behind the direction of reserve qua
Ron Jones who guided the Pirate- i
down to the one-yard line. Bubba h
the call on first and goal, but he fun
ball into the endzone with 5:13 lefi
half.
The Pirates were able to hold LSI
next drive, and then came away A ��
33-yard Jeff Heath field goal as tin
in the first half.
In the second half, it looked a- ;f F (
going to make a game oi it when they m i
ed the length of the field on their fir
The Pirates moved the ball with relar
and then Jones kept on an option and r i
41 yards around the left end to close the
margin to 21-10.
ECU regained possession of the ba
P.J. Jordan fumble recovery, but the Pira
offense once again was unable to move
ball. Three running plays netted nine ya
and then Emory made the pivotal call ol
game as he elected to go for it on fourth
one.
The play was unsuccessful a Jones fun
ed the ball, giving LSI a first down jusi 22
yards from the endzone. It took Wallace I
plays to guide his team for thier I
touchdown and a 28-10 lead, and fron
USL took control of the contest as the Pii
would never come closer than 35-1
Emory called his team performance
of the worst he's been associated with.
said if his team had any character left a-
thev would end the season with a victor)
the season finale against Sout1,era Missis
Saturday in Ficklen Stadium
Bv RK K VK( ORMAC
stuff vnl�
fter completing a successful
fall season, ECU golf coach Bob
Helmick is looking for continued
improvement from his team dur-
ng the spring.
'Going into the fall, I knew we
capable of having a sound
team Helmick said. "But,
I knew that we would have to
i lot better than we did last
i wanted us to improve on
our finish from a year ago, and in
every tournament we did that
The Pirates finished out of the
top ten in both the MacGregor
Invitational and the John Ryan
Memorial, formerly known as the
Iron Duke Classic, finishing in
16th place in each tournament
last fall.
Also two vears ago, the Pirates
led seventh out of 12 teams
in the Wolfpack lnvitatioal.
This fall the Pirate golfers
finished ninth in both the John
Rvan Memorial and the
MacGregor Invitational.
In the Wolfpack Invitational
which had a larger field than last
fall's tournament, ECU finished
an impressive fourth, fhe Pirates
were in contention to win the
tournament, trailing the leader b
only one shut going into the final
round.
The only, tournamt team
didn't improve in was the
Hargrove Davis 1 In
that tournament, Helmick played
mostly freshmen to get them
tournament experience at the col-
legiate level.
"I view the fall eas as a
time to work on your game, and
evaluate your talent tor the spr
ing season Helmick said. "It
gives you the opportunity to gel
more competition for all of your
players, as everyone gets
in at least one toui nan .
Looking hack on the fall
Helmick mentioned sev.
"highlights
� In winning the Wolfpack In-
vitational, Chris Czaja became
the first 1(1 golfer in three
vears. and onlv the second in the
pa decade, to win individual
medalist honors in a tournament.
� Mike Bradley finishing eighth
a: the Duke tournament. His 214
loial was the lowest for an ECU
golfei in a three-dav tournament
since 1976.
In addition to the play of
Bradley and C'aja, Helmick was
impressed bv the play of
sophomore Paul Steelman. "He
is really playing well Helmick
said. "He had an accident over
the summer and we were concern-
ed as to whether or not he would
be able to compete this fall
Helmick is counting on
Steelman to play a piviotal role in
the team's success for the upcom-
ing spring season.
"How Paul Steelman plays this
spring will determine how the
team finishes Helmick said.
"He will probably be the swing
player, with his score determining
whether or not we finish high in
the standings
Another sophomore Helmick
will rely on this spring is Mark
Arcilcsi. "His game is reallv com-
ing around Helmick said. "He
is hitting the ball super, and any-
day I expect him to start playing
superior golf
Helmick is also looking for-
ward to having transfer Dennis
Hart become eligible in the spr-
ing. "Hart was on scholarship at
the University of South Carolina,
and will definetely be an asset to
the golf program
Other players Helmick expects
to contribute are fourth-year
player Dav! ' Waggoner, and
juniors Roger Newsome and Kel-
ly Stimart.
"It will take a total team effort
if we are going to continue to im-
prove in the spring Helmick
said.
"I was really impressed by the
play of Chris Czaja, Mike
Bradley and Paul Steelman in the
fall. They will all play major roles
this spring, with Steelman's role
as swingman crucial
Harrison Hopes For Better Year In '84
Bv SCOTT COOPER
suf f W rllcr
Charlie Harrison begins his
third season as ECU's head
basketball coach, and in his brief
stay has put a great deal of hope
into the Pirate basketball pro-
gram.
