The East Carolinian, September 13, 1984






�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.7
Thursday September 13, 1984
14 Pages
Greenville, N.C.
Circulation 12,000
Hurricane Diana
Hits N.C. Coast
Beach policeman
told UPI shortlv
When
winds
Hurricane Diana battered Wrightsville Beach with 40 to 60 mph
late Tuesday night, this house lost all of a wrap-around porch, a
door and part of a roof. As winds of over 100 mph hit the coast earlv
mursday morning, more damage of this type was expected.
Wrightsville Beach Prepares For Storm
By GREG HIDEOUT
MftugWf f-dltor
Wrightsville Beach, N.C. � No
one was getting into Wrightsville
Beach late Tuesday evening as
area officials made final prepara-
tions for Hurricane Diana's 115
mph winds scheduled to hit early
Wednesday morning.
Civil Defense Director and Fire
Chief Everett Ward, 41, said the
evacuation of residents Tuesday-
had gone smoothly. The barrier
islands comprising the town were
blocked off by closing the one
bridge on U.S. 74 that leads into
the town. At 1 p.m. Tuesday
voluntary evacuation had begun
and by 4 p.m. the authorities were
making it mandatory, although
there were no legal grounds for
forcing people to leave.
Rains continually pounded the
beach resort community as waves
brought the tides six to 10 feet
above normal. Winds Wednesday
evening were gusting up to 45 mph
as the outer edge of Diana hung
about five miles off the coast.
Winds Tuesday night of 70 �
90 mph caused minor damage.
One roof on an old beach cottage
was totally swept away and
shingles of many of the houses
could be seen along the ground.
But no major structural damage
associated with the expected 115
mph winds was experienced.
Small sea craft and piers were also
damaged Tuesday.
Mayor Gene Floyd said he was
pleased with the way the com-
munity's hurricane preparedness
plan had succeeded so far. The
plan was being revised when the
edge of Diana hit.
Fifteen policemen and 23
firemen were staying on the island
Wednesday night to combat any
emergencies. According to Ward,
they will be checking alarms thaf
go off and responding to ques-
tions by residents who had moved
inland to evacuation shelters.
Everett said he and his men would
stay on the island until conditions
became unsafe.
Power was turned off by the
authorities Tuesday afternoon to
avoid hanging live wires after the
storm hit. Some wires had been
knocked loose by Tuesday's
winds.
Gov. James B. Hunt has
declared a state of emergency in
all coastal counties, enabling
authorities to arrest people who
do not obey emergency situation
officials. One such incident was
reported at Wrightsville Beach.
Erosion due to winds Tuesday
and Wednesday caused approx-
iamately $10,600 in property loss.
More than 76,000 cubic yards of
sand was lost during the period, a
loss of more than $100,000, accor-
ding to Everett.
Residents who would not leave
the area were asked by officials to
give the name of their next of kin
in case of emergency or death. Ac-
cording to Ward, this usually con-
vinced die-hards to leave.
With the island blocked, those
who couldn't get in were resorting
to using boats to try to get across
to their homes.
Wrightsville Beach, according
to Ward, had about 10,000 people
staying on the island at the time of
evacuation. He said the popula-
tion flucuates between 3,000 and
30,000.
The community has grown
about 33 percent in the last 10
years, thereby making most of the
stuctures on the island new. Ac-
cording to Mayor Floyd, the new
buildings are supposedly built to
withstand 140 mph winds.
WILMINGTON, N.C. (UPI)
� Hurricane Diana, "roaring like
100,000 lions turned its fury a
second time Wednesday night on
the North Carolina coast where
thousands of people returned
home despite warnings of a poten-
tial disaster.
National Hurricane Center
forecasters said the 30-mile area
from Cape Fear northward to
Wrightsville Beach would catch
the brunt of Diana, whose top
winds by nightfall had weakened
just slightly to 110 mph.
"Hurricane conditions are oc-
curring at the coast in the Cape
Fear-Wrightsville Beach area
forecaster Miles Lawrence said at
midnight, EDT.
"If the current trend continues,
hurricane conditions will spread
westward along the coast to the
west of Cape Fear Lawrence
said.
Wrightsville
Bruce Lassiter
after midnight:
"The wind is like 100,000 lions
roaring. It's keeping on and on
and it increases in intensity. If it's
not nailed down, it's going to
blow away.
And at Carolina Beach, Deputy
Sheriff Joseph McCarthy-
reported: "It's blowing cars right
off the roads and the trees are
bent over double. Have you ever
seen rain horizontally? That's
what it is doing right now
Carolina Beach policeman D.L.
Hannah said Diana was smashing
piers and added: "You couldn't
stand up if you were out there
About 400 Holden Beach
residents who ignored warnings
that "we have a disaster in the
making" and returned home
Wednesday tried desperately to
flee back inland when hurricane-
force winds began lashing the area
late Wednesday night.
"We just hope they make it
Holden Beach Mayor Kenner
Anous yelled over the roar of the
storm. "It's pitch black out there
and raining torrents, and it's just
starting
The powerful eye of the
season's first hurricane was
centered at midnight about 30
miles southeast of Wilmington
and 25 miles east of Cape Fear
near latitude 33.8 north and
longitude 77.6 west.
North Carolina officials issued
urgent pleas for a new evacuation
of the southern coast, where
restless refugees returned home
Wednesday when the stoim back-
ed offshore afier buffeting the
area Tuesday night with 100 mph
and 10-foot tides.
"Hurricane Diana is still a
dangerous storm. The inconve-
nience of a shelter is a small price
to pay for the security the
offer pleaded State Emergency
Management Director Tom Pugh.
Nine Coast Guardsmen who
rode out Diana Tuesday night at
the Oak Island station just off
Cape Fear evacuated Wednesday-
night when the hurricane turned
toward shore again.
"Sometimes it pays to be smart.
Discretion is the better part of
valor ald Coast Guard It.
Richard Atlee.
About !0T) people who returned
to Oak Island sought shelter late
Wednesday night at the First Bap-
tist Church.
"We're not really scared said
Bobbi Wiggins. "We're trusting
to the Lord to bring us through to
bring us through all this. Right at
this minute, the winds are picking
up and it's raining real hard
About 40 people who were cut
off from the mainland on
Carolina Beach took refuge in the
tiny brick St. Paul's United
Methodist Church.
"We're praying, but we're all
right the Rev. Gerald Masses
reported. "We might get to sing-
ing hymns a little bit later on.
We've got plenty of soup and
plenty of coffee and we're trusting
in the Lord
At Long Beach, just south of
Wilmington, about 3,000 people
abandoned storm shelters
Wednesday and returned to their
homes. The city urged them to
evacuate, but Mayor Ben Thomas
said many refused.
"We'll end up with about 1,000
to 1,500 people at Long Beach.
Some of them just won't go. If
they don't evacuate, we can't be
responsible for their well-being
Thomas said.
Hurricane forecaster Mark
Zimmer said the area from Cape
Fear north to Wrightsville Beach
was expected to get the brunt of
the storm.
That same area was battered by
100 mph winds and 10-foot waves
Tuesday night before the storm
backed away from the coast
Wednesday and stalled for several
hours. North Carolina Emergency
Management officials said Diana
had already caused an estimated
$710,000 damage in Wilmington.
Atlantic Beach Ghost Town Following Hurricane Warning
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Editor
Atlantic Beach, N.C. � At 8
p.m. Tuesday, Atlantic Beach was
prepared to receive the full force
of Hurricane Diana later that
night.
Diana, packing winds of close
to 135 mph, was lurking just off
shore from Wilmington and land-
fall in Carteret County, where
Atlantic Beach is located, seemed
a distinct possibility.
Although access to the beach
was not restricted until after 9
p.m Atlantic Beach was a virtual
ghost town.
Almost every business and most
residences had their windows
taped; some were boarded up.
Traffic in the area was limited to
the occasional police cruiser.
At the headquarters of the
Atlantic Beach Police Depart-
ment, C. Wade Pelletier, chief of
police, explained that a total
evacuation had been carried out
earlier that day.
Pelletier said that although the
evacuation was voluntary at first
it was later declared mandatory.
He said approximately 99 per-
cent evacuation was achieved and
it went very smoothly. He at-
tributed the easy evacuation to the
fact that there have been few re-
cent hurricane scares and also to
the publicity hurricane safety has
received recently.
"I don't think there are more
than a half dozen or a dozen peo-
ple left on the beach and they'd
stay anyway Pelletier said.
Those who refused to evacuate
were asked to fill out a form
listing their name and their next of
kin.
Among those who stayed at
Atlantic Beach were Jack and
Mary Neller, owners and
operators of the Fisherman's Inn.
The couple had several charter
fishing vessels tied up behind the
inn and said they planned to re-
main on the beach to keep an eye
on them.
"We'll hang right in there
Jack Neller said. "We've never
been in a hurricane before
"We've been tying up boats all
day said Joe Doyle, whose
fishing vessel, The Sea Lady, is
docked at Fisherman's Inn.
"With high tides, we can only
adjust the lines so much, so we're
waiting for the tide to come in so
we can adjust the lines again
Doyle said.
"If it comes this way, we'll
leave Neller said, "but we'll
stay here until the last minute
Neller added that the inn had
survived Hurricane Hazel in 1954
and he thought it would survive
Diana.
There were no guests at the
Fisherman's Inn, but the Nellers
said they would rent a room "at
the customer's own risk
City officials seemed
reasonably certain that the hur-
ricane would strike. "She's going
to be here said Atlantic Beach
Mayor Tom Plough. "You don't
fool with Mothfr Nature he
said, while contemplating the
waves breaking on the beach's
seawall.
Plough said the one problem
the city officials had had was with
surfers. "People have been surf-
ing all week. We had to stop them
from surfing today he said.
The skeleton crew of policemen
remaining at the station planned
to begin evacuating when winds
reached 45 mph. "The islands are
a barrier and act as a buffer
zone Pelletier said. "With
winds of 130 mph, we could have
at least a 12 foot sea surge. We
won't stay � we're not heroes
Hurricane Hazel, which struck
the North Carolina coast in 1954,
was uppermost in the minds of
many people.
"This one is a duplicate of
Hazel, even to track it Pelletier
said. He added that Diana was
"wobbling" in the same manner
as Hazel, with frequent slight
changes in course.
Diana remained stalled off
Wilmington for the rest of Tues-
day night and Wednesday, with
only slight changes in direction.
Recorded winds at the center of
the storm dropped to approx-
imately 115 mph. The Hurricane
Forecast Center in Miami was
unable to predict when and where
landfall might be, but Atlantic
Beach was still a possibility and
therefore remained evacuated and
on alert.
Residents were allowed in to
check on property Wednesday
morning but were urged to stay on
the mainland.
Covering The Story
By GREG RIDEOUT
M�actBf Editor
Atlantic Beach, N.C. � Cover-
ing a hurricane, especially Diana,
tests patience more than reporting
skills. And while waiting you meet
all kinds of people during that
eerie calm before the storm.
First of all, the places are
devoid of people; everyone's been
evacuated, giving the place the
haunting ambience of a ghost
town. The deserted streets shine
their streetlights down onto the
wet pavement, letting you know
that no matter what, nature is
king. People have to play by its
rules.
So with most of the people gone
to evacuation shelters, the only
ones left are policemen, firemen,
reporters and the skeptic residents
who believe nothing can happen
to them. Those who are left are
like the town during these dark
hours � a little edgy and
somewhat crazy.
The residents who stay are a
See PEOPLE, Page 3
During the lull after Hurricane Diana temporarily moved out to sea, one of the duties of the Coast Guard
was to secure drifting boats. This boat was secured at Wrightsville Beach just hours before the full force of
the storm struck the coast.

i
N





'HI EASTCAROI INIAN
si PTEMBER II, 1984
Announcements
INTERVIEW WORKSHOP
' Cai eer Planning ano Placement Service in
H ' uteri H v is ottering these one hour ses
to )! vou n jeieinpmg better interviewing
� . or obsearch a tiim and discus
. v evi 'trough this service will
' s i ���!�.� s � a be held in the Career
' ' '� It 3 p m Come on any of the
lates Sept 13 16 or Sept IB at 7
TE1 EPHONE WORKERS
a wkers needed Apply in
, v - � . � vail
SSfcRTlVENESS WORKSHOP
� � ��� . a - - Hered to students at NO
� - � Sity Counseling Center Thurs
V arm October All three
fed trom 3 4 p m in 306
� rhe workshop will tocus
ers Jist ngi sh between their
iggress . �� and onasser-t.ve
� ' - its �n earn how to express
� � � � ana respond to in
- � itions l .i manner which neither
I neliefs nor offends
vlC. NSELING CENTER
s -��' 6661
CSCI MATH MAJORS
eat o oi ;v �va arip 'or Spring and Sum
bs have rorr;cafion deadlines of
� t -�: er 2S 198 Must h ive -J.PA of 2 5 or be'
n at ieas' 1 programming
1'� � ai-aduate jobs Come
" . � �- � ippi "��- ent ��. see a
. -PING WITH STRESS
Ml if R PRESSURE?? COP N �
� r.s offered by the
�� � �- sti ients hree Pro
ten erN U IS al I ��
ex. Pn gt am O. 'ober
� rr1e� Program III
t 4 � � �- A � j Annex
if r s reqi red Can or stop
fo fgi r nto'mation
-v'
E U ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
� "o So ff w hoict its first
Bei 17 Al nteres'ea persons are
� Brrend The guesl speaxer will oe v-
p a, emeni Office 1 "e
a be held r v.encenhai' S'udent
"�' � Purpose Room �1 3C p m
HAPPY HOUR
ind Alpha Kappa Aipna would
e a MSpo. Hour Thursday
� -ents draft Si Dfl aam.s
� 8 30 unt,l 2 00
on out and eTs get live
RESUME WORKSHOPS
freer Piammg and Placement Service in
Her -g one hour sessions to
, Ou prepare your own resune Few
- � es -)e" '�: s witt ' some preparation
- ' PQUeSt a "PSue Showing your
essions to help will be
-���� - Room a' 3 p m Come
' � ' es September 12 18,27
. � . at 7 -
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
" � stei R usti a be heia on Sept 17 s, is
farting at JO z m Come out ana meet great
jirls The L ttle S sters look for
'�� j - � �- pres'ea r becoming
�� �� S s'ers themselves1 It's
1 Ca 752 4159 for any mfor
NIH
� ie from the National �nstitufe of
� MD a ne on campus October
���� ,ew'Students who would like to be
search assistants in their Normal
i-r gram Degihning Spring, 1985
Par;cipate n experiments and
- � ' - sease control and the
� .�- re e -e il2 50 per day stipend
3 so transportation paia
m NIH tudents jn jne health, natural
� �� e ana business fields
be iteresfed snouia contact the Coop
� � I Raw "mediately to signupf or an m
BLOOD DRIVE
g s, r � qii cer Training Corps.
the �ec Cross will be sponsoring a
on v-L'Trtjer is 8, 'v in the
itudent Center Room 244 Ae urge
to piease come donate a pint of life
PHYE MAJORS
fs who pn to declare physical educa
rion it major should report to Mmges Coliseum
A. inesday September 19 for a motor
a fitness test Satisfactory pertor
' ��" W i test is required as a prerequisite for
etc the physical education ma
for program Mo'e detailed information is
x, al table by calling 757 6441 or 6442
CORSO& NASWMEETING
Al Social Worx and Corrections Maiors and in
tended Majors are urged to attend Monday, Sept
t7. 19H4 a' 4 00 p m Room 105 Allied Health Get
involved in fund raisers, community service, and
parties feme and meet people m the department
RUGBY
Interested in playing this intense sport? Prac
tie beq.ns Tues . Sept ll at 4 00, behind the
Allied Health Building Everyone invited, no ex
yerienre needed Practices are Tues , Wed , and
Thursdays at 4 00 Must be willing to travel and
meet people East Carolina Rugby is ECU'S oldest
club, established W75 Rugby is elegant violence!
DZ BIG BROTHERS
Yes' We are still here and have 32 wonderful
pledge- for iM t0 meet All active Big Brothers
will have yery important meeting Wednesday,
Sept 19 atoo at the house Piease be prompt and
call if you rant attend
SURF CLUB-TEAM
Due to sraM turnout at the first meeting, no of
ficers wfre elected it was decided to hold the
team tr.ais this Sunday at the Rodanthe Pier in
Hatterasa'9 00 a m Spectators are welcome All
persons interested should contact Johnny Ghee at
758 6667 O' Dave Colby at 758 2392 before this Frl
day smce there will be no meeting this week A
meeting s scheduled to be held next week and
plans for the fall break trip to Florida will be
made tnem
PHI BETA SIGMA
Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity will have an interest
meeting Monday Sept 17 at 7 00 p m for all
ladies interested m becoming Sigma Doves The
meeting will be held in the Multi Purpose Room at
Mendenhall Student Center COME AND BE A
PART OF THE BLUE AND WHITE FAMILY
GBA
The Graduate Business Association will meet
Thursday Sept 13. 9 30 p m in Rawl 101
Members and interested nonmembers please ioin
us!
ICE HOCKEY
It you are interested in playing Ice Hockey or
lost like to ice skate, there will be a meeting on
Wednesday Sept 19 at 3 00 In Room 105 B of
Memorial Gym Those from last year as well as
new people are encouraged 'o attend For further
into contact George Sunderiand at 752 8525
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
The College Republicans meet every Thursday
evening at 7 00 p m Tonight, our guest speaker
will be Herb Lee. who is our party's candidate for
the U S House of Representatives Some "Fritz
busters" shirts will be available for thsoe who
have paid their dues Be sure to ioin us in the Cot
feehouse at Mendenhall
PRIME TIME
Sponsored by Campus Crusade for Christ, every
Thurs 7pm in the Jenkins Aud Art Bldg
We're committed to having fun, fellowship and
study of God s Word See you there1
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi E'a b.gma will be hav ng a regular meeting
on Wednesday. Sep1 19 at 5 15 pm :t will be held
in Mendenhall Student Center in room 212 All
members are urged to attend
TENNIS DOUBLES
The Department of intramural Recreational
Services is offering a Tennis doubles tournament
Oeq sfration for the event ,s set for Sept 24 25
Play begins on Oct 1 To sign up tor the competi
tion come by Room 204 Memorial Gym or call
(757 6387 Rembember Participate rather than
specta'e
NURSING STUDENTS
In orce' to rece.ve your Nursing Pin by
December u 1984 oraers must be placed in the
Student Supply Store Wright Building, no later
than September 21 1984 Orders should oe placed
at the Jewelry Counter Orders must be paid m
rer the oder is placed
PIRATE WALK
persons interested in serving as escorts or
operators for PIRATE WALK. ECU'S student
escort service are asked to attend an organiza
tionai meeting Tues Sept 18 at 7 00 m the
Multipurpose Room, Mendenhall If you cannot
attend, call the Pirate walk Office at 7S7 6616 few-
more information
KARATE CLUB
Registration for beginning Karate will be in the
dance room of Memorial Gym on Sept 27 at 7 30
C'asses tor advanced yenow belt and up will begin
Sept 28 at 7 30 m the same room KICK your
heart out with the Karate Club' I I !
PRE MED
Attention Officers there will be a meeting in
Flanagan in the Conference Room Sept 18 at 7 00
At 7 30 the first pledge meeting will be held In 307
Flanagan Mandatory for those pledging AED
BASKETBALL
The Department of Intramural Recreational
Services is offering 3 on 3 basketball competition
Registration begins Sept 17 18 Play begins on
Sept 24 Anyone interested in participating
should come by room 204 Memorial Gym or call
757 6387
AMA
Start this year out right by joining the
American Marketing Association! Anyone from
any major is welcomed Please come to Brewster
BB Room 102 on September 18 at 4 00 p m for our
first meeting Topic "How to Compete in Today's
iob Market" featuring Dr Edward Wheatley See
you there!
SEMINAR
All invited a to seminar in Home Economics on
Thursday, Sept 20, 4 p.m in room 235 Dr.
Margie Gallagher, from the Department of Food,
Nutrition and Institution Management and In
stitute of Coastal and Marine Research, will
speak on Recent Advances in Aquaculture in
Israel For more information call Dr Kathryn
Kolasa, School of Home Economice, 757 6917
ALMOST ANYTHING GOES
The BIG EVENT is here Intramural
ALMOST ANYTHING GOES This is it To
sign up for all the fun and excitement, come on by
Room 204 Memorial Gym This is the event you've
been waiting for Bring the roomee. the
girlfriend, the wife, the Little Sister, the
boyfriend, the boss, the DOG We don't care.
Just get out and have FUN, FUN, FUN Through
INTRAMURALSi !
TENNIS SINGLES
The Department of Intramural Recreational
Services is offering a Tennis singles tournament
tor anyone interested in participating Registra
tion for the tournament begins Sept 17 and ends
at 5 00. Sept 18 Come by Room 204 Memorial
Gym for more information regarding the fourna
ment and for registration
FORMAL RUSH
The Zeta Phi Beta Sorority, inc would like to in
vite all interested young ladies to its Formal
Rush The rush is scheduled for Thursday
September 13th. 7 00 p m � Mendenhall
Multipurpose Room Refreshments will oe serv
ed Please come and ioin us
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
Ton.ght. Thursday, Sept 13, at 7 00 p m We
will Dc having a sign language club meeting We
will be planning activities for this semester No
previous knowledge of sign language is needed
There will be a caption movie after the meeting.
(Kramer vs Kramer) Hope to see you there
ECU ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The ECU Accounting Society will hold its first
meeting Sept 17 All interested persons are in
vited to attend The guest speaker will be Mr
Furney James of the ECU Placement Office The
meeting will be held in Mendenhall Student
Center Mult: Purpose Room at 4 30 p m
o
INTERNATIONAL HOUSE
BOOKSTORE and ARIELE'S
INVITES ALL INTERNATIONAL FACULTY,
STUDENT AFRO-AMERICANS & FRIENDS
TO ATTEND AN:
INTERNATIONAL RECEPTION
SAT. SEPT. 15,1984
2:00pm-4:00pm
618 Pitt St. 752-8938
(Next to John's Hardware)
" ' �' " !����� ao
PHYSICALTHERAPY
Deadline for 1985 admission to professional
phase Is November 1, 1984 All general college and
physical therapy prerequisites must be com
pleted by end of Spring, 1985 Allied Health Pro
fessions Admissions Test must be taken in
November (apply early October) Application
packets are to be picked up October 5, 1984 in the
Physical Therapy Department Office (Belk
Building, Annex 3, 757 6961, Ext 261)
SCUBA
Thanksgiving vacation DