The East Carolinian, October 30, 1984






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(Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No. 19
Tuesday October 30, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
JON JORDAN � ecu Photo tab
Hot Legs
The unseasonablv warm October weather has permitted a great deal of dismay of others. It doesn't feel like fall but it will soon enough,
leg exposure on the ECU campus, to the satisfaction of some and the
Jenkins Speaks On Hunt's Record
B HAROLD JOYNER
Vwl�l�nl f�i Kdttor
Dr. Leo Jenkins. ECU
chancellor emeritus, endorsed
N.C. Gov, Jim Hunt in the much
contested U.S. Senate race at a
Thursday press conference at-
tended by eastern North Carolina
educators.
"Becau. of Jim Hunt's per-
sonal drive and commitment
Jenkins -ad, "North Carolina
has gained national recognition
as a progressive leader in educa-
tion
Jenkins commented on Hunt's
opponent, Jesse Helms, R-N.C,
saying, "Senator Helms' educa-
tional policy is not a high priority
in his activities Jenkins said,
"and I think it should be if we're
to have an effective nation. He
quoted Thomas Jefferson who
said, "The new America will
work on one condition, that is we
must have an educated
electorate Jenkins said he
believes this holds true today and
feels Hunt "is very sincere about
the education of this nation.
"If our nation is to grow and
prosper, if our economy is to
compete with any other in the
world, if our children are to have
the best opportunities in the
world, then America must have
the best schools in the world.
Neither North Carolina nor our
nation can afford to elect
representatives who feel no sense
of responsibility to education
Hunt has played a significant
part in the establishment of the
School of Medicine and has
helped ECU maintain its univer-
sity status, Jenkins said. "Also,
Hunt has helped made ECU what
it is today, and we should all be
very proud of this accomplish-
ment
Also speaking at the con-
ference was the Assistant Direc-
tor of District 15 North Carolina
Asociation of Educators, An-
nette McCrae. "President
Reagan said last year that the
average teacher salary across the
nation was $35,000. The truth is,
she said, "the figure is $10,000
more than the top North
Carolina and United States
teacher's salary She compared
what Helms has done for North
Carolina education and what
Hunt has done and she said, "the
difference can be seen. Helms has
done nothing for North Carolina
education
Since retiring as chancellor of
ECU in 1978, Jenkins has worked
as a consultant to Hunt.
Student From Grenada Visits ECU
By GREG RIDEOl T
Managing Kdllor
When 1,900 U.S. Marines and
Army Rangers hit the beaches of
Grenada a little more than a year
ago, Mark Solomon of Long
Island, NY was a little happier
than the rest of us. Solomon,
who visited ECU last Thursday as
a guest of the SGA and United
Students of America, was atten-
ding St. George's University
School of Medicine at the time.
Solomon was one of about 90
St. George's students visiting
U.S. college campuses last week,
helping to celebrate Student
Liberation Day. And although
the visit raised some political
eyebrows, the second year med
student emphasized he was just
here to "pay my respects to the
Marines who died saving my
life and to share my ex-
periences with you
There were 650 students on the
island at two campuses, True
Blue and Gran Anse. Grenada
was picked in 1976 as the school's
location because, according to
Chancellor Charles Modica, the
nation had a stable government.
But, Solomon explained to the
audience, conditions started to
change. Prime Minister Maurice
Bishop was placed under house
arrest on Oct. 14, 1983 by other
members of the government.
"It was at this time when I first
felt that things weren't right in
the country Solomon said. "I
remember going to town, which
is approximately 35 minutes from
where my campus is. 1 saw all the
shops were closing. I had asked
the storekeeper what was going
on.
"She had said that people were
going to be demonstrating and
closing up early due to Bishop be-
ing placed under house arrest.
When I had gone back to campus
right after that, I saw a tremen-
dous amount of armored trucks
and military. I felt something was
happening
Anatomy mid-terms were held
the next week, and Solomon said
students didn't keep up with
events happening on the island.
During this time, Bishop had
been freed and was holed up in a
fort. On Oct. 19, Bishop was kill-
ed aiong with half the cabinet.
That night, Solomon and other
students heard a speech over
Radio-Free Grenada by General
Hudson Austin in which he pro-
claimed a 24-hour, shoot-on-site
curfew. "We were ail pretty
shaken up Solomon said. "I
know I had chills up and down
my spine The next day, Major
Stroud, an aide to General Hud-
son, came to the campus.
"He said he would try to do
everything he can to protect us �
within his power Solomon
said. "But, meanwhile, he has to
try to resolve his internal con-
flicts within the country. We
didn't feel any better. You have
to remember this is coming from
somebody who's involved in
cold-bloodedly killing half the
cabinet. We didn't believe him.
We had no idea of what he was
going to do with us, if anything ai
all
During the next couple of days,
with classes suspended, the
students stuck together, comfor-
ting each other. Two U.S.
diplomats who had arrived from
Barbados were told by the
students that they wanted to
evacuate. Revolutionary officials
refused to let the students leave.
On Oct. 25, the day of the in-
vasion, Solomon's resident ad-
visor awakened him at 5:30 a.m.
"We heard firing � gunshots go-
ing off, bombs, halftracks he
said. "It was terrifying because
we really didn't know who was
fighting, and the fighting sound-
ed really close.
"We packed our bags � at
Costly N.C. Race
Too Close To Call
RALEIGH (UPI) - Sen. Jesse
Helms, R-N.C. and Gov. James
Hunt have waged the most costly
race in Senate history but the can-
didates predict a fraction of a
percentage point could decide the
election.
The lead has gone back and
forth in polls taken over the past
two months as the campaigns
bombarded North Carolina
televisions with mostly negative
advertisements.
Through the first half of Oc-
tober, Hunt and Helms had spent
more than $22 million and both
candidates complained the cam-
paign is out of control.
"This campaign costs too
much Hunt said. "It's time for
the people of North Carolina to
sweep aside all the distortions
and the mud and to make their
choice
The candidates stepped up
their personal campaigning in
October in an attempt to sway
voters. The race is so close that
Helms, a champion of the conser-
vative "New Right appealed
for black votes after largely ig-
noring them during his two t rms
as a senator.
Helms' first visit to a
predominantly black college cam-
pus was met by a protest from
about 200 angry black students.
The Livingstone College students
locked arms in silence, ignoring
Helms' waves and smiles and
refusing to shake his hand.
"Whether you vote for me or
not is fine � and I know vou
won't said the frustrates in-
cumbent.
Helms, who has outspent Hunt
nearly 2-to-l, tries to tie himself
closely to President Reagan. The
senator portrays Hunt as a
"Mondale Liberal" and calls his
opponent "the biggest spending
governor in the history of North
Carolina
Hunt attacks Helms as a
"right-wing extremist" who ig-
nores the interests of North
Carolina while trying to build a
conservative "political empire
"I go into the plants. I go into
the hospitals and senior citizen
centers. I go where I know half of
them aren't for me, maybe two-
thirds Hunt said last week.
"We're not talking about
changing a great number of
voters he said. "We're talking
about a few here, a few there
Helms and Hunt have vowed
to dispatch armies of volunteers
to ensure a fair vote. Helms said
his campaign plans to place poll
watchers in each of the state's
2,300 precincts to stop "machine
politicians" from stuffing ballots
for Hunt.
"They won't be cheating
because we'll be watching
Helms said.
Hunt charged the Republicans
intend to intimidate voters and
create long lines in mostly
Democratic black precincts and
promised to send out his own
volunteer monitors.
"We're going to protect peo-
ple's right to vote Hunt said.
A Gallup Poll predicted
Reagan's popularity in North
Carolina could be a deciding fac-
tor in the Nov. 6 election.
Reagan leads Democrat Walter
Mondale by a large margin in the
state and the Gallup organization
said its polls show Helms could
ride to reelection on the Presi-
dent's coattails.
Helms exhorts his supporters
to go to the polls by calling 1982
"a make or break year for all we
hold dear
Hunt's strategists are counting
on a large turnout among bacV.
voters. A voter registration drive
led by Jesse Jackson signed up
53,805 blacks in North Carolina
since the May primary.
The latest poll showed racial
polarization among the sup-
porters of the two candidates.
Blacks favored Hunt over Helms
98 percent to 2 percent and the
governor's campaign is pushing
hard to turn out their vote.
Grenada medical student Mark Solomon told ECU students of his
experiences last week.
least one of them. We stayed in
that room for at least five hours,
until 10 a.m. We were just sitting
on the floor listening to this
Solomon said. The students, who
were occupying two buildings,
were now moved into one, six or
seven people in each room.
See STUDENT, Page 6
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features7
Classifieds9
Sports10
�Halloween is tomorrow, and
a special feature on its history
and customs appears in
today's paper. See Features,
page 7.
�The Pirates lost to the
nationally-ranked South
Carolina Gamecocks last
weekend in Columbia. Sports
Editor Randy Mews reviews
the game. See Sports, page 10.
�The East Carolinian editors
support their candidates in the
presidential and senate races.
See Editorials, page 4.
Papers View Candidates Differently
(UPI) � President Reagan
won editorial-page endorsement
from the Winston-SaUm Journal
while Gov. Jim Hunt captured
support for his bid against Sen.
Jesse Helms from the Journal
and two other newspapers.
In the Gubernatorial race, The
Charlotte Observer supported
Republican Jim Martin while trie
Raleigh News and Observer back-
ed Attorney General Rufus Ed-
misten.
Hunt also won support from
the News and Observer and the
Greensboro News A Record.
The Observer wrote that Mar-
tin had bipartisan support in be-
ing elected to Congress six times
from the 9th District.
"Even those who have oppos-
ed him do not question his
character, integrity or seriousness
of purpose the Observer said.
"We believe those qualities,
along with his intelligence and in-
stinctive confidence, will make
him an effective, respected gover-
nor
Edmisten, the Observer said,
has done a "competent job" as
attorney general for 10 years but
his record has been spotty.
"Mr. Edmisten, in live
telcvison appearances with op-
posing candidates, has seemed
uncomfortable, simplistic,
sometimes pompous, and
remarkably inept for someone
who has been in the spotlight for
a decade
But the News and Observer
said that while Edmisten has
made mistakes, he "fits the pat-
tern of the state's moderately
progressive governors of the re-
cent past. Under him, the state
would continue to move
forward
Moreover, the editorial said
that a Republican governor serv-
ing over a Democratically con-
trolled legislature "would create
a divided government resulting in
stalemate
Winston-Salem urged its
readers to split the ticket and vote
Hunt into the U.S. Senate seat
held by Jesse Helms, R-N.C.
Hunt also received backing from
the Raleigh editorial page and the
opinion columns of the
Greensboro News A Record.
In endorsing Reagan, the
Winston-Salem editorial said the
Republican "has served this na-
tion wellone need look only at
a reviving economy, a strengthen-
ed defense and lowered inflation
and interest rates to understand
that Reagan's successes have
been many
Walter Mondale, the
newspaper said, "has fought
gamely against a popular, incum-
bent president. But be simply
does not have the horses
In the Senate races, the
Sec RALEIGH, Page 6
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THL i -S I
IN1AN
OCTOBER 4, 1984
Announcements
Co Rec Basketball
Brlno your favorite males and females
together to shoot the hoop. intramural
registration begins Oct � 30. Play begins
November S For more Info, come by room
KM memorial gym or call 757e3t7
ECU Wtight Club
The" ECU Weight Club will meet In room
105 B memorial gym on Oct 30, 1904 at 7:30
pm Constitution and budget spending will
be discussed
Health Careers Day
Nurses. Medical Techs.Physical Therapists,
Occupational Therapists, Social Workers,
and Slap maors Representatives from
various hospitals and health agencies will be
on campus to talk with you about employ
ment possibilities) Different organizations
will be here on the following dates Nov 2
Nursing Building 9 30-12 30 pm Nov 5
Allied Health Building 1:30-4:30 pm. Mark
your calendar and tell another friend about
mis in case they do not see the announce
ment
Co Rec Basketball
Registration for intramural co rec basket
ball will begin on Oct 29 and end Oct x To
register come by room 204 memorial gym
between the hours of 800am and 5 00pm.
For more information call 757 4387. Par
ficlpate rather than spectate.
NASA
interested In International policy and regula
tions affecting high technology exporting. If
so. this position may be for you. NASA will
be interviewing on campus in November for
Spring. 19�5 Contact the cooperative educe
tion office, 313 Rawl building as soon as
possible
Little Sister Rush
Anyone interested in being a little sister of
'he Delta Sigma Phi Fraternity If you are.
come party with the best at our halloween
party Tonight a 9 pm Our house is located
at 510 E 10th st across from the Baptist Stu
dent union Wear your favorite costume ano
see you at the house! I!
Residence Life
The department of tesldence life Is now ac
cepflng applications from students who wish
to apply for resident advisor postlons
Students need to have the following
qualifications: (1) to be a full time student
(2) to have a minimum grade poplnt average
of 2.2(3) to have a clear ludlclal record (4) to
have a time schedule that is free of other
commitments that conflict with work (5) to
have lived In a residence hall environment
(a) must reside In residence hallduring
employment Application deadline for
employment for Spring 19t5 Is Nov l, 19(4
If Interested In applying for a position, ap
plications are available In 214 Whlchard and
any Residence Hall Office
NAACP
The NAACP urges students who have not ob
talned absentee ballots to do so before Nov. 1
Absentee ballot request cards will be
available at the information desk In
Mendenhall student center.
Senior Class Vice-President
Applications now being accepted for senior
class vice president Apply at SGA office in
Mendenhall and be at our meeting on Wed .
7 00, In 243 of Mendenhall
Alpha Phi Big Brothers
All big brothers are reminded that our next
meeting will be a dinner out Sunday, Nov
4th at the Western SlHler on 10th st. starting
at 6:30. Big brothers are also asked to come
out to the house this Thursday at 400 to
clean up the yard, then we will party like
craiy frlday afternoon at Donnas Come out
Thursday and meet the sisters
Surfing
The contest last Sat wasa blgsuccessl ECU
took 2nd out of 6 teams All results will be
given at the meeting this Thursday night at
I 00 m 221 Mendenhall Another video of
Hawaii's North Shore Surfing will be shown
Team t shirts will also be sold at the
meeting Plans for the Thanksgiving trip to
Florida will be finalized The traditional
"team socia" will follow the meeting Guys
and gals and any newcomers are all
welcome!
Circle K
ECU Circle K Club Invites you to come out
and loin us this coming and every Tuesday
night at 7 00 pm In Mendenhall room 221 for
fun and socializing. Hope to see you there
Omega Psi Phi
The brothers of Omega Psi Phi frat, inc
would like to announce a halloween costume
party in Mendenhall's Multl Purpose room
Wed Oct31, Prizes will be raffled
�pm 12am Best costume wins 125 00. 2nd
and 3rd cash prizes also Free refreshments.
Snow Sking
Snow ski during Christmas break. Any per
sons interested In snowsklng Dec 30 through
Jan 4 at Snowshoe, W V should call Jo
Saunders at 757 4000 to get your name on the
list for the trip. Beginners to hotdlggers are
welcome ski instruction Is available for all
levels of ability Price depends on ski
package. Space for housing on slopes and
transportation Is limited You are Invited to
come by memorial gym 100 on Oct. 30 at 4:00
p.m. To register, see the slides and talk sk
ingl A 15 00 deposit at this time will reserve
your space.
Students for IKE
Anyone who Is Interested In Information con
earning 4th district congressman Ike An
drews please contact Jeff Clonlnger (ECU
Coordinator), 752 519.
N.C.I.O.
The North Carolina Internship office pro-
vides paid summer Intern positions for
students with state government. Positions
are available in a variety of agencies located
throughout the state Students will be paid
S3 73 per hour working during the period of
June 1 until August 1 These positions re
quire early application and interested
students should contact the Co op office ear
ly in November.
Sigma Theta Tau
The Beta Nu Chapter of Sigma Theta Tau.
the National Honor Society of Nursing, will
hold it's fall educational meeting on Thurs
day, Nov 15,19�4etepm. at the Ramada inn
In Greenville The Program, presented by
Dr Ann Belcher, RN, Ph.D Is entitled,
"The ten year plan Implications for On
cology Nursing Dr Belcher is director of
Nursing Staff Developement at the Universl
ty of Alabama Hospital In Birmingham.
Alabama. Colleagues, students spouses and
friends are cordially Invited For further In
formation, contact Lou Everett at the school
of Nursing.
College Republicans
College republicans meet Thursday at 7:00
In Mendenhall coffeehouse. If you fellas
want to earn money working for our can
dldates on election day, be there!
Alpha Omicron Pi
Please remember our philanthropy tonight
at6:30 Also we would like to thank the Betas
for a wild social last week, and wish
everyone a lamming halloween
Episcopal Worship
A student Episcopal service of Holy Commu
nlon will be celebrated on Tuesday evening,
Oct 30 In the chaple of St Paul's Episcopal
Church, 40e 4th st.one block from Gerrett
torm). The service will be at 5:30 pm. with
the Episcopal Chaplain, the Rev. Bill Had
den, celebrating.
Special Events Committee
The Student Union Special Events Commit
tee will meet on Tuesday. Nov 6. 194, at
5:30 pm in room 242 of Mendenhall Student
Center. All members and Interested
students are urged to attend.
Greenville Church of God
The Greenville Church of God on South
Memorial drive Is having a bonfire and
special outdoor service Wed night, Oct. 31
Service begins at 7:30
INOT.
Two outstanding positions available with
major corporations for Spring 1915 Students
should be manufacturing or electronics ma
jors with GPA of 2 1 or better Contact the
Co-op office In 313 Rawl building
Visual Arts
The Student Union visual Arts Committee
will meet on Thursday. Nov 1, i�t4, at 3 00
pm. Inroom 33 of Mendenhall Student
Center. All members and interested
students are urged to attend
Young Democrats
The Young Democrats will hold their regular
weekly meeting on Wed . Oct 31st at 7 pm in
room 212, Mendenhall Anyone Interested in
learning more about the democratic party
and what activities we plan for the re
mainder of this semester are invited
Fencing Club
The Fencing Club of ECU would like to invite
anyone Interested to attend our meetings
every Wed at 7:30 In Memorial Gym, room
102
Pi Kappa Phi Little sisters
Little sisters and pledges ara reminded that
the brothers will be having a happy hour
tonight at the Elbo Room starting at 9 00
Lars go out and party with the brothers
Also, girls soccer plays tonight at 7 00 on
field 2
APO
Alpha Phi Omega would like to conor adulate
me following persons on becoming APO
pledges Angela Richardson, Chris Ervln,
Kim Hotlomen. Donna Davis. Ricky Lewis.
Keith Hall, Leanne Bufrum. jimmie
Hacfcett. Robert Boney, Sandr Cesfcey
Good Luck as pledges
Phi Tau's
Remember to make it to the halloween root
party! it starts at 9 00 and Nantucket wttl
entertain us until we go downtown
Costumes are mandatory as is a buzz
Brothers. Pledges and lil sisters be read 'o
throw down on the roof I!
RUGBY
Ruggers, fans, ect the team win be holding
it's final home match mis weekend sat No
13 Oct 30 at 4 00. m Mendenhall S'uden-
Center Multipurpose room New memoes
are welcome! Refreshments win be servea
Handball
Practice will be on Tuescay Oct loth. 9 n
pm at memorial gym People planning or
going to the D C tournament on Nov � �
must be at practice Bring completed form,
with you
Phi Kappa Phi
All brothers are rem rtded of our happy hot'
at Elbo tonight starting a 9 00 t� get � c
before exams! I Congraduiations 'o c
Gleen Barnes who will be getting marr ec
this Sat night Hope you sur.y.ye ���
bachelor party on Fn
Free Throw Contest
There will be a free throw contest heia for .
you expert hoopsters Nov 13 This -
tremurai sponsored event will be heia -
memorial gym To register come Oy room
204 memorial gym or call 757 4317 Pa-
tic Ipete rather than spectate
United Way
Help support the united way! Tne SGA
will be taking contributions for the uni'e
way today outside me student store Ge -
volved and help the united way by max -
your donation today!
Typesetters
Needed
Apply In Person
At The East Carolinian Offices
Old South Building
Across From
Joyner Library