The Pirates had a dismal 4-24
record with just one ECAC South
win last year. However, ECU was
very young and lacked ex-
perience. In fact, the team has
nine returning lettermen from the
last year's squad. "The six
sophomores that will be returning
played a lot of minutes for us a
year ago, and I think they now
realize what's got to be done
Coach Harrison said.
Harrison brings to Greenville
two prize guards to strenghen his
backcourt. Scott Hardy, a junior
college transfer from Hagerstown
Community College, averaged 16
points and handed out 11 assists
last year. "Scott Hardy is a very
good point guard Harrison
said. "I think by just having him
and his ability to shoot the ball is
going to change the way people
defense us
The sole freshman on the ECU
roster this year is Herb Dixon. A
high school standout who averag-
� ed 21.8 ppg and 8.0 assists, Dixon
jlead his team to an impressive
: 17-3 record. "Herbie Dixon is a
:very, very talented young man
! Harrison said. "He's probably as
; talented any kid I've recruited
�since I've been here
Harrison said that Dixon is a
point guard, but may not
necessarily play there. "If he can
:fit in and shows he's the type of
player 1 want on the floor, he's
going to be competing for playing
time
The head coach sees the '84
Pirate squad as a very fast and
extremely quick team. "Last year
our inside game was nearlv non-
existent Harrison remarked.
"This allowed teams to keep a
closer eye on our perimeter peo-
ple
With their lack of size amd in-
side strength, the Pirates will be
relying on the quickness of their
transition game. Harrison
believes that for his team to be
successful, they must utilize their
quickness A stingy, tough
defense will pressure the opposi-
tion, turning in easy baskets on
the offensive end.
The Pirate bench seems to be
MICHAEL SMITH � ECU t�o�c L�b
Basketball coach Charlie Harrison will be looking for improvement
after last year's dismal 4-24 record
deep for the upcoming season.
Last year's sixth man William
Grady started several games and
did a fine job averaging 7.6 ppg
and grabbing nearly three re-
bounds per contest.
Others to be seen coming off
the bench are 6-10 senior David
Reicheneker and 6-8 junior David
Harris. Reicheneker is the only
senior on the young but ex-
perienced Pirate team.
"I think we are going to have
more talent this year Harrison
said. "I think we've got good
athletic talent, but talent alone
dosen't get the job done
Harrison is looking foward to
the upcoming season and believes
his team will be ready, though he
has his concerns. "My biggest
concern is the mental approach
that our kids take. What they
didn't do last year was adjust
Harrison explained. "They just
went out and played hard. I can't
complain about how hard they
played for the most part � we
just have to take them one game
at a time
Looking to the Pirates' upcom-
ing schedule, the ECAC South
poses some tough opposition.
William & Mary returns their
starting five players. Richmond
won the conference last year and
participated in the NCAA tour-
nament. George Mason always is
tough and could present pro-
blems to any of the ECAC South
opponents.
The Pirate basketball team
opens its '84 campaign in less
than three weeks, and ECU fans
should keep a watchful eye out
for the Pirate basketball squad.
ECU golf coach Bob Helmick hopes that a strong fall showing will
carry over to the spring season.
Booters Tie Seahawks
a violation after he had apperent-
ly thwarted a Seahawk
breakaway. The official awarded
the Seahawks an indirect kick
from ten yards out.
The UNC-W player lifted the
kick over the ECU defense for
the score and regulation ended at
By SCOTT POWERS
nUtam sports r diti.r
The ECU soccer team, playing
in their third match in as many
days, two of which went into
overtime, battled the Seahawks
of UNC-Wilmington to a 1-1 tie
at Minges soccer field yesterday.
The match went from a soccer
display to all out combat as the
officials let everything short of
murder go uncalled as the game
went on.
ECU jumped out to a 1-0 lead
in the first half as Brian Colgan
scored what was to be the only
ECU goal of the game.
For most of the rest of the
game ECU controlled the tempo
and the ball, but as the game
wore down, so did the Pirates.
It was evident that the Pirates
were a very tired team as the se-
cond half went on, as the
Seahawks were able to attack the
same Pirate defense that had
been all but inpenetrable for most
of the game.
When it looked as if ,e Pirates
were going to get their third win,
the Seahawks got the break that
they needed.
It came with less than one
minute to go in the game when an.
official called an ECU player for
The teams battled evenlv dur-
ing the overtime period, with
ECU missing two opportunities
and the Seahawks were unable to
generate any offense until
another penalty on a Pirate
player with less than one minute
to go gave Wilmington the same
shot that they had had to tie the
game.
This time however, the P,rate
defense held, and as soon as the
ball was safely away from thc n ,
the clock expired, giving FfT �
their second tie of the year
It was a disheartening loss for
the Pirates, a team that has been
close in nearly all of their game,
but has wound up on the shon
end in most of the close Kam
With the tie. the team
stanrU im L eam now
stands 3-15-2 with onlv tomor
row s game against ChrisinX,
Newport, which wmtSiZ
Minges soccer field r.r�,
theirschedule. ' emmn�on
B BILL MITCH ELL
SuflWms
Here's how East Carolina's op-
ponents did in their game
Saturday.
P
M
State: Second string quarterta -
Kirk Coker came off trie bench to
engineer a 52-44 win for
Seminoies over Arizona S:
Eric Thomas, the nation'
leading passer, suffered a
pointer in the second quar
on came Coker, who had
tempted one pass in four ga:
this season, which was an m-
completion. The 14
Seminoies were behind
halftime, but they tot I
for good with a third .
surge of 21 points. Florida
is now 6-1-1
Temple: The Owls tr
cinnati 42-10 on Saturdav
Soccer Te
Second In
By SCOTT POUKRv
The ECU soccer
part in the N.C. Wesie
last weekend ar
a second place finish
teams, defeating Mel
lege in overtime. 3-2, and
to nationallv rani
Wesley an. 3-1
The booters had I
team that it played
ment once ahead
once again hac the
It was the
tory for the bo tet
Monarchs this sea
wins were by ide:
Head Coach Sieve B
pleased with H.
"We thoroughly d n
Methodist in the game
them hang in the
said.
The Pirates
Monarchs 25 to eight
day's match, but their
put the ball in the
Methodist to
throughout the game
"We had the char.
match away, but we cou
thc ball in the back of e
Brody commented
ECU got its first g
by Jamie Ribei
from Brian Colgai
Murray. Later in the a
gan added a a
another assist by Mun
The score was tied 2 2.
to overtime re-
Hamilton sea
the Pirates with a .
assist by Larry Bennei
In Sunday's finals, a
Pirate team took N C
Wesleyan � a team I b
ranked in the Division (II
all season. Wesleyan r.ac: a
easier road :o the Una
ECU, advancing a W
Carolina forfeited
round. The day off proved
an advantage as the tired ECU
team fell by the score of 3-1
The Pirates playec Wes t
tough throughout the da b
fatigue set in the game bej
go Wesleyan's way. TTk
N.C. Wesleyan wa-
the year for ECU.
"The day ofl was a
vantage for them s . .
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 6. 1984
ajuns
CU
tumbles awa.
ise into geai
uarterback
ill the way
Bunn got
imbled the
: 'eft in the
sl on then
tv with a
expired
f ECl uas
march-
si drive.
v e case,
and raced
ose the
all on a
. Pirate
ve the
yards,
f the
and
� imbl-
just 22
'our
fourth
m 'here
.
that a strong fall sh
e Seahawks
i I
e m neatn
ind�
in most' rt
With ��
ds 3-15 : �m
's gam Newport, vs � Minges soccewill be �T �pher held at ning on
By BILL MITCHELL
Here's how East Carolina's op-
ponents did in their games on
Saturday.
Stale: Second string quarterback
Kirk Coker came off the bench to
engineer a 52-44 win for the
Seminoles over Arizona State.
Eric Thomas, the nation's sixth
leading passer, suffered a hip
pointer in the second quarter and
on came Coker, who had only at
tempted one pass in four games
this season, which was an in-
completion. The Uth-ranked
Seminoles were behind at
halftime, but they took the lead
for good with a third quarter
surge of 21 points. Florida State
is now 6-1-1.
Temple: The Owls trounced Cin-
cinnati 42-10 on Saturdav. Paul
Palmer had a hand in almost
every touchdown as he rushed for
scores of six ,seven, nine, and 17
yards as well as throwing a
39-yard touchdown pass to Willie
Marshall. Temple had 465 yards
offense to Cincinnati's 338. The
Owls are now 4-5 on the season.
