The East Carolinian, October 18, 1984







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(Earttltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No. 16
Thursday October 18,1984
Greenville, N.C.
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Partisan Debate
Stalled By Feud
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
r�i Mllw
A debate between the ECU
Young Democrats and College
Republicans may be held this
month if the members of the two
groups can reach an agreement
on the terms of the meeting.
The debate, which will focus
on issues prevalent in this year's
presidential campaign, was in-
itialK proposed by Charles Sune,
chairman o the campus YD's.
Sune said he was turned down by
Dennis Kilcoyne, chairman of the
(R because of his refusal to
apologize for certain actions.
Kilcoyne asked for apology for
accusing us of having a 'busy
schedule' heckling Democrat can-
didates" and for "insinuating
that our membership figure of 80
is mere propaganda
Sune said he saw nothing to
apologize for.
The CRs Wednesday proposed
a debate concerning homosexual
rights, fiscal policy and arms con-
trol, to take place on Oct. 30 at
3:30 p.m. Each group would be
allowed three participants and
the debate would be moderated
by SGA President John Rainey.
"We feel these are the three
points of greatest difference bet-
ween the two parties said Kirk
Shelley, a spokesman for the
CRs. Shelley said the CRs would
be willing to negotiate on fine
points but plan to hold to the
stated format.
"I'm willing to negotiate but I
will not be dictated to Sune
said. He added that he was happy
to see that the CRs "were willing
to discuss it but said he would
like to broaden the range of
topics.
"We are eager to debate he
said.
"1 don't think it (the debate)
wil change anybody's mind, but
it will be a lot of fun Shelley
said. "If they don't want to
debate us, it's their loss
A Squirrel, Again
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo L�b
Here we have yet another of the famous campus squirrels. This one
is busy plotting to overthrow the administration while
simultaneously giving the photographer the evil eve and preparing
for winter. Campus life is never easv.
No Decision On Name
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Koilor
Although ECU students'
displeasure with the name of the
official Pirate mascot. Pee Dee,
has received statewide media at-
tention and been expressed in an
SGA election, action has not yet
been taken to change the name.
' ' We have not made a
decision ECJ Chancellor JOrm
How ell said Wednesday. "I have
talked to Dr. Karr (director of
athletics) about it
Howell said he told Karr the
athletic department should con-
sider the student vote and
"possibly get some feeling from
the other constituencies that
ought to be involved in the deci-
sion
"I've said all along that we
would not take the hasty step of
changing it (the name) only to
find that a lot of other people are
unhappy with it so we have to go
through the process again
Howell said.
Howell said future action
would depend on many factors.
"First of all, the group that made
the initial decision should recon-
sider what they did. We'll wait to
see what they do about that
The name was selected bv a
Committee SGA Top Priority
Pee Dee
grade school student as part of a
promotional effort by the
Department of Athletics. Pro-
tests have concerned both the
name and the lack of student in-
volvement in its selection.
Karr was unavailable for com-
ment.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newt h4ttlor
A Special Projects Committee
will be the top priority of the
SGA Legislature this year, accor-
ding to Speaker of the Legislature
Kirk Shelley, who created the
committee.
The committee will have seven
SGA members. Its other
members will be drawn from the
student body. They will aid the
committee in attacking problems
such as the high cost of books
and the lack of campus parking.
"We want to give students
tangible evidence that the SGA
exists and is looking out for
them Shelley said.
The committee will be the task
force in working to solve student
problems, he added. Students
with specific concerns can con-
tact committee members through
the SGA office.
In order to find ways to res-
pond to student concerns, the
committee will hold open public
meetings to obtain students' ideas
and reactions.
Shelley said a booth will be set
up at the Student Supply Store
next week in order to take ap-
plications from students in-
terested in serving on the commit-
tee. Requirements, he said, are a
2.0 grade average and a "will-
ingness to work
"We want to change the face
of student government Shelley
said.
SGA President John Rainey
also said that emphasis would be
placed on the Special Projects
Committee. In addition, he said,
he is concentrating his efforts on
the new Freshmen Aide program.
This program is designed to
give freshmen exposure to the
functions of the SGA while serv-
ing as pages for the legislature
and various members ot me ex-
ecutive committee.
The next SGA meeting will be
Thursday night. C. Raiph
Kinsey, chairman of the ECU
Board of Trustees will speak on
the role of the trustees in student
life.
Black College Students Boycott Helms' Campus Appearance
(CPU � About 200 angry
black students locked arms in
protest and boycotted a speech by
Sen. Jesse Helms Wednesday
during the conservative
Republican's first visit to a
predominantly black college.
The protesting students at Liv-
ingstone College stood in silence
outside a campus auditorium, ig-
noring Helms' waves and smiles
and snubbing the senator when
he tried to shake their hands.
"Why should I put my hand in
dirt?" one student said. "He
represents prejudice said
another student, Rufus Beterkin.
Helms, who is locked in a bit-
ter fight for re-election against
Gov. James Hunt, appeared sur-
prised by the protest and charged
Democrats organized the
students.
"I came here to meet with the
black students. Whether you vote
for me or not is fine - and I know
you won't said Helms, who
promoted segregation for a
decade as a television commen-
tator before being elected
senator.
Helms was invited to the
700-student campus by the Liv-
ingston administration, promp-
ting the college's student govern-
ment association to distribute
fliers across campus calling for
the boycott. Student leaders
denied any outside influence.
"We are not boycotting
because we are pro-Hunt said
Daniel Webb, student vice presi-
dent. "I would say Mr. Helms
has established himself as so-
meone who is against the black
community
"He is using our school as a
pawn said student Roland
Cohen. "He doesn't have
anything to offer us. We the
students don't want him here.
He's against anything for black
people
Helms has largely ignored
black voters until this week when
he started campaigning wifh
former professional football
player Roosevelt Grier. Both can-
didates say the race is dead even
and polls show Hunt would take
98 percent of North Carolina's
black vote.
Accusing black leaders and
Democrats of leading minorities
into "the welfare syndrome
Helms defended his conservative
stands in his speech before an au-
dience of less than 100 people
scattered in the auditorium.
Helms said "no one is opposed
to helping the truly needy" but
vowed to oppose any measure
that lets citizens "ride piggy-back
on the taxpayers
The Democratic Party has been
jerking you around for 35 years
and taking you for granted
Helms said. "The federal govern-
ment cannot create jobs. It is a
total flop everytime it has tried.
You don't want to be a captive of
the welfare svstem. You want a
job
"I think the black leaders have
moved the minorities into the
welfare syndrome and if you
don't see that you ought to wake
up and smell the coffee he said.
Helms led the Congressional
fight against a national holiday in
honor of the Rev. Martin Luther
King and the senator told the
students, "I oppose a holiday for
anybody
"We don't need more holidays
for leisure. " he said.
Registered Voters
Increase Statewide
JON JORDAN � ecu l�hoto Lab
Like it or not, there are always those students who start studying
weeks before a test. However, there is such a thing as carrying it to
Budding Einstein
extremes. Watch out for this kid, a hazard to the normal curve.
(UPI) � At least 75 percent of
eligible North Carolinians have
registered to vote in the last two
years and officials predicted the
state will have the largest turnout
in history November 6.
Some 56 percent of eligible
voters in North Carolina were
registered to vote two years ago
when the state started a new cam-
paign to encourage voting.
"Now we will have qualified to
vote 75 percent of our eligible
people State Elections Director
Alex Brock said. "That's a rather
phenomenal advancement and
accomplishment
Brock said a tally of voters
who registered between last April
and the October 8 deadline will
be ready in about 10 days. From
November 1983 to April 1984,
the ranks of registered voters
swelled to more than 2.9 million,
an increase of 224,631, he said.
Of those new voters, about
163,000 registered Democratic,
53,000 Republican and 8,400
unaffiHated. Some 145,000 of the
new voters are white, 77,000
black, 1,700 Indian and 1,000
other minorities.
Brock said registration had in-
creased among all groups, but
white voters outnumbered black
voters 2.4 million to 565.000.
"You know the two reverends
have been in North Carolina -
Rev. Jesse Jackson and Rev.
Jerry Falwell. Both have had con-
siderable success Brock said.
Jackson pushed voter registra-
tion in the state during his
presidential primary campaign
last spring and black voter
registration increased 15.8 per-
cent between October 1983 and
last April.
Falwell's fundamentalist
Moral Majority organization said
it registered 100,000 conservative
North Carolina voters in 18 mon-
ths.
"Liberal churches aren't going
to call us over and say, 'Let's
have a voter registration
Moral Majority director Lamarr
Mooneyham said.
Merle Black, a political science
professor at the University of
North Carolina, said the voter
registration drive likely will
benefit conservative candidates,
even though three times more
Democrats than Republicans
registered to vote.
"


