The East Carolinian, September 27, 1984






She
(Earoltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No. 11
Thursday September 27, 1984
Greenville, N.C
12 Pages
Circulation 12.000
Rules 'Blunder' Causes Election Cancellation
B JENNIFER JENDRAS1AK
Because of election rule viola-
tions, the SGA elections were
cancelled shortly before noon
yesterday, making this the second
sear in a row that elections have
been cancelled because of pro-
cedure violations. They have
been tentatively rescheduled for
Oct. 3.
This ear's problem arose from
a list of Greek candidates
distributed by campus fraternities
and sororities. Greek candidates
running for representative posi-
tions uere listed, along with
selections for write-in positions.
While the sheet itself was not in
violation of election rules, copies
ivere found at some of the
ing places, iolating a rule
prohibiting campaign literature
within 25 feet of the polls.
SGA President John Rainey
said he received a call from East
Carolinian Managing Editor
Greg Rideout at 11:15 a.m in-
forming him that one of the
sheets was on the voting table in
front of the Student Supply
Store.
"I went down there to check
on it and found three sheets on
the table so I took them and
threw them away Rainey said.
"I then told the poll tenders that
there is no partisan literature per-
mitted within 25 feet of the poll-
ing places
More sheets were found at the
Croatan. One student said while
voting at the Croatan he was ask-
ed if he was a Greek. When he
said yes, one of the poll tenders
then showed him which can-
didates to vote for.
Following the discovery of the
violations, Rainey and Elections
Committee Chairman Howard
Lipman decided to cancel the
elections. "This was unfortunate
because of all the hard work and
preparations that had gone into
planning the elections Rainey
said.
Rainey stressed that no one in-
dividual or group was at fault in
the incident. "It's just something
that happened he said.
Lipman said one of his elec-
tions committee members noticed
some of the Greek flyers at a poll-
ing place shortly after the polls
opened and informed the poll
tenders of the rules. Lipman said
that the people tending polls at
the Croatan said they were
unaware of the fliers' presence.
"From what I've heard, it was
a major blunder Lipman said.
"There were just too many peo-
ple at too many places he add-
ed.
Lipman did not assign blame
for the "blunder" to any one
group or individual either. "I
think it was basically due to a
lack of knowledge he said. Ac-
cording to Lipman, the sheets of
paper were 4eft at the polls
because students who had used
them when voting had neglected
to take them away.
The major problem was that
the availability of the sheets was
"unfair" to the students not
listed on them since it might af-
fect the decisions of some voters,
Lipman said.
"I don't believe there was any
malice intended, it was just a
communications breakdown
Lipman said. "The issue lies with
the polltenders Rainey said.
"They should have removed
them (the fliers).
Lipman said in order to avoid
the same mistake members of his
committee will be stationed at
each of the polls when the elec-
tions are held again next week.
"I'm not blaming anybody for it,
it was an honest mistake. I just
don't want to see it happen
again Lipman said.
The incident was termed "un-
fortunate" by Glenn Conway,
president of the Inter-Fraternity
Council. "Everything we did was
above-board he said. "Lnfor-
tunately a few Greeks were a little
too zealous He added that he
feels most of the sheets were left
at the polls through an oversight
on the part of those utilizing
them.
Conway was quick to point out
that there is no connection bet-
ween the fraternity and sorority
members manning the polls and
this incident. "It had nothing to
do with the polls being manned
by Greeks he said.
"Just so there is no suspicion
next week, I would prefer to get
other people to man the polls
Conway added. He attributed the
incident to a lack of communica-
tion.
Pee Dee Receives Publicity,
But Little Respite From Name
Bv JENNIFER JENDRASIAk
Sf� Mllor
A battle being waged against
Pee Dee. the mascot of the ECU
ites, is receiving some publici-
st is not making much pro-
meeting of the advisory com-
mittee on 'he use of the university
was held Wednesday to
determine procedures concerning
the use of the logo. The commit-
tee concluded that any use of the
char n a way that "would
demean or distort it according
io University Attornev David
Stevens, is illegal The . jfflmittee
was uncertain of its role in
the fate of the name
mascot but will ask
icelloi John How ell if it is
proper for them to decide this
issue.
The controversy arose because
of plans made by The East
Carolinian to print t-shirts with a
"Pee Dee busters" symbol,
similar to the Ghostbusters sym-
bol. According to a patent at-
torney consulted by Stevens, this
would be illegal. Additionally,
while an informal polling by East
Carolinian staff members found
a ast majority of students to be
opposed to the name of the
mascot, approximately 50 per-
cent liked the actual character.
Because of the results of the
poll, actions have been taken to
facilitate a name change for Pee
Dee, including a question concer-
ning the Pirate's name on the
SGA elections ballot. The name
Requirements Change
Students have historically
had difficulty registering to
vote in Put County because of
residencv requirements. The
North Carolina State Board of
Elections recently released an
administrative directive which
should help solve this problem.
Among the items included on
the directive are:
All county boards of elec-
tions shall immediately cease
use of any questionnaire when
taking an application to
register from a college student.
No such questionnaire is per-
missable unless such question-
naire is required from all ap-
plicants who apply to register.
All county boards shall in-
form all registrars, judges and
registration commissioners that
students may not be denied per-
mission to register where they
attend school solely on the
grounds that they are living in a
dormitory or are students, pro-
vided they are otherwise
qualified.
Free Delivery
was chosen in a contest held for
area school children as part of a
marketing effort undertaken by
the Athletic Department.
Although the name Pee Dee is
not patented or licensed,
technically it has been made of-
ficial by the Athletic department.
Director of Athletics Ken Karr
said the mascot and its name are
an integral part of the
university's current marketing
strategy, and to change them
would "set the marketing pro-
gram back three years
After speaking with Dr.
Howell, either another meeting
will be called to address the name
change issue or The East Caroli-
nian will be advised to use dif-
ferent channels to air its
grievances.
ncil jomnson � ecu rtmm l��
rumn above U s, student using a list provided bv campus Greeks in order to select his candidates in vester-
uav s m.a elections. The elections were cancelled and moved to next Wednesday.
SGA Legislature
Program Gives Freshmen Experience
By HAROLDJOVNEk
MUiint Son fxlllor
The Freshmen Aide Program
at ECU offers interested
freshmen an opportunity to gain
hands-on experience in the Stu-
dent Government.
According to Staci Falkowit,
freshman aide oordinator, the
selected student will have a
chance to actually work with
various student government of-
ficers. She said, "Each student
will work with the SGA presi-
uent, treasurer and the
legislature for a few days so they
learn how the system works
Falkowitz added, "This is an ex-
cellent program for freshmen
who are interested in becoming
involved with the student govern-
ment
Any interested student may fill
out an application at the SGA of-
fice, located in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, before Oct. 1.
Falkowit vaid a committee will
review the applications and
screen the students. "What we're
looking for she said, "are en-
thusiastic freshmen who are ge-
nuinely interested in the student
government She said she in-
vites all freshmen to become in-
volved with the program, before
it is too late.
"I feel there is a lot of student
apathy on campus she said,
"so the Freshmen Aide program
was developed to help these in-
terested students become actively
involved with the student govern-
ment. Also, by the time they are a
junior or senior, they will have a
full understanding of student ac-
tivities and I definitely think this
will make a stronger student
body. I encourage all freshmen to
consider this opportunity to meet
new people and to find out how
our student government
operates
Falkowitz also said a student
leadership conference has been
tentatively planned for Oct. 8 and
these selected freshmen will be
able to attend this function.
Chancellor Howell will be one of
the scheduled speakers.
Drinking Law Causes Campus Changes
15 minutes is not a bad delivery time considering he had to go to all
this trouble. Heck, I might even give him a tip; mighty generous of
me, huh?
(CPS) � For the first time in
memory, University of South
Carolina students who are under
19 can't drink this fall.
The result, as USC officials
concoct a way to enforce the new
19-year-old drinking age the state
just adopted, seems to be a sort
of chaotic uneasiness.
Officials can't even decide how
student groups should pay for
alcohol consumed at social
events, since using activity fee
money would be "unfair" to
under-19 students, says Mike
Shaver of the Campus Alcohol
Project.
Even the campus bar is chang-
ed. The Golden Spur is replacing
beer with pizza just to avoid the
hassles the new drinking policy
creates.
Wild rumors, closed-down
campus haunts, job losses and
even complete overhauls of col-
lege social activities have been
marking the first weeks of school
as scores of colleges open up for
the first time under new legal
minimum drinking age laws or
tougher on-campus drinking
policies.
Many experts worry the new
regulations are confusing, ill-
planned and virtually unen-
forceable.
Alcohol, moreover, is so close-
ly associated with college life that
many students simply don't know
how to spend their leisure time
without drinking, says Charles
Tucker, a University of South
Florida sociologist.
The rising drinking ages and
tougher campus drinking rules
nationwide are "sure to cause
concern and turmoil on many
campuses adds Gerardo Gon-
zales, a University of Florida
counselor and director of BAC-
CHUS, a national group aimed at
controlling student drinking.
It's "a situation that ad-
ministrators realistically cannot
enforce he asserts.
If schools are going to make
the new rules work, they need to
provide alternative social ac-
tivities, say Tucker.
Without help, students are left
to entertain rumors of under-
cover campus police infiltrating
dorm and rush parties to catch
underaged drinkers.
That rumor was so widespread
at Arizona State that ASU police
two weeks ago had to issue a
public denial to reassure
students.
And University of California-
Berkeley administrators last week
chastised the student newspaper,
the Daily Californian, for runn-
ing an article that told students
how to get fake i.d.s to obtain li-
quor despite the university's
newly-adopted restrictions.
On some campuses, new drink-
ing rules are costing students
their part-time jobs.
At the University of Illinois-
Champaign, local bar owners
recently predicted as many as 150
students could lose their part-
time waiting and bartending jobs
if the town government decides to
require all liquor servers to be 21.
Some observers even fear the
new crackdown on student drink-
ing could boomerang, forcing
younger students to become
"underground" drinkers.
Left with no place to legally
drink on campus, they warn
under-aged students will do more
off-campus drinking, more
drinking and driving, and be less-
inclined to drink responsibly.
"Most of the campus drinking
programs are community-wide
programs that deal generally with
all students notes Howard
Blane, professor of education
and psychology at the University
of Pittsburgh.
"There's been precious little
research done on such programs,
and of the little that has been
done the results aren't very en-
couraging he says.
The nationwide trend to raise
all drinking ages to 21 has
"shifted the focus from alcohol
education to policy
enforcement Gonzales com-
plains.
"We encourage alcohol educa-
tion and responsible drinking,
rather than blanket
prohibitions he says.
But blanket prohibitions seem
to be the trend these days.
While 23 states had minimum
drinking ages of 21 a year ago.
this fall the total has climbed to
2 with a number of states still
debating - or planning to debate
- raising their drinking ages to
21.
And with a new federal law
which will withhold federal
highway funds from states that
haven't raised their drinking ages
to 21 by 1986, college students
can expect further clampdowns
as the remaining 23 states with
under-21 drinking ages ruch to
meet the deadline.
"I imagine we'll see some pret-
ty hot legislative battles in the
coming year says Bob
Bingaman, director of the State
Student Association in
Washington, D.C which has
helped student governments na-
tionwide lobby against drinking
age hikes in their states.
"I personally think (raising
drinking ages to 21) is unfor-
tunate says Pitt's Blane. "If
18-year-olds are allowed to vote,
fight in the military, and sign
contracts, they should be allowed
to drink. We're simply driving
student drinkers undercover
The new clampdown on drink-
ing "is an example of linear
thinking that does not really meet
the problem on its own level
concludes Robert Conyne, study
author and director of UC's
Alcohol Education Center.
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.THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 27, 1984
Announcements
Thefts
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Due to limited space. The East
Carolinian requests that organizations
submit only important announcements
about up coming events that students
need to know about in advance. Please
submit such messages as "thank you"
and "congratulation" notes to the Per-
sonals section of the classifieds in The
East Carolinian.
The deadline for announcements is 3
p.m. Monday for the Tuesday paper
and 3 p.m. Wednesday for the Thursday
paper.
They must be typed on an announce-
ment form to be accepted. These forms
can be picked up at our office.
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Current and potential Environmental Design
(Art School) majors should attend an advising
meeting Friday Sept. 28, noon, in Room 708 of the
Art Building Bring lunch and fmd out about the
new direction for the program, course sugges
tions and what environmental design Is all
about
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY
STUDENTS
Deadline for 1985 admission to professional
phase is November 1 1984. All general college
and physical therapy prerequisites must be com
pleted by end of Spring, 1985. Allied Health Pro
fessions Admissions Test must be taken in
November (apply early October) Application
packets are to be picked up October 5, 1984 in the
Physical Therapy Department Office (Belk
Building, Annex 3, 757 6961, Ext. 261).
SKI
Any persons interested In snowskling Dec 30
through Jan 4 at Snowshoe, W.V should call Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 to get your name on the list
for the trip Beginners to hotdoggers are
welcome Ske Instruction Is available for all
levels of ability Price depends on ski package
Space for housing on slopes and transportation Is
limited You are Invited to come by Memorial
Gym 108 on Oct 30 at 400 p m. to register, see
the slides and talk skiing! A $5 00 deposit at this
time will reserve your space
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
All Big Brothers of Alpha Phi Sorority art
reminded that we will be having Big Brother
Rush coming up on Thursday Oct 4 at the
Treehousc from 400 7:00 Also, lefs all make an
effort to visit out at the house more often
INTENDED SLAP MAJORS
General College students interested in major
ing in Speech Language and Auditory Pathology
will meet on Thurs, Oct.4 at 7:00 p.m. In
Brewster C 302 for pre registration and advise
merit. All intended majors are required to at
tend
FENCINGCLUB
The ECU Fencing Club would like to invite
anyone interested to join today Any questions,
call Steven Zakely at 758 9776
HAPPY HOUR
Delta Sigma Phi pledge class is having a hap
py hour at the Treehouse, Thurs , Sept 27, from 4
to 6 p m Happy hour prices for your favorite
beverage "Come party with the best"
A PO CAR WASH
Alpha Phi Omega is sponsoring a carwash for
the Ronald McDonald house! The carwash will
be Sat , Sept 2v at the Shell Service Station near
Farm Fresh it's from 9 am to 3 p.m and the
cost is $2 00 See you there
RUGBY
ECU Rugby Club has been invited to play In
the first annual ACC Rugby Tournament, Sept.
29,30 It is being held at N C State's intramural
fields, starting at 900 and lasting all afternoon
So if you are going to be in Raleigh this weekend
to watch the football game, come check it out
and support our team, Thanx
BKA
Beta Kappa Alpha will hold a general meeting
for all members and other interested business
majors Thurs , Sept 27 at 3:00 p.m. in Rawl 101
ISA
ISA members: Meeting Sat Sept. 29 at 600
p m in Mendenhall Room 221 See you there.
LACROSSE
There will be a locrosse match at N.C. State on
Sat , Sept 29 at 200. All players, please contact
Chris Tomasic immediately at 752 4999. There
will be practice on Tues , Wed , Thurs and Fri
at 3 30
ZBT LITTLE SISTERS
There will be a meeting on Thurs Sept. 27 at
500 p ,ib. in the Coffeehouse Please make every
effort to attend
WEIGHT LIFTING CLUB
The first organizational meeting of 1984 will be
Thurs , Sept. 27 at 730 in Memorial Room 105 B.
Attendance is mandatory Any questions, please
call Jeff at 758 6382
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA
Sigma Sigma Sigma and Grumpy's present 40
oz draft for $1.50, Thurs Sept. 27 at 9:00 until.
Admission at door $1.00
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
The Brothers of Kappa Alpha PsI, Inc. will be
sponsoring a happy hour at the Wiz on Thursday
night from 9:30-until Transportation to and from
the Wiz will be provided. FREE BEER wh'le it
lasts' Come ou and party with the Nupes!
FINANCIAL AID
During the week Sept. 24-28, the Student Finan-
cial Aid Office will be closed to walk m traffic
from 8:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. Students, parents,
and other parties will be seen from 1:00 p.m. to
500 p.m. The purpose of the shortened office
hours during the week is to enable the financial
aid staff to catch up on processing financial aid
applications.
HELMSBUSTERS
Students interested in Iolning the students for
Jim Hunt should please contact Scott Thomas at
752 1793 or David Brooks at 752 519.
MINORITY ARTS
The Minority Arts Committee will maet on
Thurs Sept. 27, at 5:00 p.m. In Room 242 of
Mendenhall Student Center. All members and in-
terested students are urged to attend.
NIH
A representative from the National Institute of
Health, Bemesda. MD will be on campus October
1 and 2 to Interview students who would like to be
health research assistants In their Normal
Volunteer Program beginning Spring, 19t5.
Students will participate in experiments and
research regarding disease control and the
human body. Will receive $12.50 per day stipend
plus free room and board, and transportation
paid to and from NIH. Students in the health,
natural sciences, computer science, and
business fields who may be interested should
contact the Coop office, 313 Rawl, Immediately
to sign up tor an interview.
PPHA
Pre Professional Health Alliance will hold its
first meeting of the semester Sept. 27, In Room
221 In Mendenhil at 5:30 p.m. All members and
interested guests art welcome.
SCHOOL OF ART
Prospective and current environmental design
(School of Art) members art urged to attend an
advising meeting to discuss new direction for
the program, what environmental design's all
about, course selection, etc. Bring lunch at noon,
Fri Sept. 2s, in Jenkins 201.
KARATE
Advanced classes for the ECU Karate Club is
currently meeting on Mon and Thurs. nights at
7:30. The beginning classes will have their
registration on Sept. 27 at 7:30 in Memorial Gym
dance room.
KARATE
Registration for beginning Karate will be In
the dance room of Memorial Gym on Sept. 27 at
7:30. Classes for advanced yellow belt and up
will begin Sept. 28 at 7:30 In the same room.
KICK your heart out with the Karate Club! I
BIOLOGY CLUB
The annual Blotogy Club Plant Sale will be
held on Thurs Sept. 27, and Fri Sept. 28. Times
of sale will be from 7:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m. The
sale will be held in the Biology Greenhouse room
S ill. Checks post dated Sept. 28 will be ac-
cepted. Plants make beautiful household accents
so please support the Biology Club!
APO
Alpha Phi Omega is sponsoring a carwashll
The carwash will be Sat , sept 29 at the Shell
Service Station n�r Farm Fresh. The time and
coat will be announced later.
PEACE CORPS
VOLUNTEERS
Easter.i Region Returned Peace Corps
Volunteers will meet Sun Sept. 30, at 2:30 p.m.
at Vanceboro Farm Life Elementary School. For
further Information call Mary Cotter, 752 8854. or
Charlotte Purrlngton, 752-9438.
TENNIS DOUBLES
The Department of Intramural-Recreational
Service is offering a Tennis double tourna-
ment. Registration for the event Is set for Sept.
24-25. Play begins on Oct. 1. To sign up for the
competition, come by Room 204 Memorial Gym
or call (757-6387). Remember: Participate
rather than spec tare! 11
BIO EVENT
irs herell the Department of Intramural-
Recreational Service Big Event will occur on
Oct 3. Almost anything goes! I Almost anyone
can participate and almost anything can hap-
pen! Bring your favorite person and come down
to Room 204 Memorial Gym to sign up. Registra-
tion Is Sept. 24 - 27. It will happen on Oct. 3.
REREGISTRATION
General College students should contact their
advisors prior to Oct. 1 to schedule an appoint-
ment for prereglstratlon for the Spring
Semester.
SCUBA DIVING
Thanksgiving vacation: Dive Cozumel, Mex-
ico. 8 days, 7 nights on the beautiful Yucatan
Penninsula. Drift diving on the Palancar reef
will be one of the most exiting experiences. From
Raleigh, price including air fare, mea.s, lodging,
and diving $820.00. special price for non-divers
$720.00. Air travel provided by Mexlcana and
Eastern. For registrations and further Informa-
tion, call Ray Scharf, Dlr. of Acquatlcs 757441.
CO-OP
Northern Telecom, Research Triangle Park,
NC has a co-op opining for students Interested In
human resources development as a career. Must
have a good GPA and be willing to alternate
work assignments. The co-op position will begin
Spring, 1985
ACCOUNTING
A representative from the U.S. General Ac
counting Office, Virginia Beach, VA will be on
campus Oct. 23, to interview co-op students who
would like to work as GAO Evaluators. Accoun-
ting majors who have completed 60 semester
hour and have a 2.9 GPA or higher, should con-
tact the Co-op office, 313 Rawl Bldg. to arrange
an Interview Immediately.
FRESHMEN
Application are now being accepted for the
Student Government Association's Freshman
Aide Program. Deadline for submitting applica-
tions is 5:00 Mon Oct. 1. For more information
or an application come by the SGA office, second
floor Mendenhall, or call 757 6611
HAPPY HOUR
Sigma Sigma Sigma and Grumpy's present 40
ox. draft for $1.50, Thurs Sept. 27, at 9:00 -Ad-
mission at door $1.00.
IRATES
Important practice today at the bottom of the
hill! Will discuss trip to Wilmington. If you plan
to go, at least stop by.
STUDENT LEGISLATURE
Would you like to vote for our next U.S. presi-
dent, but enloy the social life at ECU too much to
go all the way home to cast your ballot? We've
solved your problems. On Wad Oct. 4, ECU'S
delegation of the NCSL will be outside the stu-
dent store to help you. All you have to do Is fill out
a short form and for only is cents, postage and
handling, we will take care of everything so that
you can cast an absentee ballot In your own town.
ART
The Student Union Art Exhibition Committee
will meet on Tua� Oct. 2. at 3:00 p.m. In Room
238 of Mendenhall Student Center. All members
and interested students art urged to attend.
Read the Classifieds
PSI CHI
Initiation for new members will be tonight
Thurs Sept. 27, 7:00 p.m. at Western Steer on
loth Street. All members are urged to attend as a
business meeting will follow Inductions. Con
gratulatlons all new Psl Chi members!
SURF CLUB
Announcement on Tuesday was In error,
please disregard. This I correct one.
The team trials have been rescheduled for
Sat Sept. 29 at the Islander Motel In Emerald
Isle at 9:00 a.m. Also, a road trip to Hatteras has
been scheduled for fall break. Persons interested
In participating In either of these must pay their
club dues no later than this Thursday! If you
want to surf In the trials you must also contact
contest director Johnny Ghee at 758-667 by
Thursday. No exceptions There Is an Impor
tant meeting this Thursday, Sept. 27 at8:30 In the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse (in the basement).
Guys and gals (and newcomers) are all
welcome.
SOFTBALLTRYOUTS
For those of you who are Interested in trying
out for the women's Softball team. Call or see
Coach S. Manahan as soon as possible Call
757 6161 t
PRE MED
Attention members, officers, pledges of AED
there will be a meeting Oct. 2 at 6:30 at The
Western Steer on East 10th Street. The speaker
will be Dr. Jack Allison, Chief of Emergency Ser
vices at PCMH. The meeting will be Interesting
and Informative. All are Invited. Dues can be
paid at the meeting.
LAW SOCIETY
Are you Interested in law school? If so, you are
cordially Invited to the first meeting this year of
the ECU Law Society. We will be meeting on
Tuesday, October 2, at 7:00 p.m. In Mendenhall,
141. Dr. David B. Stevens, University At
, will be attending as our prelaw advisor.
Pmr more Information, call Mike Gardner,
HACKEYSACK TOURNAMENT
Sunday, October 21, 1904. Keep watching for
more Information or call 752-6635 or 758 8310
DANCE TEAMS
The East Carolina athletic department is
organizing a dance team "The Pure Gold
Dancers to perform at Pirate home basketball
games. Those interested should attend an
organizational meeting on October 10, In room
142 of Mlnges Coliseum at 7.00 p.m. Only ECU
students are eligible for the group
BE A CLOWN
Join In on the Spirit of ECU homecoming. Be a
clown in the 1984 homecoming parade, in-
terested person should contact Betsy Peters at
355-6305 by Oct. 11,1904. Participants must pro-
vide their own costumes. We will provide
balloon to pass out on parade route.
STUDENT ORGANIZATIONS
Any organization interested In being In the 1984
homecoming parade or having � entree In the
parade should contact Betsy Peters at 355-6205
before Oct 12, 1984
HOMECOMING FLASH
Needed immediately. Interested students and
service organization to help blow up balloons
before the homecoming parade on Oct. 20, 1984.
interested persons should contact Betsy Peters
at 355-6205 before Oct 11, 1984
FELLOWSHIP
The King Youth Fellowship, the Christian
organization sponsored by the Pentecostal
Holiness Church, will be meeting at 8:00 pm in
242 Mendenhall on Thursday, September 27. For
more information Contact Jackie at 752-8666
DIETETIC ASSOCIATION
Get Involved! Don't miss the first Student
Dietetic Association meeting! It will be held on
October 2, 1984 at 5:30 p m. In the Dining Hall of
the Home Economic Building. Activities and
projects for this semester will be developed and
discussed. All freshmen, transfer students, and
nutrition maors are Invited to attend. Help us
make this semeter one that YOU won't want to
forget I
BUDDHIST
Free Meditation instruction In the Tibetan bud-
dlst tradition. Learn to sit still. Listen to silence
for a change of thoughts and feelings. Tuesday,
7:00 p.m at the MSC Coffeehouse. Bring a
cushion If possible, (a tool of the trade) Always
love all ways, BM4.SG
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Student Union Travel Committee will
meet on Wednesday, October 3,1904, at 5 00 PM
In Room 242 of Mendenhall Student Center. All
member and lntre�ted students are urged to
attend.
CLASSIFIED ADS Rot: 25 words or lest Students$2.00 Non-student3.00 Eoch oddltlonal word05 All boldface type 1.00 Boxed bordetilpt.) 1.00 DEADLINES: Turn In ods to Tlie Ecnt Corollnlon by 3 p.m. one business doy before publication. No ods will be accepted over the phone. All ods must be prepaid. Please notify The East Ccrollnlan Immeodlotely If your od Is Incorrect. We will not be responsible for Incorrect ods after the first doy of publication. W� mrnn iht rifkl to rert any rd for IIM, ohtrfiliy or bad Imslt.Nam? AdHreit? CityState: Phone: Sludent .D. number: Non student$ Amount:
Number words:
Boldfare (yes) (no) Boed (yes) (no) Dated) od Is to oppeor






PRIME TIME
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ.
meets every Thursday 7 p m We are commlttted
to studying God's work, fun, and fellowship.
Please oin us. See you there.
LATTER-DAY SAINTS
Institute of Religion Class on the New Testa
ment under Bill Evenhuls, meets In a new
classroom, Brewster B 102, every Thursday
from 6:30 til 8:00 p.m. Please attend.
SOULS
SOULS wlllhave a meeting Thursday, Sept. 27
1984 at Mendenhall. The meeting will be at 4 p.m
We will discuss revisions In the constitution
check at the main desk for the room number.
Please come out and get Involved
REVIVAL CRUSADE
Coming up this weekend. Sept 28, 29 (Fri t,
Sat.) will be an event you wllinot want to miss. A
crusade team from New Jersey will be here to
render a spiritual uplift and dlllverance to all
that attend Special ministry of music will be
given by the ECU Gospel Choir on Friday night
Services will be held in Jenkins Aud. (Art Bldg )
at 7:30 p.m. both nights
ICE HOCKEY
There will be a very Important meeting of the
ic hockey club In room 105-B of Memorial Gym
on Tuesday, Oct 2 at 430 p.m Health released
arni other important forms will be distributed If
you are Interested in playing ice hockey, or lust
like ice skating, please attend if you cannot at-
tend and 'nive a good excuse, please contact
Goerge Sunderland at 752"eTft5
COLLEGE REPPUBLICANS
As usual, the College Republicans meet
tonight at 7:00 In the Coffeehouse at Mendenhall.
If yoku wnat to attend the convention, be sure to
bring money for me fees. We will discuss the con-
vention, the canvass, what to do about ECU'S
leftwlng cry babies, and other items. Turn out
and be a part of the 1984 Republican landslide!
OUTDOOR RECREATION
Intramural-Recreational Services Is offering
an exciting backpacking trip to the Shenandoah
National Park on Oct. 13. To make reservations
contact the Outdoor Recreation Center by 5:00
Fri Oct 5, or call 757 6911.
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
All interested persons In helping one or more
Republican candidates In the upcoming election
meet Thurs. night the 27th at 7 00 p m in the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse
BETATHETAPI
We will have a little sister rush tonight, Thurs.
Sept. 27, at our house at 305 E. 14th St. Or call us
at 757 3769
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
The Philosophy Club Invites you to a reading
by Dr. John Kozy on "The Unworkablllty of
Western Democracy Mon Oct. 1 at 7:00 In the
Multipurpose Room of Mendenhall Student
Center. Discussion and social to follow.
REBEL
Writing contest deadline is Oct. 29, but we'll
take entries as soon as we can get them, you can
win big bucks S100.00 for first place, $75 00 for
second, and $50.00 for third In both the poetry and
the prose contest. This is open to ECU students
only Bring your entries to the REBEL or Media
Board offices on the second floor of the Publica-
tions Bldg. Include your name, address, and
phone number. Art contest will be In early Nov.
SIGN LANGUAGE
We will be having our next meeting, Thurs
Sept. 27, at 7:00 p.m. In Mendenhall 271 All new
students are welcome, so come on out and loin
us!
DbJSCH&IOrSORCNSCCWACIS
COMMOTE FORONIY $99
For just $99 you'll be fitted with the finest soft contact lenses ovoitoble;
Bousch & lomb Softens' Contacts The price includes everything youl
need to put your glasses away for good, initial eye exam motion, lenses,
care kit. instructions and follow up visits for one month And ybOrecerve
two weeks trial
Bousch AlombSofler Contacts for $99 completeCome see for
yourself today
?Nr im ii I, wtniicu m.
OFVQMC1NC
�Y�CAft�GEHl�R
Drs. Hollls & Scibal
Upton Annex228 Greenville Blvd.
756-9404
STUDENT LEGISLATURE
Anyone Interested in the state of North
Carolina politics, debate, parllmentary pny
cedures, speech and the like, come check us out
We art the East Carolina delegation of the N C
Student Legislature We meet at 7 00 p m on
Mon nights In Mendenhall, Rm. 223 To an
delegates: Important organizational meeting
this Mon. tor the absentee ballot registration
Also, be thinking about elections Oct. 8.
FRIENDS FELLOWSHIP
Friends University Fellowship (Quakers) will
hold Its first Meeting for Worship at 6 30 p m
Sun Sept 30, in Room 212 of the Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Informal discussion of the topic
"Why Quakers Worship Silently" will follow
Meeting for Worship. All are welcome For infor
matlon, contact Pam kllnger (758 3411) or Lon
Felker (752 0787)
EDUCATION MAJORS
Let's try this again! Student North Carolina
Association Educators Organizational Meeting.
Thurs Oct 4. 3 30 p.m Speight 104 All
students Interested in membership art invited to
attend Those planning to student teach this year
art encouraged to be present Applications ano
additional information will be available at this
time A membership drive is being held the week
of Sept. 24 28 in the Speight Bldg Look for the
membership desk
MUSIC
Music courses for non music maics ant
general college students The School of v. js - �-
courages students to consider enroling n �-�
following music courses designed for no rr j
majors during the spr.ng term MUSC UOe
Non Music Maior Group Pano I jni
1215 Group Voice ii (section 003 lot
non majors). MUSC 2208 Music Apprec ��
MUSC 2218 Orchestra' NtuSiC MUSC 223S
temporary Muse, MSC 2258 Hs'or, of -
Music, MUSC 3018 introduction to Bas c Musk
Skills, MUSC 3028 Music Education - Elemef
tary Grades. MUSC 3038 Music Eoucgt o- - -
termediate Grades. MuSC 3C48 Musk tor ?.
ceptional Children Performance organ �
are open to an students out jr audition s '?
quired prior to reg'Stra'or. n ant oe-�fa�
group unless the s'uden' has 'he cons" � -
instructor No o'her school of uvc coupl-
ings may be taken without permission o nt?
tor and authorization from the Dean s oft ce
Let the
Classifieds
work for you
r
dr
DIRECT MERCHANT
CO���� i.� i �V��S S- w�
Wflvn.f NC J-�M
"O" U' 'COO AM TO i JO �l
From The Manufacturer Directly To You
All First Quality
J No Seconds Or Irregulars
Latest Fall Shipment Of Ladies
100 percent Fully Lined Skirts
Ladies Dress And Casual Blouses
Ladies Wool And Corderoy Slacks
Summer Clearance Sale Mens' Oxford SI2.50
All Short Sleeve Blouses $7
Pin Point Dress Shirts 519.50
(
Daily Specials
Serving: Steaks, Seafood, Salad Bar
Soups & Sandwiches
355-5080
520 W. Greenville Blvd
Coming Soon Full ABC 7�?ft lATVn
Permits at Greenville Blvd. Location JO-OUU
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LIKE IT
Fri, Sat & Sun
For Only
$3.99
we put rr on thf PLn

