The East Carolinian, September 25, 1984






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 o. 10
Tuesday September 25, ly84
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Rising Tuition Costs
Limit Student Choices
A Skeleton Crew
JON JORDAN � CCU Phot Lab
This ma look like the remains of a building but it's actually the Old Cafeteria Building being renovated.
The Geology Department plans to occupy most of the updated quarters.
UNCASG Praises Friday
Discusses Student Insurance
(UPI) The cost of attending
North Carolina's private colleges
has soared nearly $2,000 since
1977 � squeezing out all but the
rich and the poor who qualify for
financial aid, administrators say.
"It's clear that a substantial
number of students don't have the
financial capability and lost the
choice of attending an indepen-
dent institution because of the
cost difference Elon College
President James Fred Young said.
"You become split into only the
very wealthy who can come to
school through their own finan-
cial capabilities and the very poor
who can come through financial
aid he said.
The average tuition for students
in four-year private schools in
North Carolina stood at $4,108
this fall while the typical student
in the public University of North
Carolina system paid $727, accor-
ding to the North Carolina
Association of Independent Col-
leges and Universities.
The gap is widening. In the past
seven years, annual tuition has
jumped an average of $1,957 at
private schools and just $187 in
the University of North Carolina
system.
"This has been a problem for
some time. Right now, we're fin-
ding that the problem is getting
worse said Young, who is also
chairman of the state Association
of Independent Colleges and
Universities.
Administrators said private
schools have been forced to raise
tuition to cope with inflation but
public schools can rely on the
state to offset higher costs.
Some officials blamed the
Reagan administration for cutting
the Pell Grants program, which is
designed to help families ith in
comes in the $30,000 range.
Young said the problem is part
of the "Reagan administration's
policy of dividing the country into
the rich and the poor
In 1980, private college students
in North Carolina received $19.3
million in Pell Grants. The
amount fell to $4 million in 1982,
officials said.
"Now you don't get very much
aid unless your family has an in-
come of under $15,000 said
Ralph M. Byers, executive direc-
tor of the association of indepen-
dent colleges and universities.
"We continual) worry about
the families who just missed quali
tying for financial aid said Jean
A. Scott, undergraduate admis
sions director at Duke University,
where tuition, room and board
cost $11,029 this year.
The high cost of a private
education is sending more and
more s'udents to public schools.
North Carolina's 38 private col-
leges had 45,231 undergraduates
in 1980-81
"In terms of the middle income
groups, we don't know how many
students never applv to our school
because they're worried about
cost, ' said Sue t Kearney, ad-
missions director at Meredith Col-
lege.
Administrators at private col
leges are asking the legislature foi
money to hold down tuition in
creases. They estimate that it
would cost the tate $80 million i!
all North Carolina students now
in private schools suddenr-
jumped to public universities.
"There's a philosophical and
substantive economic reason foi
the state to ensure the health oi
the independent institutions
Young said.
By JENNIFER JENDRAMAK
N�s K-dllor
"We're growing and becoming
more recognized across the
state said SGA President John
Rainey after attending a meeting
of the UNCASG last weekend.
The UNCASG is an organiza-
tion consisting of the student
government presidents from all 16
schools in the UNC system It
helps to give each school's presi-
dent an idea ol how others schools
deai with stvident government
matters. It also gives students a
voice with the INC Board of
Governors as the L NC ASG presi-
dent has a seat on this board.
"The purpose of the meeting
In A Bitter Debate
was to organize ourselves and
prepare for the 1984-85 school
year Rainey said. A new policy
this year is to have two represen-
tatives from each school attend
the meetings. Jeff Cloninger,
ECU's assistant attorney general,
attended this meeting.
According to Rainey, Oct. 1-8
has been designated Voter
Registration Week by Gov. James
B. Hunt, Jr. The UNCASG pass-
ed a resolution in support of this.
I'hev also passed a resolution
praising retiring UNC-system
President William Friday for his
"many contributions to the UNC
system
One issue discussed by the
group concerns student health in-
surance. According to Rainey, ef-
forts are now being made to allow
the student health payment to
serve as a deductible for insurance
policies. An informational
meeting concerning this proposed
change will be held at ECU Oct. 4
and all students are invited to at-
tend.
The next UNCASG meeting has
been tentatively scheduled for
Nov. 9 at UNC-Chapel Hill. At
this time, the student body
presidents will be presented to the
UNC Board of Governors and
President Friday.
Rainey said the UNCASG is
particularly important to students
because it gives them a direct link
with other schools
SGA Elections Tomorrow
-
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NewtUilor
Who do you think will make
the best class president Do
you think Pee Dee is a stupid
name for a pirate?
SGA elections will be held
tomorrow and students will
have a chance to vote for
representatives and class of-
ficers as well as to voice their
opinions concerning several
issues.
Students will be able to vote
for 25 day representatives, 25
dorm representatives and class
officers for their class.
Candidates Battle Issues Once Again
(UPI) � Sen. Jesse Helms,
R-N.C, and Democratic Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr met Sunday
night in the third of four televised
debates in their campaign for the
U.S. Senate and discussed taxes,
social security, and their political
philosophies.
The debate followed the lines of
the long, hard political fight in
what has become the nation's
most expensive, heated and close-
ly watched Senate campaign.
Helms began by calling Hunt a
"Mondale liberal who supports
taxes and has "flip-flopped all
over the lot" in his stand on the
issues. Those have been three ma-
jor themes of Helms' extensive
media blitz.
Hunt described himself as the
candidate of moderation and ac-
cused Helms of voting in favor of
cutting Social Security and
veterans' benefits, supporting cuts
in student loans, and backing
large corporations and the rich
when it comes to tax legislation.
Those have been themes in Hunt's
television and radio advertising.
The debate grew heated at
times. Hunt said Helms had called
veterans' benefits "welfare
Then Helms retaliated by pointing
out Hunt had never served in the
military. Hunt objected to the
debate moderator, saying Helms
was unfairly questioning his
patriotism.
"I'm a Reagan conservative
and proud of it Helms began in
his opening statement. "He's a
Mondale Liberal and ashamed of
it
Helms said the Reagan ad-
ministration had established an
"upbeat" feeling "of pride" in
the country during his first ad-
ministration.
"He (Hunt) advocates the fail-
ed politics of the Carter-Mondale
years said Helms.
Then Hunt delivered his open-
ing statement saying he believes in
"positive leadership and pro-
grams
He charged that Helms "speaks
to prejudice and fear and relies
on "distortions of fact He said
Helms is the "candidate of special
interest
Helms opened the questioning
after each candidate made a state-
ment. He asked Helms whether he
had supported the idea of chopp-
ing the $122 per month minimum
benefit for social security reci-
pients. Helms replied that
"tough" decisions had to be made
to insure the integrity of Social
Security and said Hunt was the
"master of fright" in his political
advertising.
Helms began his questioning by
accusing Hunt of misusing state
aircraft, cars and personnel in his
political campaign. Hunt
retaliated with the accusation that
Helms had established an illegal
campaign financing operation.
The third debate will be broad-
cast from Charlotte on Oct. 13.
The Hunt-Helms race is being
hailed nationally as one of the
highest priced and most vicious
Senate races in history. Recent
polls show little difference bet-
ween the two.
Two- Year Schools See Little Growth
(CPS) � There will be about
7 000 fewer students enrolled at
community and other two-year
colleges this fall, and some
observers fear it could be the start
of an era or little or no growth for
the schools.
Enrollment may fall from ont
to-two percent this fall, the
American Association of Com-
munity and Junior Colleges
predicted in a studv released last
week.
It's the biggest drop in the two-
year campus population in 20
years, the group adds.
The AACJC survey of member
colleges blames the bottoming out
�f the baby boom population and
the end of the recession, which
Persuaded many people to return
to school for retraining, for the
slight decline.
"The boom era is over con-
cludes AACJC spokeswoman
Rosemary Wohlers. "In the '60s,
enrollment was growing like
crazy. Now it's leveling off
"The improving economy
means fewer students attending
community colleges she says.
"As jobs open up, students cut
back to part-time attendence or
leave school altogether
And while community colleges
still attract their share of "non-
traditional" students � people
over 24 � the decreasing popula-
tion of 18-to-24-year-old people
from which to draw students is
taking its toll.
The schools themselves have
been anticipating a decline for
years, especially since 1978, when
two-year campus enrollment
dropped slightly.
"Enrollment grew for a couple
of years after 1978 Wohler
states, "until 1983, when it slip-
ped .33 percent. The projected
drop this year is the largest in 20
years
Wohler attributes community
colleges' ability to keep
enrollments relatively stable over
the years to the rising costs of
four-year colleges. Most of their
students come "right out of high
school not other schools, she
says.
There's no real geographic
sense to the sagging enrollments
this fall.
Schools in California, Florida
and New York are anticipating
declines this school year, while
Arizona, Washington and
Maryland colleges expect slight in-
creases.
Yet some states project a
greater drop than the AACJC
predicts.
Illinois community college at-
tendance could slip as much as
five percent,officials there say.
"We definitely have to say
enrollment is down says
Virginia McMillan of the Illinois
Community College Board. "We
estimated earlier this year it would
be down five percent, but it looks
as though it may be even lower.
At some colleges, it may drop as
much as 15 percent
California's huge two-year col-
lege system, which claims it
enrolls 25 percent of America's
community college students, is ex-
amining its enrollment figures
very carefully because the system
is charging tuition for the first
time in its history this fall.
"It looks as if enrollment will
be down reports Allene Mur-
doch of the California Communi-
ty College Board of Directors.
"Some schools are experiencing
depressed enrollments, especially
in urban districts
Schools in areas with growing
populations, such as the San
Francisco area, are enjoying
enrollment increases.
In all, the schools surveyed ex-
pect a total enrollment of
4,870,000, down from last fall's
4,947,975.
In addition, there will be two
opinion questions on the
ballot. The first question, "Do
you favor the name Pee Dee for
the ECU mascot&" will "help
the SGA gauge student
feeling' concerning the
mascot, SGA President John
Rainey said.
The second question will poll
students on their choices for
president, "N.C. senator and
governor.
Both questions are designed
to see how students feel,
Rainey said Further action
may be taken on the Pee Dee
issue, depending on the


Pee Dec
response l favor the i iascoi
but I do not agree wii the
name Rainey said.
There will be 20 polling
places across campus and they
will be open all day. A valid ID
and activity card are needed to
vote.
V
The Littlest Pirate
JON JOftOAN -
ECU Photo Las
I may be little now, but wait until I'm in the Class of '99. Go
Pirates!
On The Inside
Announcements2 -Once again, the East CaroU-
Ed"ori�b4 nian's editorial experts failed to
i�S��I " "� of the football
ciassirieds8 game outcomes. For the
ports11 results, see Sports, page 14.
�The last day to drop a class is
Oct. 4. Don't forget!

�� �m





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 25. 1984
Student Opinion
N.C. Senate Race
Tout!
With election day drawing
closer, the outcome of the
Hunt-Helms Senate race is one
of the most hotly-contested
subjects in the state. Students
were asked their choice in the
battle.
"I'm sure I'll support Hunt.
I've never felt anything in com-
mon with Helms' conservative
attitudes Leslie Todd, Staff,
News Bureau
"I'm really not sure, both
are good men. If I went on ex-
perience, I'd have to go on
Jesse Brian Dillard,
Freshman, Chemistry
"I haven't really though
about it Diane Even hart,
Freshman, Medical Records
Administration
"I support Jim Hunt. He
seems more qualified Jackie
Ferrell, Freshman, Psychology
Dillard

Evenhart
Ferrell
Voter Registration Stressed
Young Dems Set Fall Goals
By HAROLD JOYNER
AaMctaat Ncwi Editor
The ECU chapter of the Young
Democrats are currently involved
with East Carolina's Campaign
for Voter Registration in working
for achievement of a statewide
goal of 20,000 registered student
voters.
At the YD's organizational
meeting last week, according to
Charles Sune, the group's chair-
man, 30 students discussed plans
for a successful voter registration
drive with the East Carolina Stu-
dent Campaign for Voter
Registration, a nonpartisan
group. Sune said the College
Republicans were invited to par-
ticipate, but declined because they
were conducting their own drive.
Sune added, "It's really unfor-
tunate because I feel a joint effort
would contribute to the national
goal of one million students.
A spokesperson for the
ECSCVR said registration will
begin next week. The locations on
campus will include the Student
Supply Store, the Croatan,
Mendenhall Student Center.
Allied Health Building, and the become aware of what direction
the Republicans are taking us
"they will understand
Medical School
Sune, who is currently the State
Chairman of the Steering Com-
mittee for MondaleFerraro, said
other goals for the Young
Democrats include educating the
registered voters. "We want to
educate the students Sune said,
"on making the most intelligent
decision in an election
Sune also said he invited the
ECU College Republicans to a
campus debate with the Young
Democrats, but they declined.
Sune said he felt a debate bet-
ween the campus clubs would be a
more effective tool in informing
the students of political plat-
Sune said,
why the Democrats are the pre
gressive party
Sune concluded, "the Your.
Democrats will continue their in
volvement with Student registry
tion. From now until Octobers
our first priority will be to get die
Students of ECU registered ; :
vote
forms. "Once the students
to -tt- cU'tmmmJJSeH or pd magnetics
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PLACE
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ANNOUNCEMENTS
Due to limited space. The �a
Carolinian requests that orgramaioru
submit only important announces-
about up coming events that Modems
need to knov. about in advance P,ca-r
submit such messages as 'thank you"
and "congratulation" notes to the Per-
sonals section of the classifieds in The
East Carolinian
The deadline for announcemer.
pm Monday for the Tuesda
and 3 r n Wednesday for the Thar
paper
The must be .ype on an announce
mem form to be a . t: These forms
:an be picked up at our office
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
- 8 g Bi-o"e'j aj A p-a P Serw �� a'e
namtndaett�t�Rt� m-i.BjE- - -
'V- nc jC or nmrmtrnt Od �'��� r'�ehou�
�rent a �w oo Aiso �� 5 a -a-e �- �'?o- �-
ftStt out et His l"oJie O'e -�-
INTENDED SLAP MAJORS
Gener-a College s'uo"j -�?'���: - e
' 5cec 8guao� anc t ��y. PattM � -
me' or Thurj oc, 4 a. - x p � � e,e�
C 3OT ar prt 'tq s"a or �c ac. wei
'eriiJec a.ors a'e 'equ ret) K ��
FENCINGCLUB
Tr ECb FeC'is � - me to inwitt
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HAPPY HOUR
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RUGBY
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I





l-MBL-K 25, NM
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 25. 1984
all Goals
hat direction
taking us
j vill understand
s i:e the pro-
"the Young
�tie iheir in-
dent registca-
til October 8,
e to get the
egistered 'to
$
MAGNETICS
S9.9P
iupon
s stereo
NT
f
i
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IES
5434
LAC.t:
PERSON!
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!
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Due to limited space. The East
Carolinian requests that organizations
submit only important announcements
about up coming events that students
need to know about in advance. Please
submit suck messages as "thank you"
and "congratulation" notes to the Per-
sonals section of the classifieds in The
East Carolinian.
The deadline for announcements is 3
pm Monday for the Tuesday paper
and 3 p.m. Wednesday for the Thursday
paper.
They must be .ypeH on an announce-
ment form to be accepted. These forms
can be picked up at our office.
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
All Big Brothers of Alpha Phi Sorority are
reminded that we will be having Big Brother Rush
coming up on Thursday. Oct 4 at the Treehouse
from 4 00 7 00 Also, lets all make an effort to
visit out at the house more often
INTENDED SLAP MAJORS
General College students interested In maloring
In Speech Language and Auditory Pathology will
meet on Thurs , Oct 4 at 7 00 p m in Brewster
C 307 for pre registration ana advisement AM In
tended majors are required to attend
FENCINGCLUB
The ECU Fencing Club would like to Invite
anyone interested to loin today Any questions,
call Steven Zakely at 758 9776
HAPPY HOUR
Delta Sigma Phi pledge class is having a happy
hour at 'he Treehouse, Thurs , Sept 27. from 4to6
p m Happy hour prices for your favorite
beverage Come party with the best"
APOCARWASH
Alpha Phi Omega is sponsoring a carwash for
tne Ronald McDonald house! The carwash will be
Sat Sept 29 at the Shell Service Station near
Farm Fresh it's from 9 am to 3 p m and the
cost is $2 00 See you there
RUGBY
ECU Rugby Club has been invited to play in the
first annual ACC Rugby Tournament, Sept 79.30
It is being held at N C State's intramural fields,
s'artmg at 9 00 and lasting all afternoon So if you
are going to be in Raleigh this weekend to watch
the football game, come check it out ana support
our team Thanx
BKA
Beta Kappa Alpha will hold a general meeting
for all members and other interested business
majors Thurs , Sept 27 at 3 00 p rr in Rawl 101
ISA
ISA members Meeting Sat Sept 29 at 6 00
p m in Menoenhall Room 221 See you mere
LACROSSE
'hfrf will be a locrosse match at N C State on
Sat Sept 29 at 2.00. All players, please contact
Chris Tomasic immediately at 752 49V9 There
be practice on Tues , Wed . Thurs and Fri ,
a' 3 30
ZBT LITTLE SISTERS
There will be a meeting on Thurs Sept 27 at
5 0C c m m the Coffeehouse Please make every
effort �o attend
WEIGHTLIFTINGCLUB
Tie irst organizational meeting of 194 will be
Thurs Sept 27 at 7 30 in Memorial Room 105 B.
Attendance is mandatory Any questions, please
call Jeff at 758 4382
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA
Sigma Sigma Sigma and Grumpy's present 40
oi draft for $1 50. Thurs , Sept 27 at 900 until.
Admission at door $1 00
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
The Brothers of Kappa Alpha Psi, Inc. will be
sponsoring a happy hour at the Wiz on Thursday
night from 9 30 until Transportation to and from
the Wiz will be provided FREE BEER while it
lasts! Come out and party with the Nupes!
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP
Fun, friendship, fellowship that's what inter
Varsity Christian Fellowship is all about! Join us
this Wed night at 7 in the Jenkins Art Bldg
auditorium as we talk more about missions. See
you there!
NEWMAN
The ECU Newman Community will be meeting
this Wed at 5 p m at the ECU Newman Center on
East loth Street (just past the music bldgJoin
us as we celebrate with a large prayer and wor
ship session, followed by a meeting and dinner
Br ng a friend and be there!
KAPPA DELTA PI
The 'i'st meeting of Kappa Delta Pi will be held
Tues Sept 25. in the Willis Building (located on
Firs- and Reade Streets) at 7 30pm Dr William
B vartin will address the problems and issues of
pub' c education We encourage all Kadelpians
anc their friends to attend this meeting.
Re'eshments will be served We look forward to
see ng you there
Announcements
SURFCLUB
The team trials were postponed last Sunday in
big choppy waves at Hatteras due to hioh winds
and strong currents These conditions maoe judg
ing impossible so another date will be set and held
at Emerald Isle The most Important meeting of
the year is this Thursday, Sept 20 in Room 221
Mendenhall at 8 00 p m Topics to be covered in
elude rescheduling of trials, club dues, t shirt
and jacket sales, planning of road trips, fund
raising, and scheduling of contests Contact Dave
Colby at 758 2392 for more information
FILMS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Films Committee will meet
on wed . Sept 26. at 5 00 p m. In Room 242 of
Mendenhall Student Center All members and In
terested students are urged to attend.
FINANCIAL AID
During the week Sept 24 28, the Student Flnan
cial Aid Office will be closed to walk In traffic
from 8 00 a m to 1 00 p m Students, parents, and
other parties will be seen from 100 p m to 5 00
p m The purpose of the shortened office hours
during the week is to enable the financial aid staff
to catch up on processing financial aid appllca
tions
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
The brothers and little sisters of Pi Kappa Phi
Fraternity will be having their little sister rush
this Tues . Sept 25 at the Elbo Room and Wed ,
Sept 26 at the PI Kappa house Girls, come out
and meet the brothers and little sisters of PI Kap
pa Phi Bring ID'S Call 756 3540 for Information
or ride
STUDENTS FOR CHRIST
informal Bible discussions Every Tues night
at 9 00 p m In Room 212 Mendenhall Everyone Is
welcome! Bring a Bible and a friend
HELMSBUSTERS
Students interested in joining the students for
Jim Hunt should please contact Scott Thomas at
752 1793 or David Brooks at 752 5198
AOTT
Come and get rid of your weekday grumpies
and loin AOTT for our happy hour this Wed at
Grumpy's from 4 7 II 00 admission
ZBT LITTLE SISTERS
There will be on executive board meeting on
Tues , Sept 25. at 7 00 pm at Renee's
BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU Biology Club will have Its next
meeting on Wed Sept 26. at 7 00 o m in Room
BN 102 John Anema, chairman of the Sierra Club
will have a slide presentation on Sierra Club
outings All interested persons and club members
are urged to attend
TEAM HANDBALL
Practice wll begin Tues , Sept 25, at 9 00 p m
at Memorial Gym People interested in playing
come to practice or call Jeff Humbert at 752 9635
tor more information
PI KAPPA PHI
The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi will be having
their first happy hour of the newspaper this Tues
Sept 25 night at the Elbo Room It's 10 cent draft
night and everyone is invited to comeout and meet
and party with the Pi Kapps
IRATES
important practice TODAY at the bottom of the
hill Will discuss trip to Wilmington If you plan
to go at least stop by
IRATES
We will be having an important meeting tonight
at 9 00 in MSC Ask at desk for room no If you are
planning on being on the ultimate team, it is
crucial that you be there
MINORITY ARTS
The Minority Arts Committee will meet on
Thurs . Sept 27, at 5:00 p m in Room 242 of
Mendenhall Student Center All members and in
terested students are urged to attend
JEWISH STUDENTS
ECUHILLEL
High Holiday Services. Rosh Hashana, Dinner
to be held at the Resnik� on Wed. evening. Sept
26, at 530 pm followed by services Wed. even
ing, Sept 26, 7 � pm Thurs, Sept 27, 9:00
a m Fri Sept 28, 9 00 am Yom Kipper, Din
ner to be held at the Resniks' on Fri evening, Oct
5fh at 5 15 p m. followed by services Fri evening
Oct 5, 7,15 p.m Sat , Oct 6, 900 am All ser
vices will be held at Congregation Bayt Shalom
All students are welcome and urged to come to the
dinners before sevices The dinners are sponsored
by the ECU Hillel organization. For more infor
mation. directions, or rides please call 756 5640
CRAFT CENTER
All ECU students, faculty, staff, and their
dependents 18 yrs or older are eligble to join the
Mendenhall Crafts Center located on the bottom
floor of Mendenhall Student Center Workshops
are now being offered in Photography, Weaving,
Pottery, Jewelry Making, Stitching, various
Christmas Crafts, Children's Ceramics and
more! Stop by the information desk or the Crafts
Center and pick up a brochure For additional in
formation call 757 6611, ext 260 (after 5 PM call
ext 271)
Ron Nichols
formerly with For Heads Only,
wishes to invite all his
customers to
Precision Designs
205 E. 3rd St.
Hours: Mon-Fri 9-7,
Sat 9-2
752-0515
Precision Designs
$2.00 Off all
men styles & ladies fashion designs
20 off all perms
MUSIC
Music courses for non music majors and
general college students The School of Music en
courages students to consider enrolling in the
tollowing music courses designed tor non music
majors during the spring term MUSC 1208, 1218
Non Music Major Group Piano I and II, MUSC
1215 Group Voice 11 (section 003 for non majors),
MUSC 2208 Music Appreciation, MUSC 2218 Or
chestral Music, MUSC 2238 Contemporary
Music, MUSC 2258 History of Jazz Music, MUSC
3018 Introduction to Basic Music Skills, MUSC
3028 Music Education in Elementary Grades,
MUSC 3038 Music Education in Intermediate
Grades, MUSC 3048 Music for Exceptional
Children Performance organizations are open to
all students, but an audition is required prior to
registration in any performance group unless the
student has the consent of the instructor No other
school of music course offerings may be taken
without permission of instructor and authorize
tion from the Dean's office
CSCIMATH MAJORS
Great Co op jobs available for Spring and Sum
mer! Several jobs have application deadlines of
September 25, 1984 Must have GPA of 2 5 or bet
ter and a good grade in at least 1 programming
course Graduate and Undergraduate jobs COme
to Rawl 313 now to make an appointment to see a
coordinator about these iobs
PRE-PHYSICAL THERAPY
Deadline for 1985 admission to professional
phase is November I, 1964. All general college and
physical therapy prerequisites must be com
pleted by end of Spring, 1985 Allied Health Pro
fessions Admissions Test must be taken in
November (apply early October) Application
packets are to be picked up Oct 5, 1984 In the
Physical Therapy Department Office (Belk
Building, Annex 3, 757 6961, Ext 261)
SOFTBALLTRYOUTS
For 'hose of you who are interested in trying out
for the Women's Softball Team Call or see Coach
S Manahan as soon as possible Call 757 6161
PLANT SALE
The annual Biology Club Plant Sale will be held
on Thursday, Sept 27 and Friday, Sept 28. 1984
Times of sale will be trom 7 30 a m to 1 00 p m
The sale will be held in the Biology Greenhouse
room S 111 Checks post dated September 28 will
be accepted Plants make beautiful household ac
cents so please suppport the Biology Club1
SCUBA
Thanksgiving vacation DIVE COZUMEL,
MEXICO 8 days, 7 nights on the beautiful
Yucatan Penninsula Drift diving on the Palancar
reef will be one of the most exiting experiences
From Raleigh, price including air fare, meals,
lodging and diving $820 00 special price for non
divers $720 00 Air travel provided by Mexicana
and Eastern For registrations and further infor
mation, call Ray Scarf, Dir of Acquatics 757 6441
SCUBA
Christmas vacation Dive Penny Camp Na
tional Underwater Park in fabulous Key I argo
The Florida Keys are the only natural coral reef
in the Continental u S This five day trip, Dec
16 21st includes lodging and two dive boat trips
daily Tanks, backpack, and weight belts are pro
vided Cost is S200 00 per person, two to a room oc
cupancy and $175 00 per person, four to a room oc
cupancy For further information, call Ray
Scharf, Dir of Acquatics, 757 6441
ACCOUNTING
A representative from the US General Accoun
ting Office, Virginia Beach, VA will be on campus
Oct. 23, 1984 to interview coop students who
would like to work as GAO Evaluators Accoun
ting majors who have completed 60 semester
hours and have a 2 9 GPA or higher, should con
tact the Co op office, 313 Rawl Bldg to arrange an
interview immediately
KARATE
Advanced classes for the ECU Karate Club are
currently meeting on Monday and Thursday
nights at 7 30 The beginning classes will have
their registration on Sept 27 at 7 30 in Memorial
Gym Dance Room
PRIME TIME
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ, every
Thurs 7 p m in Jenkins Aud Art Bldg We are
committed to having fun, fellowship and a study
of God's Word Please Join us See you there
BALLROOM DANCE
Ballroom dance for faculty and staff will begin
on October 2 at noon in Memorial Gym Room 108
Classes are scheduled tor Tuesday and Thursday
there is no charge Bring a partner or come alone
and learn basic dance steps m the Fox Trot, Cha
Cha, Waltz, Rumba and Bop1 Contact Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 or just arrive to dance.
MALE VOICES NEEDED
Greenville Choral Society, with over 50 voices,
needs more male voices in all vocal ranges,
especially tenors The Society practices ever
Tuesday evening from 7 30 9 30. and will preform
three public concerts during the 1984 85 season
For more information, contact Carolyn ipock at
355 2717
KAPPA SIGMA
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
Kappa Sig little sister rush is Tuesday and
Wednesday at the Kappa Sig House bes.de Dar
ryls Parties start at 9 00 For more information
call 752 5543
SAM
The Society for Advancement of Management
will have an organizational meeting on Wednes
day. Sept 26 at 3 00 p m in room 104 Rawl Plans
will be finalized for the events and meetings plan
ned for the semester Any student or faculty
member is welcome to attend SAM is for anyone
since we all must manage something in our lives
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Prospective and current environmental design
(School of Art) members are urged to attend an
advising meeting to discuss new directions for the
program, what environmental design's all about,
course selection, etc Bring lunch at noon, Friday.
Sept 28, in Jenkins 208
MAT
Due to increased charges by the Psychological
Corp, the Testing Center at ECU finds it
necessary to pass on the increase to the MAT can
didates Beginning Oct 1. 1984, the test fee will be
$23
FRESHMEN
Applications are now being accepted for the
Student Government Association's Freshman
Aide Program Deadline tor submitting applica
tion is 5 00 Monday, Oct 1 For more information
or an application come by the SGA office, 2nd
floor Mendenhall, or call 757 6611
TABLE TENNIS
All full time ECU Day Students wishing to par
ticipate in a singles Table Tennis Tournament
must register in the Mendenhall Student Center
Billiards Room on the bottom floor of Mendenhall
by Sunday, Sept 30. 1984 All students living m
Residence Hall should see their Directors for ad
ditional information or call 757 6611. ext 239
HOMECOMING
Pictures of the Homecoming pirate candidates
will be taken on Sept 24, 25. and 26 from 7 00
10 00 p m m the Buccaneer Office of the Pubiica
tions BuHdmg You must nave your photograph
taken at this time The cost ot the photograph will
be One 8 X 10 black and white print $20 0C
Package of two $27 00. ana Package of three
$30 00 Please make checks payable to ECU
Photo Lab Candidates must contact Mrs Ka�
Smith at 757 6009 Monday through Friday from
800am 500pm in order to schedule an ap
pointrnent for the Sitting You will have l'v� poses
taken and have the option to pick the best pose to
be printed Candidates must make their own at
rangements at the time ot the sitting as to when
they wish to select the pose of their choice P (
tures are being done by the ECU Photo Lao A
candidates MUST have their photograph taken C
these photographers as each picture is to be ot
consistent quality, thereby equalizing the preset
tation of ail candidates Any other photograpns
will be reiected
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Current and potential Env.ronmenta! Design
(Art School) majors should attend an advising
meeting Friday Sept 28. noon m Room ?08 of the
Art Building Bring lunch and find out about the
new direction for the program course sugges
tions. ana what environmental design -s ai1 abouT
PREREGISTRATION
General College students should contact Ther
advisers prior to Oct l. 1984 to schedule an ap
pomtment for preregistration for the Spring
Semester
NIH
A representative from the National institute o�
Health. Bethesda. MD will be on campus October
i ana 2 to interview students wno would like to be
health research assistants in tneir Norma,
Volunteer Program beginning Spring 1985
Students will participate m experiments anc
research regarding a sease control ana the
human body Will receive $12 50 per day s' pend
plus free room and ooara. ana transportation pac
to and from NIH Students in the health, nature
sciences, computer science, and business ' e f.
who may be interested should contac' 'He Co op
office. 313 Rawl, immediately to s g- up for ar n
terview
Copy igfit I � 1
Krogei s.iv on
Quantity Right. ReservPd
MOilP SOIC1 To Dealers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICV
Each ot tnese advertised items
i required to he readily
.iv.iu.ihie for saie in eacn Kroger
S.iv on except .is specifically
noted m this ad if we do run
out of an item we win offer you
your choice of a comparahie
item when av.mahie reflecting
the Mmf savings or a raincneck
winch will entitle you to pur
cnase the advertised item at
the advertised price within 5C
days Only one vendor coupon
will op accepted per item
items and Prices
Effective Thru sat
sept 29 1984
PREMIUM VILLAGE BAKERY
ROUND TOP
White
Bread
CITRUS HILL
Orange
Juice
24 02
Loaf
CHABLI5, RHINE OR
VIN ROSE
inglenook
Navalle
BATHROOM
Charmin
Tissue
2 Gal.
Ctn.
'0
8 Oz
Pkg
KROGER
Cream
Cheese
�j
ASSORTED VARIETIES
Totino's
Party Pizza
HOLLY FARMS CUT UP
MIXED FRYER PARTS OR
GRADE A
whole
Fryers

Lb
k
�iUliSjJJI:
DELI
Boiled
Ham
v
LIMIT PKCS
mj
v
FANCY EASTERN
RED OR GOLDEN
Delicious
Apples
COUNTRY STAND
White
Mushrooms
1 Lb
Pkg.
w�
wfcpwV�wh� ���yi.� ��� � pMfcBMMftdbdi
"�4MMM�M�
mmmmmmmmm
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-





�ije iEaat (Earolftttan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. HUNTER FlSHER, General Manager
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak, �. e j.t. Pietrzak. dva,
Randy Mews, ��. & Anthony Martin, m. Manager
Tina Maroschak. ��� e, Kathy Fuerst, ����. i
Bn i Austin, r� ���� Linda Vizena, .to�� Technician
Septembei 25, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Reagan
Soviet Talks Good Step
Last summer this paper sug-
gested Ronald Reagan do almost
anything to get to the bargaining
table with the Soviets. And,
because the election is close at
hand, the rough, evil-empire talk
was toned down and a more con-
ciliatory approach was taken.
Good move. We don't care about
the "whys" of the move, but only
that it has happened. President
Ronald Reagan, for the first time
during his four years in office, has
shaken hands with a high-ranking
Soviet official.
Andrei Gromyko, the patriarch
of the Soviet diplomatic corps, met
Reagan at the Waldorf-Astoria
Hotel in New York City to begin
what we hope will be the re-start of
a dialogue between ourselves and
the Soviet Union. Although no
concrete proposals will be laid
down and no specific issues are on
an agenda for discussion, the mere
fact of a meeting means the ice has
begun to thaw.
The two most powerful nations
in the world must always be on
speaking terms. No matter what,
as George Kenan said years ago in
his famous "X" article, the United
States and the Soviet Union should
never break diplomatic contact.
Under Reagan, we have come
dangerously close. But now a silver
lining is becoming visible in the
dark cloud. And with the threat of
nuclear war looming ominously
over the people of the world, we
must talk; it is of the upmost con-
cern.
We told Reagan to keep making
contact, and when the Today show
got the Soviets to offer a chance to
meet, the administration grabbed
at it. Good deal.
"We have within our power to
make hisory; let's not be afraid to
do so the president said at a
reception for U.N. diplomats. Mr.
Reagan please heed your own
words. You are right that history
remembers those who execute
historic agreements. One that helps
avert the destruction of a nuclear
war would certainly be destined for
greatness. Mount Rushmore,
perhaps.
We applaud this first step. We
only hope that a sense of decency
and humanity help Reagan turn
this beginning into a safer world.
Things I Thought Of
By GREG RIDEOUT
So they come up to me and say, "Hey, Greg, how the heck are you thinking
up this crazy stuff. Your brain must not be hooked up properly My response is
always, "Somebody's got to do it. It's just a God-given talent type of thing.
Yes, ladies, gentlemen and students, once again it's time for Things I Thought
Of
If you get your clothes wet, and then don't take them off for more than a
month, will mold grow on them? If so, what color will it be? This is a good
thesis topic for all you biology grad students. Good luck.
Has anyone ever told you to go run through some Jello? Imagine this big mass
of gelatin and you, in front of it with your Nikes on, ready to trudge through.
It's fun, but you'll notice how flies become your best friends for days afterwards.
How come there's always someone in your class that picks his nose? There's a
guy in mv history 1050 deal who people would swear has a finger growing out of
his nostrils. It's always up there digging for something disgusting. This morning
he found something the color of Thomas Jefferson's hair, yuk.
A friend told me that Dolly Parton puts lead weights in her undies to keep
from tipping over. I'm not sure if this is true, but if it is she'd have to put the
whole Sears set in to offset those babies.
Has anyone ever asked you to smear Havoline super premium motor oil all
over them? If someone has and you did, make sure you check under the hood
and change their filter first. Oh yeah, and use a paintbrush to get those hard to
reach spots.
Do cats translate things you say to them into meows. Like when you tell it to
"get the hell off the couch before I put you in the microwave does it put the
English into, "meow meow helmeow meow meer me me MEOW SHIT Oh
well, just thinking.
How come people never take the traffic ticket off their window before they
start driving away? They always look at it; some people even pick it up and then
put it back, like it will go away or something. My advice is to lift up the wind-
shield wiper, pull out the ticket, bow three times to Mlah or Bob Hope and then
burn the darn thing.
When people ask me why I'm always in perpetual motion, I always tell them,
"a turning Mick Jagger collects no dry seaweed.
You know why God invented nuclear weapons? Well, because he really doesn't
like us Earth fellas. Last time I talked to Pete, the bouncer at heaven's bar, he
told me God thinks we're a bunch of worrywarts. Constantly, the head honcho
complains. "Geez he says, "I just went down there for a few years, had a
small, indiscrete affair and they're still talking about the damn thing.
How many bathrooms are there in the chancellor's house? Does he have his
own, or is he forced to share one with a buddy? I'm going to have to send a
crack team of investigative journalists to look into this one folks. They better
beef up the guards.
Do you think Gilligan ever got up with Mary Ann? I can't imagine the Skipper
with Mrs. Howell, can you? Well, yes to the first and you better imagine the se-
cond, according to the latest expose in Penthouse titled, "Gil's Island Paradise:
The Untold Story, The Professor Spills His Guts Wait until you find out who
the witch doctor voodooed.
Thinking makes me patriotic, so my good deed for the day is to tell everyone
to vote in all upcoming elections. That includes the SGA's on Wednesday.
s&urzAisUfWt
Political Science D
New U.S. Pride Hazard
TRB
IteNm Republic
When I lived abroad in the early
1970s, I discovered, to my surprise, that
I was a patriot. Simple homesickness
was part of it, along with the revelation
that even a civilized country like Britain
doesn't share American standards of
liberty or plumbing.
I also took umbrage at hearing
foreigners say things about the United
States that I had spent the previous few
years saying myself.
Now the whole countr is on a
patriotic binge, egged on by the media
and by President Reagan, who officially
christened it "the New Patriotism" in a
speech to the American Legion Sept. 4.
Reagan offered as evidence the new
military television show, "Call to
Glory a country-and-Western song
called "God Bless the USA his own
invasion of Grenada and, of course,
"those young men and women on our
Olympic team this summer
The president failed to mention the
repulsive hit film, Red Dawn �
"America's movie say the ads �
about a group of spunky teenagers who
take to the hills to resist a communist oc-
cupation of Colorado.
Hollywood, nose to the Zeitgeist,
shows it can swerve right just as fatuous-
ly as it swerved left 15 years ago.
Early in the film, there's a debate bet-
ween the student council president, who
wimpishly suggests taking a vote about
whether the kids should turn themselves
in, and the former football captain, a
charismatic d'Aubuisson of the Rockies,
who understands that democracy is mere
self-indulgence.
Give up if you wish, he says with con-
tempt. But, "if you stay, you're gonna
do exactly as I say They all stay, of
course, and proceed with youthful high
spirits to blow up the communists with
bombs, shoot them point-blank in the
face, and so on. They call themselves
"the Wolverines after the high school
team. Oh yes, the wimp democrat also
turns out to be a collaborator and is ex-
ecuted.
There are different kinds of
patriotism. Which kind is "the New
Patriotism"?
One kind, the best, is worship of a na-
tion's ideals. The United States is one of
the very few nations of the world (Israel
is another) founded on a concrete set of
noble political ideals. A few others, such
as France and England, have democratic
traditions ancient enough to be a
legitimate part of their citizens' sense of
nationhood.
A second kind of patriotism, less
austere but far from ignoble, is a love of
native culture, folkways, landscape.
This kind of patriotism at its best � as
in Orwell's writing about England and
the English � becomes a celebration of
common people that incarnates a fine
democratic vision.
Then there's raw, vainglorious na-
tionalism. This can be a harmless matter
of "school spirit" (Go Wolverines!), or
it can get ugly. The tone of the New
Patriotism is perfectly expressed, I
think, in the empty bombast of John
Williams' theme music for the Los
Angeles Olympics. The rhythmic chants
of "U-S-A! U-S-A and "We're
Number One � innocent enough dur-
ing the Olympics themselves � seems
more ominous as they continue to echo
at public occasions of other sorts, such
as the Republican convention.
For heaven's sake, what is so glorious
about winning the most medals in an in-
ternational athletic contest? Olympic
prizes have nothing to do with the values
of freedom, tolerance and diversity that
have made America great. Somewhat
the reverse, as a matter of fact.
If societies are to be measured by their
performance at the Olympics, free na-
tions will inevitably fall short of
totalitarian regimes, which can organize
the whole society in pursuit of such
pointless triumphs.
A fourth kind of patriotism, the worst
kind, is exclusionary. There's all too
much of this in the air as well.
In Red Dawn we're told that the com-
munist invasion began with illegal aliens
from Mexico blowing up a Strategic Air
Command base � an appeal to rial ;t
sentiment made especially ugly h its
complete illogic.
But the dominant form of exclu-
sionary patriotism is political, and the
main purveyor is the Republican P
Republicans have taken as a cam;
theme that anyone who disagree
them is un-American.
The clearest expression of this theme
was Jeane Kirkpatrick's conc
keynote address, with its ringing refrain
about the Democrats: "They alwa �
blame America first Logic
that the main focus of Amei
political debate should be Amei an
behavior and options, not S
behavior, however heinous.
In 1980, Ronald Reagan was blan .
America first. But Ms. Kirkpatnck :
not say this. Her implied syllogisn
you disagree with Reagan admin.
tion foreign policy, if you corr.r
louder about El Salvador than a
Afghanistan, you are "blaming America
first and are therefore unpatriotic.
Just as Red Dawn is "America's
movie President Reagan announ.ej in
Dallas that the Republican are
"America's party The Democrat Yjn
implication, are somebody else' par:
When Reagan says that his re-elec
will "make America great again and let
the eagle soar he is indulging in mere
foolish vainglory. But when he says,
"Our victory will be Americ
victory he goes too far.
And when he ties his own electoral
hopes to American success in the Olym-
pics, when he muddles military vici
athletic achievement, fiction and re-
words and music, into a head
tionalist brew, he is not behaving like a
true American patriot.
(cl, IW4 I aitrd Fntnrr Stadtcair. io�
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Campus Forum
kV
Quit Slapping The Buc Around, Dudes
I am appalled at the thrashing that
sworded rascal, Pee Dee the Buc, is
taking. And I'm going to tell you so. If
Gordon Ipock can give his conservative
views, well, I too can argue about this
detestable attack by a Communistic-
contented paper. Because that is what
this attack on my good buddy Pee Dee
is � an attack on the U.S. of A.
I like Pee Dee. My TV likes Pee Dee.
That little squirt, big chested and wear-
ing size two shoes, is the symbol of
hard-working, patriotic Americans.
Other than his goatee, he doesn't even
come close to resembling a ram.
Besides his punk rock shirt (which, by
the way, he purchased on sale at the
Student Supply Store for $90), he
doesn't even compare to a yellow
jacket. And despite the fact that he us-
ed to sell hamburgers in Raleigh, he is
of no kin to that dastardly wolf (who, I
understand, belongs to the Sierra
Club).
Furthermore, your tacit suggestion
that Pee Dee is synonymous with urine
left me gagging in trepidation. Would
George Washington have been the
target of such audacity? Yes, by taking
a swipe at Pee Dee, you have given the
U.S. of A. a black eye. I have already
contacted Pee Dee's lawyer, Poopy.
I spoke to poor Pee Dee the other
day, and I must say the doleful
swashbuckler is on the verge of deep
depression. Isn't it bad enough that the
guy has to cheer for a 1-3 team without
being lambasted bi-weekly? He told
me, "Ed, if this doesn't stop, I'm go-
ing to pick up my sword and go back to
Great Britain. Ya know, they don't
treat soccer mascots like this
I told him, I said, "Pee Dee, you are
why ECU is great. You are why Ronald
Reagan is in office You exemplify
America: an immigrant who survived
and worked his way to the top. You
have nothing to be ashamed of. You
are just the target of a bunch of Pinkos
running that rag. You are great
Pee Dee's unpatched eye swelled
with a tear. I got a lump in my throat.
This little stump of a guy is going to
make it.
Ed Nicklas
Alumnus
Rockville, MD.
Debate Doo-Doo
I just finished watching the third
televised debate between Gov. Jim
Hunt and Sen. Jesse Helms, and I am
totally amazed. Amazed at the fact
that throughout that one-hour long
debate not one time did Sen. Helms ad-
dress a question to Gov. Hunt about
the issues ,n this campaign which affect
the future of our state and nation. In-
stead, Sen. Helms preferred to take the
low road. He continued his personal
attacks on Gov. Hunt, and, at the same
time, he tried to take the focus of the
debate off the issues.
Fortunately, between his responses
to Sen. Helms' smear tactics, Gov.
Hunt talked about the issues and show-
ed us his plans to insure that the people
of this state have a senator who will
give us the kind of representation that
we need and deserve in Washington.
North Carolina and its people are
prepared for the future. We're ready to
meet the challenges and issues of today
head on with a level-headed approach
and an optimistic attitude. Since our
current senator doesn't seem prepared
to move ahead with us, maybe we
should exchange him on Nov. 6 for a
senator who will have the courage and
ability to face the tough issues.
Scott Thomas
Freshman, Gen. College
Electid
By GREG RIDEOUT
Maaa0ag t.u-
The Departments of Political
Science and History will present
the first of three planned election
forums on Sept. 27 at 8 p.m. Dr
Maurice Simon, political science
chairman, says he hopes the
forums will be "in a sense a kind
of town meeting" where students
and Greenville residents can
discuss candidates and issues
The first forum will feature Bet-
ty Speir, vice chair of the North
Carolina Democratic Party;
ITOWI TOGO .
-
W? AI�o Wholpaie
fWELCOME BAG


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rHEEASIAROl IN. A
SEPTEMBER 25, 1984
mm,
i
rd
its
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camp; y
"Hie

-
icans are
T3tS
W, Dudes
I i am
lour long
Helms ad-
ibout
ation. In-
otake the
personal
I the same
:us of the
his responses
u tactics, Gov.
sues and show-
?hat the people
enatoi who will
kind ol representation that
erve in Washington.
and its people are
� the future We're ready to
ilienges and issues of today
h a level-headed approach
It rtistic attitude Since our
jnator doesn't seem prepared
.nead with us, maybe we
Icnange him on Nov. 6 for a
It will have the courage and
� ice the tough issues.
Imas
I, Gen. College
Political Science Department Sponsor
Elections Forums Planned
By GREG RIDEOUT
Maaagtag Milor
The Departments of Political
Science and History will present
the first of three planned election
forums on Sept. 27 at 8 p.m. Dr.
Maurice Simon, political science
chairman, says he hopes the
forums will be "in a sense a kind
of town meeting" where students
and Greenville residents can
discuss candidates and issues.
The first forum will feature Bet-
ty Speir. vice chair of the North
Carolina Democratic Party;
Nelson Crisp, a Greenville at-
torney and Republican Party ac-
tivist; and Dr. Thomas F. Eamon,
associate professor of political
science at ECU. Speir and Crisp
will conduct a talk on state
politics and their party's can-
didates. Eamon will concentrate
more on the national elections.
The first seminar, according to
Dr. Dorothy Clayton, an assistant
professor of political science and
a spokesperson for the forum, will
be highlighted by discussions on
campaign themes, platforms,
meaning of the 1984 elections and
the historical relevance of the
trends that will be discerned.
The second seminar, planned
for sometime in October, would
deal with predictions and the
third, after the election, would
analyze the outcomes.
. "The Departments of Political
Science and History want to try to
contribute to the political
understanding of the general com-
munity Simon said, adding that
future events with national and in-
ternational topics are planned.
Wolkin' The Plank
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Like A Mug
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SPOHTSWEAB fcjyJ ft Play weah
We Also Wholesale
loo.uff lc
Factorv Outlet
I octw) in Old Grinwtltnd School House
On Hwv n Hours �. Fn 9 30-S
!mi 9 30-3 00
fWELCOME BACK ECU STUDENTS
We invite you to come and visit one of our $
I FACTORY OUTLETS. �
We can help you stretch your �
dollar, you'll have money left over for 2
entertainment & fun.
We carry famous name brands f
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e appreciate your patronage
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Present
wy
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& Sigma Tau Gamma
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Adm.$1.50 18yrs. $1.00
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Tired of doing clothes?. . .For
S3.50 we will personally pick-up,
wash, dry, fold and hang your
91b load of clothes, as well as
deliver your laundry to you the next day.
all. Greenville Student Laundry Service
Your own personal laundry service - 758-3087

a.
Coffee Breaks
east Carolina dining services
1&1-G2&Z
iifH& �� ;
Buffet Lovers, take your
Pick of The Pizzas at Mr. Gatti's
Lunch Buffet - 11:30am-2pn Daily
All the pizza, spaghetti and sabd you
can eat $3-Q�
Dinner Buffet - 5-8pfMon&Wed
All the pizza, spaghetti and sala( yo�
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'W
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T
Free
COUPON
30 minute service
uaranteed! $
idco Games" t
1i '

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Extra Cheese
or one additional
ingredient on any
large pizza
lOffer Good For Delivery
I Or In Store
L2WlfiQJ
Once you ve tasted
Killian s Irish Red,
you might think Mexican
beer isn't so hot.
Now don't get us
wrong. The Mexicans
make some pretty
fine beers.
But none of them
slow roast their malt
like we do.
So no Mexican beer
has the color, the
character, the rich,
incredibly siruxnh taste
ofKillian'sRedAle.
So the next time
you're about to order
your favorite Mexican
beer, try a Killian's
Red, instead.
Please note. Not
every Mexican restau-
rant will carry Killian's.
Just the good ones.
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There is nothing more sophisticated, or
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) has been in effect
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of Governors in
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THE FAST CAROLINJAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 25, 1984 Page 7
A Style Of All Their Own
Back Doors Provoke Memories
By TONY BROWN
SMI Writer
The music of The Doors came
alive again Thursday night in
Greenville durir.g the the Back
Doors concert � probably the
finest Doors cover band in action
today.
The Wilkes-Barre, Penn-
sylvania group had an intensely
expectant crowd of ardent Doors
tans eagerly awaiting their open-
ing set, as currents of electricity
seemed to fill the air. Sparks
began to fly as the band launched
mto "Roadhouse Blues with
lead singer Jim Hakim setting the
night's tone, singing "let it roll �
all night long
The blackleather-clad vocalist
continuously evoked strong
memories of the Doors' Jim Mor-
rison as he worked to get the
crowd flowing with the music. His
menacing, authority-threatening
manner closely followed that of
the Doors' frontman, though
never going to the wild extremes
of the latter.
Strong vibrations emanated
from the stage as "Break On
Througn" led into the 1967 hit
Love Me Two Times The
number of people familiar with
the music was surprisingly large
considering the lapse in time since
Jthe group, was active,
Cheers greeted one of the
Doors' last hits from 1971, the
number 14 "Riders On the
Storm The rain and wind could
almost be felt as keyboardist Steve
Hoover, guitarist Richard kheut
and drummer Mike Carey laid
down a solid beat for sensuous,
dark-haired Hakim.
The pounding rhythm of
"Texas Radio & the Big Beat"
sounded through The Attic's tem-
porary location at the King &
Queen North as the end of the
first set neared.
"People Are Strange a
number 12 song for the Doors
from 1967, mellowed the crowd a
bit before a rousing version of
"Gloria" got things heated again.
This rock & roll staple was
originally a hit for Them in
England featuring Van Morrison
(no relation to Jim Morrison), but
it was overpowered in the U.S. by
the Shadows of Knight version; it
was recorded early by the Doors,
but not released until the Alive
She Cried album in 1983.
"The End" appropriately
finished the first set in frenzy. As
Hankim left the stage he thanked
everyone for supporting the club
after the fire.
The powerful performance con-
tinued for the last set with some of
the Doors' biggest hits such as
"Love Her Madly "Touch
Me and "L.A. Woman
The audience finally got the
song it wanted when the Kawai
electric piano of Steve Hoover
struck the opening chords of the
stone-classic "LightMy-Fire" �
the song which made the Doors
virtually instantaneous cult heroes
in 1967 as it smashed its way to
the top of the charts in an edited
version. The long album cut push-
ed The Doors to number two in
Billboard.
� IVAN HUMKIT � ECU Ptwto L�b
Back Doors singer Jim Hakim impressed loyal fans Thursday night.
Hoover's keyboard work was
outstanding as the extended jam
showed the abilities of the in-
dividual musicians, but kept
within a pattern � something
most bands fail to do.
It would be tough for the Doors
tliemselves to top this tune under
the same conditions. The crowd
seemed to agree as they demanded
an encore � and got it as the
show ended with "Back Door
Man
Even though Jim Morrison died
of a heart attack on July 3, 1971,
and the Doors' major success
predates that; many ECU
freshmen and sophomores were
among the most active fans pre-
sent.
Suzanne Menius, a sophomore
from Raleigh, said she's been a
fan since she could remember.
"Several years ago I saw the Back
Doors at The Pier in Raleigh
because I liked the Doors she
said. "1 liked them so I came to
see them again tonight
Elizabeth Towe, another
sophomore, remembers the group
from the radio. "The lead singer
is so much like Morrison it's
unreal Towe and others recently
attended a memorial service for
The Attic, lighting candles as they
played Doors music (would you
believe "Light My Fire?")
Sophomore Barbara Parton
said she was exposed to the
Doors' music through friends and
liked the mellow nature compared
to The Who or the Rolling Stones.
"I had tears in my eyes when they
played 'The End she added.
"My boyfriend and I were listen-
ing to it after a friend died She
went on to say she was given a
copy of The Doors' Absolutely
Live album by her high school
class after she was in a wreck.
Webb Brown, David Turl-
ington, Lauran McDowell and
Beverly Shannon were among
many ECU students who were im
pressed by the band; most said
they had previously seen the
group at The Attic.
"I'd give up everything for rock
& roll Hamik said. "It means
everything to me Hakim's
favorite artists include Creedence
Clearwater, the Stones, the
Animals, the Vardbirds and
especially Bob Dylan.
The 35-year old singer said he's
"not a hustler as he tried to
avoid two persons who insisted on
tying a bandana around his thigh.
Hakim was a prime candidate
for a movie about the Doors, but
says the project is at least tem-
porarily dead. He and Steve
Hoover plan to create some
originals in the future to keep the
energy of
however
the ! . i j z 11
As The Back Doors headed to
their next show in Virginia, a long
list of sell-outs from Florida to
California to Canada shows the
demand for Doors material is as
strong as ever.
It can't be long before someone
capitalizes on this commercial
potential � and The Back Doors
seem as capable of anv to pull it
off!
Saddler Discusses Experience As A Delegate
Bv CLINT WERNER
MaltWt
Judy Sadler, associate pro-
fessor of library science, attended
the Democratic National Conven-
tion in San Francisco as a commit-
ted Mondale delegate representing
the 1st Congressional District of
North Carolina. I interviewed Ms.
Sadler to learn about her ex-
perience and how one becomes a
national convention delegate.
Werner. Tell me how you became
a delegate.
Sadler. The most important thing
I believe that is necessary is to be
an active worker in the party.
Many people would like to be a
delegate, and to them I would say,
"Get busy in some way in the
political process. Start at the
precinct level, or join the Young
Democrats Club, or work in so-
meone's campaign Before elec-
ting you as a delegate people will
want to know who you are, or
know someone who does know
about you and what kind of a
representative you will make.
I have always been interested in
politics, even as a child. I decided
that this would be a good year to
make the effort to become a
delegate, because the Democratic
Plan calls for equal delegate
representation: 50 percent women
and 50 percent men. Before mak-
ing the decision to run I called
some party leaders in Pitt County
to see if anyone else had expressed
an interest in becoming a delegate.
Next, in March I wrote letters to
the 21 county Democratic chairs
in the 1st Congressional District
asking for their support and also
asking them to announce my can-
didacy at their county conven-
tions. Along with this letter I in-
cluded a resume of my political
activities, my card, and a copy of
the new procedures that would be
followed at the district convention
to elect delegates and alternates. I
also wrote other local, district,
and state leaders informing them
of my plans. This was very pro-
ductive and I received letters of
thanks and committments of sup-
port from some.
Werner. What were the actual
election proceedures like?
Sadler. When registering at the
district convention held at
Williamston High School each
person was given a color coded
ballot which listed the people run-
ning as a delegate for their par-
ticular candidate: blue for Mon-
dale, green for Hart and pink for
Jackson. In order to have one's
name placed in nomination before
the convention a person running
as a delegate had to receive 20 per-
cent of the total votes cast for that
candidate. My name was placed in
nomination. Eight people
qualified to run as Mondale
delegates: 5 men and 3 women.
Based on the May primary elec-
tion the 1st Congressional District
Convention would elect 5
delegates, and 2 alternates as
follows: 3 Mondale delegates and
1 alternate; 1 Hart delegate and 1
alternate, and 1 Jackson delegate.
At this stage of voting all conven-
tion delegates were allowed to
vote for each candidate's
delegates. The delegate hopefuls
were grouped together and voted
on in the following order: 1st
Jackson, 2nd Hart, and third
Mondale. I received a majority
vote on the First ballot along with
Dan Stallings from New Bern.
Bennett Taylor of Seaboard was
the third Mondale delegate
elected. Other delegates were: Zee
Lamb (Hart), and Everline Mit-
chell (Jackson). It was certainly a
thrill being elected as a delegate to
the national convention, but even
more moving to see all my
political friends from Pitt County
campaigning for me, and suppor-
ting my efforst to become a
delegate.
Judy Sadler describes
her position as
a A.C. Delegate.
Werner. What made you pursue
this goal in 1984? Was it a more
opportune time for you?
Sadler. Well, the equal represen-
tation rule certainly made me
think I would have a better chance
now, then in the past. Also, when
I found out early in the year that
no one else in Pitt County had ex-
pressed an interest to run to me or
any of the county leaders that I
contacted. And, there didn't seem
to be very many women in the
district running.
As it turned out I couldn't have
picked a better time to go. The
convention was the most unified
in recent years, we had electrify-
ing sp Aers, and for the first time
a women was nominated as the
vice presidental candidate. Being
a strong believer and supporter of
equality for all, I was able to witt-
ness the biggest step women have
made in my lifetime.
Werner. Did you have any idea
that Mondale would pick a
woman to run with him?
Sadler. I was not shocked since
Mondale had been interviewing
women, but I was very happily
surprised. I thought it would be a
man, either Hart or someone
from the South.
Werner. Do you feel that the
media stereotyped the South bv
suggesting that Ferraro is a liabili-
ty because she's a woman?
Sadler. I think that people who
are not familiar with what's hap-
pening in the South perpetuate
that notion. They're behind the
times. There are, of course, some
people all over who will not accept
a woman in this role today.
I believe they are in the minority
and such people will be voting for
Reagan and Helms regardless of
the high qualifications on the
other side. They seem to want to
go backwards instead of into the
future.
Werner: If elected and for some
reason Mondale was unable to
finish his term would you feel
comfortable with Ferraro as
President.
Sadler: Definitely. I would feel a
lot more comfortable with her
than with what we have acting as
President todav.
The Salad Bar Craze
Check Out Greenville's Many Gourmet 'Gardens9
By JENNY MEADOR
Staff Writer
'I love salad bars" is not an
unusual comment heard around
campus, especially when trying to
decide where to go for a fast, fill-
ing meal. Nowadays most
restaurants boast about their
95-item salad bar � even if that
includes separating the croutons
from the sunflower seeds. The
salad bar, once only a health food
fad, is now an entity fn itself.
JOH jO�DAII � �CU Pmf L�t
Mendenhall's salad bar contains 40 Hems and costs $1.15.
All of the restaurants surveyed
claimed that their salad bar was
better than the competition's
because "it is prepared fresh dai-
ly But Western Steer, undoub-
tably the most popular, gave a
technical reply about their won
standards. "Care and time makes
our salad bar special. We have a
full-time salad bar maintenance
person. Our vegetables are cut
fresh daily and we use no
chemicals to make our items look
fresh. The bar is set at 40-45
degrees and is constantly
monitored for quality, freshness
and cleanliness said Western
Steer manager.
No matter how technical, some
people still like salad bars for their
simplicity. Momma's reasons for
eating salad probably stuck in the
back of Annette Benthall's
response, "I like salad because it
consists of green vegetables that
are good for vou And why are
greens good for you? Education
major Jan Sitton explained that
plants produce units of cellulose
along their cell wall in a natural
process. "We need the lettuce and
greens to add bulk and fiber into
our diet. We don't store cellulose
in our body, so therefore we must
get rid of the sugars caused by
cellulose that our natural enzymes
can't break down. Fiberous salad
helps us do that. My favorite
vegetable, though, are
cauliflower, lettuce, and
cucumbers she said.
The average number of items
on a salad bar is right around 50,
but Golden Corral only has 29,
for now. Soon Golden Corral will
have a new refrigerated 50-item
salad bar. Shoney's has the widest
selection on it's extended salad
bar with a grand total of 60 items
which includes soup, and between
4:30 and 9 p.m. it includes a selec-
tion of hot vegetables for the same
price. Shoney's also has special
prices for children's plates or
salads with sandwich entrees. The
prices overall ranged from $1.99
per pound at Farm Fresh to $2.50
at Wendy's to $3.29 at Shoney's
for unlimited trips to the salad
bar.
Prices wouldn't necessarily
stop Ted Summey from going to a
salad bar. "I love salad bars he
said. What makes them so good?
"The crunch. It gives you a varie-
ty of tastes that you just don't get
with one food. You get all kinds
of flavors like cucumbers,
macaroni salad, onions, bacon
bits, olives � a multitude of dif-
ferent tastes. Thousand Island
and Western Sizzling cover that
area the best I think said Sum-
mey.
Kim Bryant likes salad bars too,
but for a practical reason. "1 real-
ly like salad because it tastes good
and also because I'm really into
health food. Lettuce is really good
for you and so are greens said
Kim.
See MUNCH, Page 8.

tj
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f!
I � � cu oe tat
With 52 items to choose from, Western Steer attracts many students.
?





JjJJLEiICAROllNIAN SEPTEMBER 25.
IV84
Classifieds
Munch Out On Salad jy 'Winner
SALE
PERSONAL
WANTED
POR SALE
month old
758 1945
Schwinn World Sport, 1
$165 00 Call Rob at
POR SALE: Get them while they re
hot! Two ECU vs NCSU football
tickets Price negotiable Call
7585251
FOR SALE Wood & Chrome Dining
Room Set S75 as is Call 758 6125 bet
we�n 2 6 p m
SMOKEY, Happy 20th birthday
to you Thanks for the many
years of friendship Remember
you II always have me (and my
goldfish) I love you Carrots
IN MEMORY OF KELVIN
PARKS. A special person who
will be dearly missed but never
foronttPn
M1SC
CAPTURE YOUR COLLEGE DAYS
and NIGHTS on video cassette VHS
or BETA, excellent color pictures and
swell HI Fi Audio Join our video club
and enjoy the JacHsons, Michael, Jer
maine Prince, Pink Floyd, Van
Haien. Cyndi Lauper, The
Pretenders Cheech & Chong The
Time The Aia Parson Proiect,
Our�n Duran and much, much
more We make video's � John
Oeaver Video Recording Services
Call 7$8 63�4
ALTERATIONS � CHEAP! Call S B
Godlev 752 1964 after 1 p m MTWF
ana Sat
STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM? Ab
soluteiy no charge ' for repair
estimates at the Tech Shop Call
757 "nineteen eighty We though
you'd like to know
NEED IT TYPED? Theses, disserta
'ions research papers, resumes etc
Word Processor. Call Betty Laws at
752 1454
GREENVILLE STUDENT LAUN-
DRY SERVICE. Complete laundry
service as wen as pick up and
delivery Call, 758 3087 for your own
personal laundrv service
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SERVICE
experience, quality work, IBM Selec
trie typewriter Lanie Shlve, 758-5301
BRUCE S BIRTHDAY BASH was
bumpin' and jumpin! Sur, thanks tor
bringing Jeff, Brad and Mr H Cobb,
when is Buffet's Birthday � Scooter
Pie iaws isn't invited
CONGRATULATIONS to all new Phi
Kappa Tau little sister Be prepared
for a lamming semester with the
best'
TONY, you're a knight in shining ar
mor � even if you did cause a little
bloodshed Thanks a million Jenny
CONGRATULATIONS to the new
pledges of the Kappa Sigma Fraterni
ty, the Alpha Psi Pledge class: Tim
Baldwin, Marvin Barnes, Todd Bar
row, Rich Bramley. Greg Buckhold,
Jeff Cashion, Doug Chavis, Kelly Con
nor. Jimmy Crouch, Butler Daniel,
George Ernst, Mark France, Doug
Grant, Mike Gresham, Kurt Kolesha,
John Martin Spencer Meymandi,
John Nelson jimmy Payne, Deke
Pemchac. Kevin Reed, Mike Riley,
Joe Roswech, Jon Sadler, Mark Stahl,
and Ted Yoader
CONGRATULATIONS to the newly
initated brothers of Kappa Sigma:
Brett Kassir, Ricn Hall, Rich Orzol,
Rubby Lanham. K C Loughlin,
Kevin Orr, Mike Matthews, Stuart
Sloan and Mike Geiger
PARTTIME WORD PROCESSOR for
local law firm IBM PC AT Salary
commensurate with experience Call
758 6200
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Non smoker washer and dryer pro
vided, New mobile home, rent $165 00
one half utilities; private room and
private bath, call 756 6151
ROOMMATE WANTED: private bdr
$200mo Ringgold Towers, 757 1005
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
Twin Oaks Aprs Completely furnish
ed, and excellent location Full bath
and walk in closet in room Rent
reasonable Call 758 7264
SEVERAL AGGRESSIVE
PARTTIME SALES PEOPLE
NEEDED TO WORK flexible
hours (up to 30 hours weekly) at
new men's and ladies specialty
shop opening soon at the Plaza
Experience preferred, but not
necessary Must be neat in ap
pearance, and able to work with
the public Telephone 1946 2970
between 8 30 10 am ONLY, or
mail resume to P O Box 1286
Washington, N.C. 27889
THE WIZ CLUB AND MILLS
BROTHERS PRODUCTION in
cooperation with John Deaver
video recording service preser
� ECU College Video Night a'
'he Wiz Come out and iam your
body at The Wiz beginning Thurs
day nite Sept 27, 1984 on Vioeo
One thin skin will get you all in.
PREE BEER for all ECU
STUDENTS Come check it out
and Jam on VIDEO, one dollar
for FREE ADMISSION and
BREW. Time 10 00 p.m. until
Cut out this ad and carry it to the
bar
NEEDED: AEROBIC EXERCISE
INSTRUCTOR to teach primarily day
time classes Must be available for
1215 p.m. classes on MWF Apply at
Greenville Athletic Club, 140 Oakmont
Dr Between 112 noon on Monday
thru' Friday
WANTED: Girl with transportation
for pick up and delivery Service � 10
hours a week. Call Greenville Student
Laundry Service 758 3087.
COL I bv�L K fc I A' A N i I 11
diStr ib, �
tion ai ds at this
(ome, no selling
mation and appli rite 1
S L owi mi. e, I -
Dr ive. M oi - . � '�
NEbOtD W A I T R I
B A R T E N O h k F RON1 DOOR
PERSONS
Nighn lub al � .
person at B -
on Tuesday �nd V
between 7 8 10 i
COPY EDI1 OR k E fi
the earbook offi e Prefi
Writing majOl or .
processing expei ie � � -�:
Media Boa
�rom the libi ar 1 2nd tlo -
757 650)
WANTED I
R ingg il
r fun
arp
laundi
utilities i .
T owi � ' -
WANTED
R n ,
Carpeted � h �
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untiniM (I J rom I'a.
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.
SUB snum
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
THIS WEEK'S SPECIAI
WHOLE SUB
NO. 6
Roast Beef
FOR ONLY
$3.39
YEARBOOKS� Come and get
your 1983 Bucanneer! Just have
an l D number that is 82 or
lower we're on the 2nd floor of
The Publications Building Open
M F 12 5 p
N
N
FRESHMEN � Mom and Dad
paid big bucks tor your freshman
record, so come and get it! M F
12 5 p.m at the yearbook office
Ljsi
TRAILER F: RENT Convenient,
near campus 2 bedrooms $135 Also
Apartment, Two Rooms and Bath,
$145. Both Available Oct , 752 2615 or
7S6 8926
f� 0va THE EAST CAROLINA PLA YHOUSE
C& .C prtstMi
faS ,V� A SEASO.S OFSISCIXC, DA C1SG,OMEDY
f&- A POWERFl I DK4,14
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to Myrtle Beach
Thursday Will pay for fy gas. Call
John A at 757 3695
; �

-

re Teaming Up To Bring You
PI KAPPA PHI
Little Sister Rush
SEPTEMBER 25th
Elbo Get Together
10' Draft Night
at the Elbo Room. Downtown
SEPTEMBER 26th
Party at the Pi Kapp House
803 Hooker Road
See Map Below
Parties begin at 9:00 pm both nights
Meet the Brothers and Little Sisters
of Pi Kappa Phi
�-��'

- . 1 ��
Featuring
1

Eij
&S-
Turn right on 14lhGoallthe
way down 1 4th to Evans
turn left and go down to
Arlington Blvd then turn right
Go down Arlington to Hooker
Rd Turn left Pi Kappa Phi is
on left
?
r
Cl
Free wine & draft for ladies till 10pm
No. men till 10:00
� �.
; Free admission for lady members
($1.00 guests)
� .
DJ Brad Allen spins your favorite Top 40
Beach & Funk all night
Plenty of parking & no long lines!
THE BEST JUST GOT BETTER
EVERY WEDNESDAY
At The
CAROLINA OPRY HOUSE
For more information, call 756-3540
For more details call 758-5570
70 Private club for members & guests
All ABC Permits
Hill Street Hlue
prcned themsc
TV series again at
m awards �
Fonda and Sir 1
walked f 1 wit 1
hon
B wh
on the i
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Tickets for this. Fridav'v Jam-
the 8 p m Re'I!dolis4
KAPF
SIGM
LITTI
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COA
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Tuesdo
Septl
Part
For Md
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on
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hich
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policymak-
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Jehate he
ed The
effect
a dorm
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t7
TV 'Winners' Awarded Emmys
Hill Street Blues and Cheers
proved themselves the class of the
TV series again at this year's Em-
�m awards, while film stars Jane
Fonda and Sir Laurence Olivier
talked off with the top acting
honors.
NBC, which finished third in
the ratings last season, narrowly
won the Emmys race with 20
awards. Ratings leader CBS was
second with 18, followed by ABC
ith 16, PBS with 10 and syn-
ated shows with 5.
Hill Street Blues - - television's
most acclaimed show of the '80
picked up five Emmvs for best
Irama series, Erecting, film
editing and two supporting per-
formances. The show has now
von 26 in four years, tying the
ord set b The Mary Tyler
toore Show.
Cheers won four Emmys, in-
uding best comedy series and
xhea Perlman, the sarcastic bar-
Mid. for supporting actress. It
Iso won for writing and film
ing.
Despite the success of the two
N BC series, the stars of the shows
ed to win any of the lead acting
Emmys
There were three first-time win-
rs for major acting awards in
iedy and drama series � John
Ritter as the prat fall-prone star of
he departed Three's Company,
Tom Selleck as the macho but
imsical investigator on
Magnum, P.I. and Jane Curtin in
e debut season of Kate & A Hie.
"I didn't have a speech
prepared for this said the sur-
prised Selleck, who was a stand-in
as host f ihe CBS telecast for the
ailing Carol Burnett.
Tyne Daly of Cagney and lacey
won best actress in a drama series
tor the second straight year.
Something About Amelia, the
ABC film about incest that broke
one of the last TV taboos, won
three Emmys including best
drama special and a supporting
actress award for Roxana Zal, 14,
who played the sexually abused
daughter.
Art Carney won for his suppor-
ting role as Jimmy Cagney's fight
manager on Terrible Joe Moron.
Fonda got an Emmy in her first
television movie. The Dollmaker,
playing an Appalachian farm
woman trying to keep her family
together during World War II.
After preparing 12 years, she
said "All that time, the thing that
worried me most was I was afraid
I couldn't play Gertie right
Olivier, who got an Oscar for
Hamlet, won his fifth Emmy for
King I ear, a syndicated produc-
tion.
Dwight Hemion became
the all-time Emmy champion with
a directing award for Here's
Television Entertainment, raising
his career total to 14.
Cloris Leachman won her fifth
Emmy for a performance on the
Screen Actors Guild 50th An-
niversary Celebration.
Bruce Wei!7 won for the first
time in four tries for his continu-
ing role as the snarling Detective
Mick Belker on Hill Street Blues.
Alfre Woodard won as suppor-
ting actress for her guest role on
the show as the mother of a child
shot by a policeman.
Pat Harrington Jr who played
a janitor and would-be family
member, was best supporting ac-
tor in a comedy from One Day at
a Time, now off the air.
Concealed Enemies: American
Playhouse, a PBS series about the
Alger Hiss case, won Emmys as
outstanding limited series and for
best director.
ABC's A Streetcar amed
Desire, the remake of Tennessee
Williams' steamy story of a family
in old New Orleans, won four
Emmys, all in the pre-telecast
show. A Day After, a horrifying
tale of life in Kansas following a
nuclear holocaust, also won two
pre-telecast Emmys.
Two honorary awards got pro-
minent play - to Bob Hope, whose
comedy specials are constant
ratings winners after a half-
century of broadcasting ex-
perience, and to David Wolper,
who produced the spectacular
opening and closing ceremonies
for the Olympics.
Other best program winners
were A Hoik Through the 20th
Century with Bill Movers and
America Remembers John F.
Kennedy for information series
and specials, The 6th Annual Ken-
nedy (enter Honors for variety,
music or comedy programs, He
Makes Me Feel Like Dancin for
childrens programs, Garfleld on
the Town for animation, and
Placido Domingo Celebrates
Seville for performing arts.
Tickets for this Friday's James Taylor concert in Raleigh are still on sale at Apple Records. Tickets for
the 8 p.m. Reynolds Coliseum performance are $13.50 and $12.50.
KAPPA
SIGMA
LITTLE
SISTER RUSH
COME MEET THE
KAPPA SIG'S
Tuesday and Wednesday
September 25 & 26
Parties Start At 9:00
L
700 E. Tenth St.
Beside DarryTs
For More Information Call
752-5543
Q
AOVERTISEO
ITEM POLICY
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10
IlJL�ASTCAROLINlAN SEPTEMBER 25,
1984
'All Of Me' Rates A verage
By DAVID WITHERINGTON
Staff Writer
All Of Me is a mildly amusing
movie with occasional hilarious
moments. It has an interesting
premise which is weakened by thin
plotting. The execution of some
of the gags is predictable, which
we've come to expect from direc-
tor Carl Reiner; however, there is
nothing in this movie to lessen the
appeal of either Steve Martin or
Lily Tomlin.
Martin is perfect as a straight
lawyer whose right side of his
body is taken over by the soul of a
deceased, wealthy dowager (por-
trayed by Lily Tomlin).
Tomlin, due to 'he structure of
the film, has far too little to do.
After the transformation, she is
only seen in mirror scenes (as
Martin's reflection). This does
deliver some classic scenarios
'hough, as Tomlin's feminine
mannerisms are exorcised through
Martin's flexible body language.
Tomlin's character, Edwina,
has spent her entire life on a
deathbed surrounded by nannies
and servants. Her paralyzed body
has restricted her activity, and as
her final moment nears, she plots
to cheat the Grim Reaper out of
his prize. Through the power of
her guru, she plans to release her
soul into the body of Terry, the
daughter of Fred, a servant (as
Steve Martin asks, "Who the heck
is Fred?)
As the incantation starts,
however, there is an accident. The
sacred bowl containing Edwina's
soul is dropped on the head of
Roger (Martin), an innocent
bystander.
Henceforth, we are treated to
two hours of constant maneuver-
ing between Martin and Tomlin,
as Roger tries to win back his
freedom by expelling Edwina
from his body. Most notable is
Roger's attempts to make love to
Terry, while being forced to heed
Edwina's prudish disapproval.
In the end, Terry is exposed as
an ex-convict. When Roger
threatens her with a charge of at-
tempted murder, she agrees to ac-
cept Edwina's soul as originally
planned. Of course, by this time,
Roger and Edwina have fallen in
love with each other.
As Edwina's soul, once trapped
in a crippled body, is transferred
to the body of Terry, a self-
proclaimed "sex poodle Roger
finally gets to have his cake and
eat it too. What next? That's it.
As the fairy tale goes, Roger and
Edwina live happily ever after,
and the evil Terry is turned
intoa horse (not a toad, as you
expected)!
So, should you go see the
movie? Let me say that you'll get
your money's worth of laughs. All
Of Me is good, lightweight enter-
tainment, but if you're expecting
a real sidesplitter, stay home. The
film is like a cross between The
Man With Two Brains and Toot-
sie. Maybe a more appropriate ti-
tle would be The Man With Two
Tootsies.
For the right choice
VOTE
LISA CARROLL
for
Freshman Class
President
Altfeto
joo
Handmade sweaters
Cotton tights
Crocheted leather sweaters
Flannel Kimonos
Specializing in Natural Fiber
Clothing for Women
116 E. 5th St. Mon-Sat 10:00-5:30
Next Door to Book Barn 757-3944
WKTffi
We're open till 2 a.m. every night with 18 varieties of
delicious subs for every taste.
hv�
Sandwiches & Salads
ASK ABOUT OUR
SIX FOOTER!
208 E. 5th St. 758-7979
GrtenvWt, NC 27S34
Seminars Scheduled
i in
By SUSAN TACKER
Staff Writer
The Committee on the Status of
Women is sponsoring a teaching
forum called "Lunchtime Learn-
ing" every third Thursday of each
month for all interested faculty,
staff and students.
The seminars, all beginning at
12 noon and meeting in
Mendenhall, room 221, range in
topics from "Poetry Readings �
Portraits of Women" to "Preven-
ting Nuclear War: A Woman's
Perspective "These are aimed
at all women on campus says
Chairman Inez Fridley, "and
we've tried to get a variety of
topics that would appeal to a lot
of different people
The committee was firs
established in the early 70's t
"advise personnel with issues o
equality said Fridley. "It
evolved since then The commit
tee is now interested in "becominj
a pro-active, instead of reactive
committee "We decided to gc
out and educate people and offei
things that would enhance women
on this campus Fridley said
The committee also plans a
Management Development
Workshop for faculty and staff.
The keynote address is to be held
at the Willis Building at noon on
October 2. The workshops, held
throughout the year, will deal
with professional development
and enhancement of employment
opportunities.
Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin star in the new somewhat amusing
comedy, "All Of Me
UNITED FIGURE SALON
2 New Members For The Price Of 1
Bring A Friend, Must Come
In Together.
Suntan And Other Specialities
Call Now For More Information
Red Oak Ptoxa
756-2820
SUPPORT
THE
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AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
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it-Ml3 UHHS
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Nobody else makes � programmed automat.on-
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� Includes Canon USA Inc
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Ray Ban Wayfarer Available. Normally
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September 28th
All Other Ray Ban Sunglasses
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25 OFF
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Oft f CQtjGfQ hop
ii8 SOUTH COTANCMF STREET
GREENVILLE. N C 27814
752-0688
t �- ' -��� Poc'O' CM v :u' Oo-ce
mb G"��NVIlLE STORE ONL�
ICldDS LOCATIONS IN: �
� KINSJON
3)5 Pa'Vview Commons GOLDSBORO
WILSON
Open 9�m-5 30pm Mon-Fn
I Beecher kirkley Dispensing Opt,c,op
How to procrastinate tastefully
-
Pour yourself a cup or Irish Mocha Mint. Chocoiatey, with a hint of mint it's i
delicious way to postpone the inevitab And it's just one ot seven inspired fl iv r
from General Foods �m���rffrrir���� -
International Coffees r�.w��m T
?JfcrY-
GENERAL FOODS INTERNATIONAI COFFFF;
AS MUCH A nil INC AS A FLAVOR
v
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y
The Pirate football team escaped
: Southern Saturda. as quarterhacl
Netters T
In Seasor
B ION BROUN
t�ff U nirr
EC I vollej ba
season last week with a f-J
as a Flun �
tested a young
Minges Coh
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qu. �
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the Pirates .s" ! ; 2
ttu best-of-three n a
�unbalanced durinj
� anc could
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McQuillei
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vtctor in i
game whicl
necessitating a third game


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i
ECU volleyball team, whkj
Wthout college experience, is off
�natche set the team back

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Fridlcy. "it'
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Hit I ASI CAROf INIAN
Sports
Bucs Escape
With 1st Win
By RANDY MEWS
The Pirate football team escaped with a 34-27 victory over Georgia
Southern Saturday, as quarterback Darrell Speed completed 12 of 21
JON JORDAN � ecu FIWNt L�6
passes for 183 yards. It was Speed's first start on the collegiate level, as
well as the team's first victory this season.
ECU escaped with a 34-27 foot-
ball victory in Ficklen Stadium
Saturday afternoon despite the ef-
forts of Georgia Southern
quarterback Tracy Ham who
rocked the Pirate secondary com-
pleting 26 of 52 passes for 403
yards.
"Ham did a great job of direc-
ting their offense ECU head
coach Ed Emory said. "He's a
great athlete, and the best quarter-
back we'll all year long
In addition to his stunning per-
formance, Ham was also respon-
sible for breaking or tying six
Ficklen Stadium records. Those
include most first downs, passing
first downs, passes attempted,
passing yardage, total yardage
and number of offensive plays.
Going into the contest, Ham
was nationally ranked for total of-
fense. However, against the
Pirates, his 458 yards was the
highest total by any player in the
nation.
"I was really suprised that I had
such a good game Ham said. "1
thought I could have a good day
throwing the ball, but I never ex-
pected to get that many yards
Although the sophomore sensa-
tion turned in one of the best per-
formances of his young career, he
was still disappointed with the
loss. "I really thought we had a
chance to take the game in the se-
cond half Ham said. "We
played a better game than they
(ECU) did, but we just couldn't
take advantage of our scoring op-
portunities
As a team, Georgia Southern
dominated the statistics The had
more than twice as many firsi
downs as the Pirates, and a
cumulated 645 yards worth of 1 I
fense compared to only 363 yard
for ECU � the turnovers wer-
Southern's downfall.
Southern gave up the ball fl-
umes, while the Pirates wt
flawless in that category.
Although the Pirates w.
dominated in almost everv othei
statistic, it was the performaiK
of ECU quarterback Darn.
Speed that put the Pirates out to a
quick 21-0 lead in the first
quarter.
Speed, who started his I
game on the collegiate level Satur
day, completed eight of his firsi
nine passes for more than 100
yards. His performance decline
dramatically in the second half a
he finished the game with 12 of 2
completions for 183 yards, but
Emory was still optimistic aob
what lies ahead for hi, new stai
ting quarterback.
"Darrell played a good ga
for a beginning starter Emor
said. "He made a few mistake-
but overall I was pleased with how
he performed
Emory said Speed, as well
the entire team would have pla
lot better if they plan on beat)
N.C. State this Saturdav.
"We cannot play against 5
like we did against Ge
Southern if we expect win, but
we work hard in practice, w
should be on State's level by game
time
Netters Take One Of Four
!
In Season Opening Matches
B IOW BROWN
Muff Wn,r,
E( I volleyball opened the I9H4
season last week with a 1-3 mark
-i a Hum of earl) action soundly
levied a voting Pirate sqLad at
Mingesolesium.
();i ednesdaj the inexperience
quickh showed as a good team
from I NC-Wilmington crushed
the Pirate 15-5 and 15-2 to take
;he best ot-three match. ECU was
ibalanced during the first game
ind could not regain its com-
l swept to vic-
tory, leaving East Carolina 0-1.
I ater the same day a match
linst N.C. Wesleyan began bet-
ter for the Pirates, but the first
tme still went to their op-
nents. The tide turned in the se-
cond match; however, as Martha
McQuillen took charge of the
IU offense, which finally tasted
lory in a hard fought 15-13
me which tied the match at 1-1,
necessitating a third game.
McQuillen continued her scor-
ing assault as she led the Pirates to
a 15-12 victory and a match in the
win column. She finished with
seven kills and accounted for
about 12 points by herself.
Alter the break-even opening
day's play, the team hosted Wake
Forest on Friday, but Wake
quickly served notice as to how
strong they were as they easily
smashed ECU in the opening
game 15-2.
ECU led 1-0 initially, but could
only score one more point as Traci
Smith served an ace. The inex-
perience and nervous tension of
the team was once again apparent
in their tentative play during the
first game.
A rapid improvement in con-
fidence had the Pirates on the
verge on breaking through during
the second game as the lead
seesawed and stayed even until the
Pirates gained an 11-9 lead. Then
Wake regained the serve and
scored six straight points to take a
'�- �ife.
iuft lllllljpgw
J
The ECU volleyball team, which consists primarily of freshman
Without college experience, is off to a 1-3 start after close weekend
"latches set the team back.
2-0 lead in the three-out-five
match as the momentum shifted
their way again.
The close loss seemed to have
an effect as the Demon Deacons
opened the third game with seven
straight points as the Pirates fail-
ed to score on their only two
serves. EC finally scored to break
the string, but could only add one
more point till Wake ended the
game by serving seven straight
points.
ECU Coach Imogene Turner
and assistant Tim Auch saw some
good signs in the play of the
Pirates despite the mixed results.
"This is the first collegiate ex-
perience many of our players have
seen she said. "We got blown
out in our first match with Wilm-
ington, but regained our balance
and came back with a good effort
against Wesleyan.
"We had Wake off balance in
the second game Turner added,
"but after leading 11-9 a side-out
changed the flow, which turned
the game around
Auch found a great amount of
improvement after the first match
with UNC-W. "We're just com-
ing into our own he said. "We
showed good transition against
Wesleyan after we got over the
opening match
Turner found the answer to
some of the problems in the offen-
sive opportunity statistics. During
the first game in the match against
UNC-W, EC made 12 errors out
of only 19 opportunities, then er-
red nine times on only 12 oppor-
tunities.
Against Wesleyan the Pirates
had 24, then 32 chances offensive-
ly, then dropped back in the loss
to Wake with 19, 28 and 16.
Reading these figures alone in-
dicates the relative success
without even looking at points
scored.
UNC-Charlotte came to Minges
Saturday as the Pirates wound up
the opening week of play with a
hard fought series of close games.
ECU put forth a lot of effort, but
couldn't quite break through as
they lost three straight games by
scores of 15-12, 15-9 and 18-16 in
overtime.
The team played much better as
a unit despite the loss. Traci Smith
had four kills in both the second
and third games, while Sharon
Shank served six service aces.
If the squad can get some con-
sistency going, the edge will start
going their way, because the talent
is there, it just needs to gel into a
unified force.
ECU travels north to face
Virginia Commonwealth tonight,
then returns home to host
Methodist College in Minges at 7
p.m. Thursday night.
�i 1 � � mf.
Ham Was Jammin
Georgia Southern quarterback Tracy Ham (8), who threw for 403 vards against ECU. was responsible
for setting six Ficklen Stadium records in his team's 34-27 loss to the Pirates Saturday afternoon.
Pirates Fall At Tournament
By ROBERT PERRY
Suff Writer
The ECU men's tennis team
participated in a dual tournament
this weekend at Guilford, but
were unable to overcome the stiff
competition.
VCU, Guilford and
Washington & Lee were the par-
ticipants, and ECU Coach Pat
Sherman said that her team's per-
formance was much improved
over last year's loss to nationally
ranked Guilford
Sherman was very happy with
the play of the doubles teams.
"Our number two doubles team
of Willis and Sermer went
undefeated in dual match play
with a 3-0 record. Also, Davis
Bagley and Ken LaMont played as
a doubles team for the first time.
They finished 2-1 after losing only
to Washington & Lee.
Sherman was also pleased with
the play of her singles players.
"Davis Bagley played well for us
after just moving up to the
number six position. He went 2-1
with his matches.
"Dan Lamont did not win his
singles match, but he played the
best tennis in his career. Last year
he was number six in the fall and
number nine in the spring, but
now he has moved up to number
two. All of his matches went three
sets.
"It was good experience for us
and we learned a lot this
weekend" Sherman said. "I think
we learned a lot that will help us
prepare for our match next
week
Sherman also said the team was
disappointed that they weren't
able to win, but if they can main-
tain their level of play from
previous weeks, they will hopeful-
ly be able to put one in the win
column.
The ECU women's tennis team
was also active this past weekend
with a win at home over UNC-G.
Coach Sherman felt that "the
whole team played very well, but
the players who played super well
were Janet Russell, Ann Mander-
field and Sy Myers.
Coach Sherman emphasized
that the whole team played an ex-
cellent match.
The men's next tennis match
will be Tuesday at 3:00 against
Campbell University.
ECU vs. Guilford
Mark Salokanned (Guilford) d.
Greg Willis (ECU) 6-1, 6-0; Mick
Demetraede (Guilford) d. Dan
LaMont (ECU) 6-2, 3-6, 6-3;
Adam Neilly (Guilford) d. Galen
Treble (ECU) 6-1, 6-0; Patricio
Apey (Guilford) d. David Turner
(ECU) 6-3, 2-6, 6-1; Mitch Adler
(Guilford) d. David Creech (ECU)
6-3, 6-4; Daves Bagley (ECU) d.
Matt Mason (Guilford) 6-7, 7-6,
6-1.
Salokanned-Neilly (Guilford)
d. Treble-Creech (ECU) 3-6, 7-5,
6-1; Turner-Willis (ECU) g.
Apey-Dave Marra (Guilford) 6
6-3; Denetreade-Eric Johns
(Guilford) d. Avery-Plummbs
(ECU) 6-2, 6-2.
ECU vs. VCU
Dale Hughes (Cl) d. Gre,
Willis (ECU) 6-2. 6-3; Spence
Kooshian (CJ) d. Dan I aM,
6-1, 6-4; Nicky Heridopdis (VCU
d. Galen Treble (ECU) 5-7, 6 J
6-4; Jamie Hevron (VCU) d
David Turner (ECU) 6-3. 6-4
Feisal Hassonn (VCU) d. Da t
Creech (ECU) 6-3, 7 Davis
Bagley (ECU) d. Ed Piorkows,
(VCU) 6-4, 6-2.
Koshian-Hevron (VCU) rj
Treble-Creech (ECU) 6-4. 6 4
Willis-Turner (ECU) d. Hughes'
Purkowski (VCU) 7-5, 6-7, 6 4;
Hasson-Heridopdis (VCU)
Creech-Plumb (ECU) 6-3, 6-3.
ECU vs. Wash. & le
Roby Miza (W&L) d Grea
Willis (ECU) 6-3, 4-6, 7.6 Chr
Wimon (W&L) d. Dan LaT
(ECU) 6-4. 5-7, 6-4; Galen Treb 1
(ECU) d. David McLeod (W&L)
6-4, 6-4; Will Hasbison (W&L I -
David Creech (ECU) 7-6 5.7 -
Jim Morgan (W&L) d DavJ
Bagley (ECU) 7-6, 6-4. "
McLeod-Jack Messerlv (W&i i
d. Treble-Creech (ECU) 3-6 6-4






�L�ASTCAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 25,
1984
Making
m
wmtfm
Selves, Aiming For Playoffs SGA ELECTIONS
One of my favorite sayings has
always been, "If you're going to
dance, you have to pay the fid-
dler which I suppose was pro-
bably the first draft of today's
cost-benefit principle.
The reason 1 bring it up is what
the Chicago Cubs just finished
paying their fiddler. While every
other team in major league
baseball put up lights, built dom-
ed stadiums and replaced outfield
bleachers with bullpens, the Cubs
danced in the sunlight. While
other teams put ' astroturf, the
Cubs grew ivy. while others
scheduled twi-night double-
headers, the Cub decided they
would rather start at noon. And
while other teams built large park-
ing lots to accommodate a grow-
ing inerest in the sport, the Cubs
left parking up to the
neighborhood entrepreneurs
lucky enough to have access to an
alley.
"But until recently, no one
seemed to care that the Cubs were
a little bit behind the times. Sure,
day baseball was an inconvenience
for the vistiting teams, but the fid-
dler kept right on playing. It
didn't really matter that much.
After all, day baseball only hurt
the Cubs.
Until 1984, that is.
This season the Cubs have
made more changes than even
George Orwell could have fore-
seen. General manager Dallas
Green first picked up outfielders
Gary Matthews and Bob Dernier
and then pitchers Dennis Eckers-
ly, Rick Sutcliffe and George
Frazier. Suddenly, the Cubs were
in favorites to win the National
League's Eastern Division. And
the fiddler was beginning to figure
out the balance due.
If the Cubs can hang on and
win their division, you see, they
would enter the National League
playoffs. Three victories there and
the Cubs would be in the World
Series for the first since 1945. But
the television networks involved
� ABC and NBC � don't like
the ratings day baseball would br-
ing and they therefore have a
clause in their contract with major
league baseball that says the net-
works are entitled to some sort of
rebate should the playoffs or
World Series be played during the
day. That rebate would have to be
paid by each team, so the question
of whether to allow the Cubs to
play day games once in the
playoffs quickly became one of
self-interest.
Moving the Cubs' home games
to Comiskey Park, home of the
Chicago White Sox, was quickly
vetoed by the Cubs management.
Installing temporary lights was
nixed by a city ordiance that was
passed, quite simply, to stop night
baseball at Wrigley Field. So
Kuhn and the other owners had to
turn to other alternatives. And,
because nothing is sacred when it
comes to appeasing the television
people,Kuhn decided to play with
the calendar.
Day games are more palatable
to the networks if they're played
during the weekend. Ratings are
higher then, meaning the net-
works can charge more to sell us
cars, hamburgers and, of course,
light beer. So, if the Cubs had to
play during the day at Wrigley
Field, then they would play there
during the weekend. "But doesn't
that take away our home-field ad-
vantage?" the Cubs asked. But
baseball didn't answer. It was
time to pay the fiddler.
Now, if the Cubs do win thier
division, they will host the first
two games of the best-of-three
National league playoff. The final
three games would then be played
in the home of the Western Divi-
sion champion, and, if the Cubs
won that series, the World Series
would follow. There although, it
is the National League's turn to
host four of the seven Series
games, the Cubs would host on
the middle three � on Friday,
Saturday and Sunday. So much
for the integrity of our national
pastime.
What bothers me the most is the
way the rest of baseball looked
upon the Cubs as a nuisance.
When there were clearly two sides
to the issue � the Cubs' and
television's � baseball im-
mediately jumped to the side of
television, as if it were a natural
reflex. But then maybe it is.
Maybe the tail is wagging the dog.
Maybe television's dollars are
more important than one of
baseball's own teams. Maybe the
fiddler couldn't be put off any
longer.
And maybe this will make the
Cubs all the more determined to
make this dance worth the price.
Tigers Drop First Game Of
Year As Bulldogs Go To 3-0
(L'PI) � Georgia Coach Vince
Dooley put it in a nutshell after
his Bulldogs rallied to defeat
Clemson 26-23 Saturday.
"It was a miracle, a real
miracle said Dooley after Kevin
Butler kicked a 60-yard field goal
with 11 seconds to play to supply
the winning margin.
Georgia fought its way back
from a 20-6 halftime deficit aided
by seven Clemson turnovers.
Butler also kicked a 43-yarder
with 6:09 to play that put Georgia
out in front 23-20 for the first
time in the game.
Clemson came back and moved
the ball 48 yards before Donald
Igwebuike booted a 48-yarder to
tie the game up one final time.
Hemson quarterback Mike Ep-
pley, usually a surehanded per-
former, committed five costly
turnovers in the second half.
Clemson, now 2-1, wasn't the
only Atlantic Coast Conference
team to endure frustration Satur-
day, North Carolina fell to 0-2
after a 52-20 whipping at the
hands of 7th-ranked Boston Col-
lege, and South Carolina shut out
Duke 21-0.
In the first conference game of
the season, Wake Forest defeated
North Carolina State 24-15, the
Deacons first win over State in
four years.
Maryland got its first win of the
season with a 20-17 upset of 18th-
ranked West Virginia, and
Virginia stunned Navy 21-9.
Georgia Tech cruised past the
Citadel 48-3 and now is the
league's only undefeated team.
Among the area independents,
East Carolina won its first game
in four outings with a 34-27 vie-
204 E. 5th Si PHONE 758-1427
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EXPIRES SEPT. 29,1984
tory over Georgia Southern.
North Carolina's loss was the
worst defeat for the Tar Heels
since 1980 when Oklahoma whip-
ped them 41-7. Boston College
quarterback Doug Flutie enhanc-
ed his standing in the Heisman
Trophy chase by ripping the Tar
Heels secondary for 354 yards
passing and six touchdowns. He
hit 28 of 38 passes before leaving
the game early in the fourth
quarter.
Tar Heel Coach Dick Crum
said if he had a vote for the
Heisman it would go to Flutie.
Wake Forest, known in recent
years as largely a passing team,
did in the Wolfpack on the
ground. The Deacons ran the ball
65 times and threw only 20 passes.
"We've got a lot creative things
in our offense and we'll go to
them when creativity is required
said Deacon Coach AI Groh.
"But we've worked hard to have a
strong talented football team that
could do what it had to do to win.
Our experience is in our offensive
line and our backs
The Deacon's backs ran for 268
yards, and the secondary picked
off six Wolfpack passes.
Maryland broke a tie with 21
seconds left on the clock when
Jess Atkinson kicked a 20-yard
field goal to hand West Virginia
its first loss in four games.
Duke was forced to play South
Carolina with a number of in-
juries. Starting quarterback Ron
Sally did not play and during the
course of the game the Blue Devils
lost tailback Julius Grantham and
split end Doug Green to knee in-
juries.
Defensively, South Carolina
held Duke to to a total of 50 yards
rushing and sacked the Blue Devil
quarterbacks seven times. On of-
fense South Carolina's veer amas-
ed 265 yards rushing.
Virginia quarterback Kevin
Ferguson scored all three Cavalier
touchdowns. He ran for two from
one yard out and then threw a
one-yard scoring pass to Geno
Zimmerlink. Navy lost
Napolean McCallum, a
contender, to a broken
the fourth quarter.
For Georgia Tech,
Robert Lavette rushed
yards and three
Along the way,
tailback
Heisman
ankle in
tailback
for 158
touchdowns.
Lavette also
became the team's career scoring
leader with 216 points.
East Carolina snapped its three-
game losing streak behind the
passing of quarterback DarreU
Speed. He threw for 183 yards
and two touchdowns. Georgia
Southern fumbled eight times los-
ing three of them.
On this week's ACC schedule,
Clemson is at Georgia Tech, Duke
is at Army, Wake Forest travels to
Maryland, North Carolina hosts
Kansas, North Carolina State
hosts East Carolina, and Virginia
is at Virginia Tech.
Melody Furci
Introducing: Tina Sexton
Beth Perry
Lisa Bissell
Walk-ins welcome, but appointments preferred
Precision Haircutting201 E. 5th St.
Come To Western Sizzhn For
Bigger, Juicy Beef Tips
JUST ASK FOR THENO.31
Daih
Lunch
Special
Mon-Sat
$2.99
1 lain-3pm
Wednesday, September 26
Paid for by SGA Elections Committee
FALL 1984 - SGA ELECTIONS
Fellow Students:
The end of September brings with it the annual
Fall SGA elections. This year's elections will take place on
campus this Wednesday, September 26, 1984, from 900
a.m. to 6:00 p.m with polling places being at various loca-
tions on campus. In these elections, class officers, dorm
representatives and day representatives will be elected for
the school year by you, the Student Body.
This past Spring Semester's election turnout
showed an increased interest in Student Government and I
hope that trend continues on Wednesday. Student Govern-
ment was established so that students would have a voice in
the decisions that affect them. These representatives that
you elect will help determine how your student fees are
spent, what type of campus life you may have, and how
much involvement the University will have in outside af-
fairs.
For the SGA to have a strong voice, a large
voter turnout is necessary on Wednesday. This election is
your chance to decide who will represent this organization
at our University. I encourage you to take a minute to vote
on Wednesday. I look forward to serving you during the
current year.
S�ncerelv.
Johnny Rainey
SGA President
lorii
B Bill MITCHFLI
M�ff Unirr
The following is a look a
ECU's football opponent
.in last Saturdays action.
Honda Slate � Thirteenth
;ed Florida State defeated
ranked Miami 38-3 in a ver
prising game. The Seminolt
;minated the attending na
champions from start to i
with coach Bobb B
freeze-option" offense
defense that sacked qua
Bernie Kosar six time I
�aids in losses.
Derek Schmid' �
'goals of 54,40ana 58 yai
;Honda State a 9-0 halftime
. 'he third quarter Florida
buried he Hurricanes
rblitz ol
.mes reeling. Jese H
I sses for 104 ya
� a reerse and
Eof blockei
Eing jaui i witl J9
Team Pi
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ticks r Flag 1
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V
I
SEPTEMBERS. 1984
NS
r 26
to
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.
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1
ie annual
place on
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usloca-
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turnout
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�jovern-
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fees are
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a large
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ing the
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 25, 1984 13
Florida State Humiliates Hurricanes, 38-13
I By BILL MITCHELL
Staff Wilier
g The following is a look at how
Z ECU's football opponents fared
Jin last Saturday's action.
m

z Florida State � Thirteenth rank-
sed Florida State defeated fourth
ranked Miami 38-3 in a very sur-
prising game. The Seminoles dor-
minated the defending national
champions from start to finish
; with coach Bobby Bowden's
"freeze-option" offense and a
defense that sacked quarterback
Bernie Kosar six times for 73
yards in losses.
Derek Schinid kicked field
goals of 54,40 ana J8 yards to give
Florida State a 9-0 halftime lead.
' In the third quarter Florida State
buried the Hurricanes 15-0 in a
:litz of scoring that sent the Hur-
lcanes reeling. Jesse Hester, a
ide receiver who caught four
passes for 104 yards, took a pitch
on a reverse and followed a wall
of blockers through the Miami
defense to score on a 77-yard scor-
ing jaunt with 1:39 elapsed in the
third quarter. Quarterback Eric
Thomas' pass to Hassan Jones for
the two point conversion made it
17-0, and Rooslvelt Snipes scored
on a 4-yard run 4:13 later to make
24-0.
Kosar went 11-19 for 154 yards,
but coach Jimmy Johnson bench-
ed him in the third quarter and us-
ed Vinny Testaverde for the rest
of the game.
Temple � The Temple Owls
scored a stunning upset over
another one of East Carolina's
opponents, Pittsburgh, 13-12. A
50-yard pass from Lee Saltz to
Willie Marshall set up a 21-yard
Field goal by Jim Cooper with 26
seconds to give them the victory.
The Owls took over at their 33
yard line for the final drive. Saltz
then hit Paul Palmer for 15 yards.
But later in the drive a clipping
penalty set them back to the 39.
That's when Lee Saltz connnected
with Marshall to the Pittsburgh
11. The Owls then ran the clock
down on drive to the 5-yard line to
set up the winning score.
The Panthers had taken a 12-7
halftime lead on a 14 yard scoring
pass from John Cummings to Bill
Ballace. But Pitt could not score
from then on, employing a runn-
ing game and going 3 of 6 in the
air. The second half was a defen-
sive battle, with Jim Cooper also
kicking a 51-yard field goal.
Central Michigan � Central
Michigan defeated Western
Michigan 38-19 with junior
tailback Tony Brown running for
174 yards and quarterback Bob
DeMarch throwing for three
touchdown passes in a Mid-
American Conference game.
Brown carried 17 times including
a 83-yard touchdown run.
Second-string quarterback Bob
DeMarco completed 12 of 19 for
222 yards and a 1-yard touchdown
run. He was Filling in for injured
Ron Fillmore.
The Wake Forest Demon
Deacons beat N. C. State 24-15 by
grinding out yardage in short
chunks and bottling up State's of-
Team Putt-Putt Underway
Juke Patrol Enters Rankings
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Staff Writer
It's tee off time again for In-
kramural Team Putt-Putt. In the
Men's Division, Beta Theta Pi
and Sigma Phi Epsilon "A" are
tied for first with a score of 295
l aoh.
The Tyler Tee-offs are seeded
r umber one while the Delta Zeta
Alpha's have captured the
mber two spot in women's ac-
t on.
Low scores are abounding as
Mike Thornton of Garrett Aces
snot a 66 and Weby Wise of Tyler
tee-offs shot an 82. Good luck
putters.
In Flag football action, Sneaker
Sam seems to be undecided as to
-uho the next chasers will be.
"However, the leaders in both
men's and women's divisions are
holding their own as the teams
below are fighting it out for poll
-)ostions. Inside sources say
however, that the Juke Patrol
pans to deactivate the Bombs-
ijiiad. Here are the new top 5
ticks for Flag Football
3 BOMBSQL'AD
3 JUKE PATROL
3 SLAY 9'ers
4 KAPPA SIGMA
5 GARRETT FIVE-O
tm
WOMEN'S
i NATURALS
2 ENFORCERS
3 THE SLAY MAMAS
4 WHITE RAIDERS
i DELTA ZETA
The IRS Outdoor Recreation
Center will be offering a
backpacking workshopclinic on
Tuesday, Oct. 2 at 5:00 p.m. in
Room 102 Memorial Gym. The
presentation includes topics con-
cering "what and how to pack
"cold weather hiking "selection
of pack and "wearing and
weight distribution this clinic is
excellent for beginning and in-
termediate packers. For more in-
formation come by the Outdoor
Recreation Center in Memorial
Gym or call (757-6911)
Remember: you can enjoy a lit-
tle bit of the old west through
horseback riding at Jarman's
Stables every Thursday. Advance
registration is required. The cost
is only $5.00 a person. To register
come to the Outdoor Recreation
Center.
Get ready for Almost Anything
Goes on October 3. The IRS rov-
ing reporter will be there for
fascinating interviews with all the
ECU zanies
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9 a.m8 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges
M-F 3 p.m7 p.m.
PERSONAL DENTIST
Do you need a caring,
professional dentist?
�Cleaning done by the doctor
�Pain-free restorative dentistry
Dr. Robert Cargill
University Professional Center
608 E. 10th St. Greenville, NC
758-4927
THE SALE'S OVER-
BUT THE SHOES REMAIN!
AT
H.LH
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GES
(Downtown Greenville)
All Shoes From Last Week's Sale
Remain At Closeout Sale Prices!
Don't Miss Out On These Outstanding
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ILL. HODGES CO.
210 E.F1PTH ST. GREENVILLE
fensc.
Wolfpack quarterback Tim
Esposito had the one bright mo-
ment when he connected with
Haywood Jefferies for a 53-yard
touchdown just before the half
ended. That made the score 14-7.
In the second half, the Deacons
dominated play, and went ahead
24-7 before State scored. Wake
ing tough on such a hot day, and
said his team did what they had
set out to do.
Pittsburgh � The Panthers lost
last week to the Temple Owls to
drop to 0-3.
Tulsa � Tulsa lost to Arkansas
18-9 in a close game. Quarterback
forest operated much of the time Steve Gage, a player to watch for
from their wing T formation with against East Carolina, had a good
Mike Ramseur hauling the ball 35
times and netting 149 yards. What
they ran was strictly power of-
fense, with quarterbacks Jamie
Harris and Foy White passing for
122 yards.
State's main problem was that
star tailback Joe Mclntosh was in-
jured so the running game was
game in the loss for the Golden
Hurricane. We play Tulsa on Oct.
13 in Tulsa.
East Tennessee State � East Ten-
nessee State lost to Appalachian
State, a North Carolina school,
14-0. The game, played in Boone,
was a romp with the Buccaneer's
very limited, and the blocking was not playing well. We play ETSU
not efficient enough to give
Esposito protection. He ended up
with seven interceptions, and
completing only 5 out of 19 at-
tempts. Wake Forest coach Al
Groh praised both teams for play
on homecoming in Greenville.
South Carolina � South Carolina
shut-out Duke 21-0. Quarterback
Allen Mitchell ran for one
touchdown and threw a 17-yard
touchdown pass to Raynard
Brown. That was all the scoring
that was needed, as South
Carolina's defense dominated the
Blue Devils. One reason for the
lack of offense on Duke's part
was because their starting quarter-
back Ron Sally was out with a
rotor cuff injury. South Carolina
played well in the first half, but
coasted in the second. We play
South Carolina on October 27.
Southwestern Louisiana �
Southwestern Louisiana only
scored two touchdowns on
Alabama as the Tide won 38-14.
The Ragin Cajun's played a tough
game, but Alabama was just too
hungry and came away with an
easy win.
Southern Mississippi � Southern
Miss lost to a top ranked Auburn
team 35 to 12 on Saturday. The
Golden Eagles had a good day,
but the high powered Auburn of-
�� wwv� � jtuu fense proved to be too much.
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ECU Cheerleaders and i
Sports world of Greenville
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�IMEEAjfrCAROLONIAN SEPTEMBER 25, 1984
Gooden Wins 17th, Gets Gift From Mays
NEW YORK (UPI) Dwight
Gooden just about locked up the
National League Rookie of the
Year award with his 17th victory
of the year Sunday.
Every time I see an episode like
the one Gooden was involved in
the other day, I'm reminded again
how Roy Campanella hit it right
on the head when he said there has
to be some little boy in you in
order to be a ballplaver.
You should'vc seen Gooden's
eyes light up when the Mets'
19-year-old pitching marvel was
presented with one of Willie
Mays' actual bats and informed
he was getting it with the personal
comliments of his boyhood hero,
the Say Hey Kid.
Gooden, who gets more of a
charge talking about his fantastic
pitching, could hardly believe it
was one of Mays' bats, but it was.
He -aid he wasn't going to use it,
but was taking it home to put it up
Watson Takes Golf's
Biggest Purse of Year
The hottest goiter on the PGA
circuit these days is a guy named
Watson, but it isn't Tom. It's a
Rhodesian by the name of Denis.
Denis Watson, who never
finished higher than second place
in three years on the PGA tour
prior to 1984, has won three times
in less than two months
His latest victory came Sunday
when he shot a 3-under-par 68 for
a one-stroke victory in a $1.1
million PGA tournament.
the event is known as the
Panasonic Las Vegas Invitational.
Watson, who won the Buick
Open Aug. 12 and the World
Series of Golf Aug. 26. picked up
a check for $162,000 foi his I as
Vegas victors. His winnings tor
his first three years on the tonrna
ment trail totaled $167,528.
Watson shot a birdie on the
final hole of the five day. 90-hole
tournament to finish with a
15-under-par, 341 total, one shot
ahead of Andy Bean
The victory moved Watson
from No. 9 on this year's PGA
monev list to No. 2. about
$65,000 beghind the othei Wat-
son, who has collected $471,185
so far this year. Tom Watson
passed up the I a Vegas tourna-
ment.
Denis Watson began Sunday's
play at 12-undei par. three shots
behind fourth round co-leaders
Craig Stadler ami fohnn) Miller
Watson' previous rounds were
69. 66. 68 and 70
While Miller
dlei losl
strokes in the swirling 40 mile pet
hour winds on the 7,077-yard,
par-71, I as Vegas C ountr) Club
couses, Watson shrugged off
bogeys on No. 1 and 7 and strok-
ed five birdies over the next six
holes to take the lead at 15-under-
par. A bogey on No. 16 dropped
him to 14-under par.
Bean, who began the round at
11-under-par, knotted it up by
shooting a birdie on No. 17 and
setting the stage for a confronta-
tion with Watson on the final
hole.
Bean hit a long drive down the
right side of the fairway, while
Watson �- playing in the same
treeshome � was a bit shorter on
the 524-yard, par-5.
Watson used a 1-wood on his
ond shot to put the ball on the
green, about 45 feet from the plin.
Bean, one of the longer hitters on
the tour, hit a 4-iron shot that
landed in a bunker behind the
green.
Bean's bunker shot rolled past
the pin to fringe in front of the
green. His 15-foot putt from just
off the green missed and he settled
for a par-5. Bean's round of
3-under-par 68 gave him a 90-hole
score of 14-under 342 and a
$97,200 check for second.
Watson missed his 45-foot at-
tempt for an eagle, sending his
putt beyond the hold. He then
stroked the comeback 12-footer
foi the birdie and the win.
"It's a wonderful feeling in
knowing you have to make the
putt to win the tournament said
Watson, who admitted he gave a
passing thought to the possible
$162,(MX) payday as he walked up
the No. 18 fairway.
on his mantlepiece instead.
Mays has never met Gooden,
who also has a shot at the Cy
Young Award, but he's looking
forward to it.
"I'm anxious to meet him
myself and maybe I'll get a chance
sometime this week before the
season ends Willie says, "I've
been watching him on television
and I think he's one of the
greatest young pitchers I've ever
seen. When I saw him the first
part of the season, all he was
throwing was fastballs and sliders.
But when I saw him the other day,
he was throwing breaking balls,
Someone's teaching him good
That someone is Mel Stot-
tlemyre, the Met's pitching coach.
Gooden's move to first base,
which is about fair, like with most
other pitchers, needs work also.
It always suprises me how few
pitchers, particularly those who
throw so hard, never put in the
work they obviously should on
keeping the baserunners honest.
Offhand, it's hard to think of
more than a handful who have ex-
ceptionally good moves to first,
Atlanta's Craig McMurtry is one -
helped by Phil Niekro- and
Charlie Hough of the Rangers and
Ron Darling of the Mets are
others.
Scratch Gene Michael from
among the possibilities for the
Montreal Expos' managerial job
next season.
The chief reason his name has
come up for as much speculation
as it has is because of the regard
Murray Cook, the Expo's new
general maanger, has for him.
Cook hasn't asked permission of
the Yankees to talk to Michael
about the Montreal job, nor is it
likely he will because he knows
Michael is happy with New York
and they're happy with him.
My own personal opinion is
that Cook wants Chuck Tanner to
manage Montreal. Cook and Tan-
ner were at Pittsburgh together six
years.
But maybe you remember what
Harding Peterson, the Pirates'
general manager, said about Tan-
ner sometime back. He said as far
as he and the Pirates' ownership
were concerned, Tanner could
have his present job as long as he
likes. Tanner hasn't given any in-
dication he's tired of it despite the
fact that by ending up last in their
division, the Pirates are making
their poorest finish in 20 years.
Speaking of keeping up the
good work. One way you find out
who your friends are is when
you're in the hospital, and
Muhammad Ali was nearly delug-
ed by all the new friends he
discovered he had among the pa-
tients during the two days he
underwent tests in Presbyterian
Hospital's Neurological Institute.
Everyone wanted his autograph
and Ali obliged them all. Come to
think of it, I can't ever remember
seeing Ali turn down anybody
who asked him for his signature.
Some celebrities complain about
having to sign their name so many
times. Ali never does.
The tests substantiated the fact
Ali suffers from Parkinson's Syn-
drome. He can live with that for
years without great discomfort,
and with the neurosurgical
methods used today, good results
are obtained in 80 percent of the
cases.
The doctors and nurses who at-
tended Ali called him a jewel of a
patient, "one in a million With
all the excitement and entertain-
ment he provided people all over
the world, and with all the help he
has given the less fortunate,
though mostly unpublicized, Ali
deserves to spend the rest of years
peacefully. Best Wishes.
If the networks are looking
around for a good future prospect
to do football color commentary
for them, Howie Long, the Los
Angeles Raiders' fourth year
defensive end, would get my vote
as an excellent possibility.
Long relates the same way to
people as John Madden does, and
you know how successful the
former Raiders' coach has been
on TV.
Madden has gotten out a book
with Dave Anderson, the New
York Times' columnist, titled.
"Hey, Wait a Minute, I Wrote a
Book Madden is such a natural
at talking about football on TV. I
enjoyed his book enormously,
too.
Joe Klein, the former Texas
Rangers' GM, could be a dark
horse candidate for the Seattle
managing job. Klein, who manag-
ed in the minors, is highly thought
of by Hal Keller, the Mariners'
Vice President of Baseball Opera-
tions.
Padres' owner Joan Kroc, club
President Ballard Smith and
General Manager Jack McKeon
all are wound up being tossed into
the pool at Goose Gossage's home
in San Diego when the Padres
celebrated their division clincher
Thursday night.
Singspiration - The Heaven Bound
Quartet will be singing at the Green-
ville Church of God on Wednesday
night Sept. 26.
Singing will begin at 7:30pm.
Transportation is available.
For more information call 355-6595.
V

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Title
The East Carolinian, September 25, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 24, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.362
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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