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Student
An ECU student was arrested inji
by Campus Public Safety officers whid
and charged with two counts of rest
first degree burglary, one count jui
of assault on a police officer and pocl
possession of marijuana follow- Tl
ing an incident in Greene dorm fror
during the early morning hours mini
of Friday, Oct. 26. and I
Maurice Lamar Kennedy, 18, KenJ
of 482 Aycock dorm was taken occi
into custody on the south side of whil
Joyner Library after being pur- whel
sued by officers from the 2nd k
floor of Greene. Both Kennedy the
and LT. S. B. Kittrell of the relei
Public Safety Department were Hos
treated and released from Pitt the
County Memorial Hospital for $2.0
Committee
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
MaastHfeM
Have you ever wanted to have
some input into the number of
days school is in session? What
do you think should be done
about teacher effectiveness at
ECU?
Student positions are currently
open on many of the committees
involved with different aspects of
campus life. "This is an oppor-
tunity to get student input where
it's needed said Elmer Meyer,
vice chancellor for student life
Applications for committee
vacancies are being taken now.
Requirements are that a student
have a 2.0 gpa and be in good
academic standing at ECU.
Among the committees with
Quiet Dorm
By ELAINE PERRY
StafTwrncr
One of the major issues on
campus last year was a proposed
quiet dorm � a dorm or section
of a dorm where quiet time for
study would be rigidly enforced.
A recommendation from the
ECU Residence Life Committee
concerning the site for the dorm
is now being considered. Accor-
ding to the recommendation, the
2nffand 3rd floors of Slay dorm
will become quiet areas. Fleming
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First Brew is .50c
with costume
WINTER
BREAK
Help us sponsor your
school's winter break
ski trip and ski free!
i800i 36 2006 TOLL KRLL
PAP
Your Adult
Wed;
Ladl
Halloweei
Free Wl
High
For La�
Men Ai
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11





