The East Carolinian, October 11, 1984






She tEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carohna campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No. 15
Thursdav October 11. 1984
Greenville, N.C.
16 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Campus Welcomes Rufus Edmisten
By JENNIFER JFNDRASIAK
ECU has received its fair share
of campaigning political can-
didates this year, and one more
was added to the list yesterday
when N.C. Democratic Guber-
natorial Candidate and State At-
torney General Rufus Edmisten
visited the campus.
Edmisten, who was making a
campaign sweep throughout the
eastern part of the state, spent
approximately 30 minutes in
Mendenhall Student Center
speaking with students and facul-
ty.
As governor, Edmisten said, he
would have something to otter
college students because he has
dealt with "everyday problems"
during his tenure as attorney
general. "There have been many
times when I've helped college
students who were ripped off by
consumer fraud he said. "I've
battled time and time again to
keep electricity and phone rates
down. 1 remember a controversy
at Carolina where they were over-
charging students at Carolina for
their phones and we took their
(the students) side
"I think college students are
much more concerned about so-
meone who is going to be for the
average everyday working man
and woman and that is what I've
been as attorney general he ad-
ded.
Edmisten said he feels college
students are "thinking conser-
vatively these days but said this
"doesn't mean anything
dramatic is happening
A recent Charlotte Observer
poll showed Edmisten with a
large lead over Republican Oppo-
nent James Martin. "It will not
hold Edmisten said. "The race
will tighten up dramatically, I've
predicted that all along
Edmisten added that he did not
feel strong state support for
President Reagan will hurt his
chances for election. "I have my
own coattails consisting of literal-
ly thousands of people I've
helped over the years he said.
Concerning Eddie Knox's re-
cent support of Reagan, Ed-
misten said he "hasn't given it
two seconds thought He added
"that's one family supporting so-
meone else and I've got
thousands of families supporting
me � you can't get hung up on
one person
The state senate race has over-
shadowed the gubernatorial race,
Edmisten said, and people are
not as aware of the issues as they
should be. He said he has most of
his support in the eastern and
western parts of the state and has
concentrated his campaigning
there.
"I concentrate on the counties
that have been good to me and
the counties that have been left
out in eastern and western North
Carolina he said.
In response to a recent Martin
campaign request for a grand
jury investigation into the con-
tributions of a Wilson man. Ed-
misten said the Martin campaign
"must be desperate
The request concerns a $10,000
donation from a man on whose
behalf Edmisten filed a friend of
the court brief. Edmisten said the
two actions were unrelated,
although separated by only a
month's time.
"There were no improprieties
in the situation he said.
Edmisten also said recent
charges of accepting campaign
contributions from children were
Edmisten
unfounded "We have hundred
of thousands of contributions
coming in all the time with no
ages attached. The law doesn't
require ages to be attached he
said. "We asked ;he State Elec-
tions Board what to do. Thev
said 'give it back ' We gave it
back and that that
Independent Living Paper
To Be Presented In Israel
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo L�b
ECU Student Ricky Creech, an English major, will present a paper on handicaps in Israel this November.
At Meeting
Speaker Confirms Policy
Veteran foreign correpson-
dent, best-selling author and lec-
turer Arnaud de Borchgrave
spoke to about 60 ECU students
and faculty on Tuesday, saying
that during the Reagan ad-
ministration "the Soviet drive
to dominate the world has made
no progress. This is not campaign
rhetoric; it is a geopolitical fact
of life
De Borchgrave served for 30
years with Newsweek magazine
as an editor and Chief Foreign
Correspondent. During that time
he covered 17 wars and 90 coun-
tries, interviewed many of the
world's leading statesmen, and
won prestigious journalism
awards. He is now a Senior
Associate at the Georgetown
University Center for Strategic
and International Studies and is
co-editor of a confidential mon-
thly Intelligence digest.
De Borchgrave devoted much
of his talk to terror and Soviet
disinformation. He stated that
terror is used almost exlusively by
Marxists and can have a tremen-
dous impact on world politics.
He reminded his audience that
"two suicidal killers used truck
bombs to unravel the American
position in Lebanon and change
the course of history He warn-
ed that terrorism is heading for
America and quoted Libyan dic-
tator Muammar Khaddafi who
said, "We are now in a position
to export liquidation, terrorism,
and arson to America, and we'll
will do so if necessary
De Borchgrave described disin-
formation as the feeding of inac-
curate stories to the media, and
noted that the Soviet KGB, or
secret police, maintains a
separate department for the
manufacture of disinformation.
"To the Soviets, the telling and
spreading of lies becomes a moral
imperative if it advances Soviet
power He said that as a voung
journalist in Paris, he was twice
approached by Soviet agents who
told him they could help him ad-
vance his career if he would agree
to spread disinformation in the
West.
As an example of disinforma-
tion, De Borchgrave discussed
the letters sent last summer,
allegedly by the Ku Klux Klan, to
several African nations, warning
them that their athletes at the Los
Angeles Olympics might be kill-
ed. Widely publicized by the
Soviet media, the letters were
pronounced by the U.S. Attorney
General William French Smith as
Soviet forgeries, the goal of
which was to get African nations
to join the Soviet boycott of the
Olympics.
De Borchgrave estimated that
1,000 disinformation items are
sent out annually by the Soviets
with only a few ever uncovered.
"Part of the goal of disinforma-
tion is to distort people's percep-
tion of reality said De Bor-
chgrave. "Soviet disinformation
has led us to believe 'detente' and
'peaceful co-existence' are ways
to peace, yet the late Soviet dic-
tator Leonid Brezhnev described
them as tools for 'a shift in the
correlation of global forces
favoring Soviet power
He stated further that
"Americans are so confused by
disinformation, they cannot ap-
preciate their own victories He
cited the failed campaign to block
deployment of American Per-
shing II and cruise missiles in
Europe, and quoted French
foreign Minister Claude
Cheysson, who said, "You
Americans don't realize what a
big political victory that was. It's
the biggest victory since NATO's
inception De Borchgrave
believes the Soviets were behind
the anti-deployment campaign.
By HAROLDJOYNER
Vulitiaf Nf�l fdllnr
Ricky Creech, a senior major-
ing in English, has been invited to
present a paper at an Interna-
tional Symposium for Disabled
Persons in Tel-Aviv, Israel.
Creech, who is physically im-
paired, was quite surprised at his
invitation to present his paper en-
titled. Independent Living And
The Aid. He said, "I received
word from the Prentike Romich
Company that the Symposium
asked me to present an abstract.
Since I had never written a paper
like that before, I though it was
quite strange Creech said the
PRC is a corporation which deals
with communication aids for the
severly handicapped
He said he helped the com-
pany, which is located in Ohio,
develop a speaking aid for
physically impaired persons call-
ed MinSpeak. The MinSpeak is a
computer designed so the person
can call up a particular pre-
programmed key and a complete
phrase is revealed.
Though this is not the first
paper he has presented. Creech
expressed his excitement about
going to a foreign land to talk
about independent living. He will
be leaving for Israel on Nov. p
and returning to Greenville Nov
24. Creech saidIt will be very
interesting to find out how
foreigners react. I can't wait to
express my ideas and exchange
information with the other peo-
ple
Assisting Creech with his travel
abroad will be Tee D.tz. Once he
arrives in Israel he will be enjoy-
ing the company of other
students fron. countries such as
United Kingdom, Norway, and
Denmark. "It should be an ex-
perience I'll never forget
SGA President John Ramey
said the cost of Creech's trip was
defrayed by an SGA appropria-
tion of SI,209. "Although the
amount only covered half of the
cost, Rainey aid, "I feel :t will
help Ricky out tremendously
After all, it is quite an honor to
be aked to present a paper in
another country. I'm sure he'll
represent the universitv well
Mvra Cain, assistant to the
Vice-Chancellor of Academic Af-
fairs. Angelo Volpe, said the Of-
fice of Instition of Advancement
was donating some money, along
with the university. "I think it is
just great that we have a student
at this university who is so
gifted Cam also said the Office
of Handicapped Students was not
able to obtain any funds from the
General Admistratior.
becausethe funds are used
more for learning equipment
rather than personal sponsorship
Upon graduation from ECU,
Creech plans to attend graduate
school either at the University of
Virginia or at Richmond He
plans to pursue a degree in
psychology, he said.
SGA Has Annual Conference
Bv HAROLD JOYNER
VuUUal Newi MHor
The SGA recently held its an-
nual leadership conference for
new legislators, giving them a
chance to hear various speakers
talk about the successful
politically involved student.
"The purpose of this meeting
was to offer the newly elected
legislators a chance to become
aquainted with each other and to
learn about various duties and
responsibilities SGA President
John Rainey said
There was a brief welcome by
Chancellor Howell, who spoke
on the necessity of their duty to
success. He emphasized to the
students, "success comes from
those who are willing to accept
the responsibility.
Also speaking at the con-
ference was Dr. Lawerence
Hough, associate professor of
political science. He encouraged
the students to continue their
goals and never give up. He
strongly urged the students to
take advantage of their greatest
asset: youth. "Use your energy
and exuberance he said, "to
bring out your best leadership
qualities
Kirk Shelley, who was elected
Speaker of the Legislature
earlier, reviewed various
parlimentary procedures. "You
must be familiar with the rules
he said, "or the entire procedure
will not be as effective as it in-
tended to be
The legislators then separated
into various groups where they
were informed by SGA officers
of the individual group's pur-
poses and the significance of their
functions.
the committee at the SGA
meetings and then debated on.
Kirk Shelley informed the
Judiciary committee of its goals
and expectations. They will be
responsible for checking out con-
stitutions of organizations and
making sure monies appropriated
to them do not discriminate
against students.
The Student Welfare Commit-
tee was informed of procedures
by SGA Vice-President Mike
McPartland. He said members of
this committee will be responsible
for originating and referring
ideas to the SGA. For example,
he said, a concern of covered
shelters over bicycle racks will be
considered and be brought up at
John Rainey ana SGA Treasurer tne $GA meeting
Georgia Mooring told the
legislators the basic function of
the Budget and Appropriations
Committee. Rainey said, "This
committee will review how stu-
dent's activity fees are allocated.
The bills will be brought up by
Due to fall break, the regular
SGA meeting will not convene
until Thursday. Oct. 18. C.
Ralph Kinsey. Chairman of the
ECU Board of Trustees, will be
the featured speaker, according
to Rainev.
Hunt Attacks Helms' Conservative 'Empire9
(UPI) � Gov. James Hunt at-
tacked the political "empire" of
Sen. Jesse Helms Wedneday, say-
ing the conservative Republican
has neglected North Carolina in
favor of his right-wing causes.
Hunt, who is challenging
Helms in his bid for a third term,
said Helms' stands are "directly
contrary to the interests of our
vative Washington appoint-
ments, right-wing, out-of-state
contributors and "personal
political machine" including the
Raleigh-based National Con-
gressional Club and Jefferson
Marketing.
"The Helms empire lies at the
center of a national network of
ultra-right groups. They are well
people and playing directly to the organized and well financed. And
needs" of groups outside the
state.
"He's not working on the
things the people of North
Carolina care about Hunt said
at a news conference. "His agen-
da is not our agenda
Hunt used a large poster to il-
lustate what he called "Helms,
Inc He outlined Helms' conser-
their hero is Jesse Helms, not
Ronald Reagan or George
Bush
The news conference and two
30-second television commericals
unveiied Tuesday were'he newest
segments to unseat Helms.
One Hunt commercial con-
nects Helms with Moral Majority
leader Jerry Falwell, Texas oil
billionaire Nelson Bunker Hunt
and the National Congressional
Club's Tom Ellis.
"It takes the campaign a step
beyond the Helms record and
answers the questions why he's
voted this way said Hunt
spokesmn Will Marshall. "It sup-
plies the motive, 'Why does Jesse
Helms do such a poor job in
representing the interest of North
Carolina
"The answer is he's been play-
ing to the audience of the far
right ad building this empire
Marshall said Hunt needed to
outline Helms congressional
record early in the campaign
before raising the question of
motive, which he said was the
"next logical step
Hunt said he did not mean to
suggest that Helms' support from
groups like the Moral Majority
and the John Birch Society is il-
legal.
"Far from that. He has a right
to do it Hunt said "I'm just
saying it's the wrong agenda. If
you're spending your time on
this, you're not helping" North
Carolina. Helms spokesman
Claude Allen called Hunt's
allegations "a bunch of
malarkey" and the strategy
"desperation tactics" that will
backfire.
"As chairman of the Senate
Agriculture Committee, the
senator is in the best position to
help North Carolina beacause
agriculture is North Carolina
Allen said.
"I remind the governor the
senator is still in Washington
Allen said. "The Senate is in ses-
sion, and he is working for North
Carolina. It is Gov. Hunt who
himself said that he considers
campaigning a 'full-time' job as
opposed to doing the respon-
siblities or duties of the
governor
At his news conference, Hunt
acknowledged he is suppported
bv Liberal groups outside North
Carolina but dented he would do
their bidding in Washinton.
"I don't think I can be
characterized as a liberal of any
strife Hunt said.
The
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features7
Classifieds10
Sports12
�This issue features a special
section with pictures of this
year's Homecoming Court.
See Features, pages 9 and 10.
�Scott Cooper takes an up
close and personal look at
Stefon Adams. See Sports,
page 12.

.
- ,���,��
�. �
��ii ji
����
mmmmmm
f '

i

� f





-IMilASTCAROLINIAN
OCTOBER II. 1984
SKATING PARTY
The Ze'a �"� Se'a Sorority is sponsoring a
�a" -9 oa"v a' Soosworid The skatino oerty
behelOOcI II om'oorMp.ni Aoml.
s o- s $' 5C ac � ck.es can oe BouoM from any
- �. eoe' if iteres'ed. caii 752 1M1 or
APO RUSH
If you -e eresfec " eadershio. friendshi
a service men vou shouia a"end Ruth on Oct.
: a"c Alpha Pfi Omega National CoM
Scv :f Frj'f s ?cx 15 (c people who ar�
-�e-esec - serving -he caois, community,
anc'e-a-on Rus aa'es are Oc' �. 7fgm In
Menaenh�' Co'teehouse Oct 10 TuntH at 41
HBrr age Mouse ana Oct n. 7� pm in
Wendenha Coe and join a coed fraternity
�r-a' se-ve;
� . CIRCLE K
ECU CirceX CfWj invitM �OV �� eem, ��, aja�J
�ofi bsw5ftiij everv-Tuelday nipht a
' 00 p m In Vendenhali 'oom 771 for fun en
soc ailing nope �o see you there
ASSERTIVENESS TRAINING
A h'� par' worn shop ofereJ to stvdents at
NO COST by tne University Counseling Center
Thurs Oct '( J5 and Ncv 1 AM three iMkM
� be conoucteO from 3 4 p m in 30 Wright An-
ne 751 ��' I Tne workshop will focus on help-
ing rr-ttfi distinguish between their ihc
tive. aggressive, and n0nassertlve behavters.
Participant can learn how to ��p'�n
nese:ves d'rectly and openly, end raspon te
interpersonal situations m a manner which
neither compromises individual belief ner et-
�ends others Please call counseling center for
registration 17576441)
STUDENT LEGISLATURE
A very important organizing meeting for the
Oct 1931 1 C will be held wed , Oct 17 atp.m.
on the second ioor lobby o Mendenhall A shert
Panamentar , Procedure workshop will be he�tf.
All member planning t0 go to the I.e. er atvetf
to attend bringing $5 for the fair ticket.
ADVISORY COUNCIL
The Graduate Advisory Council will hofp It
Oct meeting on Oct l at 4 p m In Brewster
B 104 Don t torget the Mappv HourDinner at
5 00 at New Deli following the meeting. Pleas
let aH graduate student in your department
�now they are invited to attend!
INTRAMURAL
A Sat drop m class has been added to the
schedule of classes offered In the Dept. of In-
tramural and Recreational Service. Thi will be
a drop m class Charge 50 cent per class Te
register go by Memorial Gym 104 between
8 30 4 00 on Oct 15 19
HOMECOMING
Needed immediately, interested student and
service organization t0 help blow up biltaont
before the Homecoming Parade on Oct. JO In-
terested persons should contact Betty Peter a
355 6705 before Oct 11
INTRAMURALS
Memorial Gym weight Room will be open far
Paculfy and Staff use Mon , Wed end Fri.
ingfrom7lam beginning Oct 77 throve Dec.
SCUBA DIVING
Thanksgiving vacation Dive Cotumel,
ico t days. 7 night on the beautiful Vueataei
Penninsui Drift diving on the Palancer reef
will be one of the moot exiting experience Pro
Roielgn, pnce Including air fore. moon. 1 poping,
and diving MB 00 special price for non diver -
5770 00 Air travel provided by Mexican and
E�trn. For registration and further Inform
tlon, coll Roy Schorf, oir of Acqvatlcs T7-e441.
ENCOUNTER CHRIST
Do you oftn wonder If you're the only one In
thi wrld feeling 0 certoln wy? Do you ever foot
Ilk tossing your books aside and lust tolkln)
Wall then, make an Encounfer-wlth-Chrlst
weekend Oct 25-11. Meet students from varieu
campuses withlng hi C if a terrific opportunity
to rolox and devote a ipng wk�nd to yoyl Per
mor Info, call Fr. Terry at the Mowmpn Center
�t 753 4314
BE A CLOWN
Join in on the Spirit of ECU hornecorninf. Be a
clown In the 1B4 homecoming parade In-
terested persons should contact Betsy Peters at
35�05 by Oct n,le. Participants must re-
vido their own costumes. Wo will provid
balloon to pas out on parade rout.
Announcements
SAT Scores Jump
INTERNATIONAL TRAOE
ADMINISTRATION
. Currents there are graduate n�
undergraduate co op position available for spr-
ing st International Trade Adminijtratlon in
various areas of the u S Requirement major
m economics international traderelation.
marketing business anaor finance, public ad-
ministration, computer science and moufri�
POhcv ana!�s-s Undergraduates must have
mm,mum overall GPA of 3 5 and a 7 f GPA in
ma,or course worn Deadline i October 1$.
Saiarv ranges irom $12 000 to 117.000 See your
coop oft.ce in Rawi 313 ASAP These petitions
AHPAT
The All cd He�:th Pro'essions Admiuion Test
w.ii be ottered at East Carolina university on
Saturoa. November 194 Application b'enk
art t0 oe completed and mailed to The
psvch0 ogcai Corp 7500 old Oak Blvd
Cleveland Oh.o 44'30 �o amVe by October 10.
"84 Applications may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center. Room 10J. Speight
Su'lOing
AEROBICS
Registration tor m REC Aerobic Fitness
classes begmoc ,j9 There will be � St mer-
it ng aroo m cia�s with injtructor Mark B'unet
Trie co' s 50 per lesson Come by Room 74
Vemor.a' Gym to rglSai or call ?S7-4Mr
PUBLIC RELATIONS
H you re a Marketing melor. we know yew
wih be nterested .n thi committee The Student
Un,on Pubi'C Relations and Publicity Committee
win package publicity and coordinate total pro-
motion o he Student Urnon The committee ��
-�o acceptng appications �or committee
"tempers co- more information, contact the
Stuoent Union Office at 757-411. osrl 710 or come
by the oH ce a' Room 534 Mendenheii Student
Ct
CATHOLICSTUDENTS
Sunday vass s ce'ebraea a' 11 30 a m m the
Biology ?f"�ii rm 1031 and at � 00 p m. at
the Newman Center 953 E 10th Sr For Informa-
� on ca Fr Terry 7S3 4216
SAM
Was aexletv for Advancement of Management
rill meet Wed Oct. 17. 3 pm in Rawl 104
' wfll be Mr Larry Good from Fountain
l Inc. � Maker of the "Executioner"
AH ttvdent and new members r urged to f
HOMECOMING
Tna �nfertlnment Committee for Momecom
In if seensermg Pep Rally, Thurs Oct is, at
1 p.m. Th Pep Rally begins on College Mill and
will preceed tome Campus Maii. am participant
�Pi ncauraBd to ttnd. A concert sponsored
by me Student Union will be hld in Wright
AwdHeriurn failawing the Pep Rally and will
feehyr the Pressure Boys
PSICHI
�S praduate school the next step for you? Com
and find SSJf. Five professor from Pychology
Oopt. will speak en graduate �chool entry nd re
pulrements n Thur Oct IS t 7 JO p m in
Ream l� Speight Alto tn important meeting for
all Pl Chi members will be Wed . Oct 17 at 5 X
p.m. In Pl Chi Library
REBEL
Writing contest deadline 1 Oct 7�, but we'll
take entrle a seen a we cn pet them You can
win J buck � BBSS for first place 175 for �econd
d SPP far third In both the poetry amj the prose
centts. This Is open to ECU ttudent only Br
ing you' entrl te th REBEL or Media Board
�wk on the second floor of the publications
bwikWnff. Inch) yaur nam. addrets and phone
. Art contests will be In early November
ALPHA PHI
All big brother art reminded to be at the
nous tonight at 4 15 to .nduct the new big
brother Picas wear coot and fie and be on
tlm. Remember our happy hour coming up at
tn Elbe Room Wed . Oct 17 Thi i definitely
ooing to be � great year
MAJOR ATTRACTIONS
The Student union Malor Attractions Commit
te will meet on Thur Oct 11 at 5 30 p m in
Room 34S of Mendenhall Student Center All
member and interested student are urged to
attend
VISUALARTS
The Student Union Visual Arts Committee will
meet on Thurs Oct II at 3 p m in Room 23
Mendenhall Student Center All members and in
�ere�ted students are urged to attend
PPHA
PPHA will hold its second meeting Thur Oct.
11 The Prt Professional Health Alliance will
meet Thurs for ,ts second meeting of the
semester All members and interested guest
are welcome to attend The meeting will be held
In Room 221 Mendenhall at 5 30 p.m
CLASSIFIED ADSName: Address: CifyStote:S Amount
Numner word
Rotes: 25 words or l�ss Srudenrs$2 00 Norvjtudents3 00 Eocri odditlonol word05 All boldface typp 1 00Bolcffoce (ye (no)
Phone: Student 10 number: Non-studentBc�ed (yes) Ine) Dated) od '0 aipeor
ooxei DOrOofn � pi J1 .UU DEADLINES: Turn In od to The Ecrst Corollnlan by 3 p.m. one business
dcry before publication. No ods will be accepted over ffx� phoo. All ods must
be prepaid. Pleoso notify Tne East Corolinian
Immeodiotely if your ad Is incorrect. W wi'l not be responsible for incor-
rect ods after the first day of publication.
P ntfrryv right to rtjtrt txy erf for UbH. ckrriirr or Sad tasi