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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 18, 1984
Announcements
Honor Boar
Smaller Cas
WORKSHOP
Llt� Planning Workshop This workshop Is In
t�nded �o provide assistance to students unsure
ot the direction they wish their lives to take The
?ocus will be on lifestyles tor the future Many
people do not think of themselves as having in
tluence on their futures, but rather, lust let the
future happen Participants ir Life Planning will
engage In a process of self examination of pre
sent behaviors, goal setting and decision mak
trig The Life Planning workshop will meet on
Oct. 23, 25, 30, and Nov I from JlDprn in 308
Wright Annex Although advance registration is
not required, we would appreciate advance
notification of Interest to insure that we have
adequate materials on hand Please contact the
Counseling Center in 307 Wright Annex (757 6661
tor further information or to let us know you plan
to attend
STUDENT UNION
The Student Union Productions Committee
will meet on Mon CXt 22. at 3 30 p m in Room
242 Mendenhall All members and interested
students are urged to attend
GRADUATE STUDENTS
A Happy Hour Dinner for all graduate
students win be held Oct 18 at 5 p m at the New
Deli Restaurant downtown This event is soon
sored by The Graduate Advisory Council, so
come meet your fellow graduate students For
more info call Teresa Briley (756 4183) or
Marillyn Harper (758 8021)
MINI WORKSHOP
The Writing Center will again, this year, offer
a mini workshop program This series of presen
rations made by members of the ECU Depart
ment of English, m intended to provide intensive
one time group instruction on writing problems
often confronted Cv students as thev write The
sessions will be held on Thursdays at 3 30 and
last roughly one hour The mini workshop
schedule is as follows Oct 11 Luke Whisnant,
"invention and Discovery in Writing 18 Pat
BiJiaro Writing Anxiety Workshop " 25 Bill
Hallberg Descriptive Writing Nov 1 Jim
Kirkiand, "Punctuation Workshop. ' 8 Collert
DHworth "Structuring Sentences. 15 Mike
Hamer Journal Writing and 22 Kim Smith.
Using Statistics in Research Writing
SCHOOL OF EDUCATION
It's time! For what1 To begin construction on
the School of Education Homecoming Float The
tun will Begin it 1 p m , Thurs . Oct 18, in Keel's
Tobacco Warehouse il715 Dickinson Avenue
near the Pepsi Cola Bottling Company We plan
to "float It" all day Come join us! Thanks!
FORUM
If you are interested m lectures, symposiums,
or other related programs, why not iom the Stu
oent Union Forum Committee The Student
Union Forum Committee is presently accepting
applications for committee members For more
information contact the Student union Office
757 6411. ext 210 or come by the -Mice in Room
334 Mendenhall
PUBLIC RELATIONS
if you are a Marketing major, we know you
will be interested in this committee The Student
Union Public Relations and Publicity Committee
will package publicity and coordinates total pro
motion of the Student Union The committee is
now accepting applications for committee
members For more information, contact the
Student union Office at 757 6611, ext 210 or come
oy the office in Room 234 Mendenhall
PUBLIC RELATIONS
The Student union Public Relations and
Publicity Committee is looking tor interested In
dlviduals m working on this committee packag
ing and coordinating the total promotion and
publicity of the Student union Questions? Call
757 6611, ext 210 from 8 s m 5pm Interested'
Fill out an application today in Room 234
Mendenhall
ALPHA PHI
The next big brother meeting will be Sun
night Oct 21 at 9 30 pm at the house Everyone
is urged to attend a lot of important topics will
be discussed at this meeting
PI KAPPA PHI
AH brothers, little sisters, and all pledges are
reminded to come out to the house Thurs and
Fri mght to work on the Homecom.iig Float
Homecoming is going to be at the house this year
and it's goin to be iammin Also remember the
PUSH solicitation and wood cut coming up on
Sat Oct 27
PI KAPPA PHI
The first meeting for little sister pledges will
oe at 5 on Sun , Oct 21. at the Pi Kappa house If
you cannot attend, call Lori at 758 1461 The little
sister meeting will also be Sun at 6. don't forget
your sponsor gifts and prices Also Libbi and
Lisa will be having a jammm party at their
house Homecoming night For all little sisters
and little sister pledges
VOLLEYBALL
Registration for Intramural Volleyball begins
Oct 22 and ends the 23 Play begins Oct 29 To
register, come by Room 204 Memorial Gym
Anyone interested in officiating volleyball should
come to the first clinic on Oct 22 at 6 p m in
Memorial Gym Room 102
SENATE COMMITTEES
Applications are now being accepted tor
students wishing to serve on University Commit
tees for 1984 85 school year Twenty one (21) stu
dent positions are open Committees with vacan
cies are AlcoholDrug Education Committee
(1), Committee on Canvasslng&Solicitlng on
Campus (l), Committee on Residence Life (1).
Committee on Status of Minorities (4), Commit
tae on Status of Women (2), Committee on Stu
dent Health Services (1), Housing Appeals (off
campus student) (1), Parking and Traffic Com
mlttee (1), Scholars Weekend Committee (1).
Admissions Committee (l). Career Education
Committee (li, Course Drop Appeals Committee
(J). Faculty Computer Committee (1), General
College (1). Student Scholarships. Fellowships,
and Financial Aid Committee (1), Teaching Ef-
fectiveness Committee (2) Applications are
available at the following locations Office of the
Vice Chancellor for Student Life. 204 Whichard;
Mendenhall Student Center Information Desk,
SGA Office, Mendenhall Student Center, Office
of Intramural Recreational Services. Memorial
Gym and Residence Hall Directors' Offices. The
University greatly appreciates the efforts of
those students who have served in the past and
hope that students will continue their interest
and participation. Questions about University
Committees and memberships may be directed
to the Office of the Vice chancellor for Student
Life (757 6541) submit your applications now!
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The College Republicans will meet tonight in
the Mendenhall Cotteehaouse We will discuss all
our election activities and our challenge to the
YDs The campaign has hit the accelerator and If
you've wanted to get active, now is the time
tonight at 7 p m
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
Sigma Phi Epsllon and Sigma Sigma Sigma
proudly present happy hour al Grogs Tues , Oct
22 at 9 p m Featuring the great playboy strip
off So come out and be a happy camper with the
Slg Eps and Tri Sigs Be there Aloha
CADP
Help promote responsible drinking Become a
volunteer for CADP There will be a meeting
Oct 18. Erwln Hall. 2nd floor Conference Room
218 All interested please attend
MEDITATION
On Tues. Oct 23 at 7 in Room 212 at
Mendenhall we will meet and start discussing
the book "Wisdom Energy " This will be follow
ed by meditation practice Please bring your
own cushion
ISA
We have a meeting Sat Oct 20, Room 221
Mendenhall at 6 p m We hope to see you there
TRACK MEET
Register for the Intramural Track Meet on
Oct 22 through the 25th The meet will be held on
Oct 30 The team captains meeting will be held
on the 29th at 7 00 p m in the Biology building
room 103 To sign up come by room 204 Memorial
Gym or for more information call 757 6387
BASKETBALL
Registration for Intramural Co Rec Basket
ball will begin on Oct 29 and end Oct 30 To
register come by room 204 Memorial Gym bet
ween the hours of 8 00 a m and 5 00 p m For
more information call 757 6387 PARTICIPATE
RATHER THAN SPECTATE
CROSS CAMPUS RUN
Two cross campus races will be held on
Homecoming Day Saturday Oct 20 A 2 5 mile
race will start at 9 00 a m and a 5 0 mile race
will start at 9 30 a m Both races start near the
bleachers at the ECU varsity track building
field Sign up at the intramural Recreation Ser
vices office in Room 204 Memorial Gym You
must register by 8 45 a m Oct 20
SNOW SKI
Any persons interested in Snowskiing
December 30 Jan 4 at Snowshoe, W V should
call Jo Saunders at 757 6000 to get your name on
the list tor the trip Beginners to Hotdoggers are
welcome Ski instruction is available for all
levels of ability Price depends on ski package
Space for housmg on slopes and transportation is
limited Your are invited to come by Memorial
Gym 108 on Oct 30 at 4 00 p m to register see
the slides and talk skiing' A i5 00 deposit at this
time will reserve your space
PAMLICOTAR RIVER
The Pamlico Tar River Foundation will hold
an organiratiorttN meeting tor its ECU chapter at
7 0 n. Oct 24. In room C 296. �t��u�f Purpose
of the meeting is to discuss water quality and
conservation issues In the Tar Pamlico area and
to organue an ECU chapter All students, facul
ty. and staff are invited
BUSINESS
SCHOLARSHIP
Thirteen scholarships tor approximately S5 000
are available tor School of Business maiors
Students interested in making application should
secure forms from the Fnancial Aid Office or one
of the following department offices in the School
of Business Accounting R325. Decision
Sciences R238. Finance R343 Management
R137, marketing R223
All applications must be submitted to Ruth
Jones (Rawl 334). Chairman of School of
Business Scholarship Committee, by Nov. 9,
1984 A student may apply for one or more of the
scholarships
Final selection will be made by the ECU Stu
dent Scholarships. Fellowships and Financial
Aid Committee upon recommendation of the
Dean of the School of Business The Dean's
recommendation will be made from candidates
selected by the School of Business Scholarsh p
committee
SCUBA DIVING
Thanksgiving vacation Dive Coiumel, Mex
ico 8 days, 7 nights on the beautiful Yucatan
Penninsula Drift diving on the Palancar reef
will be one of the most exiting experiences From
Raleigh, price including air fare, meals, lodging,
and diving $820 00 special price for non divers
1720 00 Air travel provided by Mexicana and
Eastern For registrations and further informa
tion, call Ray Scharf, Dir of Acquatics 757 6441
PUBLIC RELATIONS
If you are a Marketing major, we know you
will be interested in this committee The Student
Union Public Relations and Publicity Committee
will package publicity and coordinates total pro
motion of the Student Union The committee is
now accepting applications for committee
members For more information, contact the
Student Union Office at 757 6611. ext 210 or come
by the office at Room 234 Mendenhall Student
Center
WZMB
Start your Sunday mornings right by tuning In
to the Contemporary Gospel Show We play
modern music with a Christian message So
listen to the 'alternative' to the alternative FM
"music with a message" Every Sunday morn
Ing from 5 45 10:00 on your campus radio sta
tlon WZMB 91 3 FM
EBONY AFFAIR
Celebrate Homecoming with the Student Union
Minority Arts Committee at the Ebony Affair
Immediately following the Greek Step Show on
Friday, Oct. 19, this celebration will begin with
refreshments and music in Room 244 of
Mendenhall Be there!
COFFEEHOUSE COMMITTEE
We are looking for a few good people to serve
on the ECU Student Union Coffeehouse Commit
tee Anyone Interested may obtain an application
from the Student Union Office on the top floor of
Mendenhall, Room 234.
UNIVERSITY UNIONS
There Is still room in the Photography,
Jewelry Making, Darkroom Techniques, and
Children's Ceramic classes offered by the Crafts
Center in Mendenhall All ECU students, faculty,
staff, and dependents are eligible to register
(J15 00) Sign up immediately as enrollment is
limited and classes begin the week of Oct 22
SC TICKETS
Tickets for the South Carolina football game
will be on sale Thurs , Fri , and Mon between
8 30 5 pm Tickets are only available at the
Minges ticket office and cost $14 00
RECREATION COMMITTEE
The Student Union Recreation Committee is
sponsoring a Backgammon Tournament on
Tues , Oct 23 at 4 p m in Mendenhall All full
time ECU Students are eligible to participate
Register by Sun , Oct Jl, at 10 p m in the MSC
Billiards Center
SOULS
SOULS will meet tomorrow at 4 30 in Room
242 MSC Please make plans to attend Thank
you
KYF
The King Youth Fellowship sponsored the
Pentecostal Holiness Church will have a Bible
study (Genesis 1 3) on Tues . Oct 23 at 8 p m in
242 Mendenhall For more information call Jack
at 752 8666 or Kevin at 758 9190
CIRCLE K
ECU Circle K Club invites you to come out and
ioin us this coming and every Tues night at 7
p m m Mendenhall Room 221 for tun and
socializing Hope to see you there
SIGN LANGUAGE
We will be having a silent dinner Thurs . Oct
18 at Villa Roma at 7 p m If you need a ride, oe
in front of Brewster at 6 45 p m For those in
terested in our silent retreat, there will be a
meeting at B 30 p m on Thurs . following the
silent dinner in Mendenhall's Coffeehouse Also
on Sun . Oct 21 at 7. We will be having an
organizational meeting for fantasy at
Mendenhall Room 721 Come on out and join US in
the fun
ENERGY AWARENESS
As a public service to ECU students and in
recognition of Energy Awareness Week (Oct
21 28). a representative from Greenville Utilities
will be on campus to answer you energy related
questions A state certified Residential Conser
vation Services Technician will be in Mendenhall
from Ham 2 p m , Tues , Oct 23.
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
Come out and help the Kappa Alpha Psi
Fraternity, Inc celebrate their Tenth Year An
ntversary as a Fraternity on ECU s campus at
the Ramada inn this Fri night Oct 19 from 10
pm 2am The dress attire will be semi formal
NAACP
The NAACP's next meeting will be held on
Mon , Oct 22, in Mendenhall Coffeehouse
Everyone is encouraged to attend!
ENCOUNTER CHRIST
Do you often wonder if you're the only one In
this wrld feeling a certain way? Do you ever fee
like tossing your books aside and iust talking?
Well then, make an Encounter with Christ
weekend Oct 25 28 Meet students from various
campuses withmg N C It's a terrific opportunity
to relax and devote a long weekend to you! For
more info call Fr Terry at the Newman Center
at 752 4216
FORUM COMMITTEE
If you are interested in lectures, symposiums,
or other related programs, why not join the Stu
dent Union Forum Committee The Student
Union Forum Committee is presently accepting
applications for committee members For more
Information, contact the Student Union Office at
757 6611, ext. 210 or come by the office in Room
234 Mendenhall Student Center
OT STUDENTS
Sophomore students applying tor admission
pick up admission packet In the Occupational
Therapy office (306 Allied Health Belk Bldg )
All forms including transcripts must be received
in the OT office before applications close Nov
1.1984
an
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GREENVILLE. NO 27834
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OMEGA PSI PHI
The brothers of Omega Psi Phi Frat Inc
would like to announce their next Dognastic Pro
ducflon, a Homecoming Extravaganza In
Memorial Gym. Sat .Oct 20, from 10 pm 3am
Attire Dress to Impress, free refreshments
Tickets are now on sale ask any cue
LIGHTSHINE
A special Mon dinner and presentation Mike
Rice from Fayettvllie will be the guest Me will
share his experiences, especially in Canada and
some of his songs The home cooked dinner,
which costs S2 will begin at 5 30 p m at the Bap
tist Student Center and the program will follow
REAL ESTATE
There will be an organizational meeting of Rho
Epsilon Real Estate Fraternity on Mon , Oct 22.
at 3 in Rawl 103 Plans for a dinner meeting will
be discussed All persons interested are urged to
attend this meeting so plans can be made for
future activities
SURFCLUB
The team try outs were held last Mon in 3 5 ft
semi glassy waves at Frisco, Cape Hatter If you
did not surf in this contest you can still make the
team later on There is an important meeting
tonight in 221 Mendenhall at 8 A killer X min
video of Hawaii's North Shore surfing will be
shown Don't miss this!
Plans will be made for the ECU invitational
contest and the road trip to Florida at the
meeting tonight also
POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will be meeting on
Oct 18 at 8 00 p m in Room 248 Mendenhall in
'erested people should bring 6 8 copies of their
poem to be read
HELMSBUSTERS
Students interested In loimng the students for
Jim Hunt should please contact Scott Thomas at
752 1793 or David Brooks at 752 5198
DELTAZETA
Hope everyone had a great break I Remember
to be at the house at 4 on Thurs to finish decora
tions for the house Also 11 on Fri night to
decorate the house
INTRAMURALS
Memorial Gym Weight Room win be open for
Faculty and Staff use Mon , Aed . and Fn morn
ingsfrom7 8am beginning Oct 22 through Dec
5
AHPAT
The Allied Health Professions Admission Test
will be offered at East Carolina University on
Saturday. November 17 1984 Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to The
Psychological Corp , 7500 Old Oak Blvd ,
Cleveland, Ohio 44130 to arrive by October 20.
1984 Applications may be obtained trom the
ECU Testing Center Room 105. Speight
Building
INTRAMURAL
A Sat drop in class has been added to the
schedule of classes offered m the Dept of In
tramural and Recreational Services This will be
a drop in class Charge 50 cents per class To
register go by Memorial Gym 204 between
8 30 4 00 on Oct 15 19
DELTAZETA
Delta Zeta will be having a Big Brother Rush
Tuew Oct 23 at the Old Town inn at 9 All in
terested men are welcome Come on out and
meet the Delta Zetas1
HAPPY HOUR
Allthose interested in becoming a part of a
great thing come to Old Town Inn this com.ng
Tues Delta Zetas Will be having their Big
Brother Rush See �ou there
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Sooetr will be mee'irj w
Tues. Oct 23 at 7 p m n Menoenhan Room
241 Our guest speaker s Stan Sams of the ioca
law firm Howard. Browning Sams anc Pot �
Mr Sams is a former ECU Law Socet, mervi-
a graduate of UNC Chapel Hill Law Schor
he has taught business law courses at ECo
Anyone interested m law school is mvited1 For
more information, can Mike Gardner 758 164C
PSI CHI
is graduate school the next step tor Tou' Come
and find out Five professors from Psychoiog.
Dept will speak on graduate schooi entr, and 'e
quirements on Thjrs . Oct 18 at 7 30 c rr
Room 129 Speight Also an moor'an' mee- . � 1
an Psi Chi members will be wed . Oct 17 a' 5 X
p m in Psi Chi Library
ADVISORY COUNCIL
The Graduate Advsor, Counc ;
Oct meeting on Oct 18 at 4 p m in Brews-
B 104 Don't forget the Happy Hour D nner ��
5 00 at New Del' following tne meef.ng Pease
let all graduate s'udents in your aepae
know they are nv'ed attend
SEMINAR
Everyone nvttM to a 5minflf n Home
Economics on Thurj a 4 p m on Oct 18
oe m Room 235 ana Dr Kathryn Koiasa
&pea� on Vainutron .n Bangaaesr anc n
Other Developing Countries For Informal
can Dr Koiasa. 757 6917
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 CrecnvUk Blvd.
T54-3W3 - 24 HRS
24 hour Towing Service
I -Haul Rentals
Available
East Carolinian advertising
call 757-6366
By HAROLD JOYNER
wiuii Nai Mux
The ECU Honor Board has
recently heard a number student
cases involving various offenses,
according to Scott Sutker. stu-
dent attorney general.
Sutker said the Board has
averaged about 10 cases a week
this vear. Sutker said after Dean
Speier, associate dean of orienta-
tion and judiciary, receives notice
from the campus police or private
individuals concerning crimes a
student may have
committedThe minor ones are
handled by Speier and the others
are referred to me he said. Out
of ten cases, three will usuallv
reach the Board, he said
Sutker said this has been a very
slow year for the Honor Board
He explains, we haven't en-
countered as many cases as in the
past. All in all, I can attribute
to the excellent job the Freshman
Orientation Program did in in-
forming the freshmen I
rules He also added, "a lot of
students are not aware of the
violation
alarm on
found set!
he will bel
Board anc
Sutker
of H
saidthe
respoi j
cused (
of the PiiJ
" rne
cases and
ed The a
eai
ings
not
met-
ric
Dean 5 j
I
coop
I
Th
the
RA Positions
During Spring,
By ERNEST ROBERTS
Uff Wrtlrr
Students are needed to fill posi-
tions as resident advisors for nex:
semester and fall. 1985. "We're
always looking for dedicated peo-
ple said Janet Johnson, area
coordinator for west camp .
"Some RAs graduate or move up
to higher positions
Qualifications for employment
as RA include: full-time enroll-
ment (undergraduate-12 hours
per semester, 6 hours per summer
session; graduate-9 hours per
semester. 3 hours per summer
session) a minimum grade point
average of 2.2; a clear judicial
record with the university; in-
volvement in residence hall ac-
tivities such as House council.
Area Council, committees,
boards and clearance by the
Financial Aid Office.
Annual
Drive
Begins
By HAROLD JOYNER
�I St�i Mltor
Du
moc
wee
plete
an a
1
eec ar
fail. 1985
blenv cai
Johnson,
wes: 1
"5
iJIIIIIHIIIII
"Tis the season for operation
Santa Claus satd the 1984 Pitt
County Operation Santa Claus
Chairperson, Annie Askew
"This program is the Pitt
County Mental Health Associa-
tion's annual Christman drive to
provide a personal gift for each
resident in area mental hospitals
located in Kinston and
Goldsboro Askew said. The
success of the program is depen-
dent upon individuals, churches,
schools, fraternities, sororities,
dormitories and other concerned
groups. "Basically it's people
who care about helping people
she said.
"Gifts are needed for both
women and men of all ages and
sizes Askew said. "Also, in-
dividuals may send gifts for
children
She said the following personal
items are needed: men's, ladies
and children's apparel; ballpoint
pens; pencils, combs, brushes,
and shaving items. Ward gifts in-
clude radios, hairdryers, coffee
pots, and popcorn poppers.
Askew noted the ward gitV
would be available for use by
many people and therefore not
regarded as personal items.
"People may also help out by-
contributing money or sponsor-
ing a patient for a year she
said.
Collection centers will open
Nov. 26 through Dec. 10. The
main center is located at 309
Evans Street Mall and will accept
donations from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Askew
may be contactd at 752-7448 for
more information.
"I am proud to be a volunteer
for the Mental Health Associa-
tion in Pitt County and I am also
sure that you will be proud to
light up life at Christmas
Askew said.
Z
I Lai
!BI
I 14
1 FRE
aiiiiiiiiiiiiuii
? ??1
? ??
?
:
I
?
I
j
r
fl
i






THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 18. 1984 3
11
. - ir:
t 1
w on
'�� K "a Room
- ocai
�nd Pooie
� � Cr
' � and
rw a' ECU
1 Vo' For
� V '4.
� ana re
9 at 7 30
� ' -ig 'or
' a1 3C
OUNCIL
D nn&r at
NAR
-Q
in advertising
57-6366
at You Will
Treasure!
rices Available
No
Deposit
Special
;s Ring
00
Honor Board Has
Smaller Case Load
B HAROLDJOYNKR
ulslanl t�i r dlloi
The ECU Honor Board has
recently heard a number student
cases involving various offenses,
according to Scott Sutker, stu-
dent attorney general.
Sutker said the Board has
averaged about 10 cases a week
this year. Sutker said after Dean
Speier, associate dean of orienta-
tion and judiciary, receives notice
trom the campus police or private
indhiduals concerning crimes a
student may have
commutedThe minor ones are
handled bv Speier and the others
are referred to me he said. Out
ot ten cases, three will usually
reach the Board, he said.
Sutker said this has been a ver
slow year for the Honor Board.
He explains, "we haen't en-
countered as many cases as in the
past. All in all. I can attribute this
to the excellent job the Freshman
Orientation Program did in in-
forming the freshmen of various
rules He also added, "a lot of
students are not aware of the
violation of setting off a false fire
alarm on Campus. If a student is
found setting off a false alarm,
he will be brought up before the
Board and faces a possible fine.
Sutker continued with the pro-
cess of Honor Board actions. He
saidthe Public Defender is
responsible for defending the ac-
cused. It is also the responsibility
of the Public Defender and the
Attorney General to research the
cases and find out what happen-
ed. The accused is summoned to
appear at the preliminary hear-
ings, which are held before the
actual Board meeting Action is
not taken until the formal Board
meeting.
After a student is sanctioned,
he is then required to report to
Dean Speier for follow up, job
assignments andor payment of
finesDean Speier is very
cooperative and is willing to help
the student Sutker said.
The Honor Board has original
jurisdiction in cases of lying,
stealing, and other violations of
the Code of Conduct.
Honor Board Action
Classification
Charge
Action
Sophomore
Sophomore
Freshman
Freshman
Vandalism
Public intoxication
City ordinance violation
Non-cooperation with campus
police
Using offensive language to ECU
member or visitor.
Physically injuring ECU member
or property
Harassing an individual
Non-cooperation with campus
policeman
Vandalism
Disorderly conduct
City ordinance violation
Stealing
City ordinance violation
Non-cooperation with campus
policeman
$250 fine; 1 yr. probation; bann-
ed from Acock Dorm; written
reprimand
1 year suspension
Probation until May '85; 25 hrs.
work, $10 fine; written repri-
mand.
40 hrs. work; Campus Alcohol
and Drug Program; probation
until Mav 85.
RA Positions A vailable
During Spring, Fall
By ERNEST ROBERTS
Staff Writer
Students are needed to fill posi-
tions as resident advisors for next
semester and fall, 1985. "We're
always looking for dedicated peo-
ple said Janet Johnson, area
coordinator for west campus.
"Some RAs graduate or move up
to higher positions
Qualifications for employment
as RA include: full-time enroll-
ment (undergraduate-12 hours
per semester, 6 hours per summer
session; graduate-9 hours per
semester, 3 hours per summer
session) a minimum grade point
average of 2.2; a clear judicial
record with the university; in-
volvement in residence hall ac-
tivities such as House Council,
Area Council, committees, or
boards and clearance by the
Financial Aid Office.
Annual
Drive
Begins
By HAROIDJOYNER
MHlanl Sr�i tjlllor
"Tis the season for operation
Santa Claus said the 1984 Pitt
County Operation Santa Claus
Chairperson, Annie Askew.
"This program is the Pitt
County Mental Health Associa-
tion's annual Christman drive to
provide a personal gift for each
resident in area mental hospitals
located in Kinston and
Goldsboro Askew said. The
success of the program is depen-
dent upon individuals, churches,
schools, fraternities, sororities,
dormitories and other concerned
groups. "Basically it's people
who care about helping people
she said.
"Gifts are needed for both
women and men of all ages and
sizes Askew said, "Also, in-
dividuals may send gifts for
children
She said the following personal
items are needed: men's, ladies
and children's apparel; ballpoint
pens; pencils; combs, brushes,
and shaving items. Ward gifts in-
clude radios, hairdryers, coffee
pots, and popcorn poppers.
Askew noted the ward gifts
would be available for use by
many people and therefore not
regarded as personal items.
"People may also help out by
contributing money or sponsor-
ing a patient for a year she
said.
Collection centers will open
Nov. 26 through Dec. 10. The
main center is located at 309
Evans Street Mall and will accept
donations from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Monday through Friday. Askew
may be contactd at 752-7448 for
more information.
"I am proud to be a volunteer
for the Mental Health Associa-
tion in Pitt County and I am also
sure that you will be proud to
light up life at Christmas
Askew said.
Duties for RAs include ad-
ministrative duties in dorms, ser-
ving as resource people and a role
model, returning to school a
week earlier than other students,
being trained and also a friend.
Applicants for RAs should
complete an application and turn
it in to Whichard 214 or dorm
director. Along with filling out
an application, applicants should
sign up for an interview.
Applications should be com-
pleted and turned in by Nov. 1
for next semester and Jan. 11 for
fall, 1985. Any questions or pro-
blems can be directed to Janet
Johnson, area coordinator for
west campus in Fletcher at
-6100.
Advertise
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you could:
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3. Invest in the future
STOP BY AND SEE HOW
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GD
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626 W. Greenville P�vd.
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Coffee Shop Will Be Open
OnSat.Oct.20,1984E.C.U.
HOMECOMING DAY!
Try Our Free Gourmet Coffee Sample
Also Don't Miss our delicious teas and freshly baked
pastries on the premises.
You can watch the Homecoming Parade at
GOURMET INTERNATIONAL
752-3411
117 E. Fifth St.
Bus. hrs. 10.30-5:30
Spice of Life Mini Mall Mon -si
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WASH WO USE
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j Largest Laundromat in Greenville j
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I Beer - 12oz. Draft for 50C
FREE ADMISSION
A Homecoming Concert
Dill Pickles
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14th Street Location-Come by and get a
FREE sample of Nachos while washing clothes. 1
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THE
after the game for
Beef and Burgandy
All the prime rib you care to eat, choice
of potatoe, salad bar, and all the
Burgandy Wine you can drink for the
low low price 0 $1 0.95
MONDAY - FRIDAY
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6:3Qun � 2pm
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Sam - 2pm
5pm � 10pm
Sam 1 lam
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301 GREENVILLE BLVD
GREENVILLE. NC 27�J4
PRESSURE
BOYS
Thursday, October 18 at 8:00pm
in Wright Auditorium
following Pep Rally on the Mall
Sponsored by Special Concerts
and Student Homecoming Committe
!W3t!tWW S
?&
m � ��
�MMMHM
� m
A
?





�te �aat (Hutalinmn
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, c���,��,
Greg Rideout. - runm
JENNIFER JENDRAS.AK, � �� J.T. PlETRZAKi ft,
Randy Mews. ��� edu� Anthony Martin, �� Manait,r
Tina Maroschak. �. Kathy Fuerst. ��� �anagtr
Bill Austin, cv,� �� mike Mayo. rfw,um, rtchmcmn
October 18, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Peace Prize
A ward Sends Signal To World
The struggle to eliminate apar-
theid from South Africa was of-
ficially recognized this week when
Bishop Desmond Tutu was award-
ed the Nobel Peace Prize for his
passionate but peaceful "heroism"
in leading a non-violent crusade
against his country's system of
racial discrimination. Tutu, an
Anglican church official, believes
the award says loudly and clearly
to the South African government
that the system is totally evil.
What it should say to the ECU
community is that it's time to
recognize that a government that
the U.S. gives tacit support to is
blatantly and legally saying that
certain people are inferior. The
Nobel Peace Prize shows
worldwide support. We should
join in and condemn the practices
of South Africa. What can we, as
students, do? Well, for starters we
can tell our representatives and
senators that any type of favorable
treatment for the Afrikaner
government in Johannesburg is
morally wrong. Our Constitution
says all men are created equal, and
although it took us a long time to
realize this, we should oppose the
contrary of this statement
anywhere it exists in the world.
We know U.S. based corpora-
tions are thriving in South Africa.
They can continue to do so � with
our support � as long as the in-
dividual company works for
equality with its workers and en-
courages the government to ease
racial barriers. We know precious
metals such as platinum that we
need for defense are found there.
Don't jeopardize our security, but
use our economic buying power to
get the South Africans to institute
less anachronistic and morally
wrong racial policies.
We strayed away from apartheid
in our country. It was the right
thing to do. We should encourage
through any means possible that
the South Aficans do the same.
Racism is an ugly word. Legal
Racism is even uglier. Today,
along with the rest of the world, it
is time to recognize the ac-
complishments and dedication of
one man who has given his life to
halting the terrible system of South
Africa that legally dictates that one
man is inferior to another.
Bishop Desmond Tutu is a Sam
Adams, a Martin Luther King Jr.
He is man at his unselfish best,
striving for a world that is just and
humane. The Nobel Committee
has chosen the right man for this
year's award. He is truly a man of
peace.
Doonesbury
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
WumTMt THAVSRJ6HJ.
TDUJORKON ANAPPEALTO
A SPOTFOR BLACK VOTERS
- THE REAGAN
' CAMPAIGN?
BLACKVOTERS?
THATS GREAT'
HEE, HEE
SERIOUSLY?
SERIOUSLY
THIS IS A
TEST.RJ6HT?
TO SEE IF I
HAVE ANY
SHAME?
CAREFUL, .
MIKE NATSTHE
PROBLEM,
' �SON?
MIKE, WHY IS WELLCASSlE
REAGAN EVEN SAYS HIS PEO -
BOTHERING WITH PL5 WANT TO
BLACK VOTERS? BROADEN HIS
HE HARPLYNEEDS MANDATE
THEY'RE ALSO TRYING TV COUNTER A
NEW NOHMRTISAH STUDY THAT'S
POUND THAT BLACKS OF ALL CLASSES
ARE DRAMATICALLY WORSE OFF AS
A RESULT OF REAGAN POLICIES
I'M SUPPOSED TO COME UP
lAl'THA SLOGAN THAT MAKES
the point that reagan has
ignored all tub pf$adwnta6ed
not blacks per sb.
'REAGAN
HESNO
RACIST "
THATSJUSTA
ROUGH DRAFT
I WANT TO PLAY
AROUND WITH IT
SOME MORE
YOUR CLUTCH
IS FIXED, MAN
NEEDANYTHING
ELSE DONE ON
THECAR?
NO, THANKS,
RUFUS. LISTEN,
BEFORE YOU GO,
I GOTTA ASK
YOU A QUFSTION
WHAT'S CM YOU THINK OF
THAT? SOMETHING GOOD
RONALD REAGAN HAS
DONE FOR BLACKS?

HMM. LET ME
SEE THATSA
W6H0NE.IS
THIS A RIPPLE
OR SOMETHING
UH.
YEAH,
SORT OF.
HE GOT
MILLIONS
OF US TO
REGISTER1
BLESS
YOU
0Wumto&pveu&
ARE 90U BETTER
OFF BEEP
NONeWTAXfiS
NO NEW TAXES m
BEEPCUCKm,
THERE WU 90 m
A6AIN,�WHIRL ffl?
HU'M&75t,WE75t1,
CLICK BUZZ
THE NUMBERED
HAVE REACHEP IS
NO UW6ER IN
SERV1CE�.BEEP
Campus Forum
Debating The Great Debate
It seems that The East Carolinian is
once again coming down on the side
of the campus left. What better way
to cozy up to the libs in the ad-
ministration and faculty than by at-
tacking a group of successful campus
conservatives?
This time the target is once again
the College Republicans. The ECU
chapter of this organization has been
very successful and at present is very
active in the campaign.
The newest pseudo-issue, created
by the EC and the young Democrats,
is a debate. The YDs, with nothing
else to do, began an all-out pressure
campaign to get the CRs to debate.
Their campaign to coax the CRs into
debating included lies, slander,
twisting of the CRs statements, and
subliminal threats. This campaign
peaked when the EC managing
editor, who is one of last year's few
original members of the YDs, helped
his old buddies by publishing an
editorial criticizing the CRs for not
surrendering to the pressure.
Here's how the debate story pro-
gressed, minus the YD distortions.
The YDs were told by the CRs all they
had to do to clear the way for the
debate was to apologize for their anti-
CR slander with a letter in this paper.
The offer was ignored. So far, the
YDs and the EC feel they can get the
CRs to debate by threatening more
mud-slinging. Sorry, but the ECU
CRs never turn the other cheek.
No big deal. The CRs still have
plenty of work to do. They put on a
smashingly successful state conven-
tion (not covered by the EC), brought
veteran foreign correspondent and
best-selling author Arnaud de Bor-
chgrave to campus and are heavily in-
volved in county precinct organiza-
tion, a big absentee ballot campaign
and volunteer work. What are the
YDs doing? And why should the CRs
legitimize this measely organization
which is not even recognized by their
national office or national chairman?
They should concentrate on the cam-
paign, as we are, and they just might
still be around when the President is
re-inaugurated. In the meantime, we
challenge the YDs to an arm wrestling
match (a la Reagan v. Mondale) off
campus property. We are confident
that we would do to them what
George Bush said he did to Mrs.
Geraldine Zaccaro.
One last comment to the EC as to
the debate. It's none of your
business.
E. Sandy Hardy
E. Regional Director
N.C. Fed. College Republicans
My Turn
In response to The East
Carolinian's editorial of Oct. 11
("Let's Debate � CRs.YDs Should
Do Battle"), we feel it necessary to
clarify the position of the ECU
Young Democrats regarding the pro-
posed debate between our organiza-
tion and the ECU College
Republicans. For some time now, our
organization has strived to arrive at
mutually agreeable terms by which we
can promote student voter education
and offer a chance for the students at
ECU to clearly distinguish between
the positions held by the Democratic
and Republican parties as presented
by the YDs and CRs.
On at least four separate occasions,
the YDs have challenged the CRs to
participate in a debate of issues. In-
formally, I have spoken with Dennis
Kilcoyne, president of the CRs, on
three occasions to discuss the
possibility of scheduling a debate bet-
ween our organizations. On Oct. 3,
Kilcoyne expressed interest in par-
i
f
f
T
� mi � �Kn�)nn i�i ini � � ����
ticipating in a debate and as a result,
the YDs began negotiable initiatives
to acquire suitable facilities and spon-
sors of the debate. At our invitation,
Kilcoyne met with YD negotiator
David Creech on Oct. 10 to formally
workout a mutually acceptable
debate plan.
Unfortunately, our initiatives have
been thwarted by the CR leadership
who have offered both lame excuses
and preconditions as obstacles to
debate. The most recent of these
preconditions was a demand for a
public apology from our organization
for remarks to the contrary, this is
but a tactic designed to avoid debate.
Obviously, like their previous excuses
of being too busy and of aiding only
the YDs by debating (See East Caroli-
nian, Oct. 2, 1984), this is but another
strategy by which the CRs Club
wishes to withhold from the students
of ECU the real issues at stake in
1984.
In as much as we have negotiated in
good faith during the last three weeks
with the CR Club, our patience is not
inexhaustable. With this in mind, we
today announce our intention to hold
a debate on Oct. 25 at 7:30 p.m. in
Room 244, Mendenhall Student
Center. We again extend a challenge
for the ECU College Republicans
Club to participate. In lieu of this, we
request that any mature, responsible
Republican students who wish to par-
ticipate in a debate of issues to con-
tact us no later than Saturdav Oct
20, 1984.
In closing, it is our sincere desire to
hold a debate without precondition
and thereby have an airing of issues
that concern students at ECU We
hope there are students who feel that
being Republican is more than a pass-
ing political fad and who can ar-
ticulate their party's position.
Sincerely,
Charles Sune
Chairman
ECU Young Democrats
Rita's Here
Highly recommended for those
serious, mature students, especiallv
those of which are women, is this
week's free movie Educating Rita
Filmed in and around the University
of Dublin, the movie presents what a
professor-student relationship should
be in a first-class university. This ex-
cellent film justifies learning for lear-
ning's sake and shoud be o spcca
interest to those students who have
decided that the halls of ivy, strange
as it seems to some, might just be a
panacea.
Hal J. Daniel III
Professor
Things I Thought Of
By GREG RIDEOUT
bedone�"e " �Ct�ber she said� siPPin� a Dl� Coke. "It just can't
I looked at her. I looked away. "She's lying I thought to mvself "She
can t be telling the truth I stopped. I shuddered. I've got to go on -
everyone ,s expecting me to say, "It's time for another Things I Thought
Of. So, I 111 try anyway. "Hey It's uh, time for, ahhhhhhh
fn�therThings uh.uh, ahhhhhhh Things I Thought Offfff-
If someone asks you how your Fall Break was, tell him it was purple M
Don t give into the old, pat answer, "okay Be creative, sav the four love-
ly days you spent in High Point and Bethel were "dolphinish" or "Snam
m-a-canish It's casual.
Hey, George Bush's remarks the other day to a group of longshoreman
were pretty predictable. He know's a lot about behinds. In fact he's oro
bably an expert on tushes just like he is on funerals. You see he kisses old
Ronnie's so much he knows about the prez's hemorrhoids even before the
doctors do.
Do Republican's have sex? Does Ronald Reagan know evervone makes
fun of him, or is he shielded from that, too? Does Jesse Helms know he
needs a new pair of glasses? Does God wear underwear, and if he does is it
something special and unique? Are business majors required to be stupid
or is it just a coincidence they all take math lab? These are the intriguine'
questions of our time.
Do you remember how much fun it was to steal little kids' candy during
Halloween? Ah, the good old days, when an elbow to the chops of your
seven-year-old neighbor yielded treats for a week. Well, vou can re-live
those days with a mail order trick-or-treater. Yes, a beautiful replica eight-
year-old to kick and beat and steal candy from. Enjoy.
The dogs on campus are Communist agents. Sure, thev mav look like
your average lovable canine, but actually they're KGB-trained propagan-
dists. Notice how they always show up at those Peace Committee things at
the Student Supply Store. The CIA is working on using squirrels to combat
the situation, but none of them can pass accounting.
Chancellor Howell's going to host Saturday Night Live. Truth. Sometime
in November, John will head up a cast that includes special musical guest
Twisted Sister, Lucille Ball and the president of the Short Chancellors of
America League. I hear his monologue's a sock-buster
Have you ever read the dictionary backwards while eating giant mangoes
and wearing a Mu Mu feather skirt? Nothing like it. Especiallv when vou
get to the P s and reach that word. Try it some time at your next party
or Bar Mitzvah. 7
Being able to do quadratic equations leads to testical cancer Studies by
the Carnegie Institution for the Mathematically Endowed have found a
strong correlation between high school math teachers and this type of
cancer. If your majoring in math, it's not too late to switch The life vou
save could be your kid's.
Familiar question heard on campus by seniors: "Now, where was that
library place again?
Something for everyone at ECU to remember as Homecoming ap-
proaches: Beer is just a pile of yeast droppings.
i.1-� ?;rfrxTsr.
Vandalis
Crime
Report
An EC I student and a non-
student have been charged with
perty damage following an in-
cident ot extensive vandalism at
R se High School on Wednes-
iay, Oci 10 Greenville Police
e -1 e d James William
Minschew, 18, of 112 - ?
Dorm and II Public Sate.
assisted in apprehending
Sampson Marion Kellum ill
� New Bern in connection �
-dint incident. Kellum, a non-
ident who had been
m campus after being invol
.� .ght earlier that night
Blue Lights
y
with tresj
A-
ner, an
large nut
broker j
ner estir
win
Trial

Dis'
In
vehi
wee-
dorm i
C he
stole
Sire
off
Crime
Column
1984
. I .Jen- noticed a
male opening -
par. :r g lot csl
Mendenhali Student Center I
student stopped at the Blue I .
Phone lo

The studeni j on the
live
mati v m and a
nuing nar
dted in the i
.c. t, for several counts
larceny from veh
:he arres
that the ee on b.
on a charg �
were pend i s
The � . � ca nitiated the
resulting tr
the u -he Blue Light Pr
�em which was installed
campus two yea-
Kvrstwm has. hwn vis�l OvqvWMW
by�Mfcif$ and staff members re-
-tance -
KevN locked m vehicles or routine
security problems; but. rer "
crimes-in-p gi and suspic.
activity have been minimal.
The ECU Depu or
Public Safety, ena
of Blue Light Phone- to rep
police and
Hems. The phone system as
-tailed as both a securitv n
and a convenient mea: :on-
tact the Campus Pu:
Department
The Blue Light Phones, so
named because of the blue U
perched atop a red pole wh a
gra call box mounted on
pole, have a direct connecti
with a switchboard located n the
Commu Room of the
Department of Public Safety
While man- . phones have
dialing mechanisms, no numbers
can be dialed from the phones.
By simplv lifting the receiver,
the switchboard rings and a light
indicated rc locatioi 1 the
phone from which the call is be-
ing made THtRl- IS NO DIAI
TONE - HOLD ON,
PUBLIC SAFET OFFICER
WILL ANSWER When the swit-
chboard activates, the Com-
munications Officert immediate-
iv dispatevhes dn officer to the
location the phone has been lifted
before answering the phone This
procedure is I wed to provide
minimum response time to callers
needing immediate emergencj
assistance. Even if the caller -
unable to speak, a police officer
will respond Fhis mav cause a
delay in answering the phone, SO
the caller should hold on until so-
meone does answer
-
con
me:
i
i
i



Check
Out
The
Library

T
Mi
I
Call
;tt
I






THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 18. 1984
ARE YOU BETTER
Orpin dEEPhi
NO NEW TAXES
NO NEW TAXES
BEEPCLICK.m
there m eo �
A6AfNWHfRL f�R
HUMK15VW051),
CLICK BUZZ
THE NUMBER 000
HAVE REACHED IS
NO IOH&ER IN
50WE,�BEEP
r Debate
�ur sincere desire to
lebate without precondition
:hereb hae an airing of issues
concern students at ECU. We
ere are students who feel that
g Republic an is mere than a pass-
tad and who can ar-
their party's position.
V.ne
� Democrats
Rita's Here
mmended for those
mai re students, especially
h are women, is this
free movie Educating Rita.
around the University
movie presents what a
eni relationship should
class university. This ex-
fikn justifies learning for lear-
� ind should be of speca
se students who have
the halls of ivy, strange
some, might just be a
Daniel III
nought Of
- RIDHtl I

ing a Diet Coke. "It just can't
ught to myself. "She
huddered. I've got to go on �
for another Things I Thought
for. ahhhhhhh,
rhings 1 ThoughtOfffff-
m it was purple �
itive, say the four love-
lphinish" or "Spam-
a group of longshoreman
H Gerunds. In fact, he's pro-
funerals. You see, he kisses old
hemorrhoids even before the
nald Reagan know evervone makes
1 Does Jesse Helms know he
ear underwear, and if he does is it
business majors required to be stupid,
ke math lab- These are the intriguing
t was to steal little kids' candy during
en an elbow to the chops of vour
Its for a week. Well, you can re-live
l�TT Yes-a beaut.ful replica eight-
candy from. Enjoy.
'list agents. Sure, they may look like
tualh they're KGB-trained propagan-
at those Peace Committee things at
i working on using squirrels to combat
pass accounting.
Saturday Night Live. Truth. Sometime
ist that includes special musical guest
president of the Short Chancellors of
pe's a sock-buster.
backwards while eating giant mangoes
Nothing like it. Especially when you
Try it some time at your next party
ns leads to testical cancer. Studies by
fematically Endowed have found a
Jol math teachers and this type of
Is not two late to switch. The life you
s by seniors: "Now, where was that
remember as Homecoming ap-
irroppings.
A



Vandalism Tops Week's Campus Crimes
Crime
Report
An ECU student and a non-
student have been charged with
property damage following an in-
cident of extensive vandalism at
Rose High School on Wednes-
day, Oct. 10. Greenville Police
arrested James William
Minschew, 18, of 112 Aycock
Dorm and ECU Public Safety of-
ticers assisted in apprehending
Sampson Marion Kellum 111, 18,
of New Bern in connection with
the same incident. Kellum, a non-
student who had been banned
from campus after being involved
in a fight earlier that night in
Aycock dorm, was also charged Gum Road on Tuesday, Oct. 16
with trespassing.
According to David Bumgard-
ner, an official at Rose High, a
large number of windows were
broken at the school. Bumgard-
ner estimated the damage to the
windows at $2,000.
Trial date for Minschew and
Kellum is set for Oct. 22 in
District Court in Greenville.
In other incidents, two motor
vehicles were reported stolen bet-
ween October 10 and October 16.
Laura Ann Price of 405 Fletcher
dorm reported her 1976
Chevrolet Camaro had been
stolen from the 3rd and Reade
Street freshmen lot on Wednes-
day, Oct. 10. The car was
recovered by Greenville Police
officers at the intersection of
North Washington Street and
Stephen Mclntosh Hite, Jr. of
207A River Bluff Road, reported
that his 1982 Kawasaki motorcy-
cle had been stolen from behind
the Drama building on the night
of Thursday, Oct. 11. The motor-
cycle was recovered by University
officers on the north side of
Memorial Gym Friday, Oct. 12.
Oct. 10, 1:30 a.m. � William
Bostic Byers, Jr was found in
possession of a wooden artists'
desk belonging to the University.
Byers was charged with larceny in
connection with the incident at
7:30 p.m. 2:50 a.m. � A bicycle
was reported stolen from the west
side of Belk dorm. 10:10p.m. �
A bicycle was stolen from the
stairwell at Mendenhall Student
Center. 11.00 p.m. � Jeffrey
Britt Bailey of New Bern, was in-
carcerated under the Public
Assistance Act for inebriation.
October
U, 1:00 a.m. � Timothy John
Mclntosh of 329 Umstead dorm
was arrested for breaking and
entering of a coin-operated
machine. 1:20 p.m. � A bicycle
was reported stolen from the
front of Jones dorm. 7:00 p.m.
� A wallet was reported stolen
from Jones Cafeteria. 10:23p.m.
� A bicycle was reported stolen
from north of Mendenhall 11:57
p.m. � Money was reported
stolen from a room on the first
floor of Jones dorm.
Oct. 12, 4:30 a.m. � Break-ins
were reported in several linen
lockers in the basement of
Aycock dorm. 9:00 a.m. � An
attempted auto larceny was
reported in the Third and Reade
Street freshman lot.
Oct. 13, 1:30 a.m. � Eric
Gregory Joerger of Greensboro
was issued a citation for allowing
an unlicensed juvenile to operate
a vehicle. 1:45 a.m. � Todd
Austin Engels of Alexandria,
VA, was arrested for DWI. 9:45
p.m. � Angeline Taylor Hill of
Greenville was issued a citation
for driving without a license and
a one-way street violation.
Oct. 14, 1 a.m. � Barth
Dorhman Snyder of Cherry Point
was arrested for DWI. 1:45 a.m.
� Michael Anthony Narron of
Rocky Mount was arrested for
DWI.
Oct. 15, 3:50 a.m. � An at
tempted burglary in progress was
reported on the first floor of
Tyler dorm. 7 a.m. �A break-in
was reported in a room on the
first floor of Tyler Dorm. 8:10
p.m. � A bicycle was reported
stolen from south of Garrett
dorm. 10:40 p.m. � Antonio
Taylor of Greenville was arrested
for obstructing and delaying an
officer. Taylor was found in
possession of a bicycle believed to
have been stolen. The owner of
the bicycle, which was not
registered, has not been iden-
tified.
w-j m "liuwDciiLWdsm- reported in the Third and R
Blue Lights Aid In Crime Prevention
Crime
Column
On September 3, 1984, a pass-
ing student noticed a suspicious
male opening several car doors in
the parking lot west of
Mendenhall Student Center. The
student stopped at the Blue Light
Phone located beside the
v I rndenhall bus stop and called
the Public Safetj Department.
rhe student stayed on the phone
and provided descriptive infor-
mation o the person and a conti-
nuing narrative of his activities.
The call resulted in the arrest
ol the suspicious person, a non-
student, for several counts of
larceny from vehiclesd. Follow-
ing the arrest, iot was determined
that the person was free on bond
on a charge of satecracking and
other warrants were pending.
The student's call initiated the
first major arrest resulting from
the use of the Blue Light Phone
system which was installed on
campus two years ago. The
System has been used freqtrentFy
Vw-Mwtents and staff members re-
questing police assistance with
keys locked in vehicles or routine
security problems; but, reports of
crimes-in-progress and suspicious
activity have been minimal.
The ECU Department of
Public Safety encourages the use
of Blue Light Phones to report
police and security-related pro-
blems. The phone system was in-
stalled as both a security measure
and a convenient means to con-
tact the Campus Public Safety-
Department.
The Blue Light Phones, so
named because of the blue light
perched atop a red pole with a
gray call box mounted on the
pole, have a direct connection
with a switchboard located n the
Communications Room of the
Department o Public Safety.
While many of the phones have
dialing mechanisms, no numbers
can be dialed from the phones.
By simply lifting the receiver,
the switchboard rings and a light
indicated the location of the
phone from which the call is be-
ing made. THERE IS NO DIAL
TONE � HOLD ON, A
PUBLIC SAFETY OFFICER
WILL ANSWER. When the swit-
chboard activates, the Com-
munications Officert immediate-
ly dispatevhes an officer to the
location the phone has been lifted
before answering the phone. This
procedure is followed to provide
minimum response time to callers
needing immediate emergency
assistance. Even if the caller is
unable to speak, a police officer
will respond. This may cause a
delay in answering the phone, so
the caller should hold on until so-
meone does answer.
���������
In conjunction with the Blue
Light Phone system, several
elevator phones provide direct
communication with the Depart-
ment of Public Safety in the same
manner. These phones are
located in the elevators in Joyner
Livbrary, Jenkins Art, Speight,






Check
Out
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Library





the Drama Building, Wright
Building, the Press box at Ficklen
Stadium, and McGinnis
Auditorium. Elevator phones
may be used to report mechanical
problems with the elevators or
crimes-in-progress.
Blue Light Phone system pro-
The Flower Basket
3002 E.
Greenvil
0th St
le. NC
Telephone: 757-385
ORDER NOW For
Football Mu
Bouttonieres
Rose Corsag
10 Discount with th
Student Saving Card
vides an added dimension to the
security of campus. Abuse of the
phones can only interfere with
the proper operation of the
system. The possibility of a coed
being followed across campus by
a suspicious male approaching a
Blue Light phone only to find it
damaged by vandals is a frighten-
ing scenario. Vandalism of Blue
Light phones will be prosecuted.
WAN'NA
SCREW!
FREE With
Any Sandwich
Thursday thru
Saturday
Happy Hour Daily-
Pitcher $1.50
Blue Moon Cafe
Open til 3am Fri & Sat.
205 E. 5th St.
Stop in at SUBWAY and
SAVE
$1.00
Wit Your Gome Stub
On the price ol any foot
long sub or salad. Seventeen
arieties. served hot or cold,
and made to your order! We're
open late 7 nights a week.
� Carr. out convenience
e Served hot or cold
eMade to your order
� Free fixins
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7979
TRAVEL WITH QUIXOTE
HEAD FOR THE SLOPES 85
Ski Wintergreenfrom $131 per person
Includes: Transportation. 2 nights lodging and lift
tickets
Ask us about: PIEDMONT AIRLINES new 59 off Col-
lege Students Fare
Make plans for Thanksgiving and Christmas earl.
Call for details of booking requirements:
Call or come by: QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
Q319 Co lane he St.
Greenville, NC 27834
-p JT , Phone 757-0234
S QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
(WTH�NTK
scnunsuirs
DON'T MISS OUR
HOMECOMMING SALE
Wed Oa.l7th-Oct.20ih
Student Supply Store
Wright Bldg.
Owned and operated by-
East Carolina University
Everybody loves scrubsuits and at our prices, they're a
steal. Choose from surgical green, medical blue and misty
gray. Sizes: S, M, L (Runs Large) Shirt only, No. 500S,
$10.00; Pants only, No. 500P, $10.00; Set, No. 1000, $16.99
Add $1.50 per set for tax and shipping. .
SPOONCRSCk
To order call SPOONERS 1-800-682-6888
Master Card, Visa and American Express Accepted
To make mail order, send check or
money order along with this ad to
Spooners PO Box 4807
Rocky Mount. NC 27801
Simply circle the size style and color
you like and return to the above address
Be sure to include your return address
and add $1 50 tor tax and postage
� E.C.U. Napkins
� E.C.U. Cups
� Crepe Paper
?Sweatshirts
T-shirts
Overnight Bags
Art Supplies
Stadium Blanket with Original Pirate.
One left
m
)A
i- ��-��� i � ��i -�-

r
N
jY v






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 18,1984
Many Schools Hold
Registration Drives
ACROSS
1 Dawn
goddess
4 Meaningful
shoulder
expression
9 Possessed
of gift
57 Parent
colloq
DOWN
1 Urge on
2 Number
(CPS) � Over 400 students
poured through voter registration
lines at Boston College on Oct. 1,
joining thousands of others on
campuses across the country that
held mass registration drives in
observance of National Student
Registration Day.
Statewide, Massachusetts col-
leges registered nearly 3,500
students during the one-day
event, reports Jim Kessler with
the Massachusetts Public Interest
Research Group, one of the
several student organizations
sponsoring national drives to
register students.
There were similar efforts at
campuses nationwide last week as
organizers capped what they're
calling "the most ambitious stu-
dent voter registration drive in
history
It was mounted, moreover, in
the midst of a presidential cam-
paign thai has failed to excite
much campus interest.
In New Jersey, the four
Rutgers campuses alone netted
nearly 2.500 new student
registrants.
At the University of Oregon,
where the governor proclaimed
Oct. 1 sta'e student registration
day as well, over 2,500 joined
voter lists.
Students at Cosumnes River
College in California held a
Michael Jackson lip-syncing con-
test to entice their classmates to
sign up at on-campus registration
booths.
At Temple University in
Philadelphia, student organizers
passed out voter registration
forms in classes.
"The student vote is very im-
portant, and the big push is on
now for students to get out and
vote says Greg Moore, presi-
dent of the U.S. Students
Association, another sponsor of
the 1984 student vote effort.
"Right now there are 12
million college students he
notes. "In 1982, only 48 percent
of students were registered and
only 24 percent turned out to
vote. We're trying to double
those figures
By election day, Moore hopes
the national student vote cam-
paign will have over six million
students registered and ready to
go to the polls.
Since last spring, USSA, the
coalition of campus-based
PIRGs, the College Democrats
and the Young Republicans have
all been conducting ambitious
drives to get students registered
and to the voting booth.
All in all, over 750 campuses
have held student voter registra-
tion activities over the last several
months, sources report. National
organizers are working directly
with over 1,000 campuses to plan
additional events before the elec-
tion, they add.
"This is definitely the most
ambitious student voter registra-
tion project in history boasts
Kirk Weiner, publications direc-
tor for M-PIRG, which is coor-
dinating the combined student
vote movement.
Confusing and often an-
tagonistic local election laws have
hindered registration efforts on
some campuses, and logistical
problems sometimes have muddl-
ed organizers' abilities to coor-
dinate the vote drive on a na-
tional level.
Nevertheless, more students
probably are registered now than
for any other election, Weinert
speculates.
The effects, he adds, could be
"revolutionary
But while thousands of new
students are registered, getting
them to the polls remains a
challenge in a presidential race
that isn't exactly exciting student
voters.
While President Reagan has
managed to evoke some pas-
sionate campus support and gain
leads in polls of student presiden-
tial preferences, the fiery support
attracted by the earlier can-
didacies of Jesse Jackson and
Gary Hart is absent, observers
concede.
At predominantly-black
Xavier College in New Orleans,
for instance, student excitement
has dropped "to a definite
degree" since Jackson visited last
spring and led busloads of
students to register.
Jackson performed similar
feats last fall at Tuskegee In-
stitute and Mercer University.
Just last week, he made
enthusiastically-welcomed
registration stops at several
Maryland campuses.
But such visits are rare these
days, so student vote organizers
say they appeal more to students'
sense of civic duty than to impas-
sioned support for the candidates
to get students to the polls.
Students will vote on issues,
not people. M-PIRG's Weinert
says.
Consequenty, "the next big
push is to educate the voters on
the issues and why it's important
for them to get out and vote
To pique students' interest,
vote organizers are planning a
"Showdown '84" debate on
many campuses following the se-
cond television debate between
Reagan and Mondale on Oct. 21,
Weinert says.
Students will assemble to
watch the debate, and afterward
will conduct tneir own debates in-
volving students, politicians,
community leaders, faculty and
administrators.
12 African
antelope
13 Style of
automobile
14 Guido s
high note
15 Appropriate
17 Girl S
nickname
19 Additional
20 River duck
21 Leave out
23 Birds
27 Flowers
29 Mountains of
Europe
30 Note of scale
31 Exist
32 Fortune-
telling card
34 Suitable
35 Note of scale
36 Transaction
37 Muse of
poetry
39 Scene of
Shake-
speare s
Hamlet
42 Smooth
43 valk in water
44 C'tv in
Nevada
46 Odor
48 Keeo withm
limits
51 Evergreen
tree
52 Perch
54 Period
of time
55 Bush clump
56 Recipient
3 Guess
4 Mark left
by wound
5 Sharpens
6 Regret
7 Above
8 Produce
9 Greeting
10 Everyone
11 Period of
time
16 Speck
18 Nobleman
20 Edible tuber
21 Pope's scarf
22 Ethical
24 Less tainted
25 Indite
26 Surgical
thread
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
Puzzle Answer
28
33
34
36
38
40
41
45
Norm
Century plant
Treated
carefully
Old name for
Thailand
Lease
Saber
Worn awa
Heraldry
grafted
46 Rear of ship
47 Spanish for
river
48 Study
49 Anglo-Saxon
mone,
50 Young boy
53 Hawaiian
bird
1 23 14 T5 T6-pI9 1011
hrI14
MS16�18
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GERMANElNELLYj
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OMTIsPARRQWS
ROSiEURALBBRb
ARETAROTF1?
L TA LSALELlPAT0
S1NORIeVEN
wADE� REN N T01
FaR0MAC0ROL �.
fIRRO0sTERA �1
! T iOD1 DoNEEDAD
In College Handbook
1983 United Feature Syndicate inc
1 ,S-tr U'
Morry W.nei o
(919,752 8tt
By Appointment
OftfDMN
SHIRLEY'S CUT & STYLE
2nd �. M.ngn Btog
'ir C J78
Kim Shirley
(919)752 7637 f OV.on Con & P�mn f or Both Mm k Worwn
�y Aipo�ntmeni
2ta
�jco j(0�4 40 �mii m o �aom otQ �M
19 umu �r� wo
Siou pajn;dnii sajroiuoyv
s6uisojj
iontsi 6uiL6im6iH jioh
�mmos jo,h��4o Saw JOlO JIOU
:�3 iiwiiii0�y �� 4 '
6uiadm iusuoaua
:UI t9ZIOI99d$
uois jioh idiQ ftu.d �
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asp duoyUoxe a� j Bu;noo jo
noX po auios 944 441M pajog
$mV 9MW3J
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CU HOME COM IMG COMMITTEE
WITH &UEST SPEAKER
5 Buy, :
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j And j
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1 With 1
Coming
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home
When you ve been
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the "homecoming"
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Whether you're the home team.
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Domino's Pizza is,
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EH0RY
THURSDAY, OCT. 18 ,
FROn 7-00 Hill 830
SarVmg oV college hill and
-firushinOj of cenVral campus ma
Following -Wv.� pep raUu
ECU SPECIAL CONCERTS
iCIassifieds:

ADMISSION
O:30,WvlgW Audionunn
College
C SPS) � Lisa Birnbach
strikes again
The author of the Official
Preppy Handbook has just
finished her latest authoritative
guide to life in college If, called
Lisa Birnbach's (allege Hook.
There's no "official" in the title
this time around because, quite
frankly, this is the sort of book
that college officials would rather
not see. It's the "first and only
college guide to tell it like it is '
More than a hoc, col-
leges, theallege Book
pus by campus guide to life at
school. Though Lisa does include
all the standard stuff about SAT
scores, enrollmer
aid, she tries to focus on
numbers that are
once you get on campus Th
numbers like the local di . .
age. She list
the worst dorms, she I
parking situauor
hints discreetlv as u
comodatior, � .
might be preferable I
She helps stude-
classes by discussing the fcx
worst profssors v ;
freshmen weeks of tria
with an eas a:
question, "Where can ! g .
pizza?"
"This is the kind of hook I
wish I had when ! . .
school Lisa said.
Lisa began the b � ne
realized that high sell
don't discover w
need to know aN H ge uni
it's too late, and the-
come to carr.p. S
mid-September, a
ages of an Anima H i
degree at the er.c;
into the cole:
college life But b
crash has come, tl
long been chosen and cla c
already beg S n
never get over I
Lisa knew thai - n
help these help
when she four no
guide to the �.
pus life, she dec ded i t�
own.
"I didn't lot a
ihau as much exp
students and I �fhom they rr. -
be a .
the ear and I had tl
La bega - �" -
lege guide while sh
the country to pi Of-
ficial Preppy Handbook
spent two year-
sonally visiting M
all 50 states In
with as wide a cross-seel
people as possible
mixture of students I
administrators at ea: -
She also made a poinl
deans of admission,
newspaper editors, and .
casional representative-
Campus Crusade for Chris
Her experiences on -
were almost as v aried a-
pie that she met. She weni
fraternity and soi -
She sat in or. stude
meetings, faculty mee'
service, and a tew ae"
tions. And when the
over, she sent detailed
naares to over 5 �� tudents
complete her research
Dealing with so ma
and visiting so mar
a lot of work At eac
200 schools L -a fund a
"different re-e
Sometimes she behaved as a
"removed antfc
while at other : - Aiv
"visiting dignitary a"
"undercover -r " Bu! :he
toughest assignment alwav-
stayed the -arr.e She ate "dorm
food every single day
"There were times when 1 feh
very old, time- when 1 felt verj
voung Lisa recalled, "times
when I whed 1 was still in school
and times when I thanked God 1
didn't have to go back
But once the research was
done. La found that conclu-
sions were easily drawn
"Students today can be divided
into two categories she said
"There are those who disdain the
'60s and everything that came
before them These are generally
the pre-professionals who regard
College as a four-year placement
program
"Then there are those who are
nostalgic for the sixties and regret
having missed all that
excitement Lisa continued
"These are the humanities and
liberal arts types who don't
necessarily know what they'll be
doing when they graduate
In general, though, the college
students of the
servative than t
of the 0s.
Mommy and D
them role mc
She also claim;
more p
don't alway;
Students
drugs tha; �
ago, I
than ma)
"Cor
popular
college
ever
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IHF FAST C AROl INIAN
a. College Handbook
OW R - �4
I ia Birnbach
il SPSi
kes again
rhe author of the Official
Preppy Handbook has jusl
shed her latest authoritative
guide o hte in college It's called
Hirnhach's College Hook.
e s no "official" in the title
ie around because, quite
nkly, this ,s the son ol hook
ollege officials would rathe:
see It's the '�first and only
I guide to tell it like it is
More than a book about col-
. theollege Hook is a cam-
-s h campus guide to life at
I hough I isa does include
standard stuff about SAT
- enrollments And financial
ti ies to fo us on the
s thai aie still important
i you gel on campus That is,
ke ttie local drinking
its the best dorms and
ms, she reviews the
�. situation, and she even
its discreetl) as to where ac-
lodations in the parking lot
be preferable to the dorms.
helps students pick their
isses b) discussing the best and
profssors nd she saes
rn weeks of trial and error
eas answer to the crucial
v here can I get good
is the kind of book I
1 had when 1 was going to
I isa said
;a began the book when she
at high school seniors
I sv over what the really
knou about college until
too late, and they've alread
impus Sometime in
1 ' r, adolescent im-
Bg ' �- Animal House with a
deg suddenly crash
in ird realities of
co � Bui b the time the
era ha come, the school has
long b en and classes have
alrt- . S rne people
nevt.� . er it.
L: � meone had to
heir ' tudents, and
wher. iund that there was
guide e "real" facts of can
pus life, -he dec
own
"1 didn'i know of anyone who
had a exposure to as ma
Stli id to whom fhc nngfir
be a " 1 t said. "1 had
the . access
I ting her
leg � ie was touring
the promote her Of-
ficial yrepp Handbook She
sp. - on the road, per-
so- . B6 ampuses in
al! ler to meet
wr �� cross-section o
pe -he spoke to a
m ts, faculty, and
ac rs at each school.
Sh ide a point o meeting
dt � admission, student
Newspaper editors, and even oc-
c mal representatives of the
( � isade forr si
Her experiences on campus
were almost a- varied as the peo-
T thai she met. She went to
I " ' � sorority parties.
She sat in on student council
meetings, faculty meeting, chapel
services, and a few demonstra-
t : when the visiting was
i he sent detailed question-
i �vei 5.(XX) students to
plete her research.
Dealing with so man people
iting so manv schools took
' work. At each of neark
. � schools Lisa had to strike a
: fferent research pose
Sometimes she behaved as a
' removed anthropologist
while at other times she was a
siting dignitary or an
"undercover spy But the
ighest assignment always
tayed the same. She ate "dorm
: everv single day
There were times when I felt
� old, times when 1 felt very
rig Lisa recalled, "times
when I wished I was still in school
� times when I thanked God I
ln'1 have to go back
But once the research was
e, 1 isa found that conclu-
i n s were easily drawn.
"Students today can be divided
into two categories she said.
"There are those who disdain the
k and everything that came
ire them. These are generally
the pre-profesMonals who regard
ege as a four-year placement
program
"Then there are those who are
nostalgic for the sixties and regret
having missed all that
excitement Lisa continued.
These are the humanities and
liberal arts types who don't
necessarily know what they'll be
doing when they graduate
In general, though, the college
College Life Exposed
W th
re vt rm � mcntw n An� ojO. &r r u� : &, �. ,
students of the'80s are more con-
servative than the flower children
ol the '70s. "Most students like
Mommy and Daddy and consider
them role models I isa said.
She also claims that students are
more politically conservative and
don't always vote democratic.
Students today are less into
drugs than they were ten years
ago, I isa noticed. But they more
than make up for it with alcohol.
"Consuming alcohol is the most
popular form of recreation for
college and university students
everywhere she said.
Drinking games such as "Hi
Boh" and "Chugboat" have
become "national collegiate
pastimes and the most popular
drinking games at each school are
duly noted in her book. The
1984 Minx lei.
games are "a way of socializing
and institutionalizing drinking
Lisa explained.
The College Book covers most
of the country's major schools,
but there are some puzzling
lapses. Notre Dame, for instance,
should have been hard to miss. It
might also have been nice to in-
clude some schools in Canada.
And though it's always fun to
sneer at caustic descriptions of
other people's schools, it's
sometimes difficult to recognize
Lisa's description of one's own
alma mater. Administrators
around the country are already
having fits, and for once thev
may be right. The College Hook
could be titled both "Return of
the Preppies" and "Revenge of
the Nerds
r
if, (T
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8
�1HEEAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 18, 1984

Speakers, Films, Dramas Set
For Central America Week
wj���m��mw��mmjj����
M
Walkin The Plank
The ECU Peace Committee is
planning a full slate of events for
the upcoming Central America
Awareness Week which will begin
Sunday Oct. 21, and extend
through Thursday, Oct. 25.
According to ECU graduate
student, Mike Hammer, an
organizer of the week's activities,
"The week is designed to raise
the level of awareness on the
campus to the fact that the situa-
tion in Central America is poten-
tially explosive, and there is more
to be known about the issue than
one can learn from the nightly
news broadcasts. As students, we
might need to do a bit of digging
into the situation, but I think it's
important enough that it can
stand some thorough study
The first event scheduled for
Central America Awareness
Week is a talk by Jerome Hay, a
high School science teacher from
Durham, who will speak at the
Baptist Student Center on 10th
St. on his impressions of U.S. in-
volvement in Nicaragua based on
his study of the region and a six-
week trip there in the summer of
1984. This program is pot-luck,
beginning at 6:30 p.m Sunday
evening, Oct. 21; care will be
taken that it will be over in time
for the presidential debates.
Two slide shows provided by
Church World Services will be
shown on Tuesday, Oct. 23, at 8
p.m. in Room 205 of Joyner
Library. The films are Dollars for
Dictators and Born from the Peo-
ple.
Center Theatre will present
"Hands a dramatic presenta-
tion of a true story from Central
America on Wednesday, Oct. 24,
at 10:45, 11:45, and 12:45. Steve
Myott, director of Center
Theatre, has worked extensively
with Bread and Puppet Theatre,
a nationally renowned theater
company from Vermont, and he
also directs children's theater
productions in the Greenville Ci-
ty Schools. Center Theater will be
using actors, musicians, and
14-foot puppets for this produc-
tion.
On Thursday, Oct. 25, at 3:30
p.m. in Brewster D-302, a
faculty-student forum on the
Central American question will
take place. This forum is open to
the public. The ECU Peace Com-
mittee will also be providing ad-
ditional information at a table in
front of the Student Supply Store
on Tuesday and Wednesday.
According to ECU English
professor, Edith WebberThe
administration says that we're
defending American values in
Central America. Other
authoritative voices insist that
our intervention has a contrary
effect. If there was ever a need
for information, it's now
Child care will be provided
during Central America
Awareness Week.
L
y J� v
V-3
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AND AN0THLR TH1N6, riDNDAli
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r EvtF-y day?
rtriM iNSVLTS.AGfc 60UND6 ,
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Y�A R�5HT
TTTl
Decision Aid Offered
B MARIJAKE FREEMAN
stiff WrtCer
During October the ECU
Counseling Center is offering two
separate programs to help the
students select a major and
decide what to do after college.
"Each of these decisions requires
considerable thought, self-
exploration and information
about available alternatives
said a spokesman for the Center.
The program will be entitled
Major Decision Groups. The pro-
gram is on Wednesdays and
Thursdays from 3-4 p.m. in
Room 305 of the Wright Annex.
In the last part of October on
the 23rd there is also a workshop
offered to help students set goals
for the future based on values
that are important. This
workshop will also aid in decision
making in regard to money,
friends, and places to live and
work. The program is offered on
Tuesdays and Thursdays from
3-4 p.m. on Oct. 23 through Nov.
1. The location is in the Wrigh
Annex Room 308. For both pro
grams students should try to a
tend all four meetings.
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1

?
975-2121
Ext. 249
THE ATTIC IS BACK AND HOTTER THAN EVER!
This Week The ATTIC Smokes with
v�Ofc
Were Back & Hotter
Than Ever With
Thur. 18th
&
Fri. 19th
BUSTER
BROWN
Sat. Oct 20
PANIC
Ml
Honored
B Mlhl HAMH
Holly Ma!hew.v wa
Teacher oi the car awa
Mathers, a name
l'niersit Hei
psychological anthi :
in contemporai
tral America Follow .
professors who have I ee
MH What wa
Year Au'
HM I �
the criteria this
had been kino
It meant tl i
students identified �
totheevaluai
number ol si jJc:
really hard it A
don't know if it
is real nice
MH Cc
What are the imf
classes '
HM: That
lately because �
hae two ideas
to do i
iect ma
volved in
responsih
-omehow �
thai �
you hac a set u
n the intro etas
all of human evolul
lion and n
cover in one seme
think there are
student-
ethnocentrism and
ethnocentr- tl
vades our thinking i
down to the kind
that's a really
step back and looi
can't really do that
about how other p
MH Howd
joh other peoplt
HM: Well, pa
Cultures, i I
� teching technique
jjflnd oi sue. On
cept of race1 We'i
and who white In t i
classify them
that anthropolog
defined b head size. In
it more real to the
physical trait withir
But. you know . � �.
you can move into th
physical trait with ini
an understanding
a certain reason � I
with students; one. k p
at some pom bui a
quires then
and interiew people
sial intemew-
issue of wh
We had a goo
With ethnocenti u
own bias. Ii
example
they see and can relai -
work sometime
around trying
relatiMt You bav(
people kill theii
they sec
was terrible s
differences, and -
ist. 1 think
human1 What we -
ferent in our cu
1 try to give people i
tolerant hen the gel
course to introduce stud
perialism and -or: o-
Western world econon.
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SAVE
975-2121
Ext. 249
i
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ltd
YBAND.
U CAN BE.
n
ER!
IHI EASTCARCN INIAN
Style
OCTOBER 18. 1984 Page 9
Honored Teacher Discusses Philosophies
By MIKE HAMER
SMfWMtai
Holly Mathews was one of two ECU professors to receive
leacher of the Year award for the 1983-84 school year Dr
Mathews, a native of Atlanta, Ga received her Ph.D. from Duke
University. Her professional interests are in the fields of
psychological anthropology, medical anthropology, and sex roles
in contemporary society. She has done extensive field work in Cen-
tral America. Following is the first of a two-part series on ECU
professors who have been recognized for their teaching abilities.
1H: What was your first reaction when you got the Teacher of the
) ear A ward?
HM: I was real excited and real surprised. You know they changed
the criteria this year over what it has been in the past. Formerly, it
had been kind of a popular vote, and there was discussion of that.
It meant that it tended to be professional schools that won, as
students identified with their department. This year thev changed it
to the evaluations, and they also weighed it for levels of courses and
number of students. I put a high priority on teaching, and I work
eally hard at it. A lot of times you don't get any feedback and you
don't know if it's making any difference. Some public recognition
is real nice.
MM: Can you tell me what your basic philosophy of teaching is?
H hat are the important things to you as you're preparing vour
classes?
HM: That is a hard question, but I've been thinking about it more
latelv because I've been discussing it with a lot of my colleagues. I
two ideas about teaching: one is that what you're really trying
lo is to teach your students how to think, regardless of the sub-
matter, and that obligates you to get them interested and in-
volved in the class. You can't ignore the fact that you have the
responsibility to make the material interesting, relevant or
somehow stimulate their involvement. But at the same time, I feel
you have to teach the content of the subject to your student;
you hac a set amount of information you're supposed to cover.
In the intro class, which I teach a lot of, you're supposed to cover
all of human evolution, archaeology and the emergence of civiliza-
tion and modern cultural anthropology. That's a lot of stuff to
r in one semester. So you're trying to teach some content; I
think there are some basic concepts m anthropology that I want my
students to come away; that includes things like the whole idea of
ethnocentrism and cultural relativity. You know, the fact of
ethnocentrism, thinking your way of life is the best one; that per-
vades our thinking about everything from foreign policy right
down to the kind of clothes we wear and the food we eat. And
that's a really hard thing to be aware of, your own bias, until you
step back and look at how other people live and deal with that. You
can't realk do that in a course, but you can start people thinking
about how other people live in the world.
MH: How do you do that? H �� io you get students to think about
how other people li 1
HM: Well, partially we do it by reading case materials of other
cultures. I also rr to do it h using a lot of experimental techniques
� teching techniques that make the students have to address that
P d of issue. One of the things I deal with is race: what is the con-
cept
and
race? We're so sure we know what race is and who's black
ia
fho's white. In class, I make the students all stand up and
fv. themselves into groups based on different physical traits
hai anthropologists use to define race. In the early days, races were
defined by head size. In the process of doing that, I think it makes
it more real to the students that there is as much variation in the
phvsical trait within the group as there is between any two groups.
But. you know, once you have some real physical understanding,
you can move into the whole issue of how you can possibly equate a
physical trait with intelligence. And I think that paves the way for
an understanding that race is a sociological category developed for
a cen lin reason � to exploit people. So I try to do things like that
with students: one, keep them awake during class and participating
at some point; but also where they have to do something that re-
quires them to really think about the topic. I also make them go out
and interview people of different races. They were very controver-
sial interviews for the kids to do and that brought up the whole
:Lie of why it is such a touchy topic � how you divide up races.
We had a good discussion.
With ethnocentrism, we look at the whole idea of the students'
own bias. I try to have them go out after we've discussed it and find
examples of ethnocentric thinking and advertising and things that
they see and can relate it to on a day-to-day basis. Sometimes it
works; sometimes it doesn't. My whole approach is centered
around trying to make people aware of that and of the idea of
relativity. You have to look at a set of practices in context. Why do
people kill their first-born children in such and such culture? Do
they see a logical reason for doing it? You know, we would say that
was terrible. So first you have to make them aware that these are
differences, and then you have to look at why those differences ex-
ist. I think one of the goals is to say, "What is basic to being a
human?" What we share with people everywhere versus what's dif-
ferent in our culture or another culture?
1 try to give people a broader perspective so they can be more
'olerant when they get out of school. I try to use the introductory
course to introduce students to the notion of colonialism, im-
perialism and sort of the whole history of the beginnings of a
Western world economy and the exploitation of tribal people. A lot
-
of our kids have never heard of that. For the most part, they don't
know about what happened to American Indians. It's not in history-
books, and they just assume that somewhere out there are these
pygmies living a peaceful life. When, in fact, there are very few
tnbal groups left who aren't being assaulted for their land and
resources. It s a long, historical process, and it's one that goes on
now, to my mind, with economic imperialism. That's a more
sophisticated kind, but it's the same process. Once students start
seeing that happen in a lot of parts of the world. I think they can
more critically evaluate what is going on in terms of our own
policies toward developing nations.
MH: Do you see students resisting the vision 0our own culture
an imperialistic one?
as
Holl Mathews
HM: Oh yes. A lot of students will resist that, and that's okay, as
long as they're hearing and starting to think about the idea. I'm
limited in how much I can do in that intro course. But so many
students have never even considered the idea of our judgements
about what all these other countries ought to be doing � that such
thought could be ethnocentric or motivated by self interest. "Of
course we know whats' right. We're the best, biggest, wealthiest,
strongest nation in the world. And those other people, if thev're
poor, they must be either dumb or lazy The idea that there are
other factors involved in why people haven't been able to ac-
complish what they've wanted to accomplish in other countries
eludes so many students. So I try to kind of open up a new perspec-
tive to stimulate their thinking as much as I can through discussion.
And, at the same time, teach them some basic content. Also, we
really emphasize the wholistic perspective in anthropology. You
know, say your burning, overwhelming interest is politics. That's
fine, but you can't just see politics as an isolate because politics is
interwoven with religion, education, and anything else in a social
system. So we try to get them to see culture as a system of a lot of
interactive parts; and you can focus on one, but you're never going
to understand it completely unless you look at the whole system.
And that's why it takes a long time; it takes intensive involvement
which is, I guess, the basic difference in anthropology and other
social sciences. It started out because we studied other cultures
where you had to go and learn the language and live there for a long
time and figure our what was hapening. But even anthropologists
who come back to look at our own culture apply the same techni-
ques. You can't just walk into a Greenville suburb and understand
people's attitudes without knowing something about how the
neighborhood's organized, where they work, what their religious
system is and so forth. Social scientists who work in the culture
assume they know that because they're members of the culture and
they take their knowledge for granted. I think anthropology helps
you step back and say, "We can't take that for granted There's a
lot of resistance to it, but I don't mind that.
MH: Well, resistance shows thought too, doesn't it.
HM: Yeah, if people are resisting, they're not just sitting there,
which is the worst part. I have a long way to go in learning how to
teach � especially in those intro courses because that's the only ex-
posure the students will have to these items. The standard lecture
format, as it's used, often doesn't work. To do other things in
classes of 70 students isn't easy, so some experimentation is
necessary. Sometimes the techniques work, and sometimes they
don't.
I Find that one of the real problems on this campus is com-
munication. Students don't have a lot of experience with com-
municating their ideas in a written or oral form, and very little ex-
perience defending those ideas. So that makes it hard for them to
get info any kind of debate or commentarv because the students
feel like they're being criticized.
MH: You mean they're not aware of that process?
HM: Well, this summer I wrote a grant with one of mv former
teachers at Georgia State in anthropology for a field school in an-
thropolopy. One of the problems with anthropology is the subject.
It's hard for students to really understand what it's about, being so
far away and removed. So we wanted to give the majors a chance to
go and do some field work in another culture. This woman had
worked in Costa Rica before, and I worked in other parts of Cen-
tral America and she knew this particular region on the Atlantic
Coast that was settled by descendants of Jamaican slaves who came
over and worked the banana plantations. So thev are heavilv
English-speaking, only they're all bilingual in English and Spanish,
and they mostly speak Creole. But it was an area where students
with minimal linguistic skills could still do research. So we designed
a health study to go down and look at what the traditional health
beliefs were, what resources and facilities were available from the
national government because the government was starting to go in-
to the area and extend national health services. Would people use
them? Why or why not? Our basic motivation was to teach students
how to do anthropological research. How do you go in and make a
map of a community? How do you establish a presence there? How
do you go out and census a town?
We took four students from here and four from Georgia and we
went and split between two communities, and thev had a real an-
thropological experience. They actually lived in these rural com-
munities with families and also did the study. They all had to han-
dle their own individual projects One of my students looked at the
refugee problems with the Miskito Indians; one worked on
medicinal plants and collected plants; one worked on life histories,
and one worked on a description of the churches in the villages!
They all got very involved with the community; I was reailv pleased
about that. It really forced the issue of when you go in to do a
study, what do you owe to the people you're studying? tradi-
tional anthropologist says you just go in to do a study, but what
they quickly found out is that you can't just go in and be a neutral
observer. You have to establish relationships; you can't just be
neutral. You have to make some decisions about how vou justifv
your presence. At the end of our session, we decided to have a
meeting to tell the town what we found out. That's verv unusual for
anthropologists to do.
Can you imagine if somebody came into Greenville and said 1
want to study you for three months? We would slam the door in
their face. But the poor in other parts of the world don't usuallv
have the option. I was trying to stress that you're responsible for
that information you collect and what you do with it. We had thiv
meeting, and we essemjally helped ihem consolidate information �
what they thoughc about the health system � and then based on
our contacts and on their contacts, made some suggestions as to
what we thought they could do to improve health services.
MH: You mentioned that your students came back radicalized
about policies in Central America. Why is that?
HM: I think what happened was that most of them had not read
much about Central America before they went down. They sort of
knew it was down there, and they knew it had some problems, but
they had no real opinions one way or the other. And I think getting
down to Central America � we spent a week in the capital before
we went to the community � and in the community where people
are very concerned about politics in the region, even in areas where
people weren't involved in any of the fighting, they are very con-
cerned about what's going to happen. What's Reagan going to do?
What's going to happen in Nicaragua? How does this affect us?
Costa Rica has been going through a lot of internal turmoil and
economic crisis. There is a lot of confusion with American aid The
community where we were working got a teep off of President
Reagan's program, supplying un-militarv stuff � it's not weapons
but it's para-mihtary aid. Seeing that kind of thine happen, hearing
people talk about it as if it was real to them, something that would
affect their day-to-day lives � and then in this communitv having
contact with refugees right out of Nicaragua I think made a tremen-
dous difference. The students were exposed to people who had
fought against Somoza, who had been part of the Sandimsta
Regime, who were opposed to the Sandinista regime, but who all
had a personal experience to tell about it and who all had verv
strong feelings. So it stimulated the students' interest in the situa-
tion. They started doing some reading on it while thev were down
there. They started discussing it, and thev ended up wanting to
know what was the history of U.S. policy in Central America'1 And
they started reading that, looking at how we had intervened in
determining governments, what kind of governments we had sup-
ported, what we justified in the name of a better way of life, and it
semed the fact was that these people weren't Communist where we
were; they were just peasants who were trying to make a living.
See TEACHER. Page 10.
Royal Lipizzan Show
Stallions Strut Their Stuff
,
1

1
The Royal lipizzan Stallion Show will be held in Minges Coliseum this Sunday at 7:30 p.m.
The beautiful white horses ap-
pearing at ECU's Minges Col-
iseum for one performance only
on Sunday, October 21 at 7:30
p.m. have a unique and exciting
history. The rare and noble
breed, created in the 16th century
for Austria's royal house of
Hapsburg, have been imported
for this show. Only a few hun-
dred Lipizzaners have been alive
at any one time since their
breeding was originally controll-
ed by the monarch.
No commoner was allowed to
own one, but nobles serving with
the Austrian army were given
Lipizzaners to ride. The exacting
balance movements and great
leaps called the "Airs Above the
Ground which today are per-
formed solely for their beauty,
were originally a tactic of war,
used by mounted men to inspire
terror in foot soldiers. No other
breed can duplicate these
maneuvers.
Known for its exceptional con-
formation, beauty, and in-
tellignce, the Lipizzaner is the
result of centuries of
crossbreeding Spanish and
Arabic-Oriental bloodlines. The
horses were first bred by Spanish
Moors from Andalusian and
Arabian stock and the line re-
mained essentially stable for 700
years of the Moorish occupation.
During the Renaissance, the an
of classical horsemanship was
revived and several European
countries established studs to
preserve the Spanish strain. Em-
porer Maximilian II brought the
Spanish horses to Austria in
1562. His brother, Archduke
Charles, established a similar
stud in 1580 in Lipizza near
Trieste. The Lipizzan stud
flourished and was infused
toward the end of the 18th Cen-
truy with additional oriental
blood.
After 400 years of peaceful
development, the stud was forced
to flee on three occasions during
the Napoleonic Wars and was
again evacuated in 1915.
In 1942, the Lipizzan stud was
shipped for safekeeping to
Czechoslovakia where, without
the mares, the breed faced extinc-
tion. The dramatic tale of the
stud's rescue and return to
Austria by the forces of Gen.
Patton is vividly recounted in
Walt Disney's film, The Miracle
of the tthite Stallions.
Spectacular presentations are
blended together for a colorful
and stirring spectacle of majestic
tradition and superb horesman-
ship in The Royal Lippizzaa
Stallion Show. This performance
is sponsored by the Student
Union Special Events Commit-
tee.
'
I

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10
IHMASM AROUNIAN OCTOBER 18, 1984
Teacher Of The Year Talks Of Experience
ri r-r anymore, we can't inn ct�r� tkt k � :i � . . � L. �
Continued From Page 9
hat mattered to them most was having enough to eat and a safe
environment. The students began to say, "What's going on with
v?1 TKy? And they al1 came back wi,h a very diffcrent P0nt of
iew. rhev don't all agree with one another on what should be
done Some o them are favorable to the idea that we can change by
working through the system; some of them feel like our policies are
just terrible we ought to have a new president elected, or we
�ighUo 8� in a completely different direction. Again, at least they
ail had to think about it. You can't go there and not think about it.
1H Do you think that your students in general are uninformed
misinformed, indifferent, or just ignorant because of lack of infor-
mation about the real issues in Central America?
HM: Probablv the majority of them are indifferent. I don't think
it's deliberate misinformation. It's probably what they hear on TV
news, which obviously comes with a slant. I think it's again the
question oi getting people to think about an issue, which you can
either do in a classroom or an activity like those planned for Cen-
tral America Week. Or you can do it through personal experience. I
think Central America is just a low-priority issue in general.
There's a portion of the population who is genuinely concerned and
committed to working on it, but ihe majority think, "Well, it's just
a small area and they pretty much accept the line, "Well, there's
Communist influence there 1 don't think they have any
understanding of what would be entailed in real intervention in
Central America. You're not talking about a one-time Grenadian
assault; you're talking more like a Vietnam, a prolonged and pro-
bablv costly intervention.
MH: Do you feel that if it involved an intervention like El Salvador
or J ieti am, it would be as major a conflict as Vietnam was from
vour conversations with the people?
HM: 1 think the potential is there. You know, we thought Vietnam
would he an easv stituation. and it didn't turn out to be that way. I
think we would either have to go into Central America with the in-
tent of doing everything militarily we had to wipe it out, or we're
going to be involved in a very long struggle. Because in the end, you
know, you're talking about something that's been going on for
f years, this basic process of exploitation of the peasan-
'r. and when they reach the point of awareness of not taking it
anymore, we can't just stop that with a military exercise And
think that Nicaragua has been an example of what can happen
when people unite against a dictator. And it stands as an example 1
think that's why we're so scared of them. We're not scared that
Nicaragua is planning an invasion of the U.S. or the rest of Central
America, for that matter. They don't have the manpower to do
that. It's very unlikely the Russians or Cubans would help them,
but I think that we're scared it might threaten some other regimes
that we support for a whole bunch of other reasons � Guatemala
for example.
MH: Do you think we may have lost sight of our own revolution
perhaps?
HM: I think there's the whole domino theory that we're going to
lose the whole section; it's going to go down, Mexico especially,
because it's right on our border. It seems that if our policies con-
tinue in the same direction, we're pushing that faster than if we
would stand up for human rights, and the right of people to deter-
mine their own government, which is supposed to be what we're all
about. That's what kills me about this whole situation. People lose
Pressure Boys Performing
sight of the fact that when we talk about democracy and the right to
determing your own government as ideals, then what we're don
just supporting dictatorships more exploitative of the people than
the socialist's government (Nicaragua). In Guatemala, they're just
killing people. We assume that that's OK because thev're on our
side, versus the Sandinistas who aren't. Yet, the Sandinistas have
been instituting literacy programs and medical aid and trying to
redistribute wealth � all of the things that we should, in the i .
support It seems real clear to me.
WYUi hat are your plans for the future?
HM: 1 don't know. I may be in Mexico for the summer 1 did my
research for the dissertation in Mexico. 1 see real problems down
the road in Mexico. Eventually, I think I'll go bask to Cent
America. For people who don't know, ECU has an exchange :
gram in Costa Rica in the spring where 15 students go � Heredia,
which is right outside San Jose and study at the LrmerMdad Na
cional. They take courses down there in political science, bio! g
Spanish and other subjects. It costs about the same amount i
semester here, and its' a really good experience
From the midst of the triangle
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Thursday night at 8:30 in Wright
Auditorium.
led bv manager lead vocalist
John Plymale, the hand put
together a tour of the east coast
and mid-west. The rest of the
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12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 18,1984
Mental Health Assoc. Aids Residents
By DEIRDRE McEN ALLY
Staff Witt
The Pitt County Mental Health
Association is a strictly voluntary,
non-governmental organization
which is devoted to promoting
mental health, preventing mental
illness, and improving the care
and treatment of mentally ill.
Through funding from the United
Way and May membership drives,
the Mental Health Association of-
fers a variety of programs, infor-
mation, and support groups to
ECU students and members of the
surrounding community.
The REACH (Reassurance to
Each) support group counsels
those who are having problems
with a mentally ill or disturbed
family member. It is open to the
association's members and to
non-members alike, as are all pro-
grams offered by the Mental
Health Association.
The ten working committees
and 30 board members present
spring and fall spotlight programs
� educational seminars open to
the public. October's spotlight
series includes the topic iWhy do
I feel so bad now because of
something that happened then?"
One of the most well-known
programs the Mental Health
Association offers is Operation
Santa Claus. This is a program
beginning on December 10 in
which gifts are collected for
residents in area mental hospitals.
Other programs offered by the
Mental Health Association in-
clude the mini-spotlight series and
a seminar by an attorney about
the legal rights of families and
clients.
The lunchtime mini-spotlight
series, on the first and second
Thursday of November, will be
about adolescence The Mental
Health Association also refers in-
dividuals to the Mental Health
Center for counseling and sup-
port. In addition, the Mental
Health Association offers camp
scholarships, books for the public
library, a pre-school program, in-
formation, and friendship to the
mentally ill.
�� CoUHTRV CoOjClMG
ioy& -�
A Review
By MATTHEW GILLIS
Sufi Wfttai
Last Wednesday night was
hardly quiet in Hendrix Theatre,
for ECU students and faculty got
a preview of the new suspense
film The Little Drummer Girl.
Based on John Le Carre's best
selling novel of political intrigue,
the story centers around
Charlie(Diane Keaton), an
American-born actress who falls
madly in love with a Palestinian
fighter � or so she thinks. Kurtz
(Klaus Kinski) is later revealed to
be an Israeli agent who, with his
superiors, asks her to stop a
brutal Palestinian espionage
leader responsible for the bomb-
ing of an Israeli embassy. Soon
she sympathizes with the Palesti-
nians while remaining loyal to her
Israeli contacts. Indeed, the film
shows a wide variety of actions
taken by both the Israeli and
Palestinian forces.
However, this turns out to be a
very muddled film. Director
George Roy Hill, who was
responsible for The Sting, The
World According to Garp and
others, does his best to make a
good film using breathtaking
scenery. Still, the film's plot has
too many gaps throughout, with
too many actions being taken for
no apparent reason other than
terrorization and vengence.
Still, it is clear the story is mud-
dled with points unexplained and
also only points out the primary
actions of each side, including
making the Israelis somewhat
more agressive. In fact, this film
would be better as a documentary
on just what subversive moves a
country can use to gain power
and influence over another rather
than just a film for the public,
who may not know all the facts
about the Palestinian-Israeli con-
flict.
As a lesson in politics and
psychology, The Tittle Drummer
Girl is all right. But as a film? I
sympathize with the film's
heroine � I too was left battered
and bewildered, like I'd been all
"drummed out
Read The Classifieds
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Salad with your choice of dressing with homemade rolls including tea
or coffee. - mkA
2 Dinners For 9.95
Bonus With any meal, first drink is on the house with ticket stub.
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'Anything
Anything Goes, one of the fun-
�t musical comedies of the
V?,K ill open the theatrical
"�son at the East Carolina
Playhouse on October 24, with
additional performances October
M 2" and 29. The curtain
will rise each eveing at 8:15 in
('inni, Theatre.
Blending performing talents
�� the ECU Theatre Arts
Apartment with the School of
Music's orchestra and songs by
-ver-popular Cole Porter, this
Auction will revive the magic
' a �how that has the distinction
running up one of the greatest
-ess records of any Broadway
u.al of the 1930s. It is a
-stone in theatrical history for
several reasons. First, it once a
' r all established Cole Porte-
his niche as
one writer
and s j
Goes also
Merman bed
in the role of
finally. 4.mi
ed son
songs of the
Tor
You
The origii
sent Etr
fame ar
York in 19?4
hit and p
man ve-
to re j
1936 n
Crosb Il
made into
1956 and
Visit New York
Times Square, the Empire Tha
State Building, Broadway, the watch
Village, the World Trade Center. Day 1
Staten Island New York! There d -
really isn't another place quite a
Uke it; no other city comes close made a J
to capturing you with as many wh
different sights, sounds, and fee th ail 11
ings as does what everyone calls gre
casually "The Big Apple war
Now you can take a big bite of but ai. .
that apple with the ECU Student an er
Union Travel Committee and the H
their annual Thanksgiving Break Sunda
trip to New York City. The group trip to Gre
will depart Mendenhall Student proceed
Center (west parking lot) at 8 C
p.m. on Wednesdav, November
21, 1984. Travel will be via
46-passenger Carolina Trailwav nee
busses. After traveling all nigr
except for necessary rest stops, S99 j
you'll arrive at Hotel Edison cupa
right in the heart of the theatre in I
district of New York City at ap- pe'
proximately 7 a.m Thursdav. cupa j
November 22. Since tha- is �ing
r-VILLAGE
l� � 4 t 'v Al
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THfcr AS I C AROl 1NIAN
RV C0OKIM6
OCTOBER 18, 1984
13
lilgate Special
hicken
salad $3.25
S law-
Special
essing S3.95 tax
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Near Dorms
uts - 752-0476
KK li:00am00pni
PORT
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r 4pm - 2pm
h Garden
ncluding tea
k9,95
I
Ke

