The East Carolinian, October 2, 1984






Mt
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No. 12
Tuesday October 2, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Ferraro Speaks In Raleigh
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
fi Mltor
RALEIGH � Gov. James B.
Hunt Jr. received strong support
Monday from Democratic Vice-
Presidential candidate Geraldine
Ferraro during a campaign
speech at Raleigh's Fayetteville
Stree- Mall.
Rep. Ferraro, D-N.Y . spoke
to approximately 7,(XX) people in
Raleigh, stating her positions on
education, the equal rights
amendment and the federal
deficit. She also campaigned i.i
Greensboro during her trip to
North Carolina.
The crowd seemed to consist
mostly of Mondale Ferraro sup-
porters, although there was a
large group of pro-lifers pro-
testing Ferraro's pro-choice
stance. Gov. Hunt. Bob Jordan,
candidate for N.C. Lt. Go and
former Sen. Robert Morgan were
among the speakers at the rally.
"Gerry Ferraro represents the
best in the Democratic party
said Hunt in his introductory
speech. "The way she has handl-
ed herself in this campaign has
not surprised me. 1 knew Gerry
Ferraro was tough he added.
Ferraro stressed the fact that
the race is not over yet, saying
there are five weeks until the elec-
tion. "The pollsters and the pun-
dits have already decided the
presidential race � they say we
can't win she said and then
asked the crowd, "Are we going
to vend Frit Mondale to the
White House and Reagan to the
ranch? " The response was yes.
The N.C. Senate race received
a lot of attention from Ferraro.
"Nowhere in America is there a
more clearly defined choice this
year than in the race for the U.S.
Senate in North Carolina she
said, calling Hunt a "moderate
leader, in touch with the time and
the people of this great state
She said Sen. Jesse Helms
R-N.C, "extremist right-wing
ideology is out-of-step with the
times.1
"The people of North Carolina
don't want to support death
squads in El Salvador Ferraro
said. "The way to protect U.S.
interests in Central America is to
oppose both Communism and
the death squads of the right, and
that is what Jim Hunt will do
Several of Helms' stances came
under fire from Ferraro, in-
cluding his opposition to the
genocide treaty. "I led the fight
for the genocide treaty, but was
fought by extremists she said.
"When it comes to genocide, I
think every country should be
held accountable
"This administration says it's
for a balanced budget but it gave
us the largest deficit in history �
over $200 billion she said, at-
tacking the president. "Their
motto is: We make money the
old-fashioned way � we print
it
Cutting Social Security is not
the solution to decreasing federal
expenditures, Ferraro said.
"Social Security is a contract and
the elderly have a right to live in
dignity
The need for educational fun-
ding was stressed by Ferraro,
who noted that Reagan has
decreased educational funding,
but plans to send a teacher on one
of the space shuttle missions.
"Let's help the students and
teachers here on earth she said.
"This administration says 115
million women don't need their
Constitutional rights Ferraro
said, adding that when sworn in
for her second term in office, she
planned to swear to uphold a
constitution which included ERA
among its amendments.
Ferraro said people are worse
off now than they were when
Reagan was elected. "The
Reagan administration could
learn something from Jim Hunt
about creating prosperity and
from North Carolina about
creating jobs she said. She add-
ed that more jobs need to be
created in the United States in-
stead of in foreign countries.
"The unemployed don't get the
foreign newspapers where their
jobs are advertised she said.
She touched briefly on the
issue of campaign spending say-
ing, "this is an election, not an
auction. The U.S. Government is
not for sale to the highest
bidder
"There are those like your
outgoing Senator (Helms) who
want to turn the election into an
issue over who is more
patriotic she said. "The issue is
how to best serve the country; not
flaunting the flag in TV ads, but
honoring it with human beings
"The time to elect Fritz and
Gerry is not later, it's now Fer-
raro said.
Following her speech, she was
presented with a key to the city.
By HAROLD JOVNER
The future of plans to allow
for student health fees to count as
a deductible for the student's or
parents' insurance will depend on
student support at a meeting to
be held Thursday, according to
Dr. James McCallum, director of
the Student Health Center.
McCallum said the Idea began
about 3 years ago when Bill Mc-
Crae. UNC-Greensboro health
director, proposed the idea to
John Ingram, N.C. insurance
commissioner.
The program, if approved, will
allow students' health fees to
count towards an insurance
policy deductible. "When one's
deductible increases, the policy
premiums will be less Mc-
May
MICHAEL SMITH � ECU Pftoto Lab
Democratic Vice Presidential candidate Geraldine Ferraro spoke to
crowds in Raleigh and Greensboro Monday while campaigning in
North Carolina.
Callum said. "So, if one current-
ly has a $100 deductible, and the
program passes, the policy holder
may apply the health fee (at ECU
it is $99 a year) and pay the dif-
ference.
McCallum said this would
work because many campus
health centers on North Carolina
college campuses provide a varie-
tv of medical services such as
emergency room procedures and
medications. The insurance com-
panies are trying to get policy
holders away from unneccessary
medical service. "The insurance
companies feel it is right for the
student to be able to apply their
student health fee to their current
policy deductible, held by
themselves or their parents
There will be a meeting held at
Mendenhall Student Center on
Oct. 4 at 10 a.m. to discuss the
proposed change. McCallum
saidI cannot begin to stress
how much the adoption of this
plan depends on student support.
This program will not work if the
students do not go and actively
express their views McCallum
said UNC Greensboro had a
hearing in August and the tur-
nout was excellent. "It is that
kind of support the students of
ECU need to show in order to
have this program
implementedMcCallum said.
Members of the insurance
commission will conduct the
meeting and hear testimony for
or against the proposed plan, Mc-
Callum said. Students and
parents are encouraged to attend
and voice their views. McCallum
stressed, "the more people who
voice their opinions on this mat-
ter, the greater the chances of it
being passed.
"I don't see how any student
can be against it. "McCallum
said, "This plan, if passed, will
mean savings of approximately
$100 to the students or their
parents. Of course, at other
universities with higher health
fees, the savings will be more
"They want to get the feel for
support and then relay the infor-
mation to the insurance commis-
sioner McCallum said.
"Legislation has already been ap-
proved for such hearings and
final approval will depend on stu-
dent input
McCallum added, "If there is
lethargy on the students' and
parents' part, the program will
not be instituted and insurance
companies will push harder for it
not to be implemented and have
it work to their advantage
SGA President John Rainey
said the topic was recently
discussed at a recent meeting of
the University of North Carolina
Association of Student Govern-
ments and everyone approved of
the idea. "The SGA wants to
make sure the students are aware
of how important this issue is.
This is their chance to voice how
money will be applied Rainev
said.
Rainey also said if a student
cannot attend the entire meeting,
they can just drop by and tell the
people how thev feel. A student
may also show support by writing
a short letter and leaving it with
the SGA.
Rainey said time wav running
short and the organizer want to
see action before the new in-
surance commissioner is elected.
"It's not that the new commis-
sioner would not approve it
Rainey said, "but John Ingram is
familiar with the program and is
ready to implement it
Dr. Elmer Meyer, dean of Stu-
dent Life, said. "This is an ex-
cellent opportunity for a student
to make an open statement con-
cerning the issue of applying the
student health fee to one's in-
surance policy Meyer said the
meeting will go on for several
hours to ensure that all students
have a chance to voice support
At A Departmental Forum
Groups Determine Outcome
Pee Dee Gets Down
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo L�D
Len though the mighty pirates suffered a humilitating defeat last Saturday at NC State, Pee Dee trie to
get a winning date with this lady wolf. Does Mr. Dee know her beau is watching this? A new meaning to
Pirate Attack.
By GREG RIDEOUT
Managing bailor
Look for two swing groups to
decide the outcome of the U.S.
Senate race between incumbent
Jesse Helms and challenger Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr. That analysis,
along with looks into state and
national politics, came Thursday
at the elections forum sponsored
by the Departments of Political
Science and History.
Dr. Thomas Eamon, a political
science professor, told more than
50 participants to look for lower
middle-class whites and young,
upwardly mobile professionals
(Yuppies) to determine whether
North Carolina would send
Helms or Hunt to the U.S.
Senate. Eamon said other key
groups had already decided. He
made no predictions as to how
the two swing groups would vote,
saying the race was too close to
call.
Eamon, along with Republican
activist and Greenville attorney
Nelson Crisp, analyzed the
presidential race. Crisp saw
President Reagan as unbeatable,
attributing the expected victory
to the president's personality and
his standing in the polls. The one
Democrat present, state party
vice chairperson Betty Speir,
acknowledged that Democratic
candidate Walter B. Mondale
was behind but did not concede
the election yet.
Eamon did predict a Reagan
win in November, saying how his
overwhelming popularity would
probably carry him to a second
term. In the state races, Eamon
said the Martin-Rufus Edmisten
race would be tougher than usual
for a gubernatorial contest in
North Carolina and did not
predict the outcome. From lieute-
nant governor on down. Eamon
gave the edge to the Demo,�
on the ticket.
Randy Daub, Pitt County cam-
paign chairman for Republican
gubernatorial candidate Jim
Martin, explained the day-to-day
logistics of running a campaign.
The former ECU student and
Greenville attornev told how the
different state and local levels of
the Martin campaign are set up
and described the function of
each. The candidate, he said, was
the main igredient and the
organization is built around him.
The forum was kept bipartisan
for the most part, with occas-
sional weighted questions from
the audience. The next forum will
be Oct. 30 at 8 p.m. at the Willis
building and will feature three
journalists who will give their
predictions for November's
races.
Few Women Report Sexual Harassment
(CPS) � Nearly one-third of
all female college students are
sexually harassed on campus �
mostly by male faculty members
� but few women complain
because of embarrassing, drawn-
out grievance procedures, a new
book claims.
The harassment, moreover,
can cause emotional problems
and make victims hostile toward
men, says Linda Weiner, Univer-
sity of Cincinnati vice provost for
student affairs and Billie Wright
Dzeich, a U.C. English pro-
fessor, authors of "the
Lecherous Professor a book on
harassment on campus.
"Students are frightened
Dzeich explains. "They let
harassment go on. They endure
it, anything but confront it. T
don't want him to get in trouble,
I just want him to stop is a com-
mon reaction
Students often feel intimidated
or powerless to stop the harass-
ment, although institutions are
required to have grievance pro-
cedures and programs to support
them, Dzeich points out.
"Many of these programs are
slow in coming she states. "But
if they're not adequate, students
begin to protest
Few faculty members harass
students, Dzeich stresses, but
those who do are usually chronic
repeaters.
"A million-plus women are
harassed each year she adds.
"But it's a small number of
faculty who do it
The authors found three com-
mon types of harassers.
The "counselor-helper" preys
on troubled students' needs for
close relationships. The "power
broker" bargains grades and
recommendations for sexual
favors, and the "intellectual
seducer" draws personal infor-
mation from students in class.
The authors' findings are con-
sistant with those in other harass-
ment studies.
The University of California at
Berkeley determined in 1979 that
30 percent of its female students
received unwanted sexual atten-
tion from instructors.
In a 1982 University of
Washington study, 41 percent of
campus women claimed they'a
been sexually harassed. In 1983,
nearly a fourth ot Penn State's
women students said they has
been harassed.
"Our policy on sexual harass-
ment allows students three chan-
nels for complaints reports
Vicky Eide of Iowa State Unvier-
sity's Affirmative Action office.
"Informal complaints go
through advisors or department
chairs. Affirmative Action
handles formal complaints, or
students may go through an out-
side channel such as the Iowa
Civil Rights Commission
But few women ever file
charges, she adds.
"They come in and discuss op-
tions, but never come back
Eide says. "At this time no cases
are under investigation
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features6
Classifieds7
Sports8
�Doonesbury returns in this
issue. See Editorials, page 4.
�For a review of James
Taylor's concert in Raleigh last
weekend, see Features, page 6.
�A summary of how ECU's
football opponents fared last
weekend, see Sports, page 9.
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mi 1 M CAROI INIAN
(K rOHl R2, 1984
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Due to limited space, The East
Carolinian requests that organizations
submit only important announcements
about up coming events that students
need to know about in advance. Please
submit such messages as "thank you"
and "congratulation" notes to the Per-
sonals section of the classifieds in The
East Carolinian.
The deadline for announcements is 3
p m Monday for the Tuesday paper
and 3 p.m Wednesday for the Thursday
paper
The must be typed on an announce-
ment form to be accepted. These forms
can be picked up at our office.
SIGMA NU
Come chug the super mug at Grumpy y Tues.
Oct 2 from � 12 p m Cash prizes a Sigma Nu
event
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The College Republicans will meet Thurs .
OC 4 a 1 c m im the Mendenhail Coffeehouse
Ae : discuss the canvass the convention and
Fritj posters Please turn out and contribute to
our success
RACQUETBALL
Tht Racquetball Sport Club will hold an
organ zatonal meeting on Wed Oct 3. at 6 p m
m Room 102 Memorial Gym Any and all in
teresteo persons are encouraged to attend Dates
tor student Chmcs will be set and a Student Tour
nament will be discussed
KING YOUTH FELLOWSHIP
The Kmg Youth Fellowship sponsored by the
Pentecostal Holiness Church, will have a
meeting to discuss this semester Bible study
plans The meeting will be in 242 Mendenhail at 7
p m For more information contact Jackie at
752 866A
BIG BROTHERS
The sisters and big brothers of Alpha Phi
soror't, wi be having their fall big brother rush
this Thurs . 4 7 at the Treehouse restaurant
downtown Nickel draft is running so don't miss
out Come out and be a part of one of 'he best big
brother organizations on campus
PI KAPPA PHI
s t.me to start th'S semester oft with a bang
White Diamond Formal is this Sat night at the
Sheraton here in Greenv.lie All brothers and
ciecges ge' ready it's going to be a wild night
SOCCER
Registration tor intramural Soccer will be
held Oct g and 9 In Room 204 Memorial Gym
For more information, contact tne intramural
Dep' or can 757 6387
BOWLING
Register tor iitramursi Team Bowlmy Oct 8
and 9 .n Room 204 Memorial Gym until 5 p m on
�he Wi For more ntormation, come by the In
tramurai Dept or call 757 4387
BASKETBALL
Registration tor Intramural one on one
Basketball will te held on the 8th and 9fh m
Memor,al Gym
HANG GLIDING
Aycock dorm College Hill Campus .s sponsor
ng a "ang gliding clinic at 2 30 p m on OC 6. in
coniunction y. Wl try Maw Kites The clinic
wil Be held in the Dasement of Aycock dorm con
s s' ng of films lecture, demonstration and a
Question and answer section A simulator will be
se' up n �he south courtyard between Aycock
and Scot' dorms There will be a free hang
gl a ng lesson awarded to someone who attends
'he clinic Contac the Intramural Dept for the
follow up "p to 'he Outer Banks
RACQUETBALL SINGLES
Register for ntramurai Racquetball Oct 8 II
m Room 204 Memorial Gym A singles tourna
ment will ti set up according to the amount ot
Signees
BUDDHIST
Free Meditation instruction in the Tibetan bud
dist tradition Learn to sit still Listen to silence
tor a change of thoughts and feelings Tuesday.
7 00 p m . a' the MSC Coffeehouse Bring a
cushion if possible la tool of the trade) Always
love all ways, BM8.SG
TRAVELCOMMITTEE
The Student union Travel Committee will
meet on Wednesday October 3, 1984 at 5 00 PM
m Room 242 of Mendenhail Student Center All
members and interested students are urged to
attend
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
610 Grecnvulr Blvd.
7M-342J - 24 HRS
24 hour Towing Service
I Haul Reauls
Available
Announcements
SURF CLUBTEAM
There is a short but important meeting this
Thursday night at 8 00 in 221 Mendenhail concer
nmg T shirt orders and theHatteras trip Fall
Break Your dues must be paid by Thursday if
you plan to make the trip Due to bad weather the
trials were postponed last Saturday They will be
rescheduled at the meeting this Thursday Some
killer surf slides of Mexico will also be shown at
the meeting We welcome girls and all new
members
BKA
All members and guests planning on attending
the show are to meet at 7 30 p.m in the lobby
beforhand Darryis and fun times will be
waiting tor us afterwards Any questions call
Michael at 757 1613
VOTER REGISTRATION
Voter registors will be on campus today to
register all students interested in voting
November 6th If you are registered in Pitt Coun
ty and have moved if you are registered In
another county or it you've never registered
tables will be set up at Mendenhail the Supply
Store and The Croatan from 10 3
ILO
The ILO will hold a meeting on October 2 at
3 00pm in BC 305 This is a mandatory meeting
tor members We will discuss very important in
formation concerning OKtoberfest Tickets will
be distributed You must be there to get your
tickets You do not hav- to be a foreign language
maior to attend the ILO meetings We welcome
any such interested persons
HANG GLIDING
Aycock Dorm'College Hill Campus in conjunc
tion with Kitty Hawk Kites Is sponsoring a hang
gliding clinic at 2 30 p m on October 6. 1984, in
the basement of Aycock Dorm The clinic will
consist of films, lecture, demonstrations and a
question answer period A semulator will be se'
up m the south courtyard erf Aycock between
Aycock and Scott dorms A tree beginning hang
ghdmg 'esson will be awarded to some lucky per
son attending the clinic The Department ot
Intramural Recreational Services will be put
ting toge'her a trip to the Ou'er Banks, Kitty
Hawk Kites as a follow up to this activity
PAUSE SPEAKER
Dr William Cromer m Christian Education at
The Southern Baptist Theological Seminary wn
be the speaker at PAUSE at the Baptist Student
Union 511 E Tenth St , Thursday, October 4 at 7
p m Following the meeting he will be free to talk
with those interested in seminary
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Ph Be'a Lambda w.ll hold its regular meeting
On Aed Oct 3 at 4 00 p m in Rawl 341 All
members are encouraged to attend
STUDENTS FOR HELMS
All intereshKl parsons In working for Halms
Campaign ara urgad to attand a maating avary
Tuasday at 7 oo Tna maatlngs will ba hald in
Mendenhail For any Information, call 757 8434
SPECIAL EVENTS
COMMITTEE
the Student union Special Events Committee
will meet on Tuesday. October 2, 1984, at 5 30
P M in Room 238 of Mendenhail Student Center
all members and interested students are urged
to attend
PSI CHI
Psi Chi will have a general meeting Wed , Oc
tober 3 at 6 00 p m All old and new members
need to attend to see what we are planning for
this semester Come help plan the tun yourself I
Meeting will be held in the Psi Chi library
KARATE COURSE
Studants may still sign up for tha beginning
Karate course Just coma to ma dance room In
Memorial and talk to the instructor Tha class
schedules are Tues , woman's at 730, Tues ,
men's at 8 30. Wed , men's at 7 30, Wed ,
women's at 8 30 For any further questions call
7S8 0370
CSCI
Co op students who have GPA 3 0. Cobol. Ac
counting or Finance, Business Minor The
Weyerhaenser applications have arrived Pick
ykours up m Rawl 313 Deadline by October 15
1984
"LISTENING PRAYER"
You are invited to Oin the Prayer and Peace
group this Wednesday evening, Oct 3,8 30 at the
Baptist Student union This week's topic is
"Listening Prayer
VOTER REGISTRATION
Believe it you count Your vote will make the
difference Come regester so you can vote Oc
tober 6 1984 thomas Forman Park 5th Street.
10 00 a m 6pm Music for your enjoyment
Free fish sandwiches ana sodas for your refresh
ment
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of Holy commu
mon will be celebrated on Tuesday evening, Oct
2 m the chapel of St Pauls Episcopal Church
406 'th St 1 one block from Garre't Dorm) The
service will be at 5 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chaplam the Rev Bill Hadden celebrating
Supper will follow
FILMS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Films Committee will meet
on Wed Oct 3, 19B4 at 5 00 P M .n the Cot
teehouse .on the ground floor) Mendenhail Stu
dent Center All members and interested
students are urged to attend
The time had come for
somehandsorf experience.
AN OUTRAGEOUS COMEDY GUARANTEED TO
MOVE YOU IN ALL THE RIGHT PLACES.
CARDINAL ENTERTAINMENTS, SPECTRUM CINEMA PRODUCTIONS Present
aJIMSOTOSFiimHOTMOVES" Starring MICHAEL ZOREK, ADAK!LBAR,
JEFFFtSHMAN. JOHNNY TIMKO. JILL SCHOELEN, DEBtRtCHTER rmOLfm
Written By LARRY ANDERSON. PETER FOLDY �' �Wppy
Executive Producers RALPH KENT COOKE, J. DON HARMS & MARTIN PERFiT
Co-proauced By PAUL A JOSEPH, LUIGt ONGOLANi Produced & Directed By MA SOTOS
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HOT MOVES STARTS FRIDAY
AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU.
THERE ARS TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you Ye
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, NJ 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE All YOU CAN BE.
INVITATION
If you have completed 32 to 96 credit hours with
a 3 3 or higher grade point average, you should
have received an invitation to pledge Phi Sigma
Pi National Honor Fraternity You are invited to
attend our organisational Smoker Tuesday, Oct
2 at 7 00 in Mendnehall room 244. or the follow up
meeting Wednesday at 5 00 in Austin 132 Do
"iir�n a favor and attend
HAPPY HOUR
Alpha Omicron Pi is having a happy hour
tonight at Elbe 9 00 until
ENCOUNTER CHRIST
Do you often wonder if you're the only one in
this wrld feeling a certain way? Do you ever feel
like tossing your books aside and iust talking?
Well then, make an Encounter with Christ
weekend Oct 25 28 Meet students from various
campuses withing N C It's a terrific opportunity
to relax and devote a long weekend to you! For
more info call Fr Terry at the Newman Center
at 752 4214
AMA
Learn about ECU'S Career Planning and
Placement Service and Co op program Come to
Mendenhail Rm 221 on Oct 3 at 3 p m All in
terested members and non members welcomed
See you Wednesday
SAM
The Society for Advancement of Management
will hold an organizational meeting on Wed . Oct
3 at 3 00 p m in Rawl 104 All students and facul
ty are invited to attend
DEMOCRATS
The Young Democrats will meet Wed , Oct 3
at 7 p m in room 214 All interested are welcome
to attend
NEWMAN CENTER
The ECU Newman Catholic Community will
meet this Wednesday atSOOpm ECU students
and faculty are invited to iom us for worship ser
vice, followed by our group meeting and dinner
Well be fookmg for you at the ECU Newman
Center (East 10th Street iust past the music
building)
FELLOWSHIP
Fun faith, friendship that's what inter
Vars'tv Christian Fellowship isali about' Join us
at the Jenkins Art Building this Wednesday night
at 7 p m as we discuss "The holiness of God
We hope to see you there'
PUNT, PASS, ANDKICK
Registration for Intramural Punt Pass and
Kick competition will be held Oct 8 18 To
register come By Room 204 Memorial Gym or for
more information call 757 &387
PRE MED
Attention members, officers, pledges of AED
there will be a meeting Oct 2 at 6 30 at The
Western Steer on East 10th Street The speaker
will be Dr Jack Allison. Chief of Emergency Ser
vices at PCMH The meeting will be interesting
and Informative All are invited Dues can be
paid at the meeting
EDUCATION MAJORS
Let's try this again! Student North Carolina
Association Educators Organizational Meeting.
Thurs. Oct 4. 3 30 pm. Speight 104 All
students interested in membership are invited to
attend Those planning to student teach this year
are encouraged to be present Applications and
additional information will be available at this
time A membership drive Is being held the week
Of Sept 24 28 In the Speight Bldg Look for the
membership desk
DIETETIC ASSOCIATION
Get involved' Don't miss the first Student
Dietetic Association meetingi it will be held on
October 2, 1984 at 5 30 p m in the Dining Han of
the Home Economics Building Activities and
prolects for this semester will be developed and
discussed All freshmen, transfer students and
nutrition maors are invited to attend Help us
make this semeter one that YOU won't want to
forget'
ART
The Student Union Art Exhibition Committee
will meet on Tues . Oct 2. at 3 00 p m m Room
238 of Mendenhail Student Center All members
and interested students are urged to attend
ICE HOCKEY
Tbere will be a ery important meeting of 'r
ic hockey club M room 105 B of Memor � 'Jr�
on Tuesday. Oct 2 at 4 30 p m Health release;
and other important forms will be distr.putec .
you are interested �n playing ice nx�e, or tti
like ice skatmg please attend it you cannot s.
tend and Tilv a good excuse please tws
Goerge Sunoenand at 752tW?
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Intramural Recreational Services is offer no
an exciting backpacking r.p to tne Sner�- - �.
National Park on Oc 13 To maxe rese- m
contact the Outdoor Recreation Center t. ,
Fn . Oct 5 or call 757 4911
REREGISTRATION
General College students should conta- � .
advisors pr-or to Oct 1 to schedule ar- acc m
mem for prereg s'ra'on tor rha
Semester
LAW SOCIETY
Are you interested n iaw school' �' v. you art
cordially invited to the first meeting tfi s ,a' of
tna ECU Law Sooet� we arIM be me -
ly. October 2 a' 7 00 p m in Menc-
241 Dr David B S'evens Jci �� �.
win be attending as our pre law a- .
Par more information can Mike r
TJB-1440
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service
m
east Carolina
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Wide Variet
B GREG RJDKOl T
Mnuflat tailor
RALEIGH - When
Democratic Vice Presidential
candidate Geraldine Ferraro
stormed into Raleigh Mon
she created a fren Not "a
human frenzy, but a cardboard
and bedsheet one Both
Democrats and Republicans raid-
ed K-marts and mom's linen
closet in search of something
nte on. Seems eeryone needed
a sign � eithc -or
homemade Creativii.
lacking.
The signs were either f
aga
and
var
said on
'(icnrj
Reagai
"B�
Sur.
The
knew t
said ai
"Thoi
Assertivenes
Bv MARIMkrHOhMAS
v�ft Vkn,�
Students wi . -ease
their assermenes- ma ge: vome
help from the ECU .mg
Center this fall. The Cer
be offering assertier
courses which are free
students.
According to a spol
the Center, a- �
ability to stand up for
what one belie�
nying others their - j
same.
Courses will be offered Oc
pi -
ECU
Junior
Killed
Russel Kinchloe, 21, a
pre-pharmac) major, � �
when an air
while he was � e
Saratoga. N.C Ser 22 H a
on his way to v N
The Selma. N.C rial
vied by his mother. Bel
brother, David of Selma, N
His funeral was las! T
K1 n c h 1 � . b
Washington St s a n
oi the Wasbingi
riors. a local civic group
H
e.
Mr.
Nel
WHYR
For less than dorm or apart
you could:
1. Buy your own hor
2. Enjoy peace qz
3. Invest in the futu
STOP BY AND SEE
09
626 W Gee. eB
"LOWEST PRICES IN
OneY
Warra
Against Factory Defec
Parts Of The Frai
Spring Hinge Frai
MtUI Spring Hinge FRAMES By L'AMY
Wrtfc Single Vision Lenses
WHh Line Bifocals
Hat�I la� i mhkM
Qialt or Plastic .a�as Pcwaa 0' c .� Or I
(Tlntafl Era No Otha Coupon Aj
THIS AD fcHlST ACCOMPANY 0TE� Etvla
puciani
� Oaaaaaaaj EM - �-
V






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Staying ice hockey, or UM
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OUTDOOR RECREATION
�� Offering
men ����.�. rM shenanctoah
� � - '�' ar reservations
R� eson tenter by 5 op,
REREGISTRATION
����, shouki contact their
v v heduie an appoint
� n tor the Spring
. A A SOCIETY
�� hoot? t so )Ouar,
�, � 11 rt� rg �h,s esr
� .� v eh A? a II he meeting on
�Ml - � ' K c m n Venoenhall
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tomm, � � attending i i pre iavv advisor
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1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 2, 1984
Wide Variety Of Signs Visible At Rally
By GREG HIDEOUT
Maaa�)Bf rdiim
RALEIGH - When
Democratic Vice Presidential
candidate Geraldine Ferraro
stormed into Raleigh Monday,
she created a freny. Not a
human frenzy, but a cardboard
and bedsheet one. Both
Democrats and Republicans raid-
ed K-marts and mom's linen
closet in search of something to
write on. Seems everyone needed
a sign � either store-bought or
homemade. Creativity was not
lacking
The signs were either for or
against Ferraro or her positions,
and they came in anti- or pro-
varieties. "Five more weeks
said one, while another intoned,
"Gerry or Geriatric President
Reagan also caught the brunt of
"Bedtime for Ronzo" and "Help
Support Ronnie's Retirement
The Republican retaliators
knew how to turn a phrase, too.
A lot of the signs centered on
abortion. "Abortion Is
Murder cried one with letters
that dripped blood. "Aborted
Children Can't Speak Either
said another, with a third saying,
"Though Shalt Not Kill
One Republican sign alluded to
Ferraro's origins, "Yankee Go
Home The College
Republicans welcomed "Mrs.
Zaccaro a reference to her hus-
band and her's financial pro-
blems. "Wolfpacker's For
Reagan howled another.
But the prizes have to go the
the Dems in the crowd. Some of
the most off-the-wall signs were
thought up by the party in search
of a White House. "They have
the wrong M.F. in the White
House one banner politelv
cried. "Retire Ray-Gun one
sign militarily snapped. Another
asked the current president and
vice president to show affection
for a part of the anatomy,
"Reagan-Bush Can Kiss My
Tush
One Democrat held a sign
declaring, "I'm Pro-Choice,
Abort Reagan But, the most
liked anti-Reagan chant at the
rally had to be, "Hey, Hey. Ho,
Ho. Ronald Reagan's Got To
Go. Ronald Reagan � He's No
Good. Send Him Back To
Hollywood
Ferraro showed signs of liking
most of the banners.
Absentee Ballots Available
By HAROLDJOYNER
Aarislaal NmUw
Students interested in ob-
taining an absentee ballot may
do so with the help of the
North Carolina Student
Legislature, a spokesman said
today.
The NCSL will have a table
set up at the Student Supply
Store on Wednesday and will
help students Ret an absentee
ballot from their home coun-
ty. charge of 25 cents will
cover the cost of a stamp and
an envelope.
The ballot will then be mail-
ed to the student's school ad-
dress and upon its completion,
a NCSL member will notarize
and mail the document back to
the Board of Elections. The
NCSL table will be set up from
8 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Register To Vote
Assertiveness Training Offered
By MARIJAKF FREEMAN
Staff Vk rtter
Students wishing to increase
their assertiveness may get some
help from the ECU Counseling
Center this fall. The Center will
be offering assertiveness training
courses which are free to all ECU
students.
According to a spokesman for
the Center, assertiveness is the
ability to stand up for oneself and
what one believes in while not de-
nying others their rights to do the
same.
Courses will be offered Oct. 18
to Nov. 1 from 3-4 p.m. Classes
will be held in room 306 of the
Wright Annex located next to the
Student Supply Store.
According to a spokesman for
the Center, assertiveness im-
proves relationships by increasing
openness, trust, and understan-
ding. By improving relationships
a student's self-confidence has
been built and that is a main ob-
jective of the Counseling Center,
he said. During this program
students will also practice how to
respond to problem situations.
If a student cannot attend a
meeting he mav call the counsel-
ing center at 757-6661 or stop by
room 305 of Wright Annex.
Preregistration is not required.
The center is trying to help
students develop whether in
groups or individually so if a con-
flict does occur a student may
make an appointment with any
counselor.
Read The
Classifieds
VOTE
Amy Stevens
Freshman Class President
Suzanne Jewell
Freshman Class Vice-President
Paid for b the commmee o elect Siemens & Jewell
ECU
Junior
Killed
Russel Kinchloe, 21, a junior
pre-pharmacy major, was killed
when an automobile struck him
while he was hitchhiking in
Saratoga, N.C Sept. 22. He was
on his way to Selma, N.C.
The Selma, N.C, native is sur-
vived by his mother, Betty, and a
brother, David of Selma. N.C
His funeral was last Tuesdav.
Kinchloe, of 817-B
Washington St was a member
of the Washington St reel War-
riors, a local civic group.
tojwbricate-iff
-
joe
Handmade sweaters
Cotton tights
Crocheted leather sweaters
Heavy Cotton Shirts and Slacks
Specializing in Natural Fiber
Clothing for Women
116 E. 5th St. Mon-Sat 10:00-5:30
Next Door to Book Barn 757-3944
Gordon s
Golf, Ski & Tennis
Super Ski Season Package Deals on K2, Rossignol, Olin
Stadium Umbrellas reg. 19.95, Now 12.95
Men's Sweaters
reg. 29.95 Now 21.95
Ladies Sweaters reg. 30.00 Now 19.00
Winter Apparel 20 Off
Hours 12:00 - 7:00 M-Sat
Se A I sed Clubs
N L sed Skis
WHY RENT ?
For less than dorm or apartment rent
you could:
1. Buy your own home
2. Enjoy peace and privacy
3. Invest in the future
STOP BY AND SEE HOW
@
� � �
HOMES
626 W. Greenville Blvd. 756 - 5434
NO CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.
it . ' " is ii whos sent
� iK tut d take .1
serious n k � Arrm
Arrm bands otter you an average
. ! 4- r rtormances ,i month In everv-
thti e �' ;�� incerts to parades
An � 111 ds also otter v m .1
1 he Arrm h.ts bands performing
ipan Hawaii Europe and all
kt. iss America
And Arm bands otter you the
u play with good musicians lust
. u have to be able to sight-
read musK you ve never seen before and
-�: ite several other musical skills
bsa genuine, nght-now, imme-
diate opportunity
Compare it to your civilian otters
Then wnte Anny Opportunities P.O
Box 771S. Chiton. Nl 07015
ARMY BAND.
BEALLYOUCANBE.
"LOWEST PRICES IN TOWN"
One Year
Warranty
Against Factory Defects On All
Parts Of The Frame
Spring Hinge Frames
Metal Spring Hinge FRAMES By L'AMY $C J 95
W'rth Single Vision Lenses V"f
$6495
With Line Bifocals
found lensts not included)
Qiat or Plastic Lansas Powers Of Plus Or Minus 4 Diopters
(Tinted Extra) (No Other Coupon Applicable)
THIS AD MUST ACCOMPANY OFFER (Ends Soot. SO. 19M)
315 pv�� �
CommoAi
752 1446
t;
Call ut fa An Ert t �aaeaasaa
Witn Tn� Doctor Of Yovr CUOMO
OftEENVIU.1 STOW ONLY
pucians
Oo 9 M 5 X � M Mo" '��
Mcrt.r KMOJaj D'�pon�"S OSj ' "
Oirw
AcroM r�r�l
Doctors �or
NOW!
At The Student Supply Store & Croatan
�ItII VIC
"A DEAL OF A MEAL"
Prepared fresh each moring on
French Loaf - Baked Daily
Your choice of meat, cheese, lettuce & tomato
Wednesday thru Friday
POBOY of Your Choice &12oz. Pepsi
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k ft '
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N
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��'

h





Sire ?EaBt Ear0lintan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. (���,���,
Greg Rideout. mm
Jennifer Jendrasiak, � ���� J.T. Pietrzak. nworoon
Randy Mews, ��� &&� Anthony Martin, bus, Manage
TlNA MAROSCHAK, rmmm C�i� KATHY FUERST. Product,� Ma�atrr
Bill Austin, omMoAMMv Mike Mayo, �mu� Teckmcmn
October 2. W84
Opinion
Page 4
Vote
Students Must Use Choice
With the arrival of Geraldine
Ferraro in North Carolina Mon-
day, we were inclined to think
about the importance of this year's
election and elections in general.
As both Democrats and
Republicans have been saying all
sear, never has there been a clearer
choice for the American public.
Students from North Carolina
have a chance to shift our state's
views on three different levels. It is
important that you make that
choice.
Vote. It is a right that every stu-
dent has. As a university man or
woman you above all people
should be able to value and cherish
he privilege to pick your nation's
'eaders. Our country was in its
beginnings a cry in the wilderness
tor representative government. We
believed in the people ruling the
people, not a monarch with sup-
posed God-given rights to tell
nher men what to do. Our foun-
iing fathers had the wisdom and
:onfidence that we could govern
ourselves. So they let us have a
ote.
Today democracy is still a
minority form of government in
;he world. Most people live under
lictators or communist-type
egimes. We are the world's bas-
.ion of freedom, telling the peoples
of every land to have faith and
Tope: believe, we tell them, you
can � if given the chance �
govern yourselves.
Over the years suffrage has been
videly expanded in our country to
over everyone over the age of 18.
That includes you � the college
tudent. Our heritage demands
hat you use your freedom to
hoose who you want to represent
ou as your governor, senator,
tate legislator, representative,
President, etc. Pick who decides
low your tax dollar is spent, how
-our army is used and how your
iaws are drafted. If one chooses
not to choose, then you are forget-
�ing the words of Jefferson, Paine,
Lincoln.
Their words tell us to decide in
this most decisive of years. Now
more than ever there are opposite
nds of a political spectrum lined
tip against each other in our na-
; ion's presidential contest. The in-
umbent, President Ronald
Reagan, has shown us that he can
�e true almost all of the time to his
conservative beliefs. He represents
less government, a strong military,
reduced spending on social pro-
grams and morality imposed by
law. The challenger, former Vice
President Walter B. Mondale, is
liberal. He calls for a government
with less defense spending, more
social spending, a reduced deficit
and one that sees an activist role
for government.
The choice is one of the clearest
ever. You must decide. But above
all do decide. Send who you think
is best able to bring this country in-
to the 21st century. If a conser-
vative government is in order, then
by all means give us one, but if one
with more governmental action is
needed, send that one instead.
In our U.S. Senate race another
major decision is in order. Does
our state want to keep our
maverick senator, Jesse Helms,
whose votes are among the most
conservative in Congress. Or do
you want a change and wish to opt
for Gov. James B. Hunt, a
moderate southern Democrat who
represents the progressive South.
There is clearly a distinction.
Choose one.
The chore in the governor's race
is less distinct but important in the
appearance of who we want to run
our state. Will we opt for a pro-
gressive conservative, Rep. James
Martin, or do we wish to stick with
the traditional Democrat, At-
torney General Rufus Edmisten.
Do we wish to show the rest of the
country a Democrat or
Republican. The choice is yours.
Consider the issues. Read about
the candidates' positions. And
then vote. Vote.
For Your Information � The
Marshall Plan was proposed in
June 1947 by Gen. George C. Mar-
shall, U.S. Secretary of State, to
meet the need for integrated
recovery efforts against "hunger,
poverty, desperation and chaos"
in Europe. A July conference of 16
nations (the U.S.S.R. and its
satellites refused to participate)
estimated four-year aid re-
quirements at $22.4 billion. In
April 1948, Congress appropriated
$5.4 billion.
Doonesbury
-
ROHIYI
STARRING RONJALPREA&AN.ALSO STARRING GEORGE
BUSH as MICKEVt, JESSE JACKSON as g&f,
GARY HARTa MR. TV. , WALTER MQNPALE as fritz rut cat
S. oy kucn f� .xr
Campus Forum
Republicans Question EC
This is in response to some of the
items appearing in The East Caroli-
nian this semester.
First of all, why is the EC reprin-
ting so many columns from that
liberal magazine, The Sew Republic?
Why not something from the conser-
vative National Review! Or better
yet, how about something written by
ECU students?
Secondly, I must comment on the
letter of a freshman (Sept. 25). He
heads the local "Students For Hunt
He declared that Jim Hunt, as a
senator, "will have the courage and
ability to face the tough issues The
Governor has a deserved reputation
for flip-flopping on the issues. He's
had contrasting positions on taxes,
spending cuts, school prayer, arms
control, etc. If Hunt's commercials
featured the slogan, "Jim Hunt � a
man of courage and conviction I
suspect many North Carolinians
would literally die laughing.
On the other hand, Jesse Helms is
known as a man with the courage of
his convictions. Throughout his
Senate career, Helms has always told
his constituents where he stands,
sometimes at political cost to himself.
Remember his stand on the Martin
Luther King holiday? Many advised
him to be silent on the subject, but
this issue, and Helms' extensive
advertisement of his position on it,
started the Senator up from his
20-point poll deficit last October.
Anyone who doesn't know where
Hunt stands is human. Anyone who
doesn't know where Helms stands is
in the dark.
Finally, I resent the published
remarks of the head of the College
Young Democrats (CYD's). He whin-
ed that the College Republicans
(CR's) will neither help the CYD's in
a voter registration drive nor par-
ticipate in a pre-election debate. It's
not my fault the CYD's feel they need
the CR's to drag them from the pits
of obscurity. We are already conduc-
ting our own voter registration drive,
planning a big absentee ballot cam-
paign, preparing to host a state con-
vention here in Greenville, and many
other election year activities. I remind
the CYD's that last fall, in the spirit
of bi-partisanship, I submitted in
writing some good advice on how to
get your club launched. The advice
was not followed, as was predictable,
the CYD's soon folded. Also, you
should know that I offered the CYD
chairman the opportunity to co-host
a debate between the chairman of the
College Republican National Com-
mittee and the national chairman of
the CYD's. My offer has been ig-
nored.
I hope the CYD's do well in their
registration drive. Considering that a
conservative revolution is sweeping
the nation's campuses and over 60
percent of college students support
President Reagan, I hope they do
very well.
Dennis Kilcoyne
Chairman, ECU CRs
Fair Fraud
This is the season for county fairs
in North Carolina. They bring with
them the gyp-artist � the carnival
huckster. His game may change
slightly from year-to-year, or take on
new trimmings, but its basic purpose
remains the same � to make as much
money as possible in the short time
available.
With such innocent titles as foot-
ball, cat-throw, milk-bottle-throws,
and dish games, mouthed by a fast-
talking huckster capitalizing on the
strong appeal of something for
nothing, there is little difficulty in fin-
ding enough suckers.
Some of the games are simple and
produce income at a slow but steady
rate. The old milk-bottle-throw game
is such a game. The object of the
game is to knock a pyramid of bottles
off the stand with two balls. The bot-
tles are weighted � we'll say one, two
and six pounds.
To produce a winner all the
operator has to do is place the light
bottles on the bottom and the heavy
ones on top. After a little encourage-
ment with lesser prizes � and
perhaps additional attraction of a
side bet � the fleecing begins. The
heavy bottles are now placed on the
bottom and the light bottles end up
on top of the pyramid.
More complicated games are the
big money-makers; ones involving
rolling a number of small balls or
marbles on the board with numbered
holes. A chart displays all the possible
totals, giving each total a specific
point value, usually from zero to
eight. For one dollar, the victim is
given three rolls to make 10 points
and win a prize. His first three rolh
add up to 21. Upon checking the
chart, he sees that his point value is
four. He rolls again and comes up
with a 19, which draws the poin
value of two. Now he is informed tha-
he has hit the "jack-pot and if he is
willing to put up 12.50 and roll ag
for 10 points, he has a chance U
not only the prize, but $25 to boot.
Now, under the rules of the 'new
game the victim "cannot lose"
unless he quits, but now each -
cost him an additional 12.50. Every
time he rolls the "jack-pot" number,
it will cost him double for the next
roll � and the "jack-pot"
doubles. The victim's first roll in
new game produces a point value I i
which the house pays double what
victim paid for the roll. On hi nev.
roll, the player draws 19; the "jack-
pot" jumps to S50 and the cost per
roll doubles. Another roll turns ur a
"bonus number" for which the house
adds $25 to the "jack-pot
The process continues until the
"jack-pot" stands at $250 and each
roll is costing the victim $10. With the
stakes high, quick retrieving of the
balls, rapid and inaccurate adding,
and an abundance of distracting chat-
ter by the operator, the accumulation
of points becomes more and more
difficult. Before long, the victim is
forced to quit, but not until he has ex-
hausted all his funds and probably a
substantial amount borrowed from
his buddies.
Go to the County Fair, enjoy the
rides. Stay away from the games.
Joseph Calder
Dir. Public Safetv
BY GARRY TRUDEAU
:v OKAY, LET'S I PONT
TRY '5R BELIE'ETHlS'
AGAIN: YOU HAP
�71 T MONTHS TO
i
JUSTUJ0NPEPJN6
IF THERE UJAS
ANYTHING I
C0ULPP0T0
f HOP.
YOU REALLY PONT
THINK I SHOULD
HAVE ANYMORE
PRESS CONFER-
ENCES, Pll KB7
THERE'S JUST
NO NEW TO
RUN THE RISK
ANYMORE, r
SIR Jg
V AT THIS POINT, IT WON'T W
MATTER ANYUAY THEECONOMYS
R0ARIN6 AHEAP, THE SLEAZE
ISSUE IS PEAD, ANP YOU'RE 14JAY
P OUT FRONT IN THE POLLS
Ws AND AS IF THAT
UEREN7ENOUGH,
YESTERPAY YOU PICKED
UP A KEY ENDORSE ,
I
PIP7
Things I Thought Of
By GREG RIDEOUT
I got tired of thinking about September, even though I got to see the govemo.
during that month and all. So I decided to think about October kinds of things.
You guessed it. Once again ECU-kind-of-people, it's time for Things I Thought
Of
Do you have the kind of body that if you went to class naked, no one would
notice? Or would people in the class just lose their Egg McMuffin? If so, I suggest
not trying this and maybe wearing three sweaters, jogging pants and some
loafers. A stocking over the face is also preferable. On the other hand, if the op-
posite's the case
I hope you're wearing black and purple today. It's national suck on a Tootsie
Pop day, and those are the official colors. There will be booths at the student
store and sit-ins at the Croatan in support of all past and future Tootsie-Poppers.
Who does Jim Hunt's hair? I know he gets it done out-of-state, probablv bv
Warren Beatty or someone. It kind of looks like a blow-dried swallows nest.
Jesse gets his cut at the Ayden barbershop by Hal, who's never been out of Pitt
County and thinks the Civil War is still going on.
Does your professor do drugs? If you're into business probably not, but take a
psychology or English class and chances are you can tell the difference in the lec-
ture. There's nothing quite like 50 minutes in Speight with some Stones tunes and
a few Mormons banging erasers on the chalkboards in the background. Really.
Is it necessary for fat girls to wear those dance outfit clothes? You'd think
they'd notice the difference between how they look and the pictures on Jane's
albums. I suggest a trash bag or maybe a tent.
Lastly, rumor has it that all short administrators wear elevator shoes. I haven't
confirmed it as yet, but we're searching old purchase orders for proof. Just think-
ing.
P.S. � (By Dawson Mug) Who the hell drinks Meister Brau anyway? It
doesn't taste like the king of beers. It tastes like the king of chafe. No tugboat
driver I know would touch the shit. I guess I'd have to drink it if I voted for that
wimp Mondale or had a slack job like building chairs or something.
Martin,
pi
hour-long, televised & rej
Join
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tRakic
ering q
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ruiting : � - - icw

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 2. 1984
m EC
bottles end up
games are the
rrs; ones involving
i small balls or
iwd with numbered
s all the possible
total a specific
l � from zero to
� the victim is
nake 10 points
His first three rolls
checking the
point value is
5am and comes up
iws the point
� informed that
. and if he is
and roll again
I chance to win
b ii S2 to boot.
' the new
"cannot lose
� each roll will
� S2.SO. Every
number,
r the next
� pot" also
first roll in the
ril value for
. it le a hat the
11. On his next
raws 19; the "jack-
the cost per
. turns up a
; h the house
les until the
S25 �� and each
tin 110. With the
.rig of the
irate adding.
'acting chat-
r, the accumulation
more and more
long, the victim is
' until he has ex-
5 tunds and probabK a
mount borrowed from
� Fair, enjoy the
� the games.
bght Of
i i
though I got to see the governo.
H October kinds of things.
time for Things I Thought
-em to class naked, no one would
eir Egg McMutfin? If so, I suggest
-eaters, jogging pants and some
ible. On the other hand, if the op-
lay. It's national suck on a Tootsie
�here will be booths at the student
pi past and future Tootsie-Poppers.
it done out-of-state, probably by
like a blow-dried swallow's nest.
Hal, who's never been out of Pitt
on.
business probably not, but take a
hi can tell the difference in the lec-
Ipeight with some Stones tunes and
1oards in the background. Really.
(lance outfit clothes? You'd think
look and the pictures on Jane's
Itors wear elevator shoes. I haven't
Ichase orders for proof. Just think-
J inks Meister Brau anyway? It
Ike the king of chafe. No tugboat
have to drink it if I voted for that
chairs or something.

Martin, Edmisten Debate Utilities, Highways
PI) North CamKiu�� �u '
tlPI1 North Carolina's
mocratk and Republican can-
s tor governoi staged an
hour-long, televised debate Sun-
la night taking opposing views
utilities, taxes and highways.
ttorne General Rufus Ed-
ten, a Democrat, and Rep.
"ties Martin, R N ( squared
ffina Kaleigh television station,
wering questions prepared bv
� rth Carolina broadcast
I ort(.
I hey began with opening
itements. Edmisten, attorney
general for the past 10 years,
picted himself as the candidate
ol experience m state govern-
ent, and said he had saved
rth Carolina consumers
money with a tough stand on
utilities and consumer legislation.
Martin, the 9th District
representative for the past 12
years, said he had supported the
programs of President Reagan,
who the polls say is headed for a
big win in North Carolina. Mar-
tin also said education would be
his No. 1 priority.
As the questioning began, both
men said they support higher
teacher pay, although Martin
said he would raise taxes to in-
crease salaries "if that's the only
way we can do it Both men said
they oppose a state lottery to
raise money for education.
Then the debate moved on to
taxes, especially the state's inven-
tory and intangibles taxes. Both
men said they supported repeal of
both taxes. Martin said he would
back their immediate repeal. Ed-
misten said he would support a
gradual lifting of the taxes
because acting quickly would
force local governments to in-
crease property taxes.
The inventory tax puts a levy
on manufacturers that both can-
didates said was a drawback to
industrial recruitment since the
border states do not have such
taxes. The intangibles tax is a levy
on such things as savings ac-
counts, and both men agreed the
tax tends to hit the elderly
hardest.
On utilities, Edmisten claimed
to have saved consumers uicral-
ly millions and millions of
dollars He said he would back
legislation changing the way utili-
ty rates are structured. He said
utilities should not be allowed to
charge consumers for the cost of
new plants while they are still
under construction. He also said
he favors doing away with
telephone access charges, a sur-
charge local companies pay to
hook up to a long-distance net-
work.
"This (utility legislation) is one
of the biggest differences between
me and my opponent Edmisten
said.
Martin said he supports finan-
cially sound utilities in order to
attract industry and new jobs to
the state. He described the pohev
of pricing based on construction
in progress as a "pay-as-you-go"
approach that keeps the com-
panies from having to borrow
money at high interest rates. He
accused Edmisten of engaging in
a "witch hunt
"If we continue this
practiceindustries are going to
lose confidence in North
Carolina Martin said. He said
a recent survey showed North
Carolina had slipped in its stan-
ding among the most attractive
states for doing business.
On the issue of highways, Ed-
misten claimed that Martin's sup-
port of linking Raleigh with the
port of Wilmington with further
construction of Interstate 40 was
the only construction Martin had
endorsed. Edmisten said he also
supported the road , but knew of
many other needed Droiects.
Martin then accused Edmisten
of playing politics with road con-
struction, calling Edmisten's
stand "the politics of illusion "
"Anyone who has promised
every highway hasn't promised
anything said Martin, who said
the road would be an economic
boon to the state.
Placement Center Schedules Interviews
B H A1NK PERRY
SMI Wrlicr
Ihe Careei Planning and
acemeni Tenter recently had
.ointment sign-ups for
ruiting interviews. Interviews
� ii be conducted by various
panies throughout October.
Students may sign up for only
interviews on the initial day.
the schedules are not filled up
the first day, the student can
irn and sign up tor others.
Flow lists will also be provid-
ed. If someone on the original list
cannot attend the interview, a
name will be taken off the
overflow list. All lists are on a
first-come, first-serve basis.
Some of the recruiters coming
in October are: the McLean
Trucking Co A.L. Williams (in-
demnitylife insurance), Lerner
Shops, K-Mart Apparel, Roses,
Inc. and United Carolina Bank.
The following accounting firms
will also be seeking students:
McGladrey, Hendrickson &
Pullen; Peat, Marwick, Mitchell,
& Co Ernst & Whinney; Arthur
Andersen and Co. and the U.S.
General Accounting Office.
There will be a second group of
recruiters in November and two
more groups will come in
December. However, students
must be registered with the
Career Planning and Placement
Center before signing up for the
interview. The interviews are also
open to graduates. For more in-
formation, contact the Career
Planning and Placement Service
at 757-6050 or go by Bloxton
House.
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THF FAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
r�TroBLK 2. I9S4 Page 6

Wcw Mi5c' Performance Set For Thursday lclassifieds
SALE
By CARLYN EBERT
Staff Wrl in
Slap a label on any musical style and you've got
problems. Labels, by their nature, are time bombs:
They activate only after enough time has passed � a
century, perhaps � to let a style of music grow,
change, and establish.
And that's the dilemma facing young modern com-
posers writing what's called "New Music The
music-loving public doesn't know just what to ex-
pect. New wave? A synthesized cross of reggae and
Beethoven? Avant-garde wailings mixed with elec-
tronic static? Or what?
Pianist Donna Coleman, ECU assistant professor
and professed new music fan, is hard put to define
what makes up new music. But she hopes the public
will sample works by two young composers Thursday
night at the School of Music's "Festival of New
Music" � and discover for themselves the directions
serious new art music is taking in the '80s.
"I'm talking about music written sometime since
the early '70s � music that's being written right
now says Coleman, smoothing a waist-length hank
of sleek red hair. "Look at theater. People go out to
see new plays all the time; New York is just teeming
with new theatrical and dance productions. It's gotta
be new. But there's this stigma about new music. I
think the public wants to hear the music that they've
always heard. They feel comfortable with Beethoven
and Bach and Brahms because they know what to ex-
pect
Calling up memories of the experimental, disso-
nant or bizarre works of the '60s, Coleman feels that
audiences have good reason to be skeptical of
anything called "new "They might be just a little
bit afraid of what they're likely to experience because
they think they're not equipped to understand it
she explains. "And the whole point of going to a con-
cert is just to enjoy it. It's not to make it into a big in-
tellectual study "This concert she adds, "is not
electronic or avant-garde
And so in 1979 Coleman formed the Instead
Players, recruiting music students, graduates and
faculty members to fill out the ranks. Her interest in
a new music ensemble sprang in part from her
mid70s days at the University of Michigan.
Dissatisfied with the standard recitals offered
Master's music students, she banded with other
voung composers in a group called the Electric
Candlelight Consort. This was an attempt at reviving
a Michigan group from the '60s called the Once
Group, a product of what Coleman calls "The real
heyday of experimental music in this country.
Organizations like the Ford and Rockefeller Founda-
tions were very interested in spending lots of money
to promote avant-garde music. And it kind of
lingered into the 1970sWe were sort of the last
gasping breaths of that whole trend And so the In-
stead Players are keeping that experimental feeling
alive on this campus in the '80s.
The Consort included composers Jack Lennon and
Ed Cionek, whose works make up the 8:15 p.m.
Thursday concert in Fletcher Recital Hall . But while
Pianist Donna Coleman and Saxaphonist Brad Foley are warming up for Thursday's performance in A.J.
JONJOKDAN
Fletcher Recital Hall.
H.U rtioio
que called serialism, which rejected the traditionallv
tonal seven note scale in favor of a 12-tone scale.
Composers began developing works using rigorous
mathematical processes and computers, and the
music, as Coleman says, "became very intellectually
oriented Outside of elite music circles, few could
understand the new music � and audiences turned
away
"It drove the audience right out of the hall says
Jack Lennon from his University of Tennessee of-
fice At that point, Coleman says, some composers
went on writing serial music, but others began look-
ing for something else.
"I think what's been happening in the late' 70s and
'80s is that composers have started realizing that they
want an audience again she says. "There's a reces-
sion, and money plays a big part. There was so much
money available in the 1960 s that composers didn't
really need an audience. They could buv one if they
had to. But now there isn't all that money; they find
they need to rely more and more on the audience's
support for them to find any success, whether critical
or financial
"Young
composers in particular arewriting
music more with the audience in mind says Len-
non. So he. Cionek and others have responded to the
"New Romanticism" in music, which welcomes back
tonality and traditional harmonic principles. "Com-
posers are writing long, beautiful, singable lines
again says Coleman. "I think this is something
Coleman recalls having to step over listeners everybody was relieved to hear again "
crowding the aisles for a Consort performance of a Thursday's Festival offers a real hodgepodge of
John Cage me, e, she also realizes that somehow, in new works, from a lush guitar solo to a marimba
the '60s and ' 70s, new music composers started losing piece to a work adapted from chamber orchestra for
their audience They became enthralled with writing a soprano and piano. "That's one nice thing about
spare, dissonant music based on a post-WWII techni- new music says Ed Cionek "There's something
for everybody, and there's that element of surprise
In this spirit, the Instead Player's program,
directed by Coleman, includes guest guitarist Bill
Carter performing Another's Fandango; senior voice
student Denise Miller and junior piano student Cyn-
thia Bullock performing Four Love Songs (poems by
William Blake and three other poets set to music by
Cionek); and senior music student William Congdon,
marimba, performing A Tide of Voices.
The second part of the program features faculty
members Coleman and Brad Foley performing
Distances Within Me on piano and alto saxaphone;
and ECU tuba graduate student William
Chamberline, junior string student Renee Servance
and senior percussion student Kim Summers perfor-
ming Rumble with John Brewington, a graduate
assistant in percussion, conducting.
"It's music written for the concert hall says
composer Cionek, "and maybe for a particular per-
former. It's music not yet in the now-standard reper-
toire � the basic 250 pieces you hear every year
Besides the concert Thursday, a dress rehearsal at 7
p.m. tomorrow is free and open to all. Both com-
posers will be there. Cionek and Lennon will also
give a seminar at 11 a.m
Hall.
Lennon's work, says his friend Cionek, is "really
lyrical "It works from a very strong tonal center
says Coleman, who is thoroughly familiar with Len-
non's duet for alto sax and piano, having performed
it many times. "(Distances) tends to be a bit ethereal.
rhythmic dements. The thing in Ed music that real
ly stands out is his sense of humor. I'm not saying his
music is funny, but Ed is very attracted to jazz, and
we can hear some of these funky, jazzy elements pop-
ping into his m"c' particular!) in the trio " Follow
ing The Composer Without Scotch, Rumble's final
variation adds a taped drum machine track to tuba,
double bass and percussion "I like to mix pop in-
fluences into my stuff explains the composer.
Coleman gets special pleasure from performing
works by her former classmates "It means a great
deal to me she savs "Not only because they're
friends of mine, but I feel 1 can bring a special kind
of comprehension to this new music because I know
the composers " Finding performers poses a problem
for new music composers, she feeis. "Composers are
sad people in a lot of respects, because thev work
very much in isolation to produce their art and vet
it's only half finished once it's on the page. It needs
performers to come along and finish the job
"It's tough says Cionek. "There's a lot more
composers than there used to be But he is op-
timistic about the fate of new music: "There's more
and more groups playing new music, and more op-
Thursday in the Recital portunities for composers to be recorded. Now more
groups are wanting a premiere on their program
"There's an enthusiasm at universities that you
don't find an a here else he savs. "It's infectious.
It seeps into you
Perhaps Cionek has hit on a more definitive
Yoko Ono
Gets Album
By DAVID WITHERINGTON
Staff Writer
Every Man Has A Woman is
the new, long overdue tribute
album to Yoko Ono. Yoko has
always stood in John Lennon's
shadow, but her contribution to
pop music is immeasurable.
Ono's primal screams and avant
garde style have influenced such
current acts as Lene Lovich and
the B-52's. As a matter of fact, it
was their obvious flattery at this
discovery that encouraged Len-
non and Ono to come out of
retirement in 1980. Of course,
Lennon's assassination cut the
team's comeback short. Since
that tragic event, Ono has releas-
ed to solo albums, Season of
Glass and It's Alright. Both
albums displayed her eccentrici-
ty, but were blatantly filled with
references to John's death. I
guess this is understandable,
though, since John Lennon and
Yoko Ono were more like one
person than a married couple.
Anyone who couldn't see John's
mesmeric attraction to Yoko
never understood Lennon in the
first place. Yoko is a genius in her
own right, and John saw this
from the beginning. Their love
story parallels that of Romeo and
Juliet, with the public constantly
frowning when Yoko's name is
mentioned with John's. Let's
face it, Yoko has had a tough
time gaining public acceptance.
The very existence of this album
is testament to that, surfacing a
full 16 years after her musical
debut.
Every Man Has A Woman br-
ings together ten artists to pay
their dues to Yoko's influence.
The album opens with the most
obvious choice, John Lennon
himself. John sings lead on the ti-
tle track, recorded during the
Double Fantasy sessions. He
gives the song a heartfelt render-
ing, using a voal style reminiscent
As impressionism: music, it sets up very beautiful description of what to expect on Thursday: likeable
infectious yet serious music. Music, as Donna Col-
eman says, that "springs from the heart and the soul,
and not so decidedly from the mind
And whatever � decidedlv "new
sound colors She compares Lennon's textures to
Debussy's.
Cionek's compositions,
cosciously contrapuntal,
she says, are "more
with much stronger
A Review
James Taylor Shines
Engineer Steve Thompson, Yoko Ono, Roberta Flack, and Sean Ono Lennon contributed to the album.
producer Allen Tous-
of his work with the Beatles in the
late '60s. The song is the perfect
love letter written to John from
Yoko, and he answers her by
singing her own words of love
"Every man has a woman who
loves himIn rain or shine or life
or deathIf he finds her in this
lifetimeHe will know when he
presses his ear to her breast
Next up is Harry Nilsson, one
of the Lennons' dearest friends in
the mid-70's. Nilsson pays his
respects with three tunes here,
"Silver Horse "Dream Love
and "Loneliness written by
Yoko in 1975. "Silver Horse" is
the beautiful tale of a dreamer,
and Nilsson's lovely voice does
the song justice, adding a line
from the Beatles' "In My Life
"In my lifeI've loved you
more a thoughtful memory of
John to conclude a paean to
Yoko's songwriting.
We are then treated to Eddie
Money's version of "I'm Moving
On a rocker that shows the
adaptability of Yoko's tunes.
Money has taken Ono's sparse
arrangement and added guitar
solos and reverb to suit his style.
Don't get me wrong, though.
This is not to praise Money. I
prefer Yoko's version, and an ap-
pearance by Lene Lovich would
have been more appropriate here,
as the styling of "I'm Moving
On" is similar to Lene's "Lucky
Number Oh well, speaking of
moving on
Roseanne Cash does a
mediocre version of "Nobody
Sees Me Like You Do" that can't
touch Yoko's original.
"Dogtown one of Yoko's
1973 compositions, is competent-
ly handled by a new band called
Alternating Boxes. I still wish the
B-52's were featured here,
though I understand contractual
obligations prevented the release
of their "pon't Worry Kyoko
(It's Only Mummy's Hand in the
Snow)
"Goodbye Sadness the tear-
jerker from Yoko's Season of
Glass album, is well represented
by Roberta Flack. It is co-
produced and features the playing
of jazz great Ralph MacDonald.
This brings us to side two, and
a powerful version of "Walking
On Thin Ice" By elvis Costello
and the Attractions. Costello
sings this tale of risky business
with his vocals on edge, sug-
gesting a feeling of paranoia.
This is set against some brilliant
keyboard work by Steve Nieve,
and effective horn blasts by the
TKO Horns brass section, pro-
duced so efficiently by New
Orleans
saint.
"Wake Up" is next by Trio.
Just who is Trio, you might ask?
Well, it's an obscure little dance
band from Germany led by none
other than Klaus Voorman,
former Beatles player who
befriended them on their very
first visit to Hamburg in the early
'60s.
The only old track included is
the Spirit Choir's rendition of
"Now or Never produced in
1972 by John and Yoko, and
featuring John's rhythm guitar.
After the ominous events in
Yoko's life, it's only fitting that
the album ends on a positive note
� Nine-year-old Sean Ono Len-
non's declaration that "It's
Alright "Sometimes I'm so
afraidI ion't feel like facing the
world f hen somehting hap-
pensIt clicks in my heartAnd I
feel like cryingBut I know it's
gonna be alright
Through her music Yoko Ono
is forging ahead with the fight for
world peace. Though it may be a
fruitless effort, there is a warm
feeling of unity when these other
prominent musicians recognize
the need for such a statement.
And, at long last, Yoko Ono has
been accepted.
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
Fralam t-dllor
James Taylor was definitely at
his best last Friday night when he
entertained a house full of en-
thusiastic ECU and N.C. State
fans. The former Chapel Hill
resident captivated the Reynolds
C oliseum audience with his
charisma and flowing combina-
tion of new ballads and old-time
favorites.
"It's always nice to be back in
North Carolina Taylor began.
From there he moved straight in-
to the love song "Fine Anytime
She's Around Me
Probably the most refreshing
part of Taylor's performance was
his attitude on stage. Sometimes
rumored to be quick-tempered
concerning distractions while per-
forming, Taylor merrily enter-
tained the crowd with his music
and happy-go-lucky personality.
The funniest account occured
early in 'he first set when he in-
troduced his new song "Mona
Taylor heartily told the story of a
pig (Mona) he used to have who
had to be "ridded of" for fear
that the animal may one day at-
tack his child. He wrote the
words accordingly: "So much of
you to loveAnd yet, too much of
you to take care of
He also performed what he
called his "schizophrenic" song
� a melody written by Frank
Lesser � in which he sang a duet
with himself. Sound difficult to
do? Not for Taylor, and the au-
dience loved it!
From there he moved into his
new love song "My Romance
This calming, beautiful ballad is
probably the only song Taylor
sings without his guitar. He term-
ed this his "Julio Eglasia" song.
Whatever you want to call it. it
was a beautifully touching piece.
Of course Taylor sang all the
old favorites � "Don't Let Me
Be Lonelv Tonight "Oh Mex-
ico " "How Sweet It Is (To Be
loved By You) "Walk On
Down The Road and the two
Carol King hits "Fire And Rain"
and "You've Got A Friend
James Taylor performed most
of his songs alone; however, he
was accompanied by his two
talented back-up singers and his
keyboard player, bass player, and
drummer throughout the even-
ing. The group kept the crowd
clapping and swaying to the beat
of the song "This Band Can
Jam and entranced and teary-
eyed to the inspirational, har-
monic message that they sang at
the end of the show.
After years and years of turn-
ing out sure-fire hits, Taylor is
truely a legend in his own
time.Not only is he a singer, but
also a kind-hearted individual.
Taylor's performance Friday
night was done for free. All pro-
ceeds from the show were given
to the Gov. Jim Hunt Commit-
tee His patriotism also shined
through when he encouraged the
predominately college-student
audience to vote and "help be a
part of making sure we make the
right decisions for this state
Gov. Hunt presented Taylor
with a gold plate containing the
North Carolina state seal and
motto. Taylor ended the evening
with a fourth encore and the
popular tune "In My Mind I'm
Going To Carolina
Concerning James Taylor
North Carolina definitely has so-
meone to be proud of.
!
1971 23" RALEIGH GRAND
prix" � iosDeec Great condil �
$125 Leave name ana numper d'
757 6000
BEAUTIFUL MOROCCAN WALL
HANGINGS iery reasonaoie
756 9273 after 5
Ca
ADORABLE BLOND AKC CO kef
spaniel pupp.es Call 752 1973
FOR SALE Sears '
with BSR mini changer $35
radio from Toyota truck . �
Sparkon-a c flush mount speaners
$35 Caii 758 1598 af'erp.rr
PIANO FOR SALE Aac Respo
sipie parv o assume s"a montf .
payments on sp.ne? conso e p -
Can be seen locally Write
phone number Creot Manager
PO Box 521, Becxeee
BROl
PLA1
saes
I
-
NEi
TlOr
PAOl
I

V A'
STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM?
solutel no cnarge tor rei
estimates at the Tec Ca
757 "nineteen eighty
you'd like o know
NEED IT TYPED? Theses d sse'
tations. research pape-s -es
etc. Word Processor Call &
.aws at 752-U54
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE ex per e�:e q ua ty work
Seiectric typew ter Lar e
7 58 5301
ECU RUGBY CLUB esl
1975, a respectec member � i
North Carolina Rugc . Jr
Saturday at 2 OC c m
THE ARCHERY CLUBa
Wednesday. Oc'ooer 3. 1984 n Rrr
102, Memorial Gr"1" A.I oer
and those interested neec I
their insurance pc cy nc -
no.
A Tl
,1
EC
p a I
I
X1' SX& THE EAST CA ROi
4 V

as �
rs
On it��
4 l�J� � .�. i
If. � -
V
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Dm i aae � for .����-
m tmr a vtaar � a jnWa. ian�rY
WRITE.
OaenU Muaper
East Carohaa Play boom
Greenville, NC 2TS34
CALL: 7563
�TV if
SrOXSOREDBY
BE SURE TO TSI
FREE WITH

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984 tge
ursday
"�-

�� oec� ttot . �
il Hall.
ll roal
g his
jazz, and
nentv pop-
' Fi
e - final
:uha.
p m-

v A v

Kno�
?blcm
p s-cr are
more
iefinitivc
Col-
d the soul.
view

P r Shines
Eglasia song.
call it. it
'ling piece.
ang all the
Don'l Let Me
"Oh Mev
' h h (To Be
� Walk On
R ;ad and the two
� ts 'Fire And Rain"
I nend
rormed most
aione; however, he
- mpamed by his two
I ba l ip angers and his
ird player, bass player, and
Timer throughout the even-
I he croup kept the crowd
g and Nwaying to the heat
the "This Band Can
Jan md entranced and teary-
the inspirational, har-
ige thai they sang at
end oi the show
After years and years of turn-
f it sure-fire hits, Taylor is
ruei a legend in his own
t only is he a singer, but
a kind-hearted individual.
Fauor's performance Friday
it was done for free. All pro-
: rrom the show were given
tlw Go Jim Hunt Commit-
tee His patriotism also shined
ugh when he encouraged the
predominately college-student
. iience to vote and "help be a
; art of making sure we make the
right decisions for this state
Gov. Hunt presented Taylor
with a gold plate containing the
North Carolina state seal and
notto. Taylor ended the evening
with a fourth encore and the
popular tune "In My Mind I'm
Going To Carolina
Concerning James Taylor �
North Carolina definitely has so-
I rneone to be proud of.
A
?
J

Happy B-Day Bill Like A Mug
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 2, 1984 7
Classifieds
East Carolinian advertising
call 757-6366
SALE
WANTED
'978 23" RALEIGH "GRAND
PRIX"� 10 speed, Great condition,
Si25 Leave name and number at
'S1 6000
BEAUTIFUL MOROCCAN WALL
HANGINGS. Very reasonable Call
"S6 9273 after 5
ADORABLE BLOND AKC cocker
spaniel puppies Call 752 1973
FOR SALE: Sears Silvertone Stereo
ifh BSR mini changer, $35. AM FM
'adio from Toyota truck with 2
sparkomatic flush mount speakers,
S35 Call 758 1598 after 6 p.m.
PIANO FOR SALEWanted: Respon
s ble party to assume small monthly
oayments on spinetconsole piano.
Can be seen locally. Write, (include
mone number) Credit Manager,
p O Box 521. Beckemeyer, IL 62219.
BRODYS FOR MEN AT THE
PLAZA has a parttime opening for a
salesperson Experience in selling
men's fashions is preferred. Must be
able to work mornings, evenings and
on Sat Apply Phyllis Daniels,
BRODY'S for Men M F 2 5 p.m.
NEARBY FINANCIAL INSTITU-
TION seeks computer student for
PART TIME work on Data Base
Reply COMPUTER, Box 8008,
Greenville, NC 27834.
WANTED: LADY PIRATE
MANAGER Volunteer work for this
basketball season. Contact Diana at
757 6384.
603 GEORGETOWN APART
MENTS Female roommate needed
$95mo,
3 utilities, furnished
washerdryer. Stop
752 1343 anytime.
by or call
COLLEGE REP WANTED to
distribute "Student Rate" subscrip
tipn cards at this campus. Good in-
come, no selling involved. For infor-
mation and application write to:
Allen S. Lowrance, Director, 251
Glenwood Drive, Mooresville, NC
28115.
PERSON WANTED to work on cam
pus locally. For information and ap
plication send sase to: Allen
Lowrance 251 Glenwood Drive,
Mooresville, NC 28115.
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES NEED-
ED Twin Oaks apts. Completely fur
nished, and excellent location. Full
bath and walkin closet in room. Rent
reasonable. Call 758 7264.
WANTED: Male and female room-
mates. New and completely furnish-
ed condominiums. (Linens, dishes,
dishwasher, etc.) $150.00 per person,
per month. Call Amy 757-1971.
NEEDED: Parttime Exercise In
structor. An individual with positive
enthusiastic attitude. Call Theresa
at The Body Shoppe at 758 7564 to set
up an interview.
WANTED: Thirsty people who like
beer. Join the Alpha Xi Delta for
happy hour at Blue Moon Cafe Wed ,
Oct. 3 5 10.
SOLOFLEX MACHINE Like new
condition $400.00 Call Sheldon
7525125.
RIDES
Need a ride for fall break to Northern
Alabama, Tennessee, or Northern
Georgia, or anywhere near. Jenny
758 8016.
MISC
STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM? Ab
solutely "no charge" for repair
estimates at the Tech Shop. Call
57 "nineteen eighty We thought
� ou'd like to know.
NEED IT TYPED? Theses, disser
ations, research papers, resumes,
etc. Word Processor. Call Betty
-aws at 752 1454.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE experience, quality work, IBM
Seiectric typewriter Lanie Shive,
'58 5301
ECU RUGBY CLUB, established
1975, a respected member of the
I North Carolina Rugby Union. Game
Saturday at 200 p m
HE ARCHERY CLUBwill meet
Wednesday, October 3, 1984 in Rm.
102, Memorial Gym. All members
nd those interested need to bring
leir insurance policy no. and group
no
ANYONE WISHING TO PART
WITH GALLAGHER TICKETS
FOR Thurs. night � please call
752 1960.
ECU RUGBY CLUB VS. UNC W
Sat, Oct 6, 2:00 p.m. Be there!
Behind Allied Health Bldg.
THE TRI-SIG SISTERS AND
PLEDGES would like to thank
everyone that attended our Grumpy
Hour last Thursday night. We had a
blast and hope you did also!
ECU RUGBY
vs.
UNC-W
Sat. Oct 6 10
Cation
QS-n
PROGRAM
Nobody else makes
Tine photography
this simple.
�; �
. mdsti
� � � : rity auti main
; . �:�� :�
� : �� � ash "
peedlrte '88A
� �� lers A2 A
� ' '�' - rfiv MA � i able
'��. � �

� jistratioi ird
$219.95
j ort t coticfo hop
t
8 SOUtH COTANCHE STREr :
GBFENVILLE N C 27834
7S2-OS88
Classifieds Work
PIZZA � Every Mon. and Tues.
night is Buy A 16" Pizza And Get
A 14" Pizza Free Delivered. Call
Alano's Pizza Tonight at 752 3861.
"PARTY AND MEET GIRLS if
this is something your interested in
� come out to Alpha Phi Big Brother
Rush this Thursday, Oct. 4th at The
Treehouse Restaurant from
4:00 7:00. Become an Alpha Phi Big
Brother, and party with The Alpha
Phi Sisters!
Rain or
Shine
Behind
Allied
Health
Bldg.
IAU5CH6IOMB SOFLENSCONTACTS
COMPLETEFORONDT $99
Rx )u$t $99 you'l be titled with the finest sort contoci lenses ovoiioWe.
Bousch ft lomb Softens' Contacts The price includes everything you I
need to put your glosses away lor good, initial eve examination, lenses
core lot. instructions and loiowup visits for one month And yoOrecetve
two weeks trial
Bousch ft Lomb Softens Contacts tor $99 completeCome see tor
yourself today
Drs. Hollis ft Scibal
Tipton Annex228 Greenville Blvd.
759404
Kick off
your day
Lunch Buffet
! 1:30am -2pm Daily
All the pizza, spaghetti, and
salad You Can Eat
3.09
Dinner Buffet
5-8pm Mon. & Wed.
Ail the niza. spaghetti, and sal? 4
You Can Eat
Spaghetti 5-8pm Thurs.
All the spaghetti You Can Eat
The Best Pizza In Town
3.19
2.65
Corner of Cotanche
and 10th St.
Phone 758-6121
FREE
Potato Bar at
Western Sizzlin
THE FORECAST IS
FOR A PERFECT FAIR
College Nite
Wednesday
Admission Vi
Price with
ECU ID
Wristband
Nite - Thurs.
Buy a $6.00
Wristband for
Admission and
All the rides
FAIR
CONTINUES
THROUGH
OCTOBER 6
A student bites a teacher.
The school psychologist goes berserk.
The substitute teacher is a certified lunatic.
And students graduate who can't read or write.
Its Monday morning at JFK High.
TEACHERS
I nited Artists Pmu
jkA RON RISSO Product�
AnARTHlRHIUIRhJn,
so�, NICK NOLTE JOBETH WILLIAMS -JCDD HIRSCH � RA1PH VHCCHIO
TEACHERS" ALLEN GAREIELD LEE GRANT - RICHARD MULLIGAN
Wraimfa.W. R. McKlXNEV Produce DropKd b, Rl( HARD MacDONALD Dmoor of i. DAVID M WALSH
m?1" tun Producer IRWIN RISSO Producedt� AARON RISSO Dimi�d�, ARTHl'R HIUER

r
V � VOTtM I 4V4IUIU (
M�DMMc�s�rrrtt
Forum. iSr mu�K of ZZ TOP BOB SECER JOE COCKER SIGHT RANGER M SPECIAL THE MOTELS
FREDDIE MERCURY UN HL NTER ROMAN HOLUDAY ERIC MARTIN k FRIENDS
STARTS OCTOBER 5th AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE
-� r - rm IQj
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IHfc EAST C ARCH INI AN
Sports
OCTOBER 2. 1984
Page 8
State Stomps
ECU, 31-22
ECU senior fullback Reggie Branch (36) got the first 100-vard game of
his career b rushing 21 times for 104 yards in the Pirates 31-22 loss to
Pirates Impressive At Home
Duke Visits Minges Tonight At Seven
JON JORDAN - ECU Poto L��
V( . State. His performance, however, didn't compare to that of State
runnmnback Vince Kvans who rushed for over 200 yards.
By RANDY MEWS
Sporti L41lor
RALEIGH � Runmngbacks
Vince Evans and Joe Greene
combined for 320 yards Satur-
day evening to lead North
Carolina State to 31-22 football
victory over ECU at Carter-
Finley Stadium.
Evans and Green alternated
at tailback in place of the in-
jured Joe Mclntosh, and ended
up proving the depth of thier
back field to an inexperienced
Pirate defense. Evans ac-
cumulated 201 yards in the
game, the fourth-best rushing
total in Wolfpack history.
Over 57,300 spectators were
on hand � the third largest
crowd to watch a sporting
event in the state of North
Carolina � and it looked as if
the Pirates would have a shot at
victory when they fielded a
punt early in the fourth quarter
just 44 yards from the endzone
and trailing 20-14.
However, on third-and-five
from the State 39-yard line,
defensive lineman Reggie
Singletary clamped Pirate
quarterback Darrell Speed to
cause a fumble.
From there. State took only
three plays to score a
touchdown and put the game
out of reach. Green ran for 23
and 36 yards on the first and
third plays of the series, while
Pack quarterback Tim Espisto
completed a pass for a two-
point conversion to cap off the
drive and give State a comfor
table 28-14 advantage
"I thought Greene, I vans
and Espisito all had great
games ECU coach Ed Emor
said "State has a good football
team and great runmngbacks
"We threw ourselves out oi
four field goal opportunities
Emory continued. "1 thought
we would come back in the
fourth quarter, but that one
bad plav (Speed's fumble) cost
us the game
Emory also said State stuck
straight to the game plan that
had been diagnosed b wat-
ching their previous game
films. "They didn't do
anything different than we ex
pected Emory said. The
just did a better job of blocking
and executing, and also did
good job of tackling or.
defense.
Although the Pirates we
unable to achieve victory, the
ground game proved to be ef-
fective for the first time this
season. Tony Baker, :arting
his first game at tailback, rush-
ed for 120 yards, while fuilba.
Reggie Branch topped the
100-yard mark for the firsi I imc
in his career by picking up 104
yards.
The Pirates now stand a: 1-4
on the season, and ill travel to
Pittsburgh this Saturdav to
take on a struggling 0-4 Pan-
ther squad.
Bv
H) BROWN
M�ff Wntrr
improved its record to 2-4
eason behind the excellent
' Traci Smith and Martha
M cQuillan as the Pirate
volleyball team scored a well-
ed ictor oer Methodist
. Thursday night at Minges
( � � slum
e ha:d-fought contest saw
two squads alternating vie-
in the first four games in
est-of-five match, setting up
nal confrontation in the last
. in shich the Pirates nar-
scored the clincher for the
h win.
I opened with a close 15-13
ore in the first game as Mc-
Millan and Smith each scored
three kills, while Mary Barnham
had se.eral service aces to her
Jit. The Methodists had
c.al opportunities to break
igd but an improving Pirate
use shut the door as ECU
k a 1-0 lead in the match.
Xpparently fired up over the
-� opener, the Methodists
ired back to a solid second
tie win, 15-8. The Pirates
seemed temporarily unable to
slow their opponents attack as
Smith was ECU'S only bright
spot with five kills.
1 I finall) got its transition
from offense to defense syn-
chronied in the third game a-
they shook off the loss and
reersed the tide winning 15-5 to
take a 2-1 lead in the match Ann
Guida and Traci Smith each con-
tributed three kills, with Smith
adding three service aces as well.
Methodist rebounded again
with a 15-10 win, setting up the
deciding game. Smith and Mc-
Quillan each had two kills tor the
Pirates, with McQuillan adding
two service aces � hut defensive
lapses let their opponents tie the
match at two games apiece.
ECU then escaped with a 15-13
ictory in the final game to take
the match win. McQuillan was
awesome as she personally ac-
counted for seven kills. Smith
continued her leadership role
with five kills, while Ann Guida
added three kills, three service
aces, as well as two solo blocks
on defense.
Despite the close margin of vic-
tory, the Pirates seem to be com-
ing together as a team. Liberal
substitutions were made to
broaden overall team experience
in preparation for upcoming
tournament play. According to
Coach Imogene Turner, the win
was satisfying to her even more
for that reason.
"Sharon Shank has reinjured
her knee Turner said, "at.
iettei s (Ann Guida and
ramm) Riggan) hae some
ph ical problems. Shank and
Riggan may not he able to play
this week as a ell as another team
member tor other reasons, so we
wanted to prepare for those
possibilites as much as possible
Man Barnham appeared to be
the most efficient serer in the
match, but she ma be moved to
a setter's spot as a result of the in-
juries mentioned previously.
"Barnham was a vital part of the
team victory Turner stated. "I
was reallv encouraged with her
contribution
11 n u e ! o
experience
she should con-
improve with
With the tough opponents
scheduled for the next few Javs,
ECU will need to continue to
match offense with defense to be
competime. Duke and North
Carolina have much greater
resources to work, consequents
the Pirates must make up the dif-
ference with determination and
team work to offset the built-in
advantages those teams enjoy.
Duke visits Minges tonight at 7
p.m then the Pirates travel to
meet North Carolina Thursday in
Chape! Hill.
Lady Netters Keep Perfect
Season Going At Meredith
Bv IONY BROWN
The ECU women's tennis team
swe; aside all opposition in cap-
turing first place at the six-team
Meiedith College Invitational
over the weekend.
The Pirates scored their most
impressive victory this year,
almost doubling second place
Campbell's 11 points with 20 of
their own to raise their season
record to 3-0 in dual matches and
1-0 in tournament play. Pem-
broke State took third with 10
points, Atlantic Christian had
nine points, followed by fifth
place St. Mary's with three while
Meredith failed to score.
Ann Manderfield (No. 2 seed)
led the way for the Pirates as she
remained undefeated in all dual
matches and tournament play
with a 6-0 record. She beat Barb
Bulla 6-0, 6-1, Kathy Everette of
Pembroke 6-0, 7-6, then rallied
against Susan Maxwell of ACC
after losing the opening set 1-6 to
win 7-5 and 6-3.
Kris Sammons also kept an
unbeaten string alive as she went
to 4-0 in both singles and doubles
plav by defeating Julie Brady of
St. Mary's 6-4, 6-1 and Elizabeth
Horuthal of Meredith 6-2, 6-4,
before having a fairly even match
against Luanne Kennedy of Pem-
broke. Sammons narrowly won
the opening set in a tie-breaker
7-6, Kennedy came back with a
6-2 set to tie the match, then
Sammons shut the door with a
6-2 score in the decisive set to win
the number three singles.
Sharon Feeley continued her
winning streak in singles play as
she took three straight to capture
the number five singles cham-
pionship, raising her individual
singles record to 4-0. She
defeated Karla Hobbs of Pem-
broke 6-2, 6-1 in the first round.
Laura Cochrane of Meredith 6-3,
6-2, then took Liz Chase of
Campbell 6-0, 6-4 in the finals.
Karla Hoyle followed suit with
her teammates, also sweeping
three straight matches for the
number six singles title. After an
opening set 6-0 win over Dana
Perry of Meredith was reversed in
the second set, she almost revers-
ed the score again by allowing on-
ly one game for Perry while winn-
ing 6-1 to grab the match two sets
to one.
ECU wasn't quite as successful
in doubles, winning only one of
three titles, but Hoyle and Sam-
mons captured the championship
in the number three doubles in an
impressive fashion with three
straight wins. They beat
C ochrane-Wagner of Meredith
6-3, 6-1, Ellison-Smith of St.
Mary's 6-2, 6-1 and Pembroke's
Hobbs-Leonard 6-2, 6-4. Hoyle
remains unbeaten in doubles at
4-0.
Number one seed Janet Russell
defeated Carol Stanley of Camp-
bell in the semi-finals 6-3, 6-1,
after having a bye in the opening
set, but fell to powerful Anika
Andborn of ACC twice at 6-1 in
the finals. Ty Myers fought
valiantly against Yvonne Holden
of Pembroke in her opening set,
losing 6-4, then lost a tie-breaker
7-6 as Holden finally topped her
to take the match.
Myers and Feeley had a bye in
their number two doubles match,
then beat Kennedv-Holden of
Pembroke twice at 6-3, but fell to
Reilly and Gray of Campbell in
another tough series 6-3, 1-6, 6-4
in the finals. Russell and Mander-
field lost in the first round to
Maxwell-Andborn of ACC 6-4,
6-3.
"The entire women's tennis
team has put in an excellent per-
formance in each of their four
outings this fall ECU Coach
Pat Sherman said. ECU
women's tennis resumes at the
courts beside Minges on Wednes-
day against UNC-Wilmington at
3 p.m.
0
t
JON JORDAN � ecu roi� iae
The Pirate volleyball team improved thier record to 2-4 with a victory over Methodist College, and now
look to upset a powerful Duke team that will be in Minges Coliseum tonight at 7 p.m.
Booters Win First Of Season
By SCOTT POWERS
uJtllHl Sporls rditoc
After dropping a 4-0 decision
to Old Dominion last Tuesday,
the ECU soccer team finally got
their first victory of the season
with a 2-1 overtime win against
Methodist College.
The game with Methodist was
the last in a four-game road series
for ECU, but head coach Steve
Brody said the score was not an
indication of how the Pirates
outplayed the Monarchs
throughout the game.
"We had something like 27
shots on goal Brody com-
mented. "We should have had six
or seven goals
The Pirates reversed a trend
that has been plaguing them all
season by getting a goal early in
the game on a shot by Jamie
Ribel, who moved to the front
line for the first time this season.
Methodist came back to force
��TAN NUMHIT � feu rtll. j
David Skefflngton (dribbling bail) and the rest of the ECU soccer tram
picked up their first victory of the season against Methodist.
the game into overtime, but mid-
fielder David Skeffington put the
Pirates on top for good with a
goal on an assist b Brian Colgan
in the first minute of overtime
"We controlled most of the
game Brody said, "but we si
gave them too many oppoi
tunities. It's nice to get that first
w�n under our belt, though
Brody was impressed with the
plav of Ribel. but added that the
whole team played a good game.
The win was an important one
coming off a loss at the hand of
ODU, and with the team coming
home to face American Universi-
ty, one of the better programs in
the country.
Against ODU, the team once
again fell behind early, which is a
pattern that worries Brodv.
"We didn't get tough on
defense until after the 20-minute
mark he said. "That's a pat-
tern that we have to break. After
that, I felt that we played well
Although the Pirates didn't get
on the board against ODU.
Brody saw some good things on
offense which may have carried
over to the Methodist game.
"We put in a new offensive
system and we were getting more
opportunities. We moved the ball
against them (ODU) more than
we have all season he said.
"We had a lot of good oppor-
tunities to put the ball m, but we
were hitting the side of the net.
But for the first time in that of-
fense, we've got to be happy
Brody thought that goalie Jesse
Daugherty played well. "I'm very
happy with 95 percent of Jesse's
play right now. There's still
about five percent of his game
that needs work, but I think that
he's getting better
The team will now plav three
of their next four games at'home,
hosting Campbell University
tomorrow at 3:00 and plaving
Virginia Wesley an and N.C
Wesleyan at home next week
after trvelling to Pfeiffer College
Saturday.
The Pirates now stand 1-6 on
the year.
Panthers
BvBIll MIT( HH 1
Nuff Wrtwf
The following )s a summa
how ECU's opponents fared over
the weekend:
Florida State: Florida State beat
Temple 44-2" in a closelv fo .
offensive battle on Satur I
Greg Allen a- the games lea
rusher as he ran the bail � .
times for 135 vard He
once, with the 0
Thomas throwing for three n
touchdown fen
times on runs from inside
but the defense just c tuldi
die FSLs powerful
Central Michigan:
Michigan beat kerv
squeaker. 14-10 Rie
were led b re
Bob DeMarc
A Notai
In a '
wa
"Dt . and de:
this rt a
pr or
GIVE it mi
FREE
rt
THE EAST
. . i
B
All the pi
spagheni
salad you
V
For pizza out il
Gr-c. I
iiniiiiiiiiiiimimiitimiitmmtmtiiiimi
P
Wednesc
Greenville's
ALL LADLIj
FREE DRAF
9:00 t
featuring

At 10:30 F
50C Draft and $
2.00 Pitchei
Home o
Beach Party a
Phone 75
Located in Carolij
Beau's is a private club for
All ABC Permits Member
Guests Are
�lllllllllltMllltltllllltlilltlllHIIIIIIItlllllllHttllltliMtlilH

mmmmm
K i







THE EAST CAROLINIAN
:vh4
Page 8
Stomps
31-22

point conversion to cap off the
drive and give State a comfor-
table 28-14 advantage
"I thought Cireene, Ivans
and Espisito all had great
1I nes ECU coach Id Emorj
said "State has a good football
team and great runningbacks.
"We threw ourselves out ol
foui Meld goal opportunities
1 morv continued. "I thought
we would come back in the
fourth quarter. but that one
bad pla (Speed's tumble) cost
us the game "
Emory also said State stuck
grit to the game plan that
been diagnosed b wai
ching their previous game
fiey didn't do
"cent than we ex
I mor -aid. "The
ob ol blocking
� v � rig, and also did a
tackling oi
the igh the Pirates we
� achieve victory, the
i came proved to be ef-
�r the first time this
lonv Baker, starting
game at tailback, rush-
2 yards, while fullback
Branch topped the
1 mark tor the first time
� eer b pi.king up KM
es now stand at 1-4
n, and will travel to
" Saturday to
tg 0-4 Pan-
ther squad
� M
P
� mfi NT
I
T' - �
I
JON JOSOAM � ecu Mtoto l�d
icton over Methodist College, and now
seum tonight at 7 p.m.
Of Season
t -� overtime, bul mid-
lei David Skeffington put the
Pii I top for good with a
assist by Brian Colgan
: minute of overtime.
"We controlled m i I the
Brodj . a- still
them � n in oppor-
- that first
ie win under belt, though
Brodv wa- impressed with the
"� ' Ribel - . added that the
whole team piaed a good game.
The win was an important one
coming off a loss at the hands of
ODL and with the team coming
home to face American Universi-
ty, one of the better programs in
the country.
Against ODL, the team once
again fell behind earlv. which is a
pattern that worries Brodv.
"We didn't get tough on
defense until after the 20-minute
mark he said. "That's a pat-
tern that we have to break. After
that, I felt that we played well
Although the Pirates didn't get
on the board against ODL
Brodv saw some good things on
offense which mav have carried
over to the Methodist game.
"We put in a new offensive
system and we were getting more
opportunities. We moved the ball
against them (ODL) more than
we have all season he said.
"We had a lot of good oppor-
tunities to put the ball in, but we
were hitting the side of the net
But for the first time in that of-
fense, we've got to be happv
Brodv thought that goalie Jesse
Daugherty played well. "I'm very
happy with 95 percent of Jesse's
play right now. There's still
about five percent of his game
that needs work, but I think that
he's getting better
The team will now plav three
of their next four fcdmes at'home
hosting Campbell University
tomorrow at 3:00 and playing
Virginia Wesleyan and N.C
Wesleyan at home next week
after trvelhng to Pfeiffer College
Saturday.
The Pirates now stand 1-6 on
the year.
i
ram
Panthers Off To A Rocky 0-4 Start
OCTOBER 2. 194
By BILL MITCHELL
SUff �rtK
The following is a summary of
how ECU's opponents fared over
the weekend:
Florida State: Florida State beat
Temple 44-27 in a closely fought
offensive battle on Saturday.
Greg Allen was the games leading
rusher as he ran the ball eighteen
times for 135 yards. He scored
once, with the Quarterback Eric
Thomas throwing for three more
touchdowns. Temple scored three
times on runs from inside the five,
but the defense just couldn't han-
dle FSU's powerful offense.
Central Michigan: Central
Michigan beat Kent State in a
squeaker. 14-10. The Chippewa's
were led by reserve quarterback
Bob DeMarco as they defeated
their
foe.
Mid-America conference
Georgia Southern: Georgia
Southern, the only team we have
beaten this year, routed tiny
Liberty Baptist, a small Virginia
school, 48-11, to run their record
to 4-1.
Tracy Ham, their fine quarter-
back, was 9-11 passing with one
touchdown pass before leaving
the game in the second half.
Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh lost their
fourth conscutive game on the
season, with West Virgina beating
them 28-10.
Willie Drewrey caught a
31-yard touchdown pass with 1:28
left in the first half after
linebacker Derek Christian in-
tercepted a John Congemi pass.
That made it 14-7 in favor of West
A Notable Quote
In a recent interview with Soccer Coach Steve Brodv he
stated the following in response to a question of how his "team
was reacting in lieu of their less than spectacular record-
�Despite our record to date, this team is undoubtedly a
group of successful young men. Their attitude, determination
and dedication are definitely to be commended. Without ques-
tion, I feel that the future of ECU is a bright one. This group
seems to be more of a family as opposed to just a team For
this reason, as well as the team's huge desire to learn and im-
prove, the soccer future f ECU will inevitably be a bright
one '
GIVE IT THE PERSONAL TOUCH
FREE
Personal Classifieds
THE EAST CAROLINIAN is ottering free Personals in the classified section
to all East Carolina Universit) students in the October 9th publication'
�students must come h THr HNf( 4KONMS office in person to recent a free personal'
3 Pizza inn I
Buffet
3.
19
SI
All the pizza,
spaghetti and
salad you can eat!
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday
Night
6:00 till 8:00pm
For pizza out it's Pizza Inn"
Greenville Blvd. 758-6266
Hmimmiiiii
eau
Nightclub
Carolina Hast Centre
Near Plirt fhearre. Greenville
1 presents
Wednesday Night
J Greenville's Newest Ladies
I CLCEXeCK WR
I ALL LADIES FREE
I FREE DRAFT & WINE
j 9:00 to 10:30
featuring Bob "Daddy Cool" Hayuionh
Playing the best Party and Dance Music in Town
j At 10:30 For Men
I 50 Draft and $1 50 High Balis
2.00 Pitchers Of Beer
Home of Steve Hardy's Originial
Beach Party on Saturday's
Phone 756-6401
Located in Carolina East Centre
Beau's is a private club for members & guests only
All ABC Permits. Memberships available at the door.
Guests Are Welcome
iiMiiiiiMiiiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinniiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiniiii
Virginia at the half. Drewrey also
returned a punt 74 yards for a
touchdown in the fourth quarter.
He had 206 yards receiving for the
day, ending up with eleven recep-
tions.
The 0-4 start for the Panthers is
their worst start since 1972, when
they lost six straight games on
their way to a 1-10 season. The
Panthers started out this season
ranked number three in the na-
tion.
Tulsa: Tulsa lost to eighth ranked
Oklahoma State 31-7 on Satur-
day. Oklahoma State's high
powered offense proved too
strong for Tulsa, who we play on
October 13, in Tulsa. Although
Tulsa is only 2-2 on the season,
they are expected to be a tough
opponent for the Pirates.
East Tennessee State: East Ten-
nessee State beat the Citadel 14-6
in Charleston last Saturday. The
Buccaneers played a good game,
and are really starting to look like
they will give ECU a tough game
for Homecoming on October 20.
South Carolina: The Gamecocks
defeated the twelfth ranked
Georgia Bulldogs last Saturdav
night in Athens, 17-10, to push
their record to 4-0. It is the best
start for the Gamecocks in many
years and one of only seven wins
ever against the Bulldogs. South
Carolina will host ECU in Colum-
bia on October 27.
Southwestern Louisiana:
Southwestern Louisiana had a
open date last week. They play
Wichita State next week.
Southern Mississippi: Southern
Miss lost to Memphis State 23-13
in a defensive game. We play
Southern Miss in the last game of
the season, November 10.
&AOII
Present
Draft Nite
Tues. Oct. 2, 1984 9:00-2:00AM
Adm. $1.50 18yr. $1.00
lOCDraft All Nite
& Delta Zeta
Present
Draft Nite
Wed. Oct. 3, 1984 9:00-2:00AM
Adm. $1.50 18yr. $1.00
lOCDraft All Nite
"Come Play The Indian
This Fall"
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC

S.iv on
itv Ricjn's Rese
SOICI To D.1lprs
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd - Creenvilie
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Eacn ot tnpsp advertised items
IS rpQUlrea to Oe readl ,
available for saie m eacn icoqe'
Sav or eicem as specifics,
�ictpci in this ad if we ao run
out of An item we win offer you
'�UI twice of a comparae
'pf" wnen available reflecting
me ymp savings or a rainchecti
wnicn win entitle you to Dur
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the .ICIvprtlSPa pnrp vvitnm 5C
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"Ot ?9 198a

ffci
� � � � -
N






10
I Ml I M (. -Rt. IN1AN
IK lOBl-R 2. ls84
Flag Football Playoffs Near
B JEANNETTEROTH
M�ff Wrllrr
As expected, several teams were
ble to make it back from State
foi Sunda Intramural Flag Foot-
a games However, dependable
Sneakei Sam was there and has
left the following report on all the
action
In the fraternit division, a bat
etween the K "A" team and
' � ta Sigma Phi "A" squad mat-
ed ip the powers oi Hal Barber
KA) and Rich rextor (Alpha
Sigma PI a game played even-
ighout the first half. Alpha
scored 26 points and
K untered with 25 1 hese
cores prevailed throughout the
. Jei ol the contest as the
Phi "A" team
It feated KA "A" 26 25 In other
luke Patrol is rolling
il defeating the
�a II. 45-0. And.
foe Torre
Dismissed
1 1 � ' l"A (UPI) - Joe Torre,
iesi mistake was
. the National
h - first yeai.
da as manager of the
aftei failing to
feat the last two
p sted the best
ager in the W
.es have been in
owner Ted
ears still re-
a
r probabh the
pp n( d to me
� �-� yeat 1 was
p -� ters in a
Vtlanta-
Stad n shortly
Realh you
ith a g foi
isi didn't
i plateau
Bi a es
p
' second-place
H. el kvith Turner al
i f-hour and
�ld waiting
� �ithout a job.
l m duties
md I had a
H I � about a half-
. : thai - th wa it is � I
�� I'm going to
Mi n$ a ith Torre.
� hei Bra es' ex-
cess o
new manager
itered on Eddie
i laged the Brae'
;atn this pasi
rdered that
� ie coaching
.eason.
ted a 222si
. ha : aid Sun-
a : a feeling, "nothing
al I jrner would fire
�' '
his stadium of-
news confernce
th Turner was "a
eeting
He �� i .ei) comfortable
"We talked
a possible job in this
and 1 wasn't
. e him an answer
H
m self conditioned to
n and accept what 1 got. I
e worst thing that would
ed was Ted to ask me
bad and not m
aid 1 urner told him he
�J with our record
anything else and I
the reason he made
� a es beset by injuries,
loss ol third
i Bob Horner for most of
ti . finished in a tie for se-
1 with Houston at 80-82, 12
behind the division-
� Diegi Padres.
ed the fact tha he
d manager, but he
ike a change said
ered to have me
rganiation and he
talk to me about that,
want to wait until after the
Id Si J see what my op-
- at
i guess I'll find out in the next
so if there are clubs m-
ed in me
aid he would go to the
Id Series "just to let people
a I'm interested in managing.
right now I don't know if I'm
rested in a managership.
' i his is very disappointing
1 was let go, but again, that's
way it goes. I did the best I
I and felt overall we were
. successful
rre said Braves' slugger Dale
rph "came in yesterday and
me the baseball he knocked
is 100th run with. That was
emotional
Magnum force, remains in the
top five with its squeeker past the
Bern City Breakers with a score of
10-6. These are just a few of the
highlights in football action over
the weekend.
Almost Anything Goes, goes on
Wednesday, October 3 at the bot-
tom oi College Hill at 3:30. Don't
miss all the any excitement and
watch the more brave East Caroli-
nians compete for 'Almost
nthing You may even be in-
terviewed bv the infamous IRS in
the scene reporter, with highlights
and hilarity to be aired on the
Tennis Shoe Talkshow.
In upcoming intramural action,
sign up for Racquetball Singles
Tournament October 8-11. Punt,
Pass and Kick registration on the
same dates. Both play begins on
the 18 of October. Soccer, the up
and coming sport of the 80's
along with Bowling and one on
one basketball registration begins
October 8. These are the main
events of the fall IRS program so
don't let yourself miss out on all
the action. And, in case you've
forgotten, C'o-Rec Flag Football
registration ends today so, come
by room 204 Memorial Gym to
register for all upcoming activities
or call 757-6387 for information
regarding these programs.
Check into all the IRS action
and become a part of it yourself
by participating in lntramurals �
a program that not only gives you
tun and excitement but friend-
ship. Competition and recogni-
tion for your team or group. Par-
ticipate rather than spectate.
G
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 2, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 02, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.364
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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