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 30, 1984
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Student Charged With Assault
An ECU student was arrested
by Campus Public Safety officers
and charged with two counts of
first degree burglary, one count
of assault on a police officer and
possession of marijuana follow-
ing an incident in Greene dorm
during the early morning hours
of Friday, Oct. 26.
Maurice Lamar Kennedy, 18,
of 482 Aycock dorm was taken
into custody on the south side of
Joyner Library after being pur-
sued by officers from the 2nd
floor of Greene. Both Kennedy
and LT. S. B. Kittrell of the
Public Safety Department were
treated and released from Pitt
County Memorial Hospital for
injuries inflicted during a scuffle
which occurred at the time of ar-
rest. A small amount of mari-
juana was found in Kennedy's
pocket following the arrest.
The burglary charges stem
from two incidents within a ten-
minute period on the 2nd floor
and 4th floor of Greene dorm.
Kennedy allegedly entered rooms
occupied by coeds, touched them
while they were sleeping and fled
when they awakened.
Kennedy was incarcerated in
the Pitt County Jail following his
release from Pitt Memorial
Hospital under $10,000 bond for
the two burglary charges and a
$2,000 bond for the charges of
assault on an officer and posses-
sion of marijuana.
First-degree burglary is defined
under North Carolina law as "the
breaking and entering of an oc-
cupied dwelling house at night
with the intent to commit a
felony therein The maximum
penalty for first degree burglary
under the law is life imprison-
ment.
In an unrelated incident, Greg
Allan Fields, 24, of Farmville was
charged with first degree burglary
on the morning of Thursday,
Oct. 25 following an incident in
Fleming dorm.
In that incident, a coed from
the first floor of Fleming dorm
was awakened when a bookcase
next to her window was overturn-
ed as the suspect attempted to
enter her window. Fields was
then taken into custody by Public
Safety officers outside Fleming
dorm and identified by the vic-
tim.
Fields was incarcerated in the
Pitt County Jail under a $10,000
bond.
A preliminary hearing in the
Kennedy case is set for Nov. 19
with the charges of assault on an
officer and possession of mari-
juana set for trial on Nov. 16.
The Fields case is set for Nov. 6
in District Court in Greenville.
OPPORTUNITY
"Production Manager'
Committee Positions Now Available
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is now accep-
ting applications through October 26th for the
Production Manager's position. All interested
persons are encouraged to apply. Don't pass
up this opportunity to gain valuable experience
and work for Eastern North Carolina's
number one college newspaper.
Stop by the Publicat.on building located across from Jovner L.brarv
Experience prefered, but not necessary
By JENNIFER JENftRASIAK
Nrw, Editor
Have you ever wanted to have
some input into the number of
days school is in session? What
do you think should be done
about teacher effectiveness at
ECU?
Student positions are currently-
open on many of the committees
involved with different aspects of
campus life. "This is an oppor-
tunity to get student input where
it's needed said Elmer Meyer,
vice chancellor for student life.
Applications for committee
vacancies are being taken now.
Requirements are that a student
have a 2.0 gpa and be in good
academic standing at ECU.
Among the committees with
vacancies are:
�The Admissions Committee,
which recommends policies
governing undergraduate admis-
sion and readmission.
�The Activities and Schedul-
ing Review Committee which
serves as an advisory body to
various organizations concerning
use of university facilities and
ticket and admission policies.
�The Course Drop Appeals
Committee has the responsibility
of reviewing appeals of students
denied permission to drop a
course.
Meyer said only eight applica-
tions have been received for the
21 student positions. "Students
have all these positions but they
might lose some of them if they
don't show enough interest he
said.
Meyer added that most of the
committees meet only once a
month "for two hours at the
most
Applications are available at
the Office of the Vice Chancellor
for Student Life in Whichard
building, Mendenhall Student
Center Information Desk and the
SGA office, Residence Hall
Directors' offices and the Office
of Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices in Memorial Gym.
Quiet Dorm On Hold
By ELAINE PERRY
Surf W rim
One of the major issues on
campus last year was a proposed
quiet dorm � a dorm or section
of a dorm where quiet time for
study would be rigidly enforced.
A recommendation from the
ECU Residence Life Committee
concerning the site for the dorm
is now being considered. Accor-
ding to the recommendation, the
2nd and 3rd floors of Slay dorm
will become quiet areas. Fleming
dorm would become all-male and
Umstead all female.
Elmer Meyer, vice chancellor
for student life, said the recom-
mendations are "on hold until
the implications are thought
out Some factors being con-
sidered by the Student Residence
Association and the Committee
on Residence Life are the need
for space on-campus and off-
campus housing.
Last year, more than 200
students did not return to dooms
in the fall.
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W?� iEaat (Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, ommmtunwn
Greg Rideout, Mawm Fdno,
Jennifer Jendrasiak, vmf� J.T. Pietrzak, v����.mwm�
Randy Mews, v��, �� Anthony Martin, ���������
Tina Maroschak, Mm&� Tom Norton, , w�-
Bn i Austin, (maum H��atn Mike Mayo, &&& r�MM
October 30, W84
Opinion
Page 4
HUNT
The Man For The Job
The race seems like it has lasted
forever. But on Nov. 6 you will
finally get the chance to either send
Jim Hunt to the Senate or Jesse
Helms back for another six years.
We believe you should send Hunt.
For students the choice is very-
important. In Jim Hunt you will
get a hard-working, progressive
senator in tune with North
Carolina and the times. You have
seen in his eight years as governor
an optimism matched by none. He
has fought for education and civil
rights; he has brought industry to
our state, creating jobs for many.
But most of all he has governed
with compassion for everyone �
the farmer, the black worker and
the senior citizen.
His opponent, Jesse Helms,
represents negativism. He
represents the old South, the one
where racism was commonplace.
Helms has used his seat in the
Senate as a stepping stone to lead a
right-wing crusade that is packed
with a anti-everything ideology.
He asks people to fear the world.
The Senator has done very little to
make North Carolinians proud
and a lot to make them ashamed.
Hunt is for a responsible govern-
ment that cares for its needy and
behaves in a fiscally sound man-
ner. With a pull of the lever on
election day, this state can send
signals to the nation that we are
ready to live in the present and to
stop being the promulgators of
right-wing demagoguery. Students
can be proud of a moderate
Democrat such as Hunt who will
fight for student aid programs,
something Helms never did.
North Carolina is a leader. We
are the 10th largest state in the
Union. As Senator, Hunt will
show the world we are ready to
help lead the nation into the 21st
century instead of backwards into
the 13th. Hunt has fought a gallant
battle, and in an election that may
be won by half a percentage point,
students must remember who will
do the best job for the state; as
university men and women, we
must vote for the man who will
best represent that tradition.
We feel the choice is clear-cut.
On Nov. 6, help tell America that
North Carolinians are honest,
compassionate, caring, tough peo-
ple. Vote for James B. Hunt Jr. in
the N.C. Senate election.
Reagan For President
During the last four years, our
country has seen notable changes
in its economy, mostly for the bet-
ter. We can only attribute this suc-
cess to Ronald Reagan. He has put
into effect several domestic pro-
grams, gotten rid of many bother-
some government regulations and,
above all, he has made America
proud again.
No one can honestly say they
have suffered because of Ronald
Reagan � no one. Reagan has
helped cut government spending,
helped government agencies
eliminate waste in social programs
and helped America unite once
again, making us a stronger coun-
try. Four years ago, a Democratic
administration left Reagan with a
lot of problems. And, as we have
seen, Reagan has solved many of
them.
As with any man, Reagan does
have his faults. He should recon-
sider his stance on school prayer.
We think government and church
should remain separate;
Washington should not stick its
nose where it doesn't belong. Also,
abortion remains an issue that
should be left up to the individual
� not the government. However,
our country cannot afford to let an
ever-so-weakening Democratic
party run this great country of
ours; to do so would mean serious
consequences.
Many folks at ECU have asked
themselves over and over: "Am I
better off than I was four years
ago?" Chances are if you believe
in the Reagan plan and want to
continue to enjoy the new pro-
sperity our country is going
through, we think you'll definitely
answer yes.
So, on Nov. 6, The East Caroli-
nian, by a majority vote, urges you
to check your ballot for Ronald
Reagan. Give him four more years.
Doonesbury
Campus Forum
Helms Appeals To Racism
The following is a letter sent to
Sen. Helms by a North Carolina stu-
dent.
As a black voter in this state, I am
outraged.
An article recently appeared in The
Greensboro News and Record that
caused me to reflect on the current
state of senatorial politics in North
Carolina. The article was titled,
"Helms Labels Hunt a Racist in
Campaign Being an eight-year resi-
dent of North Carolina, I am well
aware of the Hunt-Helms battle
(some have compared it to Star
Hars), but Helms' remarks were the
lowest and uncalled for.
Helms stated. "I believe it's fair to
say that he's (referring to Hunt) the
racist in this campaign. He's trying to
appeal to black citizens, but he's try-
ing to hide it Remarks like this by
our senator made me think o what
Helms represents to this state.
The campaign for senator in North
Carolina has sunk to a new low. I'm
afraid. "During his two six-year
terms. Helms has never hired a black
for his Senate staff, although his
campaign press secretary, Claude
Allen, is black Helms also voted
against the bill to make Martin
Luther King's birthday a national
holiday and tried to get the FBI to
reopen the closed files on Dr. King.
In the Greenville Daily Reflector,
the Helms campaign runs newspaper
ads picturing Hunt in his office
meeting with Jesse Jackson. The ads
accuse Hunt of supporting black
voter registration and being a
member of the black political action
committee. At the bottom, the ads
state, "Is this a wise use of taxpayers
funds?"
The politics of the current cam-
paign is disgusting. Instead of focus-
ing on critical issues such as jobs, it
has become a campaign of smear tac-
tics. As a final word, I would like to
quote this verse from the Bible to
Sen. Helms, "Thou shalt not bear
any grudge against the children of thy
people, but thou shalt love thy
neighbor as thyself: I am the Lord
(Leviticus 19:18) What's wrong with
supporting black voter registration?
They are a part of this country, too.
It is my Lope that the politics of
North Carolina has risen above ig-
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
6009 EVENING VICE PRESIDENT
GEORGE BUSH'S MAN HOOP PR0B-
l�M SURFACED AGAIN TODAY, AS
� CONCERNOVER HIS LACK OF
POLITICAL COURAGE CONTINUED
TDGROUJ
CAMPAIGN OFFICIALS, ALARMED PY
REACTION TO BUSH'S NUMEROUS
POUaREVERSAiHAVB PERSUADED
HIM TD TAKE SWIFTACTON TV PRE-
VENT FURTHER EROSION OF HIS
BELIEES
(F
5
ACCORDINGLY, IN A
CVHfTE HOUSE CEREMONY
TODAY, BUSH WILL FORMALLY
PLACE HIS EMBATTLED
MANHOOD IN A BLIND TRUST
9$W
IT WILL BE RESTORED TO
HIM ONLY IN TfMES OF
NA TIONAL EMERGENCY
THE ECONOMY ERA
ABORTION PEFICITS
TUESE ARE JUST SOME
OF THE ISSUES GEORGE
BUSH HAS REVERSED
HIMSELF ON TO BECOME
A REAGAN TEAM PLAYER
f
I
ID SHELTER WHAT REMAINS
OF HIS CONVICnONS. BUSH
IS ABOUT TO FORMALLY PLACE
HIS POLITICAL MANHOOP IN
A BLIND TRUST. ANPHERE
COMES THE VICE PRESIDENT
NOW' f
MR. VICE .
PftesipetiT!
fJ YES
ROLAND?
norance. Where do you stand, Jesse?
If you stand for what I think, I hope
you're out of a job in November.
DaVinci Metcalf
UNC Greensboro
Latin Tango
After watching the presidential
debate a week ago, I am convinced
more than ever that Americans
should become more aware of our
country's involvement in Central
America. Students owe it to
themselves to study and learn the
facts concerning Nicaragua and El
Salvador rather than blindly accep-
ting the politically motivated disin-
formation espoused by the Reagan
administration. Last week, the ECU
Peace Committee sponsored a Cen-
tral America week, and I hope all
students attended as many functions
as possible. Arming ourselves with
the facts today will allow us to make
intelligent decisions that may keep us
from arming ourselves with rifles in
the future.
Rick Brown
Grad, English
How Holy?
It never ceases to amaze me that
people who profess to be "conser-
vative" in recent years continue to
resort to such radical means as amen-
ding the Constitution to achieve their
political goals. One of these goals has
manifested itself in what has become
known as the "School Prayer
Amendment It is really an issue
with little significant value to its pro-
ponents, but which is being exploited
by certain politicians, especially here
in North Carolina, to play upon the
emotions of our people and to cover
up their intellectual shortcomings by
proposing to "return God to our
schools
To begin with, this fight for the
prayer amendment is being led in
many cases by the parents of children
who are not attending public schools.
These parents have opted to provide
for their children a supposedly more
wholesome education in one of the
thousands of so called "Christian
schools which sprang up during the
'70s like wild onions. Their reasons
for choosing these "Christian
schools" are sometimes religious in
nature, but more often than not their
19th century mentality would not
allow them to accept the realities of
racial integration in public education.
Secondly, if the children of parents
who are so concerned about prayer
don't pray enough, the fault lies with
the parents and their children, not
with the schools. Children in public
schools now can pray in the morning,
pray in the evening and pray at recess
time. They can pray to themselves
before eating lunch and before taking
math tests. They can pray all day
Saturday, every holiday, and, on
Sunday, go to church and pray.
Anyone who grew up attending Bap-
tist services as I did, knows they can
pray enough during two hours on
Sunday morning to last most people
the rest of the week, and if that isn't
enough, they can go to prayer
meetings on Wednesday or Thursday
night and pray some more. (Inciden-
tally, if Ronald Reagan had prayed a
little more before the first debate, he
might have made a better showing!)
Since the children of our dear
radical-right friends have ample time
to pray, just whose children are they
concerned about? The answer is,
everyone's but their own! They want
to make sure that your children
receive the "proper" religious m-
docrination and are forced to see
their point of view. This business ol a
"non-denominational" praver is
nonsense and a contradiction in
terms. Proponents of school praer
say that a child who does not choose
to pray can leave the room. Even ii
there were first- and second-grade
children with the nerve to defend
themselves against an iron-willed
teacher, why should they suffer
indignation? After all, they are not
the ones trying to force their views on
others.
In the finest tradition of political
demagoguery, leaders of the school
prayer movement have forced even
some o our good political leader I
take up the cause, not because
right, but because they have made it a
hot issue and are determined to piav
up emotional issues and use them to
challenge the character and religious
beliefs of all those who oppose it
True religious freedom it jusv (
another reason to vote tor Walter
Mondale on Nov. 6.
David Creech
Senior, Pols
Thanks, Mick
I just wanted to write a note of con-
gratulations to Mick LaSalle for his
letter of Oct. 25. It shows us in a
somewhat humorous manner the type
of mentality responsible for trying to
re-elect Jesse Helms.
Thank you, Mick.
DeChanile Johnson
Sophomore, G.C.
Kudos, Guys
My condolences to those who,
unaware of Central America
Awareness week, neglected to attend
the gala performance of "Hands, a
dramatic presentation of a true story
of Central America Kudos to Steve
Myott and the Center Theatre. I lov-
ed the 14-foot puppets. Simply
fabulous. One question, though.
Who pulls the puppeteers' strings?
Bob Olds
Psychiatry
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number and signature of the
author(s). Letters are limited to two
typewritten pages, double-spaced or
neatly printed. All letters are subject
to editing for brevity, obscenity and
libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are
reminded that they are limited to one
every five issues.
The East Carolinian appreciates
the great number of letters received so
far this year. We are unable to print
them all when we first get them but
will do so as soon as possible.
New Health Center Pro)
Men's Heal
Health
Column
Men's health care is provided
bv the Student Health Center.
The male health program cons
of education and the prevention,
diagnosis, and treatment of
health problems. All services are
confidential.
Educational programs offered
to male student cover a var
of men's health issues including
contraception, self-te ex-
amination and se.xuallv transi-
ted dssea-cs. Other tor
fered on demand. These ;
gram
studer,1
groups
held twi
He
an
ten
.
ma'
a
reprod
I
. I
Scientists E.
Of Hurican
Scientists plar. to 'akt a c
up look at the effeel
ncane Diana on the fk oi 'he
Atlantic Ocean where the ti
storm raged for two dav-
striking inland Sept 13
"This provides an a
portumtv � almost a
setting � to study the effects I
storms on the rocks a
sediments on the sea b
said Dr Stan Rigj. ECt
geologist.
The locati i I e ee
Diana when it stalled
North Carolina coa: Sep: 11
and 12 "is almos- precisely" I
spot where Riggs and other scien-
tists have been stud
floor. It is on the outer - n
Onslow Bav on the c
shelf.
Ocean depth at r
about "5 to $5 feet.
Riggs said he expect- tl the
effect of the hurricane-lashed
waves on the water column will
be found to be extensive. "VA c
have mapped and taken core
samples and even taker uade:
water TV pictures so that we
know exactly what wa there
before the storm Riggs vaid.
"Studies now will be like
at point zero
"This is one of the few times
that an opportunity like this has
presented itself Riggs said.
"We believe that the compoviir.
and configuration of the oc�

Res
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CJA AN77-
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THlS
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I HI fcASK K'
-HI k �
Mick
Kudos, Gins
a
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forum Rules
mes let-
stew,
"em the
i, ross from
� ir
f verified n, all let-
� name, n: .
phone
o) the
� : f�o
i � � spat ed or
letters are subject
nit) and
. � will be
� and staff
pane are
nited to one
nan appreciates
� uers received so
unable to print
� first get them but
� is possible.
Men's Health Services Begin Walkin The Plank
Health
Column
Men's health care is provided
bv the Student Health Center.
I he male health program consists
oi education and the prevention,
diagnosis, and treatment of
health problems All services are
confidential
Educational programs offered
to male students covet a varietN
of men's hea I es including
conti i : ion, sell testicle e.
am �� � and se i ansmit-
ted diseases ()thei are ol
fei ed on demand 11 ese pro-
grams aie available to dormitory
students and other campus
groups A contraception class is
held twice a week at the Student
Health Center on Mondays at 10
a m and Hiursdays at 3 p.m for
females and males
hie of the mam goals of the
Student Health Centei is tor all
male students to learn how to do
a simple three-minute monthly
self-testicle examination. Cancer
ol the testes the male
reproductive glands � is one of
the most common cancers in men
15 34 years of age. It accounts
tor 12 percent of all cancel deaths
in this group. If discovered in the
earh stages, testicular cancer can
be treated promptly and effec-
tively It's important for all males
to take the time to learn the basic
facts about this type ol cancer
its symptoms, treatments and
what one can do to get the help
you need when it ocurrs
Brochures and other informa
tion about men's health are also
available at the S.H.C. including
topics such as eating disorders,
diet and nutrition, cancer, high
blood pressure, sexual dysfunc
tions, depression and alcohol and
drugs. Tests foi sexually
transmitted diseases, herpes and
the evaluation of other men's
health problems are available
Prophylactics may also be ob
tamed tor a minimal fee through
the Pharmacy.
More information about the
men's health program may be oh
tained by calling 756S41
Scientists Examine Effects
Of Huricane Diana's Winds

I �- sWHa
tt(- Jfi jb-U ;
��� t
� � �� t �
� ��'� � -
- " - �

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1
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-ft. X
ikt a close-
up Iook ai ts ol H
ricane Diai
Atlantic (k
I

des an t
pot'
sett � i
stoi
sedirm the sea bo
said Di Stan Riggs, 1 C I
geologis
The the eye of
Diana en stalled
North Cai isl Sept 1 1
dr.d 12 "is almost precisely"
spot when Riggs and othei sciei
eat:
fl
� B
she
Ocean depth it cati n is
t 11
Rig; he expc

waves on the watei column will
: : ne extensive. "We
hav map d 'a ken core
. : even cakeid�
i that we
was tl
Riggs
Si . be like
i
� I e fe times
tha1 i ty like this has
presented itself Riggs
"We b position
SPRING
BREAK
i sponso
' �
� '
i is tne result ol ocean tur-
bulence and storms. Now is the
tnce to see that it actually hap-
pens and have a base on which to
make accurate, scientific corn-
sons
Research bv Riggs and other
E I scientists and teams from
Duke University and the Univer-
� South Florida will be
resumed at the Onslow Bay sue
the last week in November, sup-
ported by a $35,000 grant from
the National Science Foundation
a $10,000 grant from the
I v Saw The studies will be
ducted aboard the Research
Vessel Cape Hatteras which is
operated by the Duke-University
o 1 North Carolina
Oceanographic Consortium and
based at Beau tort. N.C.
Riggs said plans call tor an in
terdisciplinary study b v
geologists from ECl . biologists
from Duke and state and national
marine fisheries personnel, along
with Dr. Al Hine o the I ni
tv o South Florida.
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1








THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 30, 1984
SGA Appropriates Funds For Choir
By GREG RIDEOIJT
Maaagtaf E4Mor
The SGA Legislature Monday
appropriated $750 to the ECU
Gospel Choir after extended
debate over whether or not fun-
ding the group was a violation of
the SGA rule not to give money
to religious groups. The
Legislature also gave $5,000 to
the East Carolina Playhouse.
The bill, which had come out
the Appropriations Committee
with unanimous approval, ran in-
to opposition when Legislator
Rich Wynne cautioned the body
to first examine the legality of
funding a group with religious
overtones. Wynne made a motion
to send the bill to the Rules and
Judiciary committee for it to
study the legal quesiton. "Let's
make sure he said.
The motion was denied by a
voice vote. Most members of the
SGA agreed with legislator Den-
nis Kilcoyne's remarks that the
group was clearly a cultural
organization. Legislator Stacy
Falkowitz also thought the bill
should be studied, pointing to an
example in Greensboro where a
school was forced to stop a play it
was running because of religious
overtones.
SGA Viet President pointed
out that the group's constitution
was approved by the SGA Sum-
mer Legislature and said the
legality question never came up.
The Legislature approved the bill
by voice vote, with two dissen-
tions. "I think we ignored a
point Wynne told members
after the vote.
The $5,000 appropriation to
the Playhouse was part of ten-
tative deal made between it and
the Appropriations Committee
last spring. The Playhouse had
agreed to cut it's request then
under the condition that it could
come back in the fall and seek ad-
ditional funds. The money will be
used for scenery and props.
The Varsity Cheerleaders
received $600, along with the
Poetry Forum which got $550
and the Association of Nursing
Students which received $1,366.
SGA Speaker of the House
Kirk Shelley pointed out at the
end of the meeting that the
Special Projects Committee is
seeking students to help with
committee projects. Interested
students should stop by the Stu-
dent Supply Store today between
11 a.m. and 2 p.m.
Don't Forget
To Vote
Nov. 6
Student Discusses Grenada Invasion
Continued From Page 1
With the electricity out and the
fighting continuing, the students
were in complete darkness. "We
had a ham radio, so we were in
contact with some of the military.
They told us to lay down, and if
anyone knocks on the door,
don't answer it. At this point �
and I'll have to admit, this was
the scariest time for me � I
didn't know who would walk in
that door. I felt they could have
shot us or taken us hostage. We
were all scared
Solomon and the other people
in his room lay still for three
hours. No longer able to do so,
they just walked around the room
the rest of the night. The next
morning they heard the True Blue
campus had been evacuated.
Gran Anse was next.
"About 12 noon they moved
all the students into one building
� downstairs into six rooms
Solomon said, "and the rooms
were right near the entrance
which faced the beach There
were 40 or 50 people in each
room, everyone lying face down.
A white flag was placed on the
building so the Marines would
know where the students were.
WANTED
' 'General Manager
��
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is now accep-
ting applications for the General Manager's
position through November 2nd. Interested
persons should apply on the second floor of
the Publication building, located across from
Joyner Library.
This is an excellent opportunity to work with a quality staff
while gaining valuable experience in a wide realm of business ap
plications.
Raleigh Paper Endorses Hunt
Continued From Page 1
Greensboro newspaper suggested
that "when you total up all the
reasons to vote for Hunt and
against Helms, the case for Hunt
;s overwhelming
The News & Record criticized
Heims for an "exhaustive" list of
"pet causes" and said the
Republican "divides people and
stirs up fear � fear of com-
munism, atheism, humanism and
a host of other 'isms some real
but many more imagined. This is
not leadership, it's reaction
The H'inston-Salem Journal
said that Helms is out of touch
with North Carolinians. "For ex-
ample, it is hard to believe that a
large majority of North Caroli-
nians share Helms' ideas on
Social Security, the environment
and education
The News and Observer sug-
gested voters "in one stroke in
this electioncan change the
political chemistry in their state"
by voting Helms out of office.
"By voting for Hunt, they can
prevent a national right wing
cable from getting a tighter grip
on North Carolina
Helms, the newspaper said, has
used his Senate seat "for the ad-
vancement of a right-wing
crusade with a single-minded
political agenda.
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Nightclub
Carolina East Centre
Near Plirr Theatre. Greenville
presents
Wednesday Night
Halloween Costume Contest
1st Prize - $50.00 Best Male Costume
1st Prize - $50.00 Best Female Costume
Runner up - $20.00 & complimentary dinner
for 2 from King and Queen North
2 for 1 High Balls
50 Draft
Thursday Night
Wet T-shirt Contest
Cash prizes & complimentary bottle of
champagne for all entrees.
Phone 756-6401
Located In Carolina East Centre
Beau's U a private club for members A guests only
All ABC Permits. Memberships available at the door.
Guest Arc Welcome
NEW YORK STATE
DRY, PINK OR BRUT
Taylor
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138
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rrn usi km imu
Traditi
By TINA MAROS HAh
It's that time of the
through the bottom of our closet and
off of last year's Halloween cosl .
is not just for kids anymore -
the occassion just as a
downtown Greenville tomorr
to see everything from gh
and vampires. For hundreds
the country have been rev � .
evolving new ones. Just v. I �
Halloween, which means
ing traditionally bega:
Celebrated bv the ancieru )�
Oct. 31st through the I ing c
marked the night wher.
death, called together aii ti
past vear and made
animals. As a precaut.
fires to watch out for the � �
about during the night. Thu
ches and ghosts stalk �.
The Romans also held
honor of Pomona. On tha
nuts and apples before great I
winter stores of fruits it
ceremonies evolved into one I
ween.
As time went b.
began to take root and spr I
being an evening hallowed I
stores, it became an evc-
ghosts and the supernatural
hold of the new notion a
day when the could
discover their someda
It would be maccur
Halloween without relatir.
superstitions associate
apples became and "emame:
ween pastime. Many years Jt
if a maiden won the ar
Spirit O
(CPS) � For someone wl
died in 1931, former Notre D
football coach Knute Rockne
gets-arouud, preuvell.
or;ar iear fifjun- bw
does.
Over the last vear the I
we-
pound, two-foot tall K
Rockne bust has atterueu at easi
one student graduation p
visited the shores
Michigan, and lournevec I
dianapolis recently tor the Notre
Dame-Purdue football game
Sugarcreek
B TlNAMROSlHk
Imiti tmiot
One band is heading t
top, and deservingly so. Sugar-
creek, the six-man team :r
Charlotte, N.C is proving this
with their third album. Roc A The
Sight Away. The album com
bines emotional lyrics and cor.
tent rhythms to produce a work
destined for success Billboard
even dubbed the title cut "as a
record with potential tor signifi-
cant chart action
While most of the songs on
album deal with aspects of iove
and life, each expresses a unique
thought. Rock The Nij
Away written by Rick Lee and
Tim Clark, earns its status as the
album's pick hit With a hot beat
full of energy, lead singer Tim
Clark echoes a common notion
"I can't wait for that
feelin' When it comes over
meForget about my wor-
riesGonna set myself free. Five
o'clock on Friday I'm waiting
for that whistle to blow M boss
said what's your hurry boy I said
I'm ready to go
Two of my favorite songs on
the album are "Together Again"
and "Can't Stop Thinkin' About
You "Together Again a
slow, swaying song full of feel-
ing, describes a second chance at
romance: "Now and then
remember when it fell
rightCool summer sand, and
cree-l
md
forgt
sootk
into
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t Forget
Vote
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IT 3 PKCS PLEASE
J
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INK EAS1AKOI INUN
Entertainment
(K rOBlR 10. 1984 Hage
Traditions Change; Spirit Remains
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
�ram Mtior
It's that time of the year again � time to dig
through the bottom of your closet and shake the dust
off of last year's Halloween costume. No, Halloween
is not just for kids anymore � college students enjoy
the occassion just as much. And if you visit
downtown Greenville tomorrow night, you're likelv
to see everything from ghosts and goblins to witches
and ampires. For hundreds of years, people across
the country have been reviving past traditions and
evolving new ones. Just what is Halloween all about?
Halloween, which means "hallowed or holy even-
ing traditionally began as an Autumn festival,
celebrated by the ancient Druids from midnight,
Oct. 31st through the following day, Halloween
marked the night when Saman, the great lord of
death, called together all the condemned souls of the
past year and made them inhabit the bodies of
animals. As a precaution, the Druids lit huge bon-
fires to watch out for the wicked spirits that prowled
about during the night. Thus came the belief that wit-
ches and ghosts stalk around on Halloween night.
The Romans also held a ceremonv on Nov. 1st in
honor of Pomona. On 'hat day, the people roasted
nuts and apples before great bonfires as tokens of the
winter stores of fruits. It appears that the two
ceremonies evolved into one to become our Hallo-
ween.
As time went by, wierd tales of spirits and goblins
began to take root and spread. Therefore, instead of
being an evening hallowed to autumn and the winter
stores, it became an evening enshrined to witches,
ghosts and the supernatural. Even young girls took
hold of the new notion and treated Halloween as a
day when they could look into the future and
discover their someday husbands.
It would be inaccurate to discuss the history of
Halloween without relating some of the customs and
superstitions associated with the day. "Ducking" for
apples became and has remained a popular Hallo-
ween pastime. Many years ago. people belieed that
if a maiden won the apple and slept with it under her
pillow, she would dream of her lover. Several other
superstitions were associated with "ducking" for ap-
ples as well. For example, they believed that if the
young lady ate the apple while standing in front of a
mirror, combing her hair, her future husband would
look over her shoulder into the glass. She was warned
not to turn around or he would vanish.
Another common superstition was that spirits
roamed in churchyards and cemetaries on Hallo-
ween. People believed that if a man met a spirit face-
to-face, he would fall dead.
Two of the more popular symbols of Halloween
are the black cat, the witch's traditional companion,
and the pumpkin, a symbol of harvest!
"Jack-oLanters" began with the Irish and serve to
illuminate Halloween gatherings.
The modern custom of "trick-or-treating" door to
door goes back to the pagan New Year feast. Accor-
ding to a section in a book entitled Celebrations,
"The ghosts that were thought to throng about the
houses of the living were greeted with a banquet-
laden table. At the end of the feast, masked and
costumed villagers representing the souls of the dead
paraded to the outskirts of town leading the ghosts
away
The "trick" part of the custom sterns from
"Mischief Night the name given to Halloween eve
many years ago. On this night, people did everything
from stretching ropes across roads at night to ringing
doorbells to toppling over outhouses. "The basis for
Mischief Night is the old belief in ghosts and fairies
who roamed the roads on Halloween night curdling
milk and riding people's horses to exhaustion. Any
practical joke could thus be blamed on these little
creatures over whom no one had an control
(Celebrations)
On a different note, campus organizations and in-
dividuals have treated Halloween as an opportunity
to help others by going door to door and collecting
money for such worthwhile organizations as
UNICEF.
No matter how commercialized Halloween may
seem to get, however, it's certain that the "spirit"
will forever remain the same.
Spirit Of Rockne Haunts School Officials
(CPS) � For someone who
died in 1931, former Notre Dame
footbiiil coach Knute Rockne still
gets around pretty.ejl.
�; ar -eat WfKinrt- bn�
does
Over
the last vear the 100
:rW 4 j.
4wi
8iL i i
pound, two-foot tall Knute
Rockne bust has attended at least
one student graduation party,
visited the shores of Lake
Michigan, and journeyed to In-
dianapolis recently for the Notre
Dame-Purdue football game.
The bust, affectionately known
around campus as "Rockne"
first vanished from Notre Dame's
Rc$U��Memorial last May 3rd.
PW'weeks later, editors at the
student paper, The Observer,
were surprised to receive a ran-
som note and photograph of the
campus football legend sunning
at an unnamed beach.
Among other things, the note
warned that Rockne would not
return "until the students get
their beer apparently referring
to a new student drinking policy
that restricts on-campus beer
comsumption, explains Observer
editor Bob Vonderheide.
The color picture showed the
sunglass-clad Rockne reposing in
the sand, surrounded by a boom-
box radio, a keg of beer, and a
frisbee.
In the meantime, the empty
pedestal in Rockne Memorial
became too much to bear for
many students and ad-
ministrators. Hoping to re-
capture at least some of the aura
of the missing Rockne. officials
replaced it with a smaller replica
dubbed "Rockne Junior
Over thc summer campus
police, be fuddledfay the mystery
of the missing bust, began work-
ing on leads that Rockne was
hiding out somewhere in Los
Angeles, recalls Notre Dame
Security Chief Glenn Terry.
On September 11, a few days
after a Norte Dame-Purdue foot-
ball game, Observer editors
received a second anonymous
note and several photographs
showing Rockne in a Purdue
sweatshirt, standing in front of a
welcome ;ign to Purdue JJniveajM-
ty in Lafayette, Ind.
"I went on a long road trip to
see this game the note began,
"and I'm really disappointed.
The football team has never
scored this poorly
The one-page, typewritten
message was signed "Knute
Rockne
"We still have no idea why the
notes and photos were sent to us
sas Vonderheide.
Rockne, it seems, isn't the first
Notre Dame sculpture to take
flight in the night.
"There was a similar disap-
pearance in the 1950s invoking
the statue of Father Theodore
Sonn � founder of the university
� which was kept on display in
one of the residence halls
recalls Dick Conklin, public in-
formation director and long-time
Notre Dame staffer.
'The statue mysteriously
disappeared one night, and later
we began getting postcards with
postn.arks from all around the
world � Paris, London, Rome
� saying things like 'Having a
wonderful time, wish you were
here and signed 'Father
Sorin
Eventually, Father Sorin was
found buried in a golf course
sand trap, "none the worse for
wear
Both the Observer and The
Sotre Dame Monthly, the cam-
pus magazine, did stories last spr-
ing recounting the Sorin statue
caper, Vonderheide says.
Rockne's bust vanished only
days after the articles appeared.
It finally was returned at a Sept.
23rd pep rally.
"It just showed up during the
rally Vonderheide recalls, and
elated authorities quickly whisk-
ed Rockne off to secure quarters.
But while everyone was
celebrating Rockne's return, the
worst happened.
Rockne Junior vanished.
"an
.�s
Is
Sugarcreek Rocks
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
Framrm Fdllor
One band is heading for the
top, and deservingly so. Sugar-
reek, the six-man team from
Charlotte, N.C is proving this
ith their third album, Rock The
ight Away. The album com-
bines emotional lyrics and consis-
ent rhythms to produce a work
destined for success. Billboard
even dubbed the title cut "as a
record with potential for signifi-
cant chart action
While most of the songs on the
album deal with aspects of love
and life, each expresses a unique
thought. "Rock The Night
Away written by Rick Lee and
Tim Clark, earns its status as the
album's pick hit. With a hot beat
full of energy, lead singer Tim
Clark echoes a common notion:
'1 can't wait for that
feelin'When it comes over
meForget about my wor-
nesGonna set myself free.Five
o'clock on FridayI'm waiting
for that whistle to blowMy boss
said what's your hurry boyI said
I'm ready to go
Two of my favorite songs on
?he album are "Together Again"
and "Can't Stop Thinkin' About
You "Together Again a
slow, swaying song full of feel-
ing, describes a second chance at
romance: "Now and then, I
remember whenit felt so
nghtCool summer sand, and
soft moonlightI held you
tight. Promises we made, and
dreams we sharedCould they
still be there The story ends on
a positive note: "The day is
through, and I'm holding youIn
my arms againOur second
chance, for an old romanceTo
be new again
"Can't Stop Thinkin' About
You" breaks away from Sugar-
creek's typical sound to produce
a melody both refreshing and un-
forgetable. Beginning with a soft,
soothing beat, the song develops
into a work full of vigor and in-
tensity.
The majority of Sugarcreek's
songs are short, but the lyrics are
strong and to the point. Tim
Clark seems to pour his heart out
in "Never Say Forever" and
"What's Gonna Happen
Other songs on Rock The
Might Away are "White Hot
"Lonely Blue "Got My Eye
On Her "I Don't Mean
Enough To You "Love So
Strong "One Way Street and
"What A Night
Although Sugarcreek has been
together for 13 years, they have
been referred to by some as an
"over-night" success. Thus far
the group ha.s opened for groups
like Huey Lewis & The News,
Cheap Trick and Pablo Cruise,
and have performed across the
United States.
Band members Rick Lee,
keyboards and vocals; Lynn
Sugarcreek
By the looks of things, Sugarcreek's Rock The Might Away is making its way to the top.
Samples, drums and vocals; Mike Clark, vocals and percussion; success, and Rock The "����
wtTguhar 7ndZ JS and ,Michae' Hou�h guitar and Aw, may be just what they n�d
west, guitar ana vocals, I lm vocals, are destined for ultimate to get there.
In its place the culprr.s left a
jack-o-lantern and two ha
ten notes, one of which read
"Here's a buck for o
troubies
Chief Terry still won't disclose
the contents of the second te.
He suspects the theft
inside job because the I
anchored and locked to
pedestal in the lobbv
"They must have had a k
he surmises, "because
was not broken
No one has heard from R. i
Junior since.
Big Rockne. mean
back on display in the
the Rockne Memorial. :
anchored to the pedestal bj s
rods and concrete.
Terry "thinks" the bust is safe
from future pranksters, b .
also concedes there's real
way to stop Rockne from
off with another group of deter-
mined pranksters, short of
removing the bust from pul
display.
Visiting Artist
Paints Mural
B DANIEL MAURI R
Vjbuimi I Mara tMtot
The walls of the Jenkins
Building's .Art Gallery will soon
bear the emotions and ideas of
visiting artist Joan Moment. Mo-
ment, whose stay here at ECU is
limited to one semester, has
begun work on two murals.
These paintings, 10 x 12 and 10
25, are her largest works to date.
Moment, an assistant pro-
fessor, is currently on leave from
California State University in
Sacramento. She spent the past
year in New York City where her
work was greatly influenced by
the architectural design of some
of the older buildings
Downtown Manhattan houses
numerous examples of 18th and
19th century architecture which
features the column, a
characteristic of ancient Greek
and Roman designs.
Moment has since incor-
porated the column and what she
feels it represents into her work.
Until that time her work had been
based primarily on planetary sub-
jects in concentric ellipses. She
feels that her planetary subjects
in part symbolize the human
soul. In fact, Moment said,
It is embarrassing for me to
admit that what I'm after is an
image of the soul
Moment's attitude toward her
painting is one of spontaneity.
A
,
N
i