rv a
a to
EES
wwwvwv
s�A
m iw�mpi -
'Anything Goes' Premiering Next Week
Anythmg Goes, one of the fun-
kSL musical comedies of the
�Ks, will open the theatrical
ason at the East Carolina
Playhouse on October 24, with
additional performances October
�. 26, 27 and 29. The curtain
ill rise each eveing at 8:15 in
McGinnis Theatre.
Blending performing talents
from the ECU Theatre Arts
department with the School of
Music's orchestra and songs by
the ever-popular Cole Porter, this
Production will revive the magic
of a show that has the distinction
of running up one of the greatest
success records of anv Broadwav
musical of the 1930s. It is a
milestone in theatrical history for
several reasons. First, it once and
for all established Cole Porter in
his niche as America's number
one writer of songs of fashion
and sophistication. Anything
Goes also made a star of Ethel
Merman because of her great hit
in the role of Reno Sweeney. And
finally, Anything Goes introduc-
ed some of the most popular
songs of the century: "You're the
Top "I Get a Kick Out of
You and "It's Delovely
The original production that
sent Ethel Merman on her way to
tame and fortune opened in New
York in 1934. It was an enormous
hit and played for 420 perfor-
mances before Merman went on
to recreate her starring role in the
1936 movie version with Bing
Crosby. It was televised in 1954,
made into yet another movie in
1956 and in 1962, revived off-
Broadway.
Cole Porter went on to author
a string of musical comedy stan-
dards that have remained popular
throughout the world. Among
them are Kiss Me Kate, Can Can
and Silk Stockings.
Anything Goes is the story of a
young American stockbroker
who sails aboard a trans-Atlantic
liner on an impulse to keep the
girl he loves from marrying a
stuffy Englishman. His romantic
impulse forces him to "borrow"
a passport, which in turn runs
him into one complication after
another and many hilarious con-
sequences, not the least of which
is an encounter with a gangster
disguised as a parson who has the
embarrassing distinction of being
ranked Public Enemy Number
13. Also on the passenger list is a
Miss Reno Sweeney, a night-club
queen with a bevy of Times
Square sirens bound for London
and late hours.
The Playhouse production is
under the direction of Edgar
Loessin, who commented, "This
show is a national treasure. It's
so fresh even now, and the music
never fails to delight not only
those of us who know it all by
heart, but also the younger
generation who are
"discovering" it for the first
time. It's truly a family show
Teamed up with Loessin is
Broadway and film veteran
Mavis Ray, who is
choreographing dance numbers
for the cast of some 30 actors,
singers and dancers.
Visit New York City Over Thanksgiving
Because the show calls for a
large cast, all lavishly dressed in
clothes of the 1930s, Costume
Designer Keith Lewis has had his
hands full. "We couldn't find all
the sequined fabric in North
Carolina, so 1 had to go on a buy-
ing trip to New York expained
Lewis. Close to 120 costumes will
be used for the production
The scenery of designer,
Robert Alpers, will be sharing the
lime-light with the performers,
Porter's songs and the tap dance
numbers. The show, as he design-
ed it, opens on the red, white and
blue upper deck of the USS
American, which appears to be
one large structure until it splits
to reveal the interior of the ship
in subsequent scenes. Other
scenic pieces will be flown in
from the fly loft and placed on
electric wagon units which
operate on a cable system recess-
ed into the floor of the McGinnis
theatre stage.
Reserved seat tickets for
Anything Goes and season tickets
for the entire Playhouse season
are on sale at the McGinnis
Theater Box Office from 10 a.m.
until 4 p.m Monday through
Friday.
Later productions include:
Stage Door (November 27-30 and
December 1), The Diviners
(February 6-9), The Fast
C arolina Dance Theatre
(February 20-23) and Hamlet
(April 16-20).
Reservations mav be made by
calling 57-6390.
Times Square, the Empire
State Building, Broadway, the
Village, the World Trade Center,
Staten IslandNew York! There
really isn't another place quite
like it; no other city comes close
to capturing you with as many
different sights, sounds, and feel-
ings as does what everyone calls
casually "The Big Apple
Now you can take a big bite of
that apple with the ECU Student
Union Travel Committee and
their annual Thanksgiving Break
trip to New York City. The group
will depart Mendenhall Student
Center (west parking lot) at 8
p.m. on Wednesday, November
21, 1984. Travel will be via
46-passenger Carolina Trailways
busses. After traveling all night,
except for necessary rest stops,
you'll arrive at Hotel Edison
right in the heart of the theatre
district of New York City at ap-
proximately 7 a.m Thursday,
November 22. Since that is
Thanksgiving, you'll be able to
watch the Macy's Thanksgiving
Day Parade. But you are free to
do whatever you want while you
are there. Optional tours will be
made available to individuals
who wish to participate.
With all there is to see and do
(great shopping abounds), you'll
want to keep busy every moment;
but all good things must come to
an end. The trip will depart from
the Hotel Edison at 9 a.m. on
Sunday, Nov. 25 for the return
trip to Greenville. The trip will
proceed directly from New York
City to Greenville except for rest
stops.
All good things do not
necessarily cost a lot. The full
price of this New York City trip is
$99 per person in a quad oc-
cupancy room, $110 per person
in a triple occupancy room, $120
per person in a twin double oc-
cupancy room, and $170 for a
single occupancy room. These
DONNA rDWAROS
prices include charges for round-
trip transportation from Green-
ville to New York, hotel accom-
modations, and baggage handl-
ing (one bag per person) in New
York C'v. Each trip participant
is responsible for hisher own
meals, admissions, transporta-
tion within New York City, and
incidental expenses.
All payments must be in cash,
check or money order, payable to
the Central Ticket Office. The
registration fee of $25 is due
upon application, (forms
available from the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student
Center). The balance is payable
on or before November 1.
II
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Students Welcome
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Weekends $7.00
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Griffon, NC
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I'M- EAS1 CAROI INIAN
Tulsa Drummers
Bang Bucs Home
Sports
OCTOBER 18, 1984 Page 14
Bv RANDY MEWS
SfxtiUII�
ECU coach Ed Emory said that pride and
respect are the only things left for his 1-6
football team following their 31-20 loss to
Tulsa last Saturday.
"I'm disappointed we can't hae a winn-
ing season Emory said in his weekly press
conference "If you can't be a winner, then
there's not much left for the players to ac-
complish
Emory said Tulsa was better prepared
than any other team the Pirates have faced
all year, and he was especially impressed
with the play of their defensive unit. "They
have a couple of defensive lineman
(2pound Joe Dixon and 280-pound Byron
Jones) that will be playing professional foot-
ball for many, many years Emory said.
Although the head coach was impressed
with Tulsa's play, he still felt his team should
have been victorious.
"1 never doubted we'd lose until the last
few minutes of the game. I've said that
about every game except Florida State, but
that's just the type of season it's been
According to Emory, the terrible condi-
tions didn't help his squad either. "We've
played five of our seven games on the road,
and we have still faced more adversity than
any other team in America
The following list is proof of Emory's
complaints:
� All the drummers in Tulsa's band sat in
the first row behind the ECU bench and
banged their drums whenever the Pirates had
possession of the football. When thev were
asked to refrain from drumming by the ECl
coaching staff, "they banged harder
� ECU was only given two sideline benches
for the players. When the Pirates acquired
one of the benches from Tulsa's side of the
field, the Tulsa managers took it back.
� The Pirate coaching staff was only given
two headsets, while the Tulsa staff had ten.
When Emory asked for the same amount as
the home team, he was give two more.
� The astro turf was in such bad shape that
the Pirates sustained more injuries against
Tulsa than at any time during Emory's four
years at ECU.
� The stadium was so poorly constructed
that less than ten yards separated the
sidelines from the first row of seats.
Although the "terrible conditions" af-
fected his team's play, Emory said the of-
ficiating decided the outcome of the game.
"I'll go to my grave believing that those
officials (Missouri Valley Conference) did
everything in their power to prevent us from
moving the ball Emory lamented. "There
was a split crew working the game, and every
call against us (with the exception of one)
came from those officials
Emory said it would be good for the team
to return to Ficklen Stadium after three
straight weeks on the road, and although the
Pirates will be favored in thier homecoming
game with East Tennessee State this Satur-
day, Emory spoke highly of ETSU despite
their Division 1-AA status.
"They led the nation in three defensive
categories last week Emorv said, "so I'm
expecting this to be a very difficult game for
us.
"They have 19 of 22 star'ers returning
from last vear. and they like to throw the
ball. They're sound on offense and on
defense, and unless we have good execution,
we could be in for a long, long day
MCMAEt Sv T-
Quarterback Ron Jones (8) replaced an injured Darrell speed in ECU'S loss to Tulsa last weekend. However, tht terrible
conditions" in Tuba's stadium proved to be the Pirates' biggest nemesis according tooach Ed Emory.
? Stephenson Leads Hurricane
MICHAEL SMITH ECU Photo Lb
Tony Baker (43) picked up 41 yards on this run. but the Pirates weren't so successful as they dropped a
31-20 decision to the Golden Hurricane of Tulsa last Saturday.
Brockschmidt, Holman Victorious
Bv TONY BROWN
Staff � Mtcr
Bruce Brockschmidt and Chris
Holman captured top honors in
ECU's annual swim team Pen-
tathalon held last Thursday at
Minges Natatorium.
The event pits all team
members against the clock in five
separate events. Points are
awarded according to time stan-
dards set for each event.
Brockschmidt dominated the
men's competition as he took
first place in all but one event,
while tying for second in the
other. Chris Pitelli took second
place overall, while Stratton
Smith finished third.
Holman couldn't match
Brockschmidt, but did capture
three events to lead the women's
team. Caycee Poust was second
with four top three finishes, while
Jenny Pierson swam to third
place.
Here are the top three finishers
of the men's competition:
200-yard Individual Medley: 1.
Bruce Brockschmidt, 2:01.2; 2.
Stratton Smith, 2:03.12; 3. Chris
Pittelli, 2:04.5.
100 Flv: 1. Brockschmidt.
53.7; 2. Pittelli, 54.8; 3. Keith
Kaut. 55.9.
100 Backstroke: 1.
Brockschmidt, 56.5; 2. Kevin
Hidalgo, 58.4; 3. S. Smith, 58.6.
100 Breaststroke: 1.
Brockschmidt, 1:03.2; 2. Lee
��.
OAKY PATTERSON - ECU Photo Lab
Bruce Brockschmidt and Chris Holman captured top honors in the an-
nual ECU swim team pentathalon last week.
Hicks, 1:03.3; 3. Al Smith.
1:04.5.
100 Freestyle: I. Pitelli. 48.9;
2. (tie) Kaut, 49.7; Brockschmidt,
49.7.
The top five finishers: 1.
Brockschmidt, 235; 2. Pittelli,
1,874; 3. S. Smith; 1,775; 4.
Hidalgo, 1,569; 5. Kaut, 1,558.
Here are the top three finishers
of the women's competition:
200 1M: 1 Chris Holman,
2:20.5; 2. Caycee Poust, 2:20.8;
3. Jill Gorenfio, 2:25.1.
100 Flv: 1. Ellen McPherson.
1:04.9; 2. Jennv Pierson, 1:05; 3.
Poust, 1:05.1.
100 Backstroke: 1.Holman,
1:04.3 (new Pentathalon record);
2. Lori Livingston, 1:06.6; 3.
Poust, 1:07.4.
100 Breaststroke: 1. Joelle En-
nis, 1:15.8; 2. Jennie Hokuead,
1:16.2; 3. Erin Gavdosh, 1:18.6.
100 Freestyle: 1. Holman, 55.9
(new Pentathalon record); 2.
Pierson, 57.4; 3. Poust, 58.9.
The top five finishers: 1.
Holman, 2,607; 2. Poust, 2,455;
3. Pierson, 2,392; 4. McPherson,
2,055; 5. Gorenfio, 1,892.
Coach Rick Kobe was very
pleased with his team's efforts
and noted that the top five
finishers for both the men and
women were underclassmen.
"This shows we've got a lot of
depth he said.
"Even though the team is
young, they're right on target
he added. "I'm really pleased at
what I saw and I'm looking for a
good performance in the Purple-
Gold meet to continue our
momentum
The next event for the swim
team will be the Purple-Gold
meet at Minges Natatorium Oct.
25 at 7 p.m.
By SCOTT POWERS
111 SA. Okla � Three long
first half coring passes bv Tulsa
quarterback Richie Stephenson
and a l!4-vard rushing perfor-
mance by tullback Gordon
Brown were too much for the
ECU Pirates as they fell to the
Golden Huricane of Tulsa, 31 20
The loss drops the Pirates'
record to 1-6 � the worst start
for an ECU football team since
1970
"1 have to congratulate coach
C ooper on the victory an ob-
viously disappointed Ed Emory
said. "Both teams needed a win,
but they're the ones who got it. I
just hope we can turn it around
next week
Stephenson was a key to the of-
fense of Tulsa. which ravaged the
ECU defense for 48" yards of
total offense.
"Richie controlled the football
and I must admit that he had an
excellent football game ninth-
year TuNa coach John Cooper
saod. "It was not an eas
v ictory
Stephenson, who took over
earlier in the year for the injured
Steve Gage, led the Hurricane at-
tack with an 11 of 22 passing per-
formance which netted 273 yards
and three touchdowns that put
lulsa ahead 21-10 at the half.
His first scoring pass of the
night was a 58 yarder to flanker
Ronnie Kelley with 13:41 left in
the first quarter putting the Hur-
ricane on top 7-0.
ECU quickly countered with a
touchdown pass oJ its own
17 varder from Darrvl Speed I
Jimmv aiders to knot the sc
a! 7-7 with just under ten mm .
left in the first quarter.
Spec had the Pirate mo i c
towards the ei d I the I -
quarter, but took a jarring -
on the last play of the quarter.
and was never the ame
Ron Jones took o ei ' i
Pirates in the second quarter.
the offense never really got j
again � only scoring oi
42-yard Field goal by Jeff H.
the remainder o the halt
Meanwhile, TuNa rode on the
arm of Stephenson scoring on
two more long passes � a 38
yarder to Eric Borders and a 41
yarder to Kelley to take a 21-10
lead to the lockerroom at the
half.
In the second halt, the two
teams traded scores as Tulsa
placekicker Jason Staurovsky hit
a 45-yard field goal. Heath then
responded with a 44 yarder of his
own. leaving the Hurricane with
a 24-13 lead with just under 13
minutes left to play.
Tulsa's Young quickly
responded with a 13-yard dash up
the middle to put the game out of
reach. 31-13, before Bubba Bunn
went over on a one-yard run as
time was running out.
Emory was not pleased with his
team's all-around play. "Our
football team did not piay like a
team that has played seven foot-
ball games he said. "1 thought
that we made some errors and
some miscommunications. We
play
'
IP ! .
I �'
then
would wii
deter.se played �
j hall "I
that we would .
score three oi I
cond half, but 5
in the
recovered. We
the offense
The Pirate ic.
fo r 25 ard
Spec:
vards on 12 car:
limited play g
Tony Baker was - . -
Pirates with 61 d
41 -varder in the st
The 1 -6 Pirates
this Saturdav to face 1 a
nessee State I niversity
Homecoming game, while
now 3-3. will host V
V'allev Conference foe
State
What's The Problem Anyway?
When classes resumed after
fall break last year, the Pirates
were 5-1, nationally ranked and
were preparing to play No. 5
Florida in a game that garnered
as much national attention as
any sporting event on that par-
ticular weekend.
Shews' Corner
itor s Column
This year the ECU football
team is 1-6, off to their worst
start in more than a decade and
should be considered lucky if
they manage to finish the
season at 3-8.
Many say the loss of All-
Americans Terry Long and
Clint Harris, at well as the
other nine players who were
drafted into the professional
ranks are the cause of this
year's dismal season, but such
is not the case.
The talent is there, but the
teamwork isn't. Last year's
starting unit had people who
had been playing together for
five years, and every player was
familiar with the ECU system
and how they fit in. "Last year
we had continuity Pirate
head coach Ed Emory said,
"but this year it isn't there.
"We have just as much
talent on this year's team as we
did in 1983 Emory con-
tinued. "We've got better team
speed and we're stronger in the
weight room, but we don't
have team unity
Last year's team unity was
not displayed so much in in-
dividual talent, but in the ex-
perience that was prevelant at
every single position. The
primary reason for the ineffec-
tiveness of the 1984 ECU foot-
ball team is that 1983 saw the
most experienced
player players at each position
graduate:
Quarterback � Kevin Ingram.
Runningback � Earnest
Byner.
Offensive Line � John Robert-
son, Terry Long, John Floyd.
Ends � Norwood Vann.
Defensive Line � Jeff Pegues,
Steve Hamilton, Hal Stephens,
Gerry Rogers.
Linebacker - - Mike Grant
Secondary � Clint Hai
With the exception
Florida State, this yeai -
has had the opportunity t
every game gome
fourth quarter, but :he lack oi
teamwork has cost ECU fiv
those six games.
Listed below are sev� i
reasons why the team has
ineffective this year:
� The receiving corps.
sidered one of the best in the
country entering the seas
has dropped more passes than
at any time Ed Emorv has been
at ECU
� No runningback is averaging
more than 55 yards a game.
� Ron Jones and Darrell Speed
both played against TuNa. so it
appears a shaky quarterback
situation is still undecided
� The ECU offensie line has
suffered more injuries than any
line Emory has ever been
associated with.
� The secondary play has suf-
fered because only nine sacks
have been registered this year
compared to 25 in 1983. and
the linebackers nave failed to
make an interception.
Semino
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Linksters
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Walker New
Asst. Coach
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IJ84 Page 14
I
MICHACL SMITH - ECU Phofo Lab
at weekend Howler, the "terrible
I oach Kd Emory.
Hurricane
)ul �c didn't play
tall it might be
si football games
. d
dary, which was
e times in the first
l cause for concern
pan. "We changed
at half time. We're
p real bad at corner
n dams shouldn't
but we feel that he is
� v got. Kevin Walker
� neither one of
ticed all week
� railing at the half,
felt that the Pirates
the game. "Our
ived a lot better in the
e -aid "I thought
Aould come out and
four times in the se-
speed got rattled
half and he never
We just couldn't get
going1
offense accounted
n the ground, with
i
img the team with "
n 12 carries despite his
plaving time. Tailback
Baker was next for the
1 " 67 yards, including a
ler in the second quarter.
. -6 Pirates will be at home
turda) to face East Ten-
see State University in their
:oming game, while Tulsa,
will host Missouri
iference foe Wichita
�j i
1
Irate
Laid.
we
.
;am
the
n't
u a
m-
ex-
t at
"he
Wee-
)Ot-
the
:ed
tion
tm.
lest
tart-
rd.
ies,
ms.
Anyway?
-hacker - Mike Grant.
Secondary � Clint Harris.
With the exception of
Florida State, this year's team
has had the opportunity to win
every game going into the
fourth quarter, but the lack of
teamwork has cost ECU five of
those six games.
I isted below are several
reasons why the team has been
ineffective this year:
� The receiving corps, con-
sidered one of the best in the
country entering the season,
has dropped more passes than
at any time Ed Emory has been
at ECU.
� No runningback is averaging
more than 55 yards a game.
� Ron Jones and Darrell Speed
both played against Tulsa, so it
appears a shaky quarterback
situation is still undecided.
� The ECU offensive line has
suffered more injuries than any
line Emory has ever been
associated with.
� The secondary play has suf-
fered because only nine sacks
have been registered this year
compared to 25 in 1983, and
the linebackers have failed to
make an interception.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 18. 1984
15
Gamecocks Now
Bv B1I L MITCHELI
Staff W tiler
Here's a look at how East
Carolina's opponents fared this
past Saturday.
Florida State: Auburn came from
behind in the last 48 seconds to
beat Florida State, 42-41. Brent
Fullwood ran four yards to score
his third touchdown of the game
in the fourth quarter to get the
win for the Tigers.
Auburn had built a 29-17 lead
interception return for a
touchdown by Dave Pereira.
Boston College trailed Temple
10-9 ten seconds into the fourth
quarter before quarterback Doug
Flutie led a seven-play, 80-yard
drive to the two where Strachan
scored. Flutie then went up the
middle for the two-point conver-
sion to make it 17-10. On the se-
cond play of the ensuing Temple
possession, Periera took the in-
terceprion down the sidelines for
on a fumble recovery and a
touchdown by Ed Graham, but
Florida State rallied to take a
41-36 lead on Eric Thomas's
fourth touchdown pass of the
game. Florida State is now 4-1-1
and they play Tulane next week.
Temple: Boston College, now 4-0,
stopped the Owls of Temple 24-10
last Saturday. They had to come
from behind with a two-yard run
by Steve Strachan and a 35-yard
the score to put the game out of
reach. Temple, now 3-3, plays
Delaware this Saturday.
Central Michigan: The Chippewas
really smashed Ohio University
35-3 in a very impressive offensive
show by CMU. Central Michigan
challenges Bowling Green this
week.
Georgia Southern: Georgia
Southern defeated Tennessee-
Linksters Prepare For Duke Tourney
B RIC KMcCORMAC coach Roh HplmirW "Anvtimp �.i r��iu. ���.� , . . . �
B RICK McCORMAC
SMI V rllrr
The ECU golf team is prepar-
ing to play in the John Ryan
Memorial Golf Tournament at
Duke University Oct. 18-20.
The tournament, formerly
known as the Iron Duke Invita-
tional, will have 24 teams in-
cluding seven of the eight ACC
schools. Clemson is the only
ACC member not playing.
"It's a good field said ECU
coach Bob Helmick. "Anytime
you have all of the ACC schools
as well as good golfing schools
such as James Madison, Temple,
Georgia Southern and Campbell
� the competition will be good
Last fall in the tournament, the
Pirates finished 16th out of 24
teams. While UNC, Wake Forest
and N.C. State are the pre-
tournament favorites, the Pirates
are expecting to improve upon
last year's finish.
"I feel we should finish in the
top six Helmick said. "If we
don't, I'll be disappointed
Helmick is planning on taking
Mike Bradley, Chris Czaja, Mark
Arcilesi, Paul Steelman and
Roger Newsome to play in the
tournament.
"Mike Bradley is playing great
and Chris Czaja is hitting the ball
well Helmick said. "Arcilesi
and Steelman's games are coming
around, and Roger Newsome
Homecoming Cross Country Races
Set For This Saturday Morning
hasn't played much this fall but
should be ready to play
"The entire team has played
Duke at least once before said
Helmick. "It's not a new golf
course to us and the kids are
ready.
"Duke has a good, demanding
golf course Helmick con-
tinued. "It's not extremly long,
but it does require excellent iron
shots and with its fast bent grass
greens, it's a pretty good
challenge of an individual's golf
game
The Pirates will tee of Thurs-
day at 8:00 a.m and will be
paired with Virginia and Temple
for the first round.
Chattanooga, 24-17, in a very
closely fought battle on Saturday.
Georgia Southern goes up against
Newberry next week.
N.C. State: Maryland trounced
the Wolf pack 44-21 in an ACC
battle last Saturday. Rick Bedan-
jek had three touchdowns as
Maryland turned three Wolfpack
turnovers into a 30-7 halftirne
lead. Kicker Jess Atkinson had
three field goals in the first half to
help the Terps' cause. N.C. State
plays at UNC next week.
Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh got stunn-
ed by South Carolina, 45-21, as
Gamecock quarterbacks Mike
Hold and Allen Mitchell each
passed for two touchdowns.
South Carolina, 5-0, had 443 total
yards while holding the Panthers
to only 285. Thomas Dendy dash-
ed Pitt's hopes for a win when he
ran 40 yards down the sidelines
for a touchdown after Pitt had cut
the lead to 28-21. The Panthers
play Miami next week.
South Carolina: South Carolina
defeated Pitt, 45-21. The
Gamecocks visit Notre Dame this
weekend.
East Tennessee State: Furman
topped the Buccaneers 28-16 in a
close contest on Saturday. East
Carolina plays ETSU this coming
weekend.
Southwestern Louisiana: Mem-
phis State defeated Southwestern
Louisiana 20-13 on Saturday.
Richard's A uto Service
Specializing in Foreign & Domestic Auto Repair
10 OFF ALL SERVICE & REPAIRS
This month's Special - Oil Change & Filter $12.95
752-8770
120FicklandSt.
Adjacent to Rent a Wreck
Two Cross Campus races wi
be held Homecoming Day Satur-
day October 20, 1984. A 2.5 mile
race will start at 9:00 a.m. and a
5.0 mile race will start at 9:30
a.m. Both races start near the
bleachers at the ECU arsity
track. Bunting field. The race
course is 95 percent on grass and
traverses in and about the area
surrounding Minges Coliseum,
Ficklen, Bunting Field. Harr-
ington Field and the women's
softball field. The races, which
are sponsored by the Department
of Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices, are open to all ECU
students, faculty, and staff and
ECl alumni.
The overall male winner for the
2.5 mile races in 1983 was Jeffrey
McLean a 22-year-old student
from Greenville. McLean's time
for the distance v. as 16 minutes,
Walker New
Asst. Coach
B RICK McCORMAC
Miff Writer
The ECU men's basketball
team has hired a new assistant
coach in Al Walker, replacing
Ricky Schoof who left coaching
to go into private business.
Walker, who was born in
Brooklyn, but has lived in
Queens all of his life, assumes the
position of part-time assistant
coach.
Walker's duties will include
overseeing player academics,
coordinating film exchanges with
opponents, scouting respon-
sibilities as well as on the floor
coaching.
"All of the recruiting will be
handled by Coach Harrison,
Coach Barrise and Coach
Pendergraph Walker said,
"because NCAA rules do not
allow part-time assistants to
recruit
Walker comes to ECU from
UNC-Chapel Hill, where he got
his master's degree and worked
as a volunteer assistant at the
junior-varsity level helping Roy
Williams, one of Dean Smith's
assistants.
In add'tion to being a part-time
coach, Walker teaches two
basketball classes, bowling and
physical education.
"I enjoy teaching classes
because it allows me to get out
and meet the students Walker
said.
When asked about how he likes
being at ECU, Walker said "I
like it a lot � I think the basket-
ball program is going to explode
in the next couple of years. We
have good kids who are good
students.
"The kids have been on a
weight program for nine months,
and because of that, I think we
can make a significant dent in the
conference standings Walker
continued.
In college, Walker played on
the Division III level at
Stoneybrook and Brocksport
State, both in New York.
After college, Walker played
professionally in Israel. "There
are a lot of Americans over
there Walker said in reference
to his playing days. "They play
good basketball � I was kind of
lonely until I got to meet a few of
the people in the area.
" It was a tough decision leav-
ing my family for an entire year. I
had peaks and valleys where at
times I felt successful, while at
other times I really missed my
country
minutes, 27 seconds. Donna
Robertson, a 21-year-old student
from Houston, Texas, was the
Overall Female winner of the 2.5
mile race with a time of 18
minutes, 30 seconds while Ellen
Bond, an ECU graduate student,
was the 5.0 mile winner running
the race in 34 minutes, 16
seconds.
Get ready now for these races.
Time is growing short for train-
ing
Remember all ECU students,
faculty, staff and ECU alumni
are invited to participate in one
or both of the races. Sign up at
the Intramural-Recreational Ser-
vices office in Room 204
Memorial Gymnasium. Come on
out and join the fun Homecom-
ing Day morning, Saturday, Oc-
tober 20, 1984 at 9:00 a.m.
a.m
You must register
October ?f
Greenville Flower Shop
For All Your Homecoming Flowers
1027 Evans Street
(corner of 11th and Evans St.)
Special Rate For Groups
Master Charge Visa Welcome
enensons-
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i





i
16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 18. 1984
East Tennessee State Looks For Fifth Win
Back on Track: East Tennessee
State, under second-year Head
Coach Buddy Sasser, is experien-
cing a resurgence in 1984.
Sasser has the Bucs at 4-2
through six games, even after
suspending five starters when the
Bucs were 3-1. Among those
starters were quarterback Keith
Harris, flanker Frank Armstrong
and running back Henry Latham.
East Tennessee State has not
experienced a winning season
since 1981 when Jack Carlisle
guided the Bucs to a 6-5 mark.
This season has seen the Bucs
defeat nationally-ranked UT-
Chattanooga, 1982 NCAA Divi-
sion I-AA national champion
Eastern Kentucky while losing a
heart-breaking 28-16 contest to
No. 6 Furman last week. The
Bucs led 16-6 at the half. This is
also the best start for an East
Tennessee State team since that
same 1981 season when the Bucs
were an identical 4-2 after six
games.
Winning Season Slips Away:
Head Coach Ed Emory's chances
of a winning 1984 season slipped
away with last week's 31-20 loss
to the Tulsa Golden Hurricane in
Tulsa's Skelly Stadium.
The Pirates can now do no bet-
ter than 5-6 this season and
would have to win their last four
to accomplish that. It is the first
losing season for ECU since 1981
when the Pirates posted a 5-6
mark in Emory's second season
as head coach.
Under Emory, East Carolina
put together back-to-back im-
pressive seasons in both 1982 and
1983, posting 7-4 and 8-3 records,
respectively.
Better Than 1983: East Tennessee
Spikers Lose Five
Bv TONY BROWN
SUff VkrtUf
The ECU volleyball record
plunged to 2-12 as the Pirates suf-
fered five straight match losses in
a tournament at Wake Forest last
weekend.
While extending their losing
streak to eight in a row, the team
only picked up two game wins in
the three-of-five matches, with
one of those coming in overtime.
During most of the other mat-
ches, ECU was overwhelmed as
the team seemed confused as they
were penalized for playing out of
position three times.
Here are the match results:
ECU vs. Stetson � 4-15, 4-15,
8-15.
ECU vs. Wake Forest � 1-15,
8-15, 10-15.
ECU vs. Furman � 2-15, 3-15,
0-15.
ECU vs. UNC-Charlotte �
0-15, 18-16, 3-15, 6-15.
ECU vs. Stetson � 15-10,
11-15, 4-15, 6-15.
The Pirates will attempt to re-
bound Oct. 23 as they travel to
Fayetteville to face Methodist
College and Pembroke State.
State, in just six games this
season, has already surpassed its
win output of 1983. Last year the
Bucs could manage victories in
just three of their 11 games, while
this year Coach Buddy Sasser's
crew has four victories to its
credit in just six games.
Another note on East Ten-
nessee State: the Bucs have ex-
perienced winning seasons only
twice since 1971, those coming in
1979 (7-4) and the already men-
tioned 1981 (6-5). Both were
under Jack Carlisle.
Nichols Continues To Move Up:
With his two catches for 20 yards
against Tulsa last week, senior
flanker Ricky Nichols continued
his climb in the ECU record
book.
The senior from Chesapeake,
Va now has 51 career receptions
to his credit, pulling him even
with Bob Grant (65-67) for No. 7
on the all-time receptions list.
Nichols just needs two catches
for jump into the No. 6 spot, sur-
passing Norwood Vann's 52
career catches. Nichols is just
seven shy of the No. 5 spot (58,
Tim Dameron) and eight shy of
the No. 4 slot (59, Stan Eure).
Nichols would need 22 catches in
ECU's last four games to take
over No. 3, which is owned by
Terry Gallaher (72 catches).
Nichols also has 933 career
receiving yards to his credit, pull-
ing him closer to the No. 4 mark
on the school's all-time list.
Nichols needs 90 yards to equal
Dave Bumgarner's 1,023 yards
receiving.
Heath And The Record Book:
Junior placekicker Jeff Heath
continues his assault on ECU's
career scoring list. The Virginia
Beach native accounted for eight
of East Carolina's 20 points a
week ago against Tulsa, giving
him 163 career points in his two-
plus seasons.
That leaves Heath just one
point shy of tying for the No. 5
spot on ECU's career scoring list.
With four games still to play
Heath could easily move into the
No. 3 spot before the 1984 season
concludes.
The people in front of Heath
are as follows: 1. Carlester
Crumpler (1971-73)222; 2.
Dave Alexander (1963-65)204;
3. Anthony Collins
(1977-80) 176; 4. Bill Lamm
(1977-80) 167; 5. Butch Colson
(1967-69) 164; Kenny Strayhorn
(1967-69). .164; 7 Jeff Heath
(1982- ). .163.
Heath is also the owner of the
school's career field goal record,
which he broke with his 40-yard
effort against Central Michigan
on Sept. 15, Heath now has 32
career field goals, which easily
surpasses the previous record of
26 held by Bill Lamm.
Heath's average for his 32 suc-
cessful field goals is 37.4 yards.
Heath's average for his 21 un-
successful field goal attempts is
38.9.
Heath's average for his 53 total
field goal attempts is 38.0.
Britt Plays First Game: Head
Coach Ed Emory has made it a
habit over the last two seasons to
redshirt as many of his incoming
freshmen as possible. But against
Tulsa last week Emory used the
first player from his 1984
recruiting class in linebacker
John Britt.
From Hampton, Va Brut
assisted on two tackles during his
limited playing time. A year ago
Emory used only two players
from his 1983 recriting class, with
one being current starting
quarterback Darrell Speed.
Pirates vs Southern Conference:
Since leaving the Southern Con
ference following the 1976 season
the Pirates have never lost to a
SC opponent.
East Carolina is 11-0 since the
1977 season, and 5-0 against the
Southern Conference under Ed
Emorv.
�:
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Mon Wed Fri. - 9am-5pm
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Sat. -9am-lpm
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Over 550 Wines, Wine Tastings, !
Gourmet Foods, Imported Cheeses, I I APPoilments are helpful
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Party and Cheese Trays, Coffee
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I ECU STUDENTS RECEIVE 15 7o OFF I
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Pre-OT Mixer
for all pre-occupational therapy
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Thurs. Oct. 25th 7:00-9:00
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room
Casual Dress.
Refreshment.

Activities
OT slide show
Speaker
Display of OT equipment
Jr. & Sr. OT's will be there for reference
Informal questionsanswers
Buy, Sell
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1:
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OPENS OCTOBER 19
M
Saturday - After Homecoming
Special
2 For 1 Drinks All Night
Top 0 and Best in Beach
All ECU Alumni Free Admission
Doors Open at 9:30
T
ETSL at ECL
BOSTON COI L at WEST A
WAKE FOREST at VIRGINIA
VANDERBILI at GEORGIA
ALABAMA at TENNESSKI
ARKANSAS at TEXAS
SYRACUSE at PENN ST.
OLE MISS at SOUTHERN MIS
SOTTH CAROLINA at NOIRF
ARIZONA at SOI THERNA!
OHIO ST. at MICHIGAN M
N.C. STATE at UN
LSI at KENTl ik
MICHIGAN at lOW A
PURDUE at ILLINOIS
GA. TECH at Al Bl RN
DIKE at CLEMSON
PITT at MIAMI
Experts Race
Scott Powers
Sad Sam
Tina Maroschak
Jennifer Jendraiak
Rand) Mews
Greg Rideout
I as!
Week
13-3
11-5
11-5
12-4
9-
12-4
As the pane! was chugs .
last few beers down last nis
the local hangout, one man had
more of a reason to chug a Ul
harder :han everyone else
Rideout.
"I've been going ut
with my picks and i
come back the Red One .
"but it's casual
Meanwhile, the new
Scott Powers, was bus c
over his recent u.ce
others.
"Where's the con
rogant one gloated. "I ki
Mews is stupid, but I didn't ex-
pect everyone else to just quit
To which the Muser answered.
"If I'm so damn stupid, then 'e
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��

�I







THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 18, 1984 17
th Win
cshmen .in possible But against
rulsa last ueek Emor used the
playei from his 1984
thing in linebacker
John B
rom Hampton. Va . Bntt
is- two tackles during his
playing lime yeai ago
onl) two plaers
om h )$ i -ass, with
eni starting
. Da Speed.
Pirates s Southernonference:
S iving the So ithern Con-
1976 season
�Sl to a
since the
tgainst the
T Mixer
itional therapy
5th 7:00-9:00
Itipurpose Room
Casual Dress.
Refreshment.
The Experts Pick The Winners
ETSl at ECU
BOSTON COLL. at WEST VA.
WAKE FOREST at VIRGINIA
VANDERBILT at GEORGIA
ALABAMA at TENNESSEE
ARKANSAS at TEXAS
SYRACUSE at PENN ST.
OLE MISS at SOUTHERN MISS
SOUTH CAROLINA at NOTRE DAME
ARIZONA at SOUTHERN CAL
OHIO ST. at MICHIGAN ST.
N.C. STATE at UNC
LSI at KENTUCKY
MICHIGAN at IOWA
PURDUE at ILLINOIS
GA. TECH at Al BURN
DUKE at CLEMSON
PITT at MIAMI
POWERS
ECU
Boston Coll.
Wake
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Penn St.
Ole Miss
South Car.
use
Ohio St.
UNC
LSU
Iowa
Illinois
Auburn
Clemson
Miami
SAD SAM
ECU
Boston Coll
Wake
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Penn St.
Ole Miss
Notre Dame
use
Ohio St.
UNC
LSU
Iowa
Illinois
Auburn
Clemson
Miami
MAROSCHAK
ETSU
Boston Coll
Wake
Georgia
Alabama
Texas
Syracuse
Ole Miss
South Car.
use
Ohio St.
N.C. State
LSU
Iowa
Illinois
Auburn
Clemson
Miami
MEWSJENDRASIAKRIDEOUT
ECUECUECU
Boston Coll.Boston CollBoston C oil
VirginiaVirginiaWake
GeorgiaGeorgiaGeorgia
TennesseeAlabamaAlabama
TexasTexasTexas
Penn St.Penn St.Syracuse
Ole MissOle MissOle Miss
South Car.Notre DameSouth Car.
useuseuse
Ohio St.Ohio St.Ohio St.
UNCNCSUUNC
LSULSULSU
IowaMichiganIowa
IllinoisPurdueIllinois
AuburnAuburnAuburn
ClemsonClemsonClemson
MiamiMiamiMiami
Experts Race Opens Up
uipment
jl! be there for reference
n an.sners
Scott Powers
Sad Sam
Iina Maroschak
Jennifer Jendrasiak
Ranch Mews
Greg Hideout
I ast
Ueek
13-3
11-5
11-5
12-4
9-7
12-4
Overall
56-32
54-34
52-36
50-38
50-38
47-41
Pet.
.636
.614
.594
.568
.568
.534
Games
Behind
2
4
6
6
9
As the panel was chugging the
last tew beers down last night at
the local hangout, one man had
Inore of a reason to chug a little
"harder than eeryone else. Greg
iRideout.
"Ive been going out on a limb
with my picks and 1 just can't
tome back the Red One sighed,
� 'but it's casual
Meanwhile, the new leader,
Scot: Powers, was busy gloating
oor his recent success to the
bthers.
"Where's the comp the ar-
rogant one gloated. "1 know
Mews is stupid, but 1 didn't ex-
pect everyone else to just quit
To which the Muser answered.
"If I'm so damn stupid, then tell
me why I your boss
Sad Sam cracked a smile as
Scott was dumbfounded. He
knew he'd been laid low, so he
got another beer and retreated
silently.
All the while, Jennifer Jen-
drasiak and Tina Maroschak
were plotting their strategy to
make a comeback. "I'm not go-
ing to ask my boyfriend any
more Tina whispered. "I'm
just falling further behind
"At least you've got a
boyfriend Jennifer answered.
The picks were passed in and
everyone drifted off into the
night. It looks as if they stayed in
the bar a little too long.
Go Pirates!
� a
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f





18
THEJEAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 18 1
S84
Bomb squad, Garrett Five-O Meet In Finals
ByJEANNETTEROTH
Staff Write!
They're here! The games
you've been waiting foi. The
finals of the Intramural Flag
Football season are upon us. The
men's All-Campus Champion-
ship game will be between two of
the remaining three division win-
ning teams.
Winning the men's Indepen-
dent division in a spectacular bat-
tle with the 1 ake Boys, the
Bomb squad has found
themselves again at the top of the
heap. Their first game in the
single elimination bracket will be
against the fraternity winners
Sigma Phi Epsilon. The winner
of the contest will have to face
Garrett Five-O for the final
championship game. Five-O
humiliated the Slay Miners, 39-6,
to win the Residence Hall divi-
sion last week. It all comes down
to Thursday night as the cham-
pionship game in the men's divi-
sion will be held on IM field no. 2
at 7:00 p.m.
The female finale will also be
played this week, three teams
have made it to the All Campus
Finals, winning their divisions
last week. The Naturals, led by
the offense of Ginger Rothermed
and defense of LuAnne Outlaw
will face off against either the
Slay Mamas or the Sororitv divi-
sion winner Alpha Phi, who
defeated the Tri Sigs 1-0. Look
for game results and champions
in next Tuesdays issue.
Three-on-Three basketball
playoffs are underway now that
fall break has passed. In women's
action five teams will go for the
gold as the Enforcers, Le Slam,
Umstead Jockettes, Super Girls
and Always Ready hoop it up in
playoff action. Men's action will
continue this week with the
champion being crowned on the
18th. Find out if The Fellows can
overcome the slamming power of
the other competitors.
Tennis action abounds as
open, intermediate and women's
Netters Fall To 2-5
Jackets Prepare For
Dye's Auburn Team
ATI AM A (L PI) � Robert
Lavette concedes it is unlikely
that Georgia lech can win the
Atlantic Coast Conference after a
loss Md a tie in its first two
league games, but the standout
running back still feels that
Yellow Jackets have a shot at a
bowl bid.
�1: will be tough to win the
ACC now said Lavette, only
two vards off the conference
rushing lead with 592 yards in
five games "We don't plav
Marv land (2-0) and the only team
that should be able to beat them
is Ciemson and that won't count
cause Ciemson is on proba-
;).
"Still, it we win our last si
games, we can get a eood bowl
bid
That's a tall order. The Yellow
lackets upset Alabama and
mson during a 3-0 start, but
then lost to N.C. State and tied
Virginia � in games in which
;hev were favored Now comes
Auburn and Tennessee back to
back and the Jackets don't figure
to win either of those games.
"I'm glad to get back to the
ca-v pan of our schedule Tech
coach BUI Currv said tongue in
cheek "Auburn (a 10-point
favorite) is awesome as usual.
(Auburn quarterback) Pat
Washington is far more effective
than he was against Miami and
Texas (when Auburn, now 4-2.
opened 0-2).
"They look like they ma be as
good � i b dy nght now
Currj oss to N.C.
State "was a big downer. What
impeedeJ us was all the tension
after the third (Ciemson) game.
Evervbody was reading their clip-
pings instead of thinking about
the next game
But Curry said the tie at
Virginia was even more
frustrating.
"1 can onlv remember one
other game in 30 years in which a
team 1 was connected with so
ipletely dominated playing
time and came away without a
victory said Curry. "We had
numerous chances to put it away
in the first half and didn't do it.
It is very unusual to run off 92
plays and not win
"We got stopped on the one
and intercepted another time
after we got to their 15 said
Lavette, who rushed for 161
yards against Virginia. "Our big-
gest problem has been not taking
advantage of our scoring oppor-
tunities
�V if Auburn wouldn't be
tough enough anyway, it looks
like Georgia Tech will be missing
its top two fullbacks Saturday
h th both starter Keith Glanton
and backup Chuck Easley listed
as questionable.
"It's a great concern to us
aid Curry. "If they can't play,
we're considering a lot of things.
Dave Pasanella (the no. 3
fullback) is ready and (reserve
tailback) Joel Carter can plav
fullback
Curry said he was considering
shifting second-string tailback
Malcolm King to fullback and
possibly even using starting tight
end Ken Whisenhunt there if he is
needed.
"Auburn is one of those really
strong teams that lost a great
player (Ail-American running
back Bo Jackson), but has rallied
to find other ways to win said
Curry "Anyone who thought
they would be hampered offen-
sively by the loss of Jackson has
learned otherwise.
"They have started throwing
the football with Washington
more than they have in the past
said Curry. "Their wishbone
presents us with such different
kinds of preparation problems
Georgia Tech safety Cleve
Pounds said scrambling quarter-
backs, like Washington, "have
hurt us, forcing our coverage to
break down. We've got to learn
to adjust
Curry said he hopes Georgia
Tech doesn't find itself in a high
scoring game similar to the one
Auburn played this past Saturday
when the Tigers outgunned
Florida State, 42-41.
A game like Auburn-Florida
State would not be good for us
said curry. "I like to think our
defense would hold up better
than that. I don't like to get into
shoot-outs
Bv JULIE RICHMOND
Staff Wrltrr
The ECU men's tennis team
fell to 2-5 for the season after a
8-1 loss to N.C. State last Thurs-
day.
Things looked easy for number
three seeded David Turner with a
great performance and a 6-2, 6-4
win over NCSU's Mark Blankin-
ship giving the Pirates their only
win of the day. Coach Pat Sher-
man said, "I was very pleased
with David's performance. He
played his best singles match of
this season.
The Pirates had three singles
matches to split sets but were
unable to obtain wins. "Greg
Willis and Galen Treble played
fantastic first sets. Galen was up
4-1 on his serve in the second set
but let it slip away 7-5 said
Coach Sherman.
The number two doubles team
of Willis and Turner played an
excellent first set and were up 5-2
on their serve in the second set.
Careless errors cost them the se-
took the
cond set and NCSU
match 4-6, 7-5, 6-2.
"We've been playing very poor
doubles up to this meet Sher-
man added. "The doubles teams
were changed this past week and
we saw our finest doubles of the
season from our number one
(Scott A very and David Creech)
and number three (Treble and
Davis Bagley) teams
The number two team (Willis
and Turner) has been consistently
good and just suffered their se-
cond loss of the season 4-6, 7-5,
6-2 to NCSU.
The men will be competing in
the Wilmington Invitation on Oc-
tober 19 and 20 against South
Carolina State, Campbell and
UNC-Wilmington.
October 25-28, the men com-
pete in the ECAC-South Con-
ference Tournament to close out
their fall season. Teams com-
peting are Navy, Richmond,
William and Mary, James
Madison, George Mason, and
UNC-W.
divisions prepare tor playoff ac-
tion. The top three seeds facing
off in the female division will be
Lisa Ramey, Suette Best and
Melanie Reid. In the men's in-
termediate division, nine players
remain. The championship match
must be played by Oct. 25 so
players will be bounced out in the
single elimination tournament
soon. Twenty men are still going
for the open division champion-
ship. The final game will be
played on Oct. 29.
Remember that volleyball and
the track meet will begin its
registration on Oct. 22. Anyone
interested in officiating volleyball
should come to the clinic on Oct.
22 at 6:00 p.m. in room 102
Memorial Gym.
Run for vour life Two cross
campus races will be held
Homecoming Day, October 20
A 2.5 mile race will start at 9:00
a.m. and a 5.0 mile race will �
at 9:30 a.m. Both races K.
near the bleachers at the E I
track. Bunting field. Sign up ai
in room
04
must bi
I tobei
the IM office
Memorial Gym. You
registered bv 8:45 a.m.
20.
IRS Bowling, Soccer, I
Basketball. Racquet ball and
Punt, Pass and Kick contest an
close at hand. Sneaker Sam will
be there to report all the action in
upcoming editions of the Ea l
Carolinian. Remember � Pai
ticipate rather than specta
through intramurals!
�ccc
FLY THL PURPLE AND GOLD
TV

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i
P






Title
The East Carolinian, October 18, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 18, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.368
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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