The East Carolinian, October 25, 1984






�rf�
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No. 18
Thursday October 25, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Gov. James B
Hospital while
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Hunt. Jr spoke to staff members at the ECU School of Medicine and Pitt Memorial
visiting Greenville Tuesdav.
Art Damaged By Vandals
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nfwi I dii cm
An incident of vandalism last
weekend which caused approx-
imately $10,000 worth of damage
in the Jenkins Fine Arts Building
has caused evening access to the
building to be limited.
According to Gene McAbee of
the Department of Public Safety,
the vandalism was reported at
2:40 a.m. Sunday, Oct. 20. One
sculpture worth $7,500 was
destroyed, as were a number of
smaller sculptures. In addition, a
glass case on the 2nd floor was
turned over and shattered and a
caws on ttic 1st floor was broken.
McAbee said three juveniles
were found in the building at the
time the vandalism was
discovered but can't be connected
with the incident. He added .hat
anyone with information should
contact the Department of Public
Safety.
As a response to the van-
dalism, Edward Levine, dean of
the School of Art, has ordered
the building locked between 1
and 7 a.m. Monday through Fri-
day, and between midnight and 7
a.m. on Saturday and Sunday.
The building had been left open
all night for the past several
years.
"We want to try to curtail this
kind of activity he said.
"We've had sporadic vandalism
for the last couple of months and
the faculty members don't recall
ever having so much
The destruction, Levine said,
"is very difficult to understand
Norman Keller, a faculty
member, owned the $7,500
sculpture. "I'd been working on
it for over 10 years and had just
finished it this summer he said.
"A good piece of my life was tied
up in that stone
The sculpture was marble and
weighed approximately 900 lbs
Keller said. In addition, five
students' works were destroyed.
"Every stone in the process of be-
ing carved by students was
broken he said.
Keller said it must have taken
"quite some time" to destroy the
works. "Whoever did it racked
up a healthy destruction binge.
'It seems like every
Homecoming weekend we get a
great increase in vandalism at the
School of Art Keller added. He
said this act of vandalism was
"the straw that broke the camel's
back" and everyone in the school
will end up suffering because of
it. "
"It ends up affecting 750
students he said. "I hope the
police manage to pin this thing
ECU Capital Requests
Approved By UNC Board
ByG.J.RIDEOLT
Mantling Editor
The UNC Board of Governors
approved capital improvement
requests for ECU totaling $19
million in a Friday meeting at
Chapel Hill. The total operation
and capital improvement budget
for the entire 16-member system
is a record $1 billion. The budget
requests now go to the Advisory
Budget Commission which makes
recommendations to the General
Assembly, scheduled to convene
in February 1985.
The major item for ECU is a
sports medicinephysical educa-
tion facility with a projected cost
of $8 million. The facility would
be the first major expansion of
the sports facilities in 17 years.
Chancellor John M. Howell said
the new building would take the
pressure off of other sports
buildings.
Howell expects to have an ex-
panding sports medicine program
at ECU in the future. The
medical facilities already here
makes this area ideal for such a
program, Howell said.
Other requests made by the
Board of Governors include a
biotechnology lab, with a cost of
SI.9 million and a building to
house a nuclear magnetic
resonance machine at a cost of
close to $1 million. These two
items, upon approval, will be
built with funds from the medical
family practice plan. The NMR
building requires special con-
struction materials.
Another item for ECU includes
a birthing center at the School of
Medicine, which carries a price of
$1.25 million. The present center
is overcrowded, according to
Howell.
Howell is optimistic about get-
ting the items approved by the
Board of Governors passed by
the General Assemblv. He feels
they are basically needed.
Major renovations requested
by ECU for the 1985-87 capital
improvement funds are:
Memorial
million for
facilities.
gymnasium, $3.8
improvement of
Graham building (geology),
$1.35 million for updating of the
facilities.
Old Cafeteria building
$595,000 for repairs.
The Board of Governors also
approved a 7 percent faculty
salary increase. Howell says the
board hopes to correct the im-
balance that occured last year
when the General Assembly gave
public school teachers 5 percent
more money than university
teachers.
Hunt Campaigns At ECU,
Discusses Tobacco At Rally
(UPI) � While making a cam-
paign swing through eastern
North Carolina Tuesday, Gov.
James Hunt pledged to push for
laws to rescue the state's
beleagured tobacco industry and
accused Sen. Jesse Helms of fail-
ing to stand up for farmers.
Both Helms and Hunt wooed
voters in North Carolina's tobac-
co country. Helms, chairman of
the Senate Agriculture Commit-
tee, told farmers Congress will
kill the tobacco and peanut pro-
grams unless he is elected to a
third term.
Hunt proposed a four-point
tobacco program and charged
that Helms has done nothing to
help farmers.
"My opponent says farmers
ought to vote for him because he
is chairman of the Senate
Agriculture Committee. Yet I
haven't heard him propose a
single new idea about how to save
our tobacco program Hunt
told farmers in a Greenville
tobacco warehouse.
"The real question in this race
is not which candidate can best
maintain the status quo. The
status quo is killing our
farmers Hunt said.
Hunt proposed that the federal
government reduce its tobacco
stockpile by offering discounts to
companies that buy tobacco col-
lected from previous seasons.
Under the tobacco program,
the Flue-cured Tobacco Stabiliza-
tion Corp. buys tobacco from
farmers who cannot sell their
crop for the minimum price.
The federally financed agency
now has stockpiled nearly $1.5
billion worth of tobacco, chiefly
because rising foreign imports
have cut into the domestic
market. Farmers pay storage and
interest charges on the stockpiled
tobacco.
"I suggest that for every pound
of tobacco companies buv from
1982 and 1983 crops, they be
given a pound of pre-1983 tobac-
co, with the Commodity Credit
Corp. absorbing the losses
Hunt said.
"The two programs of greatest
interest to the most North Caroli-
nians � tobacco and peanuts �
both of those programs will be
killed if North Carolina loses its
chairman of the Senate
Agriculture Committee Helms
said.
Hunt also visited the ECU
School of Medicine Pitt
Memorial Hospital where he talk-
ed with staff and patients. "I
would like to see organized
recognition of medical services
he said, adding that he was
"pleased" to see the medical
school serving eastern North
Carolina.
Hunt spent several hours in the
Greenville area, speaking to
senior citizens at the Holiday Inn.
A large number of med school
staff members turned out to greet
him, along with Dr. William
Laupus, dean of the School of
Medicine. He toured the facilities
brieflv.
Almost All Counties
Represented In Fall
Enrollment Of 13,827
ECU New, Bureau
Except for four small moun-
tain counties, every county in
the state of North Carolina is
represented in ECU'S student
body this fall.
And there are ECU students
from 46 of the 50 states plus
the District of Columbia, the
Canal Zone and Puerto Rico.
The 156 foreign students on
campus come from 45 dif-
ferent countries.
As usual, the bulk of
ECU's student enrollment �
67.8 percent of the in-state
total of 11,364 students �
comes from eastern North
Carolina, counties lying to the
east of Interstate 95, according
to figures compiled by-
Registrar Gilbert Moore.
Leading the list is Pitt
County with 2,109 students
followed by Wake with 958
and Lenoir with 478.
Cumberland and Wayne coun-
ties also have more than 400
students each at ECU. Two
populous Piedmont counties,
Mecklenburg with 338 and
Guilford with 330, ranked in
the top 10 in-state counties for
ECU students this year.
Overall, the fall semester
enrollment is 13.827. Of this
number 2.30'7 are from out-of-
state, Moore said.
The only four in-state coun-
ties not represented this year
are Alleghany, Cherokee,
Graham and Yancev.
Easy Rider
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK - ECU Phcto Lab
a hDarlinrslTl;0,h0a7iTln f " �ne "dvntage!�those who �" � �eing able to find
crTge ta February " fr�m c)�r00m' Ho�� chances � 8�� "ha, this will
College Presidents' Jobs Difficult, Stressful, Constrained
(CPS) � "The American col
lege and university presidency is
in trouble a new study reports.
Things are so bad, the study
says, that qualified applicants
don't want to become college
Presidents, and, in some cases,
incumbent presidents want to get
out of their jobs.
The study, conducted by the
Commission on Strengthening
Presidential Leadership, warns
tre president's job has become
too difficult, stressful and con-
strained at many institutions.
Colleges have "unnecessarily
and unwisely" diminished the
P�er of their presidents in the
Past 20 years through increased
government controls and meddl-
"j by faculty and governing
b0�rds, the study says.
The study adds the problems
are driving away the top
academic officials most qualified
for the job.
"Institutions must ask 'how
can we make the presidency at-
tractive to qualified applicants
suggests Nancy Axelrod,
spokeswoman for the commis-
sion's sponsor, the Association
of Governing Boards of Colleges
and Universities.
"Presidential search commit-
tees cannot simply sit back and
wait for applications she adds.
"They must carefully seek out
candidates who qualify for the
position
But only about half of the na-
tion's best-qualified academic of-
ficers want to become a college
president, the study claims.
And while finding presidential
applicants is frustrating, retain-
ing qualified presidents is often
harder.
Presidents are stymied by
federal and state controls, par-
ticularly "sunshine" laws requir-
ing that they conduct official col-
lege business in open meetings,
the report asserts.
Increased faculty influence in
hiring teachers and governing
board intervention in daily
decision-making also discourages
presidents.
"The power of a governing
board and how it relates to the
president in many cases reduces
the power of the president
maintains Larisa Wanserski, an
AGB spokesman.
Governing board actions can
"isolate (a president) from the
public, making it hard for him or
her to make decisions Wanser-
ski says.
The beleagured presidents
often react by resigning.
During any two-year period,
the study reveals, about 30 per-
cent of the nation's college
presidents are leaving or thinking
of leaving their positions. A
fourth of them are dissatisfied
with their jobs.
The average president stays at
a college seven years, Wanserski
says, not enough time to imple-
ment long-term plans for an in-
stitution.
"Colleges need to look at the
position and make it as attractive
and desirable as it once was she
asserts.
To do it, the study recom-
mends governing boards review
their provisions for presidential
support yearly, evaluate their
president in "ways that do not
encourage organized attacks
upon them and do not unduly
embarrassor weaken them
and make changes necessary to
attract and retain suitable
presidents.
Boards should scrutinize
presidential qualifications as well
as the office itself, suggests
Debra McCarthy of Higher
Education Administrative Refer-
ral Service, which helps track
down presidential candidates for
colleges.
"There's a time for
everything she contends.
"What was needed in a president
15 or 20 years ago was fine for
that time. Now, it's time for
something else
McCarthy says most colleges
are looking for presidents with
administrative experience rather
than strictly academic
background.
"Some say there's more em-
phasis on managerial ability
agrees Axelrod. "The managerial
part has become more important
for administration and fundrais-
ing, but academic background is
still important, too
In particular, the study says
each president "has a respon-
sibility for maintaining andor
creating an effective presidency
� particularly, but by no means
exclusively, in relation to the
board
Colleges gradually have dimin-
shed their president's role to try
to guarantee their own survival,
the study concludes.
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4






2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 25, 1984
Announcements
Omega Psi Phi
ts rtconlzing ail black students wtio havt ac
cumlatM a gpa of 3 0 or above You will be given
a certificate of achievement during our achieve
ment day awards cermony on Nov IB at 3 00 it
you have the qualifications write Omega Psi
Phi.P O Box 30) 4. GrennvMle. N C 27834
S.A.M.
The Society for Advancement of Management
would hhe to remind ail members of our car
wash � Saturday Oct 27 from 10 � 2, at the
Trade Station � corner of 14 st and 264 bypass
Everyone � let us wash your car cheap, and help
support the S A M Only 1 50 at time of wash
Alpha Sigme Phi
The little sisters of Alpha Signa Phi would like
to say thanks for another successful homecom
Ing and champagne breao'ajt � start resting up
tor n�t year everyone Brothers and little
sisters be creative a' the Halloween party �
Saturday nigh Ae would like to remind all girls
Interviewed a' lift! sister rush that they are m
vifed and encouraged to come so we can all ge' to
know each other See you there
Prime Time
Campus Crusade for Christ .s sponsoring
"Prime Time" this Thursday at 7 p m in the
Jenkins Auo � Art Bigd Please iom us for fun.
fellowship and bible study We are looking for
ward to meeting you
ASPA
The American Society tor Personnel Ad-
ministration will hold a meeting on 1 ues . Oct 30
at 4 00 n Vendenhaii Student Center -
Multipurpose room New members are
welcome1 Refreshments will be served
NCSL
The ECU delegation of the NC Student
Legislature will mee' again on Mon Oct 2� in
Mendenha Rm 247 at 7 00c m .ve're planning
lots of fun projects ana we need everyone 'here
to set up committees tnfo on the organization-s
read'y available to everyone Just ca'l James.
'52 � 5642 or Sandi. 7S6 � 8649 or Tmw. 758 -
7614
NCSL
Don-t forget our ragin end � of � the -
weekend happy hour at the B'ue Moon at 8 00
Sunoa
Free Throw Contest
There will be a tree throw contest held for all
you exper hoopsters November 13 This in
trjmu'n sponsored event will be held m
Memorial Gym To register come by room 204
Memorial gym or call 757-638 Parficapate
�-a'her han spec'ate
Onega Pso Phi
The brothers of Omega Ps Ph- frat, mc .
won e ke to announce a he oween costy-e par
ry - Menoenhall's Muiti Purpose room wednes
day Oct 31 Prizes will be raffleo 8 p m 12am
Bes costume wins 25 00 2nd and 3rd cash pr zes
also Free refreshments
Pi Kappa Phi
L'ttie sisters and Lil vs pledges are reminded
about the wild the paiama party this fr.dav night
with the brothers II s lock out from 8 10 then we
let the guys n Pledges should bring their pledge
books possible Also remember that Saturday
Is PUSH Souiitat.on Day Come out to the
house and wear our ersey
Phi Kappa Phi
Alright Pi Kapps This is the weekend
Tonight sociai with the Aidha Phi's Friday
our w id paiama party with the little Sisters and
Saturday our woodcut, PUSH Souicitatic- and
chid and beer dmner Also brothers cnner from
the pledges is tonight at 6 30 Forma!
brotherhood mis monday is 7 00 p m at the
house
something new
Looking or something new to do this friday6
The Baptist Student Union will be holding its fall
social this friday at 8 p.m Admission is only
81 00. and there will be refreshments 'and a lot of
dancing available Bring a friend and join us at
the BSU ion 10th st next to Wendy's; this friday
night we'll be lookmg for you!
Kappa Alpha Psi
The brothers of Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity
Inc win be sponsoring a happy hour from 9 30
pm until at the wiz FREE BEER until 12 00!
Come out and party with the Nupes! I
NAACP
The NAACP urges students who have not ob
tamed absentee ballots to do so before Nov 1
Absentee baiiot request cards will be available
at the information desk in Mendenhall student
center
APO
Alpha Phi Omega is requestion all brothers to
attend meetings We need you! All brothersnot
participating and paying fees by Oct 25 will be
asked to appear before the exectlve board APO
would also like to congratulate the following per
sons on receiving bids to pledge this semester;
Robert Bomey. Leanne Butrum, Sandre Caskey,
Donna Davis, Jimmie Hackeft, Keith Hall. Kim
Holloman, Vivian Joyner, Ricky Lewis. Angela
Richarson
Residence Life
The Department of Residence Life is now ac
ceptlng applications from students who w;sh to
apply for Resident Advisor positions Students
need do have the following qualifications (1) to
be a full time student !2) to have a minimum
grade ppoint average of 2 2 (3) to have a clear
ludicial record (4! to have a time schedule that
hi free of other commitments that conflict with
work (S) to have lived In a residence hall en
viror m�nt (A) must reside in residence hall dur-
ing employment Application deadline for
employment for Spring IMS Is November 1, 1M4
if interested in applying for a position, appllca
tiorts are available In 214 Whichard and any
��aidance Hall Office
Know about O.T.�
This Thursday at 7 00pm in MendenhaH's
multipurpose room is your big chance to find out
about 0 t (Occupational Therapy) and to talk to
students wno are already in the program
Anyone who is interested is welcome' Look for
evr ad in today s paper P S There's an OT club
meeting Tue at 5 45 In rm. 203 Allied Health, and
you're invited
College Repub
College Republicans will hold a special
meeting tonight at 5 90 In room 241 of
II.
ISA
ISA - Halloween Party Everybody Is
Invited' 11 Saturday, Oct. 27 at the International
House. Costume contest Come and Join us, you
may win the price
Videl Game Benefit
The March of Dimes with the assistance of
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority are sponsoring a video
game benefit on October 28, 1984 The benefit
will be held at Baliy's Aladdin's Castle in the
Carolina East Mali from 2 4 pm The admission
fee is 81 00 and I 50 for high score competition
Division 1 Ages 8 12. Division 11 ages 13 18,
Division HI ages 19 over Prizes will be award
ed and gift certificates will be given from Alad
din s Castle and the Student Supply Store All
proceeds go to the March of Dimes
RUGBY
2 home matches this weekend, ECU rugby club
will be hosting Cambell University and the U S
MarmeCorps team from Camp Leieune The
games start at 2 00 pm Saturday. Oct 27
Everybody s gonna be there, sacrifices will be
made
Surfing Contest
The 1984 ECU invitational Surfing Contest will
be heia this Saturday at the Islander Motel in
Emerald isle. N C Competition will begin at
9 00 am sharp and last until about 2 00 in the
afternoon Several schools are expected to com
pete including arch rival UNC W Come out and
enioy the sun and fun!
Surfing
There is a meeting thursday at 8 30 in the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse The video of Hawaii's
North Shore should be availlabie for the meeting
Team t shirts will be in and sold first come,
first serve at the meeting Don't forget ihe big
contest this Saturday at Emerald isle Contact
Johnny Ghee at 758 6667 if you want to par
ticipate
Grand Prize
Grand Pr fe S200 's� anneal Lambda Chi
Aiphrt a- Beau's We' t shirt contest Thursday
Oc 25 at 9 00 In'ereved contestants contact
Lambda Ch. Alpha at '52 6159 by Weds at 12 0C
Happy Hour
The 1984 pledge class of Delta S'gma Phi will
be hold ng happy hour at the Blue Moon Cafe on
Saturday Oct 27 from 9pm to lam Happy hour
prices Come party with the best
Students for IKE
Anyone who is mtrested in information concer
mng 4th district congressman ike Andrews
piease contact Jet� Clonmger (ECU Coor
onator 752 5198
Gamma Beta Phi
Gamma Beta Phi will meet on Thursday OC
25 n Brewster C 103 at 7 00 This is a very im
portant meeting make every effort to be there
NASA
interested in international policy and reguia
'ons attecng high �echnelogv exporting4 if so.
th.s position mj, be for you NASA will be infer
vewing on campus It! November tor Spring
'985 Contact the Cooperative Education Office
313 Raw! Building as soon as poovble
Sigme Nu
Come on down to the Sigma Nu little sister hap
py hour at Grumpy's Thurs OCT 25. 900 until
Door Prizes and lots of fun! Only �1 00 admls
sion See ya there!
Catholic Students
Sunday Mass is celebrated at 11130 am in the
Biology lecture Hall (rm 103) and at 9:00 pm at
the Newman center, 953 E 10th st For informa
tion call Fr. Terry 752 4216
CO-Rec Basketball
Registration for intramural Co-Rec basketball
will begin on Oct 29 and end Oct. X. To register
come by room 204 Memorial Gym between the
hours of 8 00 am and 5:00pm. For more Infor
mat.on call 757 6387 Partkaiparte rather than
specfate
Snow ski
Snow ski during Christmas break Any persons
interested in snowsking December 30 through
January 4 at Snowshoe, w V should call Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 to get your name on the list
for the trip Beginners to hotdoggers are
welcome ski instruction Is available for all
levels of ability Price depends on ski package
Space for housing on slopes and transporfalon Is
limited You are Invited to come by memorial
gym 108 on Oct 30 at 4 00 p m To register, see
the slides and talk skiing! A $5 00 deposit at this
time will reserve your space
Track meet
Register for the Intramural track meet on Oct
22 through the 25th The meet will be held on Oct
30 The team captains meeting will be held on
the 29th at 7 00 pm in the biology building room
103 To sign up come by room 204 memorial gym
or for more information call 757 6387
Scuba Diving
Thanksgiving vacation Dive Cozumel.Mex
ico 8 Days. 7 nights on the beautiful Yucatan
Penninsula Drift diving on the Palancar reef
will be one of the most exiting experiences
From Raleigh, price including air fare, meals,
lodging and diving 1820 00 Special price for non
divers J720 00 Air travel provided by Mexicana
and Eastern For registrations and further in
formation call Ray Scharf.Dir of Acquatics
757 6441
Helmsbusters
Students interested in joining the students for
Jim Hunt should please contact Scott Thomas at
752 1793 or David Brooks at 752 5198
Student Union
The Student Union Recreation Committee
willmeet on Monday. October 29. 1984, a' 3 00
pm in room 243 of Mendenhall Student Center
All members and interested students are urged
to attend
Halloween costume
Halloween costume contest to be held from
4 00 5 00 pm on Oct 31 in the multi purpose
room at Mendenhall Cash prizes will be award
ed Tickets are $1 00 and may be picked up at
Mendenhall or at the office at the Methodist Stu
dent Center Sponsored by Wesley Foutrtdation
TaiiTnr
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' 518 SOUTH COTAMCHC STBEE f
GREENVILLE. NC 27934
n? ffliw
If Killian's Irish Red
is a ten,
German beer is a nein.
WANTED
4 'General Manager
99
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is now accep-
ting applications for the General Manager's
position through November 2nd. Interested
persons should apply on the second floor of
the Publication building, located across from
Joyner Library.
This is an excellent opportunity to work with a quality staff
while gaining valuable experience in a wide realm of business ap-
plications.
Minority Student
Minority Student Or. dilation formerly souls
will have a meeting Thursday. Oct 25 out 4 30
pm It will be held in room 242 at Mendenhall
We urge all minority students to come out and
Participate
PPHA
PPHA will hold a scheduled meeting "vjrsdav
Oct 2S. 1984 at 5 45 pm in room 22' Vendenhai!
Student center All members and perspective
members please make plans to attend
Delta Sigme Phi
There will be a mandatory meeting (or all
brothers, little sisters, and pledges this Sunday.
Oct 28th, at 8 00 pm at the house See you
there
Health Careeres Day
Nurses. Medical Techs. Physical Therapists.
Occupational Therapists. Social Workers, and
Slap majors Representatives trom various
hospitals and health agencies will be on campus
to talk with you abou' employment possibilities!
Different organizations will be here on the
following dates November 2 Nurs!ng Building
I X 12 30pm November 5 Allied Health
Building 1 30 4 30pm Mark your calendar and
tell another friend about this In case they do not
see the announcement
$1fataSl
Too
Hats
Wool and Cotton Socks
Laurel Burch Earrings
Handmade Wool Sweaters
Specializing in Natural Fiber
Clothing for Women
116 E. 5th St. Mon-Sat 10:00-5:30
Next Door to Book Barn 757-3944
WAg-
CAR �.H �� vAV
and th- Suth�-rn FlutCured
Tobacco Festival, Inc.
Presents
y.
Now don't get us
wrong. The Germans
make some pretty fine
beers. But none of
them slow-roast their
malt like we do.
So no German beer
can boast the color,
the character, the rich,
incredibly smooth taste
ofKillian'sRedAle
So the next time f
you're about to order
your favorite German
beer, try a Killian's
Red, instead.
And go from a nein
to a ten.
L
KSmDsM)
tuMUiWC�Ciiii i CiHi Cwtam�M.WmmmH0ttmtamt
I�7�
Saturday, October 27, 1984
CAROLINA OPRV HOUSE
GREENVILLE, NC
� Gates Open at 10:30 a.m. �
� Show Begins at 12 .Noon �
Featuring Special Entertainment By:
The Bill Lyerly Band, playing music
from their two albums "Prodigal Son"
and "Higher Ground
The Green Grass Cloggers, high step-
pin' and swingin
The Too Wet To Plow String Band, a
down-home band playing all-time
favorites.
FOR YOUR INFORMATION
� Bring your lounge chairs and blankets.
� Food and Beer will be available
� RAIN LOCATION:
Farmers Warehouse
North Greene Street
Greenville, North Carolina
TICKET LOCATIONS:
Rainbow Records in Kinston, New Bern,
Havelock and Morehead City
Apple Records in Greenville
Carolina Opry House in Greenville
Competition In:
FIDDLIN'
Adult
1st Place $150.00
Runner-Up $100.00
Junior Division
1st Place$ 50.00
Runner-Up Merchandise
BANJO
1st Place$ 50.00
Runner-Up Merchandise
FLA T PICK IN GI IT A R
1st Place$ 50.00
Runner-Up Merchandise
BLUE GRASS BAND
1st Place$100.00
Runner-Up Merchandise
HORSESHOE PITCHING CONTEST
12:00-4:00 p.m.
Two (2) horseshoe pitching playing fields
will be set up. Copies of the rules will be
available on the day of the Fiddlers Con
vention. Registration is limited. You may
pre-register by filling out and mailing in
the attached Registration Form. Depend
ing on the number of entries, we are plan
ning a men's, women's and junior division.
Prizes will be awarded. This event will not
be held in the event of inclement weather.
For Further information and to register contact:
Lynn Caverly Jobes
Cured Tobacco Festival, Inc
Greenville, NC 27835-7366
(919)757-1604
Adults - $5.00 Children Under 12 - $1.00
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Crime
Column
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Former Pn
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (UPI)
� Former President Jimmy
Carter praised Gov. James Hunt
and criticized conservative
religious leaders for siding with
Sen. Jesse Helms in North
Carolina's Senate campaign
"I object very strongly to the
mixing of politics and religion
and believe that the separation of
church and state ought to be ab-
solute said Carter, who visited
the University of North Carolina
with his daughter Amy Tuesdav
"I think it's a serious mistake
what has been done in recent
times with the Jerry Falwell right-
wing evangelical television move-
ment on the one hand aligned
with the Republican Party on the
United Way
Campaign At
Book Store
By ELAINE PERRY
sunwnur
Students interested in becorr.
ing involved with a cornmunin
service will have their chance �
the United Way. "The United
Way is a source of essential help
for the less fortunate in our com-
munity. It provides dignity and
affords basic human needs for
those who cannot help
themselves said ECU
Chancellor John How ell.
The United Way is currently in
the process of its annual fund
drive. Mimi Quick, the United
Way chairman for main campus,
along with SGA President John
Rainey and Vice President Mike
McPartland have come up wuh a
way to gel the students involved
in the project.
On Tuesday, Oct. 30, from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m there will be a
one-day campaign for students.
A table will be set up in front of
the Student Supply Store for
students to give contributions to
the drive. United Way literature
will be available �
Quick said she "has found
students to be concerned with the
needs of others She added that
she feels students would like to
get involved with the organiza-
tion. "Sharing a pan of what you
do have with people who have
less provides a chance to show
you care she said.
The campaign will end on Nov.
1, however, contributions will
not be refused after that date.
Seventy-two percent of the total
ECU goal of S35,000 has been
met. The main campus goal is
$23,000. while the goal for the
School of Medicine is $12,000
The med school has collected 71
percent of its goal, while the main
campus has collected approx-
imately 75 percent.
Quick said she feels the
amount collected is "very good
for this point in the campaign
Several schools and departments
have exceeded their goals, she
said. However, several schools
have not yet reported their totals.
"I feel confident that the goal
will be achieved Quick said,
adding that support is important
to the overall contributions and a
successful campaign.
WANTED
-Typesetters -
Needed
Immediately
At The East
Carolinian
Apply at 2 Floor
Old South Building.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25.1984
T

now accep-
Managi
Interested
floor of
tcross from
I Theft, Trespassing Increase At Homecoming
Iks
aters
i( liber
men
t 10:00-5:30
757-3944
: r'
�n In:

Unit
- 50.00
- M).00
, i r 1 i i�i$ 50.00 Men nandise 50.00 M -� nandise
! 4K$ 50.00 rchandise
IS U$100.00 Merchandise
L- Hli,( OSTEST
I KM:00 i.m.rig fields
: �th rules will be
' the� r iddler's Con-
s limited. You may
i mailing in " i- Depend-s, � e are plan-
andjunior division.
ThS event will not ement weather.
formation and to register contact:
(rerly Jobes
ibacco Festival, Inc
e, NC 27835-7366
1604
;r 12-$1.00
I
Crime
Column
Campus Public Safety Officers
experienced a busy Homecoming
weekend with several arrests for
trespassing and traffic offenses.
The number of reported larcenies
and vandalisms was up from the
previous week.
17-23 were:
a bicycle was
Crimes for Oct.
Oct. 17,2p.m. -
reported stolen from the front of
Belk dorm. 4:55 p.m. � a vehicle
parked south of Belk dorm was
damaged as a result of a break-in
Oct. 18, 12:30 a.m. Brian
Former President Praises Hunt
CHAPEL HILL, N.C. (UPI)
� Former President Jimmy
Carter praised Gov. James Hunt
and criticized conservative
religious leaders for siding with
Sen. Jesse Helms in North
Carolina's Senate campaign.
"I object very strongly to the
mixing of politics and religion
and believe that the separation of
church and state ought to be ab-
solute said Carter, who visited
the University of North Carolina
with his daughter Amy Tuesday.
"I think it's a serious mistake
what has been done in recent
times with the Jerry Falwell right-
wing evangelical television move-
ment on the one hand aligned
with the Republican Party on the
United Way
Campaign At
Book Store
By ELAINE PERRY
Sun Writer
Students interested in becom-
ing involved with a community-
service will have their chance with
the United Way. "The United
Way is a source of essential help
for the less fortunate in our com-
munity. It provides dignity and
affords basic human needs for
those who cannot help
themselves said ECU
Chancellor John Howell.
The United Way is currently in
the process of its annual fund
drive. Mimi Quick, the United
Way chairman for main campus,
along with SGA President John
Rainey and Vice President Mike
McPartland have come up with a
way to 8.et the students involved
in the project.
On Tuesday, Oct. 30, from 9
a.m. to 4 p.m there will be a
one-day camnaign for students.
A table will be set up in front of
the Student Supply Store for
students to give contributions to
the drive. United Way literature
will be available �
Quick said she "has found
students to be concerned with the
needs of others She added that
she feels students would like to
get involved with the organiza-
tion. "Sharing a part of what you
do have with people who have
less provides a chance to show
you care she said.
The campaign will end on Nov.
1, however, contributions will
not be refused after that date.
Seventy-two percent of the total
ECU goal of $35,000 has been
met. The main campus goal is
$23,000, while the goal for the
School of Medicine is $12,000.
The med school has collected 71
percent of its goal, while the main
campus has collected approx-
imately 75 percent.
Quick said she feels the
amount collected is "very good
for this point in the campaign
Several schools and departments
have exceeded their goals, she
said. However, several schools
have not yet reported their totals.
"I feel confident that the goal
will be achieved Quick said,
adding that support is important
to the overall contributions and a
successful campaign.
WANTED
-Typesetters ��
Needed
Immediately
At The East
Carolinian
Apply at 2 Floor
Old South Building.
other he said. "This
breakdown is not good for our
country, and I predict that it is a
transient phenomenon
At a news conference, Carter
criticized Helms' stance on the
Panama Canal treaty, which the
two-term conservative opposed
as a "giveaway and said
Helms' view was "typical" of his
judgements.
"I think Jim Hunt is one of the
finest public servants I have ever
known in my life and will make a
great U.S. senator Carter said.
"I think Sen. Helms is just the
opposite
Carter's comments were
greeted by applause from a crowd
of more than 450 people at the
campus of the University of
North Carolina. Carter visited
the university to deliver the 1984
Weil Lecture on American
Citizenship.
The former president declined
to predict whether President
Reagan or Democratic presiden-
tial nominee Walter Mondale,
Carter's vice president, would
win North Carolina or the rest of
the South.
"I think it would be a mistake
for anyone to say the South is be-
ing written off either because
Reagan is taking it for granted or
because Mondale has given up on
it he said.
Amy Carter Eyes UNC-CH
CHAPEL HILL, N.C.
(UPI) � Amy Carter, the
freckled-faced daughter of
former President Jimmy
Carter, is taking a close look
at the University of North
Carolina to decide whether she
wants to become a Tar Heel
next fall.
While Carter visited with
university officials and held a
news conference Tuesday,
Amy quietly strolled around
campus escorted by a student
guide, a security guard and
several reporters. The
reporters were asked not to
talk to the 17-year-old high
school senior.
"It hasn't exactly been a
typical day on campus said
Judith McLaurin, secretary to
the University's chancellor.
Amy, wearing a sweatshirt
and baggy jeans, visited
Morehead Planetarium and
Observatory and peeked into
an astronomy lab class then
stopped to feed birds at the
school's arboretum.
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Russell Hart of Jones dorm was
arrested for DWI. 4:46 p.m. �
Gina Freeman of Mt. Judea,
Arkansas was arrested for selling
magazine subscriptions without a
permit in Aycock dorm. 7:10
p.m. � A bicycle was reported
stolen from the northeast corner
of Belk dorm. 8 p.m. � June
Thomas of Slay dorm was ar-
rested for damage to personal
property.
Oct. 19, 2p.m. � a wallet was
reported stolen from a room on
the 2nd floor of Aycock dorm. 4
p.m. � Karen Rigante of Green-
ville was arrested for a stop sign
violation. 10 p.m. � A 1971
Volkswagen was reported stolen
from east of Scott dorm. The
vehicle was later recovered at the
bottom of College Hill Drive. 11
p.m. � Campus police pursued
an unidentified male along the
railroad tracks near Charles
Blvd. A stolen bicycle and a
wheel from a second bicycle were
recovered; the suspect escaped.
The owner of the unregistered
bicycle has not been identified.
2:50 a.m. � an incident of exten-
sive vandalism was reported in
Jenkins Art Building. 7:12 p.m.
� a wallet was reported stolen
from a vehicle parked in the day
student parking area at 10th St.
and College Hill Drive.
Oct. 21, 2:30 a.m. � James
Ebron of Greenville was arrested
for trespassing. 9 p.m. � money
was reported stolen from a hand-
bag in a room on the 10th floor
of White dorm. 10p.m. � a ring
was reported stolen from the
bathroom on the 10th floor of
White dorm.
Oct. 22, 6:55 a.m. � a break-
ing and entering and larceny
from a vehicle was reported in the
5th and Reade St. freshmen lot.
1:30 p.m. � A bicycle was
reported stolen from between
Garrett dorm and Jenkins Art
Building. 10:30 p.m. � four
Marines from Camp Lejeune
were arrested for trespassing in
White dorm.
Oct. 23, 1:46 a.m. � A vehicle
was found vandalized in the 5th
and Reade St. freshmen lot.
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1





2tf?e East (Sarolintati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, g�.�Managfr
GREG RIDEOUT, Uanaginn td,ror
Jennifer Jendrasiak, ���, j.t. Pietrzak. amm
Randy Mews. �� m� Anthony Martin, m. Manag�
Tina Maroschak. ��� u. Tom Norton, cm m�
Bill Austin. omm m mike Mayo. r,u�, a.
October 25, N84
Opinion
Page 4
Push Forward
Scholars Program Begins New Era
A university exists as an environ-
ment for learning and research. It
is a place where young adults learn
to think; a place for them to
mature and grow academically.
Academia is where scholars in-
vestigate the problems and con-
cerns of our times. ECU strives to
be such a place.
The struggle has been long. Not
more than 20 years ago we were
still considered a teachers college;
we were not a place where the best
students came to study, nor were
we the campus where professors
hovered on the cutting edge of
discovery in their fields. We were
ECTC and ECC. Now we are a
university, and one that is on the
go.
With the announcement last Fri-
day of a major, $1 million scholar-
ship program, ECU is seeking to
become a major institution of
higher learning. We have under-
taken an effort to bring the best
and the brightest to Greenville,
where they will be offered the best
we have � honors programs,
studies abroad, seminar-size
classes. We seek these types of peo-
ple to say to the world, "Hey,
we're here to stay
The entrance in fall 1985 of five
university scholars will mean
several things. One, that no longer
can Duke or Carolina have dibs on
the state's brightest high schoolers.
We may not be able to offer them
quite as much, but ECU can offer
the chance for five youngsters to
set the mark by which others are
judged. And as the quality of ECU
students rises each year because of
these people, so will the reputation
of this university.
Two, if we are to seek the best,
our professors must do their best.
You must fulfill all aspects of be-
ing an academic: teaching,
research and service. To be slack in
one is to cheat the university, the
students and yourself. We have
some professors who today excel in
all three. But, at the ECU of
tomorrow that our chancellor and
trustees envision, more and more
of the faculty must sit firmly in this
category.
Three, admissions standards
must be tougher. Our average SAT
scores now are among the lowest in
the UNC system; they are
somewhere in the 800 range.
Nothing less than 1000 will do for
the ECU of tomorrow. The
students that the university
scholars program seeks demand
this.
We are making headway. With
this program, which Chancellor
Howell calls the highlight of his
tenure, we march onward. On the
backs of the Monitor discovery
and the wings of the soaring
School of Medicine, we add each
day a new achievement. We must
continue to do so.
Soon, because of the efforts of
past, present and future ad-
ministrations, we will be an institu-
tion with nationwide recognition.
East Carolina University will be a
part of the nation's life.
Here's something by Walter Lip-
pmann, a prominent political com-
mentator of the 20th century, for
President Reagan to mull over.
In a modern executive state, the
chief executive office must be elec-
tive. But as heredity, prescription,
consecration, rank and hierarchy
are dissolved by the acids of
modernity, the executives become
totally dependent on election.
They have no status and no tenure
which reinforce their consciences,
which invest them with power to
withstand the tides of popular opi-
nion and to defend the public in-
terest.
Doonesbury by garry trudeau
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HAPPENEP7 UKE WINNING
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Campus Forum
Mick LaSalle Lauds Helms
I was drifting to sleep, waiting for
my woman to walk in with breakfast.
But when she came through the door,
she was wearing my robe and reading
my copy of the Sunday News.
"I'm sorry, Michael. I swear I'll
get your breakfast, but I started
reading this. I know you lived there
for awhile. Do you know anything
about the Senate race in North
Carolina?"
I yawned. "Since when are you in-
terested in politics, baby?"
"I'm not, but � it says here that
this guy Jim Hunt is leading Jesse
Helms in the polls by 10 points
I sprung up and smacked her across
the mouth. "Don't you even say
that I growled.
"No, really, it's true she said,
blinking back tears. "Look
I looked. Then turned around and
put my fist through the paneling.
The rest of the morning was shot.
"I'm going back down there I
finally said.
I guess the thought of that was too
much for her. "Oh great, Michael
she sort of sobbed and screamed at
the same time. "Desert us New York
girls again
I shook my head. "What else can I
do? Jesse Helms is the only honest
guy in the Senate; he's one of the
finest men in a state of fine people;
he's the only politician in this country
that you could also call 'a statesman
I can't let him lose to Jim Hunt: some
crooked pretty-boy wheeler-dealer
wimp. All Hunt wants is to become
president someday, and meanwhile he
ain't even qualified to be senator
She was on the ground now, pull-
ing at the cuffs of my pajamas. "So
say that. But don't go! Put it in
writing! You're a writer! I got the ad-
dress of that paper you used to
write for Do anything, but just
don't leave Send a letter to that
East Carolinian
I thought about it for a couple of
minutes. She was hyper-ventilating by
now. I picked her up by her
underarms and plopped her on the
bed. I took one of the silk neckties
from the bed post and handed it to
her. She blew her nose in it.
"All right, you win, stop blubber-
ing I said. "Maybe it would be the
best for all concerned. Go get me the
portable and some paper
Mick LaSalle
(Al Agate)
Alumnus
Brown Explains
1 am a member of the Brown
University group, "Students for
Suicide Tablets Much of the
publicity has distorted our message
by emphasizing the word "suicide
For example, a New York Times
headline read, "Students to Vote on
Suicide It is important that our
ideas be understood.
Our referendum, which passed by a
60 percent majority and is not bin-
ding on the university, requests that
"suicide tablets be stocked at
Brown's health services for optional
student use in the event of a nuclear
war This is not a suicidal or
defeatist approach to the threat of
nuclear war. It is aimed at dispelling
the notion that we could survive such
a holocaust. Hoping for survival is
dangerous because it makes the idea
of nuclear war more acceptable, and
thus increases the chances that it
could occur.
Many Brown students voted for the
referendum to express their fear and
despair in a purely symbolic way.
Others actually want Brown to
stockpile the pills, because they con-
sider the threat of nuclear war a very
real one. Would the idea of suicide
seem so bizarre if you were dying a
slow, painful death from radiation
sickness? Would it be dangerous to
stockpile poison on a college campus?
Well, the chemistry building at
Brown is already chock-full of deadly
substances, including cyanide, that
could be used by some unbalanced
person to harm himself or others.
Suicide pills could be secured in a
vault. By stockpiling real pills, we
would emphasize that nuclear war is a
real threat. The missiles sure are real.
Is stockpiling suicide pills tanta-
mount to accepting nuclear war?
Hardly. Who wants to kill himself?
By equating nuclear war with suicide,
we are urging people to stop it. What
can be done? Well, a mutual,
verifiable freeze on the production of
nuclear weapons would be a start.
Reagan's strategy of "negotiation
from strength" has accomplished
nothing. If we increase our stockpile
of nuclear weapons, why would the
Soviet Union want to decrease theirs?
Reagan claims that he has brought
America back from a position of
weakness to one of strength. This is
misleading. The United States has
never been strategically weaker than
the Soviet Union. We have been at
parity with each other since the '60s,
when we lost our strategic superiori-
ty.
But arms control is not enough.
Even if both sides cut their stockpile
of nuclear warheads by half, there
would still be enough firepower with
which to destroy ourselves. Better
relations with Moscow are essential.
This means more than simply meeting
with the Soviets. It entails, among
other things, a re-evaluation of our
position in the world vis-a-vis the
Soviet Union and the Third World.
Should we continue to confuse inter-
nal, polar revolutions with Soviet ex-
panionism? Why did the administra-
tion smother (for six months) a
government report stating that the
Soviets are not controling Nicaragua?
Our dogmatic, inflexible approach to
leftist governments is, ironically,
pushing these countries towards the
Soviet Union and developing new op-
portunities for a conflict that could
go nuclear.
These ideas are not new, and they
are only some of the ways in which to
avoid nuclear war. But the Reagan
administration has done nothing in
this direction. The purpose of re-
questing suicide pills for use after a
nuclear war is to show the urgency of
the problem, to show that students
are afraid, that they consider nuclear
war a distinct possibility in their
future, and that they consider such a
war unendurable. The government
must discard "defensive" Star Wars
weapons projects and dubious civil
defense plans. We must act now,
before a war is started, to prevent
nuclear suicide.
James R. Knebelman, '85
Brown University
Helms Assailed
In response to Cynthia Mills' letter,
I would like to offer some thoughts
and, also, facts. In her letter blasting
David Brooks, she invalidly claims
that he is "a victim of liberal indoc-
trinization" just because of his
criticisms of Jesse Helms. It seems to
me that Mills has been indoctrinated
by Helms' favorite pastime, labeling
most opposition Democrats as
liberals. This was evident in one of
the Hunt-Helms debates, where
Helms labeled Hunt a "Mondale
liberal Facts show Gov. Hunt's
record and his future Senate plans
widely disprove the liberal label.
I have to agree with Ms. Mills
about character assassination
sometimes by the press, but I ques-
tion her claim when she stated that
Helms is not a racist and a bigot. It is
a fact that Helms remains a steadfast
critic of the Voting Rights Act and
has led the fight against a national
holiday in recognition of Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr claiming Dr. King
had "communist sympathies Also.
Helms stated in 1968 that "crime
rates and irresponsibility among
Negroes are facts of life which must
be faced
In reference to equal rights among
women, Jesse Helms has voted
against the Equal Rights Amend-
ment. Being the steadfast critic of
abortion, he even voted to deny
counseling, medical and legal services
to rape victims and opposed restoring
the Social Security minimum
benefits, where four out of five reci-
pients are poor, elderly women. In
reference to education. Helms r
consistently voted against college
loans for students, the Elementary
and Secondary Education Act. voca
tional education, and even educa-
tional programs for the handicapped
and Head Start budgets. In speaking
about public education Hcrns
retorted. "I ain't got no dog in Vfta
fight (September 1983)
The facts mentioned here are there,
in ink, and are only a part of Jesse
Helms' unfair and dirty politic-
Though I respect Ms. Mills' opinion.
1 do not see how Jesse Helms ha-
helped, or will help. North Carolina
citizens. I am referring to the minor:
ty, elderly, handicapped, and other
portions of the populations who have
been hurt by Jesse Helms. Quoting
Cynthia Mills, if you really want
to know about the conservative ideal-
of Sen. Helms and many others, read
something besides the News and
Observer I quite agree, just read
Sen. Jesse Helms' voting record in the
U.S. Senate.
Ricky Lewis
Junior, Med Tech
Hardy Ha Ha
I'm writing in reference to Sandy
Hardy's letter, which you published
Oct. 18, concerning the furor over the
issue of a debate between the Young
Democrats and the College
Republicans. I am affiliated with
neither of these organizations but
have known and respected Mr. Hardy
and his fine family for many years.
Hence, I was appalled at Hardy's
mention of the Young Democrats'
use of "slander" being so closelv
followed by his reference to the YD's
as a "measley organization Is this a
double standard?
Later in his letter, Hardy
challenges the Young Democrats to
an arm wrestling match. This is exact-
ly the sort of empty rhetoric and silly
one-liners used by President Reagan
and his administration to "laugh
off" issues that could prove to be an
embarassment to the Republicans.
I also found Hardy's suggestion
that the debate is none of The East
Carolinian's business most improper.
What is the business of a newspaper
in a free society if not to cover issues
pertinent to its readership?
Finally, what is a "subliminal
threat?" I'm sure Vice President
Bush will let you use one of his many
dictionaries if you need.
Webb Spilman
Sophomore
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance of Joyner Library.
Pitt Coun
By LESLIE TODD
E t e�� hmi
An unusual tract of forest land
highly valued by ECU scientists
for its environmental diversify
will remain open for use as an
outdoor classroom thanks to the
generosity of a retired Winterville
school teacher.
Mrs. Reed Parker Ellis, who
grew up not far from the wooded
property east of Falkland, recen
ly renewed a lease agreement with
ECU that allows faculty and
students to use the property for
laboratory exercises, field
demonstrations and individual
research projects.
For a token payment of one
dollar per year, ECU biologi
can conunue to explore the
relatively unspoiled forest w
boasts some unusual plants, in-
cluding mountain laurel and
galax, rarely seen in this par
North Carolina.
"Mj husband and I have
always enjoyed the things
nature, and we like the idea
the property can be preserved
used for study said Mrs Hlis,
who still visits the site to enjoy
the springtime flowers
The 100-acre tract was
chased by her father in 1918 fi
descendants of Robe Vv
Jr a Pitt County doctor and
farmer who served in the North
Carolina Assembly in the late
1700's and early 1800's. V
cleared for farmin
has long been a fa pot for
family outings. sad
Ellis joined groups of I
residents who gatherr
pick wildflower-
yami
Absentee
Ballots
Absentee Ballots can be notarized
bv the following people a: I
tf
Mar) M
20" Ma
v �
Z2 Spilman
Mrs Van He?
Jor.e: I -
Ra r v
Joyner
Pau oc Manl
ECl Cred
Patricia Norn
104Ragsdaie
5
Finos
Den:�e Mewfa
Personnel Of)
Nir.a B.
319 Bdk
Shea B .
Brod KD56
Linda Ingails
B:j N -
zzz:
htuikiiw
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Man of the Hour.
The pesr grey i �� i
features soft.��:�� I
lapels, impeccar .
trousers anc
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makes fi Biass a mas
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Since it's your turn to
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Carolina East Center
756-6736
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OLP A W�5
xNewecxv
S WITH BO0&
VASOAI
STAGE AS.
0Kf
I .
Helms
i
ai �
rapped
in
olina
� hei
6
deals
:ne
Hdrd Ha Ha
Sandy
Nht'd
� �ver the
e
B ;
:
but
id Mr Hardy
ears.
� Hardy's
rats'
closely
the D's
Hardy
its to
exact-
and silly
lent Reagan
"laugh
-1- to be an
� Itcans
iggestion
I i '
iper.
newspaper
��' issues
"subliminal
President
ne of his manv
x
I"

that
Forum Rules
man n elt omes let-
� oj view.
�" ur office in the
Building, across from
mtrance of Joyner I ibrary.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 25, 1984
Pitt County Forest Is Unique Classroom
"
B LESLIE TODD
H t St�i lUrrau
An unusual tract of forest land
highly valued by ECU scientists
for its environmental diersit
ill remain open for use as an
outdoor classroom thanks to the
generosity of a retired Winterville
school teacher.
Mrs Reed Parker Ellis, who
grew up not far from the wooded
property east of Falkland, recent-
ly renewed a lease agreement with
ECU that allows faculty and
students to use the property for
laboratory exercises, field
demonstrations and individual
research projects.
For a token payment of one
dollar per year. ECU biologists
can continue to explore the
relatively unspoiled forest which
boasts some unusual plants, in-
cluding mountain laurel and
galax. rarely seen in this part of
North Carolina.
"M husband and 1 have
aluas enjoyed the things ot
nature, and we like the idea that
the property can be preserved and
used for study said Mrs. Ellis,
who still visits the site to enjoy
the springtime flowers.
The 100-acre tract was pur-
chased bv her father in 1918 from
descendants of Robert Williams
Jr a Pitt County doctor and
farmer who served in the North
Carolina Assembly in the late
I700's and early 1800's. Never
cleared for farming, the propert)
has long been a favorite spot for
famiU outings. As a child, Mrs.
Ellis joined groups oi local
residents ,ho gathered there to
pick wildflowers.
���zaamBga�
According to ECU biologist
Dr. Vince Bellis, a variety of
natural features and a lack of
destructive logging activity in re-
cent decades make the Ellis pro-
perty locally unique and of great
value for environmental studies.
"One special beauty of this
property is that it has been logged
selectively and at a number of
different times rather than simply
clear-cut said Bellis. "This
gives students an opportunity to
observe both young and relatively
mature forest environments
within a short distance of each
other. They can see everthing
from young pines on the edge of
the property to huge beech trees
in the ravines that are 150 to 200
years old
From a botanist's point of
view, some of the most in-
teresting areas on the property
are steep, north-facing ravines
where constant shade and seeping
springs create a cool, moist en-
vironment. Here grow dense
stands of mountain laurel and
galax, plants that are normally
associated with the cool climate
of the Blue Ridge mountains. The
ravines also provide an ideal en-
vironment for certain mosses,
ferns and liverworts not com-
monly found in the Pitt County
area.
"The presence of these small
pockets of plants and animals
outside their normal range invites
some interesting scientific ques-
tions sas Bellis. "How and
when did they first become
established here9 Are the in-
dividuals found here genetically
different from those in the major
areas of distribution?"
ECU scientists identify three
distinct forest environments on
the Ellis property. The higher
elevations are dominated by a
mixture of loblolly pines and
hardwoods including several
types of oak, two types of
hickory, sweetgum, dogwood,
sourwood, American holly and
sassafrass.
A lower elevation hardwood
forest contains many of these
same trees but certain species
such as white oak, holly and iron-
wood become more abundant.
Black walnut and mulberry ap-
pear at this level with mountain
laurel, tulip trees and American
beech being abundant on the
north-facing ravines.
The lowest elevations are
found along the floodplain of Ot-
ter Creek, a year-round stream
fed by spring waters that
meanders along for several miles
before flowing into the Tar
River. Bald cypress, river birch,
basswood, and possum haw are
some of the species that
characterize this low-lying area.
According to Mark Brinson,
director of graduate studies in
biology at ECU, the property has
been used as an outdoor
laboratory for ecology classes for
well over 10 years Common field
exercises include statistical
sampling methods, soil studies,
leaf fall and leaf decomposition
studies, and vegetation analysis.
Field trips to the area number
about five or six each semester.
Other courses to utilize the
Ellis property include field
botany, field zoology, mycology
(the study of fungi), and en-
vironmental biology. At least one
graduate level thesis has been
prepared using research perform-
ed on the property.
"This area is unparalleled in
Pitt County for its community of
several distinct forest types that
are in a relatively advanced state
of ecological development
comments Brinson in a
memorandum describing the pro-
pertv "Future access to this gem
of natural beauty is highly valued
by the biology faculty and is con-
sidered an irreplaceable compo-
nent of quality education at
ECU "
Otter Creek is part of the forest near Falkland utilized b EC I
students to study subjects such as biology and botanv.
7
,
Absentee
Ballots
Absentee Ballots can bo notarized
bv the following people at ECU
Man M
207 Vl �
I spiiiriaii
Mrs H-��� lerson
l
Ra pi v ��
i .
Pa tin i Mattl
EC1 Cred
Pati � N � man
Ragsdale
Sandra Hall
Financial Aid Ofl
Mewborn
Personnel Ofl i
Nina H. ml
319 Belli
Sheila Bl i
Brod AD56
Check
Out
The
Library
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V






THE EAST CAROL IN! AN
OCTOBER 25, 1984
Tobacco Talks
At Rural Rally
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newi l-dtiot
Politicians depend a lot on
style. And style varies with the
audience. When you're Gov.
James Hunt, you're in eastern
North Carolina, the place is a
tractor dealership and the subject
is tobacco, well, the style is
down-home and rural.
Tuesday's Democratic rally at
Waller Tractor in Winterville was
aimed at farmers in general, but
specifically at tobacco farmers.
Take a warehouse full of 500
farmers and a gaggle of politi-
cians and you've got the friendly
atmosphere of a political rally,
country style.
Those attending the rally
warmed up with plates of
barbecue and slaw and some
good foot-stomping fiddle music.
But the real warming-up credit
lies with the politicians
themselves, the guys who really
depend on these people for votes.
One by one, they got up on the
trailer which served as the stage,
spouting colloquialisms in
Southern accents that could be
cut with a knife and in the pro-
cess doing a lot of cutting on each
other.
The point was, the politicians
wanted to show that they were
paisanos. And the farmers
"anted to feel that they really
were. So there were a lot of jokes
about people's farms, and the
Med Student
From Grenada
Speaks Today
By HAROLDJOYNER
EClT is participating in a na-
tionwide Student liberation Day
today as proclaimed by President
Reagan, according to Dennis Kil-
coyne, campus coordinator for
the event.
Kilcoyne invited a medical stu-
dent from Grenada, who was
rescued in the invasion last year.
Through the efforts of the SGA
and United Students of America,
Mark Soloman will visit ECU to-
day and prevent a non-partisan
view of hi- experience. Soloman
will be in Hrewster C103 from 2-4
p.m. and students will be en-
couraged to voice opinions on the
incider Kilcoyne said.
"The only reason the SGA
heloed fund this event Kilcoyne
saui, "was because of the non-
par tisan nature of Soloman's
visit. He wants to educate the
students on the experience and
hear their views on it
Another medical student who
was involved in the Grenada in-
vasion recently wrote to The E'ast
Carolinian and expressed his
views on Student Liberation Day.
Morty Weissfelner of St.
George's University School of
Medicine said, "the liberation of
the Reagan Administration came
at a terrible cost: dozens of young
American, Cuban and Grenadian
lives. Instead of celebrating the
liberation of students, their ac-
tions only encourage the decima-
tion of students. The publicity
from their ralliesencourages
the worst tendencies of our
go eminent to believe it will be
politically acceptable to send us
off to war
"If the oiganizers behind 'Stu-
dent I iberation Days' mean to
suggest through their mindless
celebration of the invasion of
Grenada that students support
military adventures I suggest
they ask their students first
Kilcoyne responded to
Weissfelner's letter by saying, "It
is true a lot of other universities
are holding rallies across the
United States today, but the
coordinators of this program felt
it would be best if we obtained an
individual who would remain
non-partisan on the Grenada
issue and simply educate the
students on his experience
size of their feet and whose wife
was really the man of the house.
And the audience loved it.
And as each successive
representative or congressman
stepped on the stage, they pulled
the crowd along, addressing their
concerns, drawing out their
responses and making them laugh
and feel at home.
Jim Hunt showed a different
style. Gone was the convoluted
rhetoric of B-l bombers and Cen-
tral American policy. What
counted was the cash crop, the
tobacco. And Hunt talked prices
and price supports. He addressed
farming as a capital-intensive
operation. He talked to the peo-
ple about what they wanted to
hear.
In a state like North Carolina,
there are many interests and con-
cerns. To get the voters, you've
got to pinpoint these. To talk
tobacco, a congenial atmosphere
and straight talk are necessities.
That's exactly what it was at
Tuesday's rally.
A I OPPORTUNITY
"Production Manager
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is now accep-
ting applications through October 26th for the
Production Manager's position. All interested
3! � persons are encouraged to apply. Don't pass
up this opportunity to gain valuable experience
and work for Eastern Nortn Carolina's
number one college newspaper.
Stop by the Publication building located across from Joyncr I.ibrar
Experience prefered, but not necessary
This 14-foot-tall puppet was one of several featured in a Wednes-
day puppet show as part of an ECU commemoration of Central
America Week.
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T-mmute guarantee applies I 1:30 AM to 1:30 PM
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ATTENTION ECU STUDENTS
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ORTUNITY
oduction Manager
R01 INI AN is now accep-
ktober 26th for the
tion. All interested
. . App. Don't pass
. un valuable experience
n North Carolina's
sp per.
'nrr I ibrarv
, i m i
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PUTT
A EAST CENTER
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crs hafs. ears,
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Ipplication in NOW!
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Style
OCTOBER 25, 1984
Page?
'Anything Goes9 Fanciful And Fun
B DAN MAURER
�IMal NaMMi tdltor
With a combination of side-
splitting humor and lavish dance
numbers, the McGinnis Theatre's
production of Anything Goes
brought a capacity crowd to their
tec: The audience remained in
stitches while being awestruck bv
the productions overwelming
grandure.
l'he story, set in the 1930s,
revolves around Billy Crocker
(played bj Paris Pete), a young
stockbroker who sails a trans-
atlantic Una to stop Hope (Mary-
Kate Cunningham), the girl he
loves, from marrying another
man Sound a little off the wall?
li gets better when Billy borrows
a ticket and passport from a not-
too-well-know gangster named
Moonface, played by Tim David-
son. -V fate would have it, these
dentials belong to none other
tn public enemy number one,
vike Eyes Johnson.
It doesn'l stop there. The story
implicated even further with
appearance of a "hot" night
lb performer named Reno
played by Janice
whose wild ways set
hip is eai
gives an exceptional pro-
a the impetuous
cker He has a fine singing
voice thai proes itself in such
igs as "It's Delovely" and
'All I brought The Night but
t's his comedic talents that make
ter memorable. While
cr has the funniest lines.
d . tend Li be the focal point
in most of the production's com-
ical scenes, and from there he
seems to orchestrate the humor.
While Pete may set the tempo,
its Davidson's excellent
character-acting that sets the
tone. His hilarious portrayal of
the pathetic but lovable gangster
comes ever so close to stealing the
show. Dressed as a parson and
sporting an authentic Brooklyn
accent, Davidson and his antics
keep the audience entertained.
As for the show's leading
ladies, they are unbeatable.
Schreiber hands in a performance
Ethel Mermen would be proud
of. Her strong voice seems to hit
home with the audiences and
helps add depth to the character.
Cunningham is wounderful as the
pretty Ms. Hope. Her beautiful
voice is
The show's mainstay is its
lavish dance numbers. The
show's dancers, led by Jennifer
Paulson (who also played David-
son's sidekick Bonnie), perform-
ed wounderfully choreographed
routines reminiscent of the
'30s. Probably the most spec-
tacular aspect of the production
was the flashy, sequened
costumes designed by Keith
Lewis.
Anything Goes will be per-
formed Oct. 25-27 and 29.
Reserved seat tickets are available
at the McGinnis Theatre Box Of-
fice from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m
Monday through Friday.
Reservations mav be made by
calling 757-6390.
Sonja Hodges, Jennifer Paulson and Monica Smith (from left to right) in the title number from the Production of Anything Goes.
Author Profiles Rock's Legends
In Rock VN 'Roll Confidential. Penny Stallings does for the music
world what she did for the Hollywood scene in Flesh and Fantasy
� she gives us a frank, witty, sometimes cynical, but always affec-
tionate portrayal of the stars � complete with gossip, trivia and a
ssortment of little known facts. RockW'Roll Confidential
will be published by Little, Brown on Oct. 31st, ($24.95, cloth;
I � 95, pb).
. Rock 'N 'Roll Confidential, Stallings traces the legends of hun-
: � ock stars and illustrates their ups and downs with 1,000
graphs � many of them never before published. She shows
he tars as they appeared in their parents' scrapbooks (before
their nose jobs, dye jobs and other changes created their own uni-
tar look") and recounts their days of struggle (Chubby
ckers put in time as a chicken plucker). Stallings catalogues the
fashions that created the unique images (Time magazine described
s Jo as "5 inches of hot buttered yak wool"), and the rock
lones vho imitated them. She pfiles the moguls and managers
v h i helped catapult the stars to tame and includes a roll call of the
late greats whose careers were cut short through tragic accidents
and careless blunders. She records the great rock rumors (Yoko
� mo is a sorceress who kept John Lennon under her spell for over
ars through the use of hypnosis), the banned record albums
Alice Cooper's School's Out which the FTC quarantined
ecause of the inflammable bikini panties that adorned the album),
the evolution of rock'n'roll movies.
Penny Stallings takes the less conventional, slightly irreverent
il more complete route to explain the phenomenon or rock, and
ibtlj and entertainingly transforms the gossip and trivia surroun-
ling the rock stars into a social and cultural document. This en-
lopedk work of witty, silly scholarship is a book all rock fans,
irdless of ag will read, enjoy and trade trivia about.
1. Who came closest to deposing Elvis as the king of rock'n'roll?
2. According to a Village Voice critic, who has the worst teeth in
rock'n'roll?
3. This rock star had nightmares about losing his hair.
4. Which record label is "the Sound of Young America?"
5. He gave up an opportunity to play for the Philadelphia Phillies
in order to become a rock star.
6. This rock'n'roll personality's record collection features discount
classical albums purchased through TV ads.
7. This rock star was the model for Bob Dylan's "Don't Look
Back "Like A Rolling Stone "Vision of Johanna and "Just
Like A Woman
8. This recording star was unable to sing for four years due to a
nose job.
9. Which of these cross-over stars has never released a rock'n'roll
record � A. Ted Knight B. Regis Philbin C. Muhammed Ali D.
Henry Winkler E. Goldie Hawn F. Richard Chamberlin G. Far-
rah Fawcett
10. This fashion trend has withstood the test of time for over 30
years.
11. This rocker has made the greatest impact on black hairstyles.
12 In "Go Your Own Way which two members of the band are
Heel wood Mac singing about?
13 Who holds the record for the most banned and bowdlerized
aibum covers?
14 Which synthetic pop group can be called the biggest con job in
all of rock'n'roll?
Men's Fashions Consistent During The '80s
BRYAN HUMUKT � CCU WH Lak
fct George Albertine shows what sartorial prowness is all about.
(UPI) � Reliable clothes continue as the staple of menswear,
says an authority on masculine clothing.
"I used to predict a major change � that men would give up
suits said Charles Hix. "I said there would be more casual dress
for the office. But I recant.
"Society will not let the man out of that uniform Segments of
that "uniform" include neckties and hats. "I predicted, too, that
the necktie would go said Hix in an interview. "I no longer think
so
"Hats? They have become optional; you don't see them worn as
a must. But bald men love hats for an obvious reason. "I see a lot
of men turning to caps and to berets.
"With women back in hats again, who knows but what men will
do the same
ilix, 42, has written extensively through the years on menswear.
His latest offering is the book, Man Alive! Dressing The Free Way,
(Simon and Schuster, $17.95).
"Not every job entails wearing a suit and tie said Hix. "But in
many occupations if you don't you'll be at a disadvantage
"Thus a man who does not dress to the high expectations of
others is not perceived as totally reliable. And being reliable is a
very critical issue in the business world
Hix, in his book, discusses some of the symbols of reliable dress,
or what he calls the "security system
He mentions details on a suit jacket. "Lapels today mean ab-
solutely nothing he writes. "Many of a suit's buttons are still
there purely for meaningless show. Some pockets are sewn shut,
never to carry anything.
"And what is more illogical than a necktie, a piece of cloth mor-
bidly akin to a noose?"
"Creased trousers are another affront to logic because they can-
not be maintained except as an exercise in futility
The section on reliable clothes is just one in the Hix book. He
discusses off-duty garb, earthy clothes, sporty clothes, clothes that
are smart, crisp, easy, and powerful.
Hix showed up for the interview in non-reliable clothes (by, say,
Wall Street standards) of pullover sweater, sports shirt, gray slacks
and no tie.
"I thought of suit and tie for the interview he said. "Then 1
thought, no, I won't be a hypocrite. It's a hot and humid day, she
will understand
The Hix book is lavish with photographs, the work of Stephen
AuCoin.
"You've got a lot of nearly nude men in the pictures I said.
"Those are to get attention said Hix, who includes a whole
sevtion titled "Sexy
"Actually it's an effort to get men to think of clothing in a dif-
ferent sense. They forget that women like to look at attractive men.
Men used to turn off at this idea. But not anymore
"If we're adept (as our own designers) we can augment our ap-
peal. If we're inept we can diminish it. Don't flub it
OK for the attention-getting photographs, but what about using
some realistic figures instead of all those professional models who
look like young gods.
"Chubbies don't look good in clothes he said. "1 believe men,
as well as women, have got to work themselves into decent shape!
And I don't see unattractive looking women in those women's
fashion magazines
Hix, a native of Northville, Mich a Detroit suburb, graduated
from the University of Michigan with Phi Beta Kappa key and
awards for creative writing.
His previous books on menswear are Looking Good and Dress-
ing Right. He also wrote Working Out, a shape-up guide for men.
Society generally demands that clothes for the job be reliable and
also wants men attentive to their appearance. "Let's face it said
Hix, "There are men who have absolutely no interest in clothes. I
won't reach them. And I'm not expecting to affect the dress of the
David Rockefellers of this world, the men who have succeeded
already at everything
"I hope to reach the younger group, from the late teens to the
early 40s. And if you think a lot of men aren't interested in clothes,
look around you at the men's shops, the department store sections
devoted strictly to menswear, a lot of it designer stuff
"You don't think all that is show, do you? Stores aren't going to
give space to something that won't sell
i
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8THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 25, 1984
?
Survey Categorizes Sex Types
(UPI) - 'There is no such
thing as normalcy" regarding
sexual behavior in America
because there is a smorgasbord of
different styles, a survey showed
yesterday.
The results, part of which will
be published in Sunday's Parade
Magazine, came from the
responses of 1,100 males and
females, 18 to 60, a group said to
represent a cross-section of the
U.S. population.
"The big surprise in this study
is how our sexual behaviors
cluster, and that there is no such
thing as normalcy and that no
one style predominates said
Dr. Carol C. Flax, a sex therapist
and researcher who helped design
the survey.
Earl Ubell, Parade's health
editor and co-designer of the
report, said, "Men's and
women's patterns of sexual ac-
tivity areremarkably similar
Ubell said eight different com-
binations of sexual styles are
possible, but they all have three
components: life satisfaction,
sensuality and eroticism. The
report described the sex styles as
follows:
� Pansexual. Twenty percent of
those surveyed take sex in all
forms, "are very sensual and are
aroused by traditional foreplay
Men and women in this category
enjoy "pornography, erotic fan-
tasies, oral sex, and anal sex
� Satisfied erotic. "More than
twice as many men as women
comprised the 12 percent who
make up this sexual style, and 20
percent of them have had some
homosexual experience This
grouping is similar to pansexuals,
except "they scored low on the
sensuality trait
� Unsatisfied erotic. "The men
and women of this group, 13 per-
cent of the sample, take sex
wherever they can get it but they
are more likelv to masturbate
Visual Arts Forum Holds
Annual Beaux Arts Ball
By TIN A MAROSCHAK
? f itim Ml lor
Interested in seeing some of the
most unique Halloween costumes
in Greenville? On Wednesday,
Oct. 31, the Visual Arts Forum
will sponsor the 10th annual
Beaux Arts Ball at the new Attic.
The ball , which began in 1974
as a minor event for mostly art
students, has grown tremendous-
ly to include students of other
majors as well. One student said
that as far as costumes go, the
event is a very untraditional
masquerade ball
Costumes are mandatory and
prizes will be given away for the
three best ones. The first prize
winner will receive $65 in cash
and a $40 gift certificate from the
Art & Camera Shop. The second
prize winner will receive a $40 gift
certificate from the Art &
Camera Shop and dinner for two
at Chicos. The third prize winner
will receive a $20 gift certificat
from the Art & Camera Shop and
dinner for two at the Olde Towne
Inn.
Admission is $3.50 in advance
and $4.50 at the door. Tickets are
available in Messick, room 106,
Apple Records, and at the Stu-
dent Organization Booth in
Mendenhall (on Oct. 29 and 30).
Doors open at 9 p.m. and the
Pressure Boys will provide enter-
tainment for the evening.
SUPPORT
THE
PIRATES!
Frustrated and seeking arousal by
any means, they want sex fre-
quently but cannot get it
� Lonely erotic. "People who
have had homosexual experience
also congregate in this style, 12
percent of those surveyed, and
men outnumber women by more
than two to one. These are
lonesome people who respond
more to sexual imagethan to
their sexual partner
� Satisfied sensualist. "These
people are happy with their sex
lives, their partners and
themselves. Most are married,
and they comprise 11 percent of
the sample
� Unsatisfied sensualist.
"Generally, sex is not important
to those of this sexual style, who
are very unhappy in many aspects
of their lives This group was
eight percent of the sample.
� Sexually conservative. "The
overwhelming majority of this
style 11 percent of the total, are
married. Although sex is not cen-
tral to their lives, they are other-
wise happy
� Nonsexual. "Thirteen percent
of the respondents fall into this
category. They score low on all
three behavior traits and are very
unhappy with their lives and
bodies. These people have no in-
terest in sex
Phi Mu Alpha Brothers
Present Special Concert
Tonight at 7:30 p.m. the
brothers of the Zeta Psi chapter
of Phi Mu Alpha will present a
recital of American music in the
A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. This
program is the first of many
campus-wide activities the
chapter will undertake this year
to encourage and promote "the
highest standards of creativity,
performance, education and
research in music in America
Phi Mu Alpha is a professional
fraternity for men in music,
founded not only to provide
fellowship for students of music
but also to encourage profes-
sional development and advance
the role and stature of music in
American life.
In addition to Thursday's
recital, the brothers hope to in
troduce a service on Valentine's
Day, similar to the well known
singing telegram whereby they
will deliver a "message"
anywhere on campus. All pro
ceeds will go to a scholarship in
the School of Music.
Tonight's program will include
various solo and ensemble per
formances by the members of the
Phi Mu Alpha choir and their
probationary members. Admis-
sion is free and everyone is in-
vited to attend.
ADVERTISE
TARLANDING SEAFOOD
$$$�' 'Featuring The Finest
' �Si Fresh Seafood.
PiaBr Where QUALITY
Makes The DIFFERENCE
10S Airport Rood 7M4327

rm
'Adults s2 oo 5
CHILDREN 1
ANYTIME ��
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
BUCCANEER MOVIES
756-3307 � Greenville Square' Shopping Center
1:00-3:00-5:00-7:00-9:00
First Born-PG-13
Starts Tomorrow
b '


House of Hats
Ml O � ision Hats
Accessories
758-3025
405 Evans St.
Downtown Mall
1:00-3:05-5:10-7:15-9:20
Places In The Heart -PG
Held Over 2nd Week 2:00-4:30-7:00-9:15
enK��on.�- Little Drummer Girl -R
"�" LATE SHOW KRI-SAT " '
Open at 11:00pm & Objects of Desire
Starts at 11:30pm
NO PASSES jjRATED X J
COpyngtil 1984
Krogef S.lv en
OuantiTv Biqnts �?� ' ��
OPEN 24
600 Greenv
HOURS EVERYDAY
ille Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED iTFM POLiC'
E.i'n of rnpse advertised i�m
is required to De read .
.(vanaoie tor saie m eacn Kroger
S.1V on e�rept as specifically
noted m tnis ad if we do run
out of an item we win offer you
your cnoice of a comDaracie
item wnen avaiiaoie reflecting
tne same savings c; 3 ramenech
wnicn win entitle vou to pur
cnase tne advertised item at
tne advertised price within 50
days Only one vendor coupon
win De accepted per item
items and Prices
Effective Tnru sat
Oct 27 1984
X-DRY, PINK, COLD DUCK,
BRUT SPUMANTE OR
j. Roget
Champagne
KROGER
instant
coffee
10 oz
Jar
LIMIT 1 JAR PLEASE
Ltr.
BtlS
East Carolinian advertising
call 757-6366
Boiled
Ham
HOLLY FARMS CUT UP
MIXED FRYER PARTS OR GRADE A
whole
Fryers
Lb.
LIMIT 3 PKCS. PLEASE
Jj
A BEWITCHING
Black cat
cake
CALIFORNIA
Fresh
cauliflower
GREAT FOR
JACK-O-LANTERNS
Halloween
Pumpkins
Hd.
Hicks
(UPI) � Every cx-movie star � su j
Rock Hudson in "Dynasty of
Elliott Gould in a sitcom, and dieij
Jane Wyman in a soap � knows 1
TV is where the action is. toul
For every movie pan, there are exf
a dozen TV roles. The tube is a tun
warm security blanket, a financial on
bonanza, a career extender. Most
fading stars and newcomers wq
would give their eye teeth for a or
Classifieds
SALE
BROKE? Xmas S js aroura tne
corner Wind Chimes as a gifl s
rightforyou HighQuahty Inexper
sive and made inn Greenyi; Orders
being aken now 758 7997
FUJI DEL REY like new
Shimano power shifters :rar
deraiiers � new spec ai zee res
Chritophe Toe clipsstraps $225
call Connie 752 1472
PIANO FOR SAE Wanted res
sibie party to assume sma mon
thly payments on spinel console
piano Can be seer oca � Write
(include phone number Cr-
Manager, PC Box 521
BecKemeyer, IL 62219
MISC
LOST Pm Pursette ;Dn�a n r�g eye
contacts osf n or around Spe
Building Please ca 758 6740
reward offereo
REBE. WRITING CONTES'
deadline s Oc 29 �Monday Br
entries by Reoei or Med a Board of
fices by 5 p.m r zes adrzec
PERSONAL
YANKEE Congratulations o my
favorite bartencer Here comes e
green. Blondie
F.P your Southern part of Heaven
maKes �ne tell celest a . Unti r-e
next totat eclipse
CAK: Got to get that beeoe" So a
you're doing ore, casa vr 5e
the best MD from MO eve' L
GJR.
TONY: P -aes are Purple Bears
are Red, Pen. ;oves Tony ac ucy
Loves Free Happy Seventh anniver
sary. Love ya Today and A'Aa.s
Peni.
HEY BEAv Malty told yo- :
about the dirty nooks in the club
house. ie's oea the ec�. ou1
him. Love ya Mvtie
MIKE. MIkfc AM) THE REST OF THF
SIG EPS - THANKS FOR FAN
tastic homfcoming: LOVF
KATHV ND ELIZABETH
CAPTAIN After the roof ac nol
laying n the park I'm look nc I
ward to Palling. I mean going to e
ball. Here's fo your first P P
NANCv HOMA The Ptv Taus hope
you are feeing defer Come See LIS
Soon
MISSY CAYTON Congratuia' Una
on Homecoming Queen 1984 85
Your're looking great' The p-
Taus
IF THIS IS IT Get a 'ea F1
Lauoeraaie Hey RB where'd you gc
for fan break Alaska' He� Kreoe
there s a arop off sunscren a or
motion our of order get out of lawn
Hey Rick who sings this let's do
bingers i can't physically ac s
Mysville e kill va The Buon
gotta ourp! v ssing you pa
you puke get a reai fraternity We
have a real soror tv rn reu of
babysitting, suitcase of Busch.
tourists, gumbie sure enjoyed "e
space center Ya'H shouia have
gone Have you ever been t0
vorid? Lite s a beach, ch ch. Hac
great time We love yens War
Homoshit and chunkDuster
HAPPY HOUR Sigma Ph Epsilon
�hd Sigma Sigma Sigma are having
� happy hour on Tuesday Oct 23 af
�p.m Come party wth us
NEED M1
NY G. - A .P.O.
THE BROTHERS
THANKS t"o everybody n Jarvia
came out to help with the float
:iai thanks to travis tor ItM
trailer ano everpocv n House Coun
�H (especianv cardboard com I
WANTED
�TEREO System problem? Ab
�ihltely no charge" for repair
�BNmates at the Tech Shop Call
ITNineTee" Eighty' We thought
WRl'd like to know
!
j
e I
PC? I
cesl
senl
' ot
ne
I
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�����
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Mothers
Concert
id stature of music in
life
lit ion to Thursday's
e brothers hope to in-
ternee on Valentine's
lai to the well known
legram whereb they
ber a "message"
n campus All pro-
. to a wholarship in
Musk
fogram will include
li and ensemble per
!he members of the
!r�ha choii and their
I members Admis
nd eersone is in-
ihrarv
m "
MILDRENCiyn
ANYTIME �I'J
IVIES
ping C�nt�r
V.
� � 1
� eel
KROGER
Sandwich
Bread
39
KROCER
instant
coffee
2
29
JAR PLEASE
UP
GRADE A
c
EASE
great for
:k-o-lanterns
aiioween
umpkins
9
lousing
"
ci Mf.
oei
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 23. IMU 9
Hicks Heads For The Limelight
(UPl) � Every ex-movie star �
Rock Hudson in "Dynasty
Elliott Gould in a sitcom, and
Jane Wyman in a soap � knows
TV is where the action is.
For every movie part, there are
a dozen TV roles. The tube is a
warm security blanket, a financial
bonanza, a career extender. Most
fading stars and newcomers
would give their eye teeth for a
successful series, or a succession
of TV movies with those huge au-
diences out there loving them.
It takes guts and perhaps a
touch of lunacy for a performer,
expecially a relatively new face, to
turn away from TV to concentrate
on the feckless movie business.
Steve McQueen gambled and
won when he quit Wanted Dead
or Alive. Jim Garner enjoyed sue-
Classifieds
SALE
BROKE? Xmas is just around the
corner. Wind Chimes as a gift is
right for you. High Quality, Inexpen
sive and made inn Greenvill. Orders
being taken now. 758 7997.
FUJI DEL REY: like new �
Shimano power shifters, crank,
derailers � new specialized tires �
Chritophe toe clipsstraps � $225.
call Connie 752 1472.
PIANO FOR SALE: Wanted respon
sible party to assume small mon
thly payments on spinetconsole
piano. Can be seen locally. Write:
(include phone number) Credit
Manager, P.O. Box 521,
Beckemeyer, IL. 62219.
MISC
LOST: Pink Pursefte containing eye
contacts. Lost in or around Speight
Building Please call 758 6740 �
reward offered.
REBEL WRITING CONTEST:
deadline is Oct. 29 � Monday. Bring
entries by Rebel or Media Board of
fices by 5 p.m. Prizes awarded
PERSONAL
YANKEE: Congratulations to my
favorite bartender Here comes the
green. Blondie
F.P your Southern part of Heaven
makes me fell ceesfiai. . Until the
next total eclipse.
CAK Got to get that beeper. So far
you re doing pretty casual. You'll be
the best MD from MD ever Love
GJR
TONY Pirates are Purple. Bears
are Red, Peni Loves Tony and Lucy
i-oves Fred Happy Seventh anniver-
sary Love ya Today and Always.
Peni
HEY BEAV: Wally told your mom
about the dirty books in the club
house Let's beat the heck out of
him Love ya, Myrtle.
MIKE. MIKE AND THE REST OF THE
SIG EPS � THANKS FOR FAN-
TASTIC HOMECOMING! LOVE.
KATHY AND ELIZABETH.
CAPTAIN: After the roof and not
laying in the park, I'm looking for
ward to balling, I mean going to the
ball. Here's to your first. F.P.
NANCY HOMA: The Phi Taus hope
you are feeling better. Come See Us
Soon
MISSY CAYTON: Congratulations
on Homecoming Queen 1984-85.
Your're looking great! The Phi
Taus.
IF THIS IS IT: Get a real Ft.
L.auderdale, Hey RB where'd you go
for fall break Alaska? Hey Kredel
there's a drop off, sunscren, major
motion, our of order, get out of town,
Hey Rick who sings this, let's do
bingers, I can't physically do this,
titysville, te kill ya. The Button, I
gotta burp! Missing you, party till
you puke, get a real fraternity We
nave a real sorority, I'm tired of
oabysitting, suitcase of Busch,
tourists, gumbie, sure enjoyed the
space center. Ya'll should have
gone, Have you ever been to
seaworld? Life's a beach, ch-ch, Had
a great time. We love yens. Mary
Lou Homoshit and chunkbuster.
happy HOUR: Sigma Phi Epsilon
and Sigma Sigma Sigma are having
a happy hour on Tuesday, Oct. 23 at
9 p m. Come party with us.
JENNY G. - A.P.O.
THE BROTHERS.
NEEDS YOU!
THANKS: To everybody in Jarvis
who came out to help witft the float.
Special thanks to travis for the
trailer and everbody in House Coun-
cil (especially "cardboard commit-
tee
WANTED
STEREO: System problem? Ab-
solutely "no charge" for repair
estimates at the Tech Shop. Call
757 "Nineteen Eighty" We thought
you'd like to know.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST: With 15
years wants f ulltime typing at home.
IBM typewriter. Call 756 3660.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: experience, quality work,
IBM selectric typewriter. Lanie
Shive, 758-5301
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All typing needs,
758 5488758 8241
TRAVEL FIELD OPPORTUNITY:
Gain valuable marketing experience
while earning money. Campus
representative needed immediately
for spring break trip to Florida. Con
tact Bill Ryan at 1 800 282 6221
TYPING NEEDED: If you need so
meone to type papers of any kind for
you at reasonable rates, please call
756 8934 after 5:30 p.m.
$60 PER HUNDRED PAID for pro
cessing mail at home! Information,
send self-addressed, stamped
envelope. Associates, Box 95,
Roselle, N.J. 07203
CAMPUS REPS NEEDED: Ski
Free � position involves marketing
and selling quality ski and beach
trips on campus. Earn free trips and
high commissions. Call Summit
Tours 1-800 325-0439
PEOPLE TO BUY LIQUOR. Pi
Kappa Phi fraternity will soliciting
in front of all ABC stores Saturday
for their national philanthropy
P.U.S.H. (Play Units for Severly
Handicapped) � Won't you please
help the Pi Kapps give a handicap
ped child a P.U.S.H.
cess in movies after leaving TV,
but eventually he returned to the
tube.
Two years ago Catherine Hicks
turned up her pretty tip tilted nose
and walked away from TV to try
her luck with movies.
Catherine who?
Hicks, Catherine Hicks; who
played the title role in the ABC
TV movie Marilyn: The Untold
Story, a video biography of
Marilyn Monroe. Catherine also
may be remembered for the failed
TV series Tucker's Witch.
God knows Catherine was not a
household name when she decided
to drop TV, especially when of-
fers were pouring in for new series
and TV films. To the public she
was just another pretty blonde.
But producers and Hollywood in-
siders detected and indefinable
something in her personality, the
way she photographed, the
spunky underlying character that
spelled stardom. Catherine
recognized it in herself somehow
and took the plunge.
For two years she was absent
from the tube. The assumption in
some quarters was that she had
been just another cutie caught up
in Hollywood's revolving door.
But no, Catherine is starring in
two movies currently showing;
Garbo Talks, and The Razor's
Edge. She co-stars, moreover,
with Ryan O'Neal in Fever about
to shoot in Las Vegas.
A smiling Catherine still isn't
sure how success came so quickly.
"At the time I didn't think it
was a particularly difficult deci-
sion to quit TV she said. "I had
done Marilyn, Valley of the Dolls,
and Tucker's Witch and it was
time to move on to something
else.
"Looking back, I guess it took
a lot of faith and belief in
miracles. I was optimistic about
getting good roles in movies,
although I realized that 75 percent
of acting parts today are in TV
"I was visiting my old school,
Notre Dame, last summer (1983)
when my agent called and told me
to fly to New York to see (Direc-
tor) John Byrun and (Comedian)
Bill Murray who was going to star
in The Razor's Edge.
"They had talked to hundreds
of actresses in New York,
Hollywood, and London. But I
didn't know that. I wasn't awed
by Bill because I'd never heard of
him. After an hour of talk, Bill
said I was the one he wanted
When The Razor's Edge was
completed, Catherine returned to
Hollywood and spent three mon-
ths refusing TV offers. Out of the
blue, Director Sidney Lumet, im-
pressed with a reading she had
done for him months earlier for
The Verdict called from New
York.
Back she went to read with
Anne Bancroft for Garbo Talks.
Zap! Catherine had her second
movie role, which she completed
last May.
There followed another four
months of unemployment and
determination not to give in to the
blandishments of the terrible
tube.
Then, voila, along came the
"fever" offer with O'Neal
Curiously, Catherine was better
paid in TV. And she lives with the
insecurity that she may never
work in another feature film as
long as she lives.
"Doing a TV series was a plea-
sant surprise she said. "I liked
working every day, coming home
tired on Friday evenings like
everyone else in the world. 1 don't
like sitting around for months
waiting for movies
"But movies are unexplored
territory for me. It takes a dif-
ferent kind of acting. Movies
magnify so that the demand for
truthfulness is much greater.
"Movies are scarier, too. The
time, talent and money and effort
are all put together. There's more
demand for excellence
"But the real reason I prefer
movies is there's more magic in
them
Apply now in in Room 234 of Mendenhall Student
Center to be on the day represenative on the Student
Union Board of Directors.
The responsibilities of the members of the Board of
Directors include:
Selecting the Student Union President
Approving committee chairpersons
Approving the Student Union Budget
Setting polocy for the Student Union
DEADLINE TO APPL Y: Friday, November 1,1984
Just Arrived In Paperback!
Pet Sematary
by Stephen King
' 'The Most Frightening Book
King Has Ever Written. "
Available At
Central Book and News
Greenville Square
Shopping Center
Open 7 Days
A Week
9:30-9:30
jl. W!I XVH i
T��.
XT V -V
Winterville J.C's
presents
8th Annual Haunted House
Oct. 27-31st
7:30 pm-untU Nightly
-Thurs. ECU Night
reduced Admission wID.
Located: 21 miles east of
Winterville on State Rd. 1709
watch for signs.
'LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN"
One Year
Warranty
Against Factory Defects On All
Parts Of The Frame
Spring Hinge Frames
$5495
Mttal Sprinc Hingt FRAMES By L'AMY
With Single Vision Ltnsts
With Lint Bifocals
(Cataract teases apt tadeeta.
64
95
Qleea or Plastic Lenses Powers Of Plus Of Minus 4 Diopters
(Tints Extra) (No Other Coupon Applicable)
TMS AD MUST ACCOMPANY OFFEA' Ends Nov. 2,1984
25 � OFF All Non-prescription Ray Ban Sunglasses
MM �M Oocto Ol Vow .
MCtMVIu.t STOMI ONLY
pucians
Om!� 4�pm Max ��!
Iiicmi Knm�y Dnwnmn Opucur
Poctora Put
PAPA LKATZ
Your Adult Entertainment Center
Saturday Night
Best in Beach and Top 40
Happy Hour 8-11 2 for 1
Free Admission
Wednesday Night
Ladies Lockout
Halloween Costume Contest
Free Wine & Beer
Highballs 50C
For Ladies 8:30-10:00
Men Admitted at 10:00
Best Costume
Lady's 1st Prize $50
Men's 1st Prize $50
Prizes will be given
away at 12 midnight
A
Papa Katz Is A Private Club
For Members & Guests
We Have All ABC Permits
10th St Ext At
Riverbluff Rd
� m ia a � ��� � -
aa� ��� a -aafcajsO�! at iM .afc
i

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1 HI si KOl IN1AN
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Corrections
In the Oct. 23 issue ol I he 1 asi
Carolinian Renee Roberson,
2nd runnei up during last
weekend's ho m e c o m i n g
festivities, was incorrectly iden-
tified as Crystal Fray. We deeplj
regret the error.
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Meet your friends on slopes os et Xmas h ilida �
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DON'T FORGET Piedmor : Xirline's new �� .
� adent fares
all foi booking requirements:
C all or come by: QUIXOTE IRAVKL8, INC
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1 QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
Also, Mams Martin's perfor-
mance was postponed until
March 13, lVKS ai g pm ini
Wright Auditorium. Wei
apologize tor the inconvenience
Dance Auditions
Dance auditions for the East
olina Dance Theatie hae
been scheduled for Monday and
ruesday, Nov. 5 and b, in the
Messick Theatre Arts Center.
I he auditions will begin at 6:30
p m each evening in Dance
Studio 114.
Each year the East Carolina
Dance Theatre produces a con-
cert representing ballet, jazz and
dem styles The pieces are
reographed b members of
Da ce Faculty in the ECU
Department of rheatre Arts, and
� past nine sears the con-
erts have plaved to "standing
room onl " audiences.
. to Dance Coor-
Patricia Weeks,
:ers should be warmed up
dance b 6:30 p.m.
" se who wish to audition
ild wear leotards and
Soul Quartet
Moving Up
Hy DAN ID SMIHKRINCION
Staff V nlrr
mdei tai.vthe
P� t hers,theNew
il quartet.aren't the
deserve tcbe.
lebuialbumfail-
5ieatethehave poor
.Netg g e s t
-e set,
.�aed bel�local
1ickily, HlackTop
th� fa thto sign the
thers to a new contract in time
a ire ne of these sets on
nyl Seville-Ization recorded at
a New Orleans night club called
features a variety oi
id immense talent. The
� im has a "back-to-the basics"
ind, opting to spotlight the
Nevilles vocal talents instead of
the overproduced syncopation
thai nfiltrates so many of the re
May be that's why
Neville Brothers aren't
popular Their records are too
,e to real emotion for the
rd-buving public.
While well-known as fine
alists, I think the Nevilles
. e bee underrated as musi-
tns. Charles Neville displays his
. Is in "Caravan" with a
rable soprano saxophone
Brother Art's piercing
keyb ards shine throughout the
x rds, and Cyril's powerhouse
. . ming provides the backbone
: all the tune
-s I've said before, these boys
need v.o introduction as vocalists.
Nevilles crooning style can
rival the best of them as "All
ese Things" Kr;ngs to mind the
ink Sinatra ballads of the '50s.
always Cyril's raw, gritty
ah tear at your heart song
after song. On the Little Willie
n classic "Fever the
thers combine their voices for
inredi ble results. The
smoothness of art in the passion
Cyril forms a chemistry that
tingles the spine.
The most curious thing about
the album is that Aaron Nevill's
als have been underplayed. In
past, he was the undisputed
leader of the group. Here, his
solos are the weakest of the
bunch Aaron destroys his own
priceless performance with a sub-
dued, mundane reading of "Tell
It Like It Is "
But, alas, this is a minor
discrepancy. The Neville
Brothers have travelled a long
road since the '60s in their quest
for commercial success, and sad-
ly, to no avail.
While Sevukke-lzation may
no' be the perfect soul album, the
Neville Brothers leave most of
their contemporaries in the dust
when it comes to sincerity. And
that's the meaning of soul.
footloose tights, and if thev have
them, should bring ballet, pointe
and or jazz shoes Some audi
tions will also be in bare feet. The
call-back date and time will be
announced at the audition. ECU
students, staff, faculty, and local
residents are all invited to audi
tion.
The Dance Theatre concert is
scheduled for Feb. 20-23 in the
McGinnis Theatre at 8:15 p.m.
For further information, call
757-6390.
JAYCEES HAUNTED HOUSE
MUMFORD ROAD (Across From G'vlle Utilities Operation Center)
Oct. 26 thru il 7:00pm to 1 Ipm
Sponsored By Greenville Jaycees
,ilfc II hOl-AHL
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YOU LL BE AERA
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ATTIC
Thur. & Kri.
Oct. 25 & 26
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Sat. Oct 27th
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OCTOBER 31st
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THE EAST CAJtOt INIAN
Sports
OCTOBER 25. 1984
Page 11
6-0 South Carolina Awaits Pirates
Tailback Jimmy Walden (36) had an impressive five-yard per carry
average last Saturday, but fullback Bubba Bunn did itall.
By RANDY MEWS
Spurn Editor
ECU head football coach Ed
Emory said his team's meeting
with ninth ranked South Carolina
this weekend will be the toughest
game of the year for his young
squad.
"South Carolina is off their
best start in the school's
history Emory said in his week-
ly press conference. "I think
they're one of the best teams in
the country
What impresses Emory most
about the Gamecocks is they're a
team molded by spirit and en-
thusiasm, not individual stars.
"South Carolina is playing the
way we did last year (8-3)
Emory said. "They're playing the
game of football the way it
should be played
�mory said he doesn't know of
another team in the country that
plays with as much vigor and ex-
citement as USC, and said play-
ing in front of 76,000 people at
USC's Wiiiams-Brice won't help
matters.
Last year at about this time
ECU Faces Toughest Yet
JIVYW cm �
ECU (nationally ranked in
several publications) faced fifth
ranked Florida in front of apr-
roximately 78,000 people, but
Emory said the circumstances are
a bit different for this weekend's
game.
Emory said teamwork is the
biggest difference between last
year's team and the one this year.
"Last year we had team unity
he said. "Everybody played
together, and everybody knew
how to work for one common
goal � victory.
The philosophy is simple. Last
year before the Florida game
ECU was 5-1 and one of the best
team's in the country � and
that's how they played. This
year's team isn't enjoying the
same success as a year ago, so
thier desire is not at such a high
level
Although Emory doesn't exude
the same confidence as he did
about last year's team, he was
pleased with the victory against
East Tennessee State in last
weekend's homecoming game.
The best thing 1 can say about
homecoming is that we won
Emory said. "All the practices
and all the scrimmages don't
mean a thing unless you can put it
all together on a Saturday after-
noon
Bubba Bunn romped for a
career high 161 yards and two
touchdowns to lead the ground
attack for the Pirates against ET-
SU, although he had only rushed
for 114 career yards prior to
Saturday's contest.
Last week in practice, Bunn
made the transition from tailback
to fullback to accomodate an in-
jury to starter Reggie Branch,
and now the possibility exists that
he will start against the
Gamecocks.
Emory also utilized the talents
of quarterbacks Ron Jones and
Darrell Speed, and for the first
time this season, they both had
good games. The two combined
to complete seven of 10 passes for
101 yards and a touchdown.
Ricky Nichols, who was
responsible for ECU's only touc-
down reception (46 yards from
Jones), also had a good game as
he moved up to sixth plae on the
all-time ECU reception list.
Although several players per-
fromed well for the Pirate-
was the 19th ranked Division
I-AA Buccaneers that domin
play thoughout the game T
executed 83 palys compared to 50
for ECU, they were ahead in fir-t
downs 24-9 and they had pos
sion of the ball for 17 more
minutes than the Pirates.
Emory said those statistics c
cerned him, and that his team
must improve this Saturdav
"We let them get down near the
goal line too many times It we
do that against South Carolina,
they're going to blow us out.
The Gamecocks, under
year coach Joe Morrison, tea
with Washington and Brigham
Young as the onlv unbeaten and
untied teams in the nation at 6-0.
Oklahoma and Texas are nexl
with no losses and one tie
Unfortunately, it doesn't lo
as if the Pirates are going to be
able to put an end to the Cocl
winning streak. Game time is
for 1:30 p.m. in Columbia. S (
W mm Mlk - A -UT -w ineoestthingl can sav about lones), also had a good game as for 1:30 p.m. in Columbia
Bradley's 214 Low Pirate Score Since 1976
B RIC K McCORMAC enough to be doino better h�i he ho, � a- u�� uJT� .
By RICK McCORMAC
Staff WMtaf
Mike Bradley shot a three-
round total of 214 in last
weekend's John Ryan Memorial
Golf Tournament, which is the
lowest total in a three day tourn;
ment for a ECU golfer since
1976.
"1 was pleased with the way I
played Bradley said. "The
course was in good shape and the
greens weren't too slow or fast. If
you look at the team totals many
of the scores were good
According to ECU golf coach
Bob Helmick. Bradley's 214 total
could have been lower. "Mike
Bradley had two birdies the first
day and five each of the last two
days, yet he finished one shot
over par Helmick said.
"Michael is playing well
enough to be doing better, but he
is young and is still making minor
mental errors that keep him from
��� -

Mike Bradley
being under par
While Bradley realizes he could
have done better, he was not
disappointed with his perfor-
mance. "If you had told me
before the tournament that I was
going to make 12 birdies, I would
have thought that I would finish
in the top three or maybe even
win the tournament Bradley
said.
"I bogeyed the first hole all
three days, so I was always down
and working hard to get strokes
back Bradley continued.
Bradley cited the second round
as possibly the key to his fifth
place finish. "1 was three over
par after 12 holes, but I kept my
patience and worked hard and
made three birdies to come in at
even par Bradley said.
Bradley was a CO-MVP last
year as a freshman, and has im-
proved tremendously this season
Bunn Switches To Tailback,
Rips ETSU For 161 Yards
By SCOTT COOPER
Staff Writer
Junior fullback Bubba Bunn
had only rushed for 116 yards in
his entire career prior to ECU's
homecoming game, but he ripped
the East Tennessee State defense
tor 161 yards and two
uchdowns on just 14 carries last
Saturday.
Bubba's performance sparked
the Pirate squad to a 24-6 victory
over the Division 1-AA 19th
ranked Buccaneers. "He had a
heck of a game said Robrt Bar-
row, ECU's running back coach.
"We knew he had the ability, and
he showed super effort
Bubba scored ECU's first
touchdown in the second quarter
on a 29-yard burst up the middle,
hile getting the Pirates' final
TD on a 42-yard gallop with just
over a minute left to play. "We
just wanted to run the clock out,
but Bubba made a great effort
and scored Coach Emory
stated. "There's no question in
my mind about Bubba Bunn be-
ing the player of the game
When asked about his perfor-
mance Saturday, Bunn said he
as glad to get the chance to play
and to contribute to the team. "I
was very pleased to do so well, it
really gave me a chance to prove
myself
Although Bunn had an
outstanding game, he gave a lot
of credit to the offensive line.
"When you can get into the
secondary without even being
touched, you're going to have a
big day Bunn remarked.
"He's strong, he's quick, he
shows good balance and good
foot agility ECU offensive
coordinator Don Murray said.
"He can do things as the great
backs can
A lot of Bunn's agility comes
from the fact that he was a
tailback only one week before the
East Tennessee State game. He
made the switch to fill if for in-
jured starter Reggie Branch. "I
banted to do a decent job there
Bubba said. "I didn't want us to
lose the game because of the
fullback spot
Bubba said that the switch to
fullback wasn't that hard. "It's
still a running back position, and
1 have confidence being back
there
"Bubba is big and strong and
can play both tailback as well as
fullback Coach Barrow
remarked.
Bubba says that fullback is a
tough position because of the
blocking responsibilities.
"You've got to get in there and
block those big guys on the
defensive line However, the
tailback position is not an easy
one either. "There's more runn-
ing involved in the tailback spot,
and you usually carry the ball
more also Bubba said. "I don't
have a preference to either posi-
tion, I just have a love for being a
running back
"He's had some academic and
other problems over the last two
years, but he has come on to con-
tribute to the team Coach
Emory commented.
"I let football get too big in my
life Bubba said. "Football will
fall into place, studying dosen't
� you have to put out that added
effort
Not playing much might be dif-
ficult for some people, but not
Bubba Bunn. "It takes a special
type of person � to not play
much � and to keep such a
positive frame of mind Coach
Barrow explained. "He's shown
a great attitude all year long
Bubba works out on the
weights twice a week. In addi-
tion, he studies films to ready
himself for his new fullback posi-
tion. He expressed that football
at the collegiate level is much
more competitive. "It's like a big
race every day Bunn said.
"You've got to learn to become a
real good practice player
The 5'11 206-pound fullback
had an impressive athletic career
at Goldsboro High School.
Besides being Goldsboro's all-
time leading rusher, he was a
three-time conference champ in
wrestling and was an all-
conference selection in track for
three straight years. However,
Bubba thought it would be best
to stick with one sport at the col-
lege level.
Being a highly sought after
high school player, Bubba was
recruited by some top college
powers such as Clemson, N.C.
State, Colorado and UNC. Bub-
ba chose ECU because "it is a
program on the move and Coach
Emory has such a positive at-
titude. Every year the program
here was getting bigger and big-
ger, and I wanted to be a part of
the growth at ECU
Looking to next week's game
at South Carolina, Bubba feels
ECU can hold its own against the
top ten team. "I'm real op-
timistic Bubba said. "We have
to let it all hang out and play to
our best ability
Bubba has two sisters and two
brothers. His older brother Dan-
ny played football at UNC a few
years ago. "He helped me deal
with the pressure and politics of
college football Bubba said.
Moreover, Bubba's biggest in-
spiration comes from his mother.
She raised the five children as a
single parent. "She was a mother
and a father to us Bubba said.
"She has always served as an in-
spiration for me � she's the
greatest person in my life
In the future, Pirate fans will
will see a lot more exciting runn-
ing from Bubba Bunn. "Bubba
will continue to improve and get
more and more playing time
Coach Don Murray exclaimed.
"He was merely waiting his turn
to show Pirate fans what he's
capable of doing
"I knew he had the potential,
so I wasn't surprised to see what
he 'did Oast Saturday) com-
mented Essray Taliaferro �
teammate and good friend of
Bunn.
According to Barrow, the
Pirate coaching staff is expecting
to use Bunn a lot more in the
future � so it should be no
suprise for Pirate fans to one day
see number 27 make his mark in
Pirate football history.
as his score of 214 is seven shots
better than either of his two tour-
naments at Duke last year.
With this being the last tourna-
ment of the fall season, Bradley is
looking forward to playing in the
Gator Bowl Invitational in Dec.
at Ponte Verde, Fla.
"The Gator Bowl is a new
tournament, and is played on one
of the finest golf layouts in the
country Bradley said. "The
scores will be higher because the
course is so tough, but I'm look-
ing forward to playing
Also in the future for Bradley
and the rest of the Pirate golfers
is the spring season in which the
ECAC South and NCAA tour-
naments are played.
"I'm looking looking forward
to the spring. This is my second
year and I want to do as much as
possible to help the team
Bradley proclaimed. "I have
some rough edges still, but 1 have
a lot of time between now and the
spring to work on my game
"In the spring, Michael will be
under par for at least one tourna-
ment, and he may even win a
tournament Helmick said. "I
feel he is capable of being as good
a golfer as ECU has produced in
the past ten years
Bradley began playing golf
when he was ten or eleven, and
taught himself how to play. "I
tend to play more on feel, it just
comes to me naturally Bradley
said.
The PGA .tour possibly lies in
the future for Bradley, but he re-
mains realistic about his chances.
"There are so many good players
on the pro tour, that it's a
longshot of making it.
"I plan to enjoy m (
career, and see what happens �
if the opportunity presents it-
I plan to give it a shot, but if i
don't make it 1 won't be too
disappointed because I rea
how hard it is
One of the most difficult thin-
about being a member of the g
team is that coach HelmklTrc
quires all team members to have a
2.0 grade point average. "It's .
easy to miss so much school and
stay caught up in your elassc-
You just have to work hard and
try to get caught up Bradk
said.
. "I enjov golf and it's big pa
of my life � but it'v not the 01
thing. If I do bad in a golf tour-
nament it's not the end of the
world

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12
THE EAST CAROL INIAN
OCTOBER 25, 1984
Pirates Prepare For Red Hot Gamecocks
Winning at Home: Both victories
for East Carolina during the 1984
season have been in Ficklen
Stadium. There was a 34-27 win
over Georgia Southern on Sept.
22 and last week's victory over
East Tennessee State.
The two triumphs upped the
Pirate's record in Ficklen over
the last three years to an im-
pressive 10-1 (.909). ECU's only
loss at home since the 1981
season was a 17-0 setback at the
hands of the Temple Owls on
Sept. 8, 1984.
The Pirates have one home
game remaining in 1984 � Nov.
10 against Southern Miss.
On the Road Again: Saturday's
1:30 p.m. kickoff with the South
Carolina Gamecocks in W illiams-
Brice Stadium will mark the sixth
road game for ECU this season.
The Pirates, an impressive 7-6 on
the road over the last two
seasons, have yet to win a game
in an opponent's stadium this
season.
ECU is 0-5 on the road in 1984
and face one more road contest
after the Gamecocks � the
Pirates travel to Southwestern
Louisiana on Nov. 3. This is the
third straight season that the
Pirates have faced the task of
seven games away from home,
but that will change in 1985. For
the first time since the 1981
season ECU will play five home
games, facing Miami-Florida,
South Carolina, Tulsa, Temple,
and a team to be announced.
Bunn Arrives: With the fullback
position hurting a little entering
last week's Homecoming game
with East Tennessee State, junior
Bubba Bunn decided to ease the
pain a bit.
Starter Reggie Branch and
backups Anthony Simpson and
Bobby Clair were nursing ankle
injuries, so Bunn was moved
from tailback to fullback last
week during practice.
What Bunn responded with
was 161 yards rushing on 14 car-
ries and two touchdowns on runs
of 29 and 42 yards. The effort
earned the junior from
Goldsboro ECAC Player of the
Week honors.
The effort was the best by an
ECU back since Tony Baker
rushed for 135 yards in ECU's
40-6 victory over William and
Mary on Nov. 12, 1983. In that
game Baker also rushed for two
touchdowns. Entering the game,
Bunn had only rushed for 116
yards on 26 carries in his previous
two seasons with the Pirates.
Blanked: East Tennessee State's
two field goals last week marked
the first time this season that the
Pirates defense kept an opponent
out of the end zone. The effort
marked the first time the ECU
defense has accomplished that
feat since holding Missouri of the
Big Eight Conference to two field
goals during last year's victory in
Columbia, Mo.
Second Quarter Blues Snapped:
The Pirates' two touchdowns in
the second quarter of last week's
victory marked the first time this
season that ECU had scored a
touchdown during that quarter.
Prior to Bubba Bunn's 29-yard
scoring run and quarterback Ron
Jones' 46-yard scoring pass to
flanker Ricky Nichols, the
Pirates sole offensive output in
the second quarter had been two
Jeff Heath field goals against
Georgia Southern and Tulsa.
The touchdowns were the first
scored by ECU in that period
since the William and Mary game
last season.
216 h TKNTH 1
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Efficient Passing: Sophomore
Darrell Speed and freshman Ron
Jones combined to complete
7-of-10 passes for 101 yards last
week for an impressive 70 percent
completion rate. Speed, who
started the game, was 4-of-6
while Jones came in off the bench
and connected on three of his
four attempts, including a
46-yard scoring strike to Ricky
Nichols in the second quarter.
The two-quarterbacks system
was the second straight week
Head Coach Ed Emory has used
his two young quarterbacks in the
same game. The same occured
during ECU's 31-20 loss to Tulsa
on Oct. 13.
Alone at the Top: With their 6-0
record, the South Carolina
Gamecocks stand alone at the top
of the NCAA Division I-A in-
dependents list. The Gamecocks
are the only major Division I-A
independent that remains
unbeaten and untied. In fact, the
Gamecocks, under second-year
Head Coach Joe Morrison, team
with Washington and Brigham
Young as the nation's only
unbeaten and untied Division I-A
schools. Oklahoma and Texas are
next with no losses and one tie.
Home Sweet Home: Incredibly,
Saturday's game with ECU will
mark the Gamecocks' sixth home
game this season. South Carolina
did not make a road trip until last
week's 36-32 victory over Notre
Dame in South Bend, Ind which
was televised live by ESPN.
6-0 Is a Record: South Carolina
has never won six games in a row
to start a season in the school's
history. The closest the
Gamecocks have come is a 6-1
final season record during the
1920 season. In 1928, the
Gamecocks ran off five straight
wins only to finish with two
losses, two ties and just one vic-
tory in their last five games.
Nichols Continues to Move Up:
With his three receptions for 60
yards against ETSU last week,
senior flanker Ricky Nichols con-
tinued his climb in the ECU
record book.
He now has 54 career recep-
tions to his credit, moving him in-
to sixth place on the all-time
school reception list, just four
short of fifth place Tim Dameron
(1970-72).
Morrison Successful: South
Carolina Head Coach Joe Mor
rison has turned the Gamecocks
around in just his second season
Morrison, who arrived in Col
umbia in 1983 from New Mexico,
where he guided the Lobos to a
10-1 mark in 1982, has compiled
an impressive 11-6 record in his
two seasons with the Gamecocks.
With six victories in six games,
the Gamecocks are guarenteed of
their first winning season since
1981, when the Gamecocks
posted a 6-5 record under Head
Coach Jim Carlen.
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CLEMSON iiN( STATj
MARYLAND at 1)1 tO
I N( tit MKMPHIs STA1
VM ' MARY at UAKf
TENNESSEE at GA. IK.
SML at IEXAS
GEORGIA at kKNTlK'
I LA at ARIZONA M
PF.NN si at WES1 a
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Al Bl RN at Miss si
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RlON at WASHING1
II I INOIs x i HHH
Rl K.hRs at BOSTON (
OLE MISS at AM)tRBI
NY at PUT
Powers S
Scott Powers
sad sam
Rands Mews
Tina Marnsthak
Jennifer Jendrasiak
Oreji Rideout
14-4
13-5
16-2
i it
li
13-5
three game lead ovci v
Rand
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cocks

1 Ur I AST AROl !MAN OCTOBER 2' I9M 3
usi foui
1 in' Dameron
hi Vujth
Moi
� V ks
� � ason
S v
l

l
v games.
The Experts Pick This Week ys Winners
�v
OUT!
A Haladi
Ft l at SOUTH CAROLINA
(1 EMSON at N.C. STTE
MARYLAND �1 DUKE
I V at MEMPHIS STATE
WM. ' MARV. at WAKE
rENNESSEE at GA. TECH
sMl at LEXAS
GEORGIA at KENTUCKY
L'CI al ARIZONA ST.
PENN ST. al WEST VA.
V A IKH at rEMPLE
URIRN at MISS ST.
NO IRK I) AMI at LSU
RIZONA at WASHINGTON
H 1 INOIS at MICHIGAN
RUTGERS at BOSTON COLL.
Ol Y Mls at VANDERBILT
V at PIIT
POWERS
use
(lemson
Maryland
Memphis St.
Wake
Tennessee
Texas
Georgia
UCLA
West Va.
Va. Tech
Auburn
LSU
Washington
Michigan
Boston Coll
Vanderbilt
Pitt
Powers Stretches Lead
ale
I ivlIlI
S �(( Powers
Sad Sam
t Mews
I uta Maroschak
Jennifer .lendrasiak
'g Hideout
Last
Week
14-4
13-5
16-2
12-6
11-7
13-5
Overall
70-36
67-39
66-40
64-42
61-45
60-46
Pet.
.660
.632
.622
.604
.575
.566
Games
Behind
3
4
6
9
10
Powers has taken a
game lead over Sad Sam.
Rand Mews pulling to
four games with just a
Can Powers hold on, or will
somebody come from back in
the pack to unseat him. Check
next week to find out what will
happen.
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A ��� "eed for specialized health care continues to
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14
I l S1 t AROIONIAN (KTOBHR23, 1984
I
Jordan Looked On To Revive Chicago Bulls
CHICAGO (UPI) - Every General Man,o,r dh tu� rutJ,
CHICAGO (UPI) - Every
couple of years, an NBA rookie
comes along who is expected to
lead his franchise out of losing
doldrums toward a berth in the
playoffs.
Sometimes the rookie can do
it: a Lew Alcindor with
Milwaukee, a Larry Bird with
Boston.
The Chicago Bulls are looking
at Michael Jordan, the 6-foot-6
Olympic hero and North
Carolina All-America, as a sa -
of the franchise.
The Bulls have not only been
second class NBA citizens as far
as their record has been concern-
ed they haven't made the
playoffs in seven seasons � but
they have grown out of favor in
victorv starved Chicago.
Attendance dipped to around
5,000 a game last year as the
Bulls' mediocre play � they dip-
ped to 29-53 failed to create
the kind of interest that the
Chicago Cubs had done in
baseball
"We realized that when we
dratted Michael Jordan, we were
not drafting for our major need
which was a center said
General Manager Rod Thorn
"But when you have a player of
his ability available in the draft,
you take him
Jordan, who will play both
guard and forward in the pros,
will be counted on to score
points; set up plays; play defense
and, possibly most important of
all, dazzle fans back into the
Chicago stadium.
"The thing people have to
understand is that this is not just
Michael Jordan's team says
Jordan, the No. 3 choice in the
June NBA collegiate draft. "This
is a team. I just want to fit in and
contribute
But during the preseason ex-
hibition campaign, Jordan show-
ed the flashes of brilliance that
millions saw at the L os Angeles
Olympics and during his stellar
three-year career with the Tar
Heels.
Just whether Jordan's abilities
will be able to turn the franchise
into a winner or start drawing
fans back to the stadium remains
a major question. The club did
have Reggie Theus, who also was
a stylish player capable of rous-
ing a crowd, for several years but
Theus couldn't turn the club into
a winner or hometown favorite
and was traded to Kansas City.
Jordan, who turned down a
chance to play a senior year with
Coach Dean Smith at UNC to
enter his name in the draft, does
have the style and exciting moves
to thrill a crowd but it may not be
enough to turn the club into an
instant winner.
"I don't think there is any
question that Michael Jordan is
one of the most exciting players
to come into the NBA in years, "
said Coach Kevin Loughery.
"We understand that there are
other things we are going to have
to improve on, however, if we are
to be a winner
Jordan, who signed a reported
seven year, multimillion dollar
contract in September, actually
will be playing a position that
may be the Bulls' strongest. The
club already has guards Quintin
Dailey, Ennis Whatley and Ron-
nie Lester � all former No. 1
draft choices.
Loughery has considered team
ing Dailey, the team's sixth man
last year, with Jordan to
capitalize on both players' scor-
ing ability. But he still faces pro-
blems getting a frontcourt sup-
porting cast for his talented
guard tandem.
Chicago still has journeyman
Dave Corzine at center but did
move to give him relief by trading
promising guard Mitchell Wig-
gins to Houston for veteran
center Caldwell Jones
"The group we have this year
seems to be together as a team
Corzine notes. "I like that feel
ing. It's something that goes
hand-in-hand with a winning
season
The team's leading scorer last
year, forward Orlando
Woolndge, also returns for a
fourth season. But the major
question mark is the other for-
ward spot.
Jordan, college basketball's
player of the year last year, could
conceivably play some in the
frontcourt but his style and size
dictate that he remain in the
backcourt.
The Bulls, who have never won
an NBA championship, have
been in and out of negotiations
with forward David Greenwood
since the end of last season
Greenwood was eligible to
become a free agent but hasn't
signed with another club Realiz-
ing his market value may have
diminished, the club reportedlv
reduced its original offer to
Greenwood in recent weeks
Regardless of his surrounding
cast, Jordan will draw attention
in other NBA cities because of his
Olympic success He is also
prepared for the rigors of NBA
traveling and the possibihtv
consistent losing.
"If 1 survived the Olympic
and Bobbv Knight Jordan sa-
of his ISA team coach, "then I'll
be readv for anything "
Soccer Gets Underway
Bv IKNNFTTK ROTH
Staff Writer
Now that flag football is over,
intramural teams have taken to
the fields again to kick around
with soccer.
Although these round ball mat-
ches have just begun, there are a
few teams who have already
come out on top. These are the
starting favorites:
Men's Independent: The Bones,
Omni. Nads.
Residence Hal! women: L'mstead
Jockettes. Sorority: Sigma Sigma
Sigma.
Fraternity: Tau Kappa Epsiion.
Both women's Independent
and men's Residence Hall divi-
sions seem to be up for grabs at
this earh date
( o-Rec flag root ball is well
underuav as :eanis battle it out
for top honors on the gridiron.
At this point, it looks as though
the favorite Third Regiment will
chalk up another championship.
Teams picked to dethrone the
troop are: KA Rebels. Spoilers,
Chaos. Love Brokers.
While manv of you were lying
in bed dreaming of a Pirate foot-
' all '� � ry, 'here were a number
of brave running anywhere
trom 2? to 5.0 miles homecom-
ing morning. These participants
ran in the intramural Cross Cam-
pus Run. Sixty men entered the
2.5 mile race and 1? females.
( ongratulations are in order to
ivho participated and especial-
!v to ECU student Greg Richard-
son who won the 2.5 mile event
with a time of 14:24. and Kathy
Handy who boasted a time of
19:36 ro lead the women.
In the 5.0 mile race, Bill White
in the Alumni division captured
first place honors out of 23 male
participants with a time of 28:06.
Jeannie Stes, first of only five
female participants blew by with
a time of 34:42. All the races were
tight with the victors crossing the
tape only seconds before the
chasers passed by.
Co-Rec basketball begins Nov.
5 but registration starts next week
UNC Back
Wins Honor
GREENSBORO, N.C. (UPI)
North Carolina tailback
William Humes, who scored the
�vinning touchdown in the Tar
Heels' win over North Carolina
State, was named the Atlantic
Coast Conference's offensive
ack of ther week Monday.
Humes rushed for 156 yards on
27 carries, scored three times and
ran for a two-point conversion in
his first start for North Carolina.
On the Tar Heels' 74-yard winn-
ing drive, the sophomore from
Asheville. N.C. carried on eight
of 13 plays.
Oct. 29-30. Come bv rooom 204
Memorial Gym to sign up. Up-
coming November activities in-
clude: Free Throw Contest
registration (Nov.7), Preseason
basketball registration (Nov.26).
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 25, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 25, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.370
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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