8
JTHEEAST'CAROL INI AN QCTOffig W. 1984
Classifieds
SALE
BROKE? Xmas is just around the
corner Wind Chimes as a gift is
right for you High Quality, Inexpen
sive and made in Greenville Orders
being taken now 758 7997
FUJI DEL REY: like new
Shimano power shifters, crank,
derailers � new specialized tires �
Chritophe toe clipsstraps � $225.
call Connie 752 1472
PIANO FOR SALE Wanted respon
sible party to assume small monthly
payments on spinet console piano
Can be seen locally Write: (include
phone number) Credit Manager,
PO Box 521, Beckemeyer, IL.
62219
FOR SALE: Large, dorm size
refrigerator Need's onwer fast Call
"52 9931.
FOR SALE: Portable Smith Corona
t'lec'ric typewriter with a case. A
steal at $95 Call 752 4314 after 7 p.m.
FOR SALE Canon AE 1 programm
ed with 1 8 lens and case, like new,
$175 Canon AE 1 with 1.8 lens, like
new $160 Call 758 7820 after 5:30.
AAISC
LOST Virginia Driver's license
Call Julie Hammer 758 8168.
PERSONAL
Pi KAPP'S would like to thank
everyone for all the work they did
this weekend Lil Sisters and little
Sister pledges y'all are the greatest.
We appreciate all you do for us.
RALLY Meet Democratic Guber
iatorial candidate Rufus Edmisten
at the King and Queen North, Sun
day, Nov 4, 3 5 p.m No charge.
PHI KAPPA TAU LITTLE
S'STERS The brothers and pledges
are looking forward to the Hallo
ween costume blast Wed night. See
ou at the house at 8 p.m. and come
dressed to impress! Massive Scrog
session following party.
SOME PEOPLE ARE JUST
ASSHOLES: Yep, and you can guess
which house they occupy by the col
or Nuc eating is something we'll
have to get use to. Where's the
Drain?
COME: skate with the Sigmas
Tuesday night at Sportsworld. Ad
mission $1 � starts at 8 p.m.
PHI TAUS: Thanks for being so
nice. I love you all Nancy Homa
GOOFY : We may be going through a
bad time right now, but I want you to
know that I do love you and care
about you very much, and always
will no matter what. Let's make nice
and be as we were I want to be
your friend again. Love, Hyper.
CONABUNGA: Jen, you made it!
Pure gold, whatever, you are the
best! See you on Broadway soon!
Your roomie, Legs! Yes, Todd can
come, too!
ALL: l need is this shot � that's all.
And this Fast Times Video, that's all
l need. And a girl with Spicolli hair,
that's all for sure.
SUZ Had an attitude adjustment,
probably will study Wed. night. Try
ing to finish The O so we can talk
about it. How do you like Solitude?
YO RAVE : You are still the one who
can scratch my itch. Still the one
that I wouldn't switch. We're still
having fun and you're still the one.
THE UNITED WAY: will be taking
donations outside the student store
today Help the United Way reach its
goal by contributing today.
PI KAPPS: would like to thank
everyone for all the work they did
this weekend Lil Sisters and Lil
Sister pledges y'all are the greatest
We appreciate all you do for us.
WANTED
STEREO System problem? Ab
solutely "no charge" for repair
estimates at the Tech Shop. Call
757 "Nineteen Eighty" We thought
you'd like to know.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: With 15
years wants fulltime typing at home.
IBM typewriter Call 754 3660.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: experience, quality work,
IBM selectnc typewriter. Lanie
Shive, 758 5301
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE All typing needs,
758 5488758 8241
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY:
Gain valuable marketing experience
whiie earning money. Campus
representative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida Con
tact Bill Ryan at 1 800 282 6221
THE ORIGINAL FAMILY STEAK HOUSE
Come To Western ShaJB For
Bigger, Juicy Beef Tips
JUST ASK FOR THE NO. 3!
No. 3 Beef Tips
Wed.&Thurs.
For $3.29
FREE Potato Fixins Bar
With Your Meal
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& SUBS
752-3861
We're Red HOT!
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30 Minute Delivery or your pizza is FREE
with this coupon
I (Must have coupon)
I
I
(Must be in correct room)
I
TYPING NEEDED: If you need so
meone to type papers of any kind for
you at reasonable rates, please call
756 8934 after 5 30 p.m.
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID for pro
cessing mail at home! Information,
send self addressed, stamped
envelope. Associates, Box 95,
Roselle, N.J. 07203
EARN EXTRA MONEY: The law
school selection service needs a
campus representative. Earning
potential great Work around you
schedule. For additional informa
tion call collect (303) 841 8305.
NEED A RESUME: CAM 758-6899 OR
758-0529 AFTER 6:30 P.M. SENIOR
MARKETING MAJOR WITH
SEVERAL YEARS OF BUSINESS EX-
PERIENCE Will WRITE RESUME
AND OR COVER LETTERS.
WANTED: Someone fluent in french
to write a letter of introduction.
758 0183
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED: to
share fully furnished trailer � has
washerdryer, microwave, color TV
stereo � $175month utilities includ
ed. Call 752 7378 after 6 30 p.m.
NEEDED: Female roomate
mature, responsible to share a two
bedroom apt $67 deposit, $135 rent.
Call after six weekdays 756 3393
HOUSE FOR RENT � Large four
bedroom house walking distance
from campus $400 mo. call 758 4183.
Operation Sunshine
Brings Joy To Girls
GREENVILLE STUDENT
LAUNDRYSERVICE:Let
GreenvilleStujent LaundrySer
vice pickup,wash, dry,fold.
hang, aswellas deliveryour
laundry!DryCleaning,too!
758 3087.
YSSSSSSSSA'SSSSSSSSSSS.
ROOMATE
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE
ROOMATE: needed to share large
apartment directly across ECU
campus on 5th St. Sl.jmonth: $120
deposit plus half utilities. Call
758 9527 � mornings
Happy
Belated
B-day
Harold
YmBmmmza&mzEBm
By DEIRDRE McENALLY
Staff Wrlirr
This year, 30 to 35 girls ages 7
to 13 are getting a good start in
life, thanks to members of
Operation Sunshine and Gloria
Pearsall, activities director. The
non-profit organization, which is
funded by the United Way, began
in 1968 as a means of keeping
these girls off the streets and in-
volved in constructive activities.
The 11 members of its board of
directors and two regular
volunteers oversee such activities
as cooking, sewing, arts and
crafts, and speakers. The pro-
gram operates from 3 p.m. to 5
p.m. on school days and from 10
a.m. to 4 p.m. during summer
vacation. Transportation for the
girls is provided from mans area
elementary schools.
In addition, the girls are in-
volved in two special projects-
each year. They donate food-
baskets to one or two need
families at Thanksgiving and thev
donate and distribute toys to the
children in the Pediatric Ward at
Pitt County Memorial Hospital
each Christmas.
Sororities, fraternities ai id
other campus organizations art-
encouraged to contribute their
services to Operation Sunshine in
any way possible.
Support the organization tl
keeps such valuable service1- a
this in business � give to the
United Ha v.
POBOYS
"A Deal of a Meal"
At the Student Supply Store
& Croata'
This Weeks Spe ial: � m - �.
Ham & Cheese Poboy M � � W
'5 Pizza inn
Buffet
Just
Mom Fri llam-2pm Noon Buffet
All the pizza, o 19
spaghetti and
salad you can eat!
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
Night
6:00 till 8:00pm
For pizza out it's Pizza Inn'
Greenville Blvd. 758-6266
Apply now in in Room 234 of Mendenhall Student
Center to be on the day represenative on the Student
I nion Board of Directors.
The responsibilities of the members of the Board of
Directors include:
Selecting the Student I nion President
Approving committee chairpersons
Approving the Student L nion Budget
Setting policy for the Student I nion
DEADLINE TO APPL Y: Friday, November 1,1984
rr:
� � � �
BICYCtC pos
Tune-up Special On All Makes
$10.95 with this ad.
Skateboards are coming soon!
(Some are here now)
Bike Club Organizational Meeting Nov. 3 6:00pm at
the Bicycle Post
530Cotanche St. 757-3616
�vz
i
NO CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.
It vou re a musician who s serious
.iKujt performing vou should take a
serious look at the Army
Army hands offer ou an average
ot 40 performance a month In every-
thing from concerts to parades
Armv bands also otter vou a
chance to navel
The Armv has hands performing It's a genuine, right now, imme
in Japan. Hawaii. Europe and all diateoppominiry
across America Compare it to yout civilian otters
And Armv bands otter you the Then write Army Opportunities, PO
chance to play w it K ood musicians Just Box 771S. Clifton. Nl 0701s
to quality, vou have to he able to sight ADafV BAkM
read musu you ve never seen betore and BriBiL imfii rir
demonstrate several othei musical skills BE ALLTOU CAN DC.
'Soldie
the
Thr
evident
are nt
deep
come-
i
I
man
B BRIAN RANCH M
sun �nuf
A Soldier's Play, by Charles
Fuller, opened and closed
Friday night in V.
Auditorium The one-time ;
duction by the Negro Ensen
Company is highly acclaimed as
one of off Broadway's bes' f
in years.
The story, told mostly in
flashback. is about a captain's in-
vestigation of a sergeant's
murder, set at For? Neal. Loui-
siana in 1944 Both men happen
to be black, which of course
causes complicate
The play never bog
some heaw "statement"
Griffon ,
The (infton Shad f
looking for a theme . �
has a "catchy1 but
tune and is representative en
of Shad F�
everv vear
Shad Festival ofl
ed a contest to select ar
propnate song, noting
mal requests foi theme
have been made fot
with at least three mus
ing said they would
it and come up with
To date.r as
Rules are - mple (1)
must be either original
in the public domain
permission will be needed ft
anyone else for it to b 2
All eres will become the pi
pertv the Grifton
Festivai. Inc (3) Verse
have Mme reference to ma
nual events of the Shad Fesl
but be genera! enough
can be jsed vear after yeai 4
Tune should be eas � � g
play. A trophy and S50 �
awarded to the winner of the :
test.
Suggestions are also being
sought for a secondary theme for wo
CHRI

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 30. 1984
Sunshine
v To Girls
girN is provided from many area
elementarv schools.
In addition, the girls are in-
volved in two special projects
I each vear The donate food-
ie baskets to one or two needy
es al 1 hanksgi ing and thev
late and distribute toys to the
in :he Pediatric Ward at
v Memorial Hospital
each Christmas.
s .vines, fraternities and
campus organizations are
aged to contribute their
- v Operation Sunshine in
Kssible
xn th rgration that
valua ices as
in business - give to the
I
BOYS
oho
i Weal"
pply Store
& CroataT
$1.65
t Mendenhall Studeni
�esenative on the Student
If members of the Board of
t I nion President
chairpersons
t I nion Budget
Mudent I nion
Y: Friday, oember 1,1984
1
���'���: '��,��: ��� ��;
akes
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6:00pm at ,
16
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rfer
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CAM BE.
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Soldier's Play' Earns An Ovation
By BRIAN RANGELEY
Start Wrtur
A Soldier's Play, by Charles
uller, opened and closed last
Jriday night in Wright
Luditorium. The one-time pro-
motion by the Negro Ensemble
tompany is highly acclaimed as
he of off-Broadway's best plays
years.
The story, told mostly in
ashback, is about a captain's in-
tstigation of a sergeant's
Jurder, set at Fort Neal, Loui-
ana in 1944. Both men happen
' be black, which of course
kuses complications.
I The play never bogs down in
kme heavy "statement" about
Jprifton
The Grifton Shad Festival is
toking for a theme song which
is a "catchy" but easy-to-sing
ne and is representative enough
Shad Festival events to be used
ery year.
Shad Festival officers authoriz-
a contest to select an ap-
opriate song, noting that infor-
lal requests for theme songs
e been made for several years,
'Wth at least three musicians hav-
teg said they would "think about
'It and come up with something
-Tp date.no one has.
Rules are simple: (1) Tune
�list be either original or already
ill the public domain so that no
permission will be needed from
'�Byone else for it to be used; (2)
All entries will become the pro-
perty of the Grifton Shad
Festival, Inc (3) Verses should
have some reference to major an-
nual events of the Shad Festival
but be general enough that they
can be used year after year; (4)
Tune should be easy to sing and
pl�y. A trophy and $50 will be
awarded to the winner of the con-
test
Suggestions are also being
sought for a secondary theme for
the "black experience" in 1944.
The prejudices and injustices are
evident throughout the play and
are necessary to the plot.
Surprisingly enough, the
deepest hatred towards blacks
comes from the murdered
Sergeant Vernon C. Waters
himself. Actor Stephen A. Jones
aptly portrays Sgt. Waters as a
man raised by his father to act,
walk, talk, and inevitably think
like a white man. Tragically for
the sergeant, his ambition evolv-
ed into self-hatred. After all, he
was black too. He took his anger
out on his men, two of them in
particular.
Private First Class Melvin
Peterson and Private C. J. Mem-
phis are at the opposite ends of a
personality spectrum. Peterson is
a hot-tempered man who isn't
afraid to stand face-to-face
against the sergeant when he feels
unfairly treated. Memphis, on
the other hand, would be happy
playing his guitar and singing
spirituals at the edge of a cotton
field.
In Water's words, Memphis is
a no-good, yessuh-nossuh
kinda nigger and Waters has
only contempt for Memphis. On
the other hand, Waters secretly
respects Peterson for being able
to stand up for his rights.
But these two men aren't the
only ones motivated to kill
Waters. Other men in the squad
also have reason. There is always
the possibility of KKK involve-
ment. And two white soldiers had
beaten the sergeant the night he
was killed. So, you can see that
the plot is an intriguing one.
Geoffrey Eaving does an ex-
cellent job as Captain Richard
Davenport, the investigator
assigned to the murder.
Davenport is everything that
Waters tried to be �
authoritative, confident, effi-
cient, succesful. But he didn't try
to be that way. He didn't play the
part of a white man. He became
the man he wanted to be without
despising what he was. And, like
Waters, Davenport wasn't
without obstacle. Upon
meeting Capt. Davenport, the
Company Commander, Capt.
Charles Taylor (played by Danny
Goldring) tells Davenport that
dark skin and rank just doesn't
look right. Taylor also swears he
will do his best to stop any in-
vestigation that is being con-
ducted by a negro.
Although the play has many
conflicting elements, the
dramatic tension failed to keep
me on the edge of my seat. But it
did keep my attention. Once,
during a jail scene, Private Smalls
(Lanyard A. Williams) began to
sob heavily hefore confessing
what he knew to Davenport, and
half the audience lauehed
The flashbacks weaved in and
out of the play in an interesting
way. As one of the characters
recalled a past incident, a light
brightened the blank at the back
of the stage. The front lights dim
med, and the action shifted to the
rear of the stage.
Far and away, however, the
cast's acting and Douglas Turner
Ward's directing were worthy of
the standing ovation at the cur-
tain call. To the cast and crew of
A Soldier's Play, I say, "Bravo
the 1985 Shad Festival which will
take place April 17-21. While fish
is always the primary theme, each
year a contest is held to choose a
secondary theme which will
stimulate creative entries in the
parade and provide different
ideas for costumes and decora-
tions. The winner of the 1985
theme contest will receive a
trophy and be recognized in the
souvenir brochure (5000 copies
are printed and distributed free
of charge).
Persons wishing to enter either
or both of the Shad Festival con-
tests should send entries to Grif-
ton Shad Festival, Box 928, Grif-
ton, NC 28530. Further informa-
tion may also be received from
this address.
The Grifton Shad Festival is
held each April and is really "an
excuse for a community-wide
party Shad (a migratory fish
which annually returns to spawn
to its birthplace) provides the
coordinating theme for a wide
variety of athletic competitions, a
parade, a street dance, crafts,
food, and fun to appeal to all
ages and interests. Plays on
words around fish or shad add to
the fun (bingo is "Shad-O
liar's contest is "Fishy Tales
1-mi 2-mi and 10 KM runs are
called "Spring Shad Run the
27-mi. bicycle race is "27 miles
up the creek with just a pedal").
Fish fry, fish stew, clogging,
art show, queen pageant, canoe
race, barbershop quartet singing,
and tournaments in bass and
hickory shad fishing, softball,
golf, archery, horsehoes and ten-
nis are among other events.
A unique feature is the Grifton
Historical Museum with its
200-year-old loom, rug hooking
and spinning demonstrations,
and exhibits on area culture in-
cluding tuscarora and prehistoric
Indians, 100 million year old
fossils, Civil War cannonballs,
tobacco and farming equipment,
and items typical of housekeep-
ing during the last 200 years.
There's even a moonshine still.
And, of course, a "Shad Room"
depicting the 15 year history of
the Grifton festival and the
geneology of Mo shad.
Mo's fll name is "Eat Mo'
Shad" ana he was born on the de-
ment counterweight of an old
bridge in early 1974, the graffiti
son of a phantom artist who has
never been identified. Mo'
descendants include "Mozod"
who resembles his cousin Izod
Alligator in size and habitat.
Have A
Happy Halloween
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$185 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
tional cost. Pregnancy Test, Birth Control,
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For fur-
ther information call 832-0535 (Toll Free
Number 1-800-532-5384) between 9A.M and
5P.M. weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 W�tt Morton St
RoUi�li,NC
1
Come Ploy
This Fall"
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Grifton, NC
CHRISTMAS IN NOVEMBER
CJOA
P JidAAJ &� �lcu�U
UAt,

mcU?
jfcTc.(J
?07. vj)
Jt
lauj?
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TKZO&s
ECU's Album Station
Celebrates
CHRISTMAS IN
NOVEMBER
FROM NOVEMBER 1st through the 30th
WZMB will give away GREAT GIFTS
donated by ECU Supporters:
Carolina Opry House
Subway
JB. 's Island Seafood
Pirate's Chest
Bucaneer Movies
Piquant Alley
Blue Moon Cafe
Apple Records
Shirt Printery
Pappa Katz
Record Bar
Frank's Pizza
Olde Towne Inn
Jeffrey's Beer & Wine
Marsh's Surf & Sea
New Deli
For Heads Only
Pepsi
H. L. Hodges�Bonds
Attic
Wash Pub
Tune your dial to 91.3fm
and find out how you can win
LISTEN FOR THE
JINGLE BELLS
757-6657 the winning number
YES, VIRGINIA, THERE IS AN ALTERNATIVE!
���
�MMMMMMi
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i






i
THE EAST i AROl INIAN
Sports
(X TOBl R JO, 1984 Page 10
South Carolina Now 7-0
National Title In Sight For Morrison, Gamecocks
B RANDY MEWS
sporu f .in. .
COLUMBIA, S.C. Reserve quarterback Mike Hold and
runningback Kent Hagood combined for 328 yards Saturday
to lead eighth tanked South Carolina to a 42-20 football vic-
tor ovei ECl
Mien Mitchell started the game for the Gamecocks, but he
proved ineffective as his team fell behind 10-7 early in the se-
cond quarter I S( coach Joe Morrison then inserted Hold
with 12:2" left in the first half, and on his first play from
scrimmage, he connected with Ira Hillary for a 71-yard
touchdown reception.
Hold, who completed nine o 16 passes for 210 yards, con-
tinued his assault on the Pirate secondary later in the second
quarter when he lotted a 26 yard touchdown score to Chris
Corley to give the Gamecocks a comfortable 21-10 halftime
lead
Although both teams played a good first half of football,
Corley's reception marked the first sustained drive by either
team in the opening two quarters as Hold marched his team 68
ards in six plays.
Prior to that, il had been a game of big plays. USC opened
the scoi ing on a 74-yard Hagood (12 carries, 118 yards) romp
from scrimmage dnd Hold's 71-yard aerial, while ECU scored
on a 64-yard bomb from Darrell Speed to Ricky Nichols and a
44-yard Jeff Heath feild goal.
The Pirates played a suprisingly good half of football in
front of the 73,800 gathered at iliiams-Brice Stadium, but as
has happened main times throughout the course of the
season, several defensive lapses gave the opposition a halftime
lead the didn't deserve.
On Hagood's "4-yard dash down the sideline, the Pirate
defense appeared to have Mitchell wrapped up on an option
play, bui i S?'s starting quarterback pitched the ball as he
was going down - and Hagood did the rest.
Also, on Hold s 4-ard touchdown pass, ECU's secondary
appeared to break down as the Pirate defender covering the
play didn't react to the ball until it was already in the air, leav-
ing Hillary wide open to coast into the endzone.
In the second half, Hold engineered a perfect drive as he
carried his team S9 yards in 10 plays to give the Gamecocks a
28-10 advantage with 7:45 left in the third quarter.
Hold threw for 51 yards during the drive, ran for another 25
on an option and then pitched wide to Thomas Dendy who ran
it in from seven yards out for the score.
On the next series, Speed got ECU moving when he hit
Henry Williams for a 40-yard pick up to move the ball just 25
yards shy of the endzone. But Speed sustained a minor injury
on the next play, and reserve quarterback Ron Jones was call-
ed to duty.
Jones was able to move the team to another first down to
the 14, but on an attempted option play, he lost control of the
pitch and the Gamecocks recovered.
South Carolina returned the favor three plays later on a
Dendy fumble, and ECU once again had a chance as they took
over on USC's 42-yard line.
The Pirates moved the ball down to the 22-yard line, but an
illegal motion penalty halted the drive, and ECU had to settle
for a 44-yard Heath field goal.
USC put the game out of reach on their next series as they
drove 80 yards in just six plays. Raynard Brown and Quinton
Lewis ripped off runs of 21 and 15 yards respectively to move
the ball to ECU's 42-yard line. From there, Lewis lofted a
balloon on a halfback-option pass that appeared a likely target
for an interception, but Eric Poole stole the ball from ECU's
Keith Ford on the one-yard line. Lewis then carried the ball
over on the next play to give the Cocks a commanding 35-13
lead with 11:46 left in the game.
The two teams traded touchdowns in the final minutes of
play to close out the scoring at 42-20.
Pirate head coach Ed Emory said his team's inability to take
advantage of good field position and poor play by the secon-
dary cost ECU the game, but he also gave credit to his con-
queror.
"Joe Morrison and his staff have built a great program
here, and if they keep playing with the same enthusiasm as
they throughout the season, thev'll have a shot at going all the
way
Emory also said that despite the loss, this was one of the
most enjoyable road trips of the year for his team, and he
hopes the series can continue beyond next year's last scheduled
meeting between the two teams in Ficklen Stadium.
MICHAEL SMITH � ECU Hw'c Lat
Kent Hagood ran for 118 yards and a touchdown on onl 12 carries as he helped South
Carolina defeat ECU 42-20 Saturday afternoon in Columbia.
Swim Team Holds Annual Intrasquad Meet
B KICKMcCOKMAC
Sufi Wrllcf
Both the men and women
swimmers staged their annual
Purple and Gold competition
Thu nighl in Minges
Natatorium, with both the men's
and women's races being very
evenly matched.
In the men's competition, both
the Purple and the Gold team
ended up with points, and the
results in :h.e women's battle were
nearly as close as the Purple team
defeated the Gold team 56 to 55.
In the men's competition,
Bruce Brockshmidt and Keith
Kaut leu the way for the Purple
team, with Brockschmidt winn-
ing bo?r; the 200 freestyle and the
200 butterfly, as well as par-
pating � winning 400
freestyle relay team.
Kaut wi in the 100 freestyle, as
well as the 50 freestyle, and par-
ticipated on the winning 400
freestyle reiav team.
Also performing well for the
Purple team was St rat on Smith
who won the 200 backstroke, and
finished second in the 200 in-
dividual medley.
Chris Pittelli was the leading
performer for the Gold team,
finishing first in the 200 in-
dividual medley, as well as swim-
ming on the winning 400 medley
relay team. Pittelli also had a se-
cond place finish in the 100
freestyle.
Pat Brennan also had two first
place finishes for the Gold team,
capturing both the 200
breaststroke and the 1000
freestyle.
Andy Cook won the 500
freestyle as well as a second in the
200 freestyle.
In the women's competition,
the winning Purple team was led
by Scotia Miller who finished
first in the 500 freestyle, second
in the 200 freestyle and par-
ticipated on the winning 400
freestyle relay team.
Nancy James won the 100
freestyle and "finished second in
the 50 freestyle.
Caycee Poust also had a first
and second place finish, as she
captured the 200 individual
medley and was the runner-up in
the 200 backstroke.
Chris Holman was the leading
swimmer for the Gold team as
she won both the 200 backstroke,
and 200 freestyle. Holman was
also on the Gold team's winning
400 medley relay team.
Jenni Pierson also won two
events for the Gold team, and
had a second place finish. Pier-
son was on the winning 400
medley relay team, and she won
the 50 freestyle. Her second place
finish was in the 100 freestyle.
ECU coach Rick Kobe was
very pleased with both team's
performance in the Purple and
Gold competition.
"They swam as well as we
could have been expected Kobe
said. "I'm very pleased with the
performances of both the men's
and women's teams. We swam
some times that you really don't
expect to see until later in the
season.
"We are exactly where we want
to be, both the men's and
women s teams were very im-
pressive
The top finishers for the men's
competition and the team they
swam for:
400 Medley Relay: Scott
Robinson, Al Smith, Gregor
Wrav, Chris Pittelli (Gold),
3:45.5.
1000 Freestyle: Pat Brennan
(Gold), 10:02; Chema Larranaga,
10:04.5 (Purple).
200 Freestyle: Bruce
Brockschmidt (Purple) 1:46.6;
Andy Cook (Gold) 1:46.7.
50 Freestyle: Keith Kaut (Pur-
ple) 22.3; Jeff Brown 23.7
(Gold).
200 Individual Medley: Chris
Pittelli (Gold) 2:02.5; Stratton
Smith 2:03.5 (Purple).
200 Butterfly: Bruce
Brockschmidt (Purple) 1:56.4;
Gregor Wray 2:02.5 (Gold).
100 Freestyle: Keith Kaut (Pur-
ple) 48.5; Chris Pittelli 49.9
(Gold).
200 Background: Stratton
Smith (Purple) 2:03.8; Kevin
Hidalgo 2:05.3 (Gold).
500 Freestyle: Andy Cook
(Gold) 4:54; Chema Larranaga
4:57 (Purple).
200 Breaststroke: Pat Brennan
(Gold) 2:16.4; Lee Hicks 2:16.6
(Purple).
400 Freestyle Relay: Tim
Baker, Keith Kaut, Scott Strub-
inger, Bruce Brockschmidt (Pur-
ple) 3:20.4.
One-meter Diving: 1. Scott
Eagle (Purple). 2. Paul Durkin
(Gold).
Three-meter Diving: 1. Paul
Durkin (Gold), 2. Scott Eagle
(Purple).
The top finishers and the team
they swam for in the women's
competition:
400 Medley Relay: Chris
Holman, Joelle Ennis, Jill
Gorenflo, Jenni Pierson (Gold)
4:41.1.
1000 Freestyle: Tracy. Hope
(Purple) 11:43.6; Vicky Langrehr
11:54.9.
200 Freestvle: Chris Holman
(Gold) 2:01; Scotia Miller 2:02.6
(Purple).
50 Freestvle: Jenni Pier-
(Gold) 26.4; Nancy James 26.5
(Purple).
200 Individual Medley: Caycee
Poust (Purple) 2:19.8; Nancy
Ludwig 2:25.6 (Purple).
200 Butterflv: Annete Burton
(Gold) 2:19.6; Jill Gorenflo
2:23.7 (Gold).
100 Freestyle: Nancy James
(Purple) 57.9; Jenni Pierson 59.0
(Gold).
2(Xj Backstroke. Chris Holman
(Gold) 2:15.2; Caycee Poust
2:19.8 (Purple).
500 Freestyle: Scotia Miller
(Purple) 5:25.8; Jenni Pierson
5:26.4 (Gold).
200 Breaststroke; Jessica Fein-
bunz (Purple) 2:36; Joelle Ennis
2 J8.8 (Gold).
400 Freestyle Relay: Ellen
McPherson. Tracy Hope, Scotia
Miller. Donna Bullock (Purple)
3:54.
One-Meter Diving: 1. Lori
Miller (Gold), 2. Nancy Jackson
(Purple).
Three-Meter Diving; 1. Lori
Miller (Gold). 2. Nancy Jackson
(Purple).
Williams Shines In Defeat
MICHAEL SMITH � ICU Mwt La
Standout ECU return man Henry Williams looks for running room against South Carolina last weekend.
Williams returned two kickoffs for 82 yards.
By SCOTT COOPER
Staff Wrlur
Despite a 42-20 loss to eighth
ranked South Carolina on Satur-
day, senior flanker Henry
Williams displayed his impressive
running ability.
Williams returned five punts
for a total of 83 yards. One
return went for a touchdown un-
til the referee said that Williams
stepped out of bounds near mid-
field. However, the capacity
crowd of 73,800 did get to see the
patented Henry Williams flip.
In kickoff returns, Williams
was almost flawless. In only two
chances to make a return,
Williams totalled 82 yards. His
longest return was for 47 yards in
which he was one tackle from go-
ing all the way.
The reason Henry only got two
chances on kickoff returns was
due to the Gamecocks kicking the
ball out of the endzone.
"We had a lot of concern with
Williams all week during prac-
tice, and he almost broke a cou-
ple on Saturday Gamecock
head coach Joe Morrison com-
mented. "That's why we had
Hagler (USC kicker) kicking the
ball out of the endzone
Tt was really frustrating for
me � their coach (Morrison)
didn't want to take that chance
Williams said. "I believe I could
have broke one or two if I got
some more chances, but I don't
blame him for doing that
Although ECU let the game
slip away in the second half,
Williams played well enough to
put the Pirates in good position
when given the chance. "The aim
of the special teams is to get good
field position Williams remark-
ed. "Against a team like South
Carolina you've got to be in good
field position
Last season Williams led the
nation in kickoff returns (31.1
yard average). This year he's 41st
nationally, though his output
against the Gamecocks should
move him up considerably. "I've
had a few ups and downs earlier
this season he said, "but I
think I had one of the best per-
formances I've had all year
against South Carolina
After his celebrated junior
season. Williams became the
focus of many scouts around the
country. "I'm not trying to im-
press anybody, I just want the
team to win Williams com-
mented. "If they (the scouts)
think I'm good enough to play.
I'm going to take that chance
Although Williams will be
looked at by professional scouts
in his last two games, he knows
practice is just as important.
"Everyday in practice, I make it
like a game Henry said. "I give
it all my effort and try to keep
everybody pumped up
With Ricky Nichols having a
big day receiving, Henry was only
able to catch one pass, but it went
for 40 yards. He expects to be
more a part of the passing game
in the futureI go out and con-
centrate on the ball Williams
explained. "I practice my pass
routes. It has paid off, and
hopefully it will continue to
Henry had an impressive high
school career at Rosa Fort High
School in Tunica, Mississippi. He
was the most valuable player and
leading scorer in his senior year.
He also holds the state record
in the long jump with a mark of
24' 5 and was the track team's
most valuable player finishing
third in the 100 and 200 meters at
the state championships.
Before coming to ECU, Henry
played at Northwest Junior Col-
lege in Senatobia, Miss. He was
All-Miss Jr. College second team
in 1981. Also, he was Jr. College
Ail-American and a member of
the JUCO national All-Star
team. His team won the National
Junior College Championship in
1982. Henry also holds the
Mississippi state record in the
200-meter dash with a time of
21.6. His junior college coach
Bobby Ray Franklin said Henrv
was most coordinated and by far
the best special teams player that
he had ever coached.
"No. 15 was the fastest guy
that I've ever played against
Gamecock defensive back Rick
Rabune stated. "That's why we
needed pressure on the quarter-
back from our big guys
Henry credited the Gamecocks
for their play against the Pirates.
"They capitalized on our
mistakes Williams explained.
"If they continue to play the way
they are, they have a chance to go
all the way
"We have to take each game
one by one � like Coach Emory-
said Williams remarked. "And
I hope that everything will turn
out all right
Henry Williams has dazzled
Pirate fans for almost two years,
and chances are you can expect
him to give the NFL something to
flip over in the years to come.
lemsoft
B Bill MIK HE1 I
M�� �dlt.
Pa
Here's how last Carolina
ponents did in their games on ei
Saturday the 27th.
Florida State: The Seminoies nad C
go open date this eek
Temple: A tackle b soph
linebacker Vince Dan
safets gase Virgina Tech
ning margin .er Ten ;
game on Saturday a (,r
defeated the Owl, v 7 Da:
safets ,ame in the
after the bail was fumbled o
Punt, Pass
�yJEANNETTE ROTH
S4�r? �-n-
While the n
season is ; .
other activities ha
with some exciting i
The punt, pa- � .
petition ended I
Holland ai nnie R.
winning the ovei i
and womei s divi
by. Runner- ever.
Bob Corns a:
Surf Club
B I)Ar01 B
The ECL Sr- I ea
ver actie
off to a good stat
�etitr.e ea
were r
weather
ide .
Tver fall breal
seph
rases d .
raves on some c
ten fe
The Pira'r a
jo: contest SaturJ �
Emerald Ke N C The
was decla:
Cess a- over
individual and si �
or the schcx It .
s determined b
made up of one surfer ft
team. Judges
and points are aw
ing in each heat. Conditions �
excellent early in I
formed three to four I sc-
rolled in. By mid-afta
however, the-well wa
only about two fee: ECL'
surfers Bobb Ra - 5k
chins. Johnny Ghee
Craig Burns arc: C i
San: were all surl
end of the contest, ECl 'A'
team was tied with UNC-W
"A" team foi t �
In the one-on-one . I
Bobby Ra
Tracy Peter- oi L N( V
leahawks took top u
Coming up for th
a Thanks�- na trie
H,
DON'T Ml
Get
Sandwiches
'e kecJtMi
3rd Anniversl
Buy Any Foo
Get The Secon
Saturday N
llam-l
Delivery Co
i i ii��
f
i






V
!

