The East Carolinian, September 20, 1984






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.9
Greenville, N.C.
Thursday September 20,1984
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Republicans Sue Hunt
Over Use Of Plane
RALEIGH (UPI) � Leading
state Republicans are asking a
court to order Gov. Jim Hunt to
pay back $100,000 in charges for
political use of state airplanes and
helicopters.
A lawsuit filed Monday said
Hunt, state officials and officers
ot his Senate campaign entered in-
to a "common plan, scheme and
design" to understate the cost of
the aircraft fees "to the great
detriment of the North Carolina
taxpayers
The suit also asked a Wake
County Superior Court judge to
ban Hunt from using the state's
aircraft for campaign trips.
A spokesman for Hunt called
the suit a "political stunt
The suit was filed by state Rep-
bulican Party Chairman David T.
Flaherty and two other supporters
of the re-election of Sen. Jesse
Helms, R-N.C. Flaherty filed a
similar complaint with the Federal
Election Commission last April.
Flaherty charged that the ar-
rangement allowed cut-rate air
travel for Hunt and members of
several political committees, in-
cluding a panel formed in 1978 to
back a constitutional amendment
that let Hunt succeed himself.
Also among the committees are
Friends of Jim Hunt, the North
Carolina Democratic Victory
Fund and the Jim Hunt Ex-
ploratory Committee.
Flaherty said Hunt and cam-
paign officals were charged
"substantially lower" rates than
those charged other state agen-
cies.
Flaherty asked the court to
figure the rates based on what was
charged in 1977 before the con-
stitutional amendment panel was
formed.
Last year when Hunt formed a
committee to explore his chances
to defeat Helms, the governor
ordered that the costs of state air
travel be split between the time
spent on state business and cam-
paigning.
After Flaherty's FEC com-
plaint, Hunt officials
acknowledged that the FEC codes
apparently call for full payment
of any trip involving campaign
business and the governor ordered
full reimbursement.
Hunt said he would stop any
use of anv state aircraft for
political business.
Drive-In Service
JON JORDAN - ECU Photo L�b
Let's face it, the concept of fast food has gone too far. Of course, if you're eating at Mendenhall, the fasier
the better.
Attic Schedules October Reopening At Downtown Location
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Editor
Following the fire at the Attic
more than a week ago, owner
Tom Haines began looking for a
new location for his club. He
relocated temporarily at the King
and Queen North, but said yester-
day that he plans to reopen the
Attic at the site where it was first
located � 209 E. 5th St.
The Attic was located at the 5th
Street site above what is at present
Rafters from 1971-75. "The Attic
is going home Haines said.
Haines said that since 1975 the
lower part of the building has
been the home of at least five
clubs. "Each time a new club
moves in they generally make the
place that much nicer Haines
said. "The reverse has happened
here (in the top part)
Because the building is not in
good condition, Haines said they
have a "massive remodeling job"
ahead of them.
The new club will be approx-
imately the size of the Attic
without the Phoenix Room,
Haines said. Remodeling plans in-
clude increasing club capacity. In
addition, Haines intends to
change the stage arrangement.
"We're tearing down the stage
and playing to the long wall, not
the short one he said. "It's
always stupid to play to the short
wall because it affects the sight-
line and the volume
Haines said he also would like
to create a new entrance for the
club.
The estimated opening date for
the club is Oct. 18 � Homecom-
ing weekend. "The club will most
definitely not be completed by this
time Haines said, adding that
one of the limitations is the
amount of financing available.
The insurance for the Attic was
cut in half last year following
passage of the DWI bill. "We had
to cut across the board Haines
said.
The club renovations should be
completed by Christmas, Haines
said, and the location of the Attic
will be "as permanent as it can
be
One future consideration for
Haines is an increase in the drink-
ing age. "God knows what will
happen then he said. "We do
feel that we are in one of the bet-
ter positions because people still
want live entertainment
Until the Attic is moved to its
downtown site, it will remain at
the King and Queen North. "The
location is working out fine except
not many students are coming
out Haines said.
Haines is currently working
with the SGA Transit system in an
attempt to provide bus service to
the King and Queen North.
The Attic will be open tonight
and Saturday, and next week's
schedule will remain as planned.
A concert by Fast Forward Friday
has been relocated to the mall at
ECU. It will be sponsored by
Miller beer.
Haines said he urges students to
come out to the club, adding that
"you don't have to dress up
"The support we get from peo-
ple right now is the most impor-
tant support we'll ever get he
said. "I thank everybody for of-
fering everything they have
been
Haines added that he was
especially grateful to the owner of
the King and Queen North, who
was very generous with his offer
for the use of the facilities, saying
that "friendship" was what mat-
tered .
i Faculty Senate Debates Computer Use
By GREG RIDEOUT
Conversation became slightly
heated Tuesday in the first Facul-
ty Senate meeting of the academic
year. Registrar Gil Moore, present
to discuss on-line registration, and
Henry Ferrell, a professor in the
history department, argued over
the merits and consequences of
converting the present pre-
registration system to a more ad-
vanced computerized one.
Gil Moore said on-line registra-
tion would enable the school to
register students closer to the end
of each semester. The system in-
Sept. 20-26
volves having an IBM personal
computer in each department.
After each student met with his
advisor and filled out the op-scan
sheet, he would then take it within
his department to a clerical
worker who would enter the data
into the system, bypassing the
registrar's office. The student
would instantly have his schedule,
or know which classes were clos-
ed. Moore hopes to have registra-
tion on-line by fall 1985.
Ferrell and other members are
concerned that not enough faculty
input was involved in converting
the procedure. Registration, Fer-
rell said, is an academic matter
which takes up a considerable
amount of the faculty's time. A
resolution was passed to study on-
line registration and the question
of whether to have more faculty
input in the matter. Currently the
Administrative Computer Users
Committee, comprised of 9-10
members, is overseeing the pro-
cess. Dean Donald Bailey of
General College is the only faculty
member on the committee.
Registrar Moore disagreed that
pre-registration was an academic
matter, saying instead that it was
administrative. Moore said he and
his office are only transferring the
policy established by a 1979 task
force into action. Moor� believes
the system jwill benefif'the stu-
dent, who now will have the
chance to pick his schedule closer
to the start of each semester.
On-line registration has been in
the works since 1971, with a the
special task force completing a
year-long study on the issue in
1979. Moore hopes the changes
will 'cut down the demand during
dropadd. Last year more than
8,000 students made more than
33,000 changes.
Ambassadors Plan Membership Drive
Ticket To Ride
If you're getting tired of campus life, one of the best places to hang
out is the ride board in Mendenhall. Plan that fantastic weekend
getaway.
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Writer
The ECU Ambassadors will be
holding their annual membership
drive next week, according to Cin-
dy Kittrell of the Alumni Associa-
tion. The Ambassadors are a
group of students who work out
of the Alumni Association and the
office of the Vice Chancellor of
Academic Affairs.
Each year, the Ambassadors
hold a membership drive to
recruit students for their organiza-
tion. This year's drive will begin
Sept. 20 and end Sept. 26. In
order to become an ambassador,
interested students fill out ap-
plications and are interviewed by
the Ambassador Membership
Committee. Upon invitation, the
student attends a dinner social at
the chancellor's home and is
welcomed into the ambassador
organization, Kitrell said.
According to Kitrell, the Am-
bassadors are involved in many
campus activities. They serve as
the official hosts and hostesses for
various university parties and
events. They serve as campus tour
guides, giving tours every day at
2:00 p.m. In addition, they assist
the Admissions Office in activities
related to attracting qualified
students to ECU.
The Ambassadors assist the
Alumni and Development Office
in support programs for the
benefit of ECU. Also, they help
with the chancellor's box during
football games.
Kitrell said there are numerous
benefits in being an ambassador
including gaining experience in
dealing with people while making
excellent contacts, and building
confidence in oneself.
Each year, the Past President's
Club of the Alumni Association
sponsors a scholarship given to an
ambassador who is a rising senior.
The scholarship consists of the
full payment of all tuition and
fees. The selection is based on
leadership and involvement.
The goals of the group include
the running of a successful Tele-
fund, which is one of their major
functions. Recognition as being a
successful organization and the
continuation as a prestigous
group are also major goals.
"The Ambassadors want
leaders with a strong commitment
to the university said Paige
Aman, Ambassador advisor.
On The Inside
I College Costs Create 'Debtor Class'
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features9
Classifieds11
Sports14
The published dates for
Change of Major and
Preregistration this semester
have been changed. Change of
Major will take place Oct. 1-12
and Preregistration is schedul-
ed for Oct. 8-12.
�Need a challenge? Check out
TV Guide's Trivia Game, see
Features, page 9.
�Some of the fall fashions are
reviewed, see Features, page
12.
�Once again, the team of ex-
perts attempts to pick the win-
ners of this week's football
games. Will Sports Editor Ran-
dy Mews' ego finally suffer a
blow? See Sports, page 17.
�Muhammed All was recently
hospitalized for treatment of
Parkinson's Disease. See
Sports, page 16.
BOSTON, MA (CPS) � By the
time the babies born this year get
to college, they may have to pay
$45,000 to $180,000 for their
degrees and face a huge post-
graduate debt, according to a re-
cent accounting firm study.
"We've witnessed an increase
of more than 330 percent in tui-
tion and required fees over the
past 15 years in the public sector
alone says Clark Bernard,
chairman of higher education
planning for Coopers and
Lybrand, which conducted the
college costs study for the
American Association of State
Colleges and Universities.
If such rapid tuition increases
continue through the turn of the
century, as many financial experts
expect, "families who have a child
this year will probably have to
spend $45,000 for a public college
education in 18 years Bernard
says.
The cost of sending a child to a
private college, moreover, will run
from $140,000 to $180,000, the
study predicts.
"The implications (of the
study) are extremely serious
says Allan Ostar, AASCU presi-
dent.
"We may well be creating a
debtor class of students" by
charging so much for tuition that
students will spend decades pay-
ing back their education loans, he
says.
Currently, the cost of attending
a public college averages $15,000,
Bernard says, while four years at a
private institution runs about
37,000.
A recent University of Wiscon-
sin study, Ostar says, shows that
today's average college student
already has a debt of $8200 upon
graduation.
Compounding high tuition
rates is the federal student aid
programs' shift from giving
students money through grants to
a greater dependence of loan pro-
grams.
Two decades ago, Ostar re-
counts, about 70 percent of all
federal student aid was in the
form of grants and other awards.
Today, 70 percent of all aid
money is in loans which students
must repay after graduating.
If tuition rates continue to soar
and the balance between grants
and loans remains lopsided, he
warns, "a student's ability to pur-
chase consumer goods, a car,
clothes � just the things it takes
to get started in life � will be
seriously impaired
And future college students fac-
ing such momentous debts "may
well be influenced in what kind of
career they go into based on how
well it will help them repay their
loans, rather than choosing the
field they really want to go into
The teaching field, he notes,
could be "drastically" affected by
big education debts, as more and
more graduates are forced to
work in the private sector, where
salaries are significantly higher.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 20, 1984
Announcements
AN NOUN EMENTS
Due to limited space, The East
Carolinian requests that orgranjzations
submit only important announcements
about up coming events that students
need to know about in advance. Please
submit such messages as "thank you"
and "congratulation" notes to the Per-
sonals section of the classifieds in The
East Carolinian.
The deadline for announcements is 3
p.m. Monday for the Tuesday paper
and 3 p.m. Wednesday for the Thursday
�paper.
They must be typed on an announce-
ment form to be accepted. These forms
can be picked up at our office.
BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
Lightshine a special dinner and program will
be held Sept 24 at 530 p m A home cooked meal
will cost $2 and be followed by a program which
will include Robert Jones who will speak and give
a slide presentation
STUDENT FINANCIAL AID
During the week of September 24 28. the Student
Financial Aid Office will be closed to walk in traf-
fic from 8 00 a m to 1 00 p m Students, parents
and other parties will be seen from 100 p.m. to
5 00 pm The purpose of the shortened office
hours during the week is to enable the financial
aid staff to catch up on processing financial aid
applications
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
This Thursday, Sept 20. at 6 00 p m. at the New
Deli, we will be having a silent dinner All new
students are welcome to attend No previous
knowledge of Sign Language is neccessary, so
come on out and join us in the fun
REAL ESTATE
Organnarionai meeting of Rho Epsilon Elec
tion of officers will be discussed Speaker will be
Les Turnage area realtor) All persons in
teresfeo Iplease attend this IMPORTANT
meeting.
?
PI KAPPA PHI
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity will be having their lit
tie sister1 rush next Tuesday afd Wednesday All m
interested girls should come out and meet the
Di-others and little sisters of Pi Kappa Phi.
SOFTBALLTRYOUTS
For those of you who are interested in trying out
for the Women's Softball Team. Call or see Coach
S Manahan as soon as possible! I Call 757-6161.
FRESHMEN
Applications are now being accepted for the
Student Government Association's Freshman
Aide Program Deadline tor submitting applica-
tion is 5 00 Monday, Oct 1 For more information
or an application come by the SGA office, 2nd
floor Mendenhall. or call 757 6611
MALE VOICES NEEDED
Greenville Choral Society, with over 50 voices,
needs more male voices in all vocal ranges,
especially tenors The Society practices every
Tuesday evening from 7 30 9 30 and will preform
three public concerts during the 1984-85 season.
For more information, contact Carolyn Ipock at
355 2717
MUSIC
Music courses for non music majors and
general college students The School of Music en-
courages students to consider enrolling in the
foiiowing music courses designed for non music
majors during the spring term MUSC 1208, 1218-
Nton Music Maior Group Piano l and II, MUSC
1215 Group Voice 11 (section 003 for non-majors),
MUSC 2208 Music Appreciation, MUSC 2218 Or
chestral Music, MUSC 2238 Contemporary
Music, MUSC 2258 History of Jazz Music, MUSC
3018 Introduction to Basic Music Skills, MUSC
3028 Music Education in Elementary Grades,
MUSC 3038 Music Education in Intermediate
Grades, MUSC 3048 Music for Exceptional
Children Performance organizations are open to
all students, but an audition is required prior to
registration in any performance group unless the
student has the consent of the instructor. No other
school of music course offerings may be taken
without permission of instructor and authoriza-
tion from the Dean's office
SIGMA NU
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
Little Sister of Sigma Nu invite all ladies of
ECU to join us at our annual Fall Rush. Our rush
will be held Sept. 17 19 at 1301 Cotanch St starting
at 9 00 Call 758 0217 or 758-7440 for more Informa-
tion or rides Looking forward to seeing you
there!
CRAFT CENTER
All ECU students, faculty, staff, and their
dependents 18 yrs or older are eligble to join the
Mendenhall Crafts Center located on the bottom
floor of Mendenhall Student Center. Workshops
are now being offered in Photography, Weaving,
Pottery, Jewelry-Making, Stitching, various
Christmas Crafts, Children's Ceramics and
more! Stop by the information desk or the Crafts
Center and pick up a brochure.or additional in-
formation call 757 6611, ext 260 (after 5 PM call
ext 271)
, NUCLEAR WAR
Nobody wants to think about the nuclear war
issue it's much easier to forget about bombs and
concentrate on our daily lives. Yet the possibility
of war is very real. So, however, is out ability to
prevent it if you would like to know more about
the nuclear issue, and what you can do, please
plan to attend a showing of the film, "The Last
Epidemic " Afterword there will be a short talk
and discussion led by Dr. John Moskop, Pro
lessor Humanities Division of the ECU Medical
School. Further discussion and refreshments will
follow the program. The film will begin at 8:00
p.m Monday. Sept. 24, in the Media Room at
Joyner Library This event is sponsored by the
ECU Peace Committee, get involved!
JEWISH STUDENTS
Students are cordially Invited to a Hlllel cook out
on Sunday, Sept 23, at 3:30 p.m. at the home of
Or. and Mrs. Warshaner and Fred Lorber, 160 E.
Fifth St. (Corner of 5th and Elm).
Come onecome ALL!I Meet your fellow
Jewish Student.
For a ride, directions or more Information. Call
Dr Bramy Resnlk at 757-6045 or 756-5640.
ALPHA SIG
LITTLE SISTERS
Thanks a million for all your support and
helping to make this the best Rush ever. "Chlckan
Plckln" � this Saturday after the game � Be
There I
PLANT SALE
The annual Biology Club Plant Sale will be held
on Thursday, Sept 27 and Friday, Sept. 28, 1984
Times of sale will be from 7:30 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.
The sale will be held In the Biology Greenhouse
room Sill. Checks post dated September 28 will
be accepted. Plants make beautiful household ac
cents so please suppport the Biology Clubl
CAR WASH
The Little Sisters of Delta Sigma Phi will be
having a Car Wash at the Texaco Station on 14th
Street. The car wash will be this Sunday from
10 30 tq 4:00. Congratulations to the Delta Slg
pledge class and to our fourteen little sister
pledges We are behind you all the way. Lefs
celebrate at the house after the football game.
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Current and potential Environmental Design
(Art School) majors should attend an advising
meeting Friday Sept 28, noon, in Room 208 of the
Art Building. Bring lunch and find out about the
new direction for the program, course sugges-
tions, and what environmental design is all about.
FILMS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Films Committee will meet
on Wednesday. September 26, 1984, at 500 p.m. In
Room 242 of Mendenhall Student Center All
members and Interested students are urged to at
tend.
APOCARWASH
Alpha Phi Omega is sponsoring a CARWASHM
The Carwash will be Saturday, Sept 29 at the
Shell Service Station near Farm Fresh. The time
and cost will be announced later.
BUDDHIST MEDITATION
Our first meeting will be at the Coffee House in
Mendenhall Student Center, Monday, Sept 24, at
700 A presentation will be made on the "Relaxa-
tion Response followed by discussion and
meditation instruction Please bring a cushion for
meditatioa.
EDUCATION MAJORS
Student North Carolina Association of
Educators Organizational Meeting, Thursday,
Sept 20, 3:30 p.m Speight 308. All students in-
terested in membership are Invited to attend.
Those planning to student teach this year are en-
couraged to be present. Applications and addi
tional information will be available at this time.
CPR
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation classes are
now being offered by the Dept of University
UNIONS Sign up at the Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday
through Friday. The cost is $1 00 for the book
Must show your valid ID card at time of enroll-
ment
HOMECOMING
Pictures of the Homecoming Pirate candidates
will be taken on Sept 24, 25, and 26 from 7:00
10:00 p.m. in the Buccaneer Office of the Publica
tions Building. You must have your photograph
taken at this time. The cost of the photograph will
be One 8 X 10 black and white print J20.00,
Package of two $27.00, and Package of three
S30.00 Please make checks payable to: ECU
Photo Lab Candidates must contact Mrs Kay
Smith at 757 6009, Monday through Friday from
8 00 am 500 p.m. in order to schedule an ap-
pointment for the sitting. You will have five poses
taken and have the option to pick the best pose to
be printed Candidates must make their own ar
rangements at the time of the sitting as to when
they wish to select the pose of their choice Pic-
tures are being done by the ECU Photo Lab. All
candidates MUST have their photograph taken by
these photographers as-each picture is to be of
consistent quality, thereby equalizing the preser
tation of all candidates Any other photographs
will be rejected.
GRE
Two workshops on Standardized Tests are being
offered by the Counseling Center: Sept. 24, 1984
from 4 5 p.m general information and tips on
taking Standardized Tests, and Sept 25,1984 from
4-5 p.m. a closer look at the GRE They will be
held in 305 Wright Annex. You do not need to
register, but if you need more Information, call
757-6661 or come by the Counseling Center (307
Wright Annex).
KARATE
Advanced classes for the ECU Karate Club are
currently meeting on Monday and Thursday
nights at 7:30. The beginning classes will have
their registration on Sept. 27 at 7:30 In Memorial
Gym Dance Room.
SAM
The Society for Advancement of Management
will have an organizational meeting on Wednes
day, Sept. 26 at 300 p.m. in room 104 Rawl. Plans
will be finalized for the events and meetings plan-
ned for the semester. Any student or faculty
member is welcome to attend. SAM is for anyone
siace v all must manage something in our lives.
BALLROOM DANCE
Ballroom dance for faculty and staff will begin
on October 2 at noon in Memorial Gym Room 108.
Classes are scheduled for Tuesday and Thursday,
there is no charge. Bring a partner or come alone
and learn basic dance steps in the Fox Trot, Cha
Cha, Waltz, Rumba and Bop! Contact Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 or just arrive to dance.
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Beginning Conversational German, Sept. 13,In
termediate Conversational German, Sept. 13,
Middle Eastern Dance, Sept. 15, Piano For
Adults, Sept. 15, Guitar, Sept. 26, Speed Reading,
Sept. 27, Contact Div. of Continuing Education.
Erwin Hall (757 6143).
PRE PHYSICAL THERAPY
Deadline for 1985 admission to professional
phase is November l, 1984. All general college and
physical therapy prerequisites must be com
pleted by end of Spring. 1985 Allied Health Pro
fessions Admissions Test must be taken in
November (apply early October). Application
packets are to be picked up Oct. 5, 1984 In the
Physical Therapy Department Office (Belk
Building, Annex 3, 757 6961, Ext. 261).
ACCOUNTING
A representative from the U.S. General Accoun
ting Office, Virginia Beach, VA will be on campus
Oct. 23, 1984 to interview co-op students who
would like to work as GAO Evaluators. Accoun
ting majors who have completed 60 semester
hours and have a 2.9 GPA or higher, should con
tact the Co-op office, 313 Rawl Bldg to arrange an
Interview immediately
CO-OP
Northern Telecom, Research Triangle Park,
NC has a co-op opening for students interested in
human resources development as a career Must
have a good GPA and be willing to alternate work
assignments. The coop position will begin Spring,
19f5
DRIVER ANDORDER TAKER
fLocal firm has need for drivers and order
takers for peak periods. Twenty hours per week,
must be 18 and have own car Contact
Cooperative Education 313 Rawl Building
STUDENT INTERNSHIP
internship position available with major
Philadelphia Television Station. Experience in
writing, research, and TV production offered.
Contact Cooperative Education Office 313 Rawl
Building
ALPHA PHI
BIG BROTHERS
The next big brother meeting will be 10:00 Sun
day night. Sept, 23 at the house. Ail big brothers
and any inactive big brothers who want to be ac
five again, need to attend. Remember to bring
your dues The executive council and adviser
will meet at "The 52 Crew's apt. tonight at 7:45
LITTLE SISTER RUSH
The brothers and little sisters of Pi Kappa Phi
Fraternity will be having their fall little sister
rush next Tuesday, Sept 25th at the Elbo Room,
and Wednesday, Sept 26th at the Pi Kapp House,
it's going to be wild Please bring ID'S
PI KAPPA PHI
Everyone try to be at the Pi Kapps A Team foot
ball game today at 500 on field I. Also remember
that the next meeting will be Sunday, 600 at the
Pi Kapp house.
JEWISH STUDENTS
ECUHILLEL
High Holiday Services, Rosh Hashana, Dinner
to be held at the Resnlks' on Wed evening, Sept.
26, at 5:30 p.m. followed by services Wed. even-
ing, Sept 26, 7X p.m Thurs Sept. 27, 9 00
a.m Fri , Sept. 28, 9:00 a.m. Yom Kipper, Din
ner to be held at the Resniks' on Fri. evening, Oct
5th at 5:15 p.m. followed by services Fri. evening
Oct. 5, 7;15 p.m Sat Oct. 6, 900 a.m. All ser
vices will be held at Congregation Bayt Shalom.
All students are welcome and urged to come to the
dinners before sevices. The dinners are sponsored
by the ECU Hillel organization. For more infor
mation, directions, or rides please call 756-5640.
PI KAPPA PHI
The brothers of Pi Kappa Phi wish to welcome
25 fall pledges, we wish you well and hope that you
will soon all be Pi Kapp brothers. Also, "A" team
football plays today at 5:00 on field 1. Brotherhood
will be this Monday night, 7:00, at the house. It
will be formal.
ENVIRONMENTAL DESIGN
Prospective and current environmental design
(School of Art) members are urged to attend an
advising meeting to discuss new directions for the
program, what environmental design's all about,
course selection, etc. Bring lunch at noon, Friday,
Sept. 28, in Jenkins 208.
PPHA WANTS YOU
Pre Professional Health Alliance will hold Its
first meeting of the semester Sept. 27 in room 221
In Mendenhall at 5:30 p.m. All members and in
teusted guest are welcome.
�4�����a����
WASH AND DRY



HARBIN HIGHLANDER CENTER INC.
Across From Highway Patrol
2804 E. 10th St.
Greenville, NC 27834
WASH $.50
501b Dryers 25
141b Dryers (30 min.) 50
NURSING STUDENTS
In order to receive your Nursing Pin by
December 14, 1984, orders must be placed in the
Student Supply Store, Wright Building, no later
than September 21, 1984 Orders should be placed
at the Jewelry Counter Orders must be paid in
full when the order is placed
AMBASSADORS
The ECU Ambassadors announce the Fall Pro
motions BLITZ. The membership drive is Thurs
day, Sept. 20 through Tuesday, Sept. 25. Stop by
our booth at the Student Store for an application
and information.
ZBT
There will be a ZBT cook out on Thursday. Sept
20, at 500 p.m. If vou need more information
please call Cindy at 758 5180 or Renee at 752 6695
Hope to see everyone there I
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma Beta Phi will have a general meeting
on Thurs , Sept. 20 at 700 p.m in Room 103 of the
Biology Building. The executive board wnl meet
before the general meeting at 630 p m
HATS
Show your school spirit by purchasing an "I
love ECU" hat for only $2.00! They will be on sale
on Wed Sept. 19, and Thurs , Sept 20 in front of
the Rawl Building (across from Student Store)
They will be sold by your American Marketing
Association who thanks you for your support!
SEMINAR
All invited a to seminar in Home Economics on
Thursday, Sept. 20, 4 p m in room 235 Dr
Margie Gallagher, from the Department of Food,
Nutrition and Institution Management and In
stitute of Coastal and Marine Research, will
speak on Recent Advances in Aquaculture in
Israel For more information call Dr Kathryn
Kolasa, School of Home Economice, 757 6917
SURFCLUB
The team trials were postponed last Sunday in
big choppy waves at Hatteras due to high winds
and strong currents These conditions made judg
ing impossible so another date will be set and held
at Emerald Isle The most important meeting of
the year is this Thursday, Sept 20 in Room 221
Mendenhall at 8 00 p m Topics to be covered in
elude rescheduling of trials, club dues, t shirt
and jacket sales, planning of road trips, fund
raising, and scheduling of contests Contact Dave
Colby at 758 2392 for more information.
OPTOMETRY CONFERENCE
The will be an Optometry Conference held in
Jenkins Auditorium Thursday. Sept 20 between 3
and 5 00 Refreshments will be from 2 3 Speakers
will be representing Pennsylvania College of Op
tometry. Southern College of Optometry. Univer
sity of Alabama School of Optometry All Are in
vited to attend


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PREREGISTRATION
General College students should contact their
advisers prior to Oct. 1, 1984 to schedule an ap
pointment for preregistratlon for me Spring
Semester
CADP
CADP will meet on Sept 20, at 4 00 p m in 218
Erwin. Anyone interested in volunteer peer
counseling is welcome to attend
KARATE CLUB
Registration for beginning Karate will be in the
dance room of Memorial Gym on Sept 27 at 7 30
Classes for advanced yellow belt and up will begin
Sept 28 at 730 in the same room KICK your
heart out with the Karate Club
TABLE TENNIS
All full time ECU Day Students wishing to par
ticipate in a singles Table Tennis Tournament
must register in the Mendenhall Student Center
Billiards Room on the bottom floor of Mendenhall
by Sunday, Sept 30, 1984 All students living in
Residence Hall should see their Directors for ad-
ditional information or call 757 6611, ext 239
SCUBA
Thanksgiving vacation DIVE COZUMEL,
MEXICO 8 days, 7 nights on the beautiful
Yucatan Penninsula. Drift diving on the Palancar
reef will be one of the most exiting experiences
From Raleigh, price including air fare, meals,
lodging and diving 8820.00 special price for non
divers $720 00 Air travel provided by Mexicana
and Eastern For registrations and further infor
mation, call Ray Scarf, Dir of Acquatics 757 6441
SCUBA
Christmas vacation: Dive Penny Camp Na
tional Underwater Park in fabulous Key Largo
The Florida Keys are the only natural coral reef
in the Continental US This five day trip, Dec
16 21st includes lodging and two dive boat trips
daily Tanks, backpack, and weight belts are pro
vided Cost is $200 00 per person, two to a room oc
cupancy and $175 00 per person, four to a room oc
cupancy For further information, call Ray
Scharf, Dir of Acquatics. 757-6441
REPUBLICANS
The College Republicans will meet tonight at
7 00 in the Coffeehouse at Mendenhall Many im
portant items will be discussed If you wish to get
involved and have an impac on this campaign,
you must attend this meeting
PRIME TIME
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ, every
Thurs 7 p m in Jenkins Aud Art Bldg We are
committed to having fun, fellowship and a Study
of God s Word Please Join us See you there
MAT
Due to increased charges by the Psychological
Corp, the Test.ng Center at ECU finds It
necessary to pass on the increase to the MAT can
didates Beginning Oct 1, 1984, the test fee will be
$23
ALMOST ANYTHING GOES
The BIG EVENT Is here intramural
ALMOST ANYTHING GOES This is it To
sign up for all tha fun and excitement come on by
Room 204 Memorial Gym This Is the event you've
been waiting for Bring tha roomee. the
girlfriend, tha wife, tha Little Sister. �,
boyfriend, the Doss, the DOG We don't care
Just get out and have FUN, fun. fun Through;
INTRAMURALSII
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Hey! Leadership, friendship and service is
what It's all about Come join a National Coeo
Service Fraternity APO! Meetings are
Thursdays at 5 p m in Mendenhall! AH Brothers
please attend!
MAJOR DECISION
MAKING A MAJOR DECISION GROUP This
program Is designed to aid students in choosing
an academic maior in a small group format Eaca
participant will also receive individual aid tron
the group leader if desired Group participants
will increase self knowledge of their interests
values and abilities, learn how these relate to r.a
iors and career decision making process The Ma
jor Decision Group will meet Wed . Sept 36
Thurs Sept 27, Wed , Oct 3, Thurs . Oct 4. from
3 4 p m In Room 305 Wright Annex Although aa
vance registration Is not required, we would ao
predate advance notification of interest to insure
that we have adequate materials on hand Please
contact the Counseling Center In 307 Wright An
nex (757-6661) for further information or to let us
know you plan to attend
NIH
A representative from the National institute of
Health, Bethesde. MD will be on campus Octobe'
1 and 2 to interview students who would like to be
health research assistants in their Norm a'
Volunteer Program beginning Spring. 1985
Students will participate in experiments ang
research regarding disease control and the
human body Win receive $12 50 per day stlpenc
plus free room and board, and transportation pa d
to and from NIH Students in the health, netura.
sciences, computer science, and business fields
who may be interested should contact 'he Co op
office. 313 Rawl, immediately to Sign up for an in-
terview
CSCIMATH MAJORS
Great Co-op lobs available for Spring and Sum
mer! Several loos have application deadlines of
September 25. 1984 Must have GPA of 2 5 or bet
ter and a good grade in at least I programm.ng
course Graduate and undergraduate jobs Come
to Rawl 313 now to make �r appointment to see a
coordinator about n��e l0ei
NAACP
The next meeting of the NAACP wu at held on
Monday. Sept 24. at 5 30 In the Coffee House on
the ground floor of Mendenhall we urge anyone
interested to attend "With your support we can
accomplish something for everyone
f
m
1
Quiet
AND
ECU CONCERT
COMMITTEE
Presents
Free Rock Concert
Featuring
"Fast Forward"
Band
Sept. 21st
Mendenhall Patio
6:00
Free Cups & Painter Hats
Bike T
Crime
Column
During the Fall Semester of
1979, an ECU freshman fell vic-
tim to one of the most common
campus crimes: bicycle larceny
The freshman reported the
larceny to the University Police
and, because he had registered his
bicycle with the Police Depart
ment, the serial number of the
bicycle was on file and included in
the theft report.
During the Spring Semester of
1983, investigators from the
University Police Department
recovered the bicycle from a local
pawn shop. The surprised victim,
at that time a senior, cheerfully
accepted the return of his proper-
ty.
But, the case was not cle
College Rep
Plan Fall A
By HAROLD JOYNER
I Newt Uilor
The ECU College Republicans
are currently involved in an all-
campus voter registration drive
targeted at potential republican
voters, according to CR Chair-
man Dennis Kilcoyne.
Kilcoyne said any student wh
has not registered to vote in the
elections must do so by Oct "
Kilcoyne said many students who
are not residents of Pitt County
may think they are not eligible to
vote. However, Robert W. Spear-
man, Chairman of the State
Board of Elections said, "In the
case of a student (who wishes to
vote), the fact he intends to stay in
a college town only for his educa-
tion and expects to leave when
some future event occurs such as
graduation, marriage, or employ-
ment, does not keep him being
considered a resident of the coun-
ty or town for the present
The student may register to vote
' in Pitt County by showing proof
of his residence, Kilcoyne said.
"He may show a car registration,
drivers license or any other proof
he paid county taxes Spearman
also said. Kilcoyne stressed that if
a student chooses to vote by-
absentee ballot, it must be
notarized. He said several
members of the College
Republicans are Notary Republics
and will be glad to notarize a stu-
: dent's ballot at no cost.
Kilcoyne said most students
. want to vote, "but don't want to
S go through the trouble He also
� said, "the students of college age
are the biggest supporters of
; Reagan, but they are the least like-
� ly to vote. It is very importam for
students to cast their ballots this
Kilcovne
GRUMPY S
"HA
Buy a super sand
($llf
(NO COUPONS)
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ALMOST ANYTHING GOES
I EvENT It here intramural
0S1 siv'hiNG GOES Thl� Is it To
� Ifta. n anaetcirement come on by
� vivr" Thit it m� �vent you Ve
g 'or Brno ffv� roomea. trie
"��� ' tut Littto Si�ter, th�
-�� boat Hw DOG" e dortt care
indfcavaFUN fun fun Through;
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Mi p � "d�rnp ana service is
r oi a National Co eo
APO' Meetings are
Menoeohan1 All Brothers
MAJOR DECISION
. ma � DECISION GROUP This
� students tn choosing
tsmal s'Ouptormat Each
� v r. e ve 'XJiviOuai aid from
��� M G'ouo oarticipants
- � y 'he.r interests
- "e 'elate to ma
�� "�� process The Va
"W Weo Sept 2a,
rs Oct 4, from
-� 4-nen Although ao
we would ap
merest to insure
� nata � t or. land Please
� - JC" Wright An
"�"�� � �a on or to let us
NIH
me ��� � nst.tute ot
ba on caous October
wouM Ilka to te
,$� �-4 - ma r Normal
ininj Sc "g 1985
�De' -nents and
vi-�i cm'roi and the
� e .e II 5C oer aa� stipend
s 6 �� s-isoor'ation pad
r -ea �" natural
- L� -ess fields
- ��; � "he Co op
�"� ' - , $- up 'o' an n
CSCf MATH MAJORS
- e for Spring and Sum
� Mi eao'ines o
��4 v - . . PA of 3.5 or bet
- a ea�- c agramm g
�- , a ��� 30S Come
�fce a" aoo�i'f' o see a
-se es
NAACP
-� s i a " . oe neid on
I Pi ItM :o�ee Mouse on.
j( Mandanha At j'ge anyone
�� �- row Support we can
. : � e.e5ne
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20, 1984
Numbers
Crime
Column
During the Fall Semester of
1979, an ECU freshman fell vie
tim to one of the most common
campus crimes: bicycle larceny.
The freshman reported the
larceny to the University Police
and, because he had registered his
bicycle with the Police Depart-
ment, the serial number of the
bicycle was on file and included in
the theft report.
During the Spring Semester of
1983, investigators from the
University Police Department
recovered the bicycle from a local
pawn shop. The surprised victim,
at that time a senior, cheerfully
accepted the return of his proper-
ty.
But, the case was not cleared
through any complicated scien-
tific identification techniques
employed by the investigators.
The case was cleared through
routine investigative legwork of
comparing local pawn shop
receipts with the Department's
stolen propertv files. The recovery
was made possible because the
victim had taken the time to
assure that the serial number and
brand name of his bicycle were on
file with the Department.
Serial numbers and brand
names are the most important
tools available to University
Public Safety officers to aid in the
recovery of stolen property.
Recovery of stolen property
without these identifying
characteristics is nearly impossi-
ble. Serial numbers also allow in-
vestigators access to the
technological resources of the
North Carolina Police Informa-
tion Network and the Federal
Bureau of Investigation's Na-
tional Crime Information Center.
PIN is a state-wide criminal
justice computer system housed in
Raleigh which allows every law
enforcement agency in the state to
have access to computerized files
on stolen property, wanted per-
sons and criminal histories. PIN
also supplies these agencies with
access to driver's license informa-
tion, driver's histories, and vehi-
cle registration information
through a hook-up with the com-
puters of the Department of
Motor Vehicles.
The ECU Public Safety Depart-
ment has a terminal connected to
the system and information can
usually be obtained from the
system in less than thirty seconds.
The NCIC is a computer system
operated by the Federal Bureau of
Investigation in Washington,
D.C. this system holds informa-
tion on stolen property, wanted
persons, and criminal histories
collected nationwide. The Public
Safety Department has access to
the system through its PIN ter-
minal.
In order for stolen property to
be entered in either of the systems,
the serial numbers and brand
names of the stolen articles must
be used. Entry of stolen articles
into these files allows the
possibility that property stolen
here and transported anywhere in
the country could be recovered. A
law enforecement officer checking
the property would only have to
run the serial number and brand
name through the computer and,
in seconds, he would know if the
property was stolen. Without
serial numbers, access to this
valuable investigative tool is lost.
Along with the recording of
serial numbers and brand names,
engraving valuable articles with
identifying numbers is another
helpful method of assisting in
recovering stolen property. Ar-
ticles should be engraved with the
owner's driver's license number
and the abbreviation of the state
of issue. The driver's license
number is used because driver's
license information is readily ac-
cessible through the PIN system.
PIN not only supplies hook-ups
with the Department of Motor
Vehicles computer in-state,but
also supplies hook-ups with cen-
tral motor vehicle computers in
each of the fifty states. If an arti-
cle is engraved with a driver's
license number along with the
state of issue, a police officer
anywhere in the country can
usually identify the owner of the
property within three or four
minutes, Social Security numbers
and ECU ID numbers are not as
effective since the Social Security
files are not accessible to law en-
forcement officers without court
order and ECU ID numbers are
not nationally recognized.
The ECU Public Safety Depart-
ment is beginning its "OPERA-
TION IDENTIFICATION a
campaign to assist students in
marking valuable articles and
recording serial numbers. The
program is underway in Aycock
Dorm now. It will continue
througout the school year across
campus.
College Republicans
Plan Fall A ctivities
By HAROLDJOYNER
VnUlui Neva Editor
The ECU College Republicans
are currently involved in an all-
campus voter registration drive
targeted at potential republican
voters, according to CR Chair-
man Dennis Kilcoyne.
Kilcoyne said any student who
has not registered to vote in the
elections must do so by Oct. 7.
Kilcoyne said many students who
are not residents of Pitt County
may think they are not eligible to
vote. However, Robert W. Spear-
man, Chairman of the State
Board of Elections said, "In the
case of a student (who wishes to
vote), the fact he intends to stay in
a college town only for his educa-
tion and expects to leave when
some future event occurs such as
graduation, marriage, or employ-
ment, does not keep him being
considered a resident of the coun-
ty or town for the present
� The student may register to vote
in Pitt County by showing proof
of his residence, Kilcoyne said.
"He may show a car registration,
drivers license or any other proof
he paid county taxes Spearman
also said. Kilcoyne stressed that if
a student chooses to vote by
absentee ballot, it must be
notarized. He said several
members of the College
Republicans are Notary Republics
and will be glad to notarize a stu-
dent's ballot at no cost.
Kilcoyne said most students
want to vote, "but don't want to
go through the trouble He also
said, "the students of college age
are the biggest supporters of
. Reagan, but they are the least like-
� ly to vote. It is very important for
students to cast their ballots this
year
"At the present Kilcoyne
said, "we are extremely busy in
preparing for the lections. Our
activities wili include, along with
the voter registration drive,
holding a state convention in
Greenville and marking the first
anniversary of the Grenada inva-
sion with 116 other clubs across
country by holding a student
liberation day on October 25. A
rescued medical student iom
Grenada will speak on campus
Kilcoyne also said "this is Presi-
dent Reagan's way of celebrating
the victory of the incident last
year
Kilcoyne said a debate has been
tentatively scheduled between Na-
tional Republican Chairman Jack
Abramoff and Young Democrat
Chairman, Steve Gursky in early-
October.
Celebrating 42 years of
Biblical Research and Teaching
THE WAY INTERNATIONAL
PROUDLY PRESENTS
THE BIBLICAL RESEARCH CLASS
POWER FOR
ABUNDANT LIVING
"I am come that they might have life,
and that they might have it more abun-
dantly s Jonn 10:10b
Come to: MendenhaJl Student Center, Rm 212
Thursdays at 7:30pm
For more information call:
758-7801 752-3447 756-5420
GIANT
BOOK SALE
JOYNER LIBRARY LOBBY
Friday, September 21: 8:30am-6:30pm
Saturday, September 22: 9:30am-4:00pm
Hardbacks.50-$2.00
Paperbacks: $.10$ 1.00
'finTlec. Inc.
crecn printer
200 Hooker Rood
756-9058
ask for Tomi
Lowest printing prices in the area
Tee shirts $3.00 Painters caps .80
Ideal for Greeks and Intramurals
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0 �aat (Karolfntati
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. o�m(m�
Greg Rideout, ��,��,��
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK. v,� ,��, J.T. PlETRZAK, ��, �,
Randy Mews. �, Anthony Martin. �. WaiMf�
Tina Maroschak. ��. �, Kathy Fuerst. wu�,o�
Bill Austin. ���- Manager Linda Vizena. �� .
September 20, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Political Travels
Republicans Sue For Airfare
Politics, politics. We know it's
close to November and the smear
machines are in full gear, and the
latest tactic by North Carolina
Republicans certainly attests to
this fact. A group of GOP leaders,
headed by state party chairman
David T. Flaherty, have filed suit,
asking Gov. Jim Hunt to pay back
$100,000 in charges for political
use of state airplanes and
helicopters.
We, like the governor, believe
the lawsuit filed Monday is
nothing more than a "political
stunt" that seeks only to cloud the
real issues of the campaign. When
principal advisors of Sen. Jesse
Helms have to resort to tactics like
this, you know their man is in trou-
ble. Sen. Helms is pulling no pun-
ches in his effort to block Gov.
Hunt from gaining the senior
senator's seat.
That Helms is running a little
scared is evidenced by many
things: the article in The Land-
mark accusing Hunt of having had
a homosexual affair; the use of
bigoted politics by linking him to
black causes and the tying of Hunt
to more liberal policies that Hunt
does not espouse. And now this,
more than likely done with Helms'
good blessings. Why?
Well, if Jesse goes down, Con-
servatism is half-dead in this state.
The Moral Majority (which is
neither) and the Congressional
fljp
Club will go down with him. He is
an iconoclast whose death knell
may sound, and anything that can
prevent it will be tried.
Rarely is a political trip a truly
political trip for an incumbent. But
when Gov. Jim Hunt has been
travelling on strictly political trips
he has or will be paying the money
back. What the filers of the suit
call a political trip and what is a
political trip are two entirely dif-
ferent things. The Republicans say
some payment charges were cut-
rate. What is cut-rate? A definition
the desperate Republicans come up
with is certainly not synonomous
with what the state will or has
come up with.
Hunt, to help the issue subside,
has said he will not use state
vehicles anymore for strictly
political business, even though he
was paying out of his campaign
chest for such trips. Seems
somewhat funny that Helms, who
has massed more money than any
other senatorial candidate in the
history of the country, is crying
over his opponent's use of cash,
but he is.
Smear jobs like this should make
people realize that Hunt is the man
for the job. When taken into con-
sideration along with Jesse Helms'
other bad points, this incident cer-
tainly helps voters make the right
choice more easily.
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Mrs. Roosevelt Was Cool
By DICK WEST
uri
WASHINGTON � Women's libbers
are fond of ruefully pointing out that no
member of the female sex has ever serv-
ed as U.S. president or vice president.
True enough. And unless Geraldine
Ferraro, the Democratic vice presiden-
tial candidate, is elected this fall, that
complaint likely will be historically ac-
curate for at least another four years.
For whatever consolation it might
provide, however, it also is historically
accurate to point out that no member of
the male sex has ever served as the coun-
try's first lady.
These thoughts � if such lofty ter-
minology can be applied to puerile
cerebration � were inspired by a visit I
made to "Eleanor Roosevelt: First Per-
son Singular a new exhibit assembled
by the Smithsonian Institution.
The exhibit, which will be open to the
public until next Jan. 7, commemorates
the centennial of her birth on Oct. 11.
1884.
Say what you will about Bess Truman,
Mamie Eisenhower, Jackie Kennedy,
Ladybird Johnson, Pat Nixon, Betty
Ford, Rosalynn Carter and Nancy
Reagan, Eleanor Roosevelt probably
was the most issues-oriented first lady of
modern times.
She was also among the most
peripatetic, having traveled more than
40,000 miles during her first year as first
lady.
Toni Morrison, or some such author,
has opined that the two most destructive
concepts yet devised by humankind are
physical beauty and romantic love. In
Eleanor Roosevelt's case, that may well
have been true.
I still remember one of the jokes told
about her notorious lack of physical
beauty. The exchange supposedly took
place at an evening reception where the
first lady was accosted by a male voter in
an advanced stage of inebriation.
"Mrs. Roosevelt, you are the ugliest
woman I ever saw
"And you, sir, are the drunkest man I
ever saw
"Yeah, but I'll be sober in the morn-
ing
The Smithsonian, for reasons that
may be evident, did not include that
punch line in its exhibit. Nor was there
any intimation that the first lady ma
have formed a highly personal relation-
ship with a writer who was lurking a-
the Capital during the New Deal days
These omissions possibly illustrate
part of the difficulty we Americans ha.e
in investing our idols with human traits
How unfortunate that they don't spring
from Mount Olympus, or something,
rather than mingle with us mere mortals'
The Eleanor Roosevelt exhibit is
nothing if not circumspect, limiting its
scope to photographs, such as snapshots
of the Roosevelt kiddies; documents,
such as her Christmas gift lists; and such
artifacts as her baby dresses, her grand-
mother's silver bowl and an ancient L.C
Smith typewriter.
The exhibit's location, however,
might be revealing. It is situated on the
second floor of the Museum of
American History, adjacent to the F
Ladies Hall, which features evening
gowns worn by the wives of various
presidents to various inaugural balls
No U.S. president I am aware of
would have fitted into any of these
gowns. Which may explain why there
has never been a male first lady.
True Pirate Fans Dislike Pee Dee

Now is the time for all true Pirate
fans to come to the aid of their
university. I for one am personally
sick and tired of attending various
ECU atlJetic events and watching
some purple and gold monstrosity
called "Pee Dee" rumble on to the
playing field claiming to be a
representative of our school. What
happened to the good oV days when
pirates were considered to be fierce
and fearless? All we have is a two-
bit purple pansy pusher with a Ben-
ny Hill grin on his face.
Boyoboyoboy, Blackbeard would
turn over in his grave if he could see
Peterhead-ah-Pee Dee.
I bet if Ronnie and Jesse were to
hear about this, there'd be some ass-
kicking going on! And just think
what all of those fanners and
bricklayers at Moo U. are going to
say when they get wind of "Pee
Dee This will be more fun than
Hee-Haw! I guess we'll have to wear
paper bags over our heads at THE
GAME to hide our shame. Pee Dee
ole boy, it's time for you to walk
the plank. You have been a menace
to the ECU society long enough.
Who ya gonna call? Pee Dee
Busters!
David Matthews
Soph General College
Article Censored
An article titled "Banned Books
Forum Held" published in the Sept.
18 issue of The East Carolinian
caught my attention. Having an in-
terest in the subject of censorship
and the banning of books, I read
this article carefully and wish to
comment on one aspect of the arti-
cle.
First and foremost, let me state
that I am against all censorship in
education but at the same time I
am in favor of truth in reporting.
The Bible was listed as being ban-
ned. I do not believe the Bible has
been objected to in the State of
North Carolina. The Living Bible,
which is a paraphrase of the Bible,
has been objected to. This objection
was not based on this being a
paraphrase, but because of the wor-
ding of the paraphrase.
Consider for instance, the passage
where King Saul in addressing his
son Jonothan at the dinner table
refers to his son as "You son of a
bitch" for having befriended David.
Other passages refer to individuals
as "bastards" in a derogotory
sense. This was what was objected
to.
Delbert J. Cross
Grad Student, SEED
Poverty Area In Southern Texas Political Battlefield
By PETER SKERRY
The Nr RcpaMIc
RIO GRANDE VALLEY, Tex. � It
was not surprising the week before
Texas's May 5 primary to see all three
Democratic presidential candidates visit
the Rio Grande Valley.
With an 80 percent Mexican majority
overwhelmingly Democratic and in-
creasingly mobilized, the valley is a sym-
bolic and actual arbiter of many
statewide elections.
Yet also in the region that week was a
much less visible but hardly less impor-
tant visitor: Tom Pauken, director of
ACTION, the federal volunteer service
agency, who was passing out federal
grants and meeting with local notables.
His ostensible purpose was to coor-
dinate the Reagan administration's
response to last winter's devastating
crop freeze. But in fact, Pauken arrived
to orchestrate a campaign against Valley
Inter-faith, a church-based community
organization that promises to bring
thousands of Mexican-Americans into
the political process.
Today the valley has a population of
more than 500,000 but remains poor and
lacks a substantial middle class. Already
suffering from peso devaluations, the
region was hit last December with a pro-
longed freeze that wiped out the citrus
crop. The result was a jump in
unemployment from 17 percent to 30
percent and a depressing long-range
forecast for an already struggling citrus
industry.
Out of the babble of pleas for help,
one emerged above the others � that of
Valley Interfaith, a year-old federation
of one Methodist and some 30 Catholic
congregations strung along 70 miles of
the Rio Grande.
The vast majority of Interfaith's ap-
proximately 5,000 members are either
Mexican-Americans or Mexican na-
tionals, undoubtedly including a number
of undocumented aliens.
In January the Reagan administration
declared the valley a disaster area.
Farmers and businessmen became eligi-
ble for various recovery loans, and
otherwise ineligible farm workers receiv-
ed emergency unemployment benefits.
But Valley Interfaith leaders argued that
such conventional disaster relief was in-
adequate.
Some within the administration ap-
parently agreed. Out of mutual discus-
sions emerged a proposal for a $67
million public works program intended
to put the maximum number of people
to work in the shortest time.
There was plenty wrong with this pro-
posal. It focused on quick-turnaround
projects requiring little planning, and
was dismissed by many as a leaf-raking
boondoggle.
Despite problems, the sense of crisis in
the valley was enough that Valley Inter-
faith was able to put together a coalition
in support of their proposal. But in late
February, when Interfaith and ad-
ministration officials met for the fourth
time, things started falling apart.
Since then, relations between the two
sides have gone from bad to wretched.
In early March, Pauken entered the
scene as coordinator of the administra-
tion's valley initiative.
Pauken arrived in the valley with this
agenda of "defunding the left" firmly in
mind. He had come fully prepared to
deal with the group � if not exactly to
negotiate with it. What Pauken did br-
ing to his new job was years of loyal ser-
vice as an ultraconservative Republican
activist.
Pauken immediately denounced the
organization's tactics before its
members even had the opportunity to
use them on him.
Since this initial assault, Pauken has
pursued a double-barreled strategy.
Without again publicly criticizing Valley
Interfaith, he continues to be involved in
a whispering campaign against it in an
effort to wean away Interfaith's less
reliable allies.
And though Pauken continues to talk
about economic development in the
valley, his grants typically go to private
social service agencies. He is thus in the
curious position, for a Reagan
Republican, of ostentatiously funding
social service agencies rejected by the ad-
ministration as costly and unworkable.
Thus, in the name of voluntarism, he
hands out federal grants as part of a
campaign to weaken a group that has
refused to accept governmental monies.
Because of their refusal, Valley Inter-
faith has an idea of voluntarism quite
close to that espoused by the administra-
tion � a point that has escaped Pauken.
Despite its inconsistencies, Pauken's
strategy has met with some success. The
sense of crisis in the valley has passed.
At the same time, Pauken has suc-
ceeded in polarizing a situation that was
remarkably unpolarized before he arriv-
ed. He has stirred action into the local
press and into religious groups angered
at church politicization. And, for many
Anglos especially, Valley Interfaith
looks like a stalking horse for revived
union movement.
But some of the strongest criticisms
toward Valley Interfaith now come from
Mexican-American elected officials �
Democrats almost to the man � who
have taken over just about every
municipal and county elected position in
the past decade.
At the height of the crisis, most will-
ingly endorsed the Interfaith proposal.
They didn't expect it to succeed; suppor-
ting it cost little and kept them in the
good graces of an emergent power in
their communities.
But now Pauken, whose politics they
hardly endorse, has emboldened the
Mexican-American officials to express
the natural antagonism any politician
feels toward an organization like Valley
Interfaith.
And Pauken may well have a hidden
agenda of his own. George Strake,
chairman of the state Republican Party,
has complained that Valley Interfaith's
proposal would benefit mostly
Democratic city and county officials
who would likely have administered the
funds.
Furthermore, Valley Interfaith it
assisting in a statewide effort to register
200,000 new Mexican-American voters
Even if such efforts are only marginal
successful, they threaten Texas
Republicans still smarting from their
narrow loss of the governorship in 1982
Given all this, it may seem strange
that Valley Interfaith expected to sec its
proposal accepted by the Reagan ad
ministration. The group's leaders mav
have shrewdly calculated that a negative
response would be a good cause around
which to organize.
At the same time, they claim to have
h�d a good chance of getting at least
some money from Washington. Some
members argue that even if the ad-
mimstration had given them a fraction
of the package, it would have both
scored a coup with Hispanic voters and
helped neutralize the fairness issue.
. uto o�y Texas, the presi-
dent had the room to take the
statesmanlike position. What has
prevailed instead are the instincts of
i!iiClCrwatJve Republicans,
motivated by both ideological and prac-
fnS' �1 ��ntime, Valley
Interfaith has taken some blows, but
3fy �V siron�er than ever. After
SLa"1 offered �' �o
Meoxan-Amencans across Texas as the
ESS, v11 VaUey Interfiith
�sysswbeen bargaining for all along.
�to� wrf fc writing � book about
Mtxkan-Amencan politics.)
M.1
Hone
B ERNEST ROBhf
The Honors Progran
strives to offer supr
an exceptional ed .
penence, begin r. .
very first da oi c
David Sanders, prog
High school sen
been admitted to EC
to apply foi
Honors Program
SAT scores grea
predicted grade
and a ranking
cent of their .
Merit final
are invjted
Enrolled
average a.r-
student
appea.
Hone
teacher recomn
dm
coming-
SGA E
Guide
elections
Committee rr
The eleci
order �
tame-
class of! .
be responsil
meetings a. j
committees
represent
representative
tion. class :
all four :
graduate cl
Dur;r.�
Committee (
Lipmar. re
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materials,
election re
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of disputes c � i
the polls. Lipma
intend for this I
Candidates ai
campaign w
when thev ai
Largest Lai
33 Wc
12 o:
rVA . V,
758-60
� PROCESS, PRN

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14 per
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IH1 EAST AROJ INIAN
SI tMl MH1 h
KM.
trust
tti SOON
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lady ma
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rking about
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illustrate
ans have
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something,
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exhibit is
imiting
snapshots
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and such
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however,
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eporting.
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abjection
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passage
ressing his
nner table
j son of a
tided David.
viduals
lerogotory
ected
I
d
effort to register
American voters.
; are only marginally
-aten Texas
arting from their
: governorship in 1982
seem strange
"xpected to see its
'he Reagan ad-
ieaders may
-d that a negative
a good cause around
hey claim to have
i - f getting at least
Washington. Some
hat even if the ad-
pven them a fraction
tckage. st would have both
oup with Hispanic voters and
" -alize the fairness issue.
carry Texas, the presi-
� the room to take the
ilike position. What has
instead are the instincts of
Inservative Republicans,
by both ideological and prac-
cerns In the meantime, Valley
has taken some blows, but
trge stronger than ever. After
iken has offered himself to
-Americans across Texas as the
target that Valley Interfaith
been bargaining for all along.
Skerry works at the Brookings
n and is writing a book about
-American politics.J
t�wn gyrm. lac
Honors Program Has Variety Of Seminars
B ERNEST ROBERTS
Staff Wrttti
The Honors Program at 1
strives to offer superioi stui
an exceptional educational
penence, beginning with
very first daj of colleg
David Sanders, program d
High school seniors who I
been admitted to ECl are .
to appiv for admission t
Honors Program if the;
SA1 scores greatei than i
predicted grade average
and a ranking in the top
cent of the; class
Mem finali
- I.
semi fimalists
a
united into the p
oiled students with
average � vited
lentS
appeal to the d
Honoi s
omraeni
i '� e, studt
"
the
aintain a 3.4 average, or
ma elect to take just one
� � . ourse
"here is no additional fee for
participation in the program.
1 lie freshman sophomore
Program offers honors
students the opportunity to take
ip to hall their General Education
equ nts according to
Sanders Students who complete
general Honors are also in a good
position to take departmental
Honors work in the several
irtments which offer Honors
to majors in then Junior and
added.
Ml freshman sophomore
Honors courses can be used to
fulfill General Education re-
quirements T'hev are of three
Honoi s sections of regular
Special Honors courses
the departments and
Seminars The Honors
include regular
hoi lore courses
es,
Honors
SGA Elections Set
n an I
-
r to s
m rep; -
meetings and
committees. There are
esentati
esentati
clas
all foui cla i
graduate class
During the n
Committee Cha
� i
edures, earn;
eria unt
sction r
The elections I;
nullified and
dispute
the
intend
.
when
.ies These include
' agai si distribution
� ' paign literature
of the polling places
ban on door to-door cam-
tl e dorms before 12
� ftei 10 p.m.
addition to the campaigning
andidates are subject to
policies concerning the ex-
d ures v their campaigns.
I ej s are not allowed to
end over $75, while class of-
e limited to $100 in expen-
Failure to comply with
ties can result in dis-
fication from the election.
a e currently 30 students
g tor day representatives
the class officer posi-
he and the Elec-
littee urge all students
idem apath has been
past I ipman
lents come out
;se oificers will
he SGA and they will
also he spending student funds
ft!
,0
z
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aI
within the disciplines, such as
English composition, an-
thropology, health, and
psychology.
The Special Honors courses
within the departments include
world history, American history
and Honors composition.
Honors Seminars, which are in-
terdisciplinary investigations of
special topics and problems, in-
clude "The Dimensions of the
Body Human "Technology
andor Survival "Literature of
the Holocaust "Patients, Physi-
cians, and Society and "Black
Women WritingWhite Women
Writing
Honors Seminars involve in-
tense student discussion, debate,
and projects and are regularly led
by two professors from different
disciplines. Seminar topics change
each semester. Upper-level
Honors courses include indepen-
dent study, special topic seminars,
and research projects.
"We have about 200 or 300
Honors students a semester
Sanders said. "And many Honors
students are recipients of Alumni
Honors Scholarships These
scholarships cover in-state tuition
and fees for all four years of col-
lege. Students who successfully
complete departmental Honors
graduate with honors from the
University. "Honors graduates
are sought after by employers,
graduate school, and professional
schools Sanders said
In addition to their classes,
students have access to the
Honors lounge. They may become
members of the Honors Students
Organization. The program aJ
provides special lectures, panels,
debates, and socials. A few
students attend the convention!
the Southern Regional Honor;
Council and the National Col
legiate Honors Council, of which
the ECU Honors Program is
member.
"All Honors students ha
something in common said h
sy Easterly, a junior Honors
dent and member of the I:
Ambassadors. "In Honors
courses, you have the advantage
1 small class and more inci-
dent Mud.
"Honors classes are more
petitive and requires more m
tion honor student Nancy I
said.
Sander expressed his h
that research a u 'ship ;
tunmes will open up ma.
ITS.
This is the the ;

tndi tid it we
Sa : . -
� '�

The H
'
semester.
Rebel
The Literary-Art Magazine of East Carolina University
WRITING CONTESTS
PROSE POETRY
l st prize100 I st prize100
2nd prize $75 2nd prize $75
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Submit typed entries to Rebel or Media Board offices
2nd floor publicaions building Include name address
and phone number
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Near Pint Theatre, Gi twill
Friday
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Student s Wei com
Pinchers of beer
50 ?. Draft
2for 1 High Ball
The ECU Cheerleaders
Pre-Game Victory Party
on Friday, September 21st
Beginning at 8:30 P.M.
For Your Convenience . . .
Free Bus Service from
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I





JEASTROLiNlANSEPTEMBER 20, 1984
m
?
B STEPHEN HARDING
A rape prevention program is
being offered again this year by
the ECU Department of Public
Safetv under the direction of
Rhonda Gurley. This year's pro-
gram includes short lectures with
time allowed for questions.
Through the program, women can
learn how to protect themselves
against rape Also, the film Vic-
tim or Victor will be shown.
Vhe film shows several ex-
amples oi a female in a vulnerable
attack situation. The scene is
repeated showing what the female
does to avoid attack.
Gurlej offered tips women may
use to avoid attack while walking
. raght She said females should
avoid walking or jogging alone,
especially at night. It is best to
walk with a friend or call Pirate
Walk I! any distance is involved,
a peron should call a taxi, she
d When no other alternative is
available, 11 is better to call the
Public Safety Depaitment than to
walk alone, Gurley advised.
If a woman must travel alone,
-he should consider riding a bike,
Gurley said. It is much faster than
walking, so there is less chance
he'll be attacked.
Gurle strongiv advised females
never to walk alone while intox-
icated. "Physical movements are
impaired so an attacker will have
the upper hand she said.
Gurley suggested persons also
take precautions while driving.
The vehicle should be kept in
good repair with plenty of gas.
The windows should be up at all
times and the doors locked while
traveling alone. The driver should
also travel on well-lighted busy
streets.
When driving alone, a person
should never stop to help someone
else in distress. Driving to the
nearest telephone and reporting
the situation to the authorities is
best.
Gurley stressed under no cir-
cumstances should a female ever
pick up a hitchiker, even a female
one. She may have a male friend
waiting down the road ready for
an attack on the driver.
If a person suspects she is being
followed, she should go directly
home. Never pull over and stop,
Gurley said. If possible the person
should attempt to get the vehicle's
license number and a description
of the car.She should then drive to
an open business or the police sta-
tion and report it.
Another precaution a woman
should take while walking or
Mendenhall Crafts Center
A vailable For Students
By El 4INEPERR1
Staff Wnlfr
d m the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, the arts and crafts
center is open to full-time
student spouses, and
ilty and their dependents
The
semt
incl
inter charges a $15
mh.
per
rship fee. The fee
k shops, tool
afl books and
magazines, and use of the crafts
center. The center also has equip-
ment and facilities for many ac-
tivities such as photo processing,
stained glass, quilting, basketry,
weaving wood carving, and
ceramics.
Thr center is open Monday
through Friday from 5-10 p.m.
and 1-5 p.m. Saturday and Sun-
day. For more information, call
757-6611 ext. 260orext. 271
JEWISH STUDENTS
High Holiday Services
Rash Hashana:
Dinner to held at the Resniks' on Wed. evening, Sept
26, at 5:30pm followed by services.
ning, Sept. 26, 7:30pm
Thin Sept. 27, 9:00am
Fri Sept. 28, 9:00am
Vom Kippur:
Dinner to be held at the Resniks' on Fri. evening, Oct.
5. at 5:15pm followed by services.
Fri. evening, Oct. 5, 7:15pm
Sat Oct. 6, 9:00am
All services will be held at Congregation Bayt Shalom. All students
me and urged to come to the dinners before services The
dinners are sponsored by the ECU Hillel organization.
r-or more information, directions, or rides please call 756-5640
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riding is to develop an accute
sense of mental awareness of the
surrounding area. Gurley also
suggests having a plan of action
and preparation to execute it at
any time.
A self-defense course can aid
the woman in developing a
reliable plan.
The program also includes sug-
gestions on what a woman should
do if she is attacked. The first is to
remain calm so rational choices
can be made to keep the situation
under control. Gurley says a
woman should turn her fear into
anger. "Fear can make you weak,
but anger can make you
stronger Fast, strong and ag-
gressive actions are best. An Ohio
study shows a female is less likely
to be attacked if she screams and
runs; not by fighting her attacker.
If rape does occur, two things
need to be done. The female
should first seek immediate
medical treatment. This will pro-
vide her with the critical evidence
the police will need later. The
woman also needs to report her
attack to the police. "Most
women do not realize rapists are
usually repeaters Gurley said.
The only way to stop rapes is to
report the rapist. Last year only
two rapes were reported on the
ECU campus and one was un-
founded, Gurley said. From
August through the latter part of
September 1983 there were eight
rapes reported by ECU students
to the Real Crisis Center, accor-
ding to Gurley. Most of the rapes
occured off-campus.
There are two types of rapists
� stranger and acquaintance. As
a whole, 30 percent of rapes are
committed by a stranger. Thirty-
five percent of women are raped
by their own date, Gurley noted.
Another 35 percent of rapists
reported were known personally
by the woman. It can be her boss,
a relative, or neighbor. Most cam-
pus rapes are of the acquaintance
type, Gurley said.
No programs have been
scheduled so far because the pro-
gram assistant of a dorm has to
request it. Most PA's wait until
the latter part of September to im-
plement a program, Gurley said.
The best response so far has
been in Fleming dorm with 40
women attending the program last
year.
This girl is patiently waiting for her laundry to be pick-
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i






THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTFMRFB 20, 1984
is Fall
by their own date, Gurley noted.
Another 35 percent of rapists
reported were known personally
h the woman. It can be her boss,
a relative, or neighbor. Most cam-
pus rapes are of the acquaintance
type, Gurley said.
No programs have been
scheduled so far because the pro-
gram assistant of a dorm has to
request it Most PA's wait until
atter part of September to im-
plement a program, Gurley said.
The best response so far has
been in Fleming dorm with 40
women attcii iing the program last
vear
B
KING
TIONS
anager
Susan Duncan or Spike
l2:00-2:00pm
: 25th
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Crust � Thin Crust
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MUST ACCOMPANY ORDER
TMR I SB�T. 22, 1984
Lb.
CALIFORNIA RED
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Crapes
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For an Extra 10 Discount
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1 Hfc i.n KOi 1NIAN
SEPTEMBER 20. 1984
By Bicycles
Access Ramps Blocked
By ELAINE PERRY
SUff V, rtl�
Some of ECU's handicapped
students have been having pro-
blems with the access ramps to
campus buildings, according to
CC. Rowe, director of Handicap-
ped Student Services.
Playboy
Mansion
Is Dorm
I SPS) While students
und the country return to dus-
cubicles in rundown dor-
ries, a fortunate feu at the
V Institute of Chicago will be
ing into the Playboy Man-
i he 72-room Victorian man-
si n features an indoor pool and
terfaJl, an unuervvater bar, sun
i steam rooms, a bowling alley,
a ume room, and an oak-paneled
ballroom. Packed with rare anti-
tes and art treasures, the house
vas a gift to the school from
Playboy Enterprises.
Neil J Hoffman, president of
the Art Institute, thinks the man-
will have a positive effect on
- ocial life of the art students,
s "ideally suited" to be a dor-
itory, he savs.
Playboj Enterprises President
istie Hefner said that her cor-
al ion was happy to help the art
ool.
"Playboy lias long been
is ciated with the arts she
mentioning Salvador Dali.
n Riers. Roger Brown, and
�rge Segal as just a few of the
tous artis; who have con-
ed to the pages of Playboy
Rowe said he has received
several calls concerning bicycles
chained to the ramps for
wheelchairs. Students are asked
not to put the bikes there. "I
don't think the students mean
anything negative. They just don't
realize that students in
wheelchairs need the ramp to gain
access to the building Rowe
said.
According to Rowe, the major
goal of the Handicapped Student
Services is to assure equal oppor-
tunity for disabled students to all
of the benefits that can be derived
from attending ECU. The ECU
Handicapped Program started in
1977 when a commitment was
developed towards serving the
handicapped student. Since that
time, the ECU campus has
become almost totally accessible
to the handicapped individual. All
classrooms and most of the
residence halls are a short distance
apart.
Rowe addded that all buildings
on campus have modified
restrooms and are accessible to at
least the first floor, except
Memorial Gym. Austin, Rawl
and Graham are the only
buildings which do not have
elevators. Each building has a
ramp when needed and there are
curb cuts throughout the campus
that allow wheelchairs to get on
and off the sidewalks with ease.
There is also a program
available to blind students.
Notetakers, tape recorders and
oral tests are provided for
students who need them. "We
will do anything within reason to
accommodate a student Rowe
said.
"However a great deal of credit
goes to the faculty and staff. They
are very receptive and a real
plus Rowe said "East Carolina
has not had a single student leave
because heshe could not be serv-
ed
The Handicapped Services Of-
fice also provides aides. Aides are
students who help the handicap-
ped. They provide transportation,
are tutors, readers and allow the
handicapped person to depend on
them.
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f






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
SEPTEMBER 20. 1984
Page 9
Women: Are We Really What We
This
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
female student may be getting exactly what she needs for a calcium-tilled diet.
(UPI) � Dr. Elaine Feldman
says you are what you eat,
especially in the case of women
who don't drink milk or eat other
foods rich in calcium.
A diet that leaves out or is short
on calcium can lead to the
development of osteoporosis, a
disease that affects an estimated
20 million Americans and is, ac-
cording to Feldman, one of the
most under-rated medical pro-
blems in the nation.
Osteoporosis is an age-related
disorder characterized by decreas-
ed bone mass and by increased
susceptibility to fractures.
The disease usually affects the
spinal column first, where weight-
bearing vertabrae of the back col-
lapse and compress, often without
pain.
"The result is loss of height and
the appearance of the stereotype
image of little old ladies with
'dowager's hump said
Feldman.
More and more physicians are
coming to recognize its impact on
the health of their patients and are
advising them about the impor-
tance of calcium in their diets and
calcium supplements.
Physicians assume that proper
calcium intake can entirely pre-
vent the disease They know it
can be arrested by the right kind
of diet, calcium supplements and
exercise, Feldman says.
Feldman, chief of the depart-
ment of nutrition at the Medical
College of Georgia in Augusta, is
a victim of osteoporosis. Her Col-
lege of Georgia in Augusta, is a
victim of osteoporosis. Her per-
sonal interest in the disorder led
her to write a book, Sutrition in
the Middle and Later Years. She
also was Atlanta moderator of a
recent national teleconference on
osteoporosis. The program was
broadcast live from New York to
medical audiences in 10 cites.
"The tragedy is that many peo-
ple are unaware of the progression
of the disease and are not doing
things to prevent their becoming
victims she said.
"It's what you eat in your twen-
ties, and even before, that is so
important later on
"From a clinical nutritionist's
point of view, the single thing one
should do is increase calcium in-
take, which can't be done entirely
by diet. Therefore a calcium sup-
plement is needed
She said studies show that
women consume 450-to-550
milligrams of calcium daily, less
than one-half the 1,000 to 1,500
milligrams needed to help prevent
osteoporosis.
Women are more often victims
of the disease than men, she said,
particularly women of slight
stature and those of northern
European extraction.
"If you are tall, even fat. vou
are at less risk she said. For
reasons no one yet knows, black
women also are at less risk than
white women, Feldman said.
In her own case, Feldman said
the disease gave no warning signs.
"I'm small and I never drank milk
as I grew up. Not everybody can
drink milk
When her disease was diagnos-
ed, "I did what my doctor told
me That included taking
calcium supplements in addition
to eating foods rich in calcium,
which in addition to milk are ice
cream, yogart, cheeses, leafv
green vegetables, sardines,
almonds and soybeans. She also
exercises by riding her bicycle.
Her advice: "Take enough
calcium throughout life. Exercise,
keep moving. Just walking for
elderly people, instead of sitting in
chairs, is beneficial
Test Your Television Knowledge
TV Guide Presents Exciting New Trivia Game For Avid Viewers
If you're the average adult
viewer, you spend 25 percent
more time annually watching
television than youngsters spend
in school. Let's see how well this
"studying" prepares you for the
TV trivia questions in TV Guide's
TV Game.
Test yourself on this sampling
of the 6.000-plus questions � one
from each of the seven TV pro-
gramming categories the ques-
tions are divided into � contained
in TV Guide's TV Game.
Drama: When it went off the
air in 1975, this Western was the
longest-running dramatic series in
TV history.
Comedy: Who played Jeannie's
"master" in Dream of Jeanie
(1965-70)?
Movies: This unlikely song-
and-dance man played Sky
Masterson in the 1955 filming of
"Guys and Dolls
News: What did Walter
Cronkite tell his viewers when
Apollo 11 's lunar module touched
down on the surface of the moon?
Sports: Larry Bird was Indiana
State's star in the 1979 NCAA
basketball championship game.
Who filled that role for Michigan
State?
Kids: Pie throwing was a
regular feature on this comedian's
numerous children's shows since
1950s.
Other TV: He made the Statue
of Liberty "disappear" in his
April 1983 special.
To determine your TV Trivia
Quotient:
(Answers: Drama, Gunsmoke;
Comedy, Larry Hagman; Movies,
Marlon Brando; News, That he
had nothing to say; Sports, Earvin
"Magic" Johnson; Kids, Soupy
Sales; Other TV, David Copper-
field)
6-7 correct .Amazing,
4-5Outstanding, 2-3Middl-
ing, 0-1 Disappointing.
The board game is
designed for 2 to 20 players (ages
10 to adult) and lists for $25.
The objective of TV Guide's
TV game is iv. acquire cards
representing each category of pro-
gramming and as many points as
possible by answering questions
correctly. The player or team with
the most points at the end of the
game is the winner.
TV Guide's TV Game was
developed by Bob Reiss of Trivia,
Inc. "One strength of the game is
its versatility says Reiss. "It can
be played with two people, as a
family game, or a party game with
up to four teams with six or more
players on a team. It can also be
enjoyed without the board by us-
ing the question and answer books
to ask questions just for the fun of
it
Here are some sample questions
from TV Guide's TV Game:
1. "Is it bigger than a breadbox?"
was a classic question on this
show.
2. He followed Ronald Reagan as
host of Death Valley Days.
3. He was the First to bring to life
the character of Hawkeye in the
1970 movie MASH. '
4. Who was the only other person
who knew the real identity of Bat-
man and Robin?
5. What "diplomat" brought
Menahem Begin and Anwar Sadat
together for the first time in 1977?
6. Howdy Doody had a twin
brother. What was his name?
7. What country did the U.S.
defeat to win the ice hockey gold
medal in the 1980 winter Olym-
pics?
(ANSWERS: 1. What's My
Line 2. Robert Taylor 3. Donald
Sutherland 4. Alfred, the butler
5. Walter Cronkite 6. Double
Doody 7. Finland)
TV Guide's TV Game includes
one playing board, four question
and answer books, pad of game
points, 28 program cards, four
network cards, eight bonus cards,
four markers and a pair of dice.
The flip side of each of the
cards used in playing the board
game contains interesting infor-
mation related to the card's face.
Bonus cards feature trivia about
TV Guide itself. For example, the
personality who has appeared
most frequently on the cover of
TV Guide is Lucille Ball with 24
appearances. She is followed by
Michael Landon (17), Arthur
Godfrey and Mary Tyler Moore
(16), and Johnny Carson (14).
Since its inception in April,
1953, TV Guide has sold mor-
than 20 billion copies.
With over 100 editions publish-
ed throughout the U.S TV Guide
uses 4,000 tons of paper per week.
The annual use of 208,000 tons
outweighs two nuclear aircraft
carriers or five Missouri-Class
battle ships.
Tokyo String Quartet
Appearing Sept. 26
ECU News Bureau
The Tokyo String Quartet, ap-
pearing Wednesday, Sept. 26, at 8
p.m is the first attraction on this
year's Artists Series.
Performing more than 100 con-
certs each season, the Quartet has
appeared in numerous cities on
four continents. Their debut
recording (Deutsche Gram-
mophon) won the coveted Grand
Prix du Disque, and their CBS
Masterworks release of the
DebussyRavel Quartcs was
nominated for a Grammy Award,
as was their recent set of the six
Bartok Quartets on Deutsche
Grammophon.
The four members of the
quartet were trained at the famed
Toho Music Academy of Tokyo
and were inspired to pursue a str-
ing quartet career by visitors from
the Juilliard Quartet.
An Artists
Series
A ttraction
Their performances have won
several major prizes in music com-
petitions. In addition to perform-
ing, the Quartet has been in
residence each year at Yale
University and American Univer-
sity in Washington, D.C.
Members of the Tokyo String
Quartet perform on four matched
Amatis, on loan from the Cor-
coran Gallery of Art in
Washington, D.C. The in-
struments were created by Italian
Iuthier Nicolo Amati between
1656 and 1677.
Tuesday night the Dorian Wind
Quintet, one of the nation's
foremost chamber ensembles,
brilliantly entertained ECU guests
;n a superb performance. The
Quintet, in frequent concerts in
North America, Europe and Asia,
has appeared with such renowned
sololists as Lorin Hollander, Ruth
Laredo, Jean Casadesus, Lukas
Foss, Jean-Pierre Rampal, and
Phyllis Curtin.
The ensemble was organized at
Tanglewood in 1961 during a
summer season at the Berkshire
Music Center, making its New
York debut this fall. Since then,
the Quintet has won acclaim not
only for its performances in con-
cert series and music festivals, but
also for its presentations of
lecture-demonstrations and
master classes. Some of its tours
abroad have been sponsored by
the U.S. government.
The Quintet conducted a master
class for ECU students yesterday
morning in Fletcher Music Center
Recital Hall.
Season tickets to the ECU Ar-
tists Series and the ECU Chamber
Festival are available at the ECU
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Single tickets for the concerts are
also available, although season
ticket purchase provides a con-
siderable savings.
Also appearing on ECU's
1984-85 Artists Series are soprano
Marvis Martin (Oct. 25), pianist
Janina Fialkowska (Nov. 19), the
Vienna Choir Boys (Jan. 15), and
the Rotterdam Philharmonic Or-
chestra with conductor James
Conlon (Feb. 27). Artists Series
concerts will be held in Wright
Auditorium.
Subsequent Chamber Festival
concerts include performances by
the Annapolis Brass Quintet
(Nov. 5), the Los Angeles Piano
Quartet (Jan. 28), the Western
Wind vocal sextet (Feb. 11) and
the Composers String Quartet
(April 20). Chamber Festival per-
formances are scheduled for Hen-
drix Theatre.
The Tokyo String Quartet
The Tokyo String Quartet will make their mark next Wednesday when they take time out of their busy touring schedule to perform at ECl
?

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10
JjHEEAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 20, 1984
Student Entrepreneurs Begin Laundry Service
By BRIAN RANGELEY
Suff Writer
A student-operated laundry ser-
vice for students will soon begin
operation around the ECU cam-
pus. Two student entrepenuers,
Fred Lorber and Kurt Yachenko,
are spearheading the business.
The pair say they are trying to
create an alternative to the ser-
vices that are available in the
dorms and near campus. The
Greenville Student Laundry Ser-
vice will serve the campus area a
few blocks off campus.
The laundry service will have an
added new twist that other ser-
vices don't; pick-up and delivery.
Students simply call and arrange a
pick-up time. Someone from the
service will pick up the laundry
and carry it in a numbered sack to
a laundromat. The laundry is
washed and dried in its own
machines, fluffed, folded, and
returned in 24-36 hours.
Students can have a load of
laundry done for the moderate
price of $3.50 per load. Yachenko
feels that the price is an excellent
one, especially when the worth of
your time is considered.
If a student was paid minimum
wage for doing laundry, he would
get $3.35 just by waiting for the
machines to run. Then there's the
cost of detergent and fluff and
fold at 50 cents per pound. The
new service supplies everything
that a load of laundry needs at cut
rates.
Yachenko says that the service
can be especially useful to dorm
students. "You check down in
Slay right now says Yachenko.
"Half of the machines are out of
order. There's too many people to
a machine
Lorber and Yachenko feel that
their service will give students
another choice. Most freshmen
have limited transportation and
have to use the machines in their
dorm. Other students can benefit
as well � those with heavy class
schedules and jobs have little ex-
tra time, especially at exam times.
Some people just hate doing laun
dry.
Lorber and Yanchenko are
keeping costs down by contracting
with a local laundromat to have
laundry done during off-peak
hours. And by doing all of the
laundry at one time, Lorber and
Yanchenko receive bulk rates for
Huff and fold.
A new service for
students
begins on Monday.
Besides the obvious potential
for monetary returns, Lorber and
Yanchenko feel that the ex-
perience of starting a small
business is invaluable. "I'm in the
situation Lorber stateswhere
I need to create some form of in-
come for myself. I don't like
working for othersI'm getting
good experience from it
As a music major concentrating
in composition, Lorber realizes
that he probably won't have a
good job as a composer waiting
for him after school. He feels that
his business experience might keep
him solvent until he makes his
name known in music.
Yancheko is majoring in in-
dustrial technology and plans to
open his own construction com-
pany. "You don't have to be a
business major to start a
business he says. He points to
ambition and knowing where to
find information as the keys to a
successful business.
Lorber added that he and his
partner have learned much about
taxes, licenses, marketing surveys,
and laws. As for the existing com
petition, Lorber and Yancheku
seem not to be worried at all. "It
they want to take the time and do
laundry themselves, that's fine
says Lorber. "We're there for the
student who doesn't have the
time, or just doesn't want to do
it
The Greenville Student Laun
dry Servi. begins taking orders
on September 24, and startx
laundering on October 1.
Home Videos: An Alternative To TV
By DAVID WITHERINGTON
M�ff Wriitr
Today more families own video
cassette recorders than ever
before. The home video market is
booming, and thanks to Sunshine
Video, Greenville movie buffs are
offered a wide variety of video
products. Sunshine Video is
located on Arlington Blvd and
serves mainly as a movie-rental
source for VCR owners.
This is a great alternative to
cable television, especially for
those of us who live in non-cable
areas. Sunshine offers all the
latest cassette releases in both
VHS and Beta formats. Their
library includes such new
favorites as Splash, Terms of
Endearment, and Trading Places.
Then, nostalgia fans can find such
classics of yesteryear as the Marx
Brothers, the Three Stooges, and
W.C. Fields. Sunshine also offers
a kiddie category, including the
best of Disney videos and other
cartoon favorites. With the hun-
dreds of video cassettes available,
Sunshine Video has something for
every member of the family.
If you own a VCR, I urge you
to join the Sunshine Video club.
The club's fee is $50 for a lifetime
membership. After your initiation
dues, there are no renewal charges
ever. You only pay the rental fees,
which currently are $3.25 per
movie each night. With videos,
you get the added advantage of
enjoying the movie in the privacy
of your own home. On Saturdays,
you can rent the store's older
cassettes at two for $5.
There is even an opportunity to
save on the membership fee. If an
established club member signs you
up, you get a $15 discount off the
regular $50 lifetime fee, and a free
movie rental. Your friend also
gets a free rental.
Besides a wide selection of
Seminar Emphasizes Body Dimensions
Bv ELAINE PERRY
Suff Writer
To Plato it's the prison house
of the soul, to St. Paul a temple,
to surgeons a disceased mass to
cut upon. Just what are we in-
dividually to make of what one
poet calls "this heavily bear who
goes with me?" Such are the
topics discussed in the Fine Arts
Honors Seminar, The Dimensions
of the Body Human.
Class size within the Honors
Seminars is limited to 15. The in-
structors for "The Dimensions of
the Body Human" are Dr. Ed-
ward Levine, dean of the School
of Art, Dr. Michael Bassman,
associate professor of Foreign
Language and Literature, and Dr.
David Sanders, professor of
English and director of the
Honors Program. Each of the
professors are offering differing
views.
"The main objective of the
course is to give artists an ap-
preciation of the dimensions of
the body said Sanders. "The
course should also make the
students more knowledgeable and
aware of people
There are many requirements
for the class such as weekly
readings, interviews with people
about how they perceive the body,
and learning one new skill during
the semester. The students must
also explain how hisher body
changed and the discipline re-
quired. The final project can be
anything relating to the course.
The seminar will also feature a
variety of guest speakers and
panels. Philosophers talk about
the relationship between body and
mind while psychiatrists speak on
the body and soul. Other possible
speakers will include a mortician
and a faith-healer.
Each speaker will explain how
he or she relates to the body giving
students ideas on how humans
relate to the body in different which are intangible and unquan
ways. The guest speakers will tifiable. The purpose behind the
recommend readings which will be
on reserve. program is to offer exceptional
There are many rewards to par- students a broader range of
ticipating in the seminar, most of classes.
SANDWICH SHO
HAPPY HOUR
vvs.
Thursday & Friday 2-7:30
Buy a Pitcher of Beer
For $2.00 and $.50
Goes To The
FRIENDS OF THE ATTIC
ATTIC
Thurs. Sept. 20
BACK
DOORS
WZMB CONCERT
Sat. Sept. 22
SNOW
1st Appearance in
over a year
The Spirit of the Attic lives at
KING & QUEEN NORTH
PET
VILLAGE
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
Vx Price Sale!
On all fresh water fish
Sept. 21 & 22
10am to 6pm
We also carry a
complete line of small animal,
dog, cat and fish supplies.
511 EVANS ST.
GREENVILLE. N.C. 27834
PMONT 756 9222
prerecorded movies, Sunshine
also offers a complete line of
blank video tapes, including top
names like Maxell and TDK. Club
members receive a ten percent dis-
count on all products purchased.
You can also find the latest video
magazines, including Video
Movies and Video Review.
So, if you own a VCR, why not
get more for your money? Visit
the store on 214 Arlington
Boulevard or call at 756-4392.
New Deli
presents
PRESSURE BOYS
Friday and Saturday
Sept. 21 & 22
513 Cotanche Street
Greenville, NC
Your Two Best Choices For Printing
�'When You Need It - The Way You Want It
With Reasonable Prices
�The-
Greenville Printing Company
� Commercial Printing
� 4 Color Process Printing
� Typesetting & Design
211 West 9th Street - Greenville
752-4720
Specializing In:
Full Service & Seif Service
Xerox Copies
� Automatic Conation
� Resumes
� Graohk Camera Ser. .
Located Downtown in
The Georgetown Shops
758-2400
CASSETTES
SAVE UP TO $5.00
Top Artists! Major Labels!
Many, Many More! Classics Included!
Come Early far Bast Selection.
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
EAST CAROLINA UNIVERSITY
September 21st thru September 28th
Get Your Favorites at Big Discounts!
" ' � �' �" ' ' � ��� ���in" 11 �i mm am i ii �in i� � i�
ii" ii -�
m wn�
Classifi
SALE
COLOR TV 13' color T V soi.a
chassis, excellent condition $9fl
call 752 186
FOR SALE
month old
758 1965
Schwmn Wona Spoj
$165 00 Ca
10 SPEED MEN'S BIKE c ac�
condition, 27" rac ng Drakes
731 7277 M-W-F S6C or oes'
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGE
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA A3'
the Kappa Sig's for a grea pa
nght! The Kappa Alpha Order
deserves thanks for the E S G We
a great t me
FOR SALE:
refrigerator Perec for : �
in excellent cond ' on J ;
offer Cai Keith at 758 �
noon
for sale baby n
cute! 758 9603
MUST SELL: ac" s ze rei
Excellent cone '
semester Call 758 2835
MISC
CAPTURE YOUR COLLEGE I
AND NIGHTS o . deo casse
or BETA, excellent coloi p
sweii Hi-F Audic Join our
ano enioy tne Jacksons V
maine, Prince. Pir Floyd
Haien, Cnc aer
Pretenders. Cheecri &. c
Time, The Alan Pa-s Prt
Duran. Duran, ana m
more We make video's
Deaver video Recce-g Se.
Call 758-6344
ALTERATIONS � CHEAP! Ca
Godley 752 1964 af'e " z
and Sat
STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM-
soluteiy "no charge :r -�
estimates at the Teen Sr
757nineteen eighty" rtx
you'd like to kno
NEED IT TYPED? eses d ss
tions- research papers -es-ef
Word Processor Ca 5e. 6a
752-1454
ECU HILLEL � J E vs
STUDENTS You are corca �
to a Mi Del cookout on Sunaay, Sec
at 3 30 p.m at the home of Dr
Mrs. Warshauer and Free La
1608 E. Fiftn St. corner of 51
Elm). For a ride, directions or
information, call 756 5640
PI KAPPA PHI LITTLE SIS
RUSH Pi Kappa Pri Fratem
be having their little sister rusri :
25 and 26. All interested g r s snT
come and meet the brothers and
sisters of Pi Kapoa p
WATCH OUT FOR THE GE
Intramural Football ea- � 5
Jeff H Kurt I Je'f S Hank C
S. � 2 games so far arc no oth
scored agas us An
"BOLthead offense a
nickle defense Sex gae s 5.
at 4:00 on the ntrami -
NEED CHEERLEADERS
PERSONAL
TARBORO: JOHN WYATTS
wrong- "I am missing U since �
been gone But hey - wha s ove
to do, got to do with it? I woncer
OXO Your "friend" from Gree.
I KNOW SOMEONE BORN n
USA September 23. There a
many sparks to start the 'e S'
shinning the pink caccv
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL
Kappa Tau new oiecges: Ge e;
for a hell raising serreser v
joined the best
MEMBERS OF THE EASTEI
STREET COUNTRY CLUB must
tend a sippin' sniffin' get smas-
bash Friday nite. Dawn G ng
Rob and specai guest Leslie
entertain. The Gozz spIr I es i
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST Ladies Gola Puisor watch
over weekend, of great sent me-
value. If found, please ca'i 758-w
Reward offered
LOST: gold rope bracelet of g
itimentai value If found please
758-9693 A rewara is offeree
WANTED
NEEDED: PART TIME SOCC
COACHES for various Pitt Cou
Schools. Contact Alice or Barr
752-6106 if interested.
PARTTIME WORD PROCESSOR
local law firm: IBM PC AT Sai
commensurate with experience
758-6200
FEMALE ROOMMATE nonsm
needed to share 2 bedroom aol
blocks from campus Carpeted
tral air and heat, quiet neighbors
bedroom furniture needed I
$112.50 per month. Call 752 9110
' � 0 m 4� f !� 1 ifcgwi iwMi' �� - .p.i-y
f
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ervice
Deli

BOYS
J
3
1
o
:s!
Classifieds
rHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 2Q.IM 1J
SALE
COLOR TV
hass s excellent
a '52 !8s6
FOR SAL E s � port, i
I -
S8 1965
10 SPEED MEN S BIKE : I -
v A � $6 oi best
THE SISTERS AND PLEDGES OF
SIGMA SIGMA SIGMA iva
the Kapi a grea' party Sat
ilSO
� - '� � E S o wrhad
a great 1
FOR
noon
FOR S
SAL E
ALE
'58 -�
MUST SELL
58 .835
one
MIS(
CAPTURE YOU
AND NIGHTS 31
-LEGE D
1
-
:
more
Dea ��

Pt KAPPA PHI LITTLE SISTER
RUSH . A
h rested girls should
i
� appa :
WATCH OUT FOR 'THE GETTO
" B
- . .
S . - ,�
- � -
rHE � c

Field

PERSONAL
TARBORO JOHN W Y A T T S
e you've
' � got
JOt to � '� � � ox
en(j frorr Qreef, ,
I KNOW SOMEONE BORN
be
sparks to v �
the i ' caddy
CONGRATULATIONS TO ALL PI
semester! yo
� � the best
MEMBERS OF THE EASTERN
STREET COUNTRY CLUB must at
onifi C- h
.
1spe a guest Les i a - � "ne Gozz spirit . es on
LOST AND FOUND
LOST adies Gold Puisor watch iost
over weenend, of great sentimental
alue I ound, please call 758-8053
R eward offered
LOST go'd rope bracelet, of great
sentimental value if found please can
758 9693 A reward is offered
WANTED
NEEDED PART TIME SOCCER
COACHES for various Pitt County
Schools Contact Alice or Barr at
752 6106 if interested.
PARTTIME WORD PROCESSOR for
locai taw firm IBM PC AT Saiar
commensurate with experience Call
758 6200
FEMALE ROOMMATE nonsmoker
needed to share 2 bedroom apt 5
blocks from campus Carpeted, cen
tral air and heat, quiet neighborhood,
bedroom furniture needed Rent
$112 50 per month Call 752 9110
WANTED CON'T
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
N smokei washer and dryer pro
. led ev mobile home, rent $165 00,
� i I utilities, private room and
Itl all 756 6151
ROOMMATE WANTED: private bdr
- ggold Towers, 757 1005
2 FEMALE ROOMMATES NEEDED
rw n Oaks Apts Completely furnish
ind excellent location Full bath
� walk m closet in room Rent
�lable Call 758 7264
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED to
sh shed condo $125 per month
� tes Call 758 6388
WANTED LADY PIRATE
MANAGER Volunteer work for this
season Contact Diana at
� 384
SEVERAL AGGRESSIVE PART
TIME SALES PEOPLE NEEDEDTO
WORK flexible hours (up to 30 hours
A � - il tew men's and ladies
lop opening soon at the
Plaza Experience preferred, but not
Must be neat in ap
nd able to work with the
Telephone 1 946 2970 between
ONLY, or mail resume to
��'� 1286, Washington, N C
Presenting The Exciting
'Man-O-Stick' Strip
f A .
Introducing Man O-Stick
our new, dynamic super hero who
has come from the planet Wood
to rid our nation o the evil that
may threaten the democracy.
Written by Jim Johnson and i
lustrated by Sandy Jarrell and
Allan Guy, Man-O-Stick will have
you on the edge of your seat with
excitement!
Tune in to the Style section
every Thursda and be amazed
when Man-O-Stick battles and
triumphs over such evil-doers as
"Evil Benny "Doctor Evi
and the too-insane to be true,
"Mad Fuji
So sit back and enjoy. Man O-
Stick is finally here for your en-
joyment.
ALTERATIONS � CHEAP: B


STEREO SYSTEM PROBLEM'
for
-She.
.�
NEED IT TYPED'
-
'

ECU HILLELJEWISH
STUDENTS
' r iitn S1�r ot 5th tw

-





I
A
12
JLHEjAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 20. 1984
Who Writes Those Commercials
By PAT MOLLOY
Stmfr Hitler
( Commercials � what a joke.
I'd pay to know what goes
through an ad writer's mind when
he makes up the dialogue for a
commercial. Probably very little.
Think about it. What would
civilization come to if Mr. Wipple
let all the ladies squeeze the Char-
min. Would it be a toilet tissue
holocaust? I'd be willing to risk it
� go for it Wippy; let 'em
squeeze away.
How about the one in which the
bathroom tissue actually speaks?
That has to be a classic. I don't
know though. As crazy as I am,
I'd probably sit and rap with it for
an hour or so, find out it was a
right wing liberal, and then beat
the damn thing to death with a
plunger. I must admit, however,
these commercials are inevitably
entertaining in a pitiable way.
I have a few favorites that I love
to laugh at � one of which is now
defunct but surely remembered.
In this commercial, a lady is
escorted into a room with a "hid-
den camera" and asked to feel
two different brands of bathroom
tissue. Of course she goes along,
no questions asked. Then, if
you're not dying of laughter
already, the lady starts getting in-
to it. "I like brand A better. It's
the one I use Suddenly, a godly
voice thunders out, "Wrong Mrs.
Martin. Yours was brand B. You
picked the new ultimately-extra-
improved Waldorf tissue. Let us
show you how soft it is Some
Students Trade Dorm-Life For The Good Hotel-Life
(UPI) � About 65 men and
women students at John Carroll
University have maid service,
cable television, double beds,
small refrigerators, fresh linens
and towels and access to a pool,
ice machines, bar and a
restaurant.
Their dorm is a hotel.
The 65 upperclassmen and
women are living at the Somerset
Inn for lack of dorm space on the
campus in suburban Shaker
Heights. The hotel is about one-
and-a-half miles from the
Catholic college and shuttle buses
run to and from the campus.
John Carroll officials said an
influx of more than 700 freshmen
this term � about six percent
more than last year � forced
them to contact the hotel, which
agreed to convert 35 of its 160
rooms into dorm rooms.
Roger Greene, the hotel's
general manager, said no more
than two guests at a time are
allowed in a room, long distances
telephone calls must be paid for
weekly, quiet hours are listed and
no bicycles or extra furniture are
allowed.
"We let them know it is a hotel,
not a dorm he said.
"Everything has been going well,
and they are a good bunch of
kids
'Camouflage' Your Wardrobe With ArmyNavy Fatigues
film of a guy dropping eggs into
some tissue is flashed upon the
screen. On brand X, which is
Charmin, the egg breaks. With
Waldorf though, the egg doesn't
even crack � Simply Amazing!
The fact that the latter egg was
hard-boiled somehow doesn't
materialize. Mrs. Martin is awe-
struck and swears to buy Waldorf
for the rest of her life.
Sometimes when I read through
a magazine, I'll come across an
advertisement for Maidenform.
You've seen them. They're the
ones with the lady in her
underwear standing in the street
by a taxi. The slogan is you
never know where she'll show
up Well, I feel safe in saying
that she'll never show up in
Rafters and buy me a beer. Of
course some of you may have had
a different experience than I. I
heard that one guy caught her in
Fredericks of Hollywood buying
some edible undies � damn
traitor. I feel confident that if I
ever did run into the Maidenform
woman, I could win her over
because I have a secret.
I read Playboy, and on the last
pages of the magazine, as in most
adult publications, they have
advertisements for very trivial ob-
jects � personal items One day 1
came across an ad that stated it
would teach me how to hypnotize
women into wanting me and do-
ing all that I bid. Being the
educated man I am, I sent the re
quested $45.50 plus $3 postage
and handling, and got the book.
Well, what do you suppose 1
learned0 Ladiesread further
ladiesfurtherdeeper, you are
now in my power. If you ever see
me downtown, you will instantly
buy me a beer and then try I
seduce me.
However, if I'm with
Maidenform woman, forget it!
By SUSAN TACKER
Suff WfttM
This fall designers have
discovered the comfort and
durability of military clothing.
Olive green pants, oversized
shirts, and everything camouflage
is on campus. Designer clothing is
often too pricey for the average
undergraduate, but this year you
can buy straight from the
designer's source � at Henry's
Army and Navy Store. Henry's,
at 1501 South Evans, can outfit
yon for fall or for battle,
whichever you prefer.
Owned and operated by Mr.
and Mrs. Henry B. Heath, the
store offers over 2,000 different
items. New and used clothing line
the walls and aisles, ranging to
everything from thermal
underwear to German military
overcoats. Prices vary according
to age, quality and condition, so
the prices quoted here may vary.
Green khaki fatigues are from
$5 up. If you thought your jeans
were comfortable, you're about to
be converted. Piles and piles of
these pants line the table; you
must dig for your size. Pants of all
kinds are available, including tan
khakis, wool Navy dress pants
with lace-up backs and 13 button
fronts, camouflage pants of all
kinds, and even padded water-
proof jump pants (great for par-
ties that are liable to become beer
fights).
For women, men's clothing is
roomy, oversized, and extremely
comfortable. Find an olive green
or khaki skirt that's several sizes
too large, belt it at the waist with
an ammunition belt, and you're
ready. The shirts are $4.95 and
up; the ammo belt is $3.50.
What about camouflage
overalls for $13.95? Sateen
coveralls are roomy, one-piece
outfits that run about $19.95. A
padded camouflage coverall, for
fall hunting or winter barhopping,
costs about $39.95.
You've always liked the Ike
jacket in all those old war movies,
right? Fitted at the waist and
made of wool, these are cheap
chic at $16.95. A Navy pea jacket
runs $29.95 and up; the matching
trousers are $12.95. And a perma-
nent favorite is nylon flight
jackets. Look like a flying ace for
under $60.
Hats, an expression of in-
dividuality everywhere except in
the service, become original on a
civilian. From berets (great on
blue hair) to Australian bush hats
to caps to helmets, the prices run
from $2.95 up.
Take a couple of hours to
browse and try on clothes at
Henry's.
205 E. 5th St.
(Across From Apple Records)
BLUE MOON
CAFE
Pirate Specials
Win or Loose
Saturday - Happy Hour
10-6
Tailgate Specials All Day
HAIRWORKS
Beauty SaJon
Janet McLawhorn Ella Saulter
Paula Garns Kim Koonce
Would like to welcome you to Hair Works,
for all of your hair care needs.
Open Mon-Sat
Walk-ins & Apptments I
Located on S. Charles St.
(Highway 43)
Beside Carriage House Apis.
Present This
Coupon For
756-7057
$1 OFF ALL
! HAIRCUTS
llIMMM!MMIMMTM!T!TTTTTr
.0 THE EAST CAROLINA PL A Y HOUSE
�� -o� A SEASON OF SINGING, DA NCING, COMED Y
A POWERFUL DRAMA
DANCE
THEATRE
A l-W
Daa't mt n fo� -�it�i�-
m far � �kait of � )oMaf iiirtrt
Ft W-tt
Daara al Hi kaT
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Da Bafhlnar
DTViNERS 0�J SmbKitomn
Ft -� Art C�if�����
A ��m I Great Prlrr-Saw 11 M
aumiil draau 1. bcfcaafc Prtvikfta
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4 pnorto Saaliaf
5 Tu Da.rn
TVkX Rrlara
WRITE: CALL: 757-6390 COME BY:
General Manager Mewkk Theatre Arts Center
East Carolina Playhouse 5th and Eastern Streets
Greenville, NC 27834 Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm
llllllliiiiiiiiiniiiintttrrrr
Invites you
to our
FREE ALL NIGHT KEG
PARTY
Thursday, Sept. 20th
? Bring your favorite beer mug-the beer's on us!
Plus Happy Hour til 10:30
And wake up music 1 overs-the
rockabillies are coming!
live one stage
MEMPHIS ROCKABILLY
BAND
Rockabilly legend Carl Perkins said,
"In 26 years on the road, this is the best
band I've ever heard and the Boston �
Phoenix said most people who have heard
them agree.
Don't Miss Boston's Memphis Rockabilly Band
This is the real thing, Jim.
Don't cha mess with my ducktail
���
How to make peace withTblstoy
SH0NEY5 FISHERMAN'S
BUFFET
If the academic wars are getting you down, declare a cease-fire. Take a break
with a rich and chocolatev cup oTSuisse Mocha. It's just one of seven deliciouslv
different flavors from fc�gfr�mWHttm I �rT"T-�kMtBrtfawM.ii?
General Foods - ��� r??
International Coffees. �"����I iMKFBml . JWm&zz3tr. i
GENERAL FOODS' INTERNATIONA1 COFI FES
AS MUCH A FEE1 ING AS A F! AVOR
Try It Ag
B DAVID WITHERIMIOS
StaJTWitM
What has Dave Edmunds, the
rockabilly king of Rockpile. beer,
up to laieK? After hearing his new
album Riff Raff, I'm sorrv I ask-
ed. With Rockpile. the pop w
Nick Lowe provided the pei
contrast to Edmunds' rockabilh
inclinations. They ere the
perfect odd couple.
Now that Rockpile is in
anaJs of pop history, Edm,
has found an unlikely new partner
� Jeff Ly nne of the Electric Light
Orchestra. What0 You've got to
be kidding' No, I'm afraid it's
true. A man who has always relied
on the bare essentials of i I
roll has sided with a ma
famous for comput-
thesizer sounds. I gues- thi
good news for those of you
lamented the breakup of f !
mean. Riff Raff sounds m re �
an ELO album than a D:
munds album Jefl i . tine
wrote two-thirds of the tu-
the whole record ha
fluence. Richard Tandy, another
ELO-er, also plas on the ale
For the record. I am a fan of botr
of these acts, but if you
mind, in their respec
tr. e ni -
NOWT
APPLIC
General Manager, B
Needel
Ebonv
tr
Inters
may appij a
Board Of
in the P
Bldg.
Phone: SI - 6009
gimumtuiiuimimiiHiiuiiiiitiiiitimiiimiiimtmi
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f






�HE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 20.1984 13
ax:
KEG
20th
f V a- f �
Try It Again Dave
B DAVID WITHERINGTON
Nl�ff Wrlir,
What has Dave Edmunds, the
rockabilly king of Rockpile, been
to lately? Alter hearing his new
album Riff Raff, I'm sorr 1 ask-
ed W nh Rockpile, the pop wit of
Nick I owe provided the perfect
contrast to Edmunds' rockabilly
inclinations The uere the
perfect odd couple.
Nou thai Rockpile is in the
anals ol pop history, Edmunds
Mas found an unlikely new partner
lefl I ynne of the Electric I lght
chestra What'1 You've got to
be kidding' No. I'm afraid it's
rue A man who has always relied
. bare essentials o rock and
1 has sided with a man who is
nous tor computerized syn-
thesizer sounds I guess this is
d news for those of you who
lamented the breakup o' El O. 1
an. Riff Raff sounds more like
ELO album than a Dave Ed-
munds album. Jett I ynne even
wrote two-thirds of the tunes, and
the whole record has his in-
fluence Richard randy, another
El O-er, also plays on the album.
1 or the record. I am a tan of both
hese acts, but if you don't
in their respective places.
please. The chemistry just isn't
there.
The record opens with
"Something About You the old
Holhnd-Dozier Holland soul
classic. Edmunds starts out sing-
ing with enough heart, but by the
song's median, Lynne's orchestra-
tions and trademark chorus
shouts make a mockery of this
lovely tune. The album continues
with several synth-pop numbers,
including two, "SOS" and
"Hang On that would fool
anyone into believing they were
actually new ELO tracks. It's as if
Edmunds was a supporting player
on his own album.
By the end of side two,
however, there is hope. Edmunds
squeezes in a beautiful ballad,
"How Could 1 Be So Wrong
and rounds the record off with a
rocker, "Can't Get Enough
This leads me to believe his heart
is still in his Eddie Cochran
records, and that this sidetrack in-
to techno-pop is just that � a
brief predecessor, Information.
Thomas Wolfe once wrote that
you can never go home again. For
your sake, Dave, 1 hope that's not
true.
NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS
General Manager, Editors, & Typesetter?
Needed For
Ebony Herald
Interested persons
may apply at the Media
Board Office - Located
n the Publications
Bldg.
Phone: 757 - 6009 Filing Daw 9-18-849-21-84
A Commendable Service
By TIN A MAROSCHAK
IfituiM Mllnr
Dave Kmunds left much to be
desired with his latest album.
The American Red Cross is pro-
bably one of the most well-known
service organizations in the world.
Not only does it provide service to
disaster victims and military per-
sonnel, it also offers classes to
ECU students and Pitt County
residents as well.
Originating in Switzerland by
Henri Dunant, the Red Cross
spreaded into the United States
during the Civil War. Clara Bar-
ton and a group of supporters
began the volunteer service which
prides itself as an organization
"standing for compassion and
humanitarian action The Pitt
County Chapter of the American
Red Cross is no exception.
During the 1983 Village Green
Apartment explosion, Director
Ruth Taylor and several
volunteers served doughnuts and
coffee to emergency personnel;
they even offered to house the un-
fortunate victims in local hotels.
On the same note, the Red
Cross sheltered March tornado
victims in D.H. Conley High
School and provided much needed
emotional support.
Just last week the chapter hous-
ed over 100 anxious persons an-
ticipating another disaster � Hur
American Red Cross
ricane Diana. Fortunately all that
was needed was emotional sup-
port. The Red Cross did,
however, house many Grifton
residents who were forced to
evacuate their homes because of
flooding. The organization
sheltered these victims all day last
Friday until they were able to find
friends or relatives to stay with.
The Pitt County Red Cross
sponsors many safety classes on
campus as well I hese include the
following: Standard first Aid,
Standard First Aid (Modular
System), Cardiopulmonarv.
Resuscitation ((PR, 1 ecture
Method and Modular System),
Swimming (Beginner. Advai
Beginner, Intermediate, Swim
mer, and Advanced). Advanced
I.ifesaving, Basic Canoeing, and
Basic Sailing. The Red I
sponsors Bloodmobile a; II
throughout the year.
Because the Pitt ountv I
Cross has contributed so mu
this campus and commui
students, faculty and
couraged to contribute
future Last week the Pitl
United Way kicked off it;
campaign with a goal of $35 "
The United Way, is an or. .
tion that Financially suppori
Pitt County Red Cross and
29 other similar community
vice agencies Support tl
organizations that support
give to the United W
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v





1 HI- EAS1 v KO! ININ
Sports
SEPTEMB! R 20, !sH4
t'dgc 14
Georgia Southern A waits
0-3 ECU Football Team
By SCOTT POWERS
? m
.��� m , . n NEIL JOHNSON ECU toto L�t
Sen.or fullback Reggie Branch and the ECl offense accumulated more vardage than Central Michigan in Saturday loss
hut head coach F.d Emory was still disappointed with his team's performance.
Linksters Ready For Season
D. Din li.rnnif � r- i � . ,
'There are no words to describe the disap-
intmeni and concern of being 0-3, but we
are not about to give up lamented East
Carolina football coach Ed Emory over the
Pirates 17 12 loss to Central Michigan last
Saturdav.
"We should hae won the football game
Emory said in his weekly press conference,
"but we didn't - and I take the blame for
that
"By the way that we came out in the se-
cond half, I thought the ballgame would be
ours. We just blew a lot of scoring oppor-
tunities
Emor went on to say that he doesn't con-
sider his club a very good football team at
this point in the season, especially or, offense.
The offensive cause was not helped by field
position, however. The Pirates were pinned
back deep in their own territory against the
Cheppewas for most of the game, starting
Irives seven times inside their own 20-yard
line, including four times inside the ten.
Although this is the worst start for an ECU
football team since 1971, Emory did say he
still has faith left in his team. "We'll come
back because we hae character he said.
"We have a tough schedule ahead of us, but
'C have kids that want to play. Some are hurt
and injured, but they'll be back too
One of the injured Pirates that will not be
back is starting quarterback Robbie Bartlett,
who was lost for the year with a knee injury.
He will be granted a hardship year by the
N( A- and will still have two years of
eligibility left.
phomore Darrvl Speed came in when
Bartletl went down, and completed four
passes for 37 ards without an incompletion.
"We were extremely pleased with the way
Darryl played Emory said He added,
however, that the starting quarterback has
not yet been chosen for the Pirates next con-
test with Georgia Southern.
A new starter will not be named until later
in the week, depending on how backups
Speed and Ron Jones perform in practice.
"Georgia Southern runs an unusual
defense Emory sa;d. "We're going to wait
and see who can pick up the coverages (he
fastest before we make an announcement on
the quarterback situation
Joe Grinage, the only defensive tackle with
any playing experience last year, was also lost
'oi the year with a knee injury.
i mor did feel that there was some im-
provement in his team's play. "Our protec-
tion never broke down � the offensive line
did a good job ol i i i ting 'he
quarterback " he said "V
but we didn't play the i �
order to win
Although Georgia & lered
the lightweight on ECU cbedule this .
Emory said his team will noi be � . 'he
agles lightly when the) ,
Saturday.
"Some people mas fe ha
Southern is the pansy on thi ti schedule,
but thev are a good lean, ' i moi . aid. "If
our players feel that way, hei we could
for a long dav "
Three things thai . e Eino
arc the defensive knowledge i
Fik Russell, quarterback i . .u . Ham an :
tremendous experience of the team
"Erk Russe was hired - �
Georgia. He was feared all o n the
by coaches for his great defensive
Emory said. "He is a great moti aroi
orgamer and a great i oa
The Eagles run a compl � �
consists of an eight-man froi
hack, which is a combination fal backe
and a strong safety.
"We will have to throw the ball a
against their eight man flex defense
want to h: successful I mor aid
The head coach also .aid e
greatest respect for quarterback I r
who in his career at Georgia Soutl
passed for over 1,2'X yat i
over 1,1 OX).
"Traev Ham is probablv the besi . a
back that we will face this year Emoi
"I think that he mav even be the best
back in the ou
The experience factor worries Emoi
The Eagles have 20 starters back fr
year's team that only lost to the I
in iyR?
Until this sear, the Georgia Soutl
ball program wac a club sport, -
has mans players with man) tw �a
year players listed
sophomores.
"They have two o uburi i
South Carolina transfers and a lot
that aren't even listed I mor sai I
have a couple of defensive linemen u
become pros. They haven't lost anybody
from their program in four years
The Eagles are 3-0 this year, and just came
off an impressive victory ovei Florid v M.
"This will be the biggest gamt that Geo
Southern has ever had Emor) added, "
we better be reads to play
B RICK McCORMAC
suff Unirr
Although still very young, the
ECU golf team is looking to start
the 1984-85 season on a good note
as they compete in the Wolfpack
Collegiate Invitational on Sept
24-25.
The Wolfpack Invitational is
held at the Wake Forest Country
Club in Raleigh and will include
teams such as perenial golf power
Wake Forest, Clemson, Duke,
Virginia. Campbell and host
North Carolina State.
The course at Wake Forest
Country Club, according to
Coach Bob Helmick, "favors
long hitters As proof, Helmick
cited the first hole � a 704-yard
par five with the last 200 yards
sloping uphill.
Last year in the Wolfpack in-
vitational the Pirates finished
seveth, but Helmick said "we
definately will do better this
year
According to Helmick, this year
the Wolfpack Invitational as well
as many other tournaments will be
using a different format. Instead
of playing 18 holes on three con-
secutive days, the teams will play
36 holes on the first day (Monday)
and 18 on the second (Tuesday).
"The new format not only
saves time and money, but it
allows the players not to miss so
much school Helmick said. "It
doesn't matter that they changed
the tournament to two days in-
stead of three � everybody has to
do the same thing
For the Wolfpack Invitational,
Helmick is planning on taking
Mike Bradley, Chris Czaja. Mark
Arcilesi, David Waggoner and
either Roger Newsom or David
McKenzie. Helmick was unsure as
to whether or not Newsom would
Senior co-captain Chris Czaja should be one of the top players on this
year's golf team. The Pirates begin their season Monday.
make the trip because of a ci
class situation on Tuesd;
Bradley (soph Durham), (
ja (sr Old Greenwhich, CT) a
Arcilesi of Charlotte are "hitting
the ball and playing well" accor-
ding to Helmick.
Bradley and Czaja will be r�
on heavily as they were Co-Mos
Valuable Players on last year's
squad.
Bradley felt "the problem w
last year's team was not that we
were inexperienced golfers, but
just inexperienced competing on
the collegiate level
Although not as young as last
year's team, the Pirates will ag
be made up primarily of
underclassmen. The top six
players will consist of two senior
a junior, two sophomores and a
freshman.
Helmick views the fali seaso
a time "to work on your ga' �
and evaluate your talent for the
spring season. It gives you the op
portunity to get more competition
for all of your players as everyone
will play in at least two tout
naments this fall
The Pirate linksters wil par-
ticipate in five tournaments this
fall, including the Wolfpack In
vitational, the Iron Duke Classic
and in Dec. the team will go to
Ponte Varda Beach, Florida, to
compete in the Gator Bowl tour-
nament.
In the spring season, when the
NCAA tournament is held, the
Pirates will participate in seven
tournaments although the dates
and places have not yet been
finalized.
Helmick is looking forward to
the spring season when Dennis
Hart will become eligible to plav.
"We will be in great shape as he
will help strengthen the team
When asked about the possibili-
ty of the Pirates receiving a berth
in the NCAA tournamei
Bradley replied "an NCAA tour-
nament bid this year is not im-
possible, but if not this year.
maybe down the road as we get
more experience
Helmick summed up his feel-
ings about this year's team by say-
ing "we have been working hard
to become a good golf team. We
have the potential to be an ex
cellent golf team, but potential
doesn't put scores on the board.
We have the talent but we have to
apply that talent
N�IL JOHNSON
ecu ��hoto Lb
Darrell Speed was listed as the third team quarterback entering fall drills, hut because of Robbie Bartleit .
injury, he's now competing for the starting job.
Speed Vying For Starting Position
Bv DON CROSS
Mff W rl.fr
offensive team has
� ed on all year by oppos-
- and reporters alike.
iugh all the adversity
k Darrell Speed's per-
� as shined.
I ast week against Central
Michigan Robbie Bartlett started
n quarterback, but he sustained
what mighl be a season-ending
knee injury. Speed came in and
directed the offense by going four
for foui and spaking a last
quarter drive.
"He gave us some zip, some
ice senior split end Stefon
Adams saidWe hated to see
Robbie get hurt, but Darrell pick-
ed us up
Speed is just a 19-vear old
sophomore, but he has a good
chance to start Saturday against
Georgia Southern.
When he talks about playing,
youthful excitement is evident.
"When i was in junior high
school Speed recalls, "1 never
even thought about playing col-
lege ball. Right now I'm very ex-
cited
At the begining of the year
Speed was listed as the number
three quarterback. He says that he
was afraid of disappearing into
the pack, even though he knew he
was good enough to play.
Speed says that senior receiver
Ricky Nichols has helped him
greatly this year with his ex-
perience. "Right now Ricky is my
favorite reciever he comments.
"He always seems to pop open
Ron Jones began the season as
the starting quarterback. He
might have to sit and watch Speed
play Saturday, but he's not giving
up. "Darrell's good, real good
Jones said. "He wouldn't be here
if he wasn't. But I think I'll get
another chance
Both quarterbacks are very
team-oriented. Speed says that the
quarterbacks all pull for one
another. Jones says they've lost as
a team, but that they're going to
win as a team, too.
There hasn't been am finger-
pointing within the team says
Jones. Speed adds that Emor) is
behind them ail the way.
"Morale is up this week in the
locker room " said Sp
"We've had two good practii
far � we'll be read) to play
Whoever starrs Saturday u
have the entire team behind him
East week the Pirates improved
100 percent offensively and del
siveiy, and according to Sped
Cieorgia Southern will go home
losers.
Hooters Fall To N.C. State
By SCOTT POWERS
�iilaat Sports fMw
The ECU Soccer team faced the
Wolfpack of N. C. State in a
match Tuesday in Raleigh and
suffered a 2-0 defeat, but Coach
Steve Brody was far from disap-
pointed with his team's play.
"If we would have played
anybody on our schedule besides
State yesterday, we would have
won Brody said. "I think our
time is getting a lot closer. We've
improved every game and now its
time to start getting out of the
hole we've dug
N. C. State is ranked in the top
ten in the nation, but after two
goals in the first ten minutes of
the game, ECU's defense shut
them down. "On defense, we im-
proved Brody added. "We
showed a lot more tenacity on
defense, played harder and stuck
a lot harder. Defensively, I was
happy
The defense was under constant
pressure from the Wolfpack
throughout most of the game, but
after the early scores, the) held
together well.
"Jesse Daughtery in goal ,
again got better. He did a super
job Brody said. "Our back four
had pressure on them all dav. and
did very well. Jeff Kime, Palmer
Grossi. Pat Golden and Mik
Murray all played verv well '
The team's inability to put the
ball in the net concerned Bro
but he didn't really evpec to score
al� �� eoalsona team like the
Wolfpack.
"Offensively, we had a few on
portunities and missed them
said "But against a team that
good and that highly ranked Z
don't really think offense-� u
Brody believes that his Ieam
may be ready to break into Z
1 acrosse club standout John Ri
him the offensive leade-
Almost
Goes On
Bv (KAMI IT ROTH
A re � .
absolu'
that free

re! Where else
- and 3 g
ne to the
sleeping bag - gaily � an
a prize d( .
ng Goes!
' anyone ca
' grab a goup of fri
n the crowd. There w
events you've e
and all in the name of I
register, come by Room
Memorial Gym on Se;
24-2 Be on the hill on Ci
or you will miss the b:c evei
Flag '
to heat up w
tough compe-
are blast .
men's residence
With scores like v"2
will be hard tc
ding 9'er, Will
�ring with 16 p
In fraternity id
Sigma "A"
Lambda Chi "
oi 39-0; wh i
beat the A B"
In W
i
Kappa Sig LitiSiste
mo- "anding pet
Wend) Ozment I
gave them 36 po i
Women's Residence Ha
the Slay Mamas si
Garter Belt Gladiator
This only a small san p
action out
The
where stars are
for team Putt-Put
Look f
upcoming tea- . s -
See SOCCER, Page
ASKOU
for
wl
h
to
2905 E. 10th St
16
m
MB
� -� ii�
i
I





1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
r Awaits
I Team
' i
in
Cr
ist
st
ve
b-
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� f io iii ze
o-

ie
e-
ic
k.
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iOn! anybod
.
3-0 this vear.ind usi came
K&M
PLjfc:ed,
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i v-v
��f jOnni� ecu �h
Hfcaus of Kohhie Bart left
Position
i i
"his weel
m " s a d Si
the entii
he (Va!e, ,
"i ,ii
I
If-
LN.C. State
sc w a ii
om
lughout n
lesse Da
n got bettei H
Brod) said ' '
revvure on them ail
�dl. Jefl Kim
i. Pat (jol � ,
' all played ver
team's inabilii
in she net concen
if didn't reallv expe
of goals on a tean .
fpack
)ffensivel, e had a
unities and missed
"But against a lean �
and that highly ranker
I really think offense "
ody believes that his team
he ready to break into rhe
?e SOCCER, pa8e ,6
SEPTEMBER 20. 1984
15
Lacrosse Gaining Popularity At ECU
� m

49
NT
�,
J.
By BILL MITCHELL
Suff Wriler
The Lacrosse team, which is
considered a club team by East
Carolina, has been very suc-
cessful. Last year they beat N.C.
State, which was a large club
team, 10-6, lost to the Carolina
club team, 11-3, and barely lost to
Duke, 9-8. Chris Tomasic, crease
defense men and leader of the
team states, "last year we had a
really good team, beating state
and almost winning at Duke, but
this year we hope to be even bet-
ter
"Last season, out of 20-23
states, "this club could really
grow to be a (varsity) sport here.
With so much influence from the
students from northern states like
Virginia, Maryland, and New
Jersey, this sport could really
boom in North Carolina. He also
said, "East Carolina lacrosse,
with enough money and support
from this university, and support
from the students, could really be
a dominating factor in N.C
John Rusk, a junior from An-
napolis, Md and the main offen-
sive threat who scored every game
last year, has been playing since
the seventh grade. He played on
dedicated players, only 12-15 of his high school varsity team, and
tham Vinyl mm � �-� - � 1 r. . , � J .1 -� � W
r.
them had ever played the game
before Tomasic said. The team
has a few of the top stars back
from last year, including offensive
threat John Rusk, last year's star-
ting center Sal Anello, and Robb
Fernando, who played
defenseman along with Chris
Tomasic. They also have starting
goalie Arnold Gambill back, who
has real potential to be a popular
sport in North Carolina. The style
of play in the south is a lot more
defensivly oriented and more of a
football style of play then the of-
fensive minded northern teams.
This makes it more of a spectator
sport because the fans love blood,
sweat, and tears
For those of you that don't
know anything about lacrosse, it
is sort of a mix of soccer, football,
and hockey, but different in its
own way. It is played by carrying
a small, hard ball about the size of
a tennis ball with a stick that has a
net on the end, down the field.
The players try to hurl the ball in-
to the net. The game is played on
a field about the size of a football
field that has two nets that are
Lacrosse club standout John Rusk demonstrates technique that makes
h.m the offensive leader of the ECU club lacrosse team.
Almost Anything
Goes On October 3
before last year had never played five teams in the country for the
the game before. Chris Tomasic past five years. I feel that lacrosse
�OOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOQOqaOOI QOOOOOOO� lOOOOQ
SAVE
20
By shopping our Downtown store
Izod, Sero, Robert Bruce,
Hubbard, Woolrich, Golden Vee,
Botany, Churchill Downs
on the Emory and Henry College
club team. He states, "North
Carolina, South Carolina, and
Georgia are really the only east
coast states that there isn't a high about 4 x 4. ThVgame is one" f
concentration of lacrosse players,
but it is spreading throughout this
state very quickly. UNC, one
team in North Carolina with a
varsity team, has been in the top
B JEANETTE ROTH
Staff Wrlitr
Are you looking for something
absolutely crazy to do with a few
friends? Well, instead of wasting
that free time sitting around �
come to the bottom of College
Hill on October 3. The big event is
here! Where else on campus can 3
girls and 3 guys change clothes
from one to the other inside a
sleeping bag � legally � and win
a prize doing it? Almost
Anything Goes! That's where!
Almost anyone can participate �
just grab a goup of friends and
join the crowd. There will be the
wildest events you've ever seen
and all in the name of fun! To
register, come by Room 204
Memorial Gym on September
24-27. Be on the hill on October 3
ot ou will miss the big event!
Flag ball action continues
hear up with high scores and
competition. The Slay 9'ers
�Ming the competition in the
men's residence hall division.
h scores like 52-13, the 9'ers
be hard to beat. One outstan-
g 9'er, Will Godrey, lead the
scoring with 16 points.
In fraternity action the Kappa
vigma "A" team routed the
Lambda Chi "A" team by a score
� 39-0; while the Phi Tau "B"
beat the Alpha Sig "B" 30-6.
In Women's Independent Divi-
sion, the Naturals trounced the
Kappa Sig Little Sisters 50-0. A
most outstanding performance by
Wendy Ozment for the Naturals
gave them 36 points alone. In the
Women's Residence Hall league,
the Slay Mamas snapped the
Garter Belt Gladiators 26-6.
This only a small sample of the
action out on the fields this fall.
The fields are not the only place
w here stars are born. Tee off time
for team Putt-Putt has arrived.
I ook for outstanding putters in
upcoming features.
favorite activity through the
Department of Intramural-
Recreactional Services.
Remember � Participate rather
than spectate
.ei
r

i

the true American sports, as the
Indians invented it. It was one of
the first sports played in North
America.
Dr. Kenneth Wilburn, the clubs
faculty advisor, is very interested
in helping out the team. He states,
"it is just my way of relating to
the students. I can really relate to
what is going on because I am
younger then a lot of the faculty
members Dr. Wilburn is one of
the africanist's in the ECU history
department. He even gets out and
plays with the team at practice.
The team practices every Tues-
day, Wednesday, and Thursday at
3:30 at the bottom of College Hill.
If you're interested in playing, or
just want to get out and watch,
you're welcome. Let's get
together and support the East
Carolina lacrosse team!
maxell
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 20. 1984
Eagles Riding Four Game Winning Streak
The Last Time: The last time an
East Carolina team dropped the
first three games of a season was
1971, Sonny Randle's first year as
head coach. ECU dropped deci-
sions to Toldeo (45-0), William &
Mary (28-10) and Bowling Green
(47-21). Ironically, Bowling
Green, a Mid-American Con-
ference school, was responsible
for that third loss in 1971. In
1984, Central Michigan, a Mid-
American Conference school,
handed the Pirates their third
straight defeat.
The First Time: Saturday's
Georgia Underdog
Against Clemson
To hear Vince Dooley tell it, his
Georgia Bulldogs will have to play
a perfect game just to stay on the
field with Clemson Saturday.
Dooley, a master at building up
the opposition, says the Tigers,
2-0, are better than Clemson's
1981 national championship
team, and much better than the
Texas team that Georgia upset in
the Cotton Bowl 10-9 last Jan. 2.
Although Dooley builds up
every opponent, the veteran
Georgia coach had some strong
facts Tuesday to support his claim
that Danny Ford's Tigers are a
serious contender for the national
title.
"I think they are every bit as
good if not better (than the '81
team) because they are more ver-
satile offensively said Dooley.
He noted the '81 Tigers were
basically a rollout team with
Homer Jordan at quarterback but
with current quarterback Mike
Eppley they have more options
and present a more balanced at-
tack.
"We have to play an error-free
game and Clemson would have to
turn the ball over to us for us to
have any chance said Dooley.
The Bulldogs, 1-0, are a 3 1-2
point underdog for the matchup
in Athens. Clemson has rolled up
95 points in pounding Ap-
palachian State (40-7) and
Virginia (55-0) while Georgia edg-
ed Southern Mississippi 26-19 in
its opener. Both teams were idle
last Saturday.
The series has become a heated
rivalry in the last 10 years with
Georgia winning five, Clemson
four and last year's game at Clem-
son ending in a 16-16 tie.
The last time a visitor won was
in 1977 when Clemson triumphed
in Athens 7-6.
"We have a lot of rivalries but
this is big said Dooley. "It's
gotten more intense the last few
years
The Georgia coach said the
Tigers "have more experience
than I can ever remember with
seven seniors starting on offense
and six or seven on defense. It's a
complete, experienced football
team.
"I know they can be as good as
anybody in the country defensive-
ly, particularly against us because
we're so inexperienced
Dooley said Tiger tackle
William "Refrigerator" Perry, a
6-3, 315-pounder, "totally in-
timidated the Virginia football
team. But it's not just
'Refrigerator' by himself. It's the
'iceboxes' next to him
Dooley referred to Perry's
younger brother, Michael, a 6-2,
275-pound freshman, and junior
Steve Berlin, 6-5, 265, who join
with the elder Perry to form a
defensive front that Georgia Tech
Coach Bill Curry, a former all-pro
center, has said is "as big, ag-
gressive ?nd awesome" as any he
played against in the pros.
"That to me is the greatest
testimony to any defensive line
I've ever heard because he (Curry)
played against the best said
Dooley.
Dooley said the Tigers are
"much better totally" than the
Texas Cotton Bowl team. "The
Texas offense was very limited
explained Dooley.
Concerning his own team,
Dooley said junior quarterback
Todd Williams has recovered
from an elbow bruise suffered in a
scrimmage last Friday and is
throwing the ball well. Veteran
EC Booters
Fall To 0-4
Continued From Page 14
win column after a rocky 0-4
start.
"We're coming into about 10
or 12 games that we can-win if we
play well. Thay're 50-50 games,
all of them Brody added.
The team received some good
news as fullback Larry Bennett's
injury was not as serious as first
believed. He may be back in ac-
tion as early as next week.
The team travels to Virginia
Commonwealth Saturday before
visiting Old Dominion University
on Wednesday, Sept. 25.
center Keith Johnson, a
280-pound junior who has been
sidelined with back problems, was
given the go-ahead for contact
Tuesday, but Dooley said he ex-
pected Johnson to see only limited
action against the Tigers.
Williams said he was impressed
with how the Tigers swarm
around the ball.
"They pursue the ball so well
he said. "It looks like they get 11
people around the ball on every
tackle
Senior linebacker Knox Culpep-
per agreed its the finest Clemson
team he has seen.
"They've always had a great
defense but this year they have
such an experienced offense
said Culpepper. "I think it's more
of a balanced team than '81
meeting between Division IA in-
dependent East Carolina and
Division IAA independent
Georgia Southern is the first in the
two school's history. The Eagles
of Head Coach Erk Russell are
3-0 in 1984, having outscored op-
ponents 97-27 in those three con-
tests. This season marks only the
third for Georgia Southern since
reviving football in 1982. Until
that 1982 season the Eagles had
not fielded a collegiate football
team in 41 years.
On A Roil: Georgia Southern
owns a four-game winning streak
as they invade Ficklen Stadium
Saturday afternoon. The Eagles
captured the last game of the 1983
season, a 15-0 shutout of Savan-
nah State, and have rolled to three
straight victories in 1984 � 14-0
over Florida A&M, 41-6 over
Presbyterian and 32-21 over Cen-
tral Florida.
The Record Book: Junior
placekicker Jeff Heath's 40-yard
fild goal in ECU's loss to Central
Michigan gave him the career field
goal record. Heath now has 27
field goals in his two-plus years
with the Pirates, surpassing the
previous marker of 26 held by Bill
Lamm (1977-78).
Heath, with his four points
against CMU, moved into ninth
place on ECU's all-time scoring
list. The Virginia Beach, Va
native now has 139 points, mov-
ing him past Bill Oine's 136
(1962-64). Heath needs just six
points to move past Leander
Green (144) into eighth place and
eight to leap frog Eddie Hicks
(146) and take over the No. 7
spot.
Erk: Georgia Southern Head
Coach Erk Russell has instilled
the same enthusiasm in his Eagles
as he did as defensive coordinator
of the Georgia Bulldogs. Russell,
who spearheaded the Bulldog
defense from 1964 to 1980, has
guided Georgia Southern to two
winning seasons � 7-3-1 in 1982
and 6-5 in 1983.
Russell is attempting the bring
Georgia Southern back to football
respectability after the school
dropped football following the
1941 season. This year the Eagles
are playing as a Division IAA in-
dependent.
In his two seasons as head
coach the Eagles have averaged 27
points a game while his 1983
squad averaged better than 225
yards on the ground each outing.
Ali Hospitalized With Parkinson9s
Former boxing great Muham-
mad Ali has returned to the
United States from West Ger-
many and checked into a hospital,
reportedly suffering from Parkin-
son's disease.
Ali was admitted to Columbia
Presbyterian Hospital's
Neurological Institute Tuesday
night for tests and evaluation.
Dr. Martin Ecker, who accom-
panied Ali in a recent trip to
Europe, said the once three-time
heavyweight champion is suffer-
ing from Parkinson's disease, a
chronic and progressive disorder
of the nervous system. The disease
is marked by a tremor and a
weakness of the muscles.
Neurologist Stanley Fahn, Ali's
attending physician, has declined
comment.
Gerard Dahill, an assistant unit
manager of Columbia
Presbyterian, said Ali checked in
Tuesday night for the second time
this month for an undetermined
length. He was discharged from
the Institute Sept. 11 after five
days of test.
Asked if Ali, 42, was in fact be-
ing checked for Parkinson's
disease, hospital administrator
Howard Smallwitz said: "We've
heard the rumors, of course. But
we can't speculate at this point
But Ecker said Tuesday in a
radio interview in Luxembourg
that Ali sufferes from Parkinson's
disease. He said the first set of
tests Ali underwent at Columbia
Presbyterian revealed such symp-
toms. He added that the disease
reasonably could have been caus-
ed by beatings to the head during
Ali's boxing career.
Ali's speech has become pro-
gressively slurred in recent years
and his movements more
lethargic. He previously has been
treated for a thyroid condition
and the medication may account
for the deterioration of his
speech.
"I always feel very tired but I
don't feel no pain Ali was
quoted in West Germany. "I
don't know what it is. I will have
to take this patiently, which is not
very much my habit
The New York Daily News
reported today that Dr. Edwin
Campbell, medical director of the
New York State Athletic commis-
sion, said one reason Ali initially
checked into the hospital was to
have his medication adjusted.
Last week
Overall
GEORGIA SOUTHERN
UNC at BOSTON COLlI
CLEMSON at GEORGL
DUKE at SOUTH CAR(
MARYLAND at WEST
VIRGINIA at NAVY
WAKE FOREST at N.C.
CITADEL at GA. TECHl
FLORIDA STATE at MI
IOWA at OHIO STATE
ARIZONA at LSU
PITTSBURGH at TEMPI
RUTGERS at SYRACUS
USC at ARIZONA STA
Sad Sam
Sad Sam, whoever he i
cares), has taken the early
the race for the "Expert'j
Close behind is the world
Tina Maroschak, win
unbeloved Randy Mews rui
close third.
But the real story is the r
last with Greg (Dead
-
Lavette,
ACC Off!
Georgia Tech tailback
Lavette, who scored his M
only touchdown in its 16-
over Alabama, and Wake
center Michael Nesselt were I
ed the Atlantic Coast Confe
offensive back and offe
lineman of the week today
On Monday, Georgia
linebacker Ted Roof and
Forest defensive end
Baldinger were named the .
defensive � back and defe
lineman of the week.
Lavette, the pre-season pic
ACC offensive player of the
also rushed 26 times for 128
and caught three passes fcj
yards.
The 6-foot, 195-pound
I of Cartersville, Ga now h
ped the 3,000-yard rushing
for his career and needs oi
? score a touchdown this
tagainst The Citadel to H
Georgia Tech's all-time
scoring leader. Lavette noi
198 points.
Roof, a 6-foot-1. 234
I junior, recorded 12 tack
eluding six solos in the Ah
upset. The Lawrencevilh
native also made three stops
loss of six yards and recovi
fumble deep in Tech ternu
kill an Alabama drive.
� Baldinger was all over thj
in the Deacons win. the 6-fl
245-pound junior made
: unassisted and five asl
tackles, including two qi
back sacks. The nativi
Massepequa Park, N.Y al
a fumble recovery, broke
pass and ended two deep
laineer drives late in the
quarter.
Nesselt, a 6-foot-4, 261-
senior, had two big hits anj
knockdown blocks in
Deacons' 17-13 win over)
palachian State. The Plant!
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1

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 20, 1984
17
treak
io spearheaded the Bulldog
rom NM to 1980. ha
a Southern to tvso
easons 7-3-1 in 1982
83
n attempting ihe bring
back to football
the school
following the
ear I lie agles
sion 1AA in
.
-vMis as heaJ
e averaged 2"
e his 1983
than 225
each outing
kinson 's
na account
on of his
ed but I
li was
ermanj "1
1 will have
which is not
News
Di Edwin
ector of the
v commis-
. initial!)
was to
' TSBBLm
H
Milwaukee Wl
The Experts Try To Pick 'Em
I ast week
Overall
GEORGIA SOUTHERN at ECU
UNC at BOSTON COLLEGE
CI EMSON at GEORGIA
DUKE at SOUTH CAROI INA
MARYLAND at WEST VIRGINIA
VIRGINIA at NAVY
V kl FOREST at N.C. STATE
CITADEL at GA. TECH
Fl OR1DA STATE at MIAMI
IOWA at OHIO STATE
RIZONA at LSU
PITTSBURGH at TEMPLE
RUTGERS at SYRACUSE
I SC at ARIZONA STATE
JENNIFER
RANDY MEWSJENDRASIAK
7-7 .5007-7 .500
12-12 .50011-13 .458
ECUECU
Boston CollegeBoston College
ClemsonClemson
South CarolinaSouth Carolina
MarylandWest Va.
NavyNavy
N.C.StateWake Forest
Ga. TechGa. Tech
Florida StateMiami
Ohio StateIowa
LSULSU
PittPitt
SyracuseRutgers
Arizona Stateuse
SCOTT POWERS
6-8 .429
11-13 .458
ECU
Boston College
Clemson
South Carolina
West Va.
Navy
N.C. State
Ga. Tech
Florida State
Ohio State
LSU
Pitt
Syracuse
use
GREG RIDEOUT
6-8 .429
11-13 .458
ECU
Boston College
Clemson
South Carolina
West Va.
Navy
N.C. State
Citadel
Miami
Iowa
LSU
Pitt
Rutgers
use
TINA MAROSCHAK
8-6 .542
13-11 .571
ECU
Boston College
Clemson
South Carolina
West Va.
Virginia
Wake Forest
Ga. Tech
Florida State
Ohio State
LSU
Pitt
Syracuse
Arizona State
SAD SAM
9-5 .642
14-10 .583
ECU
Boston College
Clemson
South Carolina
West Va.
Navy
Wake Forest
Ga. Tech
Miami
Ohio State
LSU
Pitt
Syracuse
use
Sad Sam Takes Early Lead
Sad Sam, whoever he is (who
.arcs), has taken the early lead in
the race for the "Expert" title.
Close behind is the world famous
I ma Maroschak, with our
unbeloved Randy Mews running a
Jose third.
Bui the real story is the race for
last with Greg (Dead Red)
Rideout, Scott Powers and the
ever inaccurate Jennifer Jen-
drasiak all in the hunt.
Rideout swears that he's a
shoo-in, but Powers and Jen-
drasiak vow not to let him take
last without a battle. Check the
standings next week to see if
Rideout can keep his promise.
Lavette, Nesselt Win
ACC Offensive Honors
Canon
PROGRAM
Nobody else makes
Fine photography
this simple.
Georgia Tech tailback Robert
I avette, who scored his team's
only touchdown in its 16-6 win
over Alabama, and Wake Forest
center Michael Nesselt were nam-
ed the Atlantic Coast Conference
offensive back and offensive
lineman of the week today.
On Monday, Georgia Tech
linebacker Ted Roof and Wake
Forest defensive end Gary
Baldinger were named the ACC's
defensive back and defensive
lineman of the week.
Lavette, the pre-season pick for
ACC offensive player of the year,
also rushed 26 times for 128 yards
and caught three passes for 38
yards.
The 6-foot, 195-pound native
of Cartersville, Ga now has top-
ped the 3,000-yard rushing mark
for his career and needs only to
sc "re a touchdown this week
against The Citadel to become
Georgia Ken's all-time career
scoring leader. Lavette now has
N points.
Roof, a 6-foot-1, 234 pound
junior, recorded 12 tackles, in-
cluding six solos in the Alabama
.pset. The Lawrenceville, Ga
native also made three stops for a
ss ot six ards and recovered a
fumble deep in Tech territory to
kill an Alabama drive.
Baldinger was all over the field
in the Deacons win. the 6-foot-2,
245-pound junior made eight
unassisted and five assisted
tackles, including two quarter-
back sacks. The native of
Massepequa Park, N.Y also had
a fumble recovery, broke up a
pass and ended two deep Moun-
:aineer drives late in the final
quarter.
Nesselt, a 6-foot-4, 261-pound
senior, had two big hits and five
knockdown blocks in the
Deacons' 17-13 win over Ap-
palachian State. The Plantation,
Fla native led the Deacon line as
Wake Forest ground out 247
yards rushing and 87 passing.
The players were selected by a
special committee of the Atlantic
Coast Sportswriters Association.
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 20, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 20, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.361
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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