HBLMSBUSTERS
Student Interested 'n joining the itudent for
Jim Muni should pie contac Sco" homes a-
7J-lt�J or Devig Brook at 712 51M
PUNT, PASS, AND KICK
Rfl�tr�tin for intramural Punt Pa�s and
kick competition win be held Oct 3 ig To
regltr come by Room 704 Memorial Gym or for
mere information, car '57 437
f(ON LANGUAGE
We will be having club meeting tonight
Thtrr Oct. 11 �f 7 p.m. t 731 MndenhM Dues
fer thf mfr are due tonight They are J10 for
the yeer nd S7 tor the metr we wm also be
havtnp cptloned movi (Th Fr�ncn Lt 's
Werner 1 Se, came en out and loin us!
PRIME TIME
Csmpus Crusade for Christ Is sponsoring
"Prime Time" this Thursday it 7 pm in the
Jenkins Aud (Art Bldg I Pl� loin u� for fun.
fflewhlp and Bible Study We are looking for
ward h meeting you
IBNATE COMMITTEES
Application are now being accepted for
students wishing te serve on University Commit
tees for 1)4-J school year Twenty one (71) tu
dnt wIHen are open Committee with vacan
cis ere: AlceneiOrug Education Committee
(1). Cammlrhte on Cnv��lno,Soliclt!ng on
Campus (1). Committee en Residence Life (II.
Committee en Statu of Minorities (4). Commit
tee en Stetv of Women (3), Committee on stu
4�t HMitk Swvko t, Mauetn Appeal (otf
catntsus student) l. Parking and Traffic Com
mis t). fchefar Weekend Committee (l)
AdmlMlene Committee (1). Career Education
Committee (1), Course Drop Appeal Committee
Ml. Pacutfy Computer Committee (l), General
Ceiktf (1), Student Scholarship. Fellowships.
end Financial Aid Cemmittee (1) Teaching El
'�ctlenea Cemmittee (3) Applications at
avaWaef at the following locations Office of the
Vice Chancellor for Student Life, 304 Whichard
Mendenhall Student Center information Desk
SOA OfHce. Mendenhall Student Center, Office
ef intremwrel-Recreatlonal Services, Memorial
Gym and Residence Hall Directors' Offices The
University ereefly appreciates the effort of
these stu Sent who hv served in the p�t nd
hep that jtvdent will continue their interest
and participation Questions about University
Cemmittee nd member�hlp m�y be directed
t She Office f the Vice chancellor for student
Life (77 441' Submit your application now!
RACOUETBALL
Register for intramural Racquetball Oct ill
in Room 304 Memorial Gym a singles tourna
ment will be set up according to the amount of
signees
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Any organization interested In being in the l�84
Homecoming Parade or having an entry In the
parade should contact Betsy Peters at 355 4705
before Oc' 12
PI KAPPA PHI
Hey DZ's. our Tanan and Jane social s
�onght oct 11 wear your best iomcloth ana be
ready to swmg with the Pi Kapps
CSCI
Co-op students who have GPA 3 0 Cobol Ac
countmg or Finance Business Minor The
Wyrhaiisei application have arr-veo Pick
yours up m Rawi 313 Deadline by Oct 15
PRE-MED AED
Attention pledges There will be a mandatory
meeting Oct ,7 at 7 30 in Fianagan 307 Dues
may be paid a? this meeting
AMBASSADORS
There will be a meeting of an newly selected
Ambassadors on Wed Oct 17at5pm ,n Room
231 of the Mendenhau Student Center New
members will be called and rtctvt a letter pnor
to thi meeting Thi is a very important orienta
tlon meeting and will give you your f.rjt in
troduction to sign up sheets' See an of vou there
and welcome to the best'
ATHLETIC BOARD
The Studen' Athletic Board will meet in the
Multipurpose Room at Mendenhall on Oct 17
from 4 5 p m
LAW SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will be meeting on
Tues Oct 23. at 7 p.m in Mendenhall. Room
241 Our guest speaker is Stan Sams of the local
law firm Howard. Browning. Sams and Poole
Mr Sams is a former ECU Law Society member
a graduate of UNC Chapel Hill Law School, and
he has taught business law course at ECU
Anyone interested in law school is invitedl For
more information, call Mike Gardner 75 144O
FORUM COMMITTEE
if you are interested in lcfure�. symposiums,
or other related programs, why not ,oin the Stu
dent union Forum Committee The Student
Union Forum Comm,ttee is presently accepting
application for committee member For more
information, contact the Student union Office at
757 4411, ext. 210 or come by the office in Room
234 Mendenhall Student Center
MUSIC
Music courses for nonmuS'C majors and
general college students The School o Music en
courages student t0 consider enrolling in the
following music courses designed for non music
maiors during the spring term MUSC 120. 121S
Non Music Maior Group Piano 1 and II, MUSC
1215 Group Voice II (section 003 for
non maiors), MUSC 2208 Music Appreciation.
MUSC 2218- Orchestral Music. MUSC 2238 Con
�emporary Music, MUSC 32S8 H story of jII
Music. MUSC 3018- introduction to Basic MuS'C
Sk.ns. MUSC 3028 Music Education in Elemen
fary Grades. MUSC 3038 Music Education in In
termed.ate Grades. MUSC 3048 Music for Ex
ceptionaf Children Performance organizations
are open to all students, but an audition re
auired prior to registration in any performance
group unless the student has 'he consent of 'he
instructor No other school of music course otter
ngs may be taken without permission of m�truc
'or and authorization from the Dean office
POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will be meeting on
Oct 18 at 8 00 p m in Room 241 Mendenhall In
terefed peoole ihouid bring 4 8 copie of their
poem to be read
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
The Kappa Alpha PsI Fraternity wttl be spon
soring a happy hour at the Wiz Thurs . Oct n
There will be free chicken and free beer
Transportation win be provided ostuSl 50 �tu
dent and S3 00 non student
SURFCLUB
There is a short meeting m the Mendenhall
Coffeehouse all 33 Thursday night Final plans
for th tnp to Hatteras this weekend win be
di�cu�ep Team sweat jacket �houid be in and
win be sold first come f.rst serve Our club is
open to guys and gals and we welcome any new
members
APO
A O'e'he's a"C rltaresstd oe'sonj arc urgeo
to come ano ,0n APO r Serv ce Vff "gt -
Thursdays a'5 c m n HI ASandermil a.vj (j
'ees are due Thur Oc 4 Arajpen'f forget At
Rush on oc � M ana See ,0 �-e-e
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi �m have a meeting tor a
members or. Thurs Ocf 11 at "� c - . 4
Mendenhai' The execu'ive board will ���
befo-e the general meet ng a' � 30 c m
OTSTUDENTS
Sophomore s'uaes apply ng for ac�
pick up adm ssion pac�et in the Occuca
Therapy office 304 a;i.o mm Hi Be � B
a forms inciuc "g anscripfs must be recr irec
,n the OT otfee before appica os c oe �
l��4
IF YOU'RE SO SMART
why don't you take courses in the
HONORS PROGRAM
All students with 3.4 gpa are eligible
See Dr. David Sanders, 212 Ragsdale
Wool Hats
Woven Belts
Hand Knitted Sweaters
Hand Woven Shaws
Specializing in Natural Fiber
Clothing for Women
116 E. 5th St. Moa-Sat 10:00-5:30
Next Door to Book Barn 757-3944
The Flower Basket
3002 E. 10th St.
Greenville. NC
Telephone: 757-3857
Plants Fresh Flowers
Silk & Dried Arrangements
ORDER NOW For Homecoming Corsages
Be sure to use your Student Saver Card
anon
t 'HUGRAM
gJ5Yehe makes
nwe photography
this simple.
'Canptr
�.T
� Programmed automation�
just focus and shoot'
� Shutter-priority automation
plus manual mode
� Fully automatic flash with
optional Speedhte 188A
� Optional Power Winders A2 A
and Motor Drive MA available
for rapid sequence shooting
� Includes Canon U S A Ine
one-year limited warranty
registration card
Speedine 188A ar,r
"own- W'nrjp' a-1
$219.95
CW- V�rxter a? sn0n optional
ort i caaera too
5li SOUTH COTANCHE STREE f
0�eMVIlLE. HC. 2T834
75?-06M
faata�aB�jel ��� �� �.
� MsJMMI k Bafc
Reag
(CPS) � After slipping slightly
last year, students' scores on the
Scholastic Aptitude Test show
modest increases this year, accor-
dlng to the College Board, which
runs the nationwide SAT pro-
gram.
But educators' happiness
about the improved test scores
as quickly dampened bv
remarks by U.S. Secretary of
Education Terrel Bell, who
credited President Ronald
Reagan's education policies for
the good news.
In a news conference called in
Washington, D.C. the same time
the College Board was releasing
the scores officially in New York.
Bell told reporters "the gain in
SAT scores reflects the concern
for excellence in schools that is
sweeping the nation adding he
as glad the recommendations
made by a presidential commis-
sion on excellence "are being
followed
Bell went on to imply Reagan's
call for excellence in the nation's
schools and his support for more
stringent disciplinary policies,
have helped SAT scores rise oer
the last four years.
College Board and other
education officials immediateU
complained Bell's press con-
ser
I I
reJ
stu
thr
ae
B
I
of
tha:
I
teleM
Division Of
Offers Housi
By ELAINE PERR
M�ff �m�r
The Eastern Office of the
North Carolina Division of Ar-
chives and History, located in the
Humber House at 5P W. 5th
Street, is offering free public
tours of the house.
The tours began on Wednes-
day, Oct. 3. They will be at 3:30
p.m. on the first and third
Wednesdays of each month and
will be guided by Elizabeth
Copeland, a retired city librarian
Tours will encompass the
Robert Lee Humber House. The
house was originally build in 1895
but had significant alterations
during the subsequent "5 years.
The house was altered by Robert
L. Humber Jr. after his return to
Greenville following World War
II.
Various exhibits on the Runn-
ing the Blockade Into North
Carolina. 1861-1865 and artifacts
are also available for public view.
In addition to the guided tours.
there will be two lectures. The
first will be on October 9 at 8
p.m. The topic will be "The
Blockade Runner 'Rosme The
Restoration of a 19th Century
Ship Model The talk will be
SGA Lawyer
Available
For Students
By ELAINE PERRY
SttH�rH�
Students in need of advice con-
cerning legal affairs can receive
free assistance by contacting Son-
ny McLawhorn, the attorney re-
tained by the SGA. He will offer
free advice and give students the
chance to speak with an attorney.
In order to make an appoint-
ment, students must go through
the SGA. The student should call
the SGA offices and request an
appointment The SGA secretary
then contacts Mr. McLawhorn's
office and sets up an appoint-
ment. He is available for student
consultation on Monday
2:30-5:30 p.m Tuesday. 9-11:30
p.m. and Thursday from
3:00-5:30. p.m.
Although McLawhorn can give
legal advice, in cases involving
court action he cannot represent
the student in court. However.
McLawhorn will refer the student
to an attorney If he feels it is
necessary.
The most frequent request for
advice is in the area of traffic of-
fenses, speeding and DWl's.
Other frequent areas are pro-
blems dealing with
landlordstenants and consumer
problems.
"I Jove the job McLawhorn
said. "Students are very receptive
to the advice. We (the attorneys)
try to go the extra mile and treat
the students as we want to be
treated.
give;
EC
Dr
H.
givei
dor
Der
Ma
'a:
topij
the
S I
�� i e I
I
I
in
-�.�
A
I
� n's' :





�� .� - '
� � I tO
A PHI
Pu&
l)th T.
A HIT
ft
A
t
y
b
'en
0:00-5 30
757-J944
at You Will
Treasure!
Irices Available

Ring
SA T Scores Jump
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11, 1984
(CPS) � After slipping slightly
last year, students scores on the
Scholastic Aptitude Test show
modest increases this vear, accor-
ding to the College Board, which
runs the nationwide SAT pro-
gram.
But educators' happiness
about the improved test scores
was quickly dampened by
remarks by U.S. Secretary of
Education Terrel Bell, who
credited President Ronald
Reagan's education policies for
the good news.
In a news conference called in
Washington, D.C. the same time
the College Board was releasing
the scores officially in New York,
Bell told reporters "the gain in
SAT scores reflects the concern
for excellence in schools that is
sweeping the nation adding he
was glad the recommendations
made by a presidential commis-
sion on excellence "are being
followed
Bell went on to imply Reagan's
call for excellence in the nation's
schools and his support for more
stringent disciplinary policies,
have helped SAT scores rise over
the last four years.
College Board and other
education officials immediately
complained Bell's press con-
Reagan Claims Responsibility
Walkin The Plank
ference was "a breach of eti-
quette" and "political stress-
ing that better teachers and
schools � not presidential pro-
nouncements � helped improved
SAT scores.
Nearly one million high school
seniors take the SAT each year.
Colleges, of course, use the test
results to help screen potential
students.
Nationwide scores on the math
portion of the SAT increased
three points this year, for an
average score of 47i, the College
Board reports.
Average scores on the verbal
section of the test are up one
point over last year, to 426.
Although both scores remain
far below the 1963 record highs
of 502 for math and 478 for ver-
bal, educators see them as hints
that the long decline in SAT
scores finally has been reversed.
SAT scores hit bottom in 1980,
with an average math score of
466 and verbal score of 424.
Bell's claim that Reagan's
policies are responsible for the
score increases is "simply im-
possible says College Board
spokesman Fred Moreno.
"SAT scores are attributable
not only to schools, but to books,
television, and everything else a
Division Of Archives
Offers House Tours
child is exposed to over 17
years Moreno explains.
Besides, Reagan's call for ex-
cellence last year "couldn't
possibly have any effect" on stu-
dent's test scores this year, he
says.
Because the SAT tests a wide
array of aptitudes developed over
a student's lifetime, there is vir-
tually no way to imporve scores
in a year's time, he adds.
This year's minor increases
probably are due to a combina-
tion of such things as accelerated
curricula in elementary and
junior high schools, better
teachers and teaching methods,
an increase in educational pro-
gramming on television, and
perhpas even the classroom com-
puter invasion. College Board of-
ficials point out.
Moreover, "the increase in
math scores is largely attributable
to (the improved performances
of) women says College Board
President George Hanford, while
the increase in verbal score was
largely among males.
Math scores for female
students increased four points
this year, up from 445 last year,
Moreno says. The average score
for male students increased only
two points.
In contrast, the average verbal
score for females held steady at
420, while the average score for
males went up three points.
Iowa students had the highest
scores nationally, scoring a math
average of 570 and verbal average
of 519.
And for the second year in a
row, South Carolina students
have the dubious distinction of
holding the lowest scores na-
tionally: 419 for math and 384
for verbal skills.
Other highlights from the 1984
SAT study :
Business continues to be the
most popular major, with 19.1
percent of the test takers declar-
ing it as their major. Health and
medicine came in second, with
15.1 percent, followed by
engineering with 12 percent, com-
puter science with 9.7 percent,
social sciences with 7.3 percent,
and education with 4.6 percent.
While education remains the
least popular major, the number
of students planning to go into
education rose from four to 4.6
percent. The average scores of
declared ed majors also increased
this year, by seven points on the
math section and four points for
verbal skills.
For the 10th straight year,
more women � 52 percent �
took the test than men.
Women made up the bulk of
business majors, at 62 percent,
compared to only 36 percent in
1973.
iH, nick Either we. mi mm
REAL 6AP, OK 50WTHIN6 FRDfl A
JAP�M�5� tlONTOR rDJ� 6 fWm'
& � ' OUT IU OVK P0MTOE5
C-
V30K3K30K3K3K3WC3
Bv ELAINE PERRY
StaflWrHcr
The Eastern Office of the
North Carolina Division of Ar-
chives and History, located in the
Humber House at 517 W. 5th
Street, is offering free public
tours of the house.
The tours began on Wednes-
day, Oct. 3. They will be at 3:30
p.m. on the first and third
Wednesdays of each month and
will be guided by Elizabeth
Copeland, a retired city librarian.
Tour, will encompass the
Robert Lee Humber House. The
house was originally build in 1895
but had significant alterations
during the subsequent 75 years.
The house was altered by Robert
L. Humber Jr. after his return to
Greenville following World War
II.
Various exhibits on the Runn-
ing the Blockade Into North
Carolina, 1861-1865 and artifacts
are also available for public view .
In addition to the guided tours,
there will be two lectures. The
first will be on October 9 at 8
p.m. The topic will be "The
Blockade Runner 'Rosine The
Restoration of a 19th Century
Ship Model The talk will be
SGA Lawyer
Available
For Students
By ELAINE PERRY
Stiff WMM
Students in need of advice con-
cerning legal affairs can receive
free assistance by contacting Son-
ny McLawhorn, the attorney re-
tained by the SGA. He will offer
free advice and give students the
chance to speak with an attorney.
In order to make an appoint-
ment, students must go through
the SGA. The student should call
the SGA offices and request an
appointment. The SGA secretary
then contacts Mr. McLawhorn's
office and sets up an appoint-
ment. He is available for student
consultation on Monday
230-5:30 p.m Tuesday, 9-11:30
p.m. and Thursday from
3:00-5:30. p.m.
Although McLawhorn can give
legal advice, in cases involving
court action he cannot represent
the student in court. However,
McLawhorn will refer the student
to an attorney if he feels it is
necessary.
The most frequent request for
advice is in the area of traffic of-
fenses, speeding and DWI's.
Other frequent areas are pro-
blems dealing with
landlordstenants and consumer
problems.
"I love the job McLawhorn
said. "Students are very receptive
to the advice. We (the attorneys)
try to go the extra mile and treat
the students as we want to be
treated
given by Dr. John Tilley of the
ECU Public History Program.
Dr. Tilley's history program
assembled the artifacts in the
Humber House.
The second lecture will be on
Oct. 16 at p.m. and will be
given by Chris Fonvielle and Gor-
don Watts. Fonvielle is a grad
student in the ECU History
Department and Watts is the
director of the ECU Director of
Maritime History and Under-
water Research. The lecture
topics will be "An Overview of
the Blockade Running period in
North Carolina" given bv Fon-
vielle and "Active Ar-
chaeological Sites Associated
with the Blockade Running Era
in North Carolina" given by
Watt.
OcoococooooooeeoooooocoGoooooK
WHY RENT ?
For less than dorm or apartment rent
you could:
1. Buy your own home
2. Enjoy peace and privacy
3. Invest in the future
STOP BY AND SEE HOW
gJ)OAKWOOO
HOMES
vX�
GREENVILLE STUDENT
LAUNDRY SERVICE
r, CALL 758-3087
between 8:30am and 5:30pm
626 W Grenvil! Rlvd
5434
SAVE
20
By shopping our Downtown store
Izod, Sero, Robert Bruce,
Hubbard, Woolrich, Golden Vee,
Botany, Churchill Downs

�tetntecfe'0
427 S Evans St
MBTS SHOP
Your Own Personal Laundry Service

Let Greenville Student
Laundry Service take
care of your weekly
, laundry needs.
wvwwvk
" A

FISHERMAN'S
BUFFET

Your Two Best Choices For Printing
!he Wcry Vou Want It
Wnen You Need
�Tr
With Reasonaoie Pr

Gceenville Printing Company
� Commercial Printing
fy 4 Color Process Printing
�� Typesetting & Design
211 West 9th Street - Greenville
752-4720�
�&
Specializing In:
Full Service & Self Sen �
Xerox Copies
� Automatic Conation
� Resumes
� Graotac Camera Service
Located Downtown in
The Georgetown Shops
758-2400



ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT!
Help Yourself To
� FISH FILLETS Breaded n Seasoned From
3 Favorite Shoney s Recipes
� Baked FISH FILLETS
Hot Vegetables, including Fried Okra
Seafood Chowder
French Fries
Hushpuppies
EVERY FRIDAY
5 PM � 9 PM
5H0NBKS
Only
$4-99
$5 99 with Sflad & Fru Bar
Sp3�l Ctmmrt Pmm
NC27U4
7M-21K
4
o.o
J card makes
a birthday happier!
Creative excellence is an American tradition.
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a week - 9:30 to 9:30
i ��. &. �ta
rih-
!A I





Sqf fetal Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. ammMam
'i OREG RlDEOUT Managing Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak. ���Ed J.T. Pietrzak. d� ,���,�
Randy Mews, i� � Anthony Martin, ��,�� Manage
TINA MAROSCHAK, fM�f� �rfiwr KATHY FUERST, Production Manage
Bill Austin, cvadanon Manage Mike Mayo, rtdm&m
October 11, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Let's Debate
CR's, YD's Should Do Battle
The tradition Uvts on. Students
at ECU are actively involved in the
various political races, hoping to
convert their peers to vote for the
candidate they believe can do the
job. Each day yOu see members of
groups as variant as the College
Republicans and the Greenville
Peace Committee participating in
campus politics. Their goal is to
reach students and pull them up
from the gutter of apathy.
But one thing is wrong. Through
the great number of letters to the
editor, we have found that one of
the groups, the ECU Young
Democrats, wishes to debate
another of the groups, the ECU
chapter of the College
Republicans. Our Campus Forum
has been the battleground for the
exchange of ideological warfare,
but as yet the challenge by the
Democrats has fallen on deaf
Republican ears. We think a
debate is in order.
Why? Well, just what is the pur-
pose of these two groups? As we
see it, they are here to actively in-
volve the campus in politics by br-
inging to the ECU community an
exchange of ideas. Through these
efforts, we students can more easi-
ly obtain the information needed
to. become responsible citizens. We
know putting on programs and
working in campaigns is a way of
doing this, but this is an election
year. There is no better way to air
the differences between the two
parties and presidential candidates
than staging a defeat. We here ask
the College RepsWcans-to par-
ticipate in a debate.
There are many reasons for say-
ing no. But the ones mentioned in
a letter to the editor recently aren't
good enough. The College
Republicans stated they were too
busy with projects and staging a
convention. This is admirable and
should be lauded. But surely there
is one night during the weeks
ahead where five of your 80-plus
members can get together with the
Young Democrats.
The Department of Political
Science has already agreed to spon-
sor the debates and the initial
groundwork has been laid by the
Democrats. They are willing to
hammer out a format to suit
everyone's concerns. Sure there
have been words said between the
two groups that may not be true,
but a debate could clear up the
charges and inform students about
each group and the issues involved.
We think not debating is a disser-
vice. Throw your issues in front of
the public. Is that not why you
both are here?
Never has there been a more
clear choice for the public. The
average student needs a chance to
hear both sides of the issues. You
both are informed. Be that carrier
of information they need. We of-
fer free publicity space to get the
greatest possible audience to at-
tend. By saying no to a debate,
College Republicans, you are in-
viting speculation for why you
won't.
President Reagan, the big
Republican, debated. Why don't
you?
ITBl&mmjpuKEwmo
kmemoPHONecHecK
Dooaesbury
first rrmnm.
whos Nsxrz,
mmvMll.mm,m
Campus Forum
Helms, Helms, Helms, Helms, Helms
No matter how fast the pens and
typewriters of the press have acted to
exponentially amplify the effects of
Sunday's debate, we musn't forget
that the positions, strengths and
weaknesses of the 1984 presidential
candidates have not at all changed.
Those same strengths, weaknesses
and positions should remain the
deciding factors in this presidential
election. The future of the greatest
nation on earth is at stake.
Despite the claims that Reagan
stumbled and fidgeted in his
responses, his policies and record still
came through as clearly as they ever
have. Please read the transcript of the
debate that is printed in Tuesday's
News and Observer.
Reagan's policies are logical and
have proven themselves in his ad-
ministration. He has answered his
critics with results and facts.
Reagan has taken a recessive, infla-
tionary economy with high interest
rates and produced a growing healthy
economy with low interest rates, low
inflation and low unemployment. It is
obvious that this economic prosperity
will reduce the severity of the deficit.
In economic theory there are two fac-
tors in taxation. One is the tax rate
which tells how much of a fixed
amount of income is taxed. The other
factor is called the tax base. This is
the amount of income earned that can
be taxed. If the tax rate is 10 percent
and the tax base is $100, then the tax
paid is $10. But if the tax base is $150
due to the higher per capita incomes
of the Reagan recovery then the same
10 percent tax rate will bring in $15 in
taxes. The consumer has $135 left
after taxes. Therefore, the govern-
ment has more revenues and the con-
sumer has more purchasing power,
which keeps the economy growing.
Next, Reagan's foreign policy is
that of strength and leadership. I like
this and I think the American people
like this. However, this strength is not
the cause of any world tensions. The
Soviet leadership resents Reagan for
trying to undermine the edge that
they have enjoyed for so long. They
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
SORRY 70 K�& QH.LUUDER-
wuwnmso stand, mrs
L0N6, MfCHAEl. C0N6D0N FT
ITS BEEN 0N� mSNTANY
OF THOSE DAYf. PROBLEM
MICHAEL, I'D
LIKE YOU TO
MEET OUR
PRESIDENT,
MR BELLOWS
S0Y0U
WANTT0 UELL.l
BEAN THINK
ADMAN, SO, SIR
EH. SON' I
I MEAN. I CANT BE CERTAIN, OF
COURSE, BUT IT SEEMED WORTH
LOOKING INTO, YOU KNOW, TO SEE
IF IT WORKED OUT, IF IT FELT
RIGHT AND I UN
TRY
AGAIN,
DEAR
SO YOU
WANT TV BE
AN AD MAN,
EH, SON?
YES. SIR
WITH A
VENGEANCE

cW'faA-
M1KE,H&&6 TUB POOP. OtXTOP
ACCOM HAS 3U57 HAWED US A
RUSHCAMMW AND I NEED A
YOUNG COMER WHO CAN GET IT
ON TRACK FAST. CAS9
HERE SAYS WAT
YOU'RE MY MAN'
WELL.SIR.TLLPOMYBEST
NOT TO LET YOU DOWN.
I'M VERY EXCITED ABOUT
BEING A COPYWRITER,
ANDIMANXIOUS
TO GET GOING'

AS LONG AS
I'M, SELLING
SOMETHING I
BEUEEIN. I'LL
GIVE YOU EVERY
THING IVE GOT'

GREAT I WANT
Y0UT0SELL
RONALD REAGAN
TO BLACK VOTERS
I CAN'T
STAND
IT
1SEE A CALVIN KLEIN
APPROACH. RECLINING
BLACK TEENAGERS
TALKING ABOUT THEIR
FIRST
.JOBS
imtS
���-�-
walked away from negotiations
because they no longer had a clear ad-
vantage over the United States and its
administration.
The Democrats like to remark how
Reagan has not met with the Soviet
leadership like his successors have.
Could it be that the Soviet leadership
has changed twice during Reagan's
administration? The Soviet leader-
ship is inning out of tired, sick old
men who can uphold the Communist
ideology.
Lastly, Reagan's environmental
record is not the blemished disgrace
that the Democrats make it out to be.
Reagan has indeed reduced the pur-
chase of new federal lands. He has,
however, invested millions in
revitalization of our national park
system. Reagan has also sold federal
land, but it is only a few hundred
thousand acres of worthies land that
is practically nonexistent compared to
the wealth of land owned by the
United States.
This is what Ronald Reagan stands
for. He was elected to bring hope and
prosperity to this nation. He has done
so and will continue to do so. Why
should we throw away something as
effective as the Reagan administra-
tion in exchange for anything else?
Billy Green
Senior, Fin.
Oh, Greg
There you go again, Greg. I've
been astonished in the past regarding
your attacks on President Reagan,
but this one beats all. Like most sup-
porters for Mondale, you hope for
some magical occurence to turn the
tide for the soon-to-be ill-fated can-
didacy. Instead of running on a
background of leadership and
substance, Mondale runs on issues of
unrealistic dreams that appeal only to
those who believe in fairy tales and
unilateral disarmament. Mr. Rideout,
if you could turn some of your bias
subjectiveness into level-headed ob-
jectiveness, you would not be so
quick to condemn President Reagan.
Did President Reagan lose the
debate � 1 don't think so. Why?
Since he is way ahead in the polls and
his policies are widely known, his job
was to reiterate his past achievements
and his dedication to remain on his
steady course. In the other case,
Mondale's job was to create a stirring
fervor to try to win as many votes as
he can from emotions rather than
cognitive thought. Mr. Rideout, I
suggest that you let your brain rather
than the hairs on your backside
decide which candidate to support.
Also, I suggest that in the future you
stick with your "dump Pee Dee"
campaign. For that campaign com-
bines both the intellectual and emo-
tional levels that facilitate your
capabilities.
David Pere
MktgMgmt Major
(Editor's note � Mr. Pere, due to an
early childhood disease, I have no
hair on my backside.)
Oh, David
In response to David Brooks' letter
attacking Sen. Helms, I would like to
offer some thoughts of my own.
On Wednesday, ECU was for-
tunate to have Arnaud DeBorshgrave
speak on our campus. DeBorshgrave
was chief foreign correspondent for
News week for 30 years. He spoke on
the topic of disinformation. This is
the process by which the press molds
public opinion by reporting certain
information while deleting others. I
submit to you Mr. Brooks that you
could have learned much from this
lecture.
DeBorshgrave told us of the cheer-
ing crowds we view on television in
support of the Marxist Sandinisu
government in Nicaragua. He also
told us that the media fails to report
the revocation of these peoples' ra-
tion cards if they do not appear at the
rallies in support of the Marxist
regime. Americans fail to realize how
much our political opinions are mold-
ed by the press. Much of the
testimony given before Congressional
committees is given by journalists
who are reporting news on these
countries. Subsequently, legislation
by Congress is affected by disinfor-
mation also.
I reflect on my observations fi
DeBorshgrave's lecture to make my
point to you Mr. Brooks, on the
record, of Sen. Jesse Helms. Ser.
Helms is a victim of character
assasination by the press. And you,
sir, a victim of liberal indoctrinate
believe every word of it. Anyone rig!
of center is automatically a war
monger, a racist, a bigot, and a
religious fanatic. I submit to you that
Sen. Helms is none of these His
voting record stands on its own merit.
which David Cartwright correctlv
stated to you in the preceding edition
of this paper. Cartwright took your
letter issue for issue and explained
them as the Sen. voted, not through
the ambiguity of the press.
Mr. Brooks, if you really want to
know about the conservative ideals of
Sen. Helms and many others, read
something besides the News and
Observer.
Cynthia Mills
Senior, Pols
Oh, No!
I have a question that perhaps you
experts at The East Carolinian can
answer. Why is it that all the women
on this campus have boyfriends, are
lesbians or are ugly as sin?
I heard somewhere that the perfect
crime is to shoot someone with a
bullet made of ice because the
evidence would melt inside the body.
Well, I'm bored and I think my
neighbor Hal is a jerk, so I figure
what the hey, you know? I fill the
chambers of my gun with water and
leave it in the freezer for a couple of
hours. Only when I take it out, I see
the water has dribbled out of the gun.
Incidentally, I invited Hal over from
down the hall, which is normally the
last thing in the world 1 would do,
and he's in my room yelling about
how my television reception stinks.
So I scrape some snow shavings off
the top of the freezer and push them
into the barrels. I walk across the
room and point the gun at Hal. In a
very sober tone, because it is the
perfect crime and I know I can't be
caught, I say, "Hal, get off my
back and pull the trigger. Nothing
happens except for a little water drib-
bling on my sleeve. Hal starts stomp-
ing his feet and hooting because he
thinks it's a water gun that backfired,
so I go to the refrigerator and get a
Fistful of ice cubes from the tray and
start pelting him with them. Tjfien I
serve him a leg of lamb, which is the
perfect crime because he eats the
evidence.
Major Campus Celebrity
I

I
I
I
Bicycle
Bicvcle larcenies dominated the
crime reports of the ECU Public
Saten Department for the period
beginning Sept. 25 and ending
Oct 9, 1984. Nine bicycles were
reported stolen from various
areas of campus during that
period. According to police
reports, only one of the bky
' was left unlocked - the
majority of the others were
secured bv chain locks
"(ham locks are simply ru
fective against bicvcle thieves
ho habitually carry bolt cutters
concealed in their clothing for
purpose of cutting locks
Gene McAbee. Crime Prevent
cer for the Public 5
Department.
In other crime news, pu
safety officers investigated n
� ' enies from dormitork
roora build
vehicle break-ins. Nineteen
rests were recorded.
ROTC Ofj
B ROBFKTsMHH
si�f � mi-
Short of money I i
Vv vned about find .
graduation? Foi
these problems ha-
through the ECU Arn - K
gram and sin r F -
grams on camp V
an Armv spoke: i
ROTC Program ti
men and women
educated, comri
in Active. National Gua
Reserve Forces
There are two pi .
available. The four-yea
consrs ol tw
study during the
sophomore ears. Dun
PassFail
Systems
Not Working
(CPS) � Pass fail grad. -
systems have failed, and students
who have a chance to use tl
generally reject them.
to a survey of over 1,600 colleges
using the pass fail system.
Dr. C. James Quann. reg sti
at Washington State Univer-
and author of the survev. sa
students do worse when they
giver, pass fail grades instead
letter grades.
"Many ;nsuor arc beginn-
ing to realize students perforn
a lower level with pass �
systems he sas "Students
come to class late, sk p . asses,
don't do assignments jh.
other students back Perfor-
mance is below par in many
cases
Quann sees the system a-
vestige of the more experiment
'60s and early "70s.
Even so. "only a small pa
tage of schools that initial
pass fail options aba:
them aitogther on the theorv tl
if v o u give the s t u d e i
something, it hurts to tak
awav Quann adds
Northwest Missouri State Un-
viersity, for example, changed ts
pass fail system in 1979, let:
students use it in a maximum ol
nine credit hours
"It's not o re
reports Registrar Lira Gira
"People were taking advantage
of it: using if for hard
classes and GED requiremea
The facultv is much happier
now
Quann's own Washing
State still offers pas- I
tions, but only seven percen
the student bodv use them
Some schools, of
main devotees of the system,
"Facultv instituted this sys
to encourage learning
sake of learning, instead oi
competitive environment
reports Nancy Pasca iSSO
registrar at the University oi
California-Santa Cruz
"Students like this environ-
ment and the freedom to tesl
things more than under a trad.
tional system she claims
"Faculty is committed (to it)
despite the enormous task of
written evaluations
Quann believes more schools
are moving away from pass fail
systems, however, if only because
grading fashions change from
time to time.
Passfail systems were com-
mon in the 19th Century, until
they were supplanted by
numerical grading practices.
I
1

B �-��;�'C-





EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11, 1984
aWMBRH
Helms
Thi is
is molds
certain
rs. I
ou
i this
eer-
n in
tii ta
He also
report
ra-
the
Marxist
. how
h e
on rific
mon
. ifor-
is from
ake my
on the
is. Sen.
character
nd you.
tri nation.
� ' nyone right
a war-
and a
you that
e His
ivn merit,
correctly
ng edition
ght 1 �ok our
explained
� through
ill) ant to
ti e ideals of
thers, read
ch5 and
Oh, No!
thai perhaps you
l ' aroliman can
ar all the women
. e boyfriends, are
are ugly as sin?
a here that the perfect
shoot someone with a
of ice because the
i c w dd melt inside the body.
"red and I think my
I 5 a jerk, so I figure
you kno? I fill ihe
t m gun with water and
� freezer for a couple of
� when I take it out. I see
I" I inbbled out of th gun.
fatally, 1 invited Hal over from
lthe hall, which is normally the
jnng in the world 1 would do,
in my room veiling about
television reception stinks.
ktrape some snow shavings off
p of the freezer and push them
Ihe barrels. I walk across the
land point the gun at Hal. In a
Sober tone, because it is the
t crime and I know 1 can't be
1 say, "Hal, get off my
and pull the trigger. Nothing
ns except for a little water dnb-
rny sleeve Hal starts stomp-
s feet and hooting because he
i it's a water gun that backfired,
o to the refrigerator and get a
of ice cubes from the tray and
jelting him with them. Tlien I
urn a leg of lamb, which is the
It crime because he eats the
Ice.
Campus Celebrity
f
Bicycle Larcenies Dominate Campus Crimes
Bicycle larcenies dominated the
crime reports of the ECU Public
Safety Department for the period
beginning Sept. 25 and ending
Oct. 9, 1984. Nine bicycles were
reported stolen from various
areas of campus during that
period. According to police
reports, only one of the bicycles
stolen was left unlocked � the
majority of the others were
secured by chain locks.
"Chain locks are simply not ef-
fective against bicycle thieves
who habitually carry bolt cutters
concealed in their clothing for the
purpose of cutting locks said
Gene McAbee, Crime Prevention
Officer for the Public Safety
Department.
In other crime news, public
safety officers investigated nine
larcenies from dormitories and
classroom buildings and two
vehicle break-ins. Nineteen ar-
rests were recorded.
Sept. 25, 7:10 p.m. � A
breaking and entering was
reported on the 4th floor of
Greene dorm. 11:05 p.m. � A
bicycle was reported stolen from
the Physics Building.
Sept. 26, 1:50 a.m. � Robert
Wade Whitfield, 20, of
Grimesland, was arrested for
DWI, no operator's license, and
stop sign violation.
Sept. 27, 12:30 p.m. � A
larceny was reported in a room
on the first floor of Umstead
Dorm. 8:17 p.m. � An assault
was reported on the 2nd floor of
Aycock Dorm. In connection
with the incident. Jonathan
Elwood Sadler, 19, of 218
Aycock Dorm was arrested for
assault with a deadly weapon.
11:45 p.m. � Anne Gallegos,
30, of Winterville. was arrested
for DWI.
Sept. 28, 2:00 a.m. � Maxwell
Eugene Parker. 19, of Greenville,
was arrested for DWI. 4:10 a.m.
Sept. 29, 2:55 a.m. � Rhett
Clemons Stephens, 21, of North
Myrtle Beach, SC, was arrested
for DWI and banned from cam-
pus for suspicious activity north
of the Brewster building. 8:33
a.m. � A larceny was reported
from a room on the second floor
of Garrett Dorm. 11:18 p.m. �
Dennis Robert Cunningham, 23,
of Virginia Beach, VA, was ar-
rested for trespassing.
Sept. 30, 6:20 p.m. � Eddie
Holloway, Jr 18, of Greenville
was arrested for trespassing.6:07
p.m. � A larceny of clothing
from a dryer was reported in Cot-
ten Dorm. 3:20p.m. � A break-
in and larceny was reported at
WZMB in the Library Annex.
Oct. 1, 12:41 p.m. � A tape
recorder was reported stolen
from the Music Building. 10p.m.
� A vehicle break-in was
reported in the 9th Street parking
lots.
Oct. 2, 1:05 p.m. � A bicycle
Was reported stolen from Belk
Dorm. 11:05 p.m. � A bicycle
was reported stolen from the bike
shed beside Belk Dorm. 11:30
p.m. � A bicycle was reported
stolen from east of Garrett
Dorm.
Oct. 3, 2:20 p.m. � A bicycle
was reported stolen from Minges
Coliseum. 2:40 p.m. A larceny
was reported on the 2nd floor of
Umstead Dorm.
Oct. 4, 4:45 p.m. � A bicycle
was reported stolen from the
Fletecher Dorm bike rack.
Oct. 5, 2p.m. � A bicycle was
reported stolen from the front of
Fletcher Dorm. 10:15 p.m. �
Vincent Michael Veiga, 18, of
Union, S.C. was arrested for
DWI, exceeding a safe speed, and
a one-way street violation.
Oct. 6, 2:24 p.m. � A break-in
and larceny was reported at a
room on the fifth floor of Greene
Dorm.
Oct. 7, 3:10 a.m. � A van-
dalism to a blue light phone was
discovered at Memorial Gym.
Warrants were drawn on
Christopher Hugh McLawhorn,
18, of 203D Scott Dorm and An-
drew Quentin Warren, 18, of
202A Scott Dorm in connection
with the incident. Both subjects
were arrested on Oct. 8.
Oct. 8, 12 a.m. � A vehicle
was reported vandalized south of
Aycock Dorm. 5:30 p.m. � A
larceny of money was reported
on the tenth floor of White
Dorm. 7:30p.m. �Christopher
Warren Bynum, 18, of Fairfax,
VA, was arrested for Failure to
Appear in Court. 11:42 p.m. �
Following a report of a
suspicious male on the second
floor of Umstead Dorm, Elbridge
Henry Boardman, 18, of
Hollywood, FL a student, was
arrested for Peeping Tom.
Boardman was identified as being
seen inside the women's showers
on the 2nd floor of Umstead. 10
a.m. � A bicycle was reported
stolen from the bike rack at Cle-
ment Dorm. The bicycle had been
recovered by Public Safety of-
ficers before the report was
received. The bicycle was located
in the parking lot at Seventh and
James Streets.
ROTC Offers Educational Alternative
B ROBERT SMITH
SMI Writer
Short of money for college?
Worried about finding a job after
graduation? For some students,
these problems have been solved
through the ECU Army ROTC
Program and similar ROTC pro-
grams on campus. According to
an Armv spokesman. "The Army
ROTC Program trains college
men and women to become well-
educated, commissioned officers
in Active, National Guard and
Reserve Forces
There are two programs
available. The four-year program
consists of two years of basic
study during the freshman and
sophomore years. During this
PassFail
Systems
Not Working
(CPS) � Pass fail grading
systems have failed, and students
who have a chance to use them
generally reject them, according
to a survey of over 1,600 colleges
using the pass fail system.
Dr. C. James Quann, registrar
at Washington State University
and author of the survey, says
students do worse when they're
given pass fail grades instead of
letter grades.
"Many institutions are beginn-
ing to realize students perform on
a lower level with passfail
systems he says. "Students
come to class late, skip classes,
don't do assignments and hold
other students back. Perfor-
mance is below par in many
cases
Quann sees the system as a
vestige of the more experimental
"60s and early '70s.
Even so, "only a small percen-
tage of schools that initiated
pass fail options abandoned
them altogther on the theory that
if you give the students
something, it hurts to take it
away Quann adds.
Northwest Missouri State Un-
viersity, for example, changed its
pass fail system in 1979, letting
students use it in a maximum of
nine credit hours.
"It's not o- rused anymore
reports Registrar Lina Girard.
"People were taking advantage
of it: using if for hard major
classes and GED requirements.
The faculty is much happier
now
Quann's own Washington
State still offers passfail op-
tions, but only seven percent of
the student body use them.
Some schools, of course, re-
main devotees of the system,
"Faculty instituted this system
to encourage learning for the
sake of learning, instead of a
competitive environment
reports Nancy Pascal, associate
registrar at the University of
California-Santa Cruz.
"Students like this environ-
ment and the freedom to test
things more than under a tradi-
tional system she claims.
"Faculty is committed (to it)
despite the enormous task of
written evaluations
Quann believes more schools
are moving away from passfail
systems, however, if only because
grading fashions change from
time to time.
Passfail systems were com-
mon in the 19th Century, until
they were supplanted by
numerical grading practices.
time period, there is no obliga-
tion for military service and these
courses are counted as electives.
The second two years consist of
advanced study which actually
prepares the student to assume
the responsibilities associated
with a commission. Also included
in the last two years is a six-week
summer camp.
The second program is
available for those who have only
two years left in college. A pro-
fessor of army studies can ap-
prove attendance at summer
compression courses to compen-
sate for the first two years of
study.
Aside from numerous two- and
three-year scholarships given, all
cadets receive free texts, supplies.
and uniforms necssary for all
military science courses. In addi-
tion, $100 per month is paid, tax
free, to each cadet in the
juniorsenior advanced course.
All university students may
enroll in the
FreshmanSophomore Basic
Course. To be eligible for the Ad-
vanced Study Program, students
must be in good academic stan-
ding, of required physicial condi-
tion and must demonstrate
satisfactory completion of the
Basic Course or equivalent com-
pression courses.
NOW IS THE TIME To
Order Your Football Mums!
John 9s
Plaza Shopping Center
756-1160
Flowers
503 East 3rd St.
752-3311
Classifieds
work for you
FLY THE PURPLE AND GOLD
Get High on Bouyant
Balloons From
Balloons Over Greenville
752-3815 for
Messenger Delivered Bouquets
or Balloons For Decorating
THE ORIGINAL FAMILY STEAK HOUSE
Come To Western Sizzlin For
Bigger, Juicy Beef Tips
JUST ASK FOR THE NO. 3!
r
No. 3 Beef Tips
Wed.&Thurs.
For $3.29
FREE Potato Fixins Bar
With Your Meal
FREE DELIVER
3
758-3100
Good for any delivery order
10th & Charles St.
I$2.00
You Call
The Shots.
1
i
i
i
i
i
i
With this coupon get
your choice of
�DOUBLE PRINTS or
�$2.00 OFF or a
�FREE 8x10
on your next roll of color
print film brought in for
developing.
Limit one coupon
per customer
Expires: 113084
8x10 frcn 110. 126. or
135mm negatives only
1 Hour Photo Lab
CAROLINA EAST MALL (near Belk's)
MonSat. 10am-9pm 756-6078
I
I
I
i
I
I
I
i
I
I

I
I
I
I
I
I
I
J
D
N
�fAVSPONS
Y OCT. II
T-H
900 - UNTIL
FREE BEER 9:00-12:
FR0E CHICKEN 9:00-l:00
TRANSPORTATION PROVIDED
8:30 lyfENDfefJHALL TO THE HILL
ACL TO THE HILL
ILL EE ANNOUNCED
2,00iNON-STUDENTS
9:30 MEND,
RETURN TR
il.50 STUDENT
"NEW" MOVIE CLUB
Now Open Mon-Th 10:30-7:30 Fri-Sat 10:00-8:00
SPECIAL OFFER
$1.00 ONLY
Lifetime Membership
Hurry Limited Offer
FIRESTARTER
Located Next to the Mall
Carolina East Centre
Greenville, NC
Over 1,000 Movie Inventory, Family,
Western, Nostalgia, Top 40, Comedies
All Ratings
RENTALS AS LOW AS
$2.50 For 3 Days
756-8891
"HAS EM ALL"
L XX t
fcjWhXWMt
mU��
mmm
f
V






��-���� ,����
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTORFRii iqm
ECU Joins Commemoration
By ELAINE PERRY
SlttMWrtlct
North Carolina is currently in
the process of commemorating
the 400th anniversary of the ar-
rival of English settlers at
Roanoke Island in 1584. The in-
itial celebration was on April 1,
1984 in Plymouth, England and
was attended by Gov. James B.
Hunt, Jr. and state committees
and dignitaries. The celebration
took place on the date of the
departure from England to
Roanoke Island.
The beginning of the
ceremonies on this side of Atlan-
tic started on July 13th in
Manteo. Princess Anne, the
daughter of the reigning Queen
Elizabeth of England, took part
in the ceremonies.
The first attempt at coloniza-
tion took place in Manteo con-
sisting of three voyages, collec-
tively called the Roanoke
Voyages. Those voyages
"established the foothold that
brought English culture to the
new world" according to Gladys
Howell, the Pitt County 400th
chairperson and wife of ECU's
Chancellor.
The first of the voyages con-
sisted of a group of men who
assessed the land, Indians and
general conditions. The second
expedition was comprised of men
who came to build the first and to
establish better contact with the
Indians. The third voyage, in
1586, carried male and female
settlers to establish the perma-
nent colony. That group later
became known as the Lost Col-
City Raising Funds
(UPI) � Organizers of a local
campaign to help renovate the
Statue of Liberty say they expect
to receive $1 each from every resi-
dent by the end of the month.
The campaign is believed to be
the first of its kind in the nation.
"One dollar per citizen is a
very strong community effort. I
don't know of another like it
said Helen Bollman of the Statue
of Liberty Foundation.
"The city of 4,787 already is
more than halfway toward its
goal Jim Todd, who started the
drive last month, said Monday.
"We got the idea to get in-
dividuals, groups and businesses
to pledge up to a dollar a citizen
instead of just collecting pennies
and dollar bills from
individuals Todd said.
Bessemer City's American
Legion Post 243 pledged a dollar
for each of its 260 members, then
raised $548 asking for donations
outside a liquor store.
"That's a great place to raise
donations Todd said. "People
come out after spending $8 on li-
quor and a little twinge of guilt
makes them want to spend the
other $2 on a good cause
Individuals have given the rest
of the $3,000 raised so far. Two
businesses have pledged the
amount needed to reach the goal
after September fund raising is
finished, Todd said.
mm
The Spirit of The A ttic Lives at
Thurs.Oct 11th
WZMB Ladies Lite Nite
with
MAX WARRIOR
The King & Queen Sorth
sm
Coming Sat. Oct 13th
In Concert the
NIGHT HAWKS
Wm
'????
?????
? ??
:?:?:

'mwsmmm&mi
IM��MIHOItoHIIIIMIIlllllllll1111 �� f 11111 � � 11 f � 11 � i 11 f 11111 f f � 111 � 111 � ll f 1111 f if 111 � 111111 f � it I f 11 f 11III
xWASH OUSE
' 'More Than A Laundromat
Largest Laundromat in Greenville
NOW Serving
� jNaCllOS - with cheese sauce and
1 jalapeno peppers
j BQCr 12oz. Draft for 50C
Dill Pickles I
14th Street Location - Come by and get a
FREE sample of Nachos while washing clothes.
f 758-6001 I
fffllllllfllfllllfftliltMitlllllltfflilfllllltltlltltllllfllllfllfllfllllllllllliliiifiitlllltlfllllfllllllftllltllJiliHiiiiiiHttrM
ony. The group of settlers did not
survive the attempt at coloniza-
tion. However, the first child of
English parentage born on
American soil was Virginia Dare,
whose birthday was August of
1587. That date will also be the
official end of the celebration on
August 18, 1987.
Each county in North Carolina
has a chairperson and a commit-
tee that began planning events for
their individual counties in 1983.
Howell, the Pitt County
Chairperson has incorporated
many already-established ac-
tivities into the theme for the
400th celebration.
The main project in Pitt Coun
ty is the establishment of a tobac-
co museum at the Village of
Yesteryear at the fairgrounds.
The village consists of a circle of
old Pitt County buildings, one of
which will he the museum. The
idea for the museum
"celebrating" tobacco developed
because tobacco has played a ma
ior role in the developing of Pitt
County. The museum should be
completed by 1987.
ECU will also be contributing
to the celebration. The university
is offering a variety of speakers
available to organizations
throughout the eastern counties
In addition, workshops can also
be secured. The programs involve
a variety of contemporary and
historical themses. The drama
department wil also perform
Hamlet during the Spring
semester.
The university Regional
Development Center has also of-
fered workshops on fundraising
projects throughout eastern
North Carolina.
The main focus oi the com-
meration is to celebrate the "con-
tributers to the American
culture Howell said.
"Come Play The Indian
This Fall"
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC
Y
j'r
P svc
4?
DIRECT MERCHANT
From The Manufacturer Directly To You
All First Quality v, c n , ,
w - No Seconds Or Irregulars
Second Fall Shipment Of Ladies
100 percent Fully I ined Skirts
Ladies Dress And Casual Blouses
Ladies Matching Tweed Skirts & Jackets
Metis' Oxford Si 2 50
Large Selection of Jumpers & Fall Dresses
Pin Point Dress Shirts S19.50
DONNA IDWARDS
Onor
PET
VILLAGE
Large Selection of
Unusual Reptiles
We also carry a
complete line of small animal,
dog, cat and fish supplies.
511 EVANS ST
GREENVILLE. NC 27834
PHONT 7�6 9222
OH ft
?R& BBchR
on these ongi
nal hit albums
i
KC,
")
H
J
0
o
Th,s

�-

'
7�
,V
3 for
t
�'

rff
fT
Ch
eP Trie
��ud5
-���4
an
OF
el
HERBIE HANCOCK
MAGIC WINDOWS
including
Everybody s Broke Tonight s The Night
Satisfied With Love The Twilight Clone
Magic Number
EDDY GRAHT
MyTurnToLoveYou
Fee, The Rhytt �CXo vw
vfU�o�
'u7
S55�"
n
GVe
V
1or
-rtGco.
IP
lV
0
�re
&&
Goo" pon
y L -(oo'
fkOC
on
it
Vr�
���
ioo'
o3'
t.o

ao
vV'
roe
8ce re F

iy
!W
- � � s. � Ik
mk
SALE ENDS OCTOBER 31ST.
LOOK i OR THE NICE PRICE STICKER ON
CBS CASSETTES & LPS.
PITT PLAZA
CAROLINA EAST MALL
Record Bar
RFCORDS TAPFS & A LITTLF BITMORE
MtWaMMomm
�htfhrtfetftatftertte
- - m
IHt
The
B I ISA MC DON LD
iMt vk nut
� nderous applause and re-
funding yells of "Bra-
echoed throughout EC
McGinnis Theatre Monday e
� making it clear that ;he a .
� great appreciatec
'ork that went into
Atlanta BaUct' perfonnai
The Atlanta Ballet, whkfc
cTh season is the o. I
:ompan) r
i�i � : ed
lonali - .s �� a u
' ' ��
� 'he hour
; weni � the fou
I l. XI
weal
ed mu�
rchestra vouid hae r
' '�� much more magical and
The first piece. MSc tch S
ny wa perl
ndelsohn Symphoi
Minor and created a - n
atm( -phere by using
- ' �
elaborate set. A pa
performed.
� piece '7 g
gypsy in Eng
1G
ballerina
ne con
Maniya Barredo. Tl
anding dance a i
ind
French
B HAROI I) 1
' most stuc- ECU,
mundane ritual of e
not view the campus a
France and has been in fSjn
constantly learning and exp - i
she is 1 ling a more a
�heir uav of life. I kneu wh j
talked to anyone who wa
with Elisabeth's culture an
ferences and similiariti
V
v�tT
�-t
Klisabeth
JOYNER
were hen art
CLECH. Before !
America for four da
ECU, 1 couldn'i bel e. �
much sn
JOVNER
fum � f as i
CLECH: French
Breuvter Buildings. 1
all the buildings a
Get 'Crafty
B DANIEL MAI RLR
Hidden away on the lower icei
of the Mendenhali Student
Center lies something known on
ly to a few people, too few as a
matter of fact. Concealed behind
the vending machine area lies the
Crafts Center, a virtual goldmine
for the amateur artisan
The Crafts Center offers ECU
students, faculty, and staff the
opportunity to pursue personal
hobbies or learn new crafts
Directed primanlv at the non-an
major, the Crafts Center is a �ci:
equiped facility where individuals
can attend workships or simply
use the equipment on their own
Taught by graudate students

I
ewJ
I
and
are

for
W
b
stuai
one
mer:
OWf
are
cost I
Oi
Craf
r
i







The Indian
II

� i o
JO
00
untry Club
NC
ction of
Reptiles
S C 27834
urns!
each
98
K
'Budok
an
GRANT
rnToLoveVou

& LPS.
THE EAST CAROLINJAN
OCTOBER II. I9C4 Pmc
The Atlanta Ballet Moves In Style
By LISA MCDONALD
V�ff � ril�
Thunderous applause and re-
sounding yells of "Bravo"
echoed throughout ECU's
McGinnis Theatre Monday even-
ing, making it clear that the au-
dience greatly appreciated the
hard work that went into the
Atlanta Ballet's performance.
The Atlanta Ballet, which, in
its 55th season is the oldest
regional dance company in the
I S demonstrated its profes-
sionalism with a truely polished
performance; one couldn't help
but think of the hours of practice
that went into the four pieces
the performed. The perfor-
mance' only weakness was the
taped music that was used; a live
orchestra would have made the
show much more magical and ef-
fective.
The first piece, "Scotch Sym-
phony was performed to
Mendelsohn's Symphony No. 3
in A Minor and created a roman-
tic atmosphere by using pretty,
flowing costumes, and an
elaborate set. A pas de deux was
also performed.
The second piece, "Tzigana"
(gypsy in English), was a pas de
deux featuring the prima
ballerina of the company,
Maniya Barredo. This technically
demanding dance was not only
lively and vivacious, but also a lot
of fun to watch.
"Dark Song the third piece
of the evening, was a much more
contemporary dance. No set was
used and the females wore clingy,
tea-length costumes. According
to the program, "Dark Song"
shows "the depth of emotions in
relationships between men and
women � the deep love, the re-
jections, the anguish and despair
that is involved, and finally, the
basic knowledge that one is born
alone and dies alone "Dark
Song" did show this with
dramatic music, shadowy
lighting, and emotional dance
moves. This "meaningful" work
was difficult to watch in that it
made you thinkit made you
reach inside yourself.
The final piece, "Charleston
was a humorous and entertaining
look at the speakeasies of the
1920s. The dance, which showed
ballet in a different form, com-
bined an appealing set of flashy
metallic streamers and a ceiling
dance-hall ball with jazz and
humor. It was light, fun, and a
real crowd-pleaser.
The different moods the four
pieces projected contrasted nice-
ly, and best of all, the Atlanta
Ballet acted like they were really
enjoying themselves. The per-
formers did not make it look as if
ECU was just one small stop on
their busy schedule � they made
the evening look as special as it
reallv was.
Monday night the renowned Atlanta Ballet dazzled an enthusiastic audience with four uniuut piec
French Student Experiences Campus Life
By HAROLD JOYNER
For most students at ECU, campus life is nothing more than a
mundane ritual of everyday life. However, Elisabeth Clech does
not view the campus as such. Why, you ask0 Well, Elisabeth is from
France and has been in America for only a month and a half. She is
constantly learning and exploring this new world and in doing so,
she is finding out more and more about American students and
their way of life. 1 knew what America is like, but 1 had never really
talked to anyone who was actually from France. 1 was intrigued
with Elisabeth's culture and was quite surprised to find out the dif-
ferences and similiarities between our country and France.
'
���
�V�raftSfe
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo lio
Elisabeth Clech
JO YNER: Elisabeth, tell us what your first impressions of ECU
were when you arrived here at the end of August.
CLECH: Before I arrived here at ECU, I had already been in
America for four days in New York City. However, when I came to
ECU, I couldn't believe how big it was. Universities in France are
much smaller than the ones over here.
JOYNER: How largt are the universities and are they as self-
functioning as ECU?
CLECH: French universities would be about the size of two
Brewster Buildings. ECU looks like a very large French estate, with
all the buildings and all. French universities are only a small part
of French towns, unlike here where the whole city is a "college
town
JOYNER: What type of schools are in France and how much im-
portance is place . on French education?
CLECH: The school system in France is practicallv tuition free and
school is compulsory for people ages 6-16. It's a lot like the
American high school except its called lycee. After one finishes
lycee, he takes an exam called the baccalaureat. After passing this
exam, the French student is allowed to enter a university. He begins
his specialization as soon as he begins, because the baccalaureat in-
cludes the general college information that Americans spend two
years learning here. Students are very excited about learning in
France. They realize they only have a limited time to learn this in-
formation, so they take advantage of it.
JOYNER: What kind of degree did you graduate with? Also, what
are you doing in America?
CLECH: After one graduates from the university (it usually takes
about three years) we receivea"licence So, I received a "licence
d'anglais Right now 1 am in the process of obtaining my
"maitrise d'anglais which is equivalent to an American master's
degree. When obtaining a"maitrise the French student mav stav
in France or travel abroad to obtain it.
JOYNER: When do French students begin learning English as their
second language?
CLECH: Most begin their second language around age 12. The
French student also learns a third language such as German or
Spanish.
JOYNER: You mentioned that French students are constantly stu-
dying. Does this mean they do not have a social live. ?
CLECH: French people are very private individuals and keep
things to themselves. I have noticed that ECU is a very lively cam-
pus compared to the ones in France. We do not have all the frater-
nities and free movies found on this campus. Because the French
are so individualistic, 1 have a problem understanding why
Americans are so outgoing - loud, if you will.
JOYNER: Politics are a common topic of discussion on the ECU
campus these days. Do French students discuss politics very much?
CLECH: Oh yes. It is a very common topic, mainly because our
government is so controversial. Students take a very strong stand
on political issues, just like they do here.
JOYNER: Do the French live a fast-paced life like Americans do?
CLECH: No, not at all. Americans are constanth moving, whereas
in France, we take time out each day to communicate with other
people. Lunch in France is from 12 noon to about two o'clock. The
entire city practically shuts down during this time. I am amazed at
how fast Americans eat. The French are not as health conscious as
Bretangt it Cerent tr m
JOYNER: How is the landscape
Eastern Sorth Carolina?
CLECH: Bretange"s coastline is very rugged and there are a lot o
hills and valleys. There are not many Tees there like there are here.
It's very rural and a lot of the people are dairy farmers. I've noticed
some farms around here, but the aren't as big as the ones in
Bretange.
JOYNER: What do you think about all ihe automobiles on cam-
pus? Do French student enjoy the luxury of owning an
automobile?
CLECH: I am astonished at the number of cars on at LCI and 1
have just recently realized their importance to the students for
mobility. In France, the railroad network is verv large. So. it is not
a problem for anyone to get around France without a car. The
railroads stop in all the towns, whether they are large or small. I
understand the nearest passenger railroad around here is in Rocky
Mount, a town about 45 minutes away from Greenville.
JOYNER: fs it very expensive to have a car in France?
CLECH: Yes, it is. When I left France, gasoline was about five
francs a liter. That would equal a little more than S2 a gallon in
America. Also. 1 have noticed fuel prices stay the same, but in
France the price goes up every week.
JOYNER: What advice can you give to the students of EC I who
are learning a foreign language?
CLECH: I know it is difficult, but the student must be persistant
with this task. Also, I would suggest that the student go to the
French Lab so that he will have a better understanding of the
language. I took German as my other foreign language and now 1
am learning to speak Spanish. It is not the impossible task everyone
makes it out to be. Anyone can do anything, if the put their mind
to it.
Get 'Crafty' At Mendenhall
By DANIEL MAURER
Soft Writer
Hidden away on the lower level
of the Mendenhall Student
Center lies something known on-
ly to a few people, too few as a
matter of fact. Concealed behind
the vending machine area lies the
Crafts Center, a virtual goldmine
for the amateur artisan.
The Crafts Center offers ECU
students, faculty, and staff the
opportunity to pursue personal
hobbies or learn new crafts.
Directed primarily at the non-art
major, the Crafts Center is a well
equiped facility where individuals
can attend workships or simply
use the equipment on their own.
Taught by graudate students
and local craftsmen, the
workshops cover a wide variety
of crafts such as photography,
darkroom techniques, pottery,
jewelry and enamaling, creative
stitching, floor loom weaving,
and much more. Workshop sizes
are generally small, giving
students a greater opportunity
for individual instruction.
Access to the Crafts Center is
by membership only. For $15
students, faculty and staff may
obtain a membership card and
one free workshop. While
members must also supply their
own materials, those materials
are readily available and their
cost is minimal.
One of the future goals for the
Crafts Center is to offer special
workshops and possibly
customize some of the facilities to
make them more accessible to
handicapped persons. Linda
Barkand, Crafts and Recreation
Director, is presently surveying
the situation and gathering infor-
mation from various professional
sources. But the handicap crafts
program has yet to leave the
drawing board.
The Crafts Center is open
Monday through Friday, 5 p.m.
to 10 p.m and Saturday and
Sunday from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m.
During those times one of three
supervisors will be on duty to
help.
Enrollment for workshops is
taking place now and sessions
begin on October 17.
Americans because they take their time to eat the right foods. A
typical French breakfast w.l! usually include a cup oi coffee, with
cream, and a piece of bread. The lunches and dinners are larger,
usually with three courses.
JOYNER: take it then, that there are no drive-thru's in France?
CLECH: As far as I know, there aren't an typ u div�hr's4� i
France. Even with the American bzfiks, I -sas surprised that people
trust their money into machines an'd "window tellers" -Tso7ffiere
are no fast food deliveries in France. Someone delivering a pizza to
your house in France would be unthinkable.
JOYNER: What type of American programs are shown on French
television?
CLECH: The major shows are "Dallas and "Dynasty" A lot of
French people watch the shows seriously. By that. 1 mean they
think most Americans are rich and drive large cars. Of course when
I arrived in America I saw it was totally different.
Loom weaving b only one of the many workshops offered at the Crafts Center.

