The East Carolinian, October 23, 1984






She
(Uarnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No. 17
Tuesday October 23, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Scholarship Program
Established At ECU
Shown from left are three of people behind the new scholarship program: Riley Roberson, chairman of the
scholarship committee; ECU Chancellor John Howell; and C. Ralph Kinsev, chairman of the Board of
Trustees.
Trustees Talk Pee Dee
The subject of the name of
the ECL Pirate mascot
presented itself once again last
week at a meeting of the ECL
Board of Trustees.
SGA President John
Rainey, who is also a member
of the Board of Trustees, told
the board about the outcome
of the Student Government
Association election, where
approximately 82 percent of
the students voting indicated
that they did not like the
Pirate's name Pee Dee.
Rainey said he wanted the
board's other members to be
in
aware of student interest
changing the name of
Pirate. The subject was
discussed, with one trustee.
Thomas Bennett, expressing
concern over whether the
number of students voting was
a representative sample.
The matter is currently in
the hands of Ken Karr, direc-
tor of athletics, according to
ECL Chancellor John Howell.
Howell said last week that he
has told the Department of
Athletics to take the student
vote into consideration in
deoiduifi on the feasibility of a
name change for the mascot.
Repeated attempts have
been made to contact Karr,
but he has remained
unavailable for comment.
J
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Ncwi hdllor
The establishment of a major
new scholarship program at ECU
designed to attract the most
academically gifted students
from across the state and the na-
tion was announced at Friday's
meeting of the ECU Board of
Trustees.
C. Ralph Kinsey, chairman of
the Board of Trustees, made the
announcement, saying he was
"pleased that the occasion of a
meeting of the ECU Board of
Si) Trustees was chosen to announce
the most significant academic
scholarship fund drive in this
school's history
The program will provide com-
plete academic scholarships for
20 entering freshmen chosen on
the basis of their academic and
leadership abilities.
Each award will be privately
endowed and will provide reci-
pients with $3,000 per year.
Those who choose to endow
scholarships are being asked to
provide at least $40,000. Seven of
the 20 awards have already been
funded, four by ECU alumni.
According to a working draft
of the awards program, selection
of scholarship candidates will be
made through regional screening
committees.
Each committee will accept
recommendations made by high
school principals and guidance
counselors. The screening com-
mittees will review applicants and
invite regional finalists for per-
sonal interviews. The names of
the top two or three regional ap-
plicants will then be sent to the
Admissions Office. These
finalists will be asked to submit a
writing sample and attend an on-
campus interview.
The selection criteria are: that
the candidates are in the upper 5
percent of their graduating class;
that they have demonstrated
leadership abilities and involve-
ment in school and community
activities; that they possess
capabilities for communicating
ideas verbally and in writing; and
that they convey seriousness of
purpose in educational goals.
Students who accept the
awards will be enrolled in ECU's
Honors Program and may have a
chance to do undergraduate
research. In addition, they will
have a special lounge in the new
classroom building and will be in-
vited to participate in the annual
awards program.
ECU Chancellor John Howell
said the program will be im-
plemented this year, with the first
award recipients arriving on cam-
pus next fall.
"1 regard this as a milestone in
the advancement of this institu-
tion and the most significant ac-
tion during my chancellorship
Howell said.
"The number of these
prestigious scholarships will
demonstrate that ECU is an in-
stitution of unquestioned
academic worth Howell added
Howell said he felt the pro-
gram would be able to compete
with other state scholarship pro-
grams, much as the Morehead
Scholarship at LNC-Chapel Hill
because "there are more taleir
students in the state than these
other scholarships can help "
"There are many high-achieving
students who need this kind o!
recognition added Jame-
Lanier, vice chancellor for In-
stitutional Development.
Kinsey said the program is a
way to "deepen the universe's
commitment ot greater heights of
achievement through its student
� where the true greatness of thi-
university is reflected
Kinsey funded one of the se e
scholarships. Among others pro-
viding endowments are: Riley
Roberson and Robin Roberson
Pitts, both of whom attended
ECL; the family of Helen
McLawhorn, an ECTC graduate;
and Jack Minges of Greenville,
an ECU graduate and a membe-
of the Board of Trustees.
Lanier said not all earning
from the endowments will be
spent. "We want to put 15-25
percent of the interest earnings
into principal to maintain buying
power he said.
"This is the capstone of our
scholarship program Lanier
added. He said more scholarship-
will be established if funds are
made available.
Three ECU Alumni Receive Awards In Ceremonies
Ml Sr. B
Three ECL' alumni who have
excelled in their professional
fields and in contributions to
public service programs were
presented ECL's 1984 Outstan-
ding Alumni Awards in
Homecoming Day ceremonies
Saturday.
The three honorees are John
lackson Beard III, news anchor
and Emmy Award-winning com-
mentator for KNBC-TV, Los
Angeles (BFA '75); Dr. Sheron
Keel Sumner. vice president of
the American Home Economics
�Vsociation (BS '62) and Phillip
Rav Dixon, Greenville attorney
eader in political and civic
rs (BSBA '71)
They were recognized twice on
scorning Day, first at the
Homecoming Awards Luncheon
and again at halftime of the
necorning football game with
East Tennessee State University.
'These alumni have
distinguished themselves through
public service and achievement,
bringing rewards to their com-
munities and nation and reflec-
ting great credit upon their alma
mater said Donald Leggett,
director of alumni relations at
ECL.
Beard, a native of St. Paul's
N.C. and a Vietnam-era Navy
veteran of the hospital corps,
received a degree in drama and
speech, with a minor in broad-
casting at ECU. During his
studies on campus, he also work-
ed full time at WITN-TV,
Washington, as reporter and 11
p.m. news anchor. Upon gradua-
tion, he joined NBC affiliate
WXII-TV, Winston-Salem, leav-
ing that station for CBS affiliate
WIVB-TV, Buffalo, in 1977
In 1981 he became nightly news
anchor at NBC-owned and
operated KNBC-TV, where he
coordinates two hours of news
daily, broadcasting from 4 to 5
p.m. and from 6 to 7 p.m. During
his three years at the Los Angeles
station. Beard has helped KNBC
to win its first top news ratings
since Tom Synder left the station
10 years ago.
Beard has also become involv-
ed in issues of public safety.
Earlier this year he received an
Emmy award for hosting an
hour-long special, Emergency:
learn and live, a program
designed to help child viewers
cope with dangers of today's
world. Last Christmas Beard flew
to Beirut with videotaped holidav
greetings for Los Angeles area
Marines from their families and
brought back an orphaned
Lebanese infant to its adoptive
parents.
The Lebanon trip was turned
into a five-part series, A few
Good Men, and One Small One,
which Beard conceived, wrote
and produced, winning his econd
Emmy in addition to accolades
from the Marine Corps and
children's groups.
Sheron Sumner received her
master's degree at Ohio State
University, where she was in-
itiated into three honor societies,
one of which, Omicron Nu, she
currently serves as national presi-
dent. She received the Phd degree
from UNC-Greensboro and has
been a member of the UNC-
Greensboro School of Home
Economics faculty since 1966.
In addition to teaching and
research duties, Dr. Sumner is ac-
tive in professional organiza-
tions. She is vice president for
state affiliates of the American
Home Economics Association �
one of two ECU graduates now
holding national AHEA office �
and a past president of the N.C.
Home Economics Association.
At Thursday, Monday SGA Meetings
She has also held leadership
roles as advisor, consultant and
director of various programs in
home economics education,
nutrition education and adult
education. She served on com-
mittees for the N.C. Galaxy Con-
ference for Adult and Continuing
Education, the N.C. White
House Conference on Families
advisory committee and the
Governor's Advocacy Council
for Children and Youth.
Her research and training pro-
jects have received seven grants
from government agencies and
private corporations, and she is
the author or co-author of some
100 research reports, articles and
presentations given before pro-
fessional and lay groups.
She is a native of Martin Coun-
ty and graduate of Robersonville
public school.
Dixon, graduating from the
ECU School of Business in the
top five percent of his class, c
tinued his studies in law scho.
LTNC� Chapel Hill, receiving
law degree in 19
He held several significant
honors in law school, including
editorship of the North Carolina
Ian Record, and was selected for
internships with the State Bureau
of Investigation and the Institu'e
of Government. He also served as
research assistant and law clerk
to the Hon. Naomi Morris, judge
of the N.C. Court of Appeals.
In 195 he joined the Green-
ville Legal firm. Gaylord and
Singleton, as an associate,
becoming a partner in his present
firm, Dixon, Duffns and Doub,
in 1978.
During his career as a Green-
ville attorney, Dixon has been a
leader in local business circles.
He was recently appointed vice
See ALUMNI, Page 5
Kinsey Speaks, Money Appropriated
B GREG RIDEOLT
Managing Editor
Chairman of the Board of
Trustees ( Ralph Kinsey praised
the SGA Legislature Thursday
afternoon, saying ECU has one
of the most active and heavily
funded student governing bodies
in the state. Kinsey spoke to the
legislators prior to a special ses-
sion.
Kinsev, during a speech and
question-and-answer period, told
members the functions of the
Board of Trustees. SGA Presi-
dent John Rainey, a board
member, gives student input. The
board helps to shape university
policy, keeping'students' interests
paramount, Kinsey said.
The board deals with the level
of student services, deciding how
university funds are to spent.
Issues such as parking decks and
athletic fees are within the
board's jurisdiction. Several of
the board's members are ECU
graduates, including Kinsey, who
received his BA in 1964.
After the Kinsey's speech, the
SGA suspended the rules to deal
with an appropriation for Na-
tional Student Liberation Day.
Legislator Dennis Kilcoyne told
other members that Oct. 25
would be proclaimed by Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan as a day to
celebrate the freeing of medical
students from Grenada. A stu-
dent from the St. Georges
Medical School will be on hand
Thursday to discuss the event.
The Legislature approved by
consent to sponsor the event and
give $120 to help pay for ex-
penses.
Monday night's Legislature
meeting yielded one resolution
calling for the Rules and
Judiciary Committee to in-
vestigate misuse of the SGA
emergency loan program.
Students have $4,000 in outstan-
ding loans.
Prominent N.C. Journalists Appear In Forum
B JrVMFER JENDRASIAK
N��. Ultcw
The second in a series of three
elections forums sponsored by
the Departments of History and
Political Science at ECU will be
held Oct. 30, one week prior to
Election Day and will feature
three journalists from the state as
speakers.
Jack Claiborne, associate
editor of The Charlotte Observer,
John Alexander, editorial page
editor of the Greensboro Daily
I'ews and Eddie Yandel, political
reporter for the Fayetteville
Times will be speaking in the
forum concerning outcomes of
political races, especially the
presidential race, the senate race
and the N.C. gubernatorial race.
The three will make 15-minute
presentations concentrating on
the factors that affecting the out-
comes of different political races,
said Dorothy Clayton, a member
of the ECU political science
faculty.
"Sometimes elections offer a
wide choice and they will discuss
the factors important in deter-
mining the final outcomes
Clayton said.
Following the journalists'
presentations, the floor will be
opened for questions from the
audience. Clayton said it is
thought that the forum will be of
particular interest since it will oc-
cur so close to Election Day.
The forum was funded by the
N.C. Humanities Committee
with funds provided by the Na-
tional Endowment of the
Humanities. It will be at 7:30
p.m. in the Willis Building and is
free and open to the general
public. Henry Ferrell of the
Department of History will be the
moderator.
Debates and forums have at-
tracted much attention this elec-
tion year and Sunday's debate
between Democratic Presidential
Candidate Walter Mondale and
President Ronald Reagan on the
subject of U.S. foreign policy
was no exception.
See NO, Page 5
MARK BARBER �
Homecoming Pirate
Missy Cayton, 1984 Homecoming Pirate, representing Phi Kappa
Tau fraternity, is shown here with Delores Worthington, 1983
Homecoming Pirate.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 23, 1984
Announcements
ALCOHOL AWARENESS
How much is too much? On Tues , Oct 23 at 4
pm Sgt Swanson. a NC State Trooper, will be in
Jarvis lobby to present a discussion about
alcohol and driving The breathelyzer will also
be explained Remember Oct is alcohol
awareness month
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
Come on out and party with the Kappa Alpha
Psi Frat inc this Thurs night. Oct 35 from 10
pm to? am atthevVn Admission will be $1 50
student and t2 00 non student Free beer while it
lasts' Mope to see you there!
SIGMAS
Be sure to be at Grogs at 8 00 tonight for our
pre happv hour party Be ready to throw down
We smi scared are you'
HELMSBUSTERS
Students interested m joining the students for
Jim Hunt should please contact Scott Thomas at
752 U93 or David Brooks at 752 5198
PAMLICOTAR RIVER
The Pamhco Tar River Foundation will hold
an organizational meeting for its ECU chapter at
7pm Oct 24. in room C 206, Brewster Purpose
of the meeting is to discuss water quality and
conservation issues m the Tar Pamlico area and
to organize an ECU chapter All students, facul
ty. and staff are invited
TRACK MEET
Register for the intramural Track Meet on
Oct 22 through the 25th The meet will be held on
Oct 30 The team captains meeting will be held
on the 2�th a' 7 00 p m in the Biology building
room 103 To sign up come by room 204 Memorial
Gym or tor more information call 757 6387
VOLLEYBALL
Registration for intramural Volleyball begins
Oct 22 and ends the 23 Play begins Oct 29 To
register come by Room 204 Memorial Gym
Anyone interested In officiating volleyball should
come to the first clinic on Oct 22 at 6 p m in
Memorial Gym Room 102
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
Sigma Phi Epsilon and Sigma Sigma Sigma
proudly present happy hour at Grog's Tues , Oct
22 at � p m Featuring the great playboy strip
oft So come out ano be a happy camper with the
Sig Eps and Tri Sigs Be there Aloha
MEDITATION
On Tues Oct 23 at 7 m Room 212 at
Menoenhaii we will meet and start discussing
the book Wisdom Energy " This will be follow
ed by meditation practice Please bring your
own cushion
INTRAMURALS
Memorial Gym Weight Room will be open for
Faculty ana Staff use Mon Wed . ano Fn morn
ings from 7 8am beginning Oct 22 through Dec
5
COFFEEHOUSE COMMITTEE
We are looking for a few good people to serve
on the ECU Student union Coffeehouse Commit
fee Anyone interested may obtain an application
from the Student union Office on the top floor of
Menoenhail. Room 234
VIDEOGAME BENEFIT
The March of Dimes with the assistance of
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority are sponsoring a video
game benefit on Oct 28 The benefit will be held
at Bally's Aladdin's Castle in the Carolina East
Mali from 2 4pm The admission fee is $1. and
$ 50 for high score competition Division 1 Ages
8 12, Division 2 Ages 13 18, Division 3 Ages 19
and older Prizes will be awarded and gift cer
tificates will be given for all paid admissions
Sponsor sheets can be picked up from Aladdin's
Castle and the Student Supply Store All pro
ceeds go to the March of Dimes
HAPPY HOUR
Sigma Phi Epsilon and Sigma Sigma Sigma
proudly present happy hour at Grogs, tonight at
9 $1 at the door and a raffle for prizes Also, the
great playboy strip off will be shown featuring
male and female strippers So come out and be a
happy camper with the sig eps and tri sigs
RUGBY
Two home matches this weekend, ECU Rugby
Club will be hosting Campbell University and the
US Marine Corps team from Camp Leiune
The games start at 2 p m , Sat , Oct 27
Everybody's gonna be there, sacrifices will be
made
SIG EP LITTLE SIS
Come out and party with the brothers and
pledges tonight at 9 at Grogs See ya there
DZRUSH
Delta Zeta Big Brother Rush is tonight at Old
Town Inn Come on out and meet the Delta Zetas
All interested men are welcome! Starts at 9 and