Central Michigan: Northern Il-
linois defeated the Chippewas 8-7
with a touchdown and a two
point conversion with only 26
seconds left in the game. Dick
Jenatempo threw a 20-yard
touchdown pass to Bruce Jem
and then hit Pete Ross for the ex-
tra points. Central Michigan had
scored first with only 10:35 left in
the game on a 10-yard run by
Curtis Adams. The Chippewas
got the ball back and drove to the
Northern Illinois 35 yardline,
where Robb Colen missed a field
goal that would have won the
Wolfpack
Soccer Team Gets
Second In Tourney
outshot the
eight in Satur-
:heir inability to
the net allowed
s t a close
By SCOTT POWERS
Dublin Sports hdltor
The ECU soccer team took
part in the N.C. Wesleyan Classic
last weekend and came away with
a second place finish out of four
teams, defeating Methodist Col-
lege in overtime. 3-2, and falling
to nationally ranked N.C.
Wesleyan, 3-1.
The hooters had faced each
team that it played in the tourna-
ment once already this year, and
once again had the same results.
It was the second overtime vic-
tory for the hooters over the
Monarchs this season and both
uins were by identical scores.
Head Coach Steve Brody was
pleased with his team's victory.
'We thoroughly dominated
Methodist in the game, we just let
them hang in there too long he
said.
The Pirate
Monarchs 2 to
da's match, t
put the
Methodist
througl
"We had the chances to put the
match away, bur we couldn't put
the ban in the back of the net
Brodj commented.
ECl . first goal on a shot
Ribel with an assist
from Brian Colgan and Mike
Murray. Later in the game Col-
added a goal of his own on
another assist by Murray.
The score was tied 2-2 going in-
overlime before Rand
Hamilton sealed the victory for
Pirates with a goal on an
assist by Larry Bennett.
In Sunday's finals, a very tired
P:rate team took on N.C.
Wesleyan � a team that has been
ranked in the Division III top ten
eason. Wesleyan had a much
easier road to the finals than did
, advancing after Western
( arolina forfeited in the first
round. The day off proved to be
advantage as the tired ECL"
:eam fell by the score of 3-1.
The Pirates played Wesleyan
ugh throughout the day, but as
fatigue set in the game began to
Wesleyan's way. The loss to
N.C. Wesleyan was the second of
the year for ECU.
"The day off was a definite ad-
vantage for them (Wesleyan)
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Brody said. "It was a very big
factor in the outcome of the
game, especially with us just
coming ofl of an overtime
gTne
Matt Hermes scored the lone
goal for the Pirates on an assist
from David Skeffington, as I I
fell to 3-15-1 with the loss.
lor his excellent play oei I
weekend, Mark Hardj ol the
Pirate was named the M isl
V aiuahle Playei
men He also v a i
all-tournameni t am . rtj w i h
teammates Rick Spenski, C olgan,
Murraj and Skel finj
The hooters will wrap ip theii
season tomorrow -a hen th
Christopher Newp . ime
that was cancelled earlier in the
season.
game.
Georgia Southern: East Ten-
nessee State defeated the Eagles
20-17 in a home game on Satur-
day. Georgia Southern, who in
the latest division 1-AA pole were
ranked seventh, were intercepted
six times. ETSU got field goals
from Herbie Campbell of 24 and
35 yards, along with a second
quarter score by Herman Jacobs
on a 7-yard toss from halfback
Mark Tucker to take a halftime
lead. Georgia Southern came
back to score two touchdowns in
the fourth quarter, but not until
ETSU had already kicked the
game winning field goal. Georgia
Southern is now 8-2, while East
Tennessee State is 6-3.
N.C.State: South Carolina came
back in the last 50 seconds to beat
the Wolfpack 35-28. State led at
haiftime 15-3 on touchdowns by
mce Evans and Mike Miller and
the first of three field goals by
Mike Cofer.
However, the Wolfpack
defense couldn't contain South
Carolina's second half offense as
they scored on five possisions and
missed a field goal on the sixth,
scoring 25 points in the fourth
quarter. State had a chance to
win with 3:26 left but got called
for delay of game on the USC
ten-yard-line on a third and one.
They had to settle for a field goal
to tie the game at 28. Then the
Gamecocks drove 80 yards in
nine plays where Thomas Dendy
scored on a six-yard run to make
it 35-28. South Carolina is now
8-0 while State drops to 3-6.
Pittsburgh: Syracuse defeated the
Panthers 13-7 at Syracuse on
Saturday. For the Orangemen
Todd Norley threw a three yard-
touchdown pass to tight end Mar-
ty Chalk and the Tim Green led
defense stifled the Pitt offense.
This was the first time since 1972
that the Orangemen have beaten
Pittsburgh. The Panthers are
now 1-7-1.
Tulsa: The Golden Hurricanes
pounded Illinois State 28-7 on
Saturday. Todd Fulton led the
offense with two touchdowns,
and had 128 yards rushing. The
defense held Illinois State to 210
yards total offense, and picked
off two Cardinal passes.
South Carolina: See N.C.State
Southwestern Louisiana: See
story page 10.
Southern Mississippi: Nor-
thwestern Louisiana shut-out the
Golden Eagles 22-0 on Saturday.
Wayne Vann of NW Louisiana
threw touchdown passes of 37
yards to David Turner and P
yards to Tim Haggerty. He also
sneaked in from two yards out
for a touchdown. Southern Miss
only had 128 yards total offense
to NW Louisiana's 319. Southern
Miss is now 2-7.
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If Killian s Irish Red
is a ten,
German beer is a nein.
Now don't get us
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malt like we do
So no C�erman beer
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So the next "time
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Read
The Classifieds
AOTT
Present
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Tues.Nov6, 1984 8:30 til 1:00am
Adm. $1.50 18vrs. Si 00
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Running suits (adult-men)
Tim -Pullover Jacket-100nylon taffeta
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I






10
1 Ml I s i K(
Intramurals
B JEANNETTE ROTH
While most intramural ac
mines are in the midst of their
games, the Softball championship
concluded last weekend between
two highl) touted teams.
The co-rec soft hall champion
ship saw the Dodge ('it) Hustlers
against Sig Ep and Friends, an in-
tense rivalry that had developed
from an earliei contest. Sig Ep
and Friends, begging foi revenge,
led the game 10 9 into the final
innings With bases loaded, one
out, the Hustlers provided a
threat which seemed almost mi
possible to stop But, Sig I p
shortstop Mike Holmes, snagging
a line drive, stepped on second
and ended the inning with a spec
taculai double play, closing the
threat ol the Hustlers Final
score Sig Ep and Friends 10;
Dodge Cit) Hustlers 9.
One-on-one basketball ended
its season with two victors in the
men's divisions Maurice rhorbs
m the 6'2" and ovei division took
tust place along with lames
Mann in the 6'1" and under divi-
sion.
Although volleyball season has
just gotten underway, Sneaker
Sam will once again put his life
on the line b choosing the top
five in the men's and women's
leagues
Y omen
Sig I p (iolden Hearts
: Spikers
; Enforcers
4 Alpha D(
5 Naturals
Men
1 I hird Regiment
2 Kappa Sigma
M:
Mauler
-i lai retl 1 ive ()
? Zeta He; a fait
art s 11
� foi you. Design
a T-shirt
aei - and win a
' a ;lasses.
-� no late: '
N'o -I' I lie winner will
1 riday, Dec 7
� ale your name a
�n your entry
� e sure to checl
ng break rev
' swimming pools, weight
and basketball courts
WEIGH! KOOMs
Memorial
9 a.m. s p n
9 a.m5:30 p.m.
1 p m5 p m
M :
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Minges
MI 3 p.m 7 p.m.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
7 a.m -8 a m.
' n-1
M-V. 1
Ml
M i
! p.m.
M F
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I p.m.
Minges Pool
8 n n )
P tn
a :
iea ons.
Basketball
Televised
Fifteen college basketball
games from the Eastern College
thletic Conference South
(ECAC-South), including the
seven-game conference tourna-
ment, will be televised exclusively
by Home Team Sports this cum
ing season.
The schedule features a live
Thursday night ECAC-South
Game of the Week beg.nnmg
January 10, plus the entire con-
ference tournament from the
campus of William & Mary,
March 7-9. All but one of the 15
games will be televised live.
"This is a great addition to our
winter programming, and there's
more still to come said Home
Team Sports Director of Pro-
gramming and Executive Pro-
ducer Jody Shapiro. "The
1AC -South has really made its
presence known in recent NCAA
Tournaments. The conference
tournament winner has
eliminated from the NCAA tour-
nament the likes of Georgetown,
Ohio State and Auburn in the last
three years.
"We're especially pleased, not
only because this is such a fine
conference, but also because it is
the only major conference which
is wholly contained within our
region These are some of the
teams our subscribers want to see
most
"This will be a big plus for
each program in the conference
added ECAC-South Director of
Marketing and Promotions Larry
Baldwin. "We are very happy
that for the first time, our games
will be packaged for television on
a region-wide basis
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Each of these advertised items is
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i






Title
The East Carolinian, November 6, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 06, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.373
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57678
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