The East Carolinian, October 9, 1984






She
(Earolinfatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tuesday October 9, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 15,000
SGA Elects '8485 Speaker,
Devises New Committee
Whistle While You Work
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Even campus grounds need some TLC, and if you are a Parks and Recreation major, there is no better way
to spend a day.
By GREG RIDEOUT
Maugiaa Rdj(0f
The Student Government
Legislature picked its speaker
Monday at the first meeting of
the school year. Kirk Shelley, a
junior political science major,
beat out John Chenault 24-10.
Shelley held the position last spr-
ing semester and has been in the
legislature for more than two
years.
The new speaker's first order
of business was to entertain a mo-
tion to add a fifth standing com-
mittee to the legislature. The
Special Projects Committee was
approved unanimously by voice
vote. The new committee was
proposed by the new speaker in
his nomination speech and will be
responsible for carrying out the
proclamations of the Student
Welfare Committee.
SGA President Johnny Rainey
told the new legislators in his
opening remarks that they have a
responsibility to the student
body. One goal he mentioned is
to expand the book exchange
program.
The first bill of the new year
was proposed and defeated in the
same meeting. A suspension of
the rules was put in effect by the
legislature to consider an ap-
propriations package for the
Marching Pirates The sponsors
asked for $9,200 on behalf of the
band to help pay past-due bills
and purchase and repair equip-
ment. Backers of the bill called
the Marching Pirates the largest
student group on campus and
reminded legislators "that the
SGA was a main source of fun-
ding for the nationally prominent
band.
Opponents amended the bill to
57,800 and reminded legislators
that this was the first session of
the new year and money left to
appropriate stood at just more
than $34,000. The bill, they said,
would gobble 20 percent of the
reserve.
The voice vote was negative
and the bill stopped. It was im-
mediately resubmitted and sent to
committee.
Reagan, Mondale Pleased With Sunday Debate Performance
(DPI) � President Reagan said
he felt great after his first debate
with Walter Mondale, but his
aides were not proclaiming a big
victory and appeared bent on
damage control.
Instead of discussing at length
how well Reagan did in the
debate Sunday, the president's
political advisers focused on
Mondale's performance. They
conceded that the Democrat may-
have scored some points, but
stressed that he did not do well
enough to make much of a dent
in the commanding lead Reagan
holds in the polls.
Deputy Chief of Staff Michael
Deaver put it in baseball terms,
saying that Mondale may have
scored some hits, but did not
score "a home run
Campaign speech writer Ken-
neth Kachigian said that Mondale
"needed a very sharp blow" at
Reagan "and he didn't get it
"The debate clearly showed
the sharp difference between the
two candidates and that's why
we're 20 points ahead one
White House aide said.
Reagan pollster Reobert Teeter
told reporters that of 356 people
polled within an hour after the
debate, Reagan still held a con-
siderable lead, 49 percent to 31
percent. That's about the same
lead Reagan has held in most
other recent polls.
However, before the debate,
Mondale pollster Peter Hart dis-
counted the importance of a poll
taken so soon after the debate
and predicted that it would take
48 to 72 hours for any significant)
change to register.
Meanwhile, Mondale showed a
great deal of satisfaction with his
performance in the debate.
Walter Mondale is elated by his
performance in the first debate
with President Reagan, and his
campaign chief says it marks
"the beginning of the tur-
naround" for the lagging cam-
paign.
The Democratic presidential
candidate did not claim outright
victory in the first of his two na-
tionally televised encounters with
Reagan, but aides were ecstatic.
"I did what I wanted to do
Mondale told reporters. "I felt
very good about it. I had a
chance tonight to make my case
and to let the American people
compare the two of us on several
of the central questions
Mondale went from the
Lousville debate hall to a "debate
watch" campaign rally, where
1,000 cheering flag-waving sup-
porters treated him like he had
already won the election. They
chanted "We Want Fritz to the
strains of the movie theme
"Rocky" in a steamy hotel
ballroom.
"You know what?" Mondale,
who took off his dark blue suit
jacket and rolled up his sleeves,
asked the cheering throng.
"We're going to win this elec-
tion
According to the latest ABC
News-Washington Post poll,
Mondale trails Reagan by 18
percentage points.
Mondale Scored Points In Debate. ECU Professors Say
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Many elements of domestic
policy were discussed when Presi-
dent Ronald Reagan and
Democratic Presidential Can-
didate Walter Mondale met in the
first of two debates Sunday
night, but no clear winner emerg-
ed, according to ABC polls taken
after the event. However, three
ECU political science faculty
members agree that Mondale
scored points with the public and
that Reagan did not present the
image the public has come to ex-
pect of him.
"I think in terms of style that,
to my surprise, Mondale won the
debate hands down said
Maurice Simon, chairman of the
ECU political science depart-
ment. "Reagan was un-
characteristically nervous, he was
unable to articulate his ideas very
clearly and his body language
compared to that of Mondale was
very poor
Dorothy Clayton, also of the
political science department,
agreed. "My overall reaction was
that based on his performance in
1980, I expected the president to
appear more comfortable in
handling such a debate than he
did. I thought he did not par-
ticularly seem at ease and his
responses did not have the flow
to them that I thought they had in
1980 she said.
Simon said that although the
debaters tended to use "preset
speeches Mondale seemed to
have the edge where substance
was concerned. "I think Mondale
had much more to say in terms of
offering programs and ideas and
he certainly had much more com-
mand of factual materials
Simon said.
Reagan seemed to be on the
defensive during most of the
debate and had "a very poor
command of facts Simon said.
However, he added, "there was
one noticeable area in which
Mondale was on the defensive.
That was in terms of explaining
what had happened to the old
Democratic coalition. He simply
avoided answering the question
"Mondale seemed to me to
Svc context to his answers
Clayton said. "He also seemed to
tie together some sense of what
he wanted to do, which has been
a major criticism in the past
Political Science Professor
Tinsley Yarbrough said he
thought Mondale came across
well and that he was "fairly ef-
fective in being properly respect-
ful and deferential to Reagan
while hitting away at Reagan
policies
While all three professors
agreed that Mondale made a
good showing in the debate, they
were uncertain of the effect it will
have on the second debate and
the rest of the campaign.
"Overall, I think because
Mondale was so far behind, his
appearance with Reagan is
helpful Simon said. "He mat-
ched up to the man in visual and
substantive terms and got the ex-
posure he wanted, but Reagan's
popularity may still override any
reaction to the debate itself
Simon added that he feels the
second debate will gain in impor-
tance if Democratic Vice
Presidential Candidate Geraldinc
Ferraro has "a commanding vic-
tory" in her debate with Vice
President George Bush this week.
The topic of the second presiden-
tial debate will be foreign policy,
a subject Simon says "is
Reagan's Achilles heel
Clayton said that for many
viewers the debate will only con-
firm their prior beliefs. "It all
depends on who you preferred in
the first place she said.
"Reagan may be more
vulnerable on foreign policy than
on domestic policy Yarbrough
said, "although I suspect most
voters will vote based on their
general feelings about the
domestic scene
Yarbrough added that, "the
only thing he (Reagan) has going
for him is that most of the au-
dience is going to know very little
about the issues anyway
"If forced to predict an out-
come, I'd say it's going to be very
hard to defeat Reagan unless
there is some spectacular mistake
made on his part Simon said.
In Charlotte Observer Poil
Hunt Holds Narrow Lead Over Helms
(UPI) � North Carolina Gov.
James Hunt holds a narrow lead
over Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C,
as the nation's most hard-fought
and expensive Senate race moves
into the home stretch with a
strange twist � an increasing
number of undecided voters.
A poll in Sunday's Charlotte
Observer showed the number of
undecided voters ballooned from
5 to 11 percent in the past three
weeks � apparently the result of
a blizzard of negative campaign
ads.
Helms led at one point by
almost 19 percentage points, but
recent polls showed the race dead
even. An ABC News-Washington
Post poll last week gave Hunt a
51 percent to 42 percent lead, but
both sides discounted the poll
because only 300 people were
surveyed.
Sunday's poll gave Hunt a 46
percent to 42 percent lead with a
3.5 percent margin of error � in
a survey of 804 voters.
The increase in undecided
voters this close to the election is
a rarity � especially in a race
where $13 million had been spent
by midyear.
Philip Meyer, a journalism
professor at the Unviersity of
North Carolina and head of the
Carolina Poll, said he is "kind of
intrigued by the theory that
negative advertising is turning off
voters
He said some voters are
wondering if they can back any
candidate after seeing their televi-
sion advertising.
The TV ads have been hard-
hitting and relentless. Helms
hammers away tht Hunt wants
to raise taxes and his ads usually
end with "Hunt � A Mondale
Liberal
Hunt has countered with ads
saying Helms is a member of the
"Radical Right" that wants to
cut Social Security.
The governor has tried two
ways of countering a Helms ad
showing "actual TV news
footage" of Hunt supposedly
voting in favor of a tax increase
at the National Governors Con-
ference.
Hunt first tried a parity-
countering with "actual TV news
drawings" since Helms voted
against allowing cameras in the
Senate.
The second involved two
governors who were at the con-
ference. Kansas Gov. John
Carlin called the Helms charge
that the vote was to raise taxes "a
lie" while Virginia Gov. Chuck
Robb said "we were voting to
balance the federal budget
Helms countered with TV pit-
ches from President Reagan say-
ing he'll need Helms' help in his
second term.
The Observer poll showed
Hunt's support among black
voters increased from 86 percent
to 91 percent, while Helms' black
support slid from 7 percent to 2
percent.
Hunt has accused Helms of
running a campaign "clearly
calculated to divide our people on
racial lines
But Helms told Sunday's
Greensboro Mews & Record that
"it's fair to say he's the racist in
this campaign, he's trying to ap-
peal to black citizens, but he is
trying to hide it
Hunt said it was
"unbelievable" that Helms
would call him a racist and called
the remark "the height of
irony
Edmisten Leads In Gubernatorial Race
Sign Of The Times
JON JOBOAM � ICU Pfc� !
Parking on campus is at a premium, as evidenced by some of tW
prices for spaces.
(LTI) � Democrat Rufus Ed-
misten holds a 50 percent to 37
percent lead over Republican Jim
Martin in the race for governor,
according to a poll by The
Charlotte Observer.
The random statewide
telephone poll of 804 registered
voters also indicated a summer
surge of support by Martin may
have come to an end.
The same survey in June gave
Edmisten a 60 percent to 23 per-
cent lead. In September, the
Observer poll said the lead had
been narrowed to 51 percent for
Edmisten and 39 percent for
Martin. But there was no
substantial difference between
the September and October
figures.
The poll was taken Oct. 1-4
and began a day after a statewide
televised debate between Ed-
misten, three times elected at-
torney general, and Martin, a six-
term Congressman making his
first bid for statewide office.
The poll asked the question:
"If the election for governor
were held today, would you vote
for Domocrat Rufus Edmisten or
Rupublican Jim Martin?" The
interviewers alternated the order
of the candidates names on each
call.
Robin Dorff, a political
science professor at North
Carolina State University, said
the poll may indicate that interest
in the governor's race is waning.
"The governor's race ranks
third at best in the voters'
minds said Dorff. "the stabili-
ty (lack of change from
September to October) there is
really an artifact of people not
focusing on that race
Dorff said the voters are focus-
ing on the U. S. Senate race bet-
ween Democratic Gov. James
Hunt and incumbent Sen Helms.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features7 �Sports Editor Randy Mews
Classifieds9 "��yes tlie Pirate football
Sports10 teM� defeat last weekend in
�Two new majors are being of- f � Sports, W
fered this semester. See News,
page 3.

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 9, 1984
Announcements
Two New
LAW SOCIETY
The ecu Law Society will be meeting on
Tues Oc� 23, at 7 p.m. In MerKtenhell. Room
141 Our ouesf speaker la Stan Sam ot the local
law firm Howard Browning. Sam and foot
Mr Sams is a'orrrer ECU Lew Society member,
a graduate of onc Chape! Hin Law School, and
te has taught business law course at ECU.
Anyone interesteo In law school I Invited I For
more 'formation can Mine Gardner 75 140
ASSERT! VENESS TRAINING
A three oart workshop ottered to student at
0 COST Dv 'he University Counseling Canter
Thurs , Oct IB M. and Nov I All three session
will be conducted t'om 3 4 p m In 306 Wright An-
nex i'S e� The wor�shop win focu on help-
ing mer:�rs atingt'sh between rhelr asser-
tive, aggressive find nonassenive behaviors.
Particican's �n iearn how to express
ihemseiv��s directly and openly, and espond to
4nt�rtersori�i situations Ml a manner which
neither compromises individual beliefs nor of
tends Other Please nil counseling center tor
reglst�ao- i757eeel).
FORUM COMMITTEE
H yoc are ;ntereted In lecture, symposium.
or other 'elated o'ogram. why not om the Stu
denr union Fcum Committee The Student
Union Forum Comminee i� presently accepting
applications tor committee members For more
information, contact the Student Union Office at
Ts"�-�ll, ext 310 or come bv 'he office In Room
J4 Me"denhall Student Center.
PUBLIC RELATIONS
a If you are a Marketing major, we know you
W'll be m'erejtea in ml committee The Student
tlnlor Public Relations and Publicity Committee
�. � package publicity and coordinate total pro-
I . tudaol un-an The committee is
�tow accepting sppiirn'ions for committee
bers Fo' more information, rontact the
Student union Office a' 757 Mil, ext. 210 or come
by 'he office at Room 234 Mendenhail Student
Center
ENCOUNTERCHRIST
. oter wonder �! you're the only one in
s � ia teeimg a certac way? Do you ever feel
ke 'osiirig �cur r�xks asioe and iusf talking?
Are" then make an Encounter with Christ
o���ni: Dc 25 76 Mee students from various
�mouses w 'h.ng N C i�'s a terrific opportunity
� rete and devote a ortg weekend to you! For
more Info :al Fr Torry st the Newman Center
at ?S2 4716
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
We had a great pig brother rush last Thur
afternoon we have some great guys coming Into
�he o'gen.za,en AM big brothers are reminded
'o be at 'he nouse a' 6:30 Thurs night for indue
ton of new big brothers This is a mandatory
meeting ana ou mus have coa' and tie.
PI KAPPA PHI
Push es a great success we nave 50 wonder
ful g -i? coming te ioi- us AH little s.s'ers are
reminded 'a' r sister pieoge induction will
rse Wed rvgh' 3e there by 6 X and be prepared
�o party at tne Blue Moon af'e-wards
PI KAPPA PHI
White Oem0n2 las Sat nghf was a blast and
�re bus r,ae back was wild. Wal' 'till Homecom
ng to follow it up1 All bro'hers and pledges ere
'�minded'o be at the house Wed at 6.30 p.m tor
ittte Sister e'edge induction 't's going to be a
great semes'er Also remember the little sisters
will be having a happy hour at the Blue Moon
after induction
GREEKS
Alpha X Oei'a Alpha Pi and IFC need your
suppor 'onight at 9-00 for their happy hour for
the America" Lung Association Free keg will be
jiven to the Fraternity or Sorority with the most
members present See you a' Beaus tonight
OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY
The O T Club win be having a meeting Tues .
Oct 9 at 5 45 We'll be m Room 203 Allied Health
Building New officers will be elee'ed and the up
m nc, O T Campus Mixer will be discussed
Are encourage al' members and anyone in
�ereveo n O T to attend
MUSIC
Music courses tor non-music ma(o" and
jenerai college s'udents The School of Music en-
courages students to consider enrolling In the
lollowng music courses designed for non-music
maiors during 'he spring term MUSC 1208, 1218
son Music Major Group Piano I and II, MUSC
1215 Group Voice II (section 003 for
ion maiorsj. MUSC 2208 Music Appreciation,
MUSC 2218 Orchestral Music, MUSC 2238 Con-
temporary Music, MUSC 2258 History of Jan
Music, MUSC 3018 introduction to Basic Music
Skills, M'JSC 3028 Music Education in Elemen
'ary Grades. MUSC 3038 Music Education in In
�ermediate Grades. MUSC 3048 Music for Ex
ceptionai Children. Performance organizations
are open to all students, but an audition is re-
quired prior to registration in any performance
group unless the s'udent has the consent of the
instructor No other school of music course offer-
rigs may fee taken without permi�sion of instruc
'or ana au'horiia'ion from the Dean's office.
BE A CLOWN
Join in on the Spirit of ECU homecoming. Be a
ziown in the '94 homecoming parade. In-
terested persons should contact Betsy Peter at
155 4205 by Oct 11,1984. Participant must pr�
vide their own costumes We will provide
balloons 'o pass out on parade route
DANCE TEAMS
The East Carolina athletic department It
organiiing a dance team "The P're Gold
Oancerv" to perform at Pirate home basketball
game Those interested should attend an
organizational meeting on October 10, In room
142 of Minges Coliseum et 7:00 p.m. Only ECU
students are eligible for the group.
AHPAT
The Allied Health Professions Admission Test
will be offered at East Carolina University on
Saturday, November 17. 1904 Application blanks
are to be completed and mailed to The
Psychologic' Corp, 7500 Old Oak Blvd
Cleveland, Ohio 44130 to arrive by October 20.
1984. Application may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center, Room 105, Speight
Building.
NTE � Area
The National Teacher Examination �
Specialty Areas � will be offered at Eatt
Carolina university on Saturday, November 10,
1904. Application blanks ar� to be completed and
mailed to the Educational Testing Service. Box
?11R, Princeton, NJ0B541 to arrive by October I,
1H4 Application may be obtained from the
ECU Testing Center, Room 105, Speight
Building.
IRATES
There will be a meeting tonight In MSC at 9:00
Topic to be discussed ere trip to Clemson this
weekend, ultlmax tournament and strategies In
ultimate. It I Important you attend If you plan on
playing with the infamous "Irate
IRATES
W have decided to limit our team for the
Ultlmax Tournament to 12 player. If you want
to be one of the 12 people to play, you must com
to practice. There will be no exceptions. Practice
today et 500 end Wed. at 900.
SURF CLUB
There Is a short meeting In the Mendenhail
Coffeehouse et 8 30 Thursday night. Final plans
for the trip to Hafteras this weekend will be
discussed. Team sweat lockets should be in and
will be sold first-come, first serve. Our club Is
open to guys and gals and we welcome any new
member.
HACKEYSACK
Thete Chi Fraternity will sponsor a
hackeysack tournament on Sun Oct. 21. Watch
for potters for entry Information or call:
752-4435
MEDITATION
On Tues Oct 9 et 700 in Room 212
Mendenhail we will have another meditation In-
struction session Everyone Is welcome. Bring
your favorite cushion or use a provided one
PUNT, PASS, AND KICK
Registration for Intramural Punt, Pass and
Kick competition will be held Oct. 8 18 To
register come by Room 204 Memorial Gym or for
more Information, call 757 4387
CATHOLIC STUDENTS
Sunday Mass is celebraed at 11 30 am in the
Biology lecture hall irm 103) and at 9 00 p m at
the Newman Center, 953 E 10th St For informa
tlon call Fr Terry 752 4214
AMBASSADORS
Our membership drive was a great success!
We'll have a great bunch of new members at the
next meeting, Oct 10 at 5pm in the Mendenhail
Multipurpose Room Be sure to be present at this
very important meeting and please wear your
nametag for the new members We'll have
numerous Sign up sheets for Homecoming and
other events! See you mere!
SKATING PARTY
The Zeta Phi Beta Sorority Is sponsoring a
skating party at Sportsworld The skating party
will be held Oct 11, from 7 00 9 30 p m Admis
slon Is $1.50 and tickets can be bought from any
sorority member if Interested, call 752 851 or
758 9920
APORUSH
If you're Interested in leadership, friendship
and service then you should attend Rush on Oct
9. 10, and 11 Alpha Phi Omega National Coed
Service Fraternity is looking for people who are
interested In serving the campus, community,
and the nation Rush dates are Oct. 9, 7 9pm in
Mendenhail Coffeehouse. Oct 10. 7 until at 65
Carrlaoe House, and Oct 11. 7 9 p.m. in 24
Mendenhail Come and loin a co ed fraternity
that erve!
SCUBA DIVING
Thanksgiving vacation Dive Cozumel. Mex
ico 8 days 7 nights on the beautiful Yucatan
Penninsula Drift diving on the Palancar reef
will be one of me most exiting experiences From
Raleigh, price including air fare, meals, lodging,
and diving $(20.00. special price for non divers
$720.00 Air travel provided by Mexlcana and
Eastern For registrations and further informa
tlon. call Ray Scharf, Dlr of Acquatlcs 757 4441
ASPA
The American Society for Personnel Ad
ministration will hold an organizational meeting
Tues . Oct 9 at 3 30 in Rawl 102. We would like
your ideas on activities for the coming year New
members are welcome) Refreshments will be
served.
APO
All brothers and interested persons are urged
to come and loin APO in service Meetings are
Thursdays at 5 p.m. in 212 Mendenhail Also, Fall
fees are due Thurs . Oct 4 And don't forget APO
Rush on Oct 9, 10. and 11 See vou there!
DRAMA
Anyone familiar with or having physical Im-
pairments who Is Interested In drama, please
come to Speight 103 at 4-00 p.m. on Tuesday, Oct
9 to discuss writing and producing educational
plays for children, or contact Mrs. Hazel
Stapleton at 757 4118
HELMSBUSTERS
Students interested in lolnlng the students for
Jim Hunt should please contact Scott Thomas at
752 1793 or David Brooks at 752 5198
LACROSSE
There will be a Lacrosse match Wednesday the
10th at 330 p m on the Allied Health field ECU
will be playing E ion's Varlslty team. So come on
out and support ECU and see what Lacrosse 1st
CIRCLE K
ECU Circle K Club Invites you to come out and
ioln us this coming and every Tuesday night at
7:00 p.m In Mendenhail room 221 for fun and
socializing. Hope to see you there.
BAKE SALE
Not lust any bake sale, this is the CIRCLE K
Bake Sale on Oct 11, begins at 9 In lobby of Stu
dent Store Guaran'eed HOMEMADE Goodies
lust for you!
LITTLE SIS RUSH
The Brothers and Little Sisters of Alpha Sigma
Phi would like to Invite all girls intersted to at
tend our fall Little Sister Rush We are looking
for an additional group of great girls to add to ttv
fun and beneficial atmosphere of our fraternity
Come see what we are all about � October 10-11.
from 900 until Also, thanks little Sisters for a
successful cookoutl!
SAM
The SAM would like to Invite all students In
ferested to join our beneficial club. Today is the
last day tor membership Forms are available
from Or Eckstein � Rawl 209 Membership
Fees are $7 00semester, and $17 50year Come
learn and experience the skills needed for sue
cesstui management, meet with others sharing
similar interests, and have fun
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will be having an important
meeting on Wednesday. October 10, 1984 This
meeting will be held at 5 15 m room 221 of
Mendenhail Student Center Topics of discussion
include Phi Eta Sigma sweatshirts and a walk a
fhon tor St Jude's Children's hospital.
OT STUDENTS
Sophomore students applying for admission
pick up admission packet In the Occupational
Therapy office 1304 Allied Health Belk Bldg.).
All forms including transcripts must be received
in the OT office before applications close Nov
1.1984
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
A Kappa sweetheart interest meeting will be
held Wed night at 8 30 In Room 244 Mendenhail
If Interested come on out and remember to dress
to Impress!
WHY RENT ?
For less than dorm or apartment rent
you could:
1. Buy your own home
2. Enjoy peace and privacy
3. Invest in the future
STOP BY AND SEE HOW
@
� � i
HOMES
626 W. Greenville Blvd.
PUBLIC WELCOME
The Public Is Invited To Attend A Meeting Of
The Pitt County Humane Society On Wednes-
day, October 10th To Be Held In The First
Presbyterian Church. 14th & Elm at 7:30pm.
Dr. William H. Pryor, Director of Animal
Resource, ECU School of Medicine, Will Talk
On "Use of Pound Animals in Reasearch"
And Other Topics Followed By Question and
Answer Period.
Pitt County
Humane Society, lnc
A Non-Profit Organization sol
supported by your contribution
POETRY FORUM
The ECU Poetry Forum will be meeting on
Oct. 18 et 800 p.m. In Room 248 Mendenhail. In
terested people should bring 8-8 copies ot rhelr
poem to be reed.
KA LITTLE SISTERS
Thanks for the bake sale girls I You're doing e
greet obl Don't forget to support the KA "B"
football team end the KA Co Rec softbell teem
on Wed. These ere important events met you
don't went to miss Thanks again you are an
awesome group of girls.
METHODIST WORSHIP
Worship will be held from 9. IS to 9 45 on Mon
dey evenings In the chapel et the Methodist Stu-
dent Center. Casual dress. Wed. evening
fellowship suppers will be held et 5:30 p.m et the
Methodist Student Center. Cost of the meal Is 82.
Pleese call tor reservations: 75 2030. Hot dog
lunches continue on Thursdays from 11:45 until
115 at the Methodist Student Center. 501 East
Fifth Street, across from Garrett Dorm. Hallo
ween Costume Judging Contest will be held from
4:00 to 5:00 p.m. on Oct. 31 In the Multi-purpose
room et Mendenhail. Cell 758 2030 for more
details.
PRESBYTERIAN
FELLOWSHIP
All Presbyterian students are Invited to meet
the new Campus Minister, Michelle "Mike" Bur
cher, at a fellowship meeting of song and
refreshments tonight, Tues Oct 9, at 7 30 p.m.
in the Methodist Student Center A trip to the
Stete Felr Is planned for Frl Oct 19. leaving at
1 p.m. Transportation will be provided free Cost
will be admission plus food and spending money
Call 752 7140 Mon Frl before 2 30 to reserve
your space
INTRAMURALS
If you missed our other announcements, don't
forget to register for racquetbell, punt, pass and
kick, soccer, bowling, one on one basketball this
week. To register come by Room 204 Memorial
Gym or call 757 4387 Don't forget!
AEROBICS
Registration tor IM REC Aerobic Fitness
classes begin Oct IS 19 There will be a Sat mor
nlng drop In class with instructor Mark Brunefi
The cost Is 50 per lesson Come by Room 204
Memorial Gym to register or call 757 4387
WOMEN'S HANDBALL
interested In playing team handball? Come out
to Memorial Gym et 9 p m on Wednesdays
Prectlce sterts Wed , Oct 10 Come dressed and
reedy to play For more Information, call
7574387 and ask for Willie
HAPPY HOUR
The 1984 pledge class of Delta Sigma Phi will
be holding happy hour at the Blue Moon Cafe 7 11
on Tues Oct 9 Happy hour prices Come party
with the best
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
The Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity will be soon
soring a happy hour at the Wli Thurs . Oct 11
There will be free chicken and free beer
Trn��MrtTton will tw provldM Cost I si 50 tu
dent and 12 00 non student
PUBLIC RELATIONS
The Student Union Public Relation and
Publicity Committee Is looking tor Interested In
dlvlduels in working on this committee peckeg
Ing and coordinating the total promotion and
publicity of the Student Union Question? Call
757-8411. ext. 210 from 800 am 5 00 p m In
terested? Fill out en eppHcation today in Room
234 Mendenhail Student Center
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service ot Holy Commu
nion will be celebrated on Tues , evening, Oct �
in the chapel of St Peul's Episcopal Church, 40
4th St. (one block from Gerrett Dorm) The ser
vice will be at 530 p.m with the Episcopal
Chaplain, the Rev Bill Madden, celebrating.
INTERNATIONAL TRAOE
ADMINISTRATION
Currently there are graduate and
undergraduate co op positions available for spr
ing at international Trade Administration In
various areas of the U S Requirements maiors
In economics, international traderelations,
marketing, business andor finance, public ad
ministration, computer science, and Industrial
policy analysis Undergraduates must have a
minimum overall GPA of 2 5 and a 2 9 GPA In
major course work Deadline is October 15
Salary ranges from S12.000 to 817.000 See your
co-op office in Rawl 313 ASAP These positions
need to be filled quickly
� IOLOOYCLUB
The ECU BKrfoor Club will hoto its r�r
meeting on Wed , Oct 10, 19B4 The meeting .�,
belntt�SclereCorme�Roo-mr�N i�atipm
Or Gertierd Keirmis will be speaking on hi, r,
cent visit to the Automonous University �
Guedelelere School o� Medicine m Guedeta,ar.
Mexico Mis mem topic win be admissions.
missions requirements, and other preperator,
technique for professional sctwols This is tt
first meeting ot pre-protesslonei month �
meeting will be on Oct 24 Or Deen Hayek of
fleer of admissions of East Carolina Mac .
School win be speafcintv
INTRAMURALS
The Department of intremurai Recreationa
Services will be having reglstretlon for c asses
on Oct 15-19 from 8 � 00 The ciesses �
begin Oct.23
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Bete Phi will have e meeting �or �
members on Thur , Oct 11 et 7 pm � ;�
Mendenhail The executive f "d win rnrnt
before the general mooting at i -�
MINORITY ARTS
The Student Union Minority Art Com -��
will meet on Tues . Oct 9, et 00 p m in
243 of Mendenhail Student Center All memoen
and interested students art urged te, attene
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$185 Abortion from 13 to 18 weeks a: add:
tional cost Pregnancy Test, Birth Controi.
and Problem Pregnancy Counseling For fur
ther information call 832-0535 (Toll Free
Number 1-800-532-5384) between 9AM and
5PM weekdays
RALEIGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
917 Wewt MortaoaiS.
RoUetjfc, MC
u�w��MVWJWAmww�w V.V.V�W�.v.v �
GREENVILLE STUDENT
LAUNDRY SERVICE
CALL 758-3087
between 8:30am and 5:30pm
Your Own Personal Laundry Service
Let Greenville Student Laundry Service
Pick-up, Wash, Dry, Fold, Hang, as well
as Deliver your laundry.
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And the Today Sponge is the only contraceptive that comes with someone
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Economics
Major
B HAROLD JOYNER
rteekw� v�-�i rduv
A new Economics degree pro-
gram is nov. being offered by the
College of Arts and Sciences with
Particular emphasis on
History
Major
B ERNEST ROBERTS
s�rf �rtt�r
A new Bachelor of Science
degree has recently been added to
ECU's Department of History.
The new degree involves a ma-
mathematj
son Bavl
Economscl
Ba- v,
wa appj
General
April, of
studen'
a minor al
a foreigr
degree do
nor a
ment, i"�
jor in put
two area
first
historical
second enl
sirai
hist
�'I
relative!)
cour
program
Tillev,
Hitchcock Fi
The classic films of Alfred
chock, and the high points o!
fifty-year career as the most
renowned of Hollywood direc-
tors, will be the subject of a
special course during Spr ;
semester. 1985. Students in the
class, which is titled "Alfred Hit-
Novelists
Speak
At Forum
By HAROLDJOYNER
�I Sm L4tor
The only set of identical twin
novelists in America recently
spoke at ECU as a part of the
Poetry Forum's special ever
Richard and Robert Bausv-
both from Washington, D.C
are on the faculty oi George
Mason University. Both read ex-
cerpts from their books and Peter
Makuck. a member of the ECU
faculty and director o� the Poetry
Forum said, "Even though ihe
are identical twins, their style
writing is completely different
Makuck said Richard Baus
who had his frist book published
in 1979, tends to write at
everyday life and other familiar
topics. "He uses dialogue a great
deal more than his brother in
developing his characters
Makuck said.
However, Robert Bausch's
style of writing often deals with
the bizarre. "Robert will take a
simply outrageous idea and then
expand on it said Pat Bizzaro.
an ECU English professor. He
cited an example of strange ideas
from Robert's book The Lives of
Riley Chance. "Robert took the
idea of a Vietnam soldier, who
was thought dead by his parents,
and had him experience his
hometown's reaction to his
homecoming. Because the boy's
views were so radical from
others, he was disliked by most of
the people. Even his father
thought his son would be better
off dead
Bizzaro. who knows the
Bausch brothers personally,
laughed and said, "the two of
them are so different, that if
given the opportunity to tell the
same joke, thev would probably
react to it differently
Makuck said he hopes to invite
more writers to speak on campus
before the end of the year. "The
SGA generously gives the Forum
$1.000 a year to obtain these pro-
minant writers to speak on cam-
pus. With that amount he
said, "we can usually get two or
three writers a year to speak on
their works So far. the Poetry
Forum has not determined who
the next speakers will be. but a
decision will be made before
Thanksgiving.
The Poetry Forum will have its
next meeting on Thursday, Oct.
18 in room 248 Mendenhail
Makuck welcomes anyone in-
terested to attend and participate
in this informal discussion of
poetry. He only asks that the peo-
ple bring 6-8 copies of their work
to the meeting so others will have
a chance to read it. "We not only
encourage the poet's writing, but
offer him advice and positive sug-
gestions that may improve his
workhe said.
(192"

pro- i
hurt
Dr U
ENGL 5
tie. 1 choj
"1
Hitc
T.
bl
Ai
CJ
'

I
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A





BIOLOGY CLUB
KU �"��' c,ob wm " no,
3, -�ft�$v :km C�np�� Hoom IN UBat7pm
n0 IUM��I bo KiooklnQ on his r�-
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.j� � ra ifwot o� Madiclno In C-vatfolaiar
H t mala asK �"ll � MMMNn od-
M eqw,r�m�of� and olt�f preparatory
a o.M-01 pro�e�� on! �ctool� Thl� I, th�
naM Si pra eroreaaionai month Noxt
� � M on Od � Dr Dwn HlyH. of.
. - milllMlWW ll EM! Carolina Mod lea I
. � M �a�"ifl
INTRAMURALS
- �o�T'�r" �� n�Tamural Rocroatlonal
-n� -�� ng '�gitfratlon ror claaaa
i v from � 30 ao Tna clasaos will
GAMMA BETA PHI
��� lW art! "av� a mooting Hx all
� �- rj oc H at 7 p.m in 244
' np ��ecu'iva ' -d wrlll maat
a gonara niaawwi a� t -on
MINORITY ARTS
- .v M noriry Art� Commlttoa
�� t,i00pm in Room
� w - tfaffl Cantor All momborj
. ntat ttuOonti �'� j'oao to attono
ABORTIONS UP
2th WEEK
HEGNANCY
.k weeks at addi-
rest. Birth Control,
unseiim For fur-
832 533 (Toll Free
4 between A.M and
R AL�iGH WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATIONS
�17 Wc MoryonS.
Roiotgn NC
Nly�
STUDENT
SERVICE
CALL 758-3087
30am and 5:30pm
u Laundry Service
enr Laundry Service
Fold, Hang, as well
: your laundrv.
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ighly with
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 9. 1984
Two New Majors Offered
Economics
Major
By HAROLDJOYNER
Ajablaal Newt Mtlor
A new Economics degree pro-
gram is now being offered by the
College of Arts and Sciences with
Particular emphasis on
History
Major
By ERNEST ROBERTS
mathematics, according to Car-
son Bays, coordinator for
Economics.
Bays said the program, which
was approved by the UNC
General Administration last
April, offers two options for
students. The BA degree includes
a minor and 12 semester hours of
a foreign language. The BS
degree does not include a minor
nor a foreign language require-
ment, but requires additional
cognate courses in math,
statistics, and accounting.
"This Economics minor is now
available and is designed to com-
plement majors in other social
sciences, computer sciences, and
mathematics Bays said.
Bays also notedAs a result of
the new program, the Economics
staff will be increasing He said
two Ph.D's were being con-
sideredand hopefully they'll be
here by the Fall of 1985. Also, by
1986 we will separate as a new
department within the College of
Arts and Sciences
In a national survey of job of-
fers. Bays said, 38 percent of job
offers to economists came from
businesses, 59 percent from
manufacturing and industrial
firms and slightly more than 2
percent were from government
and non-profit businesses.
Buy, Sell
And Trade
With The
Classifieds
I
Staff Writer
A new Bachelor of Science
degree has recently been added to
ECU's Department of History.
The new degree involves a ma-
jor in public history and offers
two areas of concentration. The
first concerns archives and
historical preservation, while the
second encompasses museum ad-
ministration and maritime
history.
"East Carolina is one of the
relatively few universities in the
country that offers this degree
program in history said John
Tilley, assistant professor of
history. "This degree is for
history majors who do not plan
to teach
The major is designed to com-
bine a traditional history
background with skills that can
be used in the job market.
"People with this degree will
have a combination of skills and
knowledge Tilley said. "Public
history graduates can have job
opportunities in publishing,
historical research for businesses,
museums and historical sites
The major requires 132
semester hours including general
college requirements. It will also
include useful information in
working in archives, museums
and preserving old buildings.
"There will be exciting and dif-
ferent course offerings that will
deal with practical matters of
history.
�sBjjoj
tttiZ ON tH ���
. �S wcmiiuoH-y-tOOl �
Hitchcock Films Subject Of Course
The classic films of Alfred Hit-
chock, and the high points of his
fifty-year career as the most
renowned of Hollywood direc-
tors, will be the subject of a
special course during Spring
semester, 1985. Students in the
class, which is titled "Alfred Hit-
Novelists
Speak
At Forum
By HAROLD JOYNER
Ajabtaat Neoo Edllor
The only set of identical twin
novelists in America recently
spoke at ECU as a part of the
Poetry Forum's special events.
Richard and Robert Bausch,
both from Washington, D.C
are on the faculty of Georje
Mason University. Both read ex-
cerpts from their books and Peter
Makuck, a member of the ECU
faculty and direct or-of the Poetry
Forum said, "Even though they
are identical twins, their style of
writing is completely different
Makuck said Richard Bausch,
who had his frist book published
in 1979, tends to write about
everyday life and other familiar
topics. "He uses dialogue a great
deal more than his brother in
developing his characters
Makuck said.
However, Robert Bausch's
style of writing often deals with
the bizarre. "Robert will take a
simply outrageous idea and then
expand on it said Pat Bizzaro,
an ECU English professor. He
cited an example of strange ideas
from Robert's book The Lives of
Riley Chance. "Robert took the
idea of a Vietnam soldier, who
was thought dead by his parents,
and had him experience his
hometown's reaction to his
homecoming. Because the boy's
views were so radical from
others, he was disliked by most of
the people. Even his father
thought his son would be better
off dead
Bizzaro, who knows the
Bausch brothers personally,
laughed and said, "the two of
them are so different, that if
given the opportunity to tell the
same joke, they would probably
react to it differently
Makuck said he hopes to invite
more writers to speak on campus
before the end of the year. "The
SGA generously gives the Forum
$1,000 a year to obtain these pro-
minant writers to speak on cam-
pus. With that amount he
said, "we can usually get two or
three writers a year to speak on
their works So far, the Poetry
Forum has not determined who
the next speakers will be, but a
decision will be made before
Thanksgiving.
The Poetry Forum will have its
next meeting on Thursday, Oct.
18 in room 248 Mendenhall.
Makuck welcomes anyone in-
terested to attend and participate
in this informal discussion of
poetry. He only asks that the peo-
ple bring 6-8 copies of their work
to the meeting so others will have
a chance to read it. "We not only
encourage the poet's writing, but
offer him advice and positive sug-
gestions that may improve his
workhe said.
wmmmmm0m
A. I
!
?
A
chcock and the Art of Terror
will have a chance to view 13 of
his works, from The Lodger
(1927) to Frenzy (1972). Class
discussions will range from Hit-
chcock's "nighmare images" to
his techniques of suspense to his
probing of the question of evil in
human life.
Dr. William Stephenson, pro-
fessor of film literature in the
English Department, recently ex-
plained the course offering. "Ac-
tually, the course number is
ENGL 5900 and it appears in the
catalogue as Special Studies in
Film. That's the general course ti-
tle. I choose a different topic for
study each year He added,
"I've wanted to teach a class in
Hitchcock's films for a long time,
and especially now that his estate
has made some films available
that weren't on the market for
many years. He was simply the
greatest in his field
Which Hitchcock film is
Stephenson's favorite? He laugh-
ed and said "I like every film
where Hitchcock included a pic-
ture of himself � and that's all
of them He expects that the
sharpest class reaction to a film
will be for Psycho, with its classic
stabbing-in-the-shower scene.
Stephenson noted that the class
will meet on Tuesdays and
Thursdays from 2:00 to 4:00.
"There are no special prere-
quisites, I'll welcome anyone
with an interest in Hitchcock or
in film art. The course can be
taken for credit or audited.
Students who have taken ENGL
5900 earlier, on other topics, can
repeat for credit For further in-
formation, contact Professor
Stephenson in Austin 217.
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i&s& auoXjaxa aii Bu;ioo jo pejij.
�noA po eiuos aia ipiM pejog

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She will become
their most deadly weapon.
As long as they can make
her fall in love.
DIANE KEATON
THE
LITTLE
GIRL
Call ui For An fM
Wilt, Tha Doctor Of rout
ONfCNVIU.1 STOW OHLY
pucians
Otnar Location in
Ooan 9 � M 5 30 P M Won Fn
Saacnar Kirklay Oitpanamg Option
Acroaa from
Oocio't m
SCREENING
DATE: October 10
TIME: 8:00 PM
LOCATION: Hendrix Theater
East Carolina Univ.
Greenville
Sponsored by: Student Union Films Committee
A GEORGE ROY HILL FILM
DIANE KEATON
m JOHN LE CARRE S
THE LITTLE DRUMMER GIRL'
YORGO VOYAGIS KLAUS KINSKI
Musk by DAVE GRUSIN
Executive Producer PATRICK KELLEY
Screenplay by LORING MANDEL
Based on the novel by JOHN LE CARRE
Produced by ROBERT L CRAWFORD
Directed by GEORGE ROY HILL
I -
rM� '�KI�l�ii'
IttAuMIAfflAMlSty,
�� �'���
mm
t
Jf






Stye East &ar0linian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, GmMr
GREG RiDEOUT, Managtnt Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak. ��, j.T. Pietrzak. mkmt,
Randy Mews, sr.s &� Anthony Martin, �,�� h
Tina Maroschak. am em Kathy Fufrst. mm. ���
Bin Austin, onM� v,� mike Mayo, Ad�r,uu,g r�dwu�
October 9, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
SGA
tfo? Kowr Position Wisely
With the opening session of the
1984-85 SGA Legislature under
our belts, a few words of wisdom
and notes of concern come to
mind. ECU's student body is
about to embark on another
challenging year. Along with this
comes our duty to watch and offer
words of praise or admonishment.
Our leaders � yes, students, they
are our leaders � need our and
your support to help guide them
through the decisions they will
make this year.
First of all, we'd like to say some
words on leadership. We are in-
debted to Dr. Lawrence Hough,
whose speech Monday night was
truly inspiring and insightful, for
these borrowed words of wisdom.
We cannot blame him for any er-
rors or wrong that happens
because of what we say, but he can
accept all the credit for any right
effected by the adherence to the
following advice. For those
legislators who were unable to stay
for the leadership conference, read
carefully; it will help.
As a legislator, be aggressive.
When you truly know what you
believe in and are willing to place
yourself in a position to air those
beliefs, do so in a manner that
demands attention. The students
� your constituents � demand
that you represent them to your
fullest abilities. Not bringing your
views to the attention of the
legislature is a gross dereliction of
duty and cannot be tolerated.
Use inspiration and intelligence
in your decisions. Be willing to go
apart from the crowd if your cons-
cience dictates it. A leader is one
who goes out on the limb of the
tree of ideas to test his hypotheses
about his constituency. It is a risk
he must take, but one that more
often than not brings respect for
his ability to take such a stand. A
leader who accomplishes his goals
for his followers is to be commend-
ed. For accomplishment, in
whatever capacity, is the true
measure of leadership.
Legislators must be honest. In-
tegrity cannot ever be faulted.
When a leader uses enthusiasm in a
forthright manner, he embellishes
his goals and ideals with a commit-
ment that can't be matched by
those who are out purely for per-
sonal gain. Honest noliticians and
leaders survive. They are the peo-
ple who truly represent the best of
society, whether that society be the
campus or the city or the nation.
These points, plus the others
that Dr. Hough so appropriately
expounded, must be heeded by our
student representatives during the
coming months. There will be
many opportunities to remember
them.
You will be asked to deal with
requests for money � some
reasonable and some not so
reasonable. Use these
characteristics to make your deci-
sion. Do not be subservient to one
interest or ideal. Be cosmopolitan,
not regionalistic.
We will be watching you. The
newspaper and the radio station
will be acting as a watchdog for
your constituency. If the
legislature as a whole or a par-
ticular member deviates from good
service to the university and the
students, we will let it be known.
We will also be quick to commend
any exemplary action by the
legislature or an individual
legislator.
But the most important rule to
remember is that you represent the
students. It is their money and
welfare you are looking out for.
Do what's right, and you'll do just
fine.
Doonesbury
can you name the only administration
in US history sleazy enough to
have a cabinet officer indicted?
again.
Mondale Scores
Debate Brings Surprises
By GREG RIDEOUT
Walter Mondale Sunday's night's
debate. He got across crucial points
throughout the evening while looking
poised and in command during the pro-
cess. The private side of Mondale that
aides have constantly asked him to
show came out � his humor and a
relaxed, smooth, yet forceful
countenance. He met the president
head-on and overshadowed the normal-
ly confident and effervescent Ronald
Reagan. What was supposed to happen
didn't, and what Mondale needed to do
he did.
ViewPoint
Now, I admit to bias on my part.
Although not Mondale's strongest sup-
porter, I am definitely in sync with a
number of his beliefs and believe him o
be the better of the two candidates.
Maybe it was expected of me to say
"my" candidate won. So, don't take
my word, just ask some Reagan backers
or members of the conservative faith to
evaluate the president's performance.
For example, George Will, a conser-
vative, Pulitzer-Prize winning colum-
nist and political analyst for ABC
News, was astonished at the president's
performance. He said Reagan erred in
fighting the battle of facts instead of ex-
pounding broad themes, which he does
so well. The grandfatherly image was
gone and a bumbling uncle emerged.
Will commented on the president's
fidgeting and the amount of times he
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
IT CAME SPECIAL
delivery MUST
9B IMPORTANT rr$FK0M
THE AGENCY.


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REALLY? HEY, WON-
PERFUL NEWS, MIKE IT SURE IS.
NO KIPPING1 THE SOMEBOPrs
BEST1 - FINALLY BRJNS
, ING AN INCOME
'NOW IT REAL �
TAKES THE PRESSURE
OFF ALL OF US. IT
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S J ZONKER
UHHI I'M MIKEPOONESBURY
HERE TO SEE RIGHT? I KNEW
MRS CONGPON IT. YOU'VE GOT
MY NAME IS. ENTRY-LEVEL
WRITTEN ALL OVER
YOU I'LL BUZZ
MRS CONGPON
M' YOU'RE QUITE THE
THANKS Ctm PIE, AREN'T YOU?
ARE Y0UMARR1EP?
GOP.HOWCOJUPI
ASK THAT? I MEAN,
IAJE HARDLY KNOW
EACH OTHER.
r
I PONT KNOW AS ICOULPHANDLE
ANYTHING RIGHT NOW ANYWAY I
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SHOW. YOU'RE A GOOP LISTENER,
YWKNOWTHAT? 60P,
TALK ABOUT YOUR
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EXCUSE ME,
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EXCUSE ME?
HAVE YOU BEEN
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joy KNOW YOU FROM
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THAT'SIT! I
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GOP
RIGHT1 YOU
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BOY YOU'RE
MUCH SMALLER
IN REAL LIFE.


W3Z�&
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stumbled and hesitated on his answers.
The president lost the trophy everyone
thought he would win � that for best
stage performance. Walter Mondale,
the dark-horse, carried it home instead.
The president's advisors could not
laud Reagan's performance; they were
forced on to the defensive, saying that
no matter how well Mondale did, he
could not dent the president's comman-
ding lead. This type of behavior in
politics translates to, "my guy got beat,
but I'm not telling anyone that
And on Cable News Network a
special panel made up of four
academics who specialize in rating
events of this kind gave Mondale a 3-1
decision.
What does Mondale's win mean?
Who will it affect and will the perfor-
mance translate into votes in
November? Yes. My gut reaction is it
takes away the "wimp-whiner" label
the Republicans have tried to pin on
Mondale. He has now shown those peo-
ple who doubted he had leadership
capabilities that he possesses poise,
grace and forcefulness. Americans who
have related in poll after poll they agree
with Mondale on the issues but will vote
for Reagan because of his leader-
shipshowmanship will now think
twice.
The debate will not sway the hard-
core supporters of either candidate. No
new light was shed on the issues, and
the candidates presented their basic dif-
ferences on abortion, the national debt
and taxes, government and religion,
Campus Forum �
and the role of government in general
This was enough for some conservai
to say the president won. But
voters needed more than this. The .
a chance to see Mondale articular -
message and score points with the style
factor, which is important to s� ,
voters. The "Great Communicai
Reagan seemed to grasp for words and
at times became illogical. Mr Mond
spiced his well-reasoned logic witt
humor and facts.
Yet, Reagan made no clear biunce-
Unless he had come out for abort
revealed that he was trashing all nuclear
weapons, he could not lose u:��
basic constituency. Conser. ative
realize Mondale did well. Bu- thai
doesn't matter to them; they believe n
Mr. Reagan, no matter how poorh
performed. The problem is thai thi
Democrats Reagan thought he had
his camp, like industrial worker- in the
North, may have second th lghl
Mondale's performance p�: iht-
Democratic party in a good ligbf
So it's on 10 Round Two. PresjGer.
Reagan practiced for days before the
debate. He'll probably do the same
again. But you car teach an old dog
new tricks. George Will said it best thai
"they" weren't letting Reagan be
Reagan. But maybe because we got the
flip side, voters will realize the hoax is
up. When a showman lead it's a cir-
cus. When a statesmen leads, it's a
country. Mondale exhifc arage to
lead in Louisville last nigh he gave us
grace under pressue.
Helms Stands This Way
I would like to supplement Mr.
David Brooks' recent letter with a few
facts.
Sen. Helms did support Roberto
D'Aubuisson over Duarte in the re-
cent elections in El Salvador. After
Duarte won, he flew to El Salvador
with Secretary of State George
Schultz to congratulate the new
president-elect and to pledge his sup-
port for the new government in his
capacity as chairman of the Senate
Foreign Relations subcommittee
which deals with that area of the
world.
Sen. Helms has, on numerous oc-
casions, condemned the murders
committed by all death squads, both
right-wing and left-wing. If Mr.
Brooks has additional information
which proves D'Aubuisson is con-
nected to any death squads, he should
contact the Senate Intelligence Com-
mittee at once.
The bipartisan Social Security
rescue plan which Mr. Brooks says
Sen. Helms did not support contained
11 out of 20 provisions of Sen. Helms
plan to permanently save Social
Security. Even with as many of Sen.
Helms' provisions included in the
final "rescue" package, the plan that
emerged merely raised taxes. It did
not permanently save Social Security
as his plan would. As Sen. Helms
says, "the Social Security problem
will return to haunt us
Through Sen. Helms' skillful
management of the most recent farm
bill, he insisted that tobacco taxes be
cut in half, as they were. He was suc-
cessful.
Sen. Helms did vote against an in-
crease in student loans, but not
because he is against college students.
Millions of dollars are not being
repaid, so why should he vote to in-
crease the amount of money owed the
taxpayers? Sen. Helms supports
defense policies that will prevent us
from having to fight in a war. He sup-
ports fiscal policies, which if
adopted, would allow us to purchase
a new home and to provide for our
children's futures.
David Cartwright
Sen Pols.
SGA Statement
The following is a statement by
SGA President Johnny Rainey on
student health fees and the proposal
to let them count as a deductible on
insurance policies.
The proposed plan to allow student
health fees to count as deductible for
insurance policies has received much
consideration from student leaders
across this state. At our recent
meeting in Chapel Hill, myself and
the other SGA presidents from the
constituent institutions of the Univer-
sity of North Carolina discussed the
plan and agreed to return to our
respective schools to voice our sup-
port for this plan. We feel it is in the
best interest of the students, and we
are firm in our support for this pro-
posal. Our organization is hoping In-
surance Commissioner John Ingram
will recognize the student interest in
this plan and try to implement it
before he leaves office. On behalf of
the student body, I wish to thank you
for allowing the student voice to be
heard on this proposed plan.
Johnny Rainey
SGA President
Forum Rules
77ie East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance of Joyner Library
Most R
Crime
Column
A rapist is commonly imagined
" a seed psvchological and
sociological deviant who hides
along dark streets and sidew
ariJ preys upon unsuspecting
bms He is a facelew and
nameless stranger
Women's
"men's health care is pr
: K: the Student Health (enter
'emaJe health care pro
consists of education and
cagr.osis and treatment ol
P' "ems. All services are
I dential.
Educational programs
"emale students cover a ar
� women's hea
-d;ng contract:
-examination
-muted diseases. O
� otfered upon reque These
gram- are available to .
nitory students a- I nv
- groups. Aconu
held twice a weel at the Stu
lent Health Center on M
at 10 a.m. and Thur
p m. Male students a
attend any of the class
grams.
Brochures and othf
tion about women heal
also available
Health Center inc iding
such as premer
eating disorders, diet and nu
tion and cancer. Pap
tests for pregnancv.
-exuallv transmitter
along with evaluation of otl
health problems are avails
Registration
Drive
Successful
More than 350 students
registered to vote during a c-
sponsored by the ECl Si id
Campaign for Voter Reg �
tion, according to Ja Stone, a
member of the campaign
Pitt Countv registrars
campus last Monda; and Te
day to register students. Members
of the National Association I -
the Advancement of Cokn
People and the campus Cc q
Young Democrats helped
voters up.
"This is the firsl me ve've
had registrars on camp us uritl
facing institutional barriers
Stone said. He added that if there
had been more workers. �-
bably twice as many" si
could have been regterec:
"Those who saj that student
apathy is the reason that student-
don't participate in r
politics are wrong It's a a I
plete absurdity. In fact its an in-
sult Stone said. "Students are
probablv some of the m
politically concerned people in
the state
H
cur
of
mail
and I
raf
Si
the
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Each prepared
PICK UP: Sati
(Near Tick�
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4
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inistratioii
ugh to
dieted?
no
guess
again
urpnses
general,
� atives
?ther
� got
ate his
' as anc
dal
blunder
a
the.
'der'1
tcfore the
the
n old dog
� that
igan be
- : the
he hoax is
-l cir-
ds, it a
:ourage to
te ave us
1 his Way
chase
r our
(A statement
latement by
Rainey on
hi proposal
tible on
a student
Icductible for
received much
ient leaders
V our recent
Hill, myself and
�� m the
� � he I fniver-
liscussed the
return to our
� nice our sup-
lan We teel it is in the
� the students, and we
u support for this pro-
. zation is hoping In-
�mmissioner John Ingram
the student interest in
and try to implement it
Ffice On behalf of
ident bod. 1 wish to thank you
. he student voice to be
his proposed plan.
Rainey
Nident
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
expressing all points of view.
4ail or drop them by our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance of Joyner Library.
4
i MI I AS IAROI IN1AS
I om k s ivh4
Most Rape Victims Acquainted With
Crime
Column
A rapist is commonly imagined
as a seedy, psychological and
sociological deviant who hides
along dark streets and sidewalks
and pres upon unsuspecting vic-
tims. He is a faceless and
nameless stranger.
However, this image is only ac-
curate in approximately one-third
of reported rape cases. In the re-
maining two-thirds, the rapisi
was an acquaintance of the victim
and in 30 percent of reported
rapes, the victim was raped by
her date.
Survey information reported at
the 1983 Acquaintance Rape and
Rape Prevention on Campus
Workshop at the University of
I ouisville provided the following
results:
A Department of Justice
survey indicated that 85, 000
rapes are reported annually and
the actual incidence of rape is
three to five times greater than
reported. Twenty percent of col-
lege women surveyed answered
"Yes" when asked, "Have you
ever had intercourse without your
consent and against your will?
Fifteen percent of men surveyed
answered "Yes" when asked.
"Have you had intercourse with
a woman against her will and
Women's Health Care Offered
V omen's health care is prov id
W bv the Student Health Center.
The female health care program
consists o education and the
diagnosis and treatment of health
problems. All services are con-
fidential
Educational programs offered
to female students cover a variet)
of women's health issues in-
cluding contraception, breast
self-examination and sexually
transmitted diseases. Other topics
are offered upon request. These
programs are available to dor-
mitory students and other cam-
pus groups. contraception class
is held twice a week at the Stu-
dent Health Center on Mondays
at 10 a.m. and Thursdays at 3
P m. Male students are invited to
attend anv of the classes and pro-
grams.
Brochures and other mforma-
ion about women's health are
also available at the Student
Health Center including topics
such as premenstrual syndrome,
eating disorders, diet and nutri-
n and cancer. Pap smears,
tests for pregnancv. herpes and
sexually transmitted diseases
along with evaluation of other
Uth problems are available at
Registration
Drive
Successful
the center. Prescriptions tor oral
contraceptives and diaphragms
may be obtained after an ap-
pointment with a health care pro-
uler and may be filled at the Stu-
dent Health Center pharmacy at
a minimal cost to the student.
More information about the
women's health program may be
obtained by calling 757-6841 or
bv stopping by the Student
Health (enter. Appointments for
yearly pap smears can be made bv
calling 757-6317.
without consent? For college
women, the most frequent time
for acquaintance rape to occur is
in their freshman year. Of 6(X)
women who acknowledged being
the victim of acquaintance rape,
only four reported it to the
police.
Date rape and acquaintance
rape are probably the most
under-reported and the most
psychologically damaging type of
sexual assault. A woman who is
assaulted by a stranger may feel
no personal responsibility for the
act; but a woman who is raped by
her date may feel that she, in
some way, brought the conse-
quences upon herself. The mental
anguish brought on by this feel-
�ng of responsibility may cause
the victim to believe that the
police will be unsympathetic. She
may not be able to discuss the
matter with her friends for the
same reason.
Four rapes have been reported
on the campus of East Carolina
University since the fall of 1980
Of those reported, one was un-
founded, two were stranger
rapes. The fourth, an acquain-
tance rape, was prosecuted and
the suspect is presently serving a
thirty-five year prison term for
second-degree sexual assualt. The
seriousness of the offense is not
diminished under the law bv per
sonal knowledge or dating bet-
ween the attacker and the victim.
If Department of Justice
estimates on unreported rape are
accurate, chances are that a great
many more have occurred here,
as well as on other college cam-
puses.
Some experts have placed the
blame for the increase in datc
rape and acquaintance rape on
socially accepted sexual ag
gressiveness in men along with a
tailure in females to accuratelv
communicate their intentions a-
to sexual involvement to their
dates.
The EC L Department of
Public Safetv intends to sponsor
open discussions on date rape
and acquaintance rape in severe.
of the campus residence halls
during the oming school vear II
vou are interested in this pi
gram, contact your Programming
Assistant
�?&
joo
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Heavy Cotton Shirts and Slacks
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than ??0 student'
registered to vote during a drive
sponsored bv the ECU Student
i 'ampaign for Voter Registra-
on. according to .lay Stone, a
member of the campaign.
Pitt County registrars were on
campus last Monday and Tues-
:o register students. Members
' the National Association for
e Advancement of Colored
pie and the campus College
oung Democrats helped sign
iters up.
"This is the first time we've
registrars on campus without
ng institutional barriers
x" ne said. He added that if there
cen more workers, "pro-
v twice as many" students
.Id have been registered.
"Those who say that student
hv is the reason that students
I m't participate in national
itics are wrong. It's a com-
ete absurdity. In fact it's an in-
Stone said. "Students are
babl) some of the most
ticall) concerned people in
state
You Call
The Shots.
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CAROLINA EAST MALL (near Belk's) I
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Student Supply Store Lobby
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I f
-IHJEAST�ARQUN1AN OCTOBER 9, 1984
Republicans Deny Heckling
(CPS) � Walter Mondale's
supporters, seemingly as hearten-
ed as they are upset by their can-
didate's recent reception on col-
lege campuses, are charging
Republicans organized student
disruptions of recent Mondale
speeches at Southern Cal, the
University of Texas at Arlington
and the University of Illinois.
"The evidence is strong to sug-
gest (the heckling and disruption
of Mondale appearances on cam-
puses) is an organized political ef-
fort says Bill Morton, presi-
dent of the National College
Democrats in Washington, D.C.
A private Republican group,
the Leadership Institute, headed
by a former aide to Ronald
Reagan, held a campaign seminar
for young people in Washington
in August, and trained students
to disrupt Mondale campaign ap-
pearances, contends David
Schauer, 24, who attended the
seminar.
Schauer, who now works for a
Democratic congressional can-
didate in Iowa, says students
were instructed how to position
themselves within crowds to draw
attention away from Mondale,
how to write placards to tie Mon-
dale to the Jimmy Carter ad-
ministration, and how to disavow
any connection to the Reagan
campaign in the process.
Schauer has a tape recording of
a seminar session at which an
unidentified female seminar
ieader � who Mondale student
coordinator Gary Brickman
syays is Reagan-Bush Campaign
Vouth Director Liz Pickens �
urges the studetns to "just say
'I'm a concerned citizen Don't
say 'I'm with Students for
Reagan
The Republicans deny thev are
involved with the heckling, which
has included shouted interrup-
tions of Mondale speeches.
Asked if his campaign was
ivolved in the heckling. President
Reagan last week said, "Good
I ord, no. I wish people wouldn't
do it. It's rude, and it shouldn't
r�e done
Leadership Institute head Mor-
ton Blackwell denies his seminars
taught such tactics, calling them
"stuj�d,and.eoxbauasMng
"The (people) from our office
were not involved adds Jack
Abramoff. head of the College
Republican. "We sent out a
memo that said if you go to Mon-
dale ever's, don't get involved
"The people who did it he
ays, "were a combination of
rowdy types and those who just
joined in. It's just a bunch of
people who don't like Mondale
Abramoff adds that "many
�tudents are not going to let Mon-
dale go to campuses without
some kind of protest
The College Republicans' pro-
tests, he says, have tended more
toward the silly, with a group of
CRs dressed as "Fritzbusters"
touring some campuses, and,
outside Mondale's address at
George Washington University
iast week, having the "Student
Anti-Boredom Coalition" dress
in pajamas, and handing out No-
Doz and coffee to passerby.
"That's what he says replies
Brickman of Mondale's cam-
paign. "Abramoff's not going to
say 'Ya, we were behind it and we
encourage it
The actual number of incidents
has been small. The worst
episode was at Southern Cal in
mid-September, where about 100
protestors brandished signs like
"Moscovites for Mondale" and
yelled so persistently that the can-
didate had to depart from his
prepared speech.
USC still is probing the inci-
dent, and may take action against
some of the students who were in-
volved, says John Hanson, ex-
ecutive director of Campus Life.
Some suspect the heckling was
launched from the campus's Tau
Kappa Epsilon fraternity, if only
because some of the
ReaganBush signs were assembl-
ed on the TKE lawn, Hanson
adds.
Press reports immediately after
the disruption quoted an uniden-
tified student saying the heckling
had been orchestrated by the
Reagan' Bush campaign, down to
telling demonstrators where they
should stand.
"A lot of things came out after
the incident, and they weren't
what I said says John Stuart
president of the TKE house at
USC. "So I'm not saying
anything at this time
The polls indicated the disrup-
tion evoked some voter sympathy
for Mondale, and Mondale
quickly went on to speak at
George Washington last week.
The response to Mondale and
Sen. Gary Hart, who shared the
podium "really surprised (Mon-
dale) Brickman says.
Indeed the reception was one
of the few spontaneously warm
ones Mondale has gotten since
the Republican convention in
August, and moved the campaign
to announce the next day that
Mondale would start going after
the campus vote more in the en-
suing weeks.
His next campus stop after
George Washington was the next
week at Rutgers, where Mondale
was to mark National Student
Voter Registration Day.
President Reagan's campus
receptions have been almost
universally warm, with the excep-
tion of a few vocal protestors at
an appearance at D'Anza College
in Cupertino, Ca in early
September.
&)0LttlN
IT1" Out ,m A -iCiC p�o;tsr,
inct,�� infersnon ON
a? s r, fueo : WHY
&ACHe poKT HAK� 600D
'WHAT'5 &��k m'�J3Un& on
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GREENVILLE. N.C 27834
7S2 0688
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FREE DELIVERY!
10TH A HAKI ts SIH� FTS
(jfclFJ.Vtt t S-
758-3100
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DAUSCH 0 LOAD SOFl�NS CONTACTS
COMPICTCPOROMY $99
to ust $99 you 1 be fitted with the finest soli comoct tenses avotiobte
Bousch & lomo Softens' Contacts The price includes everything you I
need to put your glasses owoy to good imtioi eye examination lenses
corekit,instnjctionsandfoiow-up visits tor one month And ybOrece�ve
two weeks trio
Bousch ft Lomb Softens Contacts tor $99corno�eieComesee�or
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�Y�CAR�CeNTER
Or. Hotlis 4 Scibal
Tipton Annex228 Greenville Bhrd.
754-9404
deli sandwiches
steaksandwiches
pizza, ice cream
convenient
fast
TO SHOP OVERTON'S
SALE STARTS THURSDAY
��.
Rebel
The Literary-Art Magazine of East Carolina University
WRITING CONTESTS
PROSE
1st prize $100
2nd prize $75
3rd prize $50
POETRY
1st prize $100
2nd prize $75
3rd prize $50
ACCEPTING ENTRIES UNTIL OCT 29
Submit typed entries to Rebel or Media Board offices
2nd floor publicoions building. Include name, address
and phone number.
Heavy Western
Sirloin Steaks
$1.87
Grade "A"
$& Whole Fryers
Sf
�m
as� -?'
&s
Busch Beer
12 pack-12 oz. cans
$3.99
Torino's Frozen
Party Pizza lOoz.pkg.
Buy one at regular price
GET ONE FREE!
Regular or Sugar-Free
Dr. Pepper 7-Up
Grade "A" Pitt County
Jumbo Eggs
dozen
DELI SPECIALS
Potato Salad
ib. 89C
Turkey Salad
� $2.99
Prices Effective Through Saturday, Oct. 13
2 Blocks From ECU
Corner Third and Jarvis Streets
1HJ I s , v(
Levi'
B ROBIN HAMKIC K
Of all the style
and gone, Levi jeans have
bablv stayed around th
Levi Strauss and Com
sold over two billio:
jeans in its 131 yea
Why? EC I studa
know the arc
durable, and fashioi
lege students have bo
Levi's for Years.
In 1853 I.e. -
to sell goods to the
the California gold
plaints of pants thai -
fast gave Lev. Stra .
create pam-
The world
jeans came
jeans. In the 185
replaced the ca
cotton fat �
added an indigo dye
the basic color
per rivei
help streng-
wit'r
back pod
traderr.arl I
right hand bac�
L'p to the 19?o
primarily wot -
COwboys; h
che" becan - p
jeans.
During World
Straus supp ed the .
with 501 jeaj - .
defense worl
1950's brough:
into the spotlit
Levi jeans �
Marian Brar.j
teenager across
followed the .i'u
During the '60s, I
one of the top thret
smuggled abroad,
and still are vet
overseas. In the So
Lev is can be put
n 5500. Jear
'Januai
B TON BROWS
st�rr �iir
January Rose bi
ferent variety ol
Carolina Opry H
.night � "good
music
Going far beyond
"new country roci
Tcept the crowd moving
spanning the gap
as diverse as Johnnv 1 .
�eger and Hue Lew
News, �
$ocW Creedencc
uater Rev � tossed
With T - McGuire
guitar. Lvr.r. Par. .
Bobby. Si � -�� bass, Rr
tMcGuire kev fc
�C Boj
5?and kep: a good p
ithrougr- g j
the tempc veer
things interesi .
S Opening with a solid vers
4
'V
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I
Januar. Rose members Tim. Bohr
1
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.
J
THE HSI CAROI INUN
Entertainment
OCTOBER 9. 1984 Page 7
Levi's: A Style Of All Their Own
By ROBIN HAMRICK
nj
JR�NSCOHTACrS
OWY $99
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rmenue
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P'frlPii�
pi
ON'S
RSDAY
Beer
k-12 oz cans
$3.99
al regular price
GE1 ONr FREE!
Free
Up
870
tter B
Whole Mania Milk
paper
99C
Golden Ripe Bananas
.� lb.
18C
ITONS
Siall Wruri
Of all the styles that have come
and gone, Levi jeans have pro-
bably stayed around the longest.
Levi Strauss and Company has
sold over two billion pairs of
leans in its 131 years of existance.
Why? ECU students seem to
know � they are comfortable,
durable, and fashionable. Col-
lege students have been wearing
I evi's for years.
In 1853 Levi Strauss went West
to sell goods to the miners during
the California gold rush. Com-
plaints of pants that wore out too
fast gave Levi Strauss the idea to
eate pants out of tent canvas.
The world's first introduction to
seans came through Lei's 501
jeans. In the 1850's Strauss
replaced the canvas with a tough
cotton fabric � denim. He also
added an indigo dye which is still
le basic color of his jeans. Cop-
per rivets appeared in 1873 to
help strengthen the pockets along
ith the stitched pattern on the
back pocket. Levi's red tag
idemark first appeared in the
ght hand back pocket in 1936.
L'p to the 1930's jeans were
primarily orn by ranchers and
tvboys; however, as "dude ran-
�" became popular, so did 501
ng World War 11 Levi
. s -upplied the armed forces
. jeans.but only people in
�e work could get them. The
brought two movie heros
the potlight wearing their
eans � James Dean and
Ma ar Brando. As a result,
icross the country
eir lead.
. '60s, evi's became
� 'hree items to be
They became
-TV popular
Soviet Union,
purchased for as
$500. Jeans dominated
the fashion scene in the '60s and
'70s, hence, to help fund the
growth, Levi Strauss and Com-
pany went public in 1971.
After speaking to some ECU
students, it is obvious why Levi's
are constantly seen walking, run-
ning, sitting, standing, cleaning,
or whatever they feel like doing
all around campus.
Darla Richards commented, "I
wear my Levi's all the time and
wherever 1 go. They are comfor-
table and fit me the best
"1 wear my Levi's unless I have
to dress up for class on Monday
and Wednesday. They are all I've
ever bought said Leslie Linker.
When Wesley Ricks was asked
why he wore Levi's, he simply
replied, "I like the way they
wear. They wear better than any
other jeans
Michele White likes her Levi's
but also enjoys wearing designer
jeans. "1 like Levi's for the com-
fort. They are the only thing I'll
clean house in Michele men-
tio ed she and her mother went
shopping a week ago. "I tried on
some Gasoline pants and really-
wanted them but they cost $64.
My mother said we should go to
the Levi section and pet two pairs
instead of one
Levi's are still strong on the
ECU campus; however, since
Clavin Klein popularized
designer jeans, the jean industry-
has boomed. New denim com-
panies have produced a large
amount of different styles and a
variation on the basic jean fabric.
Girls especially have been en-
thusiastic about this new trent.
Baggy jeans, pinstriped and
checkeredd jeans, even jeans pat-
ched with leather are prevelant on
campus. Jeans such as these have
become a status symbol.
However, the classic Levi jean
transcends all levels of society.
They are easily worn with both
sweatshirts and tweed jackets.
The Levi 501 jean is not fad but
fashion.
LvTs 501 jeans � an American classic with a uniquely personal fit � will be sold in bleached bine, white and
Wwki, gray and natural shades far women. An array of new, high-fashion colorations will enliven the world's
charcoal for men. and ii
first jeans during 194.
'January Rose' Spans The Musical Facets
Bv iow BROWN
Staff �nw
January Rose brought a dif-
a-ietv of sound to the
prv House Saturday
"good-time dance
ig :ar beyond the billing of
new country rock the band
the crowd moving all night,
rung the gap between artists
erse as Johnny Lee, Bob
cger and Huey Lewis and the
New. with a dose of "swamp
k" from Creedence Clear-
er Revival tossed in.
With Tim McGuire on rhythm
ar, Lynn Parker lead guitar,
B bbj Stover bass, Renae
uire keyboards and Greir
Boy) Crawford on drums, the
band kept a good pace
- 'ughout the evening, changing
empo and lead vocals to keep
gs interesting.
Opening with a solid version of
Garry Morris' "Why Lady
Why the group quickly-
established a good rapport with
the audience, which continued to
grow as the show progressed.
Hank Williams' "Honky Tonk
Blues" got a few dancers moving,
then after Ricky Skaggs' "Don't
Get Above Your Raisin Lynn
Parker sang lead on "Don't
Count the Rainy Days while
the slow dancers took advantage
of the nice ballad to get close.
The pace really picked up when
the first notes of three con-
secutive Creedence classics
sounded. Renae took the lead
vocals on "Bad Moon Rising"
and the dancing picked up steam
as more people left their seats to
join in the good time. Lynn
followed with excellent vocals on
"Lodi then Tim took his turn
singing for "I Heard It Through
the Grapevine
After the soft "See the Love
She Found In Me the band got
the crowd clapping with a rousing
version of Alabama's hit "Gonna
Have A Party The response
was such that the "party" seem-
ed well under way already.
Someone gasped as Tim an-
nounced an Elton John tune, but
when "Sad Songs" flowed across
the room with his fine vocals, any
doubts the country-flavored
crowd had disappeared, since the
song was so beautiful and fit in
appropriately. Dancers crowded
the floor as memories of the past
filled the air.
Long-time rocker Bob Seger's
"Shame On the Moon" led into
the nice surprise of "Heart and
Soul" by Huey Lewis. It was
another example of January
Rose's ability to bring two dif-
ferent musical styles into close
harmony while keeping
everybody smiling and having a
good time. "Gimme All Your
Lovin the 1983 song that
pushed ZZ Top to its highest
peak of popularity today, really
rocked the crowd as the energy
the band expended infused the at-
mosphere with excitement.
"Mountain Music" kept the feel-
ing going as the dance floor filled
with fast-moving feet. A wild
cheer was the response to Tim's
fiddle playing as the dancers got
so excited their main objective
almost became "safety first
whatever you do ' keep your feet
off the floor!
The second set was highlighted
by such rock songs as Bob Seger's
"Betty Lou Bob Dylan's
"Knockin" On Heaven's Door
and especially "Heart of Rock &
Roll" by Huey Lewis, which was
a particular favorite of those pre-
sent.
Lee Greenwood's ballad "In-
side Out" filled the dance floor
with its romantic slowness, as did
Inc
January Rose members Tim, Bobby, Lynn, Renae, and C'Boy have Joined together to create a band that is destined for stardom.
"Magnolia Renae played a
good honky tonk piano on 'Hey
Bartender" and Tim did a good
job on Delbert McClinton's
"Shaky Ground
January Rose showed its ver-
satility again during the final set
with the traditional bluegrass
tune "Rocky Top which the
doggers really loved, then Bobby
Stover got his chance at lead
vocals as a hot "Move It On
Over" got the rockers going. Tim
and Renae shared vocals on
Stevie Nicks' "Stop Draggin' My
Heart Around as the audience
sang along.
Near the end of the perfor-
mance came possibly the best
song of the night as the band
worked out on John Cougar's
"Authority Song C Boy
displayed his powerful drumming
while Bobby slipped in a few bars
of "In-a-Gadda-da-Vida an
Iron Butterfly hit from the '60s,
which gave a hint of his long
years of experience in rock music.
After playing The Hollies
"Long Cool Woman" as the last
song, January Rose returned in
response to appreciative fans and
finished the night with an encore
of excellent versions of
Creedence's "Suzi Q" and
"Green River
One of the most impressive
assets of the group is the ability
to use different facets of music to
not only entertain but also to
keep the fans constantly involved
physically and mentally. This
seems to follow a growing trend
in "cross over" music on today's
country scene.
"It's no longer enough to play
just country said Tim. "We
want to keep the audience happy
and we've gotten the best
response with a mix of country
and rock and roll
The experience required to
know what variety works best in
settings such is the Opry House
in Greenville was acquired from
many years of touring this area
by the band members. Although
January Rose has only been
together three months, each
member was previously in suc-
cessful bands.
Stover, Crawford and Parker
were in both the J.D. Walker
Band and Sutter's Gold Streak,
basically country-rock bands.
Crawford was with Sutter's one
night in a large night club in Ft.
Lauderdaie when a man ap-
proached him and said "Is it
alright if me and my buddy sit
in? ' Crawford was reluctant
from past experience, so the guy
introduced his "friend" � Gregg
Allman. "I believe ya'll can sit
in C Boy remembers saying.
"Gregg said he was coming back
after we jammed awhile but I
didn't believe him. Friday night
he showed up and we jammed
again
Husband-and-wife Tim and
Renae were previously in a band
named Five-Card Draw which
was based at Sackett's, a
nightclub in Franklin County,
Va. which is owned by their cur-
rent promoter Levi Jones. "They
brought live music to Franklin
County said Cindy Ferguson,
one of the band's entourage.
After J.D. Walker and Five-
Card Draw folded at the same
time, it was only natural for the
two groups to merge, since they
had jammed together and follow-
ed the same club circuits. "This is
the hottest band I've been in
said Parker. "We like what we've
done so far and everybody gets
along well
Renae explained the band's
philosophy. "We have our roots
in country and our hearts' in rock
V roll she said. "We want
people who come to see us to
leave knowing they had a good
time She added that dealing
with the fact that Tim is a star has
its problems, but so far it hasn't
affected the group negatively.
"Keeping people happy is a
challenge Tim said. "We have
one of the best road crews with
Lonnie Quinn and Gary Stultz,
which is part of the reason we can
put on the best show we can
The group is planning to
record a single soon which they
envision as a cross-over type
song. If they can capture the ex-
citement generated by their live
performance, it will have a good
chance of reaching the charts.
January Rose captured a lot of
fans Saturday night, many of
whom are sure to be at their
return engagement at the
Carolina Opry House on Oct. 17
r
t

"
f
I
�'
i
!�






8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 9, 1984
Classifieds
PERSONAL
MISC
THANX REN for a "January Rose"
Tony.
ANDY j may your 21st birthday be
like Vaseline; smooth, slick and most
pleasurable Best Wishes. Always Go-
ng Home
STEVE, BRUCE, RICH AND ALL
THE ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS, I
want to thank you for all the help you
guys are giving me this semester.
Rush was a great success and I know
we are going to have a wild year. Bob.
SUSAN TAYLOR � had a blast in
Raleigh, Lost? Can't wait until fall
break - PARTY TIME. WEENIE.
JAMES, I love you! Dollene
WIND CHIMES, Wind Chimes, Wind
Chimes, Wind Chimes, Wind Chimes,
wind Chimes, Wind Chimes, Wind
Chimes, Wind Chimes, Wind Chimes
Coming Soon
RANDY, ANDY, KEVIN, JON,
BREN, BRENDA, BOO, ETC. Toga!
Toga! Toga! Toga! Toga! BMLT! See
va Thursday at the C.O.H Kat PS.
Snout!
BABY JANERS � Tanks for being
soch a buddy! You're the Greatest!
.�hat in the world would I do without
. ou' Love, Dish.
STEVE I did it. Happy 21 roommate,
nope it was special. You mean the
�voria to me. Couldn't live without
oki Times we are together are un-
� rgettable. Love the nights alone. I
rve you Squirt.
RICKY, Thanns for the happiest year
of my life. You really are "The Only
One Love Always � LEC.
VAN! Was that ever a great party �
� thOUT any P.J Let's do it again
but remember, that P.J. is still the
-past in the East???
HAPPY BIRTHDAY to our wonder
ful Business Manager � Anthony
Aartin. Keep up the good work,
-ssual !
GINA, (GEE-GEE) Now that you're
19 years of age, You'll be able to buy
-ter, and you'll no longer fear those
egai eyes and ears.
HEY CHRIS, you dark and handsome
guy I can't remember your face or
i our Eastbrook Apt but I can
'emen-iber the passion we shared.
Zall me 752 9181
3CRUZEMITT FRED, FIG, AND
MY MANG MANG DANG � Hey,
� anks alot! Have a great day! A Lit'
vs
REALIZE THERE IS MORE TO
LIFE than parties and friends who
.ant to party their lives away. So
much more, Jesus Loves You. A
"iend.
JEFF (FROM VENTER'S) Once was
not enough. Let's meet at Venter's
this Thur Oct. 11th at 6:00. Hope to
see you there because I don't like to
eat alone. Connie (P.T.)
ROY, Happy Birthday! Hope it's a
good one, wish I could be there. Love,
Brenda.
DELTA ZETA � Good luck with your
Spaghetti Supper tonigh. We will see
rOku at Beaus tonight! Alpha Xi
Delta.
IT'S MOVING DAY, R and R.
PARTY ANIMALS: BRIT, GARY,
JIM, AND NEIL Enjoyed the party
riursday �u 9uys have certainly
earned your title. By the way Brit
ou're not a GDD.
CAROL, have you had your Quaker
instant Grits TODAAAY?
ROD, (HIPPIE) haven't seen you
iately but would still like to take yoj
out to dinner. Give us a call and we'll
come party with you sometime. An
STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM? Ab
solutely "no charge" for repair
estimates at the Tech Shop. Call
757nineteen eighty We thought
you'd like to know.
SALE
WANTED
PIZZA � Every Mon. and Tues
night is Buy A 16" Pizza And Get
A 14" Pizza Free Delivered. Call
Alano's Pizza Tonight at 752 3861
ROOM FOR RENT: 2 blocks from
campus, kitchen and bathroom
priviledges. Utilities divided among
renters. Call 758 3545 after 8 p.m.
THE PSYCHEDELIC FURS are
playing at DUKE this Wed. Does
anyone want to get a ride together?
Call Kathy Schulze at 758 8016.
TYPING SERVICE
reasonable 355 2062
neat, fast.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST with 15
years wants fulltime typing at home.
IBM typewriter. Call 756 36�0.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
VICE � experience, quality work,
IBM Selectric typewriter. Lanie
Shive 758 5301
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE Let Greenville Stu
dent Laundry Service Pick up,
Wash, Dry, Fold, Hang, as well as
deliver your laundry! Call 758 3087
between 8 30 a.m. and 530 p.m.
ALL ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
are reminded to be at new big
brother induction Wedntday night
at the house, be there at 6 30, coat
and tie. Also, thank you to everyone
who came to rush, it was a great suc-
cess. Hey, Steve Stop breaking
those liquor bottles
$60.00 PER HUNDRED PAID for
processing mail at home! Infoma-
tion, send self addressed, stamped
envelope Associates, Box 95,
Roselle, New Jersey 07203.
GUITAR LESSONS 20 years ex-
perience in rock. Call Lynn at
758 9638 for details.
Classifieds Work
ADORABLE BLOND AKC cocker
spaniel puppies. Call 752-1973
PIANO FOR SALE Wanted:
Responsible party to assume small
monthly payments on spinetconsole
piano. Can be seen locally. Write:
(include phone number) Credit
Manager, P.O. Box 521,
Beckemeyer, IL 62219.
FOR SALE: 2.5 cubic foot dorm size
refrigerator with small freezer. In
excellent condition. $50. Call Vickie
M. at 752 0525.
FOR SALE: Commodore 64K color
computer with Data Cassette and
two software programs. All in brand
new condition, $280. Must See! Call
758 9042 after 3 p.m.
FOR SALE: C and H matt cutter,
paper cutter, glass cutter, acetate
film, acid free framing paper, can-
vas panels, frames. For more infor-
mation call 758-9275.
FOR SALE: '83 Honda Ascot, 2700
miles, excellent condition $1600.00 or
best offer. Call 752 1907 or 754-5357
ask for Jack.
NEARBY FINANCIAL INSTITU-
TION seeks computer student for
PART-TIME work on Data Base.
Reply COMPUTER, Box 8008,
Greenville, NC 27834.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Village Green Apts private bdrm
Va rent ($83.50) and utilities. Call
758 9343 ask for Tracy or Chris.
OVERTONS help wanted. Ex
perienced part-time meat cutter
needed. Call Charles Overton or C.
J. Cannon for appointment. 752-5025.
CAMPUS REPS NEEDED � SKI
FREE: Position involves marketing
and selling quality ski and beach
trips on campus. Earn FREE
TRIPS AND HIGH COMMISSIONS.
Call Summit Tours 800 325 0439.
East Carolinian advertising
call 757-6366
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED FOR FALL BREAK
TO VIRGINIA TECH in Btacksburg
Will pay for a tank of gas. Please con
tact Heather 752 1079.
IF YOU'RE SO SMART
Why don't you take courses in the
HONOR PROGRAM
All students with 3.4 gpa are eligible
Spring seminars in Hero in 20C Fiction, Pop
Folk Culture, Utopia, Japanese American
Women. Sections of ANTH 1000, European
Studies, ENGL 1200, Lit of Holocast, HLTH
1000, HIST 1551 1553, LIBS 1000, PHIL 1100,
SOCI2110.
See Dr. David Sanders, 212 Ragsdale
a
Come Play The Indian
This Fall"
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC
;i anc e?
h
v4

"Specializing In Chinese Gourmet Cuisine
Luncheon Specials of the Day $2.75
Sunday Buffet $3 nr
(all you can eat)
DINNER SPECIALS
SHRIMP
w vegetable
$6.95
WANTED
Experience Layout Artist
Apply at The East Carolinian
5-6pm Tues Wed. 4:30-7pm
or Call Mike at 758-9274 (nights)
FREE
Potato Bar at
Western Sizzlin
JUMBO SCALLOPS
w vegetable
$6.95
specials come with: Hot & sour soup, Fried Rice & Hot Tea)
MonThurs. 11:30-9:30
100 E. 10th St. FRI. 11:30-10:30
SAT. 5:00-10:30 TAKE OUT
SUN. 12:00-930 ORDERS
758-1818
SPREAD THE WORD!
Ladies! Register to win a
$100.00 gift certificate from j
Virginia Crabtree 1 t
a'ea and Kathy.
MlilHIIIIIIIIIIimillllllllipillUIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIllllltllHttHltllllllllltlllllllltlllltlllllllltllUllllllllIlllltllllllllltllllltllllUMUUSSIiaultftlllUUItUailUU
I I ECU Cheerleaders and j
Sportsworld of Greenville
llIllldlllllflllllltllMtllllllftllltllllll IfflfltlltMlltttMIIIIIMIIItllllllllflllllllllIttlllMlllilllllllllltlllllllltlllUttltlll
Present
1 ECU COLLEGE NIGHT
IIIIUItMimWItttHHffltllHIIlltlllllllllllllllllMMIItHllflHIIIIllll
TiMt.Sept.25 7-11pm
$1.00 Admission with ECU ID
All profits go to ECU Cheerleaders
illlllllllllMIIHIHIIIIIIlAllllHIIIIIH
Free vine & draft
for the Ladies till 10 00
Free admission for Lady members
Xguests-Sl.00)
Doors open to men at 10
Papa Katz IXX Brad Allen plays
Top 40, Rock, funk & BeacIT
ECU Rugby team serves the Ladies
Van service for ECU
Call 758-5570 for details
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
IS A PRIVATE CLUB FOR MEMBERS GUESTS � ALL ABC PERMITS
Irreconcilable Dif
Divo
BjTINAMAROSCHAK
Imam l�i�
Movies that touch 'he heart are
moies worth seeing. After all,
eversone needs a good ay or
laugh once in a while And thai
what Warner Bros s recent
release, Irreconcilable Dif-
ferences does � touches the
heart. Packed with everything
from romance to hur or to heart-
break. Irreconcilable Differences
portraN the problems and
miseries of divorce through a
child's eev
Drew Barrymore, the blond-
haired, bright-eyed ar of
Stephen king' Hrestarter p �
trays Casey Brodskv,
California's first ten-year-old
resident to stick up for he- .
and sue her parents for di
On what grounds'1 Neghge:
Probably every child from a
broken home knows her situa-
tion: the middleman torn r
ween a bitter mother and I
the soul vearning for a stab
"united, happ" family. Ca
fdoes what every young
ants to do � fight hack'
The movie begins
�Angeles courtroom
Tasey's parents (Ran O'Nea
Albert and Shelley Long a . .
jescribe their pa re Lai -
and the circumstances that led
to the current situatio:
testimony, which encompa
the bulk of the mo
src o m b i n e - comedy
earnestness for a plot full I p
and realism.
The testimony
the stol
"begins
the fund
curs w
two'� e
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER?, 1984
an advertising
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Irreconcilable Differences
Divorce: A Child's View
ByTlNAMAROSCHAK
tralarn t4huf
Movies that touch the heart are
movies worth seeing. After all,
everyone needs a good cry or
laugh once in a while. And that's
what Warner Bross recent
release, Irreconcilable Dif-
ferences does � touches the
heart. Packed with everything
from romance to humor to heart-
break. Irreconcilable Differences
portrays the problems and
miseries of divorce through a
child's eyes.
Drew Barrymore, the blond-
haired, bright-eyed star of
Stephen King's Firestarter, por-
iras Casev Brodsky,
California's first ten-year-old
resident to stick up for her rights
land Mie her parents for divorce.
On what grounds? Negligence.
Probably every child from a
broken home knows her situa-
tion: the middleman torn bet-
veen a bitter mother and father,
the soul yearning for a stable, re-
jnited. "happy" family. Casey
joes what every young victim
ants to do � fight back!
The movie begins in a Los
ngeles courtroom where
'asev parents (Ryan O'Neal as
albert and Shelley L ong as Lucy)
lescribe their past relationship
id the circumstances that led up
the current situation. The
testimonv. which encompasses
the bulk of the movie, cleverly
; Combines comedy and
earnestness for a plot full of spice
ind realism.
. :The testimonv starts off with
the story of Albert and Lucy's
"beginning" and "end One of
the funniest parts of the movie oc-
curs when Albert describes the
two's encounter. As a college pro-
fessor, Albert decided to do
something educational and ex-
citing. So on a cold, rainy Indiana
day, he set out to see the coun-
tryside � on foot. On the same
day, silly, nieve little Lucy set off
for her new adventure as well �
marriage to a big, dumb Navy bo
named Bink. After a few
humorous scenes, Albert finally
hitched a ride with Lucy, the two
fell in love, and wedding bells
prevailed in only four days.
Like they say, the first few
years of marriage are usually
great, but when Albert's career as
a film director skyrocketed and
Lucy's importance diminished,
the troubles began. By then the
cash was flowing, but to Lucy's
dismay, their lifestyle and mar-
riage was changing drastically.
Even though they co-wrote a
movie that was a box-office
smash, the two couldn't get back
on the right track. One reason was
that Albert received all the praise
for the movie while Lucy received
nothing. Who could blame her for
being upset � she was always the
one that wanted to be a writer.
Thanks to those problems and
a bouncy young beauty named
Blake, Lucy and Albert split up.
Wondering what happened to
Casey? She was aroundbut
neither of her parents seemed to
act like it. Casey began spending
more and more time with the
family's Spanish housekeeper
named Maria. After all, kids that
age need some kind of compa-
nionship. Probably the saddest
scene in the movie occured when
Casey returned from a weekend
visit with her father. Lucy, like
many bitter mothers, began
pressuring her about what her
father was doing, what kind of
presents he bought Blake, ect-
cetera. All kids that went through
that know the story. So Casey
stuck it out with her mother until
finally, on New Year's Eve, Lucy
got herself together and began
writing a book.
At this point the tables turn.
Albert goes bankrupt after a
disastrous film and Lucy Mys
high with a number one best
seller. Still no time for Casey,
however.
At the end of the movie, Casey
makes her testimony � a
testimony so moving that even
the strongest souls hurt. She re-
quests to live with Maria and so
ends the court battlebut not the
movie. If you think happy en-
dings only happen in the movies,
think again. The unique ending
to the movie is one that every
child hopes for
Irreconcilable Differences is
playing at the Plitt Theatres at
Carolina East Centre.
Assistant Features
Editor Needed
Apply in person at The East
Carolinian in the Publications
Building across from Joyner
Library.
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Near Plirr rhe.itre. Greenville j
presents
Wednesday Night
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featuring Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayworth
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Phone 756-6401
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Guests Are Welcome
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I HI t-VSI t AKOI INIAN
Sports
K I()Bf RV. !VM Page 1"
tPanthers Escape
With 17-10 Win
By RANDY MEWS
MEAL JOHNSON - ECU Photo L�b
s the picture indicates, it was a come-from-behind type of game for the ECU football team.
An ailing John Congcmi completed 13 of 24
passes for 177 yards and a pair of touchdowns to
lead Pittsburgh to a hard fought 17-10 victory
over the ECU football team Saturday in Pitt
Stadium.
"Congemi is a fine football player Pirate
head coach Ed Emory said. "Why he had to get
healthy all at once against us � I don't know
Congemi got the Panthers on the board first
when he orchestrated a nine-play 90-yard drive on
Pitt's third possession of the game. The first-year
starter threw for gains of 11 and 18 yards during
the drive, then connected with split end Bill
Wallace for a 27-yard touchdown reception to give
his team a 0 advantage with 10:38 raoattatagfe
the half.
Pirate quarterback Darrell Speed, who had the
best game of his young career completing 11 atl
passes for 134 yards, finally got the Pirates mam
ing on the next series. Speed guided ECU from its
own 20-yard line deep into Pitt territory before he
was ever confronted with a third down call. Then,
on third-and-six from the 21-yard line. Speed
lofted a perfect pass into the endone that was
dropped by Henry Williams.
It appeared the Pirates would have to settle for
a field goal to narrow the margin to 7-3, but Jeff
Heath was unable to connect as his kick barely
managed to bounce into the endzone from 39
yards out.
Congemi promptly took advantage of ECU's
two botched scoring opportunities to moe Pitt
near midfield in the next five plays. The Panther
quarterback then threw his most impressive pass
of the day as he connected with Chuck Scales tor
44 yards over an unsuspecting Calvin Adams. The
reception gave Pitt a first-and-goal on the nine-
yard line. Two plays later, Congemi found tight
end Pat Schipani alone in the endone to give his
team a 14-0 lead.
After an exchange in possessions, the Pirates
took over 90 yards from the endone with only,
1:03 left in the half. A ten-yard Jimmv Walden
draw and a 15-yard Panther personal foul moved
the ball to the 35, and short passes to Walden and
Pope put ECU on their own 43-yard line with 2M
seconds left.
Bobby Clair plowed through the middle for 17
yards to the Pitt 35, and then Scott Lewis caught a
deflected pass to give E I a first-and ten
16 with eight seconds remaining " ng eri
then resulted in the Pirates' third miss
opportuinitv of the halt a- time ex
vard Clair run through the middle oi the line
"I take full responsibility foi the plav ai the
of the half Emory said "We looked di
ed becuase after the timeout 1 sent Darrell ba
the field without a plav We had changed
on the sidelines, and 1 assumed Darrell kn
to call.
"With an inexperienced quarterback we
get a little too fancy Emory continued
shouldve taken the three points
The Pirates finally got on the board
cond series oi the third quarter as Heal
33-yard field goal to make it 14-3 with 5 24
the period.
Craig Heyward, who rushed 1" tin
yards, went to work tor Pit! on the next
sion. The 6-foot, 235-pound runn gbacl
up gains of nine, eight, 14, eight, yard
five consecutive running plays to mo
to position for a 37-yard Mari Bra
making it 17-3.
The Pirates were finally able I -
one wtih 10.T4 left in the game. Speed
with Ricky Nichols for 30 ard I
then a combination or running and pa - I
set up a 22-yard scampei by Wald
Pirates to within 17-10.
Pittsburgh was able
24-ard line on the next series, but a n
field goal let' rr.c : � ECU
together a game- ��
Speed, however, was una
and Jeff Bolch wa called in to put -��
fourth-and-eight. "1 though: we co ild
with four minutes remaining, rathe: " u - '
on fourth and long Emory "We ei
six-man defensive front because I tl
were going to be conservative on of! it
just ran around it
The Pirates did get the ball back witl 24s
left in the game, but it was not enough l
seriously challenge a sound Pa:
"We had :e I 'in the game Ei
said. "We could have w i I . I I
won it � but we didi '
EC I now fails to 1-5 84 eas n, the
worst start since 1ST1.
Czaja Linkster Team Leader
By RICK McCORMAC
staff V nlrr
Bv winning the individual
medalist honors in the Wolfpack
Collegiate Invitational last week.
Chris Czaja became the first ECU
golfer in three vears and only the
second in the past decade to win
the individual portion of a golf
tournament.
"It felt pretty good Czaja
said. "It's been a goal of mine
ever since I got here, and I'm sure
thai it's a goal of all college
rs to win a tournament
While it was Caja's first win,
according to Coach Bob Helmick
it was no fluke. "Chris worked
hard for his first win, it was not
an accident. It was just a matter
of time until he won � he's such a
competitor that this will not be the
last golf tournament he wins
either
Czaja, a marketing major from
Old Greenwich, Conn has been
one of the top five golfers since he
arrived on campus, and is the only
senior on this vear's team.
Czaja feels while he is the only
senior, he's really not the team
leader. "Coach Helmick is the
earn leader, but if I can help some
of the younger guys out, 1 will.
We practice all afternoon every-
day, and we all try to help each
other out
While this was Caja's first
tournament crown, it was not the
first time hi has been in position
to win such a title. Czaja explain-
ed he has been near the top many
times before, but "it takes a lot of
experience and hard work to win.
You can't just go out there and
think you can win � you have to
know you can
Czaja went on to say "once you
win your first tournament it
makes it easier to win again. We
play three rounds, and 1 try to
keep myself in contention during
the first two rounds and in the
final round He said anything
can happen in a tournament, and
sometimes it's easier to come
from behind.
Caja is really confident that
the golf team will do well this
year, and one reason is the return
of Helmick. "I'm glad Coach
Helmick is back in control of the
team Caja said. "Due to him,
people are practicing harder and
showing more intrest in the golf
program
The Pirate golf team will again
face a tough schedule, playing all
of the ACC schools and the major
independents from the south.
"We play a very competitive
schedule, we're like the football
team � we play the best around
Czaja attributes much o' his
success this year on his suing and
practice this summerMy swing
is the strongest part of my game. 1
also worked a lot this summer on
my short game, and it's helped my
scoring
Since winning his first tourna-
ment, Caja feels it's only a mat-
ter of time until the Pirate team
wins a tournament. "We were
pretty confident we would win go-
ing into the last round of the
Wolfpack Invitational. If we had
played a respectable last round,
we would have won or at least
finished second
Czaja said that last year's team
didn't have the right chemistry.
"We were fragmented, and there
was no reason for it. We had the
talent, but we just weren't mental-
ly adjusted to golf on the college
level
In talking to Czaja, one gets the
impression he feels good about
this year's team. "Coach Helmick
is a great motivator and he knows
a lot about college golf. We just
have to play our own game and
everthing else will take care of
itself.
"I have confidence in the team,
we have a lot of potential Czaja
continued. "If we do well this
fall, I'll really be confident about
our chances this spring (when the
official NCAA season begins)
In assesing his and the team's
chances in upcoming tour-
naments, Czaja said he'll adopt
the the attitude that he can win
again if he plays well. "I also have
confidence in all of the team
members � we will eventually
win
Coach Helmick is also op-
timistic about the team, and
especially Czaja. "Chris is as
dedicaeated a golfer we have
the head coach said. "He puts
forth an awful lot of time in his
game and is always looking to im-
prove himself
Helmick added, "My only-
regret is that I don't have more
Chris Czaja's � what else can you
sav
ECU glofer Chris Czaja
Linksters Impove Upon Last Year's
Performance At MacGregor Classic
B RICK McCORMAC
suff Wnlrr
ECU finished ninth out of 24
;earns at the MacGregor Goll
classic held in Pickens, South
Carolina over the weekend.
Going into the tournament �
which probably hosts the
drongest field of teams the Pirate
colters will face during the fall �
�he team was looking to improve
upon a Pth place finish two years
ago.
The Pirates were led by their
two co-MVP's from last year.
Mike Bradley, a sophomore, was
the team leader with scores of
75-77-71 for a three-round total of
223.
Chris Czaja, the other co-MVP,
was next at 225 with his scores for
the three rounds being 74-77-74.
Mark Arcilesi was next with
rounds of 77-78-75 adding up to a
three-round total of 230.
Paul Steelman rounded out the
ECU scoring with identical scores
of 77 for a three round total of
231.
Pirate coach Bob Helmick had
the following to say about his
team's performance: "Last time
we we finished 17th out of 21
teams. We wanted to improve on
that and finish in the top ten,
which we did.
"We could have finished sixth,
but I'm pleased with the effort
Helmick continued. "This is the
best we have played as a team all
year
Helmick said his team is im-
proving with every tournament,
and that was the primary goal for
the fall season.
In last week's tournament, The
Pirates had six rounds in the 80's,
while this weekend not one golfer
shot above a 78.
In the team competition,
Geoigia was first at 875, followed
by N.C. State at 833. Duke was
third at 887, while South Carolina
and Clemson rounded out the top
five with scores of 890 and 891
respectively. The ECU score for
the three days was 909.
Coach Helmick added, "I'm
satisfied that the whole team is
progressing. I feel by the time we
get into the spring season we'll
have a team that will be com-
petitve with anybody in the area
The Pirates next tournament
will be on Oct. 10-12 at the Keith
Hills Countrv Club in Buies
Creek, N.C.
Homecoming
Tickets Today
Because of Eall Break, students
may pick up tickets for ECU's
Oct. 20 Homecoming game with
East Tennessee State today
through Thursday at the follow-
ing locations:
Minges � 8 a.m5 p.m.
Mendenhall � 10 a.m6 p.m.
Students may also procrastinate
and pick up their tickets Oct.
16-18.
Group tickets can be obtained
only at Minges between 8 a.m5
p.m. today and Wednesday.
Although the Pirate football team lost to Pittsburgh this Saturday, the flight home wasn't a
pointment as Neal Johnson takes a shot of an unsuspecting ECU cheerleader.
total disap.
Southed
By BILL MITCHELL
Suifntm
Here is a wrap-up of how
fcCU's football opponents did
last Saturday.
Florida State: Seventh ranked
Florida State tied Memphis State
17-17 The Seminoles are now
4-0-1 and pia Auburn next
week
Ie m
I e
toucl
win
San
four
to
Soccer Tea
By SCOTT POW ERs
The ECU soccer team - aed
three overtime games in a row
over the last week and .arr.e
with one tie and two k
make then season record i �
The games ran 'he strinj
consecutive overtime ga
four, dating ba. eir 2
tory over Methodist College
September
On Monday, Ocl be.
Pirates hosted Ames -
sity, which nas one of the
soccer programs a
The team pusned Amc- a
limit before fir.u
overtime by the ore of 1
In the game. Jamie -
scored the lone EC
the Pirates on top 1-0 eai
match, bjt Amer:
to score in the iccot
put the game aw a -
early in overtime
"We played really we.l
coach Steve Brod;
ended up playing toe
defense and not e:
We missed a lot i I
to score
On October 3
ECU Wins
Matches
Bv JULIE RICHMOND
Men. The ECU men's
team captured a 6-? win
High Point College last Frida
a home match.
In singles, number three e
Galen Treble topped H
Point's Todd Poien 6-2, 6 2
ECU's number four single
player, David Turner, de'e
Tom Cannod 6-1, 6-1 t
:oach Pat Sherman commented
"David played the bes- match I
his ECU career
Number five seec- Da- c
Creech and number s.x
Bagley both played e;e leni -
ches. Creech took a -
High Point's Mike Bridget - :
6-2, and Baglev defeated K
Brown. 7-5, 6-2
The number tr.ree team
Scott Avery and Bagley secu
the win for ECU. After
first set 4-6. the) wer- ac
the match, winning the la
sets 6-0, 6-2. in what was the
doubles victory for EC
The men compete Thursday
against N.C State at Minges
courts, and are now 2- oi
-eason.
Women. Once again, the EC.
women's team was victor .
capturing a 6-? win over 1984
NAIA Div.sior. Ill National
Champions Davidson College.
bringing the season record to
4-1.
Top seedeu singles player Janet
Russell played a fine mat
against Davids- -
ranked Cardme Barclay Rus
took the match 4-6, 6-4, 6-i
Number six singles piaver Susk
.Brown also won for ECU with a
s4-6, 6-3, 6-3 win sv�r Davidson's
Mary Van .Antwerp
The number one doubles team
rf .Ann Manderfield and Russell
played an excellent match, tc-pp-
ig Lolly Johnson and Tnna Ives
ft Davidson 6-3. 7-5
Kris Simmons. ECU's number
iree singles and doubles player,
Jfas ill and unable to compete
Sunday, which forced T Myers
Sheila Feeley, karla Hcvie I
Susie Brown all to p.av tip cm
Position.
I "We played on clay courts
�lamst Davidson cotcn Sher-
Hui said. "It took our piavers
�ome time to adjust to the slow
fWface
"This was the first time this
that we have met a team as
itally tough as we are
erman added. "It was a great
�jerience for our young team
We gained tremendously from
1 experience and 1 was very
Phased with our performar.ee
We will be looking forward to
koating Davidson on our hard
courts in the spring
ECU travels to Peace College
�ext Tuesday to face a team that
finished sixth in the 1984 Na-
tional Junior College Tourna
�r
m
immmm
Mh
MM
m
MM
'
I






12
1MI 1 AM �. Koi IN1A.N OCTOBI K 1W4
Shreekes Take AAG Crown,
Flag Football Playoffs Begin
B IEANNI III ROTH
Mill W nin
Due to Wednesday deadlines,
Sneaket Sam was unable to
report the hilarious happenings
oi Almost Am thing does in
the rhursda) edition of The East
Carolinian. Because of this
misfortune. Sneakei Sam will
give his abbreviated reporl now.
Almost nything Goes was a
huge success involving 4s, three
couple teams II ou drove bv
and saw. frantic males and
females adorned in white
1 shirts, you came b the ught
plaee Action begai it 0 and
finished around 6 p.m. All the
events were completely out of the
ordmatv, totally crazy and great
l'IUIilrii, ll'iuii v.iu� aiivj �.ism
for the crowd and participants.
As scores were recorded, a tally
was made to crown this years
championship squad. Chaos
scored 26 points to take second,
the Shreekes scored 30
to capture first. Shreekes'
member s
while
points to capti
include Richard
Frazier, 11 o Neal, Martha
Newman, Marsha Robertson,
Elizabeth Bilisoly and Eric
1 iedholm. When asked to com-
ment on the victory, all agreed
"the name inspired them Con-
Rugby Club Active
H HII I Mllllll I I
Siafl Unirr
1 he EC! Rugb team, one of
the most populai and active sport
clubs on campus, looks like it will
have a great yet
Bill Zimmerman, president of
the club, - � d about
the coming eai 1 he hav set
up quite a few games, and hope
lo well. Zimmerman said
North Carolina Rugb I nion is
. of the besi ation, and
is gaming popi every day.
The NCRl is also one of the
largest in the nation with 14 col-
les in addition to quil
few sides o en.
The ECl club has lot ol
members,
and tra 1 hey have been
up and dowi the east and
ha e e la in is to
play mate 1 he team was
The I n the AC(
� ei 29,
l : defeated Duk 4-4, I
. : i eCh 24-7 :
( lemson 22 4. In 1 h in
(ireenville they lost a
to UNC-V
. ' es e I les-
i
Pirates Fall
To Tarheels
B. M)M BROWN
and everyone is invited to par-
ticipate or just watch. All home
matches are also held there.
I pcoming games include an
away match at Appalachain State
on October 14 preceding three
straight home matchs with Camp
Lejeune, Campbell University
and i M -G.
gratulations to all who par-
ticipated in the one day affair.
Flag Football playoffs began
this weekend on the Intramural
fields. Who will be this years
champions and who will be the
chasers? Look in Thursday's edi-
tion for the latest updates.
Don't forget to register for
Racquetball singles Punt, Pass
and Kick, Soccer, Bowling and
One-on-One Basketball this
week. To sign up come by Room
204 Memorial Gym.
For all you body builders, se-
cond session Aerobic Fitness
Classes registration begins Oct.
15.
In order that we may ac-
comodate all students, faculty
and staff who utilize indoor play-
ing facilities are now required to
present an ECU photo ID card
upon entering Memorial Gym for
free play.
Horseback riding is still being
offered at Jarman's Stables every
Thursday at $5.00 per person.
Advance registration is required.
For more information contact the
Outdoor Recreation Center.
Call 757-6911.

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T he
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North C arolina crushed the
Pirates at Chapel Hill Thursday
night in
lake th.
As the 15-4, i5 6, 15-4 scores
ndicate, the Pirates only bright
spots viame in idic displays
of individu i effort, but tea
k suffered di I
"We still haen't got it
together said Coach Imogene
Turner. "We're inconsistent We
failed to assume proper defensive
positions aftei ffensive hits.
We've got to work a- a team, but
right now, it's just not happen-
ing
The Pirates must regroup after
week's tougl matches, accor-
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success in the future. The Pirates
travel to Winston-Salem on Fri-
dd to participate in the Wake
Forest Invitational, which con-
tinues through Saturday.
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Pure Golds
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The formation of a dance team
perform at ail ECU home
I isketball games was announced
yesterday afternoon by the ECU
athletic department.
The dance team, nicknamed
Pure Gold Dancers, is being
organized by the Office of
Athletic Public Rela-
tionsPromotions to "gie East
Carolina basketball games addi-
tional spirit and pageantry ac-
cording to ECU marketing assis-
'ant 1 ee Workman. "We want to
give students another way to get
involved with ECU athletics, and
give fans an entertaining halftime
program
The Pure Cold Dancers will be
under the direction of ECU stu-
dent Lisa Freestone. A junior
from Gastonia, N.C Freestone
is currently directing
choreography for the Golden
Girls of the marching Pirate
band. She is experienced in
teaching both ballet and jazz
dance, however, the group will
only deal with modern jazz.
The first meeting for tryouts is
October 10 at 7 p.m. in Room
142 of Minges Coliseum. The
dance team is open to ECU
students only, previous ex-
perience is not required.
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1
1.
THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 9, 19M
11
scape
Win
:� on the
ing error
sed scoring
a five
. line.
' e end
�rganiz-
back on
he call
k e w hat
k�t led to
' W e
� ed a
s 24 left in
ses-
ked
a
. J goal
�� �
flight home wasn't0,aldj
rrleader. p"
By BILL MITCHELL
Mill
Here is a wrap-up of how
FCU's football opponents did
last Saturday.
Florida State: Seventh ranked
Florida State tied Memphis State
17-1?. The Seminoles are now
4-0-1 and play Auburn next
ueek.
Miss
Temple: Sophomore quarterback
Lee Saltz threw for two
touchdowns in Temple's 28-14
win over William and Mary
Saturday. Saltz recovered from a
fourth period fumble that would
have given the Indians a chance
to tie by throwing a 52-yard
bomb to v.lde receiver Willie
Marshal with 2:16 left for the
final score.
Central Michigan: The Chip-
pewa's ended up in a tie with in-
trastate rival Eastern Michigan
16-16 in their game on Saturday.
The tie left their record at 4-0-1.
Georgia Southern: The Golden
Eagles executed another win on
Saturday versus 1-AA opponent
Bethune-Cookman 43-33,
pushing their record to 5-1.
Soccer Team Ties Campbell
B SCOTT POVVFRC uj L �
By SCOTT POWERS
The ECU soccer team played
:hree overtime games in a row
over the last week and came out
with one tie and two losses to
make their season record 1-8-1.
The games ran their string of
.onsecutive overtime games to
four, dating back to their 2-1 vic-
tory over Methodist College on
September 29.
On Monday, October 1, the
Pirates hosted American Univer-
sity, which has one of the best
soccer programs in the country.
T he team pushed American to the
i limit before finally succumbing in
I overtime by the score of 2-1.
In the game, Jamie Ribel
cored the lone ECU goal and put
the Pirates on top 1-0 early in the
match, but American came back
to score in the second half and
put the game away with a score
early in overtime.
"We played really well head
coach Steve Brody said. "But we
fnded up playing too much
iefense and not enough offense.
ft missed a lot of opportunities
lo score
On October 3, the Pirates
ICU Wins
Matches
By JULIE RICHMOND
SufT Writer
en. The ECU men's tennis
m captured a 6-3 win over
High Point College last Friday in
� home match.
In singles, number three seeded
OaJen Treble topped High
Point's Todd PoJen 6-2, 6-2.
ECU's number four singles
�layer, David Turner, defeated
om Cannod 6-1, 6-1. ECU
oach Pat Sherman commented,
'David played the best match of
his ECU career.
Number five seeded David
Creech and number six Davis
Bagley both played excellent mat-
ches. Creech took a win over
High Point's Mike Bridger 6-2,
6-2, and Bagley defeated Keith
Brown, 7-5, 6-2.
The number three team of
Scott Avery and Bagley secured
:he win for ECU. After losing the
first set 4-6, they went on to take
the match, winning the last two
sets 6-0, 6-2, in what was the only
doubles victory for ECU.
The men compete Thursday
against N.C. State at Minges
courts, and are now 2-4 on the
eason.
Women. Once again, the ECU
women's team was victorious,
capturing a 6-3 win over 1984
NAIA Division III National
Champions Davidson College,
bringing their season record to
4-1.
Top seeded singles player Janet
Russell played a fine match
against Davidson's nationally
ranked Cardine Barclay. Russell
took the match 4-6, 6-4, 6-0.
Number six singles player Susie
I Brown also won for ECU with a
4-6, 6-3, 6-3 win over Davidson's
Mary Van Antwerp.
The number one doubles team
)f Ann Manderfield and Russell
clayed an excellent match, topp-
ing Lolly Johnson and Trina Ives
)f Davidson 6-3, 7-5.
Kris Simmons, ECU's number
iree singles and doubles player,
vas ill and unable to compete
Sunday, which forced Ty Myers,
Jheila Feeley, Karla Hoyle and
fusie Brown all to play up one
asition.
"We played on clay courts
iainst Davidson coach Sher-
lan said. "It took our players
)me time to adjust to the slow
irface
"This was the first time this
that we have met a team as
ken tally tough as we are
Vrman added. "It was a great
Iperience for our young team.
Je gained tremendously from
�e experience and I was very
with our performance.
re will be looking forward to
sting Davidson on our hard
lurts in the spring
ECU travels to Peace College
it Tuesday to face a team that
ished sixth in the 1984 Na-
nal Junior College Tourna-
hosted Campbell University,
team that is currently ranked
ninth in the South. The game was
a back and forth battle that end-
ed in a 1-1 tie after the overtime
period.
Brody once again felt that the
team played a good match, but
added, "We missed a lot of op-
portunities to win the game. We
had the chances and we should
have won the game
He added, however, that it was
a great effort on the part of his
team to play such a tight game
with a team as highly ranked as
Campbell.
The team then travelled last
Saturday to Pfeiffer College,
where they once again were in-
volved in an overtime game. This
time they fell short, losing to
Pfeiffer by the final score of 2-1.
Brody feels that his team is im-
proving as a whole and that they
are playing well in the overtime
situations. The team is now 1-2-1
in games that have involved an
extra session.
Brody also feels that the
change in offensive strategies is
beginning to pay off. "We're
creating a lot of scoring oppor-
tunities he said. "But we still
have to put the ball in the net
There are still some things that
he feels that his team needs to im-
prove on, however. "We missed
three one-on-one opportunities
(against Pfeiffer). We are going
to have to convert some of those
opportunities into goals he
commented.
The Pirates will try to improve
their record when they host
Virginia Wesleyan tomorrow at
Minges soccer field.
N.C.State: Joe Mclntosh plaved
extremely well as State upset 12th
ranked Georgia Tech 27-22 in a
very physical game on Saturdav
in Atlanta. He had 138 yards on
27 attempts, scored once and set
up two other touchdowns. State,
now 3-2, was leading 27-10
before Tech scored twice in the
final three minutes. Tech failed
on both two point conversion
tries.
N.C.State reserve tailback
Vince Evans scored twice from
two yards and one-yard out and
kicker Mike Cofer added field
goals of 35 and 22 yards for the
other scores.
Georgia Tech Coach Bill Curry
praised the offensive line for real-
ly opening things up for Mcln-
tosh and Eans Quarterback
Tim Esposito also had a good
game, going 15 of 19 for 143
yards.
Tulsa: The Golden Hurricane
stomped West Texas State 35-7
on Saturday.
East Tennessee State: Junior
Herbie Campbell kicked a school
record four field goals to help
ETSU defeat UT-Chattanooga
12-0. The Buccaneers, overcom-
ing the suspension last week of
five players, including starting
quarterback Keith Harris, took
advantage of five Tennesse-
Chattanooga turnovers to upset
the Moccasins. The Buccaneers
are now 4-1, and share first place
in the Southern Conference with
a 2-1 record.
South Carolina: Thomas Dendy
ran for two first quarter
touchdowns and the defense con-
verted two blocked punts to help
20th ranked South Carolina rout
Kansas State 49-17. The
Gamecocks, now 4-0, played ag-
gresive defense and capatalized
on Kansas State's mistakes to
easily take the victory.
Southwestern Louisiana: The
Ragin Cajun's romped over
Wichita State on Saturday 31-3.
Southern Mississippi: Mississippi
State defeated Southern Miss for
the first time in nine years on
Saturday 27-18. Mississippi State
won behind the leadership of
sophomore quarterback Don
Smith, who had a hand in all
three of their touchdowns. Smith
Finished with 198 total yards, in-
cluding 130 in the air. Southern
Miss, now 1-4, did not get a first
down until after they were
already trailing 24-3.
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 9, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 09, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.366
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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