h orsdevours will be served with special drink
prices too
ISA
Halloween Party Everybody is invited! Sat .
Oct 27 at 9 p m at the international House
Costume contest Come and join us. you may win
the prize
SURFCLUB
The 1984 ECU Invitational Surfing Contest will
be held this Sat at the islander Motel in Emerald
Isle N C Competition will begin at 9 am sharp
and last until about 2pm Several schools are
expected to compete including arch rival UNC
W Come out and enjoy the sun and fun!
SURFCLUB
There is a meeting Thurs at 8 30 in the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse The video of Hawaii's
North Shore should be available for the meeting
Team t shirts will be in and sold first come, first
serve at the meeting Don't forget the big contest
this Sat at Emerald Isle Contact Johnny Ghee
at 758 4667 if you want to participate
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
First annual Lambda Chi Alpha and Beau's
wet t shirt contest Grand prize $200 on Thurs .
Oct 25 at 9 Interested contestants contact
Lambda Chi Alpha at 752 6159 by Wed at 12
HAPPY HOUR
The 194 pledge class of Delta Sigma Phi will
be holding happy hour at the Blue Moon Cafe on
Sat . Oct 27 from 9pm to Urn Happy hour
prizes Come party with the best
PURE GOLD DANCERS
Remember Tues Oct 23 Be ready to begin
at 7 p m
YOUNG DEMOCRATS
The Young Democrats will hold their regular
weekly meeting on Wed Oct 24 at 7 p.m. In
Room 212, Mendenhall Anyone interested in
learning more about the Democratic party and
what activities we plan tor the remainder of this
semester are invited
OMEGA PSI PHI
The brothers of Omega Psi Phi Frat, Inc
would like to announce a Halloween costume
party in Mendenhall's Mulfi Purpose Room from
8 pm. 12 a.m. on WedOct. 31. Prizes will be raf
fled Best costume wins $25 Second and third
cash prizes also. Free refreshments
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Fun. friendship, faith that's what Inter
Varsity Christian Fellowship is all about) Join us
this Wed night at 7 in the Jenkins Auditorium for
out subject "One Relationship Under God "
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Looking for something new to do this Fri � The
Baptist Student Union will be holding its Fall
Social this Fri at 8 p.m. Admission is only $1.
and there w i 11 be refreshments (and a lot of danc
ing) available. Bring a friend and join us at the
BSU (on 10th St next to Wendy's) this Fri night
We'll be looking for you!
ECU NEWMAN COMMUNITY
Attention! The ECU Newman Catholic Com
munity will be holding a short prayer service this
Wed at 5 p.m Join us for this service, followed
by a meeting and dinner all at the ECU
Newman Center on East 10th St (just past the
music bldg.)
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
We will meet Thurs the 25th at 5 p m Inquire
at desk in Mendenhall A Maynard Waters recep
tion will be at 7 p m Call Dennis 758 2448 or San
dy 757 0711
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
The brothers of Kappa Alpha Psi Frat , Inc
will be sponsoring a happy hour from 9 30 p m
until 12.00. Come out and party with the Nupes!
NAACP
The NAACP urges students who have not ob
�amed absentee ballots to do so before Nov. 1
Absentee ballot request cards will be available
at the Information desk m Mendenhall
PHI KAPPATAU
Manditory meeting for all brothers, pledges.
and little sisters will be held on Wed the 24th. at
the Elbo Room at 9 p m to drink heavily and
raise hell Be there!
HAPPY HOUR
Phi Kappa Taus are having a blow out happy
hour at the Elbo Room on Wed 24 at 9 p m Be
there and party with the best!
STUDENTS FOR CHRIST
Informal Bible discussions are held every
Tues night at 9 p m in Room 212 Mendenhall
Everyone is welcome! Bring a Bible and a
friend
STUDENTS FOR IKE
Anyone who is interested in information con
cerning 4th District Congressman Ike Andrews
please contact Jeff Cloninger (ECU
coordinator), 752 5198
SCUBA DIVING
Thanksgiving vacation Dive Cozumei, Mex
ico 8 days, 7 nights on the beautiful Yucatan
Penmnsula Drift diving on tne Palancar reef
will be one of the most exiting experiences From
Raleigh price including air fare, meals, lodging,
and diving $820 00 special price for non divers
$720 00 Air travel provided by Mexicana and
Eastern For registrations ano further informs
tion. can Ray Scherf. Dir of Acquatics 757 6441
KYF
The King Youth Fellowship sponsored the
Pentecostal Holiness Church will have a Bible
sudy i Genesis 1 3) on Tues . Oct 23 at 8 p m in
242 Mendenhall For more information call Jack
at 752 8666 or Kevin at 758 9190
CIRCLE K
ECU Circle K Club invites you to come out and
join us this coming and every Tues night at 7
p m m Mendenhall Room 221 for fun and
socializing Hope to see you there
ENERGY AWARENESS
as a public service to ECU students and in
recognition of Energy Awareness Week (Oct
21 28), a representative from Greenville Utilities
will be on campus to answer you energy related
questions A state certified Residential Conser
vation Services Technician will be in Mendenhall
from 11 � mi p m , Tues , Oct 23
BASKETBALL
Registration for Intramural Co Rec Basket
ball will begin on Oct 29 and end Oct 30 To
register come by room 204 Memorial Gym bet
ween me hours of I 00 am and 5:00 p m For
more information call 757 6387 PARTICIPATE
RATHER THAN SPECTATE
SNOW SKI
Any persons interested in Snowskiing
December 30 Jan 4 at Snowsnoe. W V should
call Jo Saunders at 757 6000 to get your name on
the list for the trip Beginners to Hotdoggers are
welcome Ski instruction is available for all
levels of ability Price depends on ski package
Space for housing on slopes and transportation Is
limited Your are invited to come by Memorial
Gym 108 on Oct 30 at 4:00 p m to register, see
me slides and talk skiing! A $5 00 deposit at mis
time will reserve your space.
BUSINESS
SCHOLARSHIP
Thirteen scholarship for approxiirwjWy � 000
�re available for School of Buslnws major.
Student interested M making application should
secure forms from me Fnancial Aid Office or one
of me following department office in me School
of Bu�ine� Accounting R325. Decl�lon
Sciences R238 Finance-R143; Manaflement-
R137, markatlng-RIM
All applications mu�t be submitted to Rum
Jones (Raw! 334), Chairman of School of
Business Scholarship Commit, by Nov �,
'9�4 A student may apply for one or more of the
scholarships
Final selection will be made by the ECU Stu
dent Scholarships. Fellowship and Flnonclol
Aid Committee upon recommendation of the
Dean of the School of Business. The Deen's
recommendation will be made from candidate
seiec'ed by the School of Business Schotersh p
COWHifrtf.
QAUSCH & IOMD SOFl�NS CONTACTS
COMPLETE FORONIY $99
Fof ittst $99 you it be titled with the tmest soft contact tenses available.
Bausch & lomb Softens' Contacts The ptice includes everything you �
need to put vouf glasses away lor good, initial eye examination lenses
care kit instructions and foHow-up visits tor one month And yomeceive
two weeks trial
Bausch & Lomb Softens Contacts for $99 complete" Come see for
yourself today1
For SHjIiMi With ICU ID.
optom�twc
�Y�CAR�G�H1�k
Drs. Holtis & Scibal
Tipton Annex228 Greenville Blvd.
756-9404
COLLEGE
HILL
DINING
HALL
convenient
comfortable
3 meals daily
east Carolina Aimnff services
PI KAPPA PHI
Hey. Pi Kapps, let's get ready for this
weekend Thurs night t shirt graffiti social
with the Alpha Phi's. Fri night, our wild paiama
party with the little sisters and lil sis pledges and
our Sat woodcut, PUSH solicitation and
chilibeer dinner at the house. Study now and
blow out this weekend Also. "B" team soccer
plays tonight at 4 and "A" team tonight at 7, let's
get out and support our brother
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
The sisters and big brothers wish to welcome
all of the new young men into the Alpha Phi Big
Brother organization. Our next meeting will be a
dinner out at 6:30 p.m Sun Nov 4 at tne
Western Sizzler on 10th St Also, ail big brothers
are Invited out to watch me sisters play soccer
Wed Oct. 24 at 4 on the intramural field, come
on out if s a good way to meet the girls.
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Alpha Phi Omega is requesting all brothers to
attend meetings we need you! All brothers not
participating and paying fees by Oct 25. will be
asked to appear before the Executive Board
APO would also like to congradulate the follow
ing persons on receiving bids to pledge this
semester: Robert Boney, Leanne Butrum, San
dra Caskey, Donna Davis, Jimmie Hackett.
Keith Hall. Kim Holloman, Vivian Joyner, Ricky
Lewis, Angela Richardson
RESIDENT ADVISORS
The Dept. of Residence Life is now accepting
applications from students who wish to apply for
Resident Advisor positions. Students need to
have the following qualifications: (1) to be a full
time student, (2) to have a minimum grade point
average of 2.2, (3) to have a clear judicial
record, (4) to have a time schedule mat is free of
other committments that conflict with work, (5)
to have lived in a residence hall environment.
and (6) must reside in residence hall during
employment. Application deadline for employ
ment for Spring 1905 is Nov 1 If interested in ap
plying for a position, applications are available
in 214 Whichard and any Residence Hall office
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
This Thurs at 7 p.m in Mendenhall's Multi
Purpose Room Is your big chance to find out
about O T (Occupational Therapy) and to talk to
students who are already in the program
Anyone who is interested is welcome! Look for
our ad in today's paper PS There's an OT club
meeting on Tues at 5 45 in Rm 203 Allied
Health, and you're invited
AMBASSADORS
Ambassadors old and new we will be having
our general meeting Wed , Oct 22 at 5 p m in the
Mendenhall Multi Purpose Room This will be
our first joint meeting and lots of surprises are
planned Old ambassadors wear your nametags
so our new ambassadors will be able to recognize
you And once again, a big ECU welcome to all
our new members
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will meet on Thurs . Oct 25
in Brewster C 103. at 7 This is a very important
meeting make every effort to be mere
NASA
interested in international policy and reguia
tions affecting high technology exporting? if so.
this position may be tor you NASA will be inter
viewing on campus in Nov for Spring, IMS Con
tact the Cooperative Education Office, 313 Rawl
Bldg. as soon as possible
PRE MED STUDENTS
Students who have even a slight interest in a
medically oriented field are urged to attend the
ECU Biology Club meeting on Wed , Oct 24 The
meeting will be held in Room BN 102 and. if
necessary, be moved to the main biology bldg
auditorium so as to accomodate seating for all
those in attendance Dr Dean Hayek. Officer of
Admissions for the East Carolina School of
Medicine will be speaking on the topic of Medical
School This meeting will afford pre med
students who are interested in other areas of
medicine insight on requirements and admis
slons processes Students who are interested m
ioming the Biology Club will have a prime oppor
tunity to do so at this meeting Remember you
do not have to be a member of the Biology Club to
enoy our speakers, but you do nave to be a
member to take advantage of our many other
benefits Please This will be the Main Event of
pre professional month Don't miss if I!
PEACE WALK
Andy Rector, an ECU graduate ano former
Greenville resident is now participating ,n ,
peace wal� from Point Conception. California aj
Moscow. USSR Andy is visiting old fr.enos m
Greenville todar and Wed morning ana wn i
lOtn the group as they walk mto RocXy Mot
Wed afternoon The wai began Mar i.i��4�ic
will arrive m Moscow Oct 15. 1M5 hav ng
covered �J00 m.les on toot After dei wer.ng
messages to gov't officials in Washington ano kg
U N officials m New York they will fly i0
Europe The mam obiective of the walkers u to
increase communication between people o� trie
US and people of eastern Europe and the Soviet
Union They are carrying messages from u
people including gov't officials expressing ou-
desire tor peace it you have a message ro-j
would like to send send to Peace Walk. D23
Golden Estates North. Dougiasviiie. GA 30134
SIGMA NU LITTLE SIS
Come on down to the Sigma Nu Little 5s'�
happy hour at Grumpy's Thurs . Oct 25 9 jr'
Door prizes and lots of fun! Only tl adf ss gr
See ya there1
CATHOLIC STUDENTS
Sunday Mass is celebrated at II 30 a m in Mm
Biology Lecture Mall !Rm 103) and at I p m at
the Newman Center. 953 E 10th St For .ntorma
tion call Fr Terry at 752 4214
CABOUNA ���WAY?
and tJh� Southern Fltie-ur�-l
Tobacco Festival, Inc.
Presents
Saturday, October 27, 1984
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
GREENVILLE, NC
� Gales Open at 10:30 a.m. �
� Show Begin at 12 Noon �
Featuring Special Entertainment By:
The Bill Lyerly Band, playing music
from their two albums "Prodigal Son"
and "Higher Ground
The Green Grass Cloggers, high step
pin' and swingin
The Too Wet To Plow String Band, a
down-home band playing all-time
favorites.
FOR YOUR INFORMATION
Bring your lounge chairs and blankets.
Food and Beer will be available
RAIN LOCATION:
Farmers Warehouse
North Greene Street
Greenville. North Carolina
TICKET LOCATIONS:
Rainbow Records in Kinston, New Bern,
Havelock and Morehead City
Apple Records in Greenville
Carolina Opry House in Greenville
Competition In:
FIDDLIN
Adult
1st Place $150.00
Runner-Up $100.00
Junior Division
1st Place 50.00
Runner-Up Merchandise
BANJO
1st Place$ 50.00
Runner-Up Merchandise
FLAT PICkIN GUITAR
1st Place$ 50.00
Runner-Up Merchandise
BLUE GRASS BAND
1st Place$100.00
Runner-UpMerchandise
HORSESHOE PITCHING CONTEST
12:00-4:00 p.m.
Two 12) horseshoe pitching playing fields
will be set up. Copies of the rules will be
available on the day of the Fiddler's Con
vention. Registration is limited. You may
pre-register by filling out and mailing in
the attached Registration Form. Depend
ing on the number of entries, we are plan
ning a men's, women's and junior division.
Prizes will be awarded. This event will not
be held in the event of inclement weather.
For Further information and to register contact:
Lynn Caverly Jobes
Cured Tobacco Festival, Inc.
Greenville, NC 27835-7366
(919)757-1604
Adults - $5.00 Children Under 12 - $1.00
SRA Of
B HAROLD JOYNER make
she S!
The Student Residence housing
Association, a campus associa- to the
tion which serves all students liv- not or
ing in dorms, is planning various they liv
activities and relying on student rently,
suggestions concerning residence quiet
hall life, according to Debbie noise
Gembicki, SRA president. Soal
The SRA is not placing as year i
much emphasis on formalities SRA
this ear and Gembicki explains, part nj
e want a more relaxed at- home
�nosphere within the SRA, with Ge
more emphasis on personal in- reservi
volvement and motivation. We end-o!
are not ignoring the rules, but we ing ph
feel the informal table-discussion The ar
type meetings are more for
effective she said. be.
Last year's controversial quiet other
dorm proposal in which a certain
residence hall would be chosen to Ger
house undergraduate student in
a strictly quiet area is still under
discussion and Gembicki said the
main problem right now is the in- and
crease of apartment building- i
Greenville. "We have got I
Greenville N
Opens Doo
By HAROLD JOYNER
The Attic is back in business in
a new location, following the
destruction of its original loca-
tion by a fire last month.
The new location, at 509 E. 5th
St held its reopening thi p
weekend. Tom Haines, ownet
the club, said there �a a large
student crowd and attributed I
to the club's proximity to cam-
pus. "That one block difference
really showed this past weekend.
I have a feeling the Attic will get
better student attendance as the
result of being closer to the
university.
The new club is the size of the
former building minus the
Phoenix Room, Haines said. "A
lot of hard work went into com-
pleting the opening this weekend
We did about three months work
in three weeks and about two-
thirds of it is completed he
said. The building has gone
through a major renovation and
has already taken on a new im-
age. "We heard a lot of positive
comments from the students this
weekend and some of them of-
fered their suggestions. We really
appreciate this feedback he
said.
"The capacity of the new Attic
is about the same as the old one.
however we weren't able to find
room for the Phoenix room. A
lot of people can't see how big it
really is until they actually go in
it he said.
Haines does not foresee any
problems due to the loss of the
parking lot near the old club.
"The nightclubs are so close
together Haines said,
"customers who choose to drive
are always close enough to walk
to the Greenville nightclubs
One chance Attic patrons
may notice is a different loca-
tion of the band site. "We
jumped at this chance to make
the bands visible to all of the peo-
ple Haines said. "Also, there
will be less trouble with volume
control because we have installed
i
I
I
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ttic
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WfttaJ
Attic,
also
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In

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PEACE WALK
a" ana former
1 ' Mhn
��'� " ng
s.
- I �P-S ,S to
"1 US
� � � � is ng rxir
� � � FSMQ .
TTLE SIS
ST UDENTS
rtllOH
R - . r .Mil
Ti i .a �l�J
thes �
�01 $219 95
ticro hop
$150.00
$100.00
$ 50.00
-handise
$ 50.00
handise
v 50.00
I i se
$100.00
handise
' SI
m p m
� - will b'
: Her - I on
'i ou may
tiling in
Depend
i are pian
" d sion.
ent will not
� � ' � � we ither.
register contact:
averly Jobes
obacco Festival, Inc
He, NC 27835-7366
7-1604
ler!2-$1.00
4
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 23, 1984
SRA Offers Activities For Dorm Residents
B HAROLD JOYNER
�uim�i New, fdlio.
The Student Residence
Association, a campus associa-
tion which serves all students liv-
ing in dorms, is planning arious
activities and relying on student
suggestions concerning residence
hall life, according to Debbie
Gcmbicki, SRA president.
The SRA is not placing as
much emphasis on formalities
this year and Gembicki explains,
"we want a more relaxed at-
mosphere within the SRA, with
more emphasis on personal in-
volvement and motivation. We
are not ignoring the rules, but we
'eel the informal table-discussion
1V P e meetings are more
effective she said.
last sear's controversial quiet
dorm proposal in which a certain
residence hall would be chosen to
house undergraduate students in
a stricth quiet area is still under
discussion and Gembicki said the
main problem right now is the in-
crease of apartment buildings in
Greenville. "We hae got to
make dorm life more attractive
she said, "by offering lower
housing costs and more activities
to the students that they would
not ordinarily have access to if
they lived in an apartment Cur-
rently, residence halls have set
quiet hours which help control
noise among the residents.
Social plans for the upcoming
ear include a tailgating party for
SRA members. The tailgating
party is being planned for the last
home football game at ECU and
Gembicki said an area will be
reserved for SRA members. Also,
end-of-the-year activities are be-
ing planned for the members.
The annual Homecoming Dance
for this year was cancelled
because of a late booking and
other conflicts with the manage-
ment of the banquet hall.
Gembicki said the SRA was
recently involved with the
Shriner's annual chicken fry. The
dorm students helped sell tickets
and promote the event. She also
said membe s helped with the
ECU Alumni Telefund and SGA
elections. "Residence halls will
obtain points by serving in com-
munity projects thereby making
them a candidate for Residence
Hall of the Year she said.
Dorms will also be participating
in an energy contest through next
March. The dorm conserving the
most energy wins 100 points
towards the outstanding dorm
contest.
A major problem the SRA is
currently facing, Gembicki said,
is the lack of participation of
Resident Advisors. "By not do-
ing this she said, "they are not
able to go back to the residence
halls and relay the information to
the students. We simply cannot
work efficiently unless we have
an open line of communication
Lack of motivation and en-
thusiasm are also problems
among ECU student residents
which Gembicki hopes to
alleviate.
Recently, an ECU delegation
representing the SRA went to a
Leadership Conference held at N.
C. State University. The Con-
ference, titled Keep the hire
Burning, informed students of
various topics such as rape
prevention, procrastination, and
effective meetingsThe con-
ference really helped us realize
the importance of motivation for
an effective residence hall
organization. We hope to hold a
regional conference at ECU in
Green ville Nightclub
Opens Doors Again
the spring of 1986 Gembicki
said, "1 know it will take a lot of
work, but it will definitely be
worth the trouble
She also said she will be presen-
ting a paper concerning student
apathy at the National Associa-
tion of College and University
Residence Halls. This national
conference will be held at the
University of Florida in 1985
Another SRA goal is to build
unity with the Student Govern-
ment Association, ECU ad-
ministration, and the students.
"We wan; to be able to involve as
many people as possible in ac-
tivities for the residents. We are
here for the students, and we
V
flM ifc 0KT
Inter Fraternity Council
a presents
BL LADIES LOCK-OUT
)7V: Wednesday Night
Free Wine & Beer
Highballs 50C
For Ladies 8:30-10:00
Men Admitted At 10:00
Door prizes all night
Men Members $1.00 Men Guest $2.00
Membership SI.00
PAPA KATZ
vY
G
Bv HAROLD JOYNER
Sw.lant New, l-dilor
The Attic is back in businesN in
a new location, following the
destruction of its original loca-
bv a fire last month.
The new location, at 509 E. 5th
s' . held its reopening this past
� id. Tom Haines, owner of
" - . lb, said there was a large
dent crowd and attributed this
to the club's proximity to cam-
"That one Mock difference
really showed this pas; weekend.
1 have a feeling the Attic will get
' � � student attendance as the
result : being closer to the
university.
The new club is the size of the
f o r m er building minus the
Phoenix Room, Haines said. "A
lot ol hard work went into com
pitting the opening tins weekend
We did about three months work
in three weeks and about two-
thirds oi it is completed he
said. The building has gone
through a major renovation and
has already taken on a new im-
age. "We heard a lot of positive
comments from the students this
weekend and some of them of-
fered their suggestions. We really
appreciate this feedback he
said.
"The capacity of the new Attic
is about the same as the old one,
however we weren't able to find
room for the Phoenix room. A
lot of people can't see how big it
reallv is until they actually go in
it he said.
Haines does not foresee any
problems due to the loss of the
parking lot near the old club.
"The nightclubs are so close
-ether Haines said,
comers who choose to drive
always close enough to walk
to the Greenville nightclubs
One change Attic patrons
may notice is a different loca-
tion of the band site. "We
tped at this chance to make
the bands visible to all of the peo-
ple Haines said. "Also, there
will he less trouble with volume
control because we have installed
z
H
m
We Haw Ai ABC Per-
a sound board to accomodate tne
sound swem
Insurance for the Attic was cut
in half last year following the
passage of the Safe Roads Act
and Haines said financial pro-
blems forced the relocation.
However, Haines said the quality
of the Attic will remain the same
and for the next six months, all
money taken in will be put back
into the club.
"If the people continue to sup-
port us. we will be able to put in
things such as an air conditioning
unit and a better sound system
Haines said. Admission to the
Attic will remain the same for the
students, except for an additional
tittv cents. "We do not want to
pass on our financial problems to
the- students ht-��ije we rirfirn
without them, there would be no
Attic he said. Customers can
also expect to see the regular
bands return at the same prices,
Haines said.
In addition, Haines said, there
will be two benefit concerts
featuring bands such as
Sidewinder and Xantucket. the
first of which will be held Nov
18.
welcome suggestions from
them she said. Gembicki also
wants to open the channels of
communication with the SGA "I
feel the the SRA will be more ef-
fective if each organization can
rely on each other for support
she said.
The next meeting of the SRA
will be held on Oct. 24 at 4 p.m.
in Room 212 Mendenhall. Gem-
bicki said a RA will speak on the
problems of residence ha life
and possible suggestions m
avoiding them. All SRA members
and other students concerned
with residence hall living are
vited to attend this semi I irmal
discussion.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
I18J Vbortion from 13 to 18 wee
nona. � Pregnancy Test. B
and Problem Pregnancy Counsel.r.g For fui
ther information call 832-0335 iT
Number 1-800 532-5384) between 9A M ai
5P M weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 W�t Morton St
Raie.gh NC
WHY RENT ?
For less than dorm or apartment rent
you could:
1. Buy your own home
2. Enjoy peace and privacy
3. Invest in the future
STOP BY AND SEE HOW

HOMES
626 W Greenville Blvd 756 - 5434
WE PAY
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Class Rings Diamond Rings
Gold & Sliver Jeweriy
SilverCoins
&��
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Wl BUY & SELL
T.V's, stereo's, cameras, video, microwave ovens,
bicycles, watches, binoculars, walkmans portable
AM-FM, cassette, heaters, good furniture, china &
crystal, typewriters, etc.
EVANS,
corner
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-3866
FREE
Potato Bar at
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mmm hqhlanpew cmnm me
Across From Highway Patrol
2804 E. 10th St.
Greenville, NC 27834
WASH $.50
501b Dryers 25
141b Dryers (30 min.) 50
dean
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A WINN
� HV DRAMA CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD BE8T PTEW AMERICAN PLAY �
OUTER CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD: OUTSTANDING OPT BROADWAY PLAY
� 3 OBIS (OrriYAT) AWARDS: OUTSTANDING PERFORMANCES �
SUPERLATIVE
POWERFUL'
MAXxNIFICEN
,rhe
(om parry
T�l�
JA
UNDERWEAR SALE
at THE SALVAGE STORE
112 X. Greene StGreenville, X.C.
(Located beside Harris Supermarket)
We've discontinued our FRUIT OF THE LOOM
underwear and t-shirt line
All sizes available in unopened packages.
These are not irregulars but good
top of the line underwear and t-shirts
Sale begins Thursday, October 24th at 8:00am
and lasts through Saturday
UNBELIEVABLE PRICES
MORE THAN 40
OFF REGULAR RETAIL

THE NEGRO ENSEMBLE COMPANY
A SOIJMEirS VIM
PULITZER PRIZE WINNER!
by Charles Puller
FRIDAY. OCTOBER 26. 1984
�'�� ��
Friday 11 . � .
1 I at the I s -
-
- - � -
i m �
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)
I

�te iEaat aiamlmtati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, a-mnmm,
Greg Rideout, Mwmn rmtm
JENNIFER JENDRAS.AK. � �, j.T. pIETRZAK
Randy Mews, E Anthony Martin, ��, Mmagr,
TINA MAROSCHAK, ft� �, Kathy Fuerst pui,(on
Bn i Austin, ��. a Mike Mayo rm
October 23, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Pee Dee
Let's Go, Athletic Department
The night was getting late and
poor Pee Dee was still in a foul
mood. It had been a long time
since people started thrashing his
name about, and he was ready to
hit the road. "Students, alumni
and faculty don't like me he
snarled. "Well, heck, 1 don't like
them either. I'm leaving
Well, everyone is glad he's leav-
ing, even though he doesn't of-
ficially have his walking papers.
We are glad Dr. How ell has told
the athletic department to look in-
to the way the name was selected.
We wish he had been more forceful
and abolished the name with one
stroke of his chancellor's pen, but
his indication that he believes the
students to be right on this matter
is a step in the right direction.
Well, what do we do now?
Fellow students, we tell the athletic
department to get with it. The
ball's in their court, and we'll be
watching to see if the guys over
there fumble. They have come
close to coughing up the pigskin by
not answering our questions or
returning our calls. We see this as a
sign that no action has been taken.
This is not acceptable. Dr. Karr
must listen to the chancellor and
the students and begin to rectify
the problem � in a way that in-
cludes a lot of student input.
We suggest a committee charged
with the responsibility of picking a
new name or just leaving the Pirate
as the "Pirate Along with
students, there should be represen-
tatives from the athletic depart-
ment, the faculty and alumni. This
is the way it should have been done
the first time. But, alas, better late
than never.
We hope by next Tuesday we
will be able to report to you that
the athletic department has taken
action. We hope to sav that a
meeting of the committee is
scheduled for next week, and those
with views on the subject are
welcome to go and express them.
But we can't sav that yet. The se-
cond half kick-off hasn't been
received yet. We need some players
on the field, athletic department.
Pee Dee still sits around. "I
hope this committee boots me
out he says. "I'm tired of being
called Pee Dee. I want a new name
or no name at all. People are mak-
ing fun of me, and no one likes me
because of the way my parents
named me. Hi Ho
Doonesbury
Pee Dee popped up at the Board
of Trustees meeting on Friday.
Although members declined to get
officially involved in the affair, a
few members stepped forward to
voice their disapproval of the name
and the way it was chosen. Trustee
John F. (Jack) Minges said he
backed the students.
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
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so 08sessep uirm facts?
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The
(Editor's Note: The following are two
critiques of Sunday night's debate. I
asked students Dennis Kilcoyne, a pro-
minent Republican on campus, and
Charles Sune, a noted Democrat at
ECU, to evaluate as objectively as
possible the performances by Walter
Mondale and Ronald Reagan. The
order the columns appear in was deter-
mined by a coin toss.)
By CHARLES SUNE
Whatever the result of the Nov. 6
election, it is clear that Walter Mondale
won Sunday night's debate with Ronald
Reagan. Score Mondale 2, Reagan 0.
Whether this in itself will be enough to
make a real difference next month, re-
mains to be seen. No matter, Mondale
skillfully raised the issue of paramount
importance in this campaign: the issue
of presidential leadership. Is it enough
to seem presidential, or does the
presidency require more?
There is little disagreement that
Ronald Reagan does seem presidential.
Whether seen standing on the Great
Wall of China, Normandy Beach or at
the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics, Ronald
Reagan looks like a U.S. president
should. If only image were enough to
run the most powerful office in the
w rid.
Sunday night's debate provided the
Debate
DEM OCR A TS
opportunity for the American public to
distinguish between seeming presiden-
tial and being presidential; between
seeming to lead and real leadership.
Ronald Reagan showed that while
seeming presidential may get great
mileage in political commercials, when
it comes to grasping the serious foreign
policy issues of our time he fails
miserably. Without a script, Reagan
was like a fish out of water � he flop-
ped around a lot.
Similar to performances at his infre-
quent press conferences, Reagan show-
ed he does not fully grasp the issues �
much less understand the underlying
implications. This was best illustrated
when syndicated columnist Georgie
Anne Geyer asked the President about
the now infamous CIA assassination
manual. The President, unsure of
himself and his facts, spelled out direct
CIA involvement in Nicaragua. Though
probably accurate, the statement was
contrary to the administration's official
position of only providing aid to the
contras. When pressed on his statement
in Geyer's follow-up question, Reagan
said, "I'm afraid I misspoke Like
Reagan, I too am afraid he misspoke �
on this and other issues.
Did Reagan, who has a record of op-
posing arms control, misspeak Sunday
when he suggested we "demonstrate"
his Star Wars system as a method of
negotiating arms control with the
Soviets? Remember, this is the same
president who once suggested we fire a
nuclear "warning shot" as a measure to
prevent nuclear war. Such an approa
flies in the face of our arms controi
strategy, which has followed a bipar-
tisan path over the last three decade
What is more important here is tha:
Reagan is suggesting the United S:a:e
can and should pursue a policv 1
nuclear superiority � a fantasy tha
historic precedent has shown will re- .
in the escalation of Soviet counter-
production of similar weapons systems
Reagan's strategy is costly and, most
importantly, ineffective.
Walter Mondale. by contrast, show-
ed a thorough knowledge of the issue-
as well as the background necessary to
understand arms control and foreien
policy. Mondale's only fault was that
he did not press (he President hard
enough. Mondale shot4 xha
knowledge of issues is not an option to
leadership, but. rather, it is a require-
ment to be a successful leader.
"A president is supposed to com-
mand said Walter Mondale. Without
Mondale's knowledge and insight e
will be left to wander in our world of
uncertainly for four more vears. The
question is, can we afford such a vaca-
tion from realitv.
REPUBLICANS
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
When my editor asked me to write
this column, he begged me to be objec-
tive, knowing what a biased conser-
vative I am. Well Greg, I tried. And my
objective opinion is that President
Reagan came out on top.
Mondale went into the debate with a
25-point deficit in some polls. He need-
ed a miraculous performance for
himself and a very bad one from
Reagan. He got neither. In fact Reagan
looked pretty good � he was chipper,
quick with his classic one-liners, and
did as well with the facts as he ever has.
Mondale, on the other hand, fell short
of his performance in the first debate.
Give him credit, though. Mondale
was well-briefed and on top of the
facts. He answered most of the ques-
tions competently and without any ma-
jor blunders. But he was also his old,
uninspiring self. On top of that, he was
not aggressive, which was unusual.
The Reason for his timidity may have
been Reagan's own aggressiveness. In
the first debate, Reagan was flawed
from the start and aroused Mondale's
killer instinct. This time, Reagan
started strong and coasted to the end.
Thus, Mondale's attempted exploita-
tion of the Lebanon, arms control and
leadership issues fell flat. He seemed
simply to state his concerns and then
fall quiet.
Mondale attacked Reagan as detatch-
ed, uninformed and not in charge of af-
fairs. It was a risky strategy doomed to
fail. Reagan was obviously expecting it,
and he reacted to Mondale's assertions
by either belittling them or ignoring
them. Besides, the American people
don't buy the assertion that Reagan is
not a strong leader. That makes as
much sense as saying Mondale is un-
concerned about social problems.
Mondale put himself on the defensive
by constantly assuring the viewers that
he is not weak, that he is a man of
strength. Reagan went for the jugular,
saying, "I've seen the commercial
showing Mr. Mondale standing on the
deck of the Nimitz (aircraft carrier),
watching the F-14's take off. But if he'd
had his way, he'd have been standing
on water because there would have been
no Nimitz. As a senator, he opposed the
Nimitz, the F-14, the B-l bomber, the
M-l tank and the MX missile Ooooh!
Once again, Reagan diffused the
"age issue" with a stilleto-like one-
liner. When a reporter leveled at the
President a question about age, Reagan
deftly deflected the issue, risky to him,
by saying, "I refuse to make an issue of
my opponent's youth and
inexperience That line is matched on-
ly by Reagan's "There you go again
of 1980. It was a perfect demonstration
of his dependence on always saying
something memorable. While in the
voting booth, many Americans who
were thinking of voting against Reagan
because of his age will remember that
line and chuckle as they put a check by
"Reagan-Bush
Both men made some odd
statements. Reagan said he would give
"Star Wars" technology to the Soviets
if his gift would get them to agree on a
fair arms-control treaty. Mondale said
"Reagan's national debt" is responsi-
ble for illegal immigration. It seems,
says Mondale, that the deficit causes
high interest rates, which hurts
Mexico's economy, which makes Mex-
icans poor, which makes the
muchachos tiptoe across the Rio
Grande into Texas. Weird. I hope
Campus Forum
neither man is serious.
This debate may go down in history
as a parallel to the Reagan-Carter
debate of 1980. Mondale may have won
on points, but Reagan won the au-
dience, which is all that really matters.
Post-debate polls show a draw, but
those pollsters contacted a cross-section
of likely and non-likely voters. Highly
respected pollster Clarence Darden
surveyed likely voters only, and he flat-
ly predicted that Mondale will be
humiliated on Nov. 6. In fact, his post-
debate poll showed a 6 � 28 point lead
for the Gipper among likely voters in
the South! And no Democrat since the
Civil War and Reconstruction has won
without carrying the South.
Debases are the best example of TV's
influence on elections. What matters to
the viewers is not who makes the most
points, but who looks good. Mondale
looked terrible. The circles under his
eyes were more noticeable than ever
(the makeup man must be a Reagan
undercover agent), and the only time he
smiled was when Reagan cracked his
one-line on the "age issue Perception
and style, not substance and issues, are
what matters on TV. But the debates
gave Mondale his only chance to swing
the voters to his side. However, when
Reagan is prepared, as he was Sundav
night, he is unbeatable.
The strongest evidence of Reagan's
victory came after the Kansas City
business had ended. ABC correspon-
dent Sam Donaldson, the White House
press corps' most virulently anti-
Reagan reporter, conceded the contest
to Reagan. The debate was a gamble
Mondale had to take, but even
Donaldson understood that the effort
by Mondale had failed.
Letter Laws Laid Lucidly
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number and signature of the
author(s). Letters are limited to two
typewritten pages, double-spaced or
neatly printed. All letters are subject
to editing for brevity, obscenity and
libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are
reminded that they are limited to one
every five issues.
In Seven Hour Riot
Studen
(CPS) � In one of the most
Solent episodes yet this fall of
nationwide student resistance to
strict new drinking policies, as
manv as 1,000 Illinois State
Lnivcrsitv students took to the
Greets in a seven-hour not last
eek.
The voung people, mostly ISL
students, flocked from campus to
Clt hall on Oct. 4, pelting police
ith rocks and breaking store
and office windows, officials
report.
Other protestors staged a sit-in
at a downtown theater and threw
rocks at police attempting to
remove them.
Traffic on a nearby highwav
also was disrupted by partying
protestors equipped with a keg of
beer, observers say.
Local and state police broke up
the seven-hour disturbance with
tear gas about 2 30 a.m. follow-
ing three arrests and a plea to
students from ISL' Presic
Llovd Wallace to stop
demonstrating. Officials reported
no serious injuries.
Officials note new city laws
governing the use of alcohol and
making students get permits for
parties are being enforced for the
first time this fall.
"There have been reports of a
number of spontaneous parties
with 2,000 or 3,000 people who
take over whole neighborhoods
explains Steve Mahrt. the .
lawyer. "And there a'e
thousands oi students out at
night, roaming neighborho
drinking beer. Occasionally, a
few get drunk and vandalize p
perty
Similar crackdowns are oc.
ing on other campuses this tali as
civil authorities move to curb off-
campus partying and enforce new
drinking regulations and laws
A.
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A lumni Recei
Continued From Page 1
chairman of the indust- al
deveopmem divson of the
Pitt -Greenville Chamber of
Commerce and serves as attorney
for Greenville schools and the
Greenville Utilities Commission.
He is also local counsel and
board of directors chair for Peo-
ple's Bank and Trust co.
His community service in-
cludes chairing several local
boards, including the Pitt-
Greenville Ans Council's 1984
arts fund drive. Dixon is promi-
nent in state and county -
associations and in the North
Carolina Democratic Party He is
a native of Raleigh and a
graduate of Enloe High School.
The three Outstanding Alumni
Award recipients were selected by
the ECU .Alumni Association
Board of Directors from
nominees suggested by alumni
and ECU faculty and staff
members. The chief criteria for
selection are professional
achievement and contributions to
the public welfare.
No Winner
In Sundav
Debate
Continued From Page 1
Clayton said a clear winner of
the debate could not be determin-
ed. "Each candidate's supporters
could find confirmation for lik-
ing that particular candidate
she said.
Expectations prior to the
debate were high. Clayton added
"Reagan needed to do better
(than in the last debate) and
chances were that he would. I
think he did, although he was not
as smooth and consistent as the
public might have liked
Mondale, she said "performed
fairly consistently with the way
he did in the last debate
although he did not appear to be
as relaxed.
Dr. Maurice Simon, chairman
of the political science depart-
ment, agreed that there was no
clear-cut winner. "I doubt that
Reagan recovered anv of his
losses from the first debate he
said. "And I doubt that Mondale
gained any additional support
"The networks are calling it a
stalemate and many people
believe it was Simon said.
IM






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 23, 1984
U SGMETWN
BUT
MEMBER
AMP V07F
155 WITH JU5H)

- s control with the
- is the same
once suggested we fire a
" a a measure to
s ich an approach
arms control
wed a bipar-
three decades.
here is that
e L'nited States
sue a policy of
a fantasy that
-1- n will result
Soviet counter-
: weapons systems.
costly and, most
�contrast, show-
- edge of the issues
- vand necessary to
ntro1 and foreign
nly fault was that
nd rvoi press the President hard
M e showed that
issues is not an option to
ather, it is a require-
ful leader.
supposed to com-
Mondale. Without
Igc and insight we
lei in our world of
four more years. The
:ai ac afford such a vaca-

�-
i � go down in history
the Reagan-Carter
Mondale may have won
t Reagan won the au-
ail that really matters.
now a draw, but
' acted a cross-section
I i oters. Highly
Clarence Darden
nly, and he flat-
Mondalc will be
fi In fact, his post-
� ed a 6" � 28 point lead
g likely voters in
And no Democrat since the
i War and Reconstruction has won
ut carrying the South.
are the best example of TV's
lections. What matters to
is not who makes the most
I but who looks good. Mondale
? rd terrible. The circles under his
were more noticeable than ever
le makeup man must be a Reagan
faercover agent), and the only time he
1 1 was when Reagan cracked his
(e-hne on the "age issue Perception
style, not substance and issues, are
fat matters on TV. But the debates
.e Mondale his only chance to swing
.oters to his side. However, when
lagan is prepared, as he was Sunday
?ht, he is unbeatable.
The strongest evidence of Reagan's
1 � .ame after the Kansas City
siness had ended. ABC correspon-
lt Sam Donaldson, the White House
:ss corps' most virulently anti-
igan reporter, conceded the contest
Reagan. The debate was a gamble
ndale had to take, but even
maldson understood that the effort
Mondale had failed.
idly
editing for brevity, obscenity and
bel, and no personal attacks will be
emitted. Students, faculty and staff
nting letters for this page are
mmded that they are limited to one
ien five issues.
i


A
In Seven Hour Riot
Students Protest Drinking Policies
(CPS) � In one of the most
violent episodes yet this fall of
nationwide student resistance to
strict new drinking policies, as
many as 1,000 Illinois State
University students took to the
streets in a seven-hour riot last
week.
The young people, mostly ISU
students, flocked from campus to
city hall on Oct. 4, pelting police
with rocks and breaking store
and office windows, officials
report.
Other protestors staged a sit-in
at a downtown theater and threw
rocks at police attempting to
remove them.
Traffic on a nearby highway
also was disrupted by partying
protestors equipped with a keg of
beer, observers say.
Local and state police broke up
the seven-hour disturbance with
tear gas about 2:30 a.m. follow-
ing three arrests and a plea to
students from ISU President
Lloyd Wallace to stop
demonstrating. Officials reported
no serious injuries.
Officials note new city laws
governing the use of alcohol and
making students get permits for
parties are being enforced for the
first time this fall.
"There have been reports of a
number of spontaneous parties
with 2,000 or 3,000 people who
take over whole neighborhoods
explains Steve Mahrt, the city
lawyer. "And there are
thousands of students out at
night, roaming neighborhoods,
drinking beer. Occasionally, a
few get drunk and vandalize pro-
perty
Similar crackdowns are occurr-
ing on other campuses this fall as
civil authorities move to curb off-
campus partying and enforce new
drinking regulations and laws.
At the University of Texas at
El Paso, disorderly conduct
charges wer filed against Phi
Kappa Tau fraternity President
Dan Sosa when the frat's
neighbors complained about a
noisy party.
The fraternity, which is appeal-
ing a prior disorderly conduct
conviction as well as the current
charge, plans to relocate.
More frequent Southwest
Missouri State University police
patrols are enforcing drinking
regulations with a new law allow-
ing them to arrest students on
suspicion of a misdemeanor.
Thanks to recent hikes in the
minimum drinking age and new
regulations designed to minimize
campuses's legal liability for stu-
dent behavior, milder protests
have erupted at Wisconsin, North
Carolina State, Indiana, St.
Bonaventure and Florida, among
dozens of schools, in recent
weeks.
The ISU crackdown netted
over 300 violators in August and
September, says Normal City
Hall spokesman Mahrt. There
were only 17 in May and June.
But all the violations stemmed
from the city's public possession
of alcohol ordinance, not the new
mass gathering law which re-
quires permits for public gather-
ings of 300 or more, Mahrt
reports.
"We haven't had a single party
disturbance this fall agrees
Richard Godfrey, ISU director of
institutional advancement and
Normal mayor. "And the frats
have had no problem with the or-
dinance. It's very easy to comply
with
Some students questioned the
ordinance's summer passage,
claiming few students were on
campus then, but Godfrey recalls
ISU student leaders joined
discussions of the measure last
spring.
And the demonstration, adver-
tised through leaflets and the
campus newspaper, was not en-
dorsed by the student govern-
ment, he adds.
Most protestors had no idea
why they were there, he main-
tains.
WANTED
1 'General Manager
91
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is now accep-
ting applications for the General Manager's
position through November 2nd. Interested
persons should apply on the second floor of
the Publication building, located across from
Joyner Library.
This is an excellent opportunity to work with a quality staff
while gaining valuable experience in a wide realm of business ap-
plications.
KlitM
mm
'�
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A lumni Receive A wards
Rebel
The Literary-Art Mogazine of East Carotoxa University
WRITING CONTESTS
PROSE POETRY
1st prize $100 1st prize $100
2nd prize $75 2nd prize $75
3rd prize $50 3rd prize $50
ACCEPTING ENTRIES UNTIL OCT. 29
Submit typed entries to Rebel or Media Board offices,
2nd floor publicaions building. Include name, address
and phone number.
Continued From Page 1
chairman of the industrial
development division of the
Pitt -Greenville Chamber of
Commerce and serves as attorney
for Greenville schools and the
Greenville Utilities Commission.
He is also local counsel and
board of directors chair for Peo-
ple's Bank and Trust co.
His community service in-
cludes chairing several local
boards, including the Pitt-
Greenville Arts Council's 1984
arts fund drive. Dixon is promi-
nent in state and county bar
associations and in the North
Carolina Democratic Party. He is
a native of Raleigh and a
graduate of Enloe High School.
The three Outstanding Alumni
Award recipients were selected by
the ECU Alumni Association
Board of Directors from
nominees suggested by alumni
and ECU faculty and staff
members. The chief criteria for
selection are professional
achievement and contributions to
the public welfare.
No Winner
In Sunday
Debate
Continued From Page 1
Clayton said a clear winner of
the debate could not be determin-
ed. "Each candidate's supporters
could find confirmation for lik-
ing that particular candidate
she said.
Expectations prior to the
debate were high, Clayton added.
"Reagan needed to do better
(than in the last debate) and
chances were that he would. I
think he did, although he was not
as smooth and consistent as the
public might have liked
Mondale, she said "performed
fairly consistently with the way
he did in the last debate
although he did not appear to be
as relaxed.
Dr. Maurice Simon, chairman
of the political science depart-
ment, agreed that there was no
clear-cut winner. "I doubt that
Reagan recovered any of his
losses from the first debate he
said. "And I doubt that Mondale
gained any additional support
"The networks are calling it a
stalemate and many people
believe it was Simon said.
Read
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Homecoming '84: 'A Part Of Your Life'
at the iumni Coffee Hour and Open House (top left). At 10 musical landing at center right. No game is complete without a tailgate partv howler (third row left) or
the third-place winning float during the parade. Iwo of FCI 's the annual art exhibition at (,rav (.alien (third row. righti. Sundav night the World ramous Roval I.ipi-
. pirate spin! center left while the homecoming court -rvstal rrav, Missv an Stallion show traveled to K I (bottom left). I he (.olden (.iris put on a thrilling halftime show for the
smiled to clapping fans. Meanwhile, this parachuter narrowh excaped a crowd (bottom right) (Ml photos taken bv Jon Jordan).







IHI I -l Ki i M
Entertainment
R A s Bridge Communication Gap
Recent
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Boozers, Joggers: A
Look At Pastimes
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drinket is
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tho i aIh he
l�U7leS vliUMl ,1 tilth
' "
it bon to relieve his stre
It's unlikely that this does
anything "positive tor his breath.
though
Now I am by no moans an ex
� on relieving stress, but I do
have my own ideas about what's
relaxing and what isn't Attet a
grueling week ol classes, there's
nothing I like better to do than sit
around and throw darts at my
rhe joggei would love it
mse he could watch the cat
jump around until he collapses
1 he boozei would love it becaue
he wouldn't have to move much
ave tor the pivoting to dii
ferent angles
I realize that this ma) seem a
bit extreme, but I figure it this
way Hettet to inflict pain than to
receiv z it
B I IN MAR()S( HK
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Break out sour spool
Mine because the 10th an:
"Halloween Masque
just around the corn I
d.w , Oct 26, 1 he Roxie M
�ttsc rafts c enter. Inc. is sp
soring the yearly even:
A I

ipeon

profits going i
Green Grass gj D.
i elebration.
Highlighting the evening a
be entertainment from Be.
the Hightones, the
and The 1 emon v
R u! abaga Broth Mike
" I tghtning" v ells will a
make a special appearam e
cording to Roxie's Executive
Duetot. Bill Shepherd, the i
poration has always utilized local
talent, mainly because the bands
get to play tot such a large an
dience (800 1.000 people).
Also on the agenda is a
costume contest People from the
ECl art and drama departments
will judge the contest, with the
overall winnet receiving $100 and
M .

FKR FRIDAY
S PM � 9 PM
MONEYS





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 23. 1984
�-) Pi. S
Gap
ob triai
a bout
It also viies the
a char�ntribute to
R s th some k on cam
a'iit lines
he most impor
etstudents � I he going on
said
Flet-
wi tor ted to ng a
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us! a
.
. ear hiai i, i
.
u
Event
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n critics as the new leormne Price
at 8 p.m. in Wright uditonum.
e Ball Set
id i ia :e v.innc' r
The "Halloween Mcl
Ball' will be held at the I
Queen North on Greet
rs will open a- -
happy hour will be from
to 10 p.m.
f vou want to he a pan �
magical evening, � .
available at the New ,�
Bar, Apple Record
Music. The will cost S5
vance and $6 at th
Horror
By CUNT WERNER
M.ff Hrtler
Where are the classic horror
movies? During the '30s and '40s
Universal Studios made a number
oi motion pictures based on the
world's great horror stories and
legends. The first films were
Bram Stoker's Dracula and Mary
Shelley's Frankenstein
One o the most powerful
moments in the history of horror
cinema is when Belahugosi as
Count Dracula greets his visitor,
Reinfield. Dracula listens to
wolves howling and says in a
Hungarian accent as thick as
gooiash, "Listen to them,
children of the night. What music
they make It is a scene that
oozes got hie atmosphere from
the corners of the screen.
Moments like this are sadly ab-
sent from today's horror films.
Modern horror movies tend to
emphasize momentary jolts of
terror. For example, a co-ed
turns a corner in a dark dorm and
is hacked to death by a mad
killer. This is a sudden shock of
surprise. These films are gorey
and ladden with numerous shots
of latex mutilations. The classics
of the '30s and '40s are nearly
free of blood and guts and the
horror is more subtle and endur-
ing. They work deep on the
psyche.
The horror that ferments in the
subconscious is what made films
like Frankenstein, Dracula and
The Half man classics. The hor-
ror grows as one contemplates a
man stitched together from the
rot of death, running through the
Bavarian countryside drowning
children.
Perhaps the greatest horror
film of all time emerged from this
genre, James Whale's The Bride
of Frankenstein. Boriskarloff
repeated his role as the monster
Classifieds
PERSONALS
1) BK, BROTHERS lonigh! is going
to be ,i blast at the Old rown Inn' Can
ai! to see you all!
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST WITH 15
years uams full time typing at home. IBM
typewriter. Call 75f-3660.
NEARM FINANCIAL INSTITUTION
seeks Computer Student for part-time
work on Data Base Reply COMPUTER,
Box 8008, Greenville, NC 27834.
MISC
MIRK) SYSTEM PROBI.FMS? Ab-
solute! "no charge" for repair estimates
at the Tech shop. Call 757- "nineteen
eighty We thought you'd like to know
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE
experience, qualm work, IBM Selectric
typewriter. Lame Srme. 758-5301.
SALE
FOR SIK King Sie waterbed good
condition, (all 758-9532.
EP1PI HONE 12-STR1M, GUITAR, ex
cellent sound and action. Accurate tuning
mechanisms $250.00. 758-6752, after 6
p.m.
Worse
for this sequel to the original
Frankenstein. Whale used the
film to belittle some of society's
most sacred institutions. There is
a mock crucifixion and a
blasphemous wedding of two liv-
ing corpses. The juxtapostion of
life and death in conjunction with
some lively dialogue makes The
Bride of Frankenstein a
memorable experience.
Other films of the period in-
clude The Mummy, The
Wolf man. Son of Frankenstein,
Ghost of Frankenstien, House of
Dracula, and House of Frankens-
tein. Where are these films now?
They are never shown on televi-
sion. Are there no shock theatres
willing to provide viewers with
quality horror films? Even the
all-night movies shown on Hallo-
ween are usually 1950s grade D
movies about aliens or giant
bugs. These are amusing but
hardly as entertaining as Lugosi's
Lon Chaney Jrs
Dracula or
Wolf man.
Something must be done. A
generation is growing up with the
notion that a good horror film
consists of 90 minutes of a mu-
tant called Jason butchering
"heated" teenagers.
Hjiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimitiiiiiiiiiiiii
Read The
Classifieds
iTIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllliiiiiiiifiiiiiiiimiiiiiirr

Come Ploy The Indian
This Fall"
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC
DONNA LDUAROS
Sih Pizza inn
Buffet
Mon-Frl 1 lam-2pm Noon Buffet 3.09
All the pizza, 19
spaghetti and
salad you can eat!
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
Night
6:00 till 8:00pm
For pizza out it's Pizza Inn r
Greenville Blvd. 758-6266
VILLAGE
We Carry A Complete Line
of Dog, Cat, and Fish Supplies
Free Gift with $10 or more purchase
Master Card and Visa are accepted and financing
is available.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE. N C 27834
PfrlONT 756 9222
im 19 :
� lv 111
it, Piqnrs Reserved
50 � " "� aiers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Creenvill
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items
is required to oe readily
available for sale in each Kroger
Sav on except as specifically
noted in this ad if we do run
out of an item we win offer you
your choice of a comparable
item when available reflecting
the same savings or a rameneetc
which will entitle you to pur
chase the advertised item at
me advertised pnee within 50
days Only one vendor coupon
win oe accepted per item
items and Prices
Effective Thru sat
Cct 27 1983
KROGER
Sandwich
Bread
24 0Z.
Loaf
X-DRY, PINK, COLD DUCK,
BRUT SPUMANTE OR
J. Roget
Champagne
WHITE
ScotTissue
Bath Tissue
A $169
Pkg. I
TAB, SPRITE, DIET COKE
MELLO YELLO OR
Coca
Cola
2 Ltr.
N.R.B.
$129
I SAVE
KROGER
instant
Coffee
$929
10 Oz.
Jar
LIMIT 1 JAR PLEASE
r
HOLLY FARMS CUT UP
MIXED FRYER PARTS OR GRADE A
Whole
Fryers
Lb.
V
LIMIT 3 PKGS PLEASE
J
A BEWITCHING
Black cat
Cake
CALIFORNIA
Fresh
Cauliflower
GREAT FOR
JACK-O-LANTERNS
Halloween
Pumpkins
Hd.
� 11 � - � -
1 i





III t s I
Sports
Homecoming Was A Smash
Bubba Breaks loose For 161 Yards And Two TD's
MIUs
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(.nit I ournament held on (he campus ot Duke I niersit lasi weekend
Linksters Close Out Fall Season
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staff M ntri
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sophomore Mike Bi adle.
ed ninth in l he lohn K
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Bi adle had round
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T
r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 23, 1984
11
)
l
4i
ARBE� ECU PtlOto Lab
h - cam, Ml i-oach Ed frnorv
ivei "I lhf namt.
'ANLEY LEAUr - Contributing Photxjr�oner
interested in the game. EC! 's
(ls crowned at half time.

�S$fe
BRYAN HUMBEBi
Ifinish at the John Ryan Memorial
ll Season
tournament Helmick a:d. �'
sust need to get them some nelp
Helmick said he's conf
that hiv team can p .�
together, it's just a ma � �
Jing the right combination of
plavers who .an do the
Wake forest on the team
competition with a team total of
856. Duke was next at 857
followed by Norht Carolina with
ojy.
Georgia Tech's B,ll Mac
with a 208, followed by Wall
Chuck Taylor, both at 210
The tournament concludes the
tall season for the ECl if
team, with the official Scfl
season beginning in February
Florida State Whallops Tulanei
My BILL MITCHELL
Staff Wrtttr
Temple: Delaware pulled an
upset over 3-4 Temple by the
final score of 34-19 on Saturday.
Quarterback Rich Gannon pass-
ed for 232 yards and three
touchdowns to lead Delaware
over the Owls. Delaware, nor-
mally a 1-AA powerhouse but
only 4-3 this year, yielded an ear-
ly touchdown to Temple, but
then took command. Temple
plays at Virginia Tech next week.
Florida State: The top ten
Seminoles took a 27-7 win over
the Green Wave of Tulane last
weekend. FSU now stands at
5-1-1 on the season.
N.C. State: Intrastate riv Is Nor-
the Carolina played a tig t game
last Saturday with the ' trheels
pulling out a 28-21 victory in the
closing minutes.
Sophomore William Humes,
starting in the back field for UNC
for the first time, sailed over the
go lline with 31 seconds left to
assure the Tarheels of victory. He
wound up with 156 yards rushing
on the day.
The Pack overcame a 20-7
deficit with 13 minutes left to
play in the third quarter to take
the lead 21-20 on touchdowns by
Ricky Wall and Mike Miller
before the third quarter ended.
The lead held until late in the
fourth quarter when Humes
scored.
Georgia Southern: Newberry was
defeated by Georgia Southern
41-6 on Saturday. The Golden
Eagles soundly outplayed them
up and down the field. Georgia
plays Valdosta State next week.
Pittsburgh: Record breaking
quarterback Bernie Kosar passed
for 351 yards and one touchdown
in a 27-7 victory for the Miami
Hurricanes over Pitt.
Kosar, who broke a school
record by throwing 29 comple-
tions in 42 attempts, hit Stanley
Shakespeare for a 16-yard
touchdown on Miami's first
possession.
two possessions of the second
half. Cox added a 27-yard field
goal before Pittsburgh could
finally muster a 13-yard scoring
pass from Chris Jelic to Darnell
Stone to make it 27-7 with 7:48
remaining. Pitt drops to 1-6 and
the Hurricanes are now 7-2.
OPPORTUNITY
' Production Manager' �
East
10.
Tennessee State: See page
Booters Win One, Lose One
By SCOTT POWERS
Antetaat Sporti Rdltw
The ECU soccer team split its
two games in the last week to run
their record to 2-9-1 at the mid-
way point of the season.
The Pirates took a 2-0 victory
over Virginia Wesleyan on Oc-
tober 10, but head coach Steve
Brody was not totally pleased
with his team's play.
"We should have scored six or
seven goals he commented.
"Virginia Wesleyan was totally
out of their league playing
against us
He went on to say, however
that a win was a win and that he
would take any that they could
get.
The Pirates goals in the game
came on shots by Jamie Ribel and
Larry Bennett as the Pirates took
the lead early and coasted home
for their second win of the
season.
The team then took on North
Carolina Wesleyan, the number
eight ranked Division III team in
the nation, and ended up on the
short end of a 1-0 score.
It was the same old story for
the Pirates, as they once again
fell behind early in the game and
never could rally.
The only goal of the game
came on a Wesleyan penalty kick
after a hand ball call against ECU
barely ten minutes into the con-
test.
Despite Wesleyan's high rank-
ing, Brody felt that his team
should have won the match.
"We didn't play very well at
all the coach stated. "We had
the opportunities to win the
game, but we didn't execute when
we needed to
The team received more bad
news last week when it was
discovered that standout
freshman Jeff Kime, who has
oeen a starter all season, would
be out due to mononucleosis for
at least six weeks.
"Losing Jeff will defmitely
hurt the team Brody said. "He
has played very well for us all
year
The Pirates travel to James
Madison, an ECAC-South foe,
for a match today, before return-
ing home to face Richmond in
another conference match this
weekend.
South Carolina: The Gamecocks
downed the Fighting Irish of
Notre Dame 36-32 with a
22-point fourth quarter burst led
by back-up quarterback Mike
Hold. Hold scored two of the
touchdowns in the fourth with a
sneak and a 33-yard run. Quinton
Lewis scored the other with a
four yard smash. The Irish were
leading at halftime 17-14 when
kicker John Carney booted a
48-yard field goal with no time
remaining. South Carolina
wasn't able to score until the
fourth quarter. South Carolina is
now 6-0, their best start ever.
Southern Mississippi: Quarter-
back Robert Duckworth sprinted
seven yards for a third quarter
touchdown and underdog
Southern Mississippi held on for
a 13-10 victory over the Universi-
ty of Mississippi. Southern Miss
ended a four year losing streak in
this meeting between intrastate
rivals and pushed its record to
2-5. Trailing 10-3 at intermission,
Southern Miss scored a field goal
and then a touchdown on the first
two possessions of the first half.
Southern Miss takes on SW Loui-
siana next week.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is now accep-
ting applications through October 26th for the
Production Manager's position. All interested
persons are encouraged to apply. Don't pass
up this opportunity to gain valuable experience
and work for Eastern North Carolina's
number one college newspaper.
Stop by the Publication building located across from Joyner Library.
Experience prefered, but not necessary
ECU FACULTY AND STAFF
TOM TAFT For State Senate
COFFEE
Thurs. Oct. 25th
5:00pm
Democratic Headquarters
604 Arlington Boulevard
Discussion with Tom Taft
Paid by Tom Taft for State Senate and ECU Faculty and Staff.
THE ORIGINAL FAMILY STEAK HOUSE
Come To Western Sizzlin For
Bigger, Juicy Beef Tips
JUST ASKFORTHENO. 3!
��
No. 3 Beef Tips I
Wed. & Thurs.
For $3.29
FREE Potato Fixins Bar
With Your Meal
Pre-OT Mixer
for all pre-occupational therapy
students
Thurs. Oct. 25th 7:00-9:00
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room
gf
a)
Casual Dress
Refreshment.
Activities
OT slide show
Speaker
Display of OT equipment
Jr. & Sr. OT's will be there for reference
Informal questionsanswers
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Graowiik BKd
TM-3H3- 14H�
24 hour Towing Service
I -Haul Rentals
ALANO'S PIZZA & SUBS
FREE DELIVERY
CALL 752-3861
We Accept Competitors Coupons
LUNCH SPECIALS
12" 1 Item Pizza and 2 14oz. Drinks
For Only $4.75 Delivered Free.
Offer good between the hours of 11:30am-3:00pm
ft SPECIAL OF ALL SPECIALS ft
Introducing the "Belly Buster"
It has 10 Delicious toppings
Pepperoni
Ham
Hamburger
Sausage
Onions
Double Cheese
Green Olives
Mushrooms
Green Peppers
Black Olives
ONLY $12.50 16" Pizza
ONLY $8.50 12" Pizza
NOT VALID WITH ANY OTHER SPECIAL
�Sf'dzAiMit'S
THE PLAZA
GRAND OPENING SALE
Our founder, Roscoc Griffin
would be proud of the way his
shoe stores have grown to
cover Eastern North Carolina
including a second Greenville
location. As part of the stores
grand opening ceremonies, we
would like to pay tribute to
Roscoe's sense of value by
introducing RoscoeBucks.
These certificates are good
for five dollars off any of our
non-sale shoes in stxk and are
redeemable only at our new
Greenville Plaza location. Limit
one per customer please. For
old fashioned bargains and
now two locations in
Greenville, stop by and check
out our new store, located in
Greenville Plaza.
A new shipment of the
popular MIA Apache
moccassin has arrived in time
for our Grand Opening Sale.
90
You'll find these and other
values at �ur famous Roscoc
Griffin prices So come on by
and help us celebrate
WORD DEPOT
P. 0. Box 666
Greenville, N.C. 27834
(746-4353 OR 756-5620)
Complete word processing service) -
resumes, theses, term papers, reports
letters, documents, statistical, labels
FAST, EFFICIENT,
CONFIDENTIAL SERVICE
HOURS
M-F 5 p.m10 p.m.
Sat 8 a.m12 Noon
Spend these
RoscoeBucks
at our
Grand Opening
Sale
jt '
GHlISIIOIK!l.G !VO 1 1
ROMCOK GRffFIN SHOW
9.
THIS NOTE IS &00O FOR S50O OFT
ON ANY NON-SALE SHOE IN STOCK-
LIMIT ONE NOTE PER CUSTOMER
CJOODOJOr ATGREEaNillE
T.EA STORfc THROUGH
NOVEMBER 3, tBH
Guxcrxn
�tSHOCS
GREENVILLE PLAZA
6
0&kf6i�ce
feksr
Wtift(iod
Vo
5KOSCOEIUJCKS

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�DJUjAgTCAROLlNlAN OCTOBER 23,
1984
Bombsquad Takes Victory
Soccer, Bowling Underway
B JEANNETTE ROTH
Miff Wnln
This years flag football finals
in the men's and women's dii
sions saw the top two ranked
teams from the beginning of
regular season take the All-
Campu- honors. In the women's
semi-finals. Residence Hall "Slay
Mama defeated sororities'
"Alpha Phi" 30-12, led by
quarterback June "Hollywood"
Gurnet. In the All-Campus
championship game between the
"Sla Mamas" and the top rank-
ed Independent "Naturals
Ginger Rothenel once again
scrambled in the back field to give
her team a "Natural" 33-12 vic-
tory.
The men's final saw Scott Mc-
Carroll's Bombsquad who
defeated fraternit champ Sigma
Phi Epsilon, take on "Garrett
Hve-O the underrated but
oerw helming Residence Hall
winners. "Five-O" earned the
bye for the All-Campus Tourna-
ment, as they prepared for the
championshp game. The first
half saw Five-O take an early lead
with a pass from Don Gross to
Jeff Konecke. Bombsquad came
back with a toss from Scott Mc-
Carroll to Garry Bishop plus a
conversion which tied the battle
at 7-7. "Five-O" broke the tie on
another pass to Konecke but the
"Bombsquad" refused to give-in
scoring one more time on the last
play ot the half to pull within one
at 14-13. The second half was all
Bombsquad as Scott McCarroll
threw in a few more passes to
make it four TD assists for the
evening as the Bombsquad won
25-14.
The Putt-Putt tournament
Falcons In Trouble
SUWANEE, (L'PI) - No one.
least of all Dan Henning, ex-
pected the Atlanta Falcons of-
fense to come apart at the seams.
Last Season, Henning's first at
the Falcons helm, had been a
shakedown cruise, a learning
period for the one-back offense
Henning brought with him from
Washington.
Although Atlanta was only
9, the first four losses were all
by 4 or less points and the offense
� with Steve Bartkowski the top
rated passer in the NFL and
William Andrews the top all-
purpose running back in the
league avergaed 32 points over
the closing five games.
Henning figured the offense
was set for '84, that if the Falcons
tightened up their defense they
would be a solid contender for a
playoff berth.
But that was before Andrews
went out for the for the year with
a preseason knee injury, before
Billy "Whiteshoes" Johnson suf-
fered a similar blow five games
into the season, before running
backs Gerald Riggs and Lynn
Cain were hobhUd.
Henning said any more losses
at the skilled positions will force
the Falcons to readjust their
thinking.
"We'll hae to take a different
approach with our defense he
said. "We will have to do things
that will keep us in a low scoring
game. But we haven't reached
that point yet.
"The lo�s of so many running
backs creates a dual problem
said Henning. "it not only
hampers our running game, it
also puts a dent in our passing
A year ago, Andrews (59) and
Johnson (64) were responsible for
more than a third of Atlanta's
pass completions. Bartkowski,
connecting on two-thirds of his
attempts, is averaging 17 comple-
tions and 229 yards per game �
just about last yea clip, but he
hasn't thrown a to ichdown pass
the past three gan5 and Henning
blames that on the receivers.
"Bart has gotten the ball in
close plenty of times, but he can't
take it in himself said Henning.
"Many touchdown passes are
due to the speed and running
ability of the people who catch it.
"With the injuries to our run-
ners, he's had to fit the ball in
places where he normally
wouldn't have to. There have
been too many dropped passes of
late and he's had to throw the
ball away more often than he us-
ed to
When Andrews was in the
lineup, Bartkowski used him as a
primary target. Riggs, while do-
ing a good job as a runner when
he's been healthy, isn't in An-
drews' class as a receiver.
"The only receiver we have
with more than one year's ex-
perience is Alfred Jackson
Jackson seems to feel that some
of the hobbling Falcons could do
better than they have if they
wanted to.
"We've got guys on this team
who don't know the difference
between pain and injury said
Jackson. "If we had more guys
who did. we'd be 6-1 instead of
where we are now
finished up last week with these
results:
The division champions were:
Residence Hall � Garrett Aces
and Par Four; Independent: Bur-
nouts and Tri Sigs; Greek arrett
Acres � Residence Hall � Par
Four: Sig Eps and Alpha Delta
Pi.
In all-Campus action the In-
dependent "Burnouts" grabbed
the men's division victory from
Sigma Phi Epsilon. The ladies
match up between two sorority
powers Tri Sig and Alpha Delta
Pi ran par for the course as the
ADPi's took the championship.
3 on 3 basketball rounded out
the season with the Fellows,
seasonal favorites defeating
Slakers II.
The women's division bounced
along with a match up between
the "Enforcers" and "Alway
Ready The girls from "Always
Ready" took the win away from
the "Enforcers" in a tight con-
test.
Soccer and Bowling are just a
few of the activities presently go-
ing on withing the Intramural
Department. pre-Season basket-
ball is upcoming in December In-
tramurals: Participate Rather
Than Spectate.
Sigma Nu
Present
DRAFT NITE
Tues. Oct. 23, 1984 9:00-2:00am
Adm.S1.50 18 vrs. $1.00
lOCDraft All Nite
� 0KT
Present
DRAFT NITE
Wed. Oct. 24, 1984 9:0O-2:OOam
Adm. $1.50 18 vrs. $1.00
lOCDraft All Nite
HELP US
CELEBRATE
Our 3rd Anniversary
and
Register To Win A Giant
6- Foot Sub
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 23, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 23, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.369
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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