HE FORECAST Ii
FOR FAIR DAYS
& FAIR NIGHTS
SFOXSORED B THE Pill" fufWR ,h(;los
October 1-6
i �
crime
Report
& 17, 10:15 a.m. - Mono
as reported stolen from a purse
on the 10th floor of Clement
?dorm; 3:00 p.m. - Four room.
I were reportedly broken into in
� Greene dorm A purse was stolen
; from one of the rooms on the 9th
floor. 8:00p.m. - A vehicle
S broken into on the southeast side
�of Scott dorm, vandalized.
;� several articles were stolen;
'�pm. Philhp King of 130 Slav
dorm was referred to the
Associate Dean of the Judi.
jfor stealing a desk drawer from
;Room 134 Slav dorm.
Bicycle
University Public Safel
fleers will begin strict ei
ment of ordinances gov e-
operation of bicycles or
in the wake of three ti a.
cidents involving bicyc
three-day period. Investig
officers noted violations of
law for the opera-
bicycles in each ace .
ding to Mr. Joseph H Ca
director of public safe
On Sept. 39, 1984 �
O'Briant Edward I �
Belk Dorm, was injured
attempted to pa-
Chevrolet Truck
of College H 11
operator
Leonard Bryant, Jr
wood Apann
had slowed a:
a parking space
occurred.
On Sept I 984
Oldsmobile operate -
Merle Lawrence of
Student Injun
B HAROLD JOWKK
�tM�Ht Sf�
-
i An ECU student who wa
fenously injured in a hit-anc
tcident following a at the
Kappa Phi fraternity hou in
early September
grcuperating well a
Rehabilitation Center at P
G (unty Memorial H
a Arthur Grifl
THI
BECOMIN
on the me I
earning a BSN, w I
Clifton. NJ07C
ARMYNUI
DAILY LI AC
S3.50
Free draft or glass I
si
Restaurant: I lam - 2l
LADIES LITE MG1
i
j Lg. Chef Salad
i
i
j Please present when crde- -
En
coupon
Vr4
K
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27. jWj
J Amount
Nurh?r v�cwdv
�' � e (yes) (no)
-I (?) (no)
- id l� lo oppear;
MUSIC
-aiors and
hoc f Music en
-g in trie
�l for non music
- M SC 1208 1218
- MUSC
p � on 003 tor
� I Apcecation,
v SC "38 Con
H story oi Jan
Basic Music
�� - f� E irmen
A'ion m in
M M sk for Ex
� e organizations
I I � "on Is re
performance
-�.en' of the
x-se offer
ss.on of instruc
"t Dean s office
Let the
Classifieds
work for you
aaaaa
lv To You
:ulars
Jned Skirts
Oxford S12.50
S19.50
Daily Specials
food, Salad Bar
ndwiches
r 5-5080
Greenville Blvd.
5S-4600
Stantonsburg Road
Eyes For You
Ribeyes, That Is
:castis
DAYS
IGHTS
1984
( o mifjucw;lfx:ios
Tl-6
Thefts Top Week's Reported Campus Crimes
Crime
Report
Sept. 17, 10:15 a.m. � Money
I was reported stolen from a purse
�on the 10th floor of Clement
�dorm; 3:00 p.m. � Four rooms
were reportedly broken into in
Greene dorm. A purse was stolen
i from one of the rooms on the 9th
5-floor. 8:00p.m. � A vehicle was
:j broken into on the southeast side
I of Scott dorm, vandalized, and
several articles were stolen; 12:00
tp.m. � Phillip King of 130 Slay
dorm was referred to the
Associate Dean of the Judiciary
�:for stealing a desk drawer from
cRoom 134 Slay dorm.
Sept. 18, 8:25 a.m. � A ten-
foot by ten-foot section of carpet
was reported stolen from the can-
teen area of Fletcher dorm; 8:37
p.m. � A cheerleader reported
jewelry stolen from her purse
during practice at Minges Col-
iseum.
Sept. 19, 12:55 a.m. � A
Peeping Tom was reported at
Fleming dorm; 8:40 a.m. � Two
hubcaps were reported stolen
from a staff member's vehicle
parked north of Jarvis dorm.
12:40 p.m. � A wallet was
reported stolen from the terminal
room of the computer area of
Austin. 5:00 p.m. � A break-in
was reported at a room on the 7th
floor of Greene dorm. No larceny
was reported.
Sept. 20, � 12:30 a.m. �
Jonathan Herold Neuhardt, 20,
of New Bern, was arrested for
DWI and careless and reckless
driving on College Hill Drive.
10:54 a.m. � A break-in was
reported at Room 224 in Joyner
Library. 4:25 p.m. � A break-in
and larceny from a vehicle was
reported in the 5th and Reade St.
freshman parking lot. 5:15 p.m.
� A purse was stolen from a
vehicle parked at Minges Col-
iseum.
Sept. 21, 12:30 a.m. � A
watch was stolen from a room on
the 4th Floor of Aycock dorm.
2:10 a.m. � Adrienne Louise
Mullaney of 104 Fleming dorm
was arrested for DWI in the 5th
and Reade St. parking lot. 6:45
a.m. � A vehicle parked in the
5th and Reade St. lot was
reported broken into; 12:00p.m.
� A resident of Greene dorm
reported her room was entered by
an unknown person while she was
asleep. 1:20 p.m. � A bicycle
was stolen from the bike rack
near Greene dorm. 11:05 a.m. �
A sheet of ultra-violet plastic was
stolen from the Flanagan
Building.
2:15p.m. � A staff member in
the Art Building reported two
mirrors had been stolen from a
bathroom on the 2nd floor. 6.70
p.m. � A bicycle was stolen
from the bike shed east of Jones
dorm. 11.00p.m. � A break-in
and larceny was reported involv-
ing a vehicle parked in the 14th
St. Freshman lot.
Sept. 22, 2:00 a.m. � Stephen
Fredericks III, 17, of Greenville,
was arrested for trespassing.
11:05 p.m. � A bieak-in and
larceny of stereo speakers from a
vehicle was reported southeast of
Aycock dorm. 11:50 p.m. �
John Keith Crisco, Jr 17, of
Asheboro, was arrested for
possession of spirituous liquor
under age. 6:30p.m. � A bicycle
was reported stolen from the bike
rack northeast of White dorm.
The bicycle was later located and
returned to the owner.
Sept. 23,� 12:15 a.m. �
Richard Daren Johnson, 18, of
307 B Scott dorm was arrested for
larceny of a fire extinquisher
from the Old Cafeteria; 9:28
p.m. � David Michael
Sturguess, 22, a sailor assigned to
the USS Coral Sea, was arrested
for assault on a female in Greene
dorm.
Sept. 24, 8:10 a.m. � A staff
member reported a phone stolen
from S- 111 in the Biology Bldg.
3:30 p.m. � Cheryl Carter. 34,
of Greenville, was arrested for
stop sign violation and no
operator's license. 3:50p.m. � A
bicycle was reported stolen from
the bike shed east of Jones dorm.
7:45 p.m. � A resident of Jones
dorm reported $20 had been
stolen from his wallet which was
left in his unlocked room on the
1st floor of Jones. 9:25 p.m. �
Darrell Wayne Johnson, 19, was
arrested for a one way street
violation and no operator's
license.
?
1
Bicycle Regulations Strictly Enforced
University Public Safety Of-
ficers will begin strict enforce-
ment of ordinances governing the
operation of bicycles on campus
in the wake of three traffic ac-
cidents involving bicycles in a
three-day period. Investigating
officers noted violations of state
law for the operators of the
bicycles in each accident accor-
ding to Mr. Joseph H. Cadler,
director of public safety.
On Sept. 19, 1984, Keith
O'Briant Edwards, 18, of 105C
Belk Dorm, was injured after he
attempted to pass a 1983
Chevrolet Truck on the right side
of College Hill Drive. The
operator ot the truck, Wade
Leonard Bryant, Jr of 23 Glen-
wood Apartments, Greenville,
had slowed and begun a turn into
a parking space when the impact
occurred.
On Sept. 21, 1984, a 1981
Oldsmobile operated by Donald
Merle Lawrence of No. 67
s
Riverbluff Apartments attempted
to turn into a parking lot on Col-
lege Hill Drive and turned into
the path of a bicycle operated by
Christopher John Allard, 18, of
316B Scott Dorm. The speed of
the bicycle at the time of impact
was estimated at thirty mph. (The
campus speed limit is 15 mph for
all vehicles.)
On September 22, 1984, a 1981
Pontiac operated by Martha
Allyn Richardson of 2001 Forest
Hills Drive, Greenville, attemp-
ted to make a left turn in front of
Greene Dorm. The vehicle was
struck by a bicycle operated by
Annie Gia Pham, of Minot Air
Force Base, North Dakota. The
bicycle was traveling west in the
eastbound lane against traffic.
Calder reminds students that
all state and University motor
vechicle regulations also apply to
bicycles. Bicyclists must obey
posted speed limits, observe
Peeping Toms Caught
Two Jarvis Dorm residents
were arrested for a peeping torn
offense outside a first floor
bathroom window of Fleming
Dorm at 11:55 p.m. Monday. Of-
ficer Robert J. Brewington
observed the two subjects enter-
ing the court yard of Fleming
Dorm. The two subjects, iden-
tified as Patrick Christopher
Mooney and Mark Robert Pat-
terson, both ot 130 Jarvis Dorm,
went to the open bathroom win-
dow and looked inside. The
bathroom was occupied at the
time by a female student. The
suspects were taken into custody
and transported to the Pitt Coun-
ty Magistrate's Office where they
were placed in the Pitt County
Jail under a $200 bond. Trial date
is set for October 15.
Student Injured In Accident Is Recovering
By HAROLD JOYNER
Aulsiint Newi hdhor

An ECU student who was
Seriously injured in a hit-and-run
tcident following a party at the
Kappa Phi fraternity house in
e�rl September said he is
Recuperating well at the
Rehabilitation Center at Pitt
bounty Memorial Hospital.
Arthur Griffin, a junior
English major, said he is still un-
sure of exactly what happened
the night of the accident but is
slowly remembering facts per-
taining to the accident.
"Right now, I am spending
about 4 to 5 hours a day irr
therapy he said. This includes
occupational, physical and
psychiatric therapy. "Hopefully I
won't be here much longer
Griffin added.
Griffin is still an enrolled stu-
dent and said he is able to com-
plete his class assignments
through the rehabilitation pro-
gram.
"The doctors at the center are
really pleased with my progress
he said. "I had to go to Duke for
surgery on my head and I am
healing from that now Griffin
said he lost the vision out of his
left eve.
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713,
Clifton, NJ 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
DINNER SPECIALS
$3.95
DAILY LUNCH and
$3.50
Free draft or glass of wine with purchase of any meal (with valid ID)
Serving Seven Days A Week
Restaurant: 11am - 2pm TA VERN: 4pm - 2pm
coupon
LADIES LITE NIGHT OUT i
"I r
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OLDE TOWNE CLUB & Fries
For 99
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I
Expires 10-5-84 I
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� coupon
stop�yield signs and conform to
one-way street regulations.
Bicycles are not allowed to
operate on sidewalks or
walkways intended for pedestrian
traffic.
At Carolina East Mall
(84
AWDONs
Offers all E.C.U. Students 2 Free
tokens with student I.D. and $1.00
purchase.
Mondays 10am to 9pm
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V
J
Sire iEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, ammmm�
Greg Rideout. m ed,��
J ENNIFER JENDRAS1AK. mm Ed.ior J .T. PlETRZAK. D�ror of Adver,u,nt
Randy Mews, .s.r� &�� Anthony Martin, b �,�,��
Tina Maroschak. A�'��rf.wr Kathy Fuerst. product m
Bill Austin, cmiitoi .Mowifr Mike Mayo, .jwi�, Technician
September 2 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Elections
Ignorance Stops Balloting
Two times up to bat; two
strikeouts. Not a good record, but
it's the one our SGA elections have
grabbed onto. Wednesday morn-
ing the balloting was cancelled due
to partisan campaign literature at
the polling booths. It was there,
basically, because of ignorance.
The votes at the Student Supply
Store and Croatan polling areas
were thus tainted and the election
called off.
We're not here to blame the
Greeks or their idea. In fact, the
active effort by the Greek
organizations to get their members
elected to the SGA Legislature is
admirable. In an era of increasing
apathy about the political system,
a concerted effort by anyone to in-
crease awareness of the system
should be applauded. We have no.
qualms with the Greeks passing
out a list of who to vote for, we
just ask that they not be handed
out within 25 feet of the polling
stations.
The individuals we are going to
put a little blame on are the poll
tenders. They were instucted by the
elections chairperson on the rules
� what is and is not allowed to
happen. Their fault may be due to
ignorance or just plain stupidity,
but no matter what, the people
manning the polls at the student
store who let the list stay on their
table should have known better.
Common sense tells you better.
Perhaps, as the Inter-fraternity
Council president said, the Greeks
manning the polls were a little
over-zealous in trying to get sup-
port for the Greeks. We are sure
they'll know better next time. Keep
that zealous spirit � it's needed in
the electoral process � but leave
the lists off the tables.
We are glad the elections have
been cancelled and new ones slated
for next week. It was the right
thing to do under the cir-
cumstances, and a courageous
decision in light of last year's
blunder. SGA President John
Rainey and Elections Chairperson
Howard Lipman should take it in
stride and remember Murphy's
Law next week. To the Greeks,
keep up the electoral spirit. And,
lastly to the poll tenders, know the
rules.
.J Beueve NSPReADiN6
MY MONey AROUNP iNA
LOT OF DiFFeR�MTBANKS)
r
i
4
fi-25
Te6Jt�C&vt
0K,� NOW HAVE COMRADE CHERN0VKO WAV� ,�GO0P,
GOOD NOW SWWW TURN HM THIS WAV
Sniffles Signal Voting
By IAN CASE PUNNETT
Collegiate Featare Syadlcatc
My sniffles have spoken; Election
Day '84 must be nigh.
One good snort tells me a lot. Calen-
dars notwithstanding, my annual end-
of-summer cold is the sure sign that fall
has befallen the Great Plains again.
Sleeping with the windows open as late
into September as I can, there comes a
morning that shows the warm night air
has flown south; my runny nose is once
more off to the races and November is
lurking behind the first pile of dead
leaves.
And as sure as the snot on my upper
lip, November will kick off with the
usual bi-partisian snowjobs which
forewarn the coming blizzards of
winter. And so, like every other Elec-
tion Day, my sniffles remind me of all
the past years I have been seen shivering
inside of voting booths, unable to
warm-up to either of the major
presidential contenders.
Unless something extraordinary hap-
pens soon � like Reagan gets a
Mohawk or Mondale has the air let out
of his face � I will remain convinced
that neither of these political pin-ups
has the chutzpah needed to return this
nation to authentic greatness.
After three-plus years of Reagan's
hardline, after Mondale's three-year
campaign and after the self-defeating
Democratic primary, neither candidate
seems much more than a political
posteroy.
Like the Jerry Lewis telethon, the na-
tional conventions in San Francisco and
Dallas were little more than star-
studded pitches for more support
(equals money), with Reagan and Mon-
dale emerging as nation-saving symbols
of their respective parties. After many
hours of this sitcom, a podium ap-
pearance by the nominees on leg braces
and crutches seemed noticeably absent.
Further, pursuant to the repitition of
history, neither of these Republican or
Democratic symbols has made a move
nor dared a statement unless it has been
pre-approved by six white guys in
striped silk ties. Both Reagan and Mon-
dale are campaigners not of inspiration
but of constipation � always holding
back until the other one goes first.
For this, I am accused by some of be-
ing too flippant about the seriousness
of our nation's political process. To
that, I promise to take voting more
seriously when and if I am given a
serious candidate for whom to vote.
The first sniffles of the season,
therefore, serve to remind me that again
we are faced with another election all of
default: white collars supporting Mori-
dak only because they want to take tl c
guns out of Reagan's hands until he
learns not to point them at other boys
and girls; blue collars rallying for
Reagan only because Mondale look1; as
politically appetizing as a plate of dried
mashed potatoes. Dried, instant mann-
ed potatoes.
Without the democratic spirit stirred
in me, my ballot seems as Kleenex ar.d
my alternative returns: cast a vote or. it
or blow my nose in it. There is hardK a
difference. Come Election Day. a
will depend on how my cold is doing.
For if I am to vote for simple sym-
bols, then I prefer to wait until 1 can
vote for a candidate which symbolizes
substantial things. Let's start with a
man or woman who knows the dif-
ference between "peace" and "r.ct
fighting between "economic grow '
and "white people getting their -
back
Still, until then I am told, it k nv
responsibility as a free American to ex-
ercise my right to vote. Voting. 1 ana
lectured, is the most glorious dury
citizens of the world can have. It :�, I
am scolded, nothing to sneeze at.
But as the apolitical frosts gather or.
my closed window sill, my nose itches
and the temptation becomes increasing-
ly harder to resist.
Voting For Helms Is Unintelligen
I too share Scott Thomas' amaze-
ment ("Debate Doo-Doo Sept. 25,
1984) over the third televised debate
between Gov. Jim Hunt and Jesse
Helms. 1 am also amazed at the
number of people with whom I have
spoken who intend to vote for our
beloved Senator in November.
It is beyond my realm of com-
prehension that any intelligent, well-
informed college student could have
the poor judgement to support Helms
for a position as important to the
people of this state as Senator. If I
may reiterate what Mr. Thomas
declared, not once did this "fine
spokesman" address an issue perti-
nent to the people of our fair state,
not once did he justify his harmful ac-
tions in the capital and not once did
he take a stand save for repetitiously
describing himself as a Reagan con-
servative. (Possibly Brother Jesse
hopes to ride back to Washington on
the coat tails of the president).
Those of you who have told me
that Jesse stands up for that which he
believes in must not be aware that the
only reason he's standing is so he can
get high enough out of the gutter to
hurl false or misleading accusations
at the next Senator of North
Carolina.
I say the next Senator of North
Carolina because I have enough con-
fidence in the people of my home
state to believe that while many sup-
port Helms the majority of North
Carolinians are conscientious enough
that they want a Senator with integri-
ty, intelligence and ability.
Paul Hoffman
Sophomore, English
State Stats
It's that time of year again when
the Pirates invade Raleigh. Over the
years, this rivalry has generated a lot
of excitement and some impressive
statistics.
As Chief for the NCSU campus
police; however, I want you to be
aware of some other statistics of
which none of us should be proud.
Each year this department makes
more arrests for disruptive behavior
during and after the ECU-State foot-
ball game than for all the others on
our home schedule combined.
Let's make sure that these
"statistics" are not the reason that
this great rivalry is ended! Enjoy the
game but restrict the "action" to the
team on the football field.
James W. Cunningham
Dir. of Public Safety
N.C. State University
Reagan's Record
"The one card that's been missing
in these (arms control) negotiations
has been the possibility of an arms
race
Ronald Reagan
Oct. 2, 1980
Last Tuesday, The East Carolinian
noted an undisputable fact: Soviet-
American talks of any kind should be
hailed as a major breakthrough at
this point. However, Reagan's talks
with Andrei Gromyko should not
overshadow the Reagan record on
arms control. Nor can we afford to
overlook what beyond arms control is
Reagan's overriding motivation in
meeting the Soviet leader � his re-
election.
Let's get the Reagan record
straight: In the last 25 years, six
American presidents have produced
20 arms control agreements. Ronald
Reagan has failed to produce a single
arms control agreement.
In 1963, Ronald Reagan opposed
the Limited Test Ban Treaty. In 1968,
Reagan opposed the Non-
Proliferation Treaty. In 1972, Reagan
opposed the SALT-1 agreement and
the Anti-Ballistic Missile Treaty (both
negotiated by Richard Nixon).
Ronald Reagan has also opposed
SALT-II and the Peaceful Nuclear
Explosions Treaty.
The message to be gained from all
of this is clear: Ronald Reagan has
not only failed to produce an arms
control agreement but has opposed
the bipartisan arms control efforts of
the last quarter century.
The talks have included no specific
agenda and no specific proposals con-
sidered. Except to assist in Reagan's
re-election, the talks promised and
produced no results. Reagan's record
on arms control remains intact.
Voters this year are offered a
choice between a president who has
never supported any arms control
agreement and a candidate who not
only supports arms control but
helped negotiate SALT II. On this
issue, as with many others, the choice
is Democrat.
Charles Sune
Chairman, ECU Young Democrats
Register Now
I wish to address the topic of voter
registration on this campus. The N.C.
Board of Elections has cleared the
way for all students of ECU to
register for the upcoming elections. It
doesn't matter if you are from out of
state or in state for registration pur-
poses.
Being an important election year
for both parties, there will be a non-
partisan registration drive on cam-
pus. The days will be Oct. 1 and 2
from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. in the follow-
ing places: Mendenhall Student
Center, Student Supply Store, the
Croatan and the allied health
building. It is very important for all
students to register for this election
and hopefully this registration drive
will accomplish that goal.
Kevin C. Bergan
Greenville
At Recital Hall
New Musi
B CARLYNEBERT
waf�mf
A Festival of New Music
� featuring works by two young
American composers will be
: presented Thursday, Oct. 4 at Ll
8:15 p.m. in the A. J Fletcher J
Music Center Recital Hall Com- j
posers Edmund Cionek and John
Anthony Lennon will be i a hand
; to watch the Instead Plaverv.
ECU's New Music Ensemble.
hich includes students, facult
members and a guest artist The
; will perform five pieces written
since 1979 at the free concert
The program includes Clone
duet for soprano and piano Four
Love Songs, and a solo marimba
performance of A Tide of oices j
His Rumble, a jazzy trio for
tuba, double bass and percus-
sion, features the additional color El
of a tape-recorded drum machine pj
track. Lennon's works on the bill HI
are the solo guitar Another's
Fandango, and Distances M ithin
ir, a lush, impressionistic j
Tor piano and alto saxophone
"Both of these composers have
xcponded to the preva:
tendency in music today, tow
that's being called the 'New
Romanticism said coordin
Donna Coleman. "It's tonal
Lose 16
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i
v i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 27, 1984
JL
)

U Ml
0000,
lo
ting Mort-
main to take the
hands until he
iem at other boys
rallying for
Mondale looks as
plate of dried
ied, instant mash-
. spirit stirred
Kleenex and
isl a ote on it
There is hardly a
n Da, a lot
old is doing.
� i Mmple sym
mtil I can
ch svmbolizes
start with a
� nows the dif-
and "not
tnic growth"
. iheir jobs
told, it s mv
can to et-
r�g, I am
rious duty
ivc. It is, I
ze at.
rather on
se itches
-reasing-
diligent
has als
: Peace:
posed
u clear
: gained from all
nald Reagan has
luce an arms.
Dut has opposed;
:ontrol efforts of:
.ded no specific
pi posals con-
' in Reagan's
promised and
Reagan s record-
mains intact.
� are offered a'
-evident who has-
anj arms control 3
id a candidate who not a
arms control but z
W T H. On this-
I i many others, the choice a
ing Democrats
lister Now
address the topic of voter j
I on this campus. The N.C.
lections has cleared the
II students of ECU to I
Itne upcoming elections. It
Jter if you are from out of
state for registration pur- '�
important election year
rties, there will be a non-
jistration drive on cam-
lays will be Oct. 1 and 2
to 4 p.m. in the follow-
Mendenhall Student
idem Supply Store, the
ind the allied health
is very important for all
register for this election
(illy this registration drive
iish that goal.
rrgan
I
8
At Recital Hall
New Music Festival Presented
By CARLYN EBERT
Staff Witter
A Festival of New Music
featuring works by two young
American composers will be
presented Thursday, Oct. 4 at
8:15 p.m. in the A. J. Fletcher
Music Center Recital Hall. Com-
posers Edmund Cionek and John
Anthony Lennon will be on hand
to watch the Instead Plavers,
ECU's New Music Ensemble,
which includes students, faculty
members and a guest artist. They
will perform five pieces written
since 1979 at the free concert.
The program includes Cionek's
duet for soprano and piano Four
Love Songs, and a solo marimba
performance of A Tide of Voices.
His Rumble, a jazzy trio for
tuba, double bass and percus-
sion, features the additional color
of a tape-recorded drum machine
track. Lennon's works on the bill
are the solo guitar Another's
Fandango, and Distances Within
Me, a lush, impressionistic duet
tor piano and alto saxophone.
"Both of these composers have
.responded to the prevailing
tendency in music today, toward
what's being called the 'New
Romanticism said coordinator
Donna Coleman. "It's tonal
music, as opposed to the very
abstract or cerebral style of the
'60s and '70s
Coleman, assistant professor
of piano and director of the In-
stead Players, invited Cionek and
Lennon � both schoolmates of
hers from the University of
Michigan � to give Greenville a
taste of the different musical ex-
pressions produced by the two
composers with a common
background and training. In the
'70s, the three musicians per-
formed in a group called the Elec-
tric Candlelight consort. "Their
music is complementary to each
other said Coleman. "I think
people will enjoy them
Cioi.ek, a New York-based
freelance composer and arranger,
studied composition at the
University of Michigan and at the
Ecole Normale de Musique in
Paris as a Fulbright-Hays Fellow.
He has taught at the University of
Wisconsin-Oshkosh and at
Nassau Community College.
Cionek, 34, is an assitant at the
New York Art Cn�emble and the
New York Quintet, both of which
have premiered his new com-
positons to critical acclaim.
North Carolina native Lennon,
34, teaches composition and
theorv at the Universitv of Ten-
nessee at Knoxville. With com-
position degrees from the Univer-
sities of San Francisco and
Michigan, he has received
numberous honors including the
a Guggenheim Award, the
Charles Ives Prize from the
American Academy of Arts and
Letters, a National Endowment
for the Arts grant, a David Bates
Prize and a Norlin Foundation
Fellowship with the MacDowell
Colony.
A dress rehearsal in the Recital
Hall on Wednesday, Oct. 3 at 7
p.m. is open to the public, as is a
lecture-discussion led by the guest
composers at 11 a.m. on the day
of the concert.
Coleman points out that no
special understanding of "new
music" is necessary to appreciate
these works, "the whole point of
going to a concert is just to enjoy
it, not to make a big intellectual
study she said. "This par-
ticular concept of new music will
be very enjoyable to all
For further information, con-
tact the School of Music.
Read
The
Classifieds
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JHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 27. 1984
Students Find Year's Tuition Picture Mixed
(CPS) � In-state students at
Michigan's four-year state col-
leges and universities won't have
to pay any more tuition than they
did last year.
But students at Arizona's three
state universities will pay 14 per-
cent more, even though the na-
tional inflation rate has been
around four percent since last fall.
Students nationwide, in short,
are finding a mixed tuition picture
as they start fall classes. While
scattered colleges and university
systems have managed to hold in-
creases to a minimum, many other
schools have imposed tuition
hikes well above the inflation rate.
"There's no trend toward freez-
ing or raising tuition that I'm
aware of says Brooke Breslow
of the College Board. "There will
be different states and institutions
each year that freeze. Some stay
stable for two years, then go up.
Then others freeze the next year
In mid-August, the College
Board predicted total college costs
� which include room and board,
books, supplies, transportation,
and personal expenses as well as
tuition � will rise an average six
percent this fall.
Some colleges, of course, have
been more successful than others
in keeping increases down.
Administrators at all of
Michigan's four-year colleges
took Gov. James Blanchard's of-
fer to freeze in-state
undergraduate tuition in exchange
for an 11 percent increase in state
funding.
"There was some concern
among administrators that tuition
was too high says Ron Jursa of
Michigan State Higher Education
Management. "Colleges were
afraid of being priced out of the
market
"I think the freeze is good
stresses Jim Labadie, a senior at
Wayne State University in
Detroit. "But tuition is still fairly
high. I think we're still among the
top ten in the country in terms of
high tuition rates
Tuition freezes, in fact, typical-
ly don't last. The University of
New Mexico has followed last
year's tuition freeze with a 10 per-
cent hike this year.
"The 10 percent reflects the
Breakthrough Made In Registration
By JAY STONE
Staff Writar
Rob Mullins, a representative
of the National Student Cam-
paign for Voter Registration,
recently announced a major
breakthrough in student voter
registration. Previously, accor-
ding to Mullins, many county of-
ficials administered oral or writ-
ten questionnaires to students.
These would help to prohibit a
student from registering to vote
in the town where he attended
school.
The questionnaires employed,
Mullins said, dealt with the issue
of establishing one's residency.
Students were asked questions
designed to prove non-residency.
These questions were not asked
NAACP
Sponsoring
Drive
The ECU Chapter of the Na-
tional Association for the Ad-
vancement of Colored Persons
will be helping with a voter
registration drive to be held in a
Greenville park from 10 a.m. to 6
p.m. on Oct. 8.
Wilma Case, president of
NAACP, said she wants to re-
mind students that the deadline
to register to vote in the
November elections is very close.
She added that anyone interested
in helping the group with voter
registration should come to a
meeting to be held Oct. 1 at 5:30
in the Coffeehouse on the ground
floor of Mendenhall. "Students
who want to help but can't attend
the meeting can help with flyer
distribution on Oct. 4 and 5
Case said.
The NAACP is also in the pro-
cess of holding a campus-wide
membership drive with chairmen
for different areas of campus.
NAACP meetings are held on the
second and fourth Monday of
each month at Mendenhall.
"The NAACP has been
molding the lives of several
generations since 1909 Case
said. She said the organization's
main goal is to protect and ad-
vance the rights of minorities,
especially where hiring policies
are concerned. Voter registration
and membership drives are the
other two important goals, she
said.
of any other group, Mullins add-
ed.
According to Mullins, the
breakthrough came when Leslie
Winner, a Charlotte lawyer, was
contacted by him and asked to
study the problem. Ms. Winner
then reportedly spoke with the
State Attorney General and
Chairman of the State Board of
Elections, Robert Spearman.
Spearman issued a memo advis-
ing all county Boards of Elections
that the use of disriminatory
questionnaires aimed expressly at
students is unconstitutional.
"I believe this represents a big
breakthrough for students all
over the stat- " said Mullins. "In
many places, this will make the
first time that students haven't
been discouraged vom register-
ing to vote. As a resc ' I'm confi-
dent we can set records for stu-
dent voter registration this year
Mullins, who is the North
Carolina coordinator for the
NSCVR, added that his organiza-
tion is involved in organizing a
broad-based coalition of campus
groups aimed at registering one
million new student voters na-
tionwide. In North Carolina,
Mullins said, the goal is 20,000.
"This is a bipartisan effort
Mullins said "We want to include
as many groups as possible in this
registration effort
"It is important to get students
to vote Mullins said. "Only by
voting can students expect to
have their interests represented.
change in state funding says
UNM budget director Jim
Wiegmann. "We also needed to
make up somewhat for the
1983-84 freeze
And this year's freeze in the
state of Washington could
translate into a 24 percent increase
during the 1985-1987 period at
state community colleges, says
Kate Brown of the Washington
Association of Community Col-
leges.
The cost of education continues
to climb, she notes, and while in-
flation is only four-to-five percent
nationally, the Higher Education
price Index, which measures the
cost of goods and services to col-
leges, is running at 10-to-ll pe-
cent increases.
Colleges will spend a total $85.5
billion this school year, according
a National Center for Education
Statistics report released last
week.
In Arizona, legislative pressure
on campuses to raise more money
to pay the higher costs convinced
the Board of Regents to kick up
tuition 14 percent at the three
state universities.
"Tuition is set by the regents
says Otis Elliot, spokesman for
the regents. "But it's certainly in-
fluenced by the governor and the
state legislature
But when legislators and the
governor attempted to raise in-
state tuition at the State Universi-
ty of New York system, student
protest helped kill the proposal.
"The students made their
unhappiness clearly known says
Dick Gillman of SUNY Affairs
and Development. "We have a
pretty strong student body. They
went directly to the legislators.
Tuition stayed where it was,
which pleased us very much
At least one school managed to
roll back tuition this year.
First-through-third-year
students at George Washington's
med school will pay 1.3 percent
less � or $250 � than last year.
Fourth-year students get a $100
tuition decrease, from $17,000 to
$16,900 a year.
Even those tiny rollbacks,
however, are rare nationwide as
many schools impose double-digit
increases again this fall.
Penn State's increase, for ex-
ample, is 10.8 percent for
1984-85. An administrative study
shows costs at Penn have increas-
ed 170 percent since 1972.
"We have looked at every
available avenue for breaking the
16-year cycle of tuition
increases university President
Bryce Jordan said this summer
"Unfortunately, this year's
budget reflects the cumulative ef-
fects of past underfunding
Oklahoma students face 10 per-
cent in-state and 15 percent out-
of-state increases this year
because of legislative cuts m
education funding.
Private colleges and universities
are averaging tuition increases of
approximately 7.5 percent in
1984-85, the College Board says
Stanford raised tuition 7.5 per.
cent, considerably below its 10 7
percent average yearly increase
since 1971. But in the past decade
the school has risen from eighth to
sixth place in tuition costs among
comparable institutions.
Cornell and Dartmouth
students will pay 7.9 percent more
this year. Administrators blame
higher energy and maintenance
costs and diminishing federal col-
lege aid funds for the jump
University of Miami student
leaders blame administrative
"mismanagement" for a 7.5 per -
cent cost hike there.
Mark
Get Well
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i- a mL. Greenville. NC.
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF OEM PARTS
10 Percent Off WHh H� AM
,ltv ??rt� of a Reasonable Price
Pottery & Weaving
from
Eastern North Carolina
Local Artist's Exhibition
Mendenhall Gallery
Sept. 23 - Oct. 6
Information concerning purchases-
Listed in the Gallery
r.
j;
An
-i
nl
B JENN MEAC
All the France you ee
ed of from Paris to La
� elegant restaurants, a
past castles and cat
candelit nighttime seen
farmhouses m the coun
these set the tone for a s
romantic movie Even
Until September sound'
: tic. In reality, however
an answer to the qucstioi
long can you stay0'
in til September stai
airport and end
place, but in befwe-
several rain scenes, mos
with passion From
beginning Mo Alexande
Allen), a mid-wester-
Missouri, is cap;
charming Frenchman.
Will Lh
(UPI) Time was
g American women melted
g the romantic charm
� French lovers as Charles
"Maurice Chevaiier, Louis
dan and, more recer.
� Montand.
Today Hollywood t
have a resident French
leading man.
The suave, tres cal
Gallic lover has given wav
-likes of Tom Selleck and
Bedford or Rob Low
Michael Jackson.
However, for Amel
j women who still drearr
I sian smoothies with tha:
; seductive French acce

newcomer Thierry Lhcrd
who stars in the new movm j
j September.
His name may be
� nounceable, but it is Ui
French.
Thierry is tall, slender,
30s and handsome. But
hardly cast in the mold
j French predecessors. For
! thing he has a Sam Shepard
cut � it stands strajg
; unruly disarray His accer
- is barely discernible.
� Thierry, moreover, has
mention of becoming an
jboyer.
j "I don't know why Amed
.expect romance f:
French he said during a
" romotional stop ;r. H
ame
(CFS) � "Everybody's t
about Bagism, Shaf
Dragism. Madism. Ra
Tagism
"Snap out of it Mason
and John and
Timothy Leary, Rosemary
my Smothers. Bobby
Tommy Cooper, Derek I
Norman Mailer. "
"He won't stop! Car
Doc?"
Possibly. Tell me FreJ
your roommate been playinj
games lately?"
Just Trivial Purs-
girlfriend bought it las:
Now it's the only thing :
Tracy do from dusk to dav
"Trivia before sex, tsk,
as I thought. I'm sorry Frei
Mason appears to be sun
from HTP
"HTP?"
"Hyper-Trivia Pursuit
mind is functioning as a
vacuum cleaner, sucking
fspewing out worthless, see-
o
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ixed
We have looked at every
liable avenue for breaking the
vea- cycle of tuition
creases university President
ce Jordan said this summer
! nfortunately, this year's
j Igei reflects the cumulative ef-
pasl underfunding
loma students face 10 per-
state and 15 percent out-
� increases this year
of legislative cuts in
m funding
leges and universities
tging tuition increases of
ri) 5 percent in
he College Board says.
itsed tuition 7.5 per-
jsiderably below its 10
ige yearly increase
' m the past decade,
nsen from eighth to
tuition costs among
tstitutions.
and Dartmouth
7 9 percent more
J-m-strators blame
and maintenance
hing federal col-
'�' the jump.
Miami student
le administrative
ent" for a 7.5
er e
per
mi
a PD MAGNFTICS
pes for $9.99
f�� T-Shirt or
oler with coupon
V '94
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
stereo
Anting

PY
own in
n- Shops
00�
.�f
5 TA
er
v 7
tc), lanterns
30am - 5:30pm
ing
olina
ion
chases-
Ithe Gallery
THE EAST CAROLINJAN
Style
-1 I'l '
An Extremely Common Flick
By JENNY MEADOR
S��ff Wittar
All the France you ever dream-
ed of from Paris to La Napoule
� elegant restaurants, a boatride
past castles and cathedrals,
candelit nighttime scenes, and
farmhouses in the country. All
these set the tone for a seemingly
romantic movie. Even the title
Until September sounds roman-
tic. In reality, however, it's just
an answer to the question, "How
long can you stay?"
Lntil September starts in an
airport and ends in the same
place, but in between there are
several rain scenes, most pouring
with passion. From the very
beginning Mo Alexander (Karen
Allen), a mid-westerner from
Missouri, is captivated by the
charming Frenchman, Marcia
(Thierry Lhermitte). She is
especially attracted by his clear,
piercing green eyes � the only
outstanding feature about him
besides his smooth accent.
After missing a flight to
chaparone high schoolers
throughout Europe, Mo finds
himself staying in an apartment
owned by a friend who just hap-
pens to be on vacation. The
apartment is also located adja-
cent to Marcia's. Destined to
meet, the two go out on a date
and before long they find being
separated intolerable.
So what's the big conflict? Mo
can't get a passport to any other
country for two weeks and the
Frenchman is married. For-
tunately for him, the rest of the
family is vacationing in the south
of France. But as for Mo, she's

not used to being treated like one
of Marcia's amny mistresses. Yet
the couple have something special
in common � bathtubs,
bedrooms and buns.
I guess most young, adven-
turous couples do have these
things in common, but what real-
ly holds them together? After all,
it can't be the common elements
of culture. It's more than dif-
ficult to argue with a Frenchman
as Mo finds out after making the
American dish "french toast
While Marcia demonstrates his
knife and fork eating routine, Mo
asks if he is ever wrong. Of
course that would be impossible
for him to admit and in his reply
he says, "No. I may not always
be right, but I am never wrong
As for the french toast?
"Definitely not french at all
On the flip side was music �
light and romantic, and at times
flaring and intense. Although it
sounds like music for a sopa
opera, there was one outstanding
performance on classical guitar
by newcommer Hutton Cobb,
originally from North Carolina.
With little suspense and
drama, you might wonder why
you paid to see thisacting.
There are a few moving scenes,
but they are all resolved in the
same manner � being frustrated,
cry, go to bed, wake up hoping he
or she is still there. And all this
happens in four weeks? The real
question is � is it love or does
she just admire him because he's'
finally learned how to bring a
glass of wine to his lips while
holding it between his toes and
sitting Indian style?
Will Lhermitte Replace American Idols?
(UPI) � Time was when
American women melted under
the romantic charm of such
j French lovers as Charles Boyer,
J Maurice Chevalier, Louis Jour-
"Jdan and, more recently, Yves
SMontand.
Today Hollywood doesn't
!have a resident French cliche
pleading man.
The suave, tres charmant
Gallic lover has given way to the
likes of Tom Selleck and Robert
Redford or Rob Lowe and
Michael Jackson.
However, for American
women who still dream of Pari-
sian smoothies with that soft,
j seductive French accent there is
newcomer Thierry Lhermitte,
who stars in the new movie Until
September.
His name may be unpro-
nounceable, but it is thoroughly
French.
Thierry is tall, slender, in his
I 30s and handsome. But he is
� hardly cast in the mold of his
; French predecessors. For one
? thing he has a Sam Shepard hair-
j cut � it stands straight up in
unruly disarray. His accent, alas,
is barely discernible.
Thierry, moreover, has no in-
tention of becoming another
boyer.
"I don't know why Americans
expect romance from the
French he said during a quick
promotional stop in Hollywood.
"I suppose they still think of us
in terms of 19th century novels
"The guy I play in this picture
is very earthy. Like most Fren-
chmen, he leads a very structured
life and falls apart when he falls
in love. But then again he is in-
volved in the typical French
dilemma of love. He has a wife, a
mistress and also falls in love
with a beautiful American
tourist
The tourist in Until September
is played by Karen Allen.
"I think other Frenchmen have
played similar roles Thierry
continued, "but I don't intend to
follow in their "ootsteps. For one
thing, I understand some
Hollywood French actors faked
their accents.
"The longer they stayed in
America, the thicker their accents
became
Theirry, who is married and
the father of two children,
studied English in school and
devoted two months to intensive
tutoring to perfect his English,
which he now speaks idiomatical-
ly.
He hopes to appear in more
American movies and realizes his
chances are slim unless he
perfects his English. Jean-Paul
Belmondo and Alain Delon, two
of France's top stars, bombed in
Hollywood, unable to surmount
the language barrier.
"Hollywood doesn't need ac-
tors with heavy French accents
Thierry said. "There are
thousands of competent actors
right here. Why should producers
go with a guy their audiences
can't comprehend?
"With a French accent you
might be able to build a career
playing maitre d's, chefs or comic
lovers, but that is the extent of it.
The only French accent that has
produced a star in the past 20
years was Inspector Clouseau in
the Pink Panther pictures. Peter
Sellers' French accent was
perfect
"Of course, Frenchmen
resented Clouseau at first. He
struck too close to home. But as
the Pink Panther pictures in-
creased in popularity, all was
forgiven"
"The cultural differences bet-
ween France and the United
States are greater than most peo-
ple in both countries can believe.
Sometimes it is quite subtle. We
French are self-conscious about
expressing our feelings. We are
more reserved while Americans
are more outgoing. We are not
effusive and would never tell
total: strangers, 'Have a nice
day
"The French tend to doubt the
sincerity of the overfriendly
American. We try to be more
diplomatic because the French
ego is more easily bruised
Thierry, unlike many another
Gallic import, has a rich sense of
humor and a self-mocking at-
titude untypical of his coun-
trymen.
He is a rising star in Paris. In
the past two years he has starred
in seven French films, not all of
which, he is quick to add, were
unqualified hits.
"Our film industry is
flourishing he said with a touch
of pride.
"We make about 150 movies a
year, many more than a decade
ago. They are not made on so
lavish a scale as Hollywood. An
ordinary French film would cost
one million dollars, an expensive
film two million. Very small
budgets for Hollywood. But then
our pictures are released only in
Erench-speaking countries �
arance, Belgium, Switzerland
and sometimes Canada
"To become an international
star, of course, European actors
must appear in Hollywood films.
Now that I have made a start, I
have plans for two additional
American pictures, one with
Karen (Allen) and another with
Michael Gruskoff, who produced
Until September.
"First it is necessary to see
what happens when this picture is
released
"Until Septemler" is ply
Sneak P
Game Lovers Lap Up Trivial Pursuit
(CFS) � "Everybody's talking
about Bagism, Shagism,
Dragism, Madism, Ragism,
Tagism
"Snap out of it Mason
and John and Yoko,
Timothy Leary, Rosemary, Tom-
my Smothers, Bobby Dylan,
Tommy Cooper, Derek Taylor,
Norman Mailer
"He won't stop! Can you help,
Doc?"
Possibly. Tell me Fred, has
your roommate been playing any
games lately?"
Just Trivial Pursuit. His
girlfriend bought it last week.
Now it's the only thing he and
Tracy do from dusk to dawn.
"Trivia before sex, tsk, it's just
as I thought. I'm sorry Fred, but
Mason appears to be suffering
from HTP
"HTP?"
"Hyper-Trivia Pursuit. His
mind is functioning as a trivia
vacuum cleaner, sucking up and
spewing out worthless, seemingly
unrelated facts. It's all he can do,
and I'm afraid there's not a
cure
"And bishops, Fishops, Rab-
bis, and Popeyes, bye-bye
Bye-bye Mason. Perhaps
someday they'll name a question
after you. "Who was the first
man to continually If you
know the answer, or wish you
knew the answer, or just like
stealing Rickhard Dawson's job
and asking the questions,
welcome! The Trivial Age is upon
us!
The three Canadians responsi-
ble for Trivial Pursuit (and $400
million for Selchow and Righter)
have just completed the Genus II
set of new question cards. Genus
I consisted of the game's original
2,000 questions, the answers for
which taught us more than we
wanted to know about birthrates
and death rates, and Liberty
Bells, and Bob Bell, and Henry
James and James Bond, and
James Lofton and Charles
� Oil ION
SILVER SCREEN
EDITION
ALL-STAR
SPOUTS EOmOM
O "GGBAPMYSETTINGSNICKNAMESTELEVISIONPEOPLE 4 PLACES
g EN'ERTAINMfNTTITLESEOOTBALLSTAGE 4 SCREENGOOD TIMES
SN MlSTORVOFE SCREENCATCH AILnightly NEWSSCIENCE 4 TECHNOLOGY
ON SCREENBASKETBALLpublishingART. CULTURE
V�" NATUREPRODUCTIONBASEBALLLIVES 4 TIMESNATURAL WORLD
gfe SPORTS 4 LEISUREPORTRAYALSNUMBERSRPMGAMES 4 HOBBIES
c: O D ECAR)
?Irivj�i Pursuit has MJBMflUtJMBUBlBfc
students.
Laughton. Especially Charles
Laughton.
There were enough Genus I
questions about Charles
Laughton to comprise a Charles
Laughton edition of the game.
Not that there's anything par-
ticularly harmful about trivia,
which is, by it's very nature,
trivial. Most parents would agree
that it's safer to have our nation's
youth enraptured by the cheese
pies of a Trivial Pursuit board
than out roaming libraries and
classrooms, getting an education
and consequently acting upon
their newfound enlightment by
voting our president out of of-
fice.
No, trivia is fairly harmless, it
doesn't cause cavities and no one
has spontaneosly combusted
while pursuing it.
But how far past the wagon-
wheel borders of TP's
gameboard can we pursue before
America becomes a nation of
trivial minds? Before TP prowess
outweighs MTV familiarity in the
status ranks of high schools
across the country?
The danger is real, as the ex-
ploding proliferation of trivia
pursuit has begun with the TP
prototype at its forefront. In ad-
dition to Genus, Sports, Silver
Screen, Baby Boomer and Genus
II editions, bookstores this fall
will be swamped with TP calen-
dars, greeting cards and sta-
tionary sets.
ABC is planning a special and
radio stations across the country
are playing their own versions.
Granted, TP marketing won't
change the world. Trivial Pursuit
could hang tough for a while,
then go the way of Smurfs or
fade as fast as Pac Man fever. TP
could be this year's Hula Hoop.
It's the other 40 games you
have to worry about.
There's "People Magazine's
and "TV Guide's and "Solid
Gold's" ("Who is the oldest
Beatle? Paul McCartney!
Wrongo! Ringo? Righto). Any
recognizable media entity from
Culture Club to PTL Club, from
Mr. Ed to Mr. T is eligible to,
and probably has, spit out the
questions and rushed out his or
her game.
In an interview with Time (sur-
prising since Time's trivia game
sells right behind the original),
TP's creators reveal their three
secret question catagories. Most
fall into "the broad middle
ground" where anyone,
regardless of age or education
can answer them. Then there are
"stoppers such as "What is
Arizona's area code?" Finally
come the infamous "mongies"
(short for Mongoloid) which even
a VJ could answer. "What are
the three colors found in the
American flag? What are three
colors found in America?"
If you think TP's questions are
inane, play the rest. That's when
it gets scary. Imagine a world
more terrifying than any
Orwellian nightmare, a planet in-
habited after a trivia Babel in
which each individual was left
speaking his own worthless
tongue.
Think about the inevitable, im-
pending trivia gap which will
stretch between generations until
one day our children will have to
ask who Larry "Bud" Melman
or Rhoda was.
Or just look at the present,
take "People Magazine's" ver-
sionplease. "People" divides
their game into some of the same
generic catagories as the mag:
Song, Tuge, Screen, Jocks. A
typical card's answers include
Juice Newton, Modern Art,
Senator Bill Bradley, Indira Gan-
dhi.
You Jeopardy fans can provide
the questions, I'm going to read
up on Charles Laughton
m �����;
By EL AIM PI Rm
si.ff n
Places in the Hear
sneak preview ol "x -
shown on Sun
p.m. in Hendrix 1
The film stars 5
Danny Glove a
Malkovich are the
porting actors. Dii
Robert Benton (wl J
Kramer vs Dramer) ' es i
Heart takes place d
1930s depression i
Texas. The movie i sen
emotional. Ja Kr
Sewsweek said o'
"this kind of sensiti
ship is welcome in
noisy, blatant mo i Benti
-A Woitin
By AMY BONES! I . .
Miff Wnltr
Hospice, a bran h i I
Carolina Home He
is a term used to describ
of persons who have a il-
lness (advanced cancer). 1
private, non-profit organi; � .
run by volunteers The pui
of Hospice are: to help deal
the physical and psychoh .
pains of the patient, gie
support to the patient's fan
give people a "support sj
to help deal with the idea o
death, and to help per le
more about terminal illn
These objectives arc carried
in the home environment �
the patient and famil) will fe
more comfortable
There are different si
available to patients, gen
divided into two main - atagorie
Pallitive and Support! .
Pallitive care includes me I
relief of pain and othei symp
toms, while Supportive ,are
mentally helping the patient and
family deal with the patient's il
lness.
The various professional
vices include skilled nursing I
R.Ns, Physical Therapy, Ox
cupational Therapy, and Speech
Pathology. Other volunteers ma
be Home Health Aides which at
trained by the Agency to prv.
personal carp mrh r� ith
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TlOi;
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find out I

Ft
i





8
THI KAS1 C AROllNlAN SEPTEMBER27. 1984
Bob Hope Cracks On The Big Guys
(UPl) � Bob Hope loves election
years and proves it Friday night
with monologue broadsides at
President Reagan and Walter
Monale as he kicks off his 55th
vear on TV
Not since Will Rogers has anv
comedian bombed U.S.
presidents and would be White
House occupants as gleefully as
rapid Robert
He began when Roosevelt was
the chief executive 46 years ago.
During Roosevelt's awesome bat
lies with publisher Burtie McCor
mic, Hope observed that Fala,
Roosevelt's dog. was the only
White House pooch paper-
trained on the Chicago Tribune
A long-time pal of President
Reagan, Hope said he strives to
be fair to both candidates. In-
deed, he tosses more barbs at
Reagan than he doe� Mondale.
"It's easiei to pick on the top
dog Hope expained. "People
know I'm a friend of Reagan's,
so I try to keep it even. You don't
want to pick on the underdog too
much. Nobody likes that
Even so, Hope took a cue from
the cricket who invaded the
presidential bedroom earlier this
month, causing the president and
first ladv a couple of sleepless
nights.
"I can understand Mondale
sneaking into the White House
Hope said Following a long
pause, he added, "but rubbing
his hind legs together
He grinned rafishl) and added,
"Every time Mondale gives a
speech. Reagan's hair gets
darker
"Reagan's not worried. He's
confident he will win. But he's
taking no chances, making bush
weai a dress
Hope has a quiver full of
political darts for Friday's
monologue, but very few will be
aimed al Democratic Vice
Presidential candidate Geraidine
Ferraro. He believes it ill
behooves a comdian to make fun
of a lady
With Eleanor Roosevelt, one
of his favorite targets of the past,
it was different. She was definite-
ly an upper dog and interna-
t.onally beloved. Hope said he
felt sorry for candidate Ferraro.
But Mondale is fair game.
"Mondale is fighting Reagan
on religion he said. "He wants
to separate church from state �
and Reagan from state
"Mondale's scared. He thinks
God is a Republican. He has to
be to own all that property.
"On the other hand, Reagan
told one of his aides, 'Mnndale's
wrong. I'm not too religious.
And 1 want you to notify the rest
of m disciples
"Aides are worrying about the
Reagan Mondale debate. Will
Reagan fall asleep while Mon-
dale's talking& More than that,
they're worried about Reagan
falling asleep while he's talking.
"Reagan has had more catnaps
ihat Morris.
"And the Deomocrats told
Mondale to get tougher, so he
hired Jimmv C'agney as his cam-
paign manager. That wasn't
enough. The other day he slapped
Ferraro. and she decked him
Hope says his favorite political
target remains ex-President
Gerald Ford, especially gibes
about his propensity for hitting
spectators with errant golf shots.
"When Gromyko gets down to
disarmament talks, the first item
on his agenda is taking away
Ford's golf clubs Hope quip-
ped.
Much as he likes political
material, Hope pounces on any
subject in the news, including the
recent Miss America travails of
dethroned Vanessa Williams and
the newly crowned Mormon
beauty from Utah.
"1 saw those pictures in Pen-
thouse and 1 think Vanessa
should have won the Miss Con-
geniality award Hope said.
'The pageant officials were upset
because she wasn't wearing her
crown.
'They sure changed the image
of Miss America this year. The
new one is so pure her compact
has stained glass. Her dates have
gotta have a big car because she
takes the Mormon Tabernacle
Choir with her.
"I undestand in the swim suit
competition they had to change
her bathing suit. Hers had a hole
Prime Time Ratings Place ABC First Again
(l PI) � ABC won the prime
time ratings for the second con-
secutive week last week, as the
three networks continued to roll

isv 83 ; season.
1 he A C Nielsen prime time
ratings fo the eek t tding
23 gave ABC a 15.3 rating ana a
27 percent share of the audience,
NBC a-148 rating with a 26 share
and CBS a 14.2 rating with a 25
share.
The premiere of the critically
acclaimed new situation comedy
an NBC The Bill Cosby Shon
�d the number one show of the
.eek. and several other new pro-
grams bumped the season's
premiere of some of last year's
favorites, at least temporarily,
ff the Top 10 I ist
ABC's new show i,litter,
which ranked 12th when it
premiered the previous week,
came in a poor 30th last week,
and the network's Hawaiian
Heat, which was 7th when it
. .v,
J8th a
fiiK) are ulster,
tiei ed against
tovei NF i r' oi ball game
and 60 Minutes on CBS, slipped
to 48th last week.
Other new programs that got
off to less than hot starts were
CBS's (over Up (33rd), NBC's
Partners in (rime (36th), ABC's
Finders of Lost Loves (40th),
NBC's Hot Pursuit (50th) and
ABC's People Do the Craziest
Things v55th).
The new CBS sitcon E-R, starr-
ing Elliot Gould plunged from
first place the previous week to
51 si last week when it was com
petmg with the season's premiere
of NBC's hottest show The
i
A Team
The Emmy awards program
placed 13th.
In the evening news category,
CBS Evening Sews with Dan
Hat her was number one for the
!26th consecutive week with a
10 8 r ating nd a . i hare
ABC's World eis tonight
had a 9.9 rating with a 22 share
and B( Mghfiy mv had an
8.2 rating with an 18 share.
Top 10 prime time shows for
the week ending Sept 23, accor-
ding to the A.C. Nielsen Co
were:
1 The Brill Cosby Show (NBC)
2. 60 Minutes (CBS)
3 Highway to Heaven (NBC)
4. Hunter (NBC)
5 The A-Team (NBC)
6. BC Sunday Sight Movie
(The Enforcer)
7. ABC Sunday Sight Movie
(Paper Dolls t
8. After MASH (CBS)
9. Three's Company (ABC)
10.7e.Mie (vBC)
ANSA
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me





THE EAST CAROL INI AN
Sports

SEPTEMBER 27, 1984
Page 10
Speed Named Starting Quarterback For Pack
By RANDY MEWS
tfMttWmtm
The ECU football team finally
appears to have its quarterback
dilemma resolved, as Pirate head
coach Ed Emory announced in
his weekly press conference that
Darrell Speed would start against
N. C. State this Saturday.
Robbie Bartlett appeared to
have the starting job wrapped up,
but he went down for the season
with streched knee ligaments in a
17-12 loss to Central Michigan.
Since that time, Speed has filled
in admirably completing 16 of his
last 25 passes for 220 yards.
In the Pirates 34-27 victory
over Georgia Southern last
weekend. Speed got off to a sizzl-
ing start completing eight of his
first nine passing attempts, and
for the first time this season it ap-
peared that the offense was able
to move the football.
However, Emory said the
defensive play has yet to match
that of the offense. "I was disap-
pointed with the play of our
defensive line Emory said in
reference to Southern quarter-
back Tracy Ham's 26 of 52 com-
pletions for 403 yards. "It wasn't
that our secondary was doing so
bad, we just weren't putting any
pressure on the quarterback.
"About 80 percent of the pro-
blem was Ham's quick release
and his ability to move in the
pocket Emory continued, "but
if we plan on stopping Tim
Espisito (State quarterback), our
defensive ends are going to have
to get more into the game
Although the Pirates are listed
as a three-point favorite, Emory
said the contest in Raleigh will be
their toughest game to date for
his young team. "State is hungry
for a victory, and they'll be
pumped up to play us
The Wolfpack drew less than
35,000 fans for their games with
Furman and Wake Forest, and if
nothing else, Emory said the
57,000 expected to show up at
Carter-Finlcy Stadium will be
motivation enough for State to
put an end to their two-game los-
ing streak.
According to Emory, the fact
that ECU is coming off a win,
and State has dropped two
straight, won't have anything to
do with the outcome of the game.
"We're going to have to play our
best game of the year in order to
come away with a victory the
head coach said.
Emory referred to the
Wolfpack as a veteran team,
making note of the fact that they
have 19 of 22 players returning
that were either listed as first or
second team last year.
Although the defense is
Emory's primary concern going
into the game, the Pirates' offen-
sive line is still in a questionable
state. Starting offensive tackle
Tim Dumas will be unable to play
because of a pulled hamstring,
while counterpart Brad Henson
will only see limited action.
Emory said both his team and
the Wolfpack are struggling, and
thinks Saturday's contest will
prove to be the pivotal game in
both club's seasons.
' 'One of the goals of this year's
team was to finish the season as
the top team in North Carolina
Emory said. "If we beat State, I
think we'll still have a good shot
at achieving that goal
iWK, V &

y
Darrell Speed was named the starting quarterback for the Pirates' con-
test with N.C. State this Saturday. Coach Ed Emory made the an-
MIKE IMiTH � ECU "hofo L�B
nouneement at his weekel press conference, and said he expects a cap-
city 57,000 people to be on hand.
Daugherty Improving At New Position
ECU Goalie Jesse Daugherty
Bv SCOTT POWERS
AablMt Sporti Ldllor
If anyone were to ask Jesse
Daugherty if he would be playing
goalie for the ECU soccer a few
years ago, chances are he would
have given that person a funny
look.
It's definitely been a roun-
dabout road for him to get where
he is today.
After picking up the game in
Germany a few years ago, his
family moved to Pope Air Force
Base, just outside of Fayetteville.
He soon became the starting
goalie for the Reid Ross High
School soccer team during his
senior year of high school, and
his love for the game continued
to grow from there.
He then moved on to Campbell
College for his freshman year of
college, but decided against play-
ing soccer after a couple of prac-
tices.
After one year at Campbell, he
transferred to ECU, but the
closest that fu came to playing
varsity soccer that season was
playing for an intramural team
from Aycock Hall, Men Without
Talent, which he organized main-
ly from people who had never
played the game before.
The team, anchored by his
goalkeeping, won the Residence
Hall championship and advanced
to the All Campus finals before
being defeated by an Independent
team, Sensation, 3-2.
He then decided to give the
varsity team a try during the spr-
ing. His continuous improve-
ment, and a lucky break, has put
him in the position of starting
goalie for the varsity team in his
first year of college competition.
His lucky break was when stan-
dout ECU goalie Grant Pearson
went down with a knee injury
that sidelined him for the year,
and left the team with two goalies
that had never played at the col-
lege level.
After watching teammate Greg
Brandle play most of the first
game against George Mason, he
stepped in and has played the last
four games, and according to
head coach Steve Brody, im-
provement has been his
trademark.
"When he came out and
started working with us in the
spring, we didn't think that he
would be a factor Brody said.
"There were some technique pro-
blems and some hand problems
all the way up to the first match.
"But after that first match,
Jesse started to hold everything,
work hard, and now everything is
starting to fall into place. He"s
very coachable, a very hard
worker and very intense. I guess
that it just took some time
Daugherty knows that he has
had some breaks, but instead of
just taking what is given to him,
he is using them to his advantage.
"I was fortunate this year that
there were only two goalies on the
team he said, "but 1 can Nee
some improvement in my game. 1
didn't hae much competition in
high school, but its a different
story now
He has nothing but respect for
Brody. "He is v e r
knowledgeable about the game.
He has already helped to make
me a better player he said.
As does Brody. he feels that
the team's best days are still
ahead. "We are playing better,
with a lot more tenacity. I think
that we will get our share of
wins he commented.
As long as he keeps improving
his game, there is no doubt that
the team will improve. But the
one thing that is impressive with
Daughter) is that he is still able to
keep sports in perspective with
the rest of his life.
"I'm just out there having a
good time he said � and
anyone who can keep that
perspective is bound to be suc-
cessful.
Non-Revenue Sports Underway
GOLF: The ECU golf team,
led by senior medalist Chris Cza-
ja, finished in a tie for fourth
place in the Wolfpack Invita-
tional at the Wake Forest Coun-
try Club in Raleigh.
Czaja, who went into the final
round trailing Art Robrtson of
North Carolina State by one
stroke, shot a two-over-par 74
while Robertson faltered and
shot a nine-over-par 81.
In doing so, Czaja became the
first Pirate golfer in three years to
win a tournament, with the last
being Don Sweeting who won the
Old Dominion Tournament in
1981.
ECU golf coach Bob Helmick
was extremly pleased with
Czaja's performance. "Chris did
great. He's a senior and it's his
first individual win on the col-
legiate level � I am really proud
of him
Although Helmick was pleased
with Czaja's performance, he felt
the team should have finished
first as well. "Going in to the last
round we were one shot behind,
if we had gotten some help for
Chris Czaja and Mike Bradley we
would have won
Helmick felt the Pirate
linksters had too many rounds in
the eighties, but also added that
this was a "rather long course
with narrow fairways
Following Czaja's 219 total for
the Pirates was Mikke Bradley,
who had rounds of 74-80-73 for a
total of 227. Helmick felt that
Bradley "ran out of gas during
his second round of the day" on
Monday, but he came back on
Tuesday to fire a 73.
Paul Steelman was next for the
Pirates with scores of 76-76-83
for a three-round-total of 235.
Mark Arcilesi had rounds of
79-78-81 for a total of 238, while
David Waggoner rounded out the
Pirate scoring with scores of
83-77-81 for a three-round-total
of 241.
Campbell University won the
team competition with a three
day total of 901. Old Dominion
was next at 906, followed by the
N.C. State red team at 912. ECU
finished in a tie for fourth with
Guilford at 914.
Sports
Update
Helmick had predicted before
the tournament that the Pirates
would improve on last year's per-
formance, and that held to be
true as the Bucs scored ten
strokes better and finished four
places higher in the team stan-
dings.
Helmick said "we should have
won, but there is no use in crying
over spilt milk � we did improve
over last year, so that's good
The Pirates' next tournament
will be the MacGregor Inter-
collegiate Golf Classsic Oct. 5-7
at the Pickens Country Club in
Pickens, South Carolina.
�Rick McCormac
VOLLEYBALL: The ECU
volleyball record fell to 1-4 Tues-
day night, as the Pirates couldn't
overcome a resurgent Virginia
Commonwealth squad 15-4, 15-8
and 15-5.
VCU ended a slump with an
excellent week of play during a
tournament at James Mason, in-
cluding a win over previously
undefeated George Washington,
while placing second in the ten-
team field.
ECU was unable to stem the
tide of the VCU momentum as
the Pirate defense faltered
against the power of the VCU of-
fense, although the East Carolina
offense played good also.
"Defense let us down Coach
Imogene Turner said. "I haven't
prepared them to be mentally
tough. Our offense has to be mat-
ched by our defense
Donna Zecounis was the
brightest star defensively, accor-
ding to Turner. "Donna did a
tremendous job blocking she
said. "Martha McQuillan had a
number of kills and hit well,
also
Sharon Shank has returned to
action after a pre-season sprain
and is doing a good job, but
should play even better when she
gets over her injury fully. Her leg
was sore after the match, but ap-
parently okay, the coach said.
A potential bit of good news is
the possible return to action of
Barbara Chadwell, who broke
her ankle during practice prior to
the season opener. She's been
working on her timing and is a
possible starter for the next
match this week.
ECU returns to action tonight
at 7 p.m. as they host Methodist
College in Minges Coliseum.
�Tony Brown
SOCCER: Even though the
ECU soccer team is showing im-
provement every game, they still
can not break into the win col-
umn as they dropped their fifth
straight game of the year last Fri-
day, falling to Virginia Com-
monwealth by the score of 3-1.
The team had to face many try-
ing circumstances before they
even got to play the game, accor-
ding to head coach Steve Brody.
"When we got to VCU, we had
to turn around and go 30 minutes
south of the school to another
field Brody said. "When we
got there, the field conditions
were about 10 to 15 times worse
than the worst intramural field
The field was also a lot smaller
than the average soccer field, and
that may have affected the team's
play, but Brody was not making
excuses for his team. "We should
have won the game he said.
The team once again fell
behind early, and the team's in-
ability to put the ball in the net
kept them from taking control of
the game. A David Skeffington
goal was all that the ECU offense
could muster.
Brody sees improvement in the
team's play, and feels that it is
only a matter of time before the
team will get it's share of wins.
One of the bright spots on the
team has been the play of defen-
sive players Jeff Kime, Rand
Hamilton and goalkeeper Jesse
Daugherty.
The booters have one more
game left on their current road
trip, travelling to Fayetteville this
Saturday to face Methodist Col-
lege. ECU returns to Greenville
next week for home games
against American University and
Campbell University.
�Scott Powers
ECU Lo
7 -eble Slams
TENNIS: Galen Treble (above)
slammed, jammed and outmann-
ed his opponent 6-0, 6-1 on the
varsity tennis courts Tuesday
afternoon. The rest of the ECU
men's tennis team was successful
as well, as they defeated Campbell
7-2 to pick up thier first victory of
the season. ECU now stands at
1-2 on the fall season.
Top
i (
Stac
aera
the

peare
I as
I
ECU and N.C. State: Last year's
22-16 ECU victory over the
Wolfpack snapped a five-game
losing streak for the Pirates at the
hands of N.C. State The game,
televised nationally on Super Sta-
tion WTBS (Atlanta), drew
57,700 fans, at the time the
largest crowd to witness a foot-
ball game in the state of North
Carolina.
Fifteen fourth-quarter point
set a 16-7 State lead and gave the
Pirates only their fourth victory
in the 14-game senev wl
began in 1970. Eer game in the
series has been played
Raleigh's Carter-Finle Stac
Eight of North Carolina State'1-
Almost An
Putt Putt,
ByJEANNETTEROTH
Nttff � Olrf
Well, today is the la
register for the infamou- A
Anything Goes
festivities include the I
events:
1. Wacky Rela
2. And The Keg Rolls (
3. Budweiser-All-An
4. Balloon Dance
5. Silly Centipede
6. Flour Power
Morris Spea
Senate Abou
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Former Miami Dolphir.
back Eugene "Mercury" Mo
serving a 20-year sentei �
drug charges, wa
prison for a da to give a -
panel his views or. I �
drug abuse.
Appearing Tuesda) he-
Senate subcommittee
alcoholism and drug abuse. v
ris sajd law enforcement age
will never be able to
seemingly endless flow of iUeg
drugs into the United States.
Morris, who was accompanied
by three federal marshals, said
the problem can oniy be attacked
successfully through an educa-
tion program
"The borders oi this coup
can't be protected well enoug
put a dent in the amount
coming into this country
said. "The dealers often a
users. They're in it
monev.
"The addicts d
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758-6001






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 27, 1984
11
or Pack
w�.fc4�
KC SMITH ECU Photo L�6
Ndid he ; ipects a cap-
Position

- rj-j ferent v erv
1ime.
to make
-
1 think � E But the sive with
ive with
ami
NITAM NUMHIT - ICU
'ams
s tennis team was successful
ell, as they defeated Campbell
o pick up thier first victory of
season. ECU now stands at
n the fall season.
ECU Looks For Second Win Against State
ECU and N.C. State: Last year's
22-16 ECU victory over the
Wolfpack snapped a five-game
losing streak for the Pirates at the
hands of N.C. State. The game,
televised nationally on Super Sta-
tion WTBS (Atlanta), drew
57,700 fans, at the time the
largest crowd to witness a foot-
ball game in the state of North
Carolina.
Fifteen fourth-quarter points off-
set a 16-7 State lead and gave the
Pirates only their fourth victory
in the 14-game series, which
began in 1970. Every game in the
series has been played in
Raleigh's Carter-Finley Stadium.
Eight of North Carolina State's
Top 20 crowds have been when
ECU has visited Carter-Finley
Stadium, and the series has
averaged 51,962 fans each time
the two schools, separated by ap-
proximately 100 miles, meet. Five
of State's Top 10 crowds have ap-
peared when ECU has been the
opponent.
Last' season's crowd is now the
second largest in North Carolina
history, surpassed only by the
57,800 that witnessed North
Carolina's 42-14 victory over
Stae on Oct. 15, 1983. Last
season's victory was ECU Coach
Ed Emory's only one over the
Wolfpack in four attempts.
Heath and the record book: With
his 10 points against Georgia
Southern, junior placekicker Jef
Heath moved into seventh place
on ECU's all-time scoring list
with 149 points. Heath, who con-
nected on field goals of 38 and 33
yards while also converting on
four-of-four extra points, sur-
passed Leander Green (144
points) and Eddie Hicks (146
points), and trails No. 5 Kenny
Strayhorn and Butch Colson (164
points) by 15.
Heath also now has 29 career
field goals, a school record. With
his four extra points against
Georgia Southern, Heath has
now converted on 62 of 65 extra
points, with all three misses com-
ing in the 1983 season.
Stefon and Ricky: Senior split
end Stefon Adams gained sole
possession of 10th place on
ECU's career receptions list with
his four catches against Georgia
Southern. Adams, from High
Point, N.C. now has 45 catches
for his career, pushing Billy Ray
Washington (41) out of the No. 10
spot. Senior flanker Ricky
Nichols holds down the No. 11
spot with his 43 catches. Nichols
is now No. 9 on the school's
career yardage list with his 818,
and needs just eight yards to
Almost Anything Goes Set To Begin,
Putt Putt, Football Well Under Way
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Sl�ff Writer
Well, today is the last day to
register for the infamous Almost
Anything Goes. This year's
festivities include the folowing
events:
1. Wacky Relay
2. And The Keg Rolls On
1. Budweiser-All-American
4. Balloon Dance
5. Sillv Centipede
6. Fie r Power
Everyone who participates will
receive a free Im-Rec Budweiser
T-shirt to show-off on campus.
All it takes is 3 lucky girls and 3
brave guys to fumble through the
zaniest relays on campus. To
register come by room 204
Memorial Gym or call 757-6387.
Make sure you bring shirt sizes so
we'll have a hand designed shirt
ready for you. The Big Event
beginst at 3:30 at the bottom of
College Hill on October 3.
Morris Speaks Out To
Senate About Drugs
WASHINGTON (UPI) �
Former Miami Dolphins running
back Eugene "Mercury" Morris,
serving a 20-year sentence on
drug charges, was excused from
prison for a day to give a Senate
panel his views on how to curb
drug abuse.
Appearing Tuesday before a
Senate subcommittee on
alcoholism and drug abuse, Mor-
ris said law enforcement agencies
will never be able to halt the
seemingly endless flow of illegal
drugs into the United States.
Morris, who was accompanied
by three federal marshals, said
the problem can only be attacked
successfully through an educa-
tion program.
"The borders of this country
can't be protected well enough to
put a dent in the amount of drugs
coming into this country he
said. "The dealers often aren't
users. They're in it for the
money.
"The addicts don't see
themselves for what they really
are. The drugs make you feel as
though you don't have any
responsibilities Morris told the
subcommittee, led by Sen. Paula
Hawkins, R-Fla.
Morris joined coaches, school
administrators and other former
professional football players in
urging Hawkins to help establish
an education program against
drug abuse.
They agreed that the program
should be directed at junior high
school students and their parents.
Morris was sentenced two
years ago after being convicted in
Miami on drug trafficking
charges. He played for the
Dolphins from 1969 through
1976, but he said he did not get
involved in drugs until his foot-
ball career was over.
"When you're doing good,
you don't get involved in drugs
Morris said. "When people have
to deal with reality on the
downside of life, that's when they
get involved
��ffi$0&
East Carolinian advertising
call 757-6366
A
f
WASH
HOUSE
Largest Laundromat in Greenville
33 Washers 20 Dryers
12 oz. Draft For Only 50
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The IM Outdoor Recreation
Center is offering a trip to the
Shenandoah National Park on
October 13, 1984. This exciting
adventure will take up 4 days and
3 nights in a primative at-
mosphere shared only by by
packers and the untamed
wilderness. You'll see spectacles
like the summits of Stony and
Rag Mountains and see the sights
of Cosbin's Cabin.
Make your reservations in
room 113 Memorial Gym by Fri-
day, October 5 at the Outdoor
Receration Center and you'll be
set for an adventure you'll never
forget. The cost is minimal (only
$12.00 with personal equipment)
and all are allowed to use Im-Rec
equipment if they have none.
There will be a pre-trip meeting
in room 105 Memorial gym at
4:00 p.m. October 8. All who
plan to take the trip must attend.
the terrain covered will be dif-
ficult so all campers, packers and
trailblazers are urged to be in
good physical condition before
attempting the trip.
Team Putt-Putt, flag football,
and 3-on-3 basketball updates
will be abounding in the next
report of Sneaker Sam saysplus
new picks as the games go on.
Rembember � The Tennis
shoe Talk Shoe airs every Tues-
day and Thursday at 2:30 and
5:30 on WZMB 91.3 FM. Listen
for exciting updates, features and
the IRS Intramural Scoreboard.
Get involved in Intramurals �
Participate rather than spectate.
DON'T
LUNCHWITH
CLOWNS
Get uk'Sef6c&matwe
lav
Sandwiches & Salads
We're Open Late Every Night
208 E. Fifth St. y B 758-7979
cSHONEYS FISHERMAN'S
Yi 1 M?� BUFFET

ALL-YOU-CAN-EATI
Help Yourself To
� FISH FILLETS Breaded 'n Seasoned From
3 Favorite Shoneys Recipes
� Baked FISH FILLETS
� Hot Vegetables, including Fried Okra
Seafood Chowder
French Fries Qy
Hushpuppies � - -ff
EVERY FRIDAY
5 PM � 9 PM
SHONEYS
$5 99 with Salad � Fruit Bar
Spocil CNtrJrwn s PricM
8faville, NC 27U4
7M-21M
move past Jimmy Adkins (825)
into the No. 8 spot. Nichols needs
32 yards to take over the No. 7
spot, held by Norwood Van (849
yards).
Georgia Southern rolls: Although
the Pirates snapped their three-
game losing streak with a 34-27
victory over Georgia Southern
last week, it didn't come easy.
The Eagles, a Division I-AA in-
dependent in only their third year
of existence since reviving foot-
ball in 1982, shattered one
NCAA I-AA record, tied
another, broke four Ficklen
Stadium records and tied two
others. The following are the
records Georgia Southern, now
3-1 this season, broke or tied:
NCAA: Most yards gained by a
losing team � 645 yards
(previous mark 554 by Nevada-
Reno vs Weber State, Nov. 6,
1982).
Most Attempts � 103 (tied mark
set by Portland State vs Weber
State, Nov. 22, 1980)
Ficklen Stadium: Most First
Downs Opponent � 35 (previous
mark 26 by William & Marv
1981)
Most First Downs Passing � 20
(ties mark by William & Marv
1981)
Most Passes Attempted � 52
(previous mark 47 bv Murray
State, 1983)
Most Yards Passing � 403 (tied
mark by William & Mary, 1981)
Most Offensive Plays � 103
(previous mark 89 bv William &
Mary, 1968)
Most Yards Total Offense � 645
(previous mark 493 b West
Texas State, 1967)
The Eagles' 645 yards of total of-
fense was the most allowed b an
ECU defense since the Seminoles
of Florida State rolled to 558
yards in their 47-46 victory to
open the 1983 season.
Once you've tasted
Killian's Irish Red,
you may never
go Dutch again.
Now don't ��et us
wrong. The Dutch
make some pretty fine
beers. But they don't
slow-roast their malt
like we do
So no Dutch beer
has the color, the
haracter, the rich,
incredibly smooth taste
of Killian's Red Ale
So the next time
you're about to order
vour favorite Dutch
reer, try a Killian's
Red, instead.
You may never yo
Dutch again.
VnXTANSRgT)
I9H4 Adolphood ,nM � i -
�4 -��� hf �i(-iijim. H
UNSHINE
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IDEO,
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LATEST ARRIVALS:
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We have a large selection of family, classic, comedy,
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ECU STUDENT SPECIALS
ARRIVING SOON:
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Offering "VCR Rentals
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214 Arlington Blvd.
756-4392
?
f
� I





i:
II I KSl � kvU IM
SEPTEMBER 27, 184
The Experts Pick The Winners
ECl ai N.C. M AH
1)1 Kr al Kn
CLEMSON at GEORGIA IKCH
I V at KANSAS
V Xkr EORES1 at MARY1 M
VIRGINIA at IR(iIM IKH
NDhKBll 1 at ABAMA
II NNESSEE at Al'Bl'RN
MISSISSIPPI si 1F at Fl OHIO A
GEORGIA at sH 111XROI INA
11 1 INOlS al lOW
I si at SOI 1IIERN CA1
NOTRE DAME at MISSOl KI
OKI HO1 STATE al IT 1 S
Msl MR(,1N1 at PITT
XRION si I r at si NK)RI)
II XAS at PrNN si ATI
SAD SAM
N.C. State
Army
Clemson
UNC
Wake
Virginia lech
Alabama
Auburn
Florida
(ieorgia
Iowa
Southern Cal
Notre Dame
Okla. St.
Pitt
Ariz. St.
Texas
TINA MAROSCHAK
ECU
Duke
Clemson
Kansas
Maryland
Virginia Tech
Alabama
Auburn
Florida
Georgia
Illinois
LSI!
Notre Dame
Okla. St.
West Va.
Ariz. St.
Texas
RANDY MEWS
ECU
Arm
Clemson
UNC
Maryland
Va. Tech
Alabama
Auburn
Florida
(ieorgia
Iowa
Southern Cal
Notre Dame
Okla. State
Pitt
Ariz. State
Texas
JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
ECU
Army
Clemson
UNC
Maryland
Va. Tech
Alabama
Auburn
Florida
Georgia
Iowa
Southern Cal
Notre Dame
Tulsa
Pitt
Stanford
Penn St.
SCOTT POWERS
N.C. State
Army
Clemson
UNC
Maryland
Virginia lech
Alabama
Auburn
Florida
Georgia
Iowa
Southern Cal
Notre Dame
Okla. St.
West Va.
Ariz. St.
Texas
GREG RIDFOI I
N.C. state
Duke
Clemson
UNC
Maryland
V irginia
Alabama
uburn
Honda
Georgia
Illinois
Southern Cal
Notre Dame
Tulsa
Pitt
Ariz. St.
Texas
Two Tied For Expert Lead
1 SnIiii
WeekOverallPet.Be
Sad sam8-622-16.579
1 ina Marosi hak9-5i6.579
Ranch Mews8-620-18.5262
Jennifer Jendrasiak8-61-19.5003
Scott Powers8-619-19.500J
Greg Rideout6-817-21.4175
Games
?g Rideout is happ to final-
a little peace and uiet
lown in the basement, een
igh we still have a Pee Dee.
Bui Randy Mews is the hap-
� all because he finally
i see Jennifer Jendrasiak
in a bathing suit
ftei looking at these picks,
however, 1 doubt that anyone
will be happy for long. Check
next Thursday as the weekly
drama continues.

Ramseur, Clover Win
ACC Offensive Honors
ii'pi) �
. � M hael
tlantic

� th
- i
-
Ma er,
a 29-17
:toi - - nia, was

-nan of the week.
Ramseur. the Deacons' tl
ling rusl 2,042
Lginc 49 vards a
Against North Carolina State,
the junior from L.andis, N. C,
ed with a hip injury and ran
� 149 yards on 35 carries. He
also caught four passes for 35
yards.
Clover, a senior from Upper
Mariboro, Md led the Terp
linemen who cleared the way for
Maryland's 195 yards rushing
and 369 ards total offense
against West Virginia.
The weekly selection of ACC
players of the week is made by a
special committee of the Atlantic
Coast Sportswriters Association.
ATTIC
Sept 2th
Secret Service
Sepi 28th
Illusion
- nden
Sat Sept. 29
Glass Moon
In Concert
The Spirit of the Attic lives at
KING & QUEEN NORTH
'ee, Inc.
crccn printer
200 Hooker Rood
756-9058
ask for Tomi
Lowest printing prices in the area
Tee shirts $3.00 Painters caps .80
Ideal for Greeks and Intramurals
THEIR 10 YEAR OLD DAUGHTER
IS SUING THEM FOR DIVORCE.
�i
I
RYAN O'NEAL SHELLEY LONG DREW BARRYM0RE
"IRRECONCILABLE DIFFERENCES" A LANTANA PRODUCTION
SAM WANAMAKER � ALLEN GARFIELD SHARON STONE
iwtffw WILLIAM A. FRAKER, A.S.C. e� m NANCY MEYERS
pti ARLENE SELLERS �j ALEX WMTSKY
�� NANCY MEYERS s CHARLES SHYER r CHARLES SHYER
PG
PARENTAL GUIOAMCE SUGGFTO �
SOME MATERUL MAY NOT BE SUIT ABU FOB CHB-DREN

DISTRIBUTED B AARNER BOOS
A WARNfR COMMUNICATIONS COMFAN-


iii ill III III Hi fil Hi id l
OPENS AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE
FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 28TH






Title
The East Carolinian, September 27, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 27, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.363
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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