1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 30. 1984
11
I
:HACl SM'Th - ECU Wwto Lab
inies as be helped South
Meet
.Ties 26.5
dley: Caycee - 19.8; Nancy Tie). Annete Burton Jill Gorenflo
Nanc . Jenni PierJames son 59.0
roke. t nn$ iyceHoJman Poust
Miller Pierson
ca Fein-le Ennis
Relay: Ellen : Hope, Scotia ;k (Purple)
-1. Lon Jackson
ring; - N :1. Lori Jackson
efeat
holds the state record
tnp with a mark of
i md was the track team's
iiuable player finishing
the 100 and 200 meters at
championships.
� coming to ECU, Henry
N 'west Junior Col-
fknatobia. Miss. He was
Jr. College second team
he was Jr College
and a member of
O national All-Star
won the National
�liege Championship in
Henry also holds the
ioi state record in the
dash with a time of
junior college coach
ay Franklin said Henry
kt coordinated and by far
special teams player that
pver coached.
5 vvas the fastest guy
ever played against
:k defensive back Rick
tated. "That's why we
essure on the quarter-
m our big guys "
credited the Gamecocks
play, against the Pirates.
:apitalized on our
i Wilhams explained.
continue to play the way
they have a chance to go
la "
lave to take each game
ie � like Coach Emory
illiams remarked. "And
lat everything will turn
?ht
Williams has dazzled
is for almost two years,
kes are you can expect
Ve the NFL something to
lin the years to come
.i


I-
s
Clemson
By BILL MITCHELL
SuttWrttCT
Here's how East Carolina's op-
ponents did in their games on
Saturday the 27th.
Florida State: The Seminoles had
an open date this week.
temple: A tackle by sophomore
linebacker Vince Danials for a
safety gave Virgina Tech the win-
ning margin over Temple in their
came on Saturday, as thev
defeated the Owls 9-7. Danials
safety came in the second quarter
alter the ball was fumbled on a
handoff from Lee Saltz to Paul
Palmer.
Central Michigan: Bowling
Green lost to the Chippiwa's of
Central Michigan 42-21 in a rout
on Saturday. Tailback Curtis
Adams had a great game, as did
quarterback Ron Fillmore. Cen-
tral Michigan plays Northern Il-
linois next week.
Georgia Southern: The Golden
Eagles trounced Valdosta State
38-8 in a 1-AA game on Satur-
day. Tracy Ham, the quarterback
of the Golden Eagles, had
another good game. The Eagles
play Pirate opponent East Ten-
nesse State next week.
N.C.State: The Wolfpack piled
up 378 yards of total offense
against the league's toughest
defense and held a very powerfull
offense to 100 yards in the second
quarter, but despite all this lost
35-34 to Clemson on Saturday.
Turnovers were the key thing that
kept State from victory. Two lost
fumbles were turned into
touchdowns for the Tigers, and
Wolfp
Navy
they also picked off two intercep-
tions. State was leading at the
half 24-21, but in the first four
minutes of the third quarter
Clemson scored two touchdowns.
State was able to come back but
fell just short.
Pittsburgh: Sophomore quarter-
back Bill Byrne ran for a
touchdown, threw for another,
and passed for the tying two-
point conversion in an amazing
13 second span to help Navy tie
Pitt 28-28. The Midshipman trail-
ed 28-14 with 1:28 remaining
Punt, Pass And Kick Winners Crowned
By JEANNETTE ROTH
While the intramural soccer
season is just getting underway,
other activities have finished up
with some exciting results.
The punt, pass and kick com-
ration ended with Stuart
Holland and Johnnie R. Prott
winning the overall in the men's
women's division respective-
Runners-up in the event were
Bob Corris and Tracv Cole.
Old intramural records were
crushed during the men's seg-
ment of the contest as Stuart
Holland set two new records in
both the punting and kicking
events, while Russell Ebelber also
set a new record in the passing
event with a toss of 176' 2
Individual honors in the
women's division went to Tracy
Cole with a punt of 80' 6
Maureen Jicka in the passing
competition and Johnnie Pratt
kicking for the individual victory.
Surf Club A ctive
By DAVE COLBY
C oathbuiiBf U hirr
The ECU Surf Team has been
r) active this semester and is
fi to a good start in the com-
petitive season. The team try-outs
were postponed due to bad
v eat her but were finally held in
ideal conditions at Cape Hatteras
ver fall break. Hurricane
sephine produced excellent
aves during the tryouts with
aves on some days reaching six
to ten feet.
The Pirates also hosted a ma-
jor contest Saturday, Oct. 27, at
nerald Isle N.C. The contest
.as declared a tremendous suc-
cess as over 70 surfers competed
idividuaily and six teams battled
or the school title. Team scoring
is determined by six-man heats
made up of one surfer from each
.earn. Judges score each wave
and points are awarded for plac-
ing in each heat. Conditions were
excellent early in the day as we!I-
ToTined tViTee to four foot waves
rolled in. By mid-afternoon,
wever, the swell was reduced to
only about two feet. ECU's top
rfers Bobby Rains, Scott Cut-
ins, Johnny Ghee, Cliff Scott,
�aig Burns and Gordon Van-
Sani were all surfing well. At the
d of the contest, ECU's "A"
am was tied with UNC-W's
'A" team for top team honors.
the one-on-one surf-off ECU's
bby Rains was defeated by
ic Peters of UNC-W as the
Neahawks took top team honors.
Coming up for the surf team is
a Thanksgiving triD to Florida to
compete in a tournament with ten
other schools. The Pirates finish-
ed second last year in the tourna-
ment.
Anyone interested in joining
the ECU Surf Club or Team
should call Dave Colby at
"58-2392 for more information
or attend the meeting this Thurs-
day night in 221 Mendenhall. A
30-minute video of Hawaii's
North Shore surfing will be
shown at the meeting. Guys and
gals are all welcome.
Spikers Win
By TONY BROWN
SUff Wrttr
The ECU volleyball team snap-
ped a 16-game losing streak in an
unusual way � they beat a team
that wasn't on their schedule!
After falling to St. Andrews
Saturday in two straight games
15-8. 15-7, the Pirates beat Lyn-
chburg 15-9. 15-11 � a team
which, through an administrative
scheduling error, didn't appear
on ECU's printed schedule.
Traci Smith and Martha Mc-
Quillan starred for ECU, but er-
rors were too much to overcome
against St. Andrews. "It's good
to get a win said Coach Im-
ogene Turner. "We still were
disorganized, though she add-
ed. "We hope we can close on a
good note
The Pirates are at home
tonight against Atlantic Christian
at 7 p.m.
House of Hats
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In the finals of the co-rec soft-
ball tournament, Sig Ep and
Friends defeated the Dodge City
Hustlers to win the season after
defeating the No. 1 ranked Mixed
Sticks.
Co-Rec flag football, bowling
and co-rec tennis are only in the
beginning stages with teams
geared up to toss, roll and smash
their way into the championship
playoffs.
Soccer matches have just
begun but there are several teams
showing up first in various divi-
sions. LAGNEF has a 2-0 record
in the men's residence hall divi-
sion. In men's independent
games, the NADS are on top.
Alpha Delta Pi and Chi Omega
are both leading the women's
divisions also boasting 2-0
records.
The tennis tournament is boun-
cing along as Jackson Cecil and
Rogerson Thomas prepare to
compete in the semi-finals. The
open divisions are up for grabs as
several players continue to knock
out competitors on their way to
victory.
Track meet results will be
publicized as soon as the events
are over along with all the results
of other intramural activities.
PERSONAL DENTIST
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when Byrne scored and Todd
Solomen missed the point after.
Then Navy picked up the onside
kick to get the ball back. He then
threw a 16-yard scoring pass to
John Lobb witn 4 left. They
tied it up with a pass to Mark
Stevens to set off a wild celebra-
tion on the bench. Pittsburgh is
now 1-6-1 on the season.
Tulsa: Texas Tech defeated Tulsa
on Saturday 20-17. The Hur-
ricanes only had 73 yards rushing
to Texas Tech's 441. Nate Harris,
defensive back for Tulsa did have
a good game though, as he picked
off three Tech passes. Tech had
to score 14 points in the fourth
quarter to get back into the game,
and only won the game with a
field goal with only 1:56 left in
the game.
East Tennessee State: James
Madison lost to the Buccaneers
9-6 on Saturday. Irving Campell,
the kicker, did all of the scoring
for ETSU with three field goals
He kicked the last one with 10
seconds left to go in the game to
win the game. They play Georgia
Southern next week.
South Carolina: see page 10.
Southwest Louisiana: The Ragin
Cajun's defeated Southern
Mississippi 13-7 in a game that
was tight down to the wire. SW
Louisiana scored first on a
71-yard pass from Don Wallace
to Pierre Perkins. That was it un-
til the third quarter when
Southern Miss' Tom Compton
ran it in for seven on a fake field
goal try. Tom Brossard kicked a
field goal to put the Cajun's up
10-7, but then Southern Miss
drove down to the 2 yardline. The
defense held, and Brossard wa-
able to kick one more field goal
to put the game out of reach.
Southern Miss: The Eagles lost to
USL. See above.
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12
I HI I AS: CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 30, ls84
Men Netters Take Fifth At
ECAC-South Tournament
B TONY BROWN
SMWita
The ECU men's tennis team
ended the fall season on a good
note despite a fifth-place finish in
the ECAC-South Tournament
over the weekend.
1 he only seeded position
awarded the Pirates was a
number four seed to Davis Bagley
at the number six singles spot. Six
FCC plaers drew the top-two
seeded players as opponents in
the first round, but good play in
the consolation brackets in-
dicated the team will be ready for
a repeat of last year's fine spring
season.
Alter losing in the first round,
Dan 1 aMont led the way for the
Pirates with a convincing 10-1
win over Phillipe Pauget of
American University in the semi-
finals of the consolation, then
took lhe finals with a hustling
6 4, o 2 effort over William &
Mar Mike Siancak.
Galen Treble also took a con-
solation victory in a hard-fought
battle with W&M's Kevin
Kearns. After easily handling
American University's Matt
1 ong 10 2. 1 reble fell behind 3-1
against Kearns in the first set but
came back to win 7-5 in a tie-
breaker, then repeated the same
score for the title.
David Creech gai. ed yet
another consolation title for the
Pirates after losing a valiant ef-
fort against no. two seed John
Christensen of Richmond.
Creech won the first set 6-2, but
the momentum shifted as
Christensen rallied in the last two
sets 6-4, 7-5 to defeat Creech.
Creech didn't let the close first
round loss affect him, though, as
he rallied to take the consolation
title. First beating David McGee
of UNC-W 10-8, he went on to
play an outstanding series against
George Mason's Dave Sileo.
Following a 6-3 loss in the open-
ing set, Creech fought back for
two 6-4 sets to take win.
Greg Willis had the misfortune
of drawing the top seed in both
his first-round singles and
doubles matches. He fell to
number one seed Scott McTeer of
Richmond 6-2, 6-2, then lost to
Dan Gilsenan of UNC-
Wilmington 10-7 in the pro set of
the consolations.
Willis' score was almost
duplicated as the no. three seed
from James Madison, Gary
Schendell, handed ECU's David
Turner a 6-1, 6-2 loss in the
opener, then Turner dropped a
close one in the first round of the
consolation by an identical 10-7
score.
Davis Bagley captured the only
first round victory for the Pirates
against Tommy Allen of UNC-W
6-2, 6-3, but lost out in the semi-
finals against James Madison's
no. one seed Rob Smith 6-1,6-1.
Booters Drop Three
fc. I t?1 y"l .lV T
B SCOII POWERS
Itatstani sport I dtiw
The soccer
Spiders of K:
com
team tell to the
:hmond Sunday.
a string of defeats
dating back to ct. 10 when they
defeated Virginia Wesleyan.
1 he loss, which was the Pirates
fifth in a row, culminated a
disappointing week for coach
Steve Rrod 's charges.
The team began the week with
a 7-0 loss at the hands of Navy on
Oct. 21. in what Brody called an
all-around bad display by the
team.
" V t let Nav take the game to
us Brody said. "I think that
out players were in awe of their
program.
"V hen we goi out on the field,
we realized that they weren't that
bul we never did take the
game to them
The team then travelled to
James Madison on October 23,
and there they played the Dukes
tighth before finally succumbing
3-2.
The Pirates' scoring was done
by Brian Colgan, who had two
goals in the losing cause.
The game was played in wet
conditions, and Brody thinks that
the poor field conditions hurt his
team.
"The field had a lot to do with
our play he commented. "We
should have won the game, but
all three o their scores were
stupid ones. Jesse Daugherty (the
Pirates goalkeeper) didn't play a
very good game
The team's third loss of the
week came at the hands of Rich-
mond Saturday. Once again, as
has been the story for most of the
season, the booters fell behind
early, only to see their comeback
efforts fall short.
After falling behind early in
the first half 2-0, the team rallied
to pull within 2-1 late in the half
when David Pere scored his first
goal of the season. Pere scored
again early in the second half to
draw the Pirates into a tie with
Richmond at 2-2. From there on
out, however, the Spiders took
control of the scoring as they ad-
ded two more second half goals
to take the victory 4-2.
"We just broke down on
defense Brody said. "We gave
ip four stupid goals in the game.
We had chances to win the game,
but we didn't capitalize on
them
With the losses, the team's
record fell to 2-13-1, and with all
chances for a winning season
lost, they must now regroup and
try to finish the season on a
positive note.
"Considering all of the losses,
the team is doing about as well as
expected Brody commented on
the morale of the team. "We've
played six or seven games in a
row that we should have won, but
we just haven't done it
The team will try to rebound
against William & Mary at home
tomorrow before traveling to
North Carolina Wesleyan to par-
ticipate in the N. C. Wesleyan
Classic Nov. 3-4, before closing
their season with home games
against UNC-Wilmington on
Nov. 5 and Christopher Newport
on Nov. 7.
In the doubles play, ECU ad-
vanced to two consolation semi-
finals, but failed to win any titles.
Willis and Turner lost the open-
ing round match against Trinka-
Hanfling of James Madison 6-3,
6-3, then came back with a semi-
final consolation win over
Gilsenan and Gratz of UNC-W.
The Pirates lost out in the finals
to Geiger-Young of George
Mason 4-6, 6-0, 6-4.
Avery-Creech made the con-
solation finals after losing a
tough 6-3, 3-6, 3-6 match against
no. one seed Wagner-Stuart of
Navy. ECU gained the finals by
defeating UNC-W's Mauer-
Bowen 10-5, but lost the finals vs
Sileo-Masters of George Mason
4-6, 6-0, 6A.
Coach Pat Sherman viewed the
tournament and fall season play-
as much improved over last year,
despite similar overall records.
"We've upgraded our level of
competition greatly she said.
"Dan LaMont played a super
tournament she added, saying
"He continued his super hustle
and smart, controlled play
"Treble played his best mat-
ches of the fall" Sherman said.
"Creech played the best tennis of
his life at the ECAC-South
tourney and Scott and Avery
played the finest match I have
seen any ECU doubles learn play
in the past three years
Sherman found the tourna-
ment results indicative of the
Pirates' ability to compete very
strongly in the fall season. "This
team represented ECU well she
said. "We're looking forward u
a good spring season.
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VOLUME 1
STILL ON SALE
ONLY 9
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 30, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 30, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.371
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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