!
tmm
m
MM
r?
k






THE EAST CAROL INI AN OCTOBER 11, 19M
Candidates For '84
Ml JI
Jones Dorm
Student Athletic Board
Susanne Barr
Gold Squad Cheerleaders
Ldia Bowman
l 'instead Dorm
Robin Bowman
Fletcher Dorm
Sylvia Bragg
Women's Basket I
Sandra Bull
Stephanie Edwards
Sigma Phi Epsilon
Tara haircloth
Mpha Xi Delta
Crystal Fray
Ebon Herald
I

'
Holh Hink
A c k i)
Karen Hall
Purple Squad Cheerleaders

Iebbie Hardison
kappa Alpha
I eiuh Hard
Susan Johnson
Lambda Chi Alpha
Jeannie Keating
Swim Team
Leah Kaye Kendrick
S.O.I 1 s
.
Da Stu Rep
Janice Love
Zeta Beta Tau
kath Lusk
Sla Dorrr.
Patricia Marquis

Lori Pate
Kimberly Phinizy
Society for the Advancement of East Carolina Assoc. of Nursing American Marketing Assoc.
Management Students
Marta Rano
Ambassadors
Melanie Redd
Beta Theta Pi
Brenda Rekl
Corrections Social Work. I
Jeannt Rt
Christie Sparrow
Fleming Dorm
Michelle Stahel
Alpha Omicron Pi
Sue Stanko
ECU Student Committee of Oc-
cupational Therapy Assoc.
Leigh Anda Summerfield
ECU Student Union
Vicki Tharrington
Gamma Beta Phi
Terry Tingen
ECU Photo Lab
Chria barren
Clemer'
m � m
MMMtariM
m� -
������ua
Mk,
f
r-�-
I






!
r '84
Homecoming Pirate
:hall
Sandra Bullock
Scot! Dorm
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 11. I jjj f
Ciena Burroughs
Delia eta
Missy Cayton
Phi Kappa Tau
Melisa Cox
Phi Beta I ambda
Ashley DeLappe
Chi Omega
Susan Durrwachter
Sports Medicine
Hardison
I eigh Haid
Be Ik Dorm
Suzanne Hard
Clothing & rexiiles
Joev Hobbie
Cotten Dorm
Paula James
White Dorm
Paula Jones
Student Dietetic Assoc.
Anne Johnson
Sigma. Sigma, Sigma
f
� pB
kath I.usk,
Patricia Marquis
Buccaneei
Kath Marshburn
Student Medical Records Assoc.
Patricia Dean McDermott
WZMB
�afl

Martha McQuillan
Vollevball Team
Sally Noakes
Alpha Phi
Betty Jo Norman
ECU Peace Committee
Brenda RekJ
���
ork Organ
Jeanne Resua
( ampus Crusade for Christ
Jill Reynolds
Panhallemc Council
V
Renee Roberson
Green Dorm
Mary Anne Sandell
Alpha Delta Pi
Student Council for Exceptional
Children
Julie Shenill
Tvler Dorm
Terry Tingen
ECU Photo Lab
Chrisa Warren
Clement Dorm

Marie Wells
Jams Dorm
Wendi Wood
Phi Upsilon Omicron Honor
Society
Weekend Homecoming Events
Pep Ralley � Begins on the hill and ends at Mendenhall, Thursday, 7 p.m.
Free Concert � Wright Auditorium. Thursday, 830 p.m.
Alumni Coffee Hour And Open House � Taylor Slaughter Alumni Center, 901 East Fifth Street. Saturday. 9am
Art Exhibition - Gray Gallery, Friday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m Saturday. 9 am to 1 p.m Sunday. 1 am to 4 p m
Cross Campus Run - I he Department of Intramural Recreational Services is sponsoring a cross-campus run. Both a 2 5 and a 5
mile run will be held with the races starting beside Bunting Track Various categones will be established and all ECU facultv
staff, students, and alumni are encouraged to participate Saturday, 9 am Call 757-38
Homecoming Parade � Theme is ECU '84 � A Part of Your Life. Fifth Street Band Contest will be conducted during the
parade. Saturday, 10 am
Alumni Awards Luncheon � Minges Coliseum. The Outstanding Alumni Awards will be presented at this occasion and ail
alumni are invited Reservations at $7 50 per person are necessary Saturday. 11 45 am
Homecoming Tailgate Party � Ficklen Stadium parking lot off Charles Street adjacent to Harrington Baseball Field Early
arrivers will receive special "tailgate" packages as long as supply lasts. Begins Saturday at 12 noon and lasts until 2pm
Football Game � ECU Pirates vs. the Buccaneers of East Tennessee State University in Ficklen Stadium Saturday, 2pm
Traditional Alumni "Keg" Social � Greenville Moose Lodge, Highway 264 at West End Admission is $2 per person and
entertainment will be provided by the "Monitors Saturday, 5 to 7 p.m.
World Famous Royal Upizzaa Stallion Show - Minges Coliseum. Sundav, 730 p.rn Tickets are $6 and may be reserved bv
calling 757-6611. ext. 266. y
.��i� ii �� � m
� � 11 Mawma�M
��
MhMai
I
I






i
10
HE EAST CARPI INIAN OCTOBER 11. 1S84
Upcoming Singing And Acting Auditions
Singers interested in perform-
ing in the ECU Opera Theatre's
IT production are invited
� mdition on luesdav, October
; ccording to Dr. Clyde Hiss,
oi the ECU Opera
: eatre, auditions will be held in
Recital Hall of A.J. Fletcher
Theatre from 5 p.m. to 6 p.m.
ind again at 7:30 p.m.
Solo and chorus parts will be
available for singers of all voice
tvpes An accompanist will be
available, although singers may
bung then own accompanist.
Since its founding in 16, the
ECU Opera Theatre has perform
ed such operatic fare as The
Magic Flute, Falstuff, Die Fleder-
maus , and Cosi fan Tutte. First
performances in N.C. have in-
cluded such works as Francis
Poulenc's Les Mamelles de
Tiresias and Jacques Ibert's
Angelique The group also
presented the world premiere of
Gregory Kosteck's Maurya.
Performances of the coming
opera will be Feb. 20, 21, 22, and
23.
Voting auditions for George S.
an and Edna Ferber's
CO ,ied, Stage Door, will
held i hursday, Oct. 18 and
t ct 19 in the Messick
;i center The audi
i begin each eening at
oom 206.
ilie madcap theatrical
world of New York City, Stage
Door follows the attempts of
stage-struck young ladies and
their efforts to break into the
magic of Broadway theatre.
Stage Door has 30 roles (22
tcmale and 8 male) to be cast by
Cedric Winchell. Scripts are
available in the ECU Joner
Classifieds
Library Reserve Book Room.
This will be the East Carolina
Playhouse's second major pro-
duction of the 1984-1985 season.
Performances are scheduled
for Nov. 27-30 and Dec. 1 in
McGinnis Theatre.
SALE
MISC
WANTED
Bt E BLOND AKC cocker
r s Call -2 1V73
� k s a i E Wanted
a � lo assume small
� payments on spinet console
Can oe seen locally. Write:
phone number) Credit
P.O. Box 521.
Iu�: e� IL 62219.
� lit . jUi. toot dorm size
ith small freezer In
liei.t c idition $50. Call Vickie
� it 753 0525
SALE: '83 Honda Ascot, 2700
es exrellc-it condition $1600 00 or
fer Cal 2 1907 or 75 5357
. s
i. tI i okRtTOR b X
� I I a e Cal
SI EREO SYSTEM PROBL EM? Ab
sotuteiy 'no cha.ge" tor repair
estimate at the Tech Shop Cal
'57 "nineteen eighty" we thought
vou d like to know.
PIZZA- EveryMon. and Tues
night isBuyA 16 Pizza And Get
A 14" D77aFreeDelivered. Call
Alano'sPizza Tonight at 752 3861.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with
15 years wants fulltime typing at
home IBM typewriter. Call
756 3660
NEARBY FINANCIAL INSTITU
TION seeks computer student for
PART TIME work on Data Base.
Reply COMPUTER, Box 8008,
Greenville, NC 27834
OVERTONS help wanted. Ex-
perienced part time meat cutter
needed. Call Charles Overton or C.
J. Cannon for appointment. 752 5025.
CAMPUS REPS NEEDED � SKI
FREE: Position involves marketing
and selling quality ski and beach
trips on campus. Earn FREE
TRIPS AND HIGH COMMISSIONS.
Call Summit Tours 800 325 0439.
WANTED ONE OR TWO PEOPLE
to share an apt starting in Dec
Must stay during summer breaks
Must be within '4 mile from ECU
Rent up to $110 00 Call Kath:
752 4805 after 2:00 p.m.
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED FOR FALL BREAK
TO VIRGINIA TECH in Blacksburc,
Will pay for a tank of gas Please con
tact Heather 752 1079
House of Hats
Tl
t
ll O c asion Hats
and
Assories
758-3025
405 Evans St.
Downtown Mall
�M �����
LK ATOR 1
i - bn v. and m e $55
WEIGHT SET 300 lbs
: tio 752 3022 It's
� i is fen on g
GREENVILLE STUDENT
LAUNDRY SERVICE Let Green
ville Student Laundry Service
Pick up, Wash Dry. Fold, Hang,
as well as deliver your laundry!
Call 758 3087 between 830 a m.
gru i 30 p m
S60 00 PER HUNDRED PAID for
processing mail at home! Infoma
tion. send self addressed, stamped
�?nveicpe Associates, Box 95,
Roseile, New Jersey 07203
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
IC�: all I ping needs
'58 5406 58 8241
. t
OFLEX FOR SALE; $400 Ca
.don between 10 12 p.m
Thcr fi 5125
r 4) AUTO MARK IV Gov
-de. Bued. New $400.00 Roger
1 k 44 .� Si 7 2 Uarei
(400 Q Remington Moael HOC
. n. 12 gauge 30" barrel
todel engraving new $500 00
V49
BRONCO 4x4 Deign Coon
ispens 1 new tires, E Z Lift
AM F VA cassette
01 diti n 63 Datd
k MVP Metalic blue, Air
: oi tires, excellent condition
a I assume low payments
ESTONE TIRES, 700 14,6 Ya
4 t 150.00 ph 7s2 694�
21 b portable
1 etlent condition
READ
THE
CLASSIFIEDS
Melody Furci
Introducing: Tina Sexton
Beth Perry
Lisa Bissell
Aalk-ins welcome, but appointments preferred
Precision Haircutting 201 E. 5th St.
10-7 10 9:10
Bcj.i, i K k. ac t the Nerds-R
l1
- flT-iryaKit. g" � f?-g- ,aBi ��.���� �
: SP0RTSW0RU)
PLfttSONAL
oui lit birthday Df
ine smooth, slik, anc
pleasurable Best Wishes
- :ing Home
KA�PA PHI LITTLE SISTERS
-c show it as much as we
appi date all you ac
i Ihe support ou give us
,o i have with us - in
iove ou all very much
a s the brothers of Pi Kap
Tuesday Night
College Nite
Ladies Free!
$1.00 Admission for Men
Bring ECU ID
uivision with MTV
16ft SCREEN
FREE
Potato Bar at
Western Sizzlin
"THE WILD LIFE"
(Week
n
li rn. LltTLE GIRLS ?
it 11:30 LOST
1 NOl tS RATED X
��W�"�����3. � � � �� -
FREE AIMISSION
A Homecoming Concert
DEI 1 A ZETA'S, let's do it rite
. ' all nite The brothers of
Kappa Phi would like to
welcome our new little sister
pledges Congradulate our
les on their work and wish
I .� c great fall break -
batK -eady to party.
' 5'h FLOOR RAINBOW CON
IN! Hat a tanfastu Fall
i m am Joanie � ycu are
' (St hail reps ever And to
and Missy � thanks for
�� rt Vou arc the best
Pi KAPPS Delta Zeta's can't wait to
part in the jungle tonight! See you
KAPPA TAU LITTLE
ERS. The brothers and pledges
eddy for a jammin slammin
(throw down blast tonight with the
group of girls at ECU!
Seiko midnight black.
For day, for dress.
For a very special man.
There is nothing more sophisticated, or
more modern, than the dramatic impact
of black. Seiko doubles the effect
VMt,h a black dial outlined and
'marked with.gilt. Note, too, the
gilt ladderwprk in the bracelet.
Seiko leaves nothing to be
desired: three hand design,
date and the incomparable
performance of
Seiko Quartz.
featurii
THE
� .
COBB: Fall break '84 You take care
of he gas, I'll take care of the blasts.
Lets get out of town Zak
SHERIL you little "hot tub I miss
ou an "awful lot and I love you in
the most wonderful way. Please
hurry and come home! TC The
DC Kid.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY PAUL
WHITE! Have a good one. Be ready
10 party with me on the 18th. I love
ou. Amy.
LINWOOD, stay out of the
Sheraton bathroom and quit look-
ing in trash cans. It's gone
forever. Bo Jack.
Floyd G. Robinson
Jewelers
407 Evans St. 758-2452
iu g�t the best ot eiko
where ou see this sign I
BOYS
Thursday, October 18 at 8:00pm
in Wright Auditorium
following Pep Rally on the Mall
Sponsored by Special Concerts
and Student Homecoming Committe
Chit wood:
By (,KAl) MLILIs
vat' Wru�
"I have an obligation to thi-
(cardiacy division, but also to the
global development of this
university complex
This was the commitment e
pressed by Dr Walter Randolph
Chitwood. Jr in a recent inter-
view. Chitwood is the new pro-
fessor and Chief of the new
diac surgery division at the E
Medical School and Put County
Memorial Hospital With a long
ten-year residency at D �
Medical Center behind hin I
wood has brought the'e.r-
of cardiac surgery to the i
Carolina Medical o
arrival marks an imp
milestone in the Jer
this complex under i .
unrivalled prominence
center for eastern
Carolina's health care
new cardiac irgei livi
means a lot to
eastern North Carolina -
won't have to go
� they car. -
own comma:
important
Chit wo I
provide his
Carolinians "Green
warm people; my
comfortable hei
"Cardiac
Julienne
Homecoming
15 Off of All Fri
group orders!
1703 W. 6th St.
Cr
I sprnt mi summer ihi� rar
thfrt. I cimr to admirr �nd rr�p- �
tiiude to�trd th proliferation I -
and it I rmrrvm for Pra. I
tions.
The village in which I h�el house-
province. Politics had n �� � -
became more policalh a�are of theent
anthropologists hope to achiese the
enlightening as I began to see ih�
amount of people in the I s �a m 4
trml Amencans
It �as in m village of Pueni I
of Colorado. �ho ha� hed ano �
and I bevame fnends. and N :
�hkh she had written to famih and I
written letter, from a woman wh baa �
of her name countrs and of Centra U
near. I would like to �hare shi� letter -
what is actualls happening in "sicaraugi
polic. from a person who is liv
Wanda S. Flanagan
Senior, nthropologs
Dear Fnends ar.j I to
1 recent!5 ndtdfi
L.S. I had t-o jav: excuse
that we'd be abie to set �
said she's planning 1
news 1 �a al-rav
r'easures of mj ra -
dangerous, p
someplace sa-f
It's no: the . cceni
up short aga:r the til
have to-orr aK " �
a beautiful countrv on que
Costa Rica abohsfr
fco put tax mor.e r- be -4
grown proud of the exen p
MCial justice Las! ea- ?�?- s'
ed neutralits � ot�a
been established her: p BWte eave 0
on an tnternatior, .a.t
The gosernmer ol "
congratulated Costa R � -e J r"
conflicts so close ia N cai� .
States is conspicuous absei
S Cituens living in Costa R � e J
henepreser;ecc BWrt T
Day. he told us he apprecia: - caM
C S. government'1 cold recef I
President Monge a B�defst Bfthel
doing everything withir. tti pema I
straints. to mihtar.re Coeta R ca a- I j
goal is to mihtanly surround and ultimatdj
Nicaragua.
I realue that some of sol are fairly �
America and that most of 'u abhor the
the wars You have MCCai W fvceiien: bO
Ufeber, which describe the htstoncal r 1
I'm probably the only U S citier. rr I
appreciate knowing what 1 see happening J
In 19-9 the Nicaragua peopfe �onl'
of the crudest and wealthiest dictators o
Somoza familv � fatm m Nicaragua �
Look �
This space was provided I
tions.
i






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11, 1984
11
Chitwood: One Committed To Service
of Hats
Hat
015
time HJy
it Girls
ost
ION
5
t 8:00pm
um
the Mall
certs
ommitte
B GRADY MULLIS
MlNHtilH
'7 iave an obligation to this
(cardiac) division, but also to the
global development of this
university complex. "
This wa the commitment ex-
pressed by Dr. Walter Randolph
Chitwood, Jr. in a recent inter-
view. Chitwood is the new pro-
fessor and Chief of the new car-
diac surgery division at the ECU
Medical School and Pitt County
Memorial Hospital. With a long
ten-year residency at Duke
Medical Center behind him, Chit-
wood has brought the technology
of cardiac surgery to the East
Carolina Medical complex. His
arrival marks an important
milestone in the development of
this complex underscoring its
unrivalled prominence as the
center for eastern North
Carolina's health care. "This (the
new cardiac surgery division)
means a lot to the people of
eastern North Carolina � they
won't have to go to distant places
� they can be treated in their
own community � that's very
important Chitwood said.
Chitwood is excited that he can
provide his services to East
Carolinians. "Greenville has very
warm people; my family feels
comfortable here he said.
"Cardiac surgery is something
kind of glamorous; it's always in
the forefront. We hope to use
that to help advertise the medical
school, so more patients who
need cardiac care will come to
this area
Chitwood comes from a "long,
intense, superb" program at
Duke Medical Center that pro-
duces some top medical profes-
sionals, including Dr. William
DeVries, a good friend and
fellow resident of Chitwood's
who was responsible for implan-
tation of the first artificial heart
in Barney Clark. "It has its place
and may evolve to a clinically ap-
plicable procedure, but
transplant is a much more viable
option for now Chitwood said.
Chitwood has successfully
transplanted hearts in animals,
but he has not yet attempted a
transplant in a human subject.
He hopes to perform human
heart transplants in the years
ahead. "1 want to develop a busy
clinical cardiac surgery division
with good care and good teaching
� with a well thought-of, well
recognized program. My goal for
this program is not only to make
it better, but also to make the en-
tire med school better He em-
phasized his plan to provide
routine surgery for patients of all
ages on a full-time basis using
three to four surgeons capable of
performing any type of cardiac
surgery any time.
To complement this busy
clinical activity, Chitwood will
develop an active research facili-
ty. During his residency at Duke,
Chitwood was heavily involved in
research and is now responsible
for approximately 50 publica-
tions. His research will involve
study of the left ventricle and
changes in blood flow and
metablolism relating to car-
diopulmonary bypass and par-
ticular drugs. Chitwood praised
the opportunity for research at
the school of medicine. "There
are exciting, excellent resources
here, and the access to these
resources for research is good
With all of these tireless goals
in mind, Chitwood has brought
with him a pretrained staff from
Duke Medical Center that he
refers to as his "nucleus In ad-
dition he brings the know how of
high-tech modern equipment he
describes as "the best of the
best His commitment to quali-
ty care for East Carolinians is ap-
parent during the interview, as he
emphasized the importance of his
service to others.
Dr. Walter Randolph Chit-
wood, Jr. was born in 1946 in
Pulaski, Virginia. He graduated
with a B.S. from Hampden-
Sydney College of Virginia in
1968. Afterwards, in July of that
year, he married Tamara Shane
Whitt. He spent 1968-1970 work-
ing for DuPont in Wilmington,
Delaware. Dr. Chitwood return-
ed to his alma mater, Hampden-
Sydney, to work as a Biology in-
structor from 1970-1971. Then he
attended the University of
Virginia at Charlottesville from
1971-1974 where he received his
M.D.
From 1974-1984 Dr. Chitwood
served as intern, junior assistant
resident, senior assistant resident,
chief resident, and teaching
scholar at Duke Medical Center.
During this extensive residency
program, Dr. Chitwood travelled
abroad giving research presenta-
tions, making academic visits and
working on research. During this
time he has amassed approx-
imately 50 publications, has
received a research fellowship on
cardiovascular physiology and
research awards and grants from
the National Insitutes of Car-
diovascular Traning, the North
Carolina Heart Association, and
the John Horsely Research prize.
Dr. Walter Randolph Chitwood Jr.
Julienne s Florist
Homecoming Corsages
15 Off of All Fraternity
group orders!
i�
i&a
ms
"We want to be uour night spot
eirry nite
WELCOMES
THE CLASS OF 1988
TO ECU
1703 w. 6th St. 752-5216
Doors Open: DST 9:00-2:00 am Eat 8:30-1:00 a.m.
MONDAY � CLOSED - Opn tor pmirc ,1crm vxialianj IptcuJ Miindj.s r
tint v.pr ot e�i h m�tr;
TUESDAY � CRAZYTITSDAY � Pilferr n: evcattcaca ��rk frm BikiniComrv
Air Band ContMt tc Drih Nttc Etch Tupvljv � alwayi different
& . - . - tun
�WEDNESDAY - Ht. MP SITt � Free adm.iSion to ECl'tjdenn SI 00 I8w -Jm
All CMns 55� t:ll 1 1 OC p m . BO llB riding
THURSDAY - uOLUEE SITE - $1 00 Mm.iuon lor til ,t�oenti J. .
18 w idm Ait -�ni 55� till 1 1 00 p m . 80� till loung
ITUDAY - End of the Wee� Ptrf. - Fndi Afternoon 1 30 till 7 10 F'ee
�dmiis.cnI OC I8u idm ' All cans M till 5 15 p m SO ii�
till 7 30 FRIDAY MTfc - f 00 trlmnn-TTT S2 00 IS ft idm All
c�n5 SO till 1 1 OC pm
SATl P.DAY - Bes' r. Dance Music � $1 00 aomissior EC1 students
$2 OC 1 8 i �dm
SUNDAY - LADIES SITE - For 1 5 earsour favomc v. i to wrjp up Ike weekend
Free idm ss.on tot ladMf f 1 00 IByi rjir ,6 NicfceiDraft white u
UU'S
"BRING YOUR FRIENDS & COME EARLY
OttOMCTWC
�Y�CAR�C�H1�R
Drs. Holiis & Sciba!
Tipton Annex228 Greenville Blvd.
756-9404
For Peace From Central America
I spent m summer this e�r in the I imon Province of Costa Rica. During m sta
there. 1 came to admire and respect this country for its true democracy and its at-
titude toward the proliferation of world peace. C osta Rica's abolishment of arms
and its I niversitv for Peace should be a monument to the rest of the world's na-
tions.
The village in which I lived housed mans Mcaraguan refugees, as did the entire
province. Politics had a was of winding into mans conversations, and I gradually
became more polically aware of the Central American crisis from what all aspiring
anthropologists hope to achieve, the "insider" point of view. It was frustrating yet
enlightening as I began to see that the point of view of the press and of a large
amount of people in the T.S. was more than often in conflict with that of many Cen-
tral Americans.
It was in my village of Puerto Viejo that I met Paula Palmer, a writer and native
of Colorado, who has lived and worked on the Talamance Coast for 11 years. Paula
and 1 became friends, and on the day before I left (osta Rica she gave me a letter
which she had written to family and friends back n Colorado. It is a sincere and well
written letter, from a woman who has the advantage of a bicultural viewpoint, that
of her native country and of Central America. With the presidential elections so
near, 1 would like to share this letter with you. with hopes that it can give Insight into
what is actually happening in Mcarauga, Costa Rica, and within our own foreign
policy. from a person who is living there
Wanda S. Flanagan
Senior, Anthropology
Dear Friends and Family:
1 recently indulged in a rare luxury, a long-distance phone call to a friend in the
U.S. I had two good excuses: my birthday and her doctorate degree. I also hoped
that we'd be able to set a date for her second visit with me here in Costa Rica. She
said she's planning to come in January with two other good friends � wonderful
news! I was already imagining introducing these Boulderites to the good, simple
pleasures of my beach worl, and then my friend said, "Paula, if it seems too
dangerous, politically, for us to come to Costa Rica, would you meet us instead,
someplace safe1"
It's not the only time in recent months that Mans and hopes have suddenly come
up short against the thought: what if the war s reads to Costa Rica? It's horrible to
have to worry about this, not just because I liv here, but because Costa Rica is such
a beautiful country, unique in the world for s democratic, peaceful traditions.
Costa Rica abolished its army in 1949, cho sing to stay out of the arms race and
to put tax money into health and education programs instead. Costa Ricans have
grown proud of their exemplary democracy and their traditions of peacefulness and
social justice. Last year President Mon,e dieclared Costa Rica's permanent, unarm-
ed neutrality in other countries' militar conflicts, and a University for Peace has
been established here to promote peace education and nonviolent conflict resolution
on an international scale.
The governments of many Latin American and European nations have publicly
congratulated Costa Rica for its declared neutrality, especially in view of the armed
conflicts so close in Nicaragua, Honduras, Guatemala and El Salvador. The United
States is conspicuously absent in the list of Costa Rica's supporters. In June, 620 U.
S. Citizens living in Costa Rica signed a letter of support for Costa Rica's neutrality.
When we presented the letter to President Monge the week of our own Independence
Day, he told us he appreciates this indicator of U. S. citizens' support in light of the
I S government's "cold reception" of Costa Rica's neutrality proclamation.
President Monge is understating the U.S. position. The Reagan administration is
doing everything within its power, often overstepping both legal and diplomatic con-
straints, to militarize Costa Rica as it has already militarized Honduras. The U.S.
goal is to militarily surround and ultimately to crush the Sandinista government in
Nicaragua.
I realize that some of you are fairly well informed about what goes on in Central
America and that most of you abhor the violence and the U.S. role in accelerating
the wars. You have access to excellent books like Inevitable Revolutions by Walter
Lafeber, which describe the historical roots of the present conflicts. But I also figure
I'm probably the only U.S. citizen most of you know who lives here. Maybe you'd
appreciate knowing what I see happening around me.
In 1979 the Nicaraguan people won a revolution against Anastasio Somoza, one
of the crudest and wealthiest dictators on the planet. The United States had put the
Somoza family in power in Nicaragua 40 years ago and continued to support the dic-
tatorship until days befor the regime fell All Latin America celebrated the success
of the revolution. All Latin America celebrates the achievements of the new San-
dinista rulers: their literacy campaign, rural and community health program, land
reform, economic pluralism (some nationalization, some private enterpirse). These
are the things that matter most to poor people; these, and peace.
Nicaragua has had no peace.
The despised Somoza National Guard escaped to Honduras where it organized a
counter-revolutionary force (the "contras"), equipped, trained and funded with L.
S. tax dollars. The U.S. government has built air force and naval bases in Honduras
where more than 2,000 American military men are stationed. Joint U.S-Honduras
military maneuvers have been in operation in Honduras continually during 1984.
And the CIA-supported contras have been attacking Nicaraguan villages and
government outposts since 1980.
In recent months President Reagan has vowed to keep financing, supplying and
advising the contras in spue of the Congressional vote to stop this funding. He has
also jeopardized the United States in worldwide public opinion by disregarding the
International Court ruling against the U.Sbacked mining of Nicaragua's ports, the
truth is there would be little armed opposition to the Nicaraguan government
without U.S. dollars, weapons and military advisors.
And what would happen if the fighting stopped for lack of funds? Well, we can't
know for sure, but at least the Sandinistas would have the opportunity to
demilitarize their society put their soldiers to work on agricultural production, and
loosen up the government control that they have justified because their country is
under attack.
The government that will be elected there in November would have to put itself to
work resolving the country's internal conflicts � but with programs, not with guns.
In this effort they would have the cooperation of many democratic nations.
I have a young Nicaraguan friend who fought with the contras for three years. His
name is Augustine. I met him when he came to Puerto Viejo to take up fishing, hav-
ing fled from the fighting in his own country. This is what he told me:
"I don't agree with the Sandinistas, so I took up fighting with the contras and I
got to the rank of captain. Me and some of the other captains disagreed with the
leaders and when we explained our ideas we noticed that they never accepted what
we suggested. Finally they told us, 'Look, we can't do what you all want because we
get our money from the CIA and they have their own plan. So iust follow our orders
and keep quiet
"So I get to realize I'm out there in the jungle risking my life and losing my
friends because I think we're fighting for ourselves, for Nicaraguans, and I get to
learn it's only for CIA we're dying for. If they don't listen to us now when we're
fighting how they're going to listen to us if we even win the fight?
"So I decide to leave the fighting and wait until it's over and then go back and
work for my town and my family. The thing that has me worried is it looks like the
fighting will never stop because those big people only care about power, while we,
the poor people, we only want peace and work
As long as Ronald Reagan is President of the United States, Augustine will not be
able to go back to Nicaragua to live and work in peace. Nicaragua is not a Grenada
that can be invaded and subdued in a matter of days. The people of Nicaragua suf-
fered too long under Somoza to ever consent to be defeated and governed again by
Somoza's men. Please believe me when I say the U.S. military "solution" is no solu-
tion at all. It's a waste of your tax money, a drain on Nicaragua's scarce resources, a
senseless, protracted massacre that offers hope to no one.
And yet it appears that President Reagan is preparing an all-out assault on
Nicaragua, despite the protests and alternatives offered by the Sandinistas
themselves, the world community and the Contadora negotiating group. Look what
his administration is doing in Costa Rica:
The U.S. has persuaded Costa Rica, a country without an army, to accept $9
million in military aid. For the first time in history Costa Ricans see armed men in
camouflage fatigues on the streets of the capital city and riding around in U. S. army
jeeps. The American embassy here has been pressing Costa Rica to accept a group of
1,000 U.S. National Guardsmen whose task would be to "build roads" in the nor-
thern zone bordering on Nicaragua. Costa Rica rejected the U.S. soldiers in
December last year; the proposal was made again in January, and President Monge
had to fortify his neutrality position with a tour of European states to secure their
support in order to say "no thanks" again to the U.S.
But A.I.D. will get the job done anyway. The U.S. agency announced the financ-
ing of 64 separate projects to build infrastructure (roads, bridges, extended airport
runways and facilities) in the northern border region. These are war preparations.
The airport in the northern zone, for example, was just amplified in 1982 despite
arguments then that the work was unnecessary by Costa Rican standards. Now AID
is funding further construction. WHY?
Meanwhile, an intense propaganda campaign in Costa Rican newspapers is
financed by the CIA. The intent is to make Costa Ricans so fearful of Nicaraguan
military aggression that they will accept Costa Rican militarization as a necessary
defense measure. The CIA calls this propaganda "disinformation an Orwellian
term for lies. The big lie in this case is that the Sandinistas are the aggressors. The
United States has not even been able to provide evidence that the Sandinistas are ar-
ming the rebels in El Salvador. Nicaragua is unde attack by the United States. It is
not attacking anyone. Yet full-page ads fill Costa Rican newspapers with scare
headlines lik
"Are we men or chickens?"
"Do we have blood in our veins or ice-water?"
"Are we going to wait until THEY invade Central Park'1"
You can see how this propaganda appeals to the machista side of the Latin per-
sonality, equating militarism with manhood, undermining the traditional Costa
Rican values of pacifism and neutrality. It is reallv terrible to see the Umved States
setting out to subvert the one stable, peaceful democracy in Central .America
I am fearful of a war soon to be fought on Costa Rican soil. It won't be started by
Nicaragua. It will be started by my own country's government. It won't end soon'
and the United States will not win it because the United States has mis-identified the
enemy. The enemy in Central America is the gruelling persistence of injustice
repression and poverty. The wars fueled by U.S. economic interests and waged with
U.S. weaponry are only aggravating the injustice, repression and poverty with the
additional griefs of violent death and homelessness for millions of refugees.
But what about the Communist threat? All the evidence shows that where people
can live decently, where they perceive fairness and opportunity and participation in
decision making, Russian-style Communism is no threat at all. In Costa Rica for
example, in the last national election (1982), the union of three leftist parties was on-
ly able to gain 2 percent of the popular vote.
If the U.S. would put is resources to work supporting Central American land
reform, pluralistic economic developement and the strengthening of democratic in-
stitutions � instead of war � Communism would soon have little appeal in the
region. As long as the U.S. carries the Big Stick, it will be attacked, justifiably, as
the Bully. The irony of Ronald Reagan's militaristic policy in Central America is
that it pushes people toward Communism. Our less trigger-happy allies seem to
understand this. Not one of them supports Reagan's military strategy in Central
America.
The Reagan administration is just plain wrong, tragically wrong, in its militaristic
approach to Central America's turmoil.
Thank God there are peace efforts to give hope against Reagan's belligerence. The
European community, the Contadora Group, the Latin American democracies,
Costa Rica as a whole, and hundreds of churches and organizations in the U.S. are
promoting alternatives to the fighting in Central America.
And, most hopeful of all, the U.S. Deomocratic Party has approved a platform
calling for an end to U.S. military intervention in Central America.
This year the Presidential election offers us a clear choice between war and peace.
I'm writing this letter to ask you on behalf of mv Central American neighbors to
make a choice for peace in 1984.
If you normally vote Republican, please make an exception this year. If you
already plan to vote for Mondale and Ferraro, please do much more than that
Please use your spare time � or make spare time � to work actively for the
Democratic ticket. This year it's a matter of life and death for millions of Central
American people, for my neighbors. For my adopted country.
I cherish many of the deepest values of the American people. Can you feel with
me the pain of seeing our values debased and distorted in a region where our
presence brings death and division rather than hope and healing? Mexico's great
novelist Carlos Fuentes speaks for all of Latin America when he says that "Yankee
Go Home" is not the cry of our southern neighbors. They don't want our absence,
but what Fuentes calls our "civilized presence Is that so much to ask of us?
We are not helpless against our President's betrayal of our values and our civiliz
tion. Please join me in these actions to re-route our Central American policy towa d
justice and peace:
1) Urge your congressional representatives to vote against all military "aid" to
Central America. Urge them also to formally endorse and fully support Costa Rica's
neutrality.
2) Work for and vote for Senate and House candidates who are committed to in-
ternational cooperation and negotiation instead of unilateral military intervention.
3) Work hard for and vote for Mondale and Ferraro.
In May this year, 40,000 Costa Ricans paraded in the streets of San Jose in sup-
port of Peace and Neutrality, some 50 American residents here marched with them
under a banner that read: "U.S. Citizens for Costa Rican Neutrality We were
cheered and applauded, and it felt marvelous to be makeing a positive statement for
peace against all the forces of war. One Costa rican, reading our banner, said to me:
"Ha! North Americans for peace? That will be the day
That will be the day, dear friends. We can make that day come true. It's very ex-
citing to get to look forward to a new, constructive era of US-Central American
cooperation. It would feel so good to be a part of that change.
My very best wishes to you.
Look forward to the upcomming schedule of events for Central America Week.
This space was provided by donations from concerned E.C.U. students, faculty, and student organiza-
DAUSCH & LOAD SOFIENS CONTACTS
COMPLETE FORONIY $99
For just $99 you H be fitted with the finest soft contact lenses available
Bausch&lombSoflens' Contacts The price includes everything you H
need to put your glasses away lot good initial eye examination lenses
carekit instructions and follow up visits tor one monrh And ybcneceive
two weeks trial
Bausch & Lomb Soflens Contacts for S99 complete7 Come see for
yourself today'
$ For Sh.t-i.li WMi ECU ID.
tions.
For more information on how you can help contact- THE
GREENVILLE PEACE COMMITTEE, 758-4906 or call your local
Democratic office. y locaJ
40lifc�4MM
.

� - ����afc�i�a�
�aa a.
��
�aaaaaai

V i
.
V





THE EAST CAROt INI AN
Sports
OCTOBER II, 1984
Page 12
Pirates Ready
For Hurricane
Pittsburgh defensive end Tony Woods (90) wraps up Pirate quarter
hack Darrell Speed (2) in last Saturday's game. Although EC!
ost
17-10. Speed had the best game of
passes without an interception
NEIL JOHNSON � ECU Photo Lab
his young career completing 11 of 21
Manwaring Optimistic About Season
B SCOTT POWERS
uitiam sport Kditor
It will be a different type of
Lady Pirate basketball team that
will take the court this season, and
according to head coach Emily
Manwaring. it will be a lot more
exciting.
"We're going to run, press and
steal the ball � anything to
generate some excitement on the
court Manwaring said.
Manwaring replaced former
head coach Cathy Andruzzi at the
end of the 1984 season, bringing
with her JoAnne Bly, her assistant
at San Francisco State. Laurie
Sikes, a former ECU standout,
will also serve as an assistant
coach.
Manwaring, unlike her
predecessor, will work for an up-
tempo game. "I'd like for us to
average 120 points a game she
said.
Last year's team averaged just
over 56 points a game, while giv-
ing up about the same.
As tar as the defense is concern-
ed, the name of Manwaring's
defensive scheme speaks for itself.
It's called the "destroj 1) and
the coach has set some high goals
for it.
"We want our defense to hold
the other team to less than 54
points a game she said.
For a team to score 120 points a
game and hold the opposing team
to such a low amount ma seem
impossible, but Manwaring has
faith that it can be done.
"We'll have to put a lot o
pressure on the other team
because we're not going to have
the height to sta down inside
with them she commented.
"We're going to try to beat them
up and down the court The
tallest player listed on this year's
roster is only 5-11.
Manwaring knows of the con-
troversy between Andruzzi and
the fans in the past, and hopes
that they can be laid to rest.
"We want to hold our own this
year, and get our attendance up
she said. "We've got to win some
more games this year if we want to
do that, and 1 feel that we can.
"I want the fans to come to the
game to have a good time she
added. "I want people to come
out and cheer, or don't come at
all
In order to generate some en-
thusiasm on the team during
preseason workouts, Manwaring
names a Workout Player of the
Week every week. This will
become the Player of the Week
once the season gets underway.
Anita Anderson, a 5-11 senior
from Raleigh, was named
Workout Player of the Week for
last week. "Anita wants to do
really well Manwaring said.
"She's happj to work and she's
playing through a lot of pain
now Anderson suffers from an
ongoing back injury.
The only real difficulty thus tar
for the team is adjusting to the
personnel changes and not with
the system. However. Manwaring
expects the problem will correct
itself in the near future.
As one can see. a lot o change
is store for the 1984-85 edition o
the Lad) Pirate basketball team.
But looking at the recent exodus
o fans away from the games and
the lack of progress of the pro-
gram in the last few years, change
is essential to make the Lady
Pirates a team that will once again
be the leaders o' ECU athletics.
ECU head football coach Ed
Emory quoted baseball great
Yogi Berra at his weekly press
conference, saying "it ain't over,
till it's over
The Pirate head coach is off to
his worst start (1-5) since coming
to ECU in 1981, but is still confi-
dent that his team can turn it
around.
"We've got a long way to go
Emory said, "but we can still
have a successful season. We
have a strong program with
strong people in it � it's just a
matter of playing with consisten-
cy
In last Saturday's 17-10 loss to
Pittsburgh, Emory said the
Pirates played well enough to
win, but they just blew a lot of
scoring opportunities.
Although a dropped pass in the
endone and a missed field goal
were among those botched op-
portunities, Emory especially
noted what took place at the end
of the first half.
ECU had called a timeout with
eight seconds remaining on the
16-yard line, and instead of pass-
ing into the endzone, Bobby Clair
was sent up the midlle for a gain
of five yards.
"It would have been a hell of a
play if it had worked Emory-
said. "One of our fifth-year
lineman missed the call and
didn't block who he was suppos-
ed to
Although a fulfilled assign-
ment could have proved to be the
turning point in the game, Emorv
accepted responsibilty tor the
mishap. "We looked disorganiz-
ed because 1 sent Darrell (ECU
quarterback Darrell Speed) ba.k
on the field without a plav.
'With an inexperienced
quarterback we tried to get a little
to fancy Emory continued.
"We should have taken the three
points
Emory said part of the team's
failure to be productive on of-
tense can be attributed to the lack
ot teamwork. "We've got the
strength and the speed, hut we
just don't have good team
chemistry
Emory said the team will ta
giant step forward when Speed
develops the ability to recogme
defensive formations and adjust
the call at the line of scrimmage
"He's just too darn young
Emory remarked. "It's rnv fault
for not having him plav in a
backup role to Kevin Ingram (la I
year's starting quarterback)
Although Emory felt his t
should have defeated the Pan
thers, he did sav the rest of the
offensive unit played well. "Oui
offensive line played the best thev
have all season. Tim Mitchell and
Jimmy Walden had the best
games of their season, and the
receivers plaved well, despite the
absence of Stefon Adams
Adams plaved defense for the
first time on the collegiate lev el
against Pitt. He was moved from
split end to free safety, and
responded with a team leading
ten tackles.
Defensively, Emory was still
disappointed with his team's per-
formance. "We're just not a verv
good tackling football team right
now. Craig Heyward had a heck
of a day (17 rushes, 110 yards),
but we've been missing tackles
for the last five weeks
The one bright spot was the
play of Lawrence Brooks, who
has seen limited action since ar-
riving at ECU. Brooks was v
one of the team captains for the
Pirates' game with Tulsa Satur-
day night.
Mthough ECl 's ive
plav may not be up to par. Emory
said Tulsa's defensive unit is the
toughest his team will see all year.
The Golden Hurricane is led bv
defensive lineman Robert P -
(6' 7" � 290 pounds) and By
Jones (6 4" � 280 pounds).
Tulsa stands 2-3 on the year,
and they're coming off an im-
pressive 35-7 victory over Wesi
Texas State.
Adams Makes Transition To Secondary
B SCOTT COOPER
stiff Wr1l�T
Split end Stefon Adams
played defense for the First time
in his collegiate career Saturday
against Pittsburgh, and in do-
ing so, led the Pirate defense
with ten tackles.
Adams has been the leading
receiver on the football team
for the last two seasons, and is
the eighth leading receiver in
ECU history � but according
to head coach Ed Emory, the
move was necessary.
"Our secondary play against
N.C. State was awful, and I felt
we needed to strenghten it
Emory said. "Stefon is one of
the best natural athletes on the
team, and I knew he could do
the job if we put him back
there
Adams said he was a bit
reluctant to make the move
when First asked by Emory, but
1 'Stefon is one of the
best natural athletes
on the team. I knew
he could do the job
(in the defensive
backfield) if we put
him back there
�Ed Emory
felt the move would be
beneficial to his football
career. "The coaches didn't
pressure me, and said the deci-
sion to make the switch was up
to me Adams explained.
"But I felt I would have a bet-
ter chance at making the pros if
I had experience at two posi-
tions
Although Adams was the
defensive leader against Pitt, he
said playing in the secondary is
more of a challenge than his
former position. "Defense is
harder because you have to be
more aware Adams said. "A
missed tackle or a blown
coverage can result in a big play
for the opponent
Despite his natural talents,
Adams spent many extra hours
after practice looking over
Films. "I studied different for-
mations and the pass routes of
other receivers Adams
remarked. "I really enjoy
defense and I know 1 must
work harder and harder each
week to prepare myself
"He really worked hard last
week and did a fine job for
us stated Linwood Ferguson,
defensive secondary coach.
"Stefon is a fine young man,
and didn't mind making the
change. He is the type who
would do anything to help the
team
Stefon has two brothers also
playing on the Pirate football
team (Amos and Calvin). But
his older brother Ricky, who
graduated from N.C. State a
few years back, has been his
� biggest idol. "I've always wat-
ched him play, and admired
Stefon Adams
him a great deal Stefon said.
"I got my positive attitude
from Ricky Ironically, in his
senior year, Ricky was also
moved from the receiver spot
to play defense.
Stefon played tailback and
free safety in high school at
Southwest Guilford. However,
the move from offense to
defense on the collegiate level
was more difficult. "The tran-
sition was kind of tough but I
got support from the players
and coaches remarked
Adams. "Vernard (Wynn) gave
me advice on coverages and
other defenses, and K.K.
(Kevin Walker) guided me as
well
"Stefon handled the transi-
tion with an open mind, and
showed a lot of character and
class said coach Ferguson.
Against the Panthers,
Walker (cornerback and room-
mate of Adams) talked to
Adams, making him aware of
given situations throughout the
game. He gave good run sup-
port against Pitt Walker add-
ed. "Stefon needs a bit more
work, but he still plaved very
well
Many people had an in-
fluence on Stefon's football
career, and Adams speaks very
highly of his high school offen-
sive line coach. "Coach Cog-
gins saw I had ability and really
pushed me Adams said,
while also adding that his
coach's impact has helped him
to become a better football
player.
At the collegiate level, not
many players get the chance to
7r wouldn't be easy
(making it in
professional
football). I would
have to put forth a
great deal of
effort. "
�Stefon Adams
play on both sides of the line.
Stefon just may be one player
with the capabilities to do so.
"I'd like to play both ways, but
it would be very tough
Adams said. The coaching
staff said that if needed, Stefon
could get the chance near the
end of the season.
Adams also hopes to be
drafted as a professional
player. "It would be a big plus,
and 1 would have to keep a very
positive attitude. It wouldn't be
easy, because I would have to
put forth a great deal of
effort ������
Last year's Pirate squad w . w. ��T' t . :
graduated 11 players to the
professional ranks, and it
shouldn't be a surprise to Stefon Adams (14) played defense for the first time on the collegiate level in his team's 17-10 love .� d
Pirate fans to see Stefon sburgh last weekend. The senior split endfree safety went into the contest as the team's leadinJ r!l,
Adams make it as well. but came away with a game-high 10 tackles
Doing It All
m.
I
ECU, Tul.
Square Oj
Third and la�t: Tulsa will be the
third, and last, opponent on 1 as'
Carolina's 1984 schedule I
ECU will be facing for the I
time. The other two prior to the
Golden Hurricane were Pitt and
Georgia Southern. The Pu
sport a 1-1 record agair,
time opponents in 1984 (U r
win over Georgia Southern and
17-10 loss to Pitt)
Nichols moves up: W tth
catches for 62 yards in lasl �-� � r
17-10 loss to Pitt, sen
Rickv Nichols leapfrog
the No 5 spol �
career vardage
Chesapeake. Va . nati � I
accumulated 91? .arecr �
yards, pushing him ;
Eure (882 yard
rada (906 yards) N
just 110 vards sh I
Dave Bumgarner (1
for the No 4 sj
still to plav.
Nichols als
8 spot on the scl
receptions list as he r.
three-plus seasons N
two shy oi No. 7, thi
No 6 and nine sh rl f N
Nichols uld nee: i
in EC U's last five gan �
to becoem the
receptions leac
Still could be a winner:
though ECU Finds erv
uncomfortable 1-5 situati i
Pirates can still salvage a wii
season out of 198-
luck. Bv winning
games � EC 1 �- ltd i
a 6-5 and would a-
ing -eas n since 198
Pirates p . 6 marl
This season is als the 1
finds Head acl Ed
with a losing re. rd aft
games, in each of Emoi
three seasons he was 3 " six
games jeep ini I
las: season saw his P:ra:es 5-
Identical �tart: Tulsa is now I
after last week's 35 victor)
Missouri Valley Conference
ponent West Texas State, v.
matches exactly the Golden H
ricape 1983 record a: tfc
of the - .
have come � i
State and v
the losses have been I rka
8-9) and nations i �
Oklahoma State : I
Brigham ing (38 !
The 198? season sa
defeat San Dieg 5 ss �
thwes- ana hil
Arkansas,
Oklahoma State in its I
The Golden H
off six straight � . .
East Ca
a bowl ir.vitation
Since 1�J"2
eighth-vear c
an impress . 8 -
19"? seas
ncane has
ing season
that being a J-8 can
19 . Cooper's
coach I nder I
Hur- 5 53-29
The Coope
10 . s 978: 9-2 979
1980 B-3 H 7-4 ?82
Coopei i MVC �
the Yea
10-1 team, whicl
season rani 6th bv I PI
19th bv P in the I na p
Coopc also serves as
athletic director, a p
assumed in 198
Winners of late: With he
four seasons the Tulsa
Hurricane are qu .
establishing themselves as ore ol
college football's top pr. -
Tulsa has recorded seas
8-3, 4. 10-1 and 8-3 s not 98
That adds up to an impress
33-11 mark for Head Coach
Cooper and his staff, a ve-v
respectable 50 winning perot
tage.
Yet. Tulsa. like East Carolina a
year ago. has been overlooked bv
the post-season bowls The lasl
time a Tulsa team plaved
bowl game was 1976 when the
Golden Hurricane dropped a
20-1" decision to McNeese State
of the Southland Conference in
the Independence Bowl
Pirates on turf: East Carolina has
played twice on artificial surface
during the 1984 season and have
come up empty handed both
times. ECU droped a 17-12 deci-
sion to Central Michigan in Mt.
Pleasant, Mi an last week's
17-10 loss to Pitt in Pitt Stadium
During the 1983 season the
Pirates played twice on turf,
mmmmm








THfc fcAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11, 1984
s Ready
urricane
kat
IMS
ind the speed, but we
: � have good team
.1 d the team will take a
foi ward when Speed
elops the abili:v to recognize
f formations and adjust
v scrimmage.
K) darn young
"It's m fault
a him pla in a
- am (iast
a k)
x �ugh I fiis team
the Pan-
resi of the
"Our
e best the
Mitchell and
he best
. and the
�pite the
Vdams
the
b tte level
He m & from
ifet and
leading
- IS still
- per-
a very
� -
td a heck
irds),
I tackles
as the
ks, who
� nee a:
� as v Oted
the
� Satur-

mor
11 '
i acallear
d b
R txPike
- '�ai d B ron
Jor- � 4 ;yipounds).
- Is 2-3on thevear.
�2 Ofl tlWest


� � t i '
�, � . �
GA-Y -T,�ONe,upnoto-�
in his teams 17-10 loss to Pi
1 as the team's leading receive
ECU, Tulsa Looking For A Victory,
Square Off This Weekend In Tulsa
I hird and la l i. �. ;n u l. .
Third and last: Tulsa will be the
third, and last, opponent on East
Carolina's 1984 schedule that
ECU will be facing for the first
time. The other two prior to the
Golden Hurricane were Pitt and
Georgia Southern. The Pirates
sport a 1-1 record against first-
time opponents in 1984 (34-27
win over Georgia Southern and
17-10 loss to Pitt).
Nichols moves up: With his five
catches for 62 yards in last week's
P-10 loss to Pitt, senior flanker
Ricky Nichols leapfrogged into
the No. 5 spot on ECU's all-time
career yardage list. The
Chesapeake, Va native now has
accumulated 913 career receiving
vards, pushing him past Stan
Eure (882 yards) and Dick Cor-
rada (906 yards). Nichols is now
lust 110 yards shy of overtaking
Dave Bumgarner (1,023 yards)
for the No. 4 spot with five games
still to play.
Nichols also took over the No.
8 spot on the school's career
receptions list as he now has 49 in
three-plus seasons. Nichols is just
two shy of No. 7, three shy of
No. 6 and nine short of No. 5.
Nichols would need 31 receptions
in ECU's last five games of 1984
to becoem the school's all-time
receptions leader.
Still could be a winner: Even
though ECU finds itself in a very
uncomfortable 1-5 situation, the
Pirates can still sahage a winning
season out of 1984 with a little
luck. By winning the last five
games of 1984 ECU would finish
a 6-5 and would avoid its first los-
ing season since 1981, when the
Pirates posted a 5-6 mark.
This season is also the first that
finds Head Coach Ed Emory
with a losing record after six
games. In each of Emory's first
three seasons he was 3-3 six
games deep into the season while
last season saw his Pirates 5-1.
Identical start: Tulsa is now 2-3
after last week's 35-7 victory over
Missouri Valley Conference op-
ponent West Texas State, which
matches exactly the Golden Hur-
ncane's 1983 record at this point
the season. This season's win
have come against West Texas
sate and Southern Illinois while
the losses have been to Arkansas
(18-9) and nationally-ranked
Oklahoma State (31-7) and
Brigham Young (38-15).
The 1983 season saw Tulsa
defeat San Diego State and Nor-
thwest Louisiana while losing to
Arkansas, Oklahoma and
Oklahoma State in its first five.
The Golden Hurrican then reeled
" six straight victories, but like
East Carolina, was not extended
a bowl invitation.
Since 1972 Tulsa, under
eighth-year coach Jim Cooper, is
an impressive 81-45-1 since the
1973 season. The Golden Hur-
ricane has suffered only one los-
ing season in the past 11 seasons,
that being a 3-8 campaign in
1977, Cooper's first year as head
coach. Under Cooper the Golden
Hurricane is 53-29.
The Cooper Era at Tulsa:
1977: 3-8; 1978: 9-2; 1979:
1980: 8-3; 1981: 7-4; 1982:
1983: 8-3; 1984: 2-3.
6-
10-
Cooper earned MVC Coach of
the Year honors in 1982 for that
10-1 team, which finished the
season ranked 16th by UPI and
19th by AP in the final polls.
C ooper also serves as the school's
athletic director, a position he
assumed in 1981.
Winners of late: With the last
tour seasons the Tulsa Golden
Hurricane are quickly
establishing themselves as one of
college football's top programs.
Tulsa has recorded seasons of
8-3, 7-4, 10-1 and 8-3 since 1980.
That adds up to an impressive
33-11 mark for Head Coach Jim
Cooper and his staff, a very
respectable .750 winning percen-
tage.
Yet, Tulsa, like East Carolina a
year ago, has been overlooked by
the post-season bowls. The last
'ime a Tulsa team played in a
bowl game was 1976 when the
Golden Hurricane dropped a
20-17 decision to McNeese State
of the Southland Conference in
the Independence Bowl.
Pirates on turf: East Carolina has
played twice on artificial surface
during the 1984 season and have
come up empty handed both
times. ECU droped a 17-12 deci-
sion to Central Michigan in Mt.
Pleasant, Mi an last week's
17-10 loss to Pitt in Pitt Stadium.
During the 1983 season the
Pirates played twice on turf,
splitting the two games with Tem-
ple (a 24-11 victory) and Florida
(a 24-17 loss). Over the last two
seasons ECU is 1-3 on the carpet.
Not since The 1971 season was
the last time an East Carolina
football team found itself 1-5 six
weeks into the college football
season. At 1-5 in 1984, ECU con-
tinues to mimmick that 1971
season when the Pirates dropped
their first three, notched a vic-
tory, than dropped two straight.
That year, however, did see
ECU, under first-year Head
Coach Sonny Randle, bounce
back to finish with three victories
in its last four games. The Pirates
(4-6) played only 10 games during
the 1971 season.
Key is 17: In East Carolina's first
six games of 1984, the number 17
has appeared in the final score
four times. Once for ECU, when
the Pirates found themselves on
the short side of a 48-17 final at
Florida State, and three times for
opponents: a 17-0 Temple vic-
tory, a 17-12 Central Michigan
victory and a 17-10 Pitt victory.
The only two games where the
number 17 did not appear in the
final was North Carolina State
(31-22 State victory) and Georgia
Southern (a 34-27 ECU victory).
Stefon impressive: Senior Stefon
Adams debut at free safety last
week was an impressive one. The
High Point, N.C native, made
the switch following ECU's loss
to North Carolina State after be-
ing the Pirates starting split end
for the past two-plus seasons.
Adams was ECU's leading
receiver a year ago, and still leads
the Pirates in 1984 with his 13
catches for 193 yards (2.6 recep-
tions a game).
Adams played his first game as
his new position against Pitt, and
was ECU's leading tackier with
10. It was the first time Adams
had played in the defensive
back field since leaving Southwest
Guilford High School in High
Point.
Tulsa and North Carolina: Tulsa
has played only one school from
the state of North Carolina in its
history. The Golden Hurricane
sports an 0-2 mark against the
Demon Deacons of Wake Forest,
with the last meeting coming in
1971 (51-21 Wake Forest victorv
in Winston-Salem). This will be
the first meeting for East
Carolina against a school from
the state of Oklahoma.
B.�AIK1! Q r
"TARLANDING SEAFOOD
j$fcr3 "Featuring The Finest
Fresh Seafood.
Where QUALITY
Makes The DIFFERENCE.
105 Airport Rood 758-0327
ranr
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$185 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks at addi-
tional cost Pregnancy Test, Birth Control
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling. For fur-
ther information call 832-0535 (Toll Free
Number 1-800-532-5384) between 9AM and
5P.M. weekdays.
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 W��t Morgan St.
Raleigh, NC
j Friendly Hair Designer's
10 Discount on all services
(with ad)
Lisa Wright Pat Williams
EmnaAnge Van Nichols
Kit (Griffin) Brouwer
Mon Wed Fri. - 9am-5pm
Thurs - 9am-until Precision Cuts
x Sa t. - 9am -1 pm Perms
Appointments are helpful Sculptured nails
walk-ins welcome Tanning booth
H9 West 4th St. Greenville 758-3181

r
cqp d cz cr
or
EVERYTHING YOU ALWAYS WANTED
IN A BEER. AND LESS.
c 1984 M.er b'evvng Co IvMwaukee W
'
1
f





f
.�

14
THF EAST CAROl ON1AN
OCTOBER II, W84
Kobe
By TONY BROWN
Suff �illtf
New record performances are
expected this season by ECU
swim coach Rick Kobe as the
Pirates prepare for the 1984 fall
schedule by holding their annual
pentathalon intrasquad meet to-
day.
In this pre-season event each
team member competes in the
100-yard freestyle, breaststroke,
backstroke, butterfly and the
200-yard individual medley.
Points are scored according to
where each time places on a pre-
set scale and the top three
finishers get awards.
"This event sets the season for
Upcoming Season
us said Kobe. "We've even had
some swimmers in the past that
did so good in events other than
their specialty that they were
switched to that event Kobe
also uses the pentathalon to
gauge how the team has progress-
ed and to get the team warmed up
for he regular season.
Although coming off last
year's excellent 8-4 record against
tough competition, the coach
feels this could be the finest
squad ever at ECU. "We should
be better this year he said.
"We've got many returnees that
qualified for or placed in the na-
tionals He also expects several
freshmen to strengthen the team
this year.
A review of the 1984 men's
roster shows the expected strong
points of the Pirate squad.
Chema Larranaga, Sr Peru
� Olympic team member for
Peru in '80 and '84. Current ECU
record holder in 1000 and
1650-yard freestyle. Eastern
champion last year.
Scott Eagle, Jr Winston-
Salem � Top Pirate diver last
year. Rated one of best ever at
ECU. Two-time regional champ
and qualified for nationals last
season.
Chris Pittelli, Jr NJ � Two-
time most valuable swimmer for
ECU. Scored most points on
IRS Playoffs Get Underway
ByJEANNETTEROTH
Staff WrHa
With the onset of playoffs in
practically all current intramural
activities, action on the courts
and fields of ECU are heating up.
Television is not the only place
to see Monday. Night Football.
On the intramural gridiron,
teams are being eliminated slow-
ly, as the winners wait for their
big chance at the 1984 champion-
ship. This Monday, Third Regi-
ment knocked off AFROTC, 32
to 13. The Slay Niner's held off
the " team, 44 to 34. Stuart
Holland scored 22 points to
almost single-handedly defeat the
'Y's'despite a great effort by Ed-
die Hamod who added 20 points
of his own. In a penalty ridden
game between the Love Brokers
and Top Cock 'A the Brokers'
walked away with the victory in-
suring their spot for competition
in upcoming playoff action.
Co-rec softball playoffs begin
with four teams boasting
undefeated records. The Mixed
Sticks, fried City Gang, Born to
Run, and Dodge City Hustlers
will all battle it out for the cham-
pionship with starting playoff
records of 4-0.
Team putt-putt is moving right
along as the Beta Theta Pi squad
retains the best record with six
wins and no losses. 1 hey are the
team to beat in the fraternity divi-
sion, while the Tyler Tee-Offsaxe
expected to take the trophy in the
women's division. Check for up-
coming final scores o three-on-
three basketball and tennis
singles
Registration for ollebaIl. a
track meet, a cross campus run
and punt, pass and kick are going
on now or are just ahead in Oc-
tober. Don't forget to sign up in
Memorial Gym between 8 a.m-5
p.m.
Aerobic Fitness registration for
second session begins Oct. 15. A
special drop-in class will be held
on Saturdays for only 50 cents on
a first-come first-serve basis �
participate through Intramurals.
team at Eastern championships.
Andy Cook, Jr, Greenville �
Transfer from University of
Georgia. Expected to challenge
record book in freestyle events.
Kevin Hidalgo, Sr, Virginia �
Finalist in Easterns at 100 and
200-yard backstroke.
Stratton Smith, Sr, Charlotte
� Third in mile and fourth in 400
individual medley at Easterns.
Pat Brennan, Fr, Charlotte �
Expected to develop into a top
freestyler and individual
medalist.
Bruce Brockschmidt, Va. �
Potential to be best all-around on
team. Already close to varsity
records.
Lee Hicks, Hickory � Top
breaststroker. Expected to con-
tinue improving this season.
The women's team also had a
great year during the '83 season,
finishing 9-4 and qualifying nine
members for the nationals, with
one making All-America.
"We think our experience will
help a lot this year Coach Kobe
said. "We're getting to the point
where we are competitive with
some of the top teams, even
though they have more funds to
work with
Here's a look at the women's
'84 fall leaders:
Nancy James, Sr, Winston-
Salem � Only senior, former
All-America. Working to regain
top form. Specialist in free-style
sprint, co-captain.
Jessica Feinberg, Jr, NJ �
Qualified for nationals last
season and was first alternate at
100-yard breaststroke. Holds
ECU record in same event. Cur-
rently rated best swimmer on
team.
Jean Keating, So. NY � Na-
tional qualifier for 50-yard
freestyle. Member of record-
setting 400-yard medley relay
team and set freshman record for
50-yard freestyle
Lori Livingston, So, MD �
National qualifier in 200-yard
backstroke, holds ECU record in
same event and was on team
which set freshman record for
400-vard medlev relay.
Scotia Miller, So, MD � Na-
tional qualifier in freestyle.
Lori Miller, So. � National
champion diver at one and three
meters. Expected to continue
same form this year.
Caycee Poust, So, � Gained
All-America status last season in
the 100-yard backstroke.
Jenny Pierson, Fr, NJ � Prep
All-America team member. Has
potential to qualify for nationals
in most freestyle events.
Chris Holman, Fr, Charlotte
Probablv the fastest deaf
swimmer in the world. Won gold
medals in deaf games. Potential
to be All-America and national
champion in freestyle sprint and
backstroke.
Nancy Ludwig and Nanc
James are the co-captains this
vear and are expected to continue
their leadership roles. "Ludwig
was our top morale booster last
sear and helped our
momentum Kobe said "She
helped get us pysched up and the
crowd behind us"
Kobe feels the strongest op-
ponents this year will be Florida
St, North Carolina, Navy and
N.C. State "We have a typical
ECU schedule � all top teams
he said. "Although we've never
beaten N. C. State and only
beaten Carolina once, the com-
petition is always fierce. We in-
tend to be competitive no matter
who we're facing.
"We had a good season last
year he added, "but we think
we can do even better this year "
ECU's pentathalon starts at
3:30 p.m. today in Minges
Natatorium.
ECU � TULSA
TEMPLE at BOSTON COI I
SYRACUSE at WEST VA.
PENN ST. at ALABAMA
AUBURN at FLORIDA ST.
OLE MISS at GEORGIA
N.C. STATE it MARYLAND
PITT at SOUTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA at TENNESSEE
GA. TECH .t VIRGINIA
DUKE at VIRGINIA TECH
UNC at WAKE FOREST
MISSOURI at NEBRASKA
AIR FORCE at NOTRF DAMF
IOWA at PURDUE
OKLAHOMA at TEX As
WASHINGTON at STANFORD
World Serin
DETROIT vi SAN DIFGO
Scott Powri
Sad Sam
Randy Mew
Tina Maroachak
Jennifer Jendrasiak
Greg Rideoat
lui
Ueek
12-�
12-?
11-6
10
12-5
0-S
i

j
1
Peace Drops ECU,
Record Now 4-2
Greenville Flower Shop
For All Your Homecoming Flowers
1027 Evans Street
(corner of 11th and Evans St.)
Special Rate For Groups
Master Charge Visa Welcome
758-2174
If Killian's Irish Red
is a ten,
German beer is a nein.
By JULIE RICHMOND
Staff Wrlltr
The absence of number one
seed Janet Russel and number
three seed Kris Sammons put the
ECU L ad Pirate tennis team at a
disadvantage as they fell 7-2 to
Peace College Tuesday.
Russet's absence, due to a nur-
sing commitment, and Sammon's
ibsinc. jdii"4aviHae?s. for�ad.
each player to play positions
which were higher than normal.
"We played very good matches
considering that everyone had to
play up one position coach Pat
Sherman said.
Number six seed Susan Mont-
jo played exceptionally well.
Her 6-2, 6-4 win over Peace's
Iracv Fogarty was the only vic-
tory for ECl in singles.
In double pla, ECl"s Iv
Myers and Sheila Feeley, the
number two seeds, took the se-
cond win for ECU. 6-3, 6-4.
Sherman commented. "All three
of our doubles teams played ex-
ceptionall) well. 1 was particular-
Is pleased with Ty and Sheila's
performance. Peace has a strong
JjiaaRaiaT ivCplayed well agajnst
them.
"This season our women have
played up to their potential in all
of their matches. They're all
good competitors and 1 couldn't
have asked for a better team to
coach
The women compete in their
final match of the season toda) al
High Point College.
c4
5
SI � COTANCMZ
GBHJW1LLE. M C A
TAtfqA-hWq Clf�CKtnH-t
q0&
I
H
Basketball Managers
Needed For Season
Bv RICK McCORMAC
NUff Wrttrr
The ECU men's basketball
m is in need of team managers
for the upcoming season.
Although the job is time consum-
ing, it does present good oppor-
tunities for those who are
dedicated.
Managers work from 2:30-6:30
p.m and on game days
5:30-9:30 p.m. Among the duties
for managers are doing laundry,
taking care of equipment and get-
ting the court ready for practice
and games.
As managers work their wa
up, they may keep statistics,
work in the lockerroom or help
with filming games.
A manager also travels on the
road with the team and is respon-
sible for providing team meals.
"We give our managers a lot of
responsibility, it's not just being
a go-for said assistant coach
Tom Barrise.
"It's good for someone in-
terested in getting into
coaching Barrise continued. "I
know of a couple of college
assistants who started as team
managers
The first year managers work
on a volunteer basis, but it's
possible for managers to earn a
partial or full scholarship depen-
ding upon the individual.
Anyone intrested in becoming
a manager, or just finding out
more about it, should contact
Coach Barrise either this week or
immediately following fall break.
ecu
Pirate
Pride
vMeabn GWAMs
FAQxlHatApMortes
T-WArtircAps
SppAtsrrs ,
CfeeXfeAbirtg Besses
Now don't pet us
wrong. The Germans
make some prettv tine
beers But none of
them slow roast their
malt like we do
So no German beer
can boast the color,
the character, the rich,
incredibly smooth taste
of Killian's Red Ale
So the next time
vou're about to order
your favorite German
beer, try a Killians
Red, instead
And go from a nein
to a ten
A LA SO
S
CALL 752-3861 F
12" 2-11
and 2
ONI
$5.
14" 2-1"
and 3
o:
$7'
16" 2-11
and 4
ON
w
vnjJANSREn
HMI -� K fmm Quafcn ���� �� 'I
1 '
SHORT 0
SAVE
Pres-
NOT VALID VrTH II
Richard's Auto Service
Specializing in Foreign & Domestic Auto Repair
10 OFF ALL SERVICE & REPAIRS
This month's Special - Oil Change & Filter S12.95
752-8770
120 Fiekland St.
Adjacent to Rent a Wreck
HOMECOMING SPECIAL
ECU SOUVENIR CUP
JUMP ABOARD THE
FRESH EXPRESS
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Greenville Blvd.
796-M23 - M HRS
24 hour Towing Service
I Haul Rentals
Available
!NO STYROFOOD HERE!
Get 3h'Sieihwmtioe
Sandwiches & Salads
We're Open Late Every Night
208 E. Fifth St.
DRIVERS WANTED: Apply In Person
Five Color
16oz Plastic Cup
Filled With Your
Favorite Softdrink
75C
(combined Reg.
Retail-$1.05)
Offer Good Monday - Saturday, Oct. 15-20
Available at Soda Shop-Wright Bldg. & Croatan
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Owned and Operate by East Carolina University
NORTHWESTERN COL
As t rd �c" sr- � H
grew MwIwmt&m CoU�Q
vou tyMe' a saC eanm
Doctc o' CNrop��cWc
Comm.tt�f K) 'v s
'esea'cs to v ytmn
pus tHsttnQuisNKl "
dedicated teac- nj
If vou wooc � K "c
o Cocact'C ca" hi
cop'ete Ke 'orn
ad'SS'Os w " "p TOLL FPI
s�on 290 cv coi'ect at (612
Northman Colf9� �f C'Ojvi
Name
Add'ess
City
SEND TO: Northwaataff Coag�
A4miaatona 0��ea. 2M W��t �
Bkomngto�v UH�w��o�� SWS
t tOO 32t 322 E �� c
?
'
� I� � � �����
T I
I
i ' a

r.





t


THE EAST CAPOL1NIAN OCTOBER 11, Igjj IS
�50AI
potential to quaht'v for nationals
in mosi freestyle events.
Chris Holman, Fr, Charlotte
babl) the fastest deaf
dimmer in the vorld Won gold
- in deaf games Potential
menca and national
freestyle sprint and
Sanc I udwig and Nancy
the co captains this
.hted to continue
es "1 udwig
alt booster last
helped our
Kobe said "She
up and the
K strongest op-
a be Florida
�: - arolina, Na and
e have a tpical
top teams
though �e've never
State and only
ce, :he com-
erce We in-
) matter
ison last
led e think
s vear
starts at
Minges
ns Irish Red
a ten,
eer is a nein.
v
sss
r �
r�i .
I
v3
- iXi
r
d��.
fitfrt:
r
s
T E A D
-�-� MMI I -�� � �W M�� sWi-� Mtt l�T1
SPECIAL
IRCUP
4
75C
(combined Reg.
Retail-$1.05)
lay, Oct. 15-20
Bldg.&Croatan
STORE
irolina University
The Experts Pick The Winners
ECU at TULSA
TEMPLE at BOSTON COLL.
SYRACUSE at WEST VA.
PENN ST. at ALABAMA
AUBURN at FLORIDA ST.
OLE MISS at GEORGIA
N.C. STATE at MARYLAND
PITT at SOUTH CAROLINA
FLORIDA at TENNESSEE
GA. TECH at VIRGINIA
DUKE at VIRGINIA TECH
UNC at WAKE FOREST
MISSOURI at NEBRASKA
AIR FORCE at NOTRE DAME
IOWA at PURDUE
OKLAHOMA at TEXAS
WASHINGTON at STANFORD
WoHd Series:
DETROIT vg. SAN DIEGO
POWERS
Tulsa
Boston Coll.
West Va.
Penn St.
Auburn
Georgia
Maryland
South Car.
Florida
Ga. Tech
Va. Tech
UNC
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Iowa
Oklahoma
Washington
Detroit
SAD SAM
Tulsa
Boston Coll.
West Va.
Penn St.
Fla. State
Georgia
Maryland
South Car.
Florida
Ga. Tech
Va. Tech
UNC
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Iowa
Oklahoma
Washington
San Diego
MEWS
ECU
Boston Coll.
West Va.
Penn St.
Fla State
Georgia
Maryland
South Car.
Florida
Ga. Tech
Va. Tech
UNC
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Purdue
Oklahoma
Stanford
Detroit
MAROSCHAKJENDRASIAK
TubaTuba
Boston Coll.Boston Coll.
SyracuseWest Va.
Penn St.Penn St.
Fla. StateAuburn
GeorgiaGeorgia
MarylandMaryland
South Car.South Car.
FloridaFlorida
Ga. TechVirginia
Va. TechVa. Tech
Wake ForestUNC
NebraskaNebraska
Notre DameNotre Dame
PurduePurdue
OklahomaTexas
WashingtonWashington
Detroit
Detroit
RIDEOUT
ECU
Boston Coll.
Syracuse
Alabama
Auburn
Georgia
Maryland
Pitt
Florida
Ga. Tech
Va. Tech
Wake Forest
Nebraska
Notre Dame
Jowa
Oklahoma
Stanford
Detroit
Scott Powers
Sad Sam
Randy Mews
Tina Maroschak
Jennifer Jendrasiak
Greg Rideout
Overall Pet.
43-29 .597
43-29 .597
41-31 .569
41-31 .569
31-34 .528
35-37 .486
Games
Behind
A Tradition . . .
Go Garrett Five-0
SCP
3
ALANO'SPIZZA & SUBS
SPECIALS
CALL 752-3861 For FREE Delivery
12" 2-Item Pizza
and 2 Drinks
ONLY
$5.75
14"2-Item Pizza
and 3 Drinks
ONLY
$7.50
16"2-Item Pizza
and 4 Drinks
ONLY
$8.75
,iM
SHORT ON MONEY?
SAVE
$1.00 on any 12" Pizza
$1.25 on any 14" Pizza
$1.75 on any 16" Pizza
Present this coupon when ordering.
NOT VALID WITH ANY Ol HER SPECIAL
ANSA
mufflers
Your One Stop Automotive Service Center.
We stock a complete line of automotive parts
and accessories in our parts dept.
2616 I TENTH ST 7S8 7676
)
HEADS UP)
A Hair Salon
'Tor Heads that turn Heads"
Downtown Greenville
318 S.Evans St. Mall
758-8553
Our Stylist's are internationally trained
each year to bring you on top of hair and
nail fashion. You deserve the best and we
give it
Walk-ins accepted
Appointments available
A- 1
&
NORTHWESTERN COLLEGE OF CHIROPRACTIC
As the need for specialized health care continues to
grow. Northwestern College of Chiropractic can help
you enter a satisfying career taking care of people as a
Doctor of Chiropractic.
Committed to high standards in education and
research for over 40 years, Northwestern offers you
comprehensive chiropractic training on a modern cam-
pus distinguished for its excellent facilities and
dedicated teaching staff.
If you would like to know how Northwestern College
of Chiropractic can help you achieve your career goals,
complete the form below or call the
admissions office TOLL FREE at 1-800-328-8322, Exten-
sion 290 or collect at (612) 888-4777.
Please send me more information on
Horthwtfm College ol Chiropractic
copyngnt i98a
Kroger Sav on
Ouantitv Pignts Reserved
None soici to Dealers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM POLIO
Eacn of these advertised items
is reauired to tie reaany
available for sale in eacn Kroger
sav on except as specificauv
noted in this ad if we do run
out of an item we win offer you
your cnoice of a comparaoie
item wnen avaiiaoie reflecting
tne same savings or a raincneck
wmen win entitle you to pu'
cnase tne advertised item at
tr� aave-tised prce witfiin sc
days Only one vendor coupo"
wn re accepted per item
items .mo Prices
Effective Tnru sa
act is i ?sa
KROGER SMALL OR
LARGE CURD OR
L0WFAT
Cottage
Cheese
Bright
Bleach
24 02.
Ctn.
CHABLIS, RHINE
OR VIN ROSE
inglenook
wines
KROGER REGULAR MEAT
OR MUSHROOM
Spaghetti
Sauce

KROGER
Multi-Grain
Bread
02.
ar
1.5 Ltr
Btl.
Name
Stale
Z-p
)
Years ol college experience
SEND TO: Northwestern Coilaga ol Chiropractic,
Admissions Office. 2501 Weat Mth Street,
Bloomlngtort, Minnesota 55431
1-M0-32M322. t��ensl�� 250; eoMeel et (612) 335-4777
320
DOUGHTIES
TOP ROUND
Roast
24 02
Loaf
t
SAVE
SOO
Lb

6 CT. PKG. OF
Kaiser Rolls
WITH THE PURCHASE OF
1 LB. Off MORE
Virginia
Baked Ham
Lb.
CHOOSE FROM RING
DONUTS, FILLED LONG
JOHN OR BISMARK
DONUTS OR CINNAMON
SWIRL
Fresh Made
Donuts
w
$449
INCLUDES FREE
1 LB. OF POTATO SALAD
AND 4 ROLLS
wishbone
Fried Chicken
J
DOZ.
Lb.
HONEY DIPPED
Banana
Chips
$59
Tancy eastern
GOLDEN OR RED
Delicious
Apples
$38
si
y
r, �, -m
-�' � �jeMMMNX�M�dMMIXMX � � t.
A
V I
t'
i





f
t
1
16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 11, 1984
Get carded for
savings at Revco
GET AN EXTRA 10 OFF
WITH YOUR STUDENT I.D. CARD
ifVC
fa fac
-xt
Rave Hair Spray
I : n
Elegulaj i Exti H 1
eve � lay
$139
m eo.
Ladies Scuff
Slippers
Assorted colors and sizes
Get it for
less everyday
3?9
Poster Board
White
Get it for
less everyday
tampons
�J REVCO
V
0
V
I
I
Revco Tampons
30 cou
Re? ilai : �
mi ared I I.
Get it for
� s evervday
$23Q
P0USM
HM0�m
O
Revco Nail
Polish Remover
every 1 �.
59
Comb Set
8 pack
Assorted size
Get it for
less everyday
79
0
Arm & Hammer
Laundry Detergent
z
ret it 1 :
less everyday
I
pevCOggg
�. lr� - KhA

Revco Alkaline
Batteries
2 pack
AA
�i pared u Evereadj
:� � it for
less evervdav
$1�
i
G.E. Steam &
Dry Iron
Model F363
Get it for
less everyday
Gran Prix Cassette
Recorder With
AMFM Radio
Get it for
less everyday
maens
Jergens Soap
3 oz bar
Get it for
less everyday
17
gh

Texas Instruments
Solar Calculator
4$00 $1599
GREENVILLE
South Park Shopping Center
115 E. Red Banks Rd.
756-9502
Model TI 1706
Get it for
less everyday
$599
ta
REVCO
V
tJj"Evco
mir wo
(tKinetic.
Muff
otoiieiic
frtff
Revco Cosmetic
Puffs
100's or 300's
Compared to nati n � brands
Get it for
less everyday
83.1
Ko-Rec-Type
24 count
Get it for
less everyday
72
fcMB
Oarm
Jordache Spray
Cologne
For Men 1 7 fl. oz
For Women 1 fl oz
Get it for
less everyday
$7�9
Plastic Wastebasket
11 quart
Get it for
less everyday
$OQ
Mead Brief Folders
With ?� ckets
134-7100
Get it for
less everyday
39
S

Salle Shampoo
16 fl oz
Assorted formulas
Get it for
less everyday
99
�(ONLY E.C.U. STUDENT IDS
QUALIFY FOR 10 DISCOUNT)
DISCOUNT DOES NOT APPLY TO
ALCOHOL, TOBACCO PRODUCTS, FILM
PRODUCTS, MAGAZINES OR SOFT DRINKS
t7Revco
DISCOUNT DRUG
COPYRIGHT 1984 BY REVCO D.S INC.
Items available while quantities last.
Revco reserves the right to limit quantities.
'
mmmmmmmm
ft
V






Title
The East Carolinian, October 11, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 11, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.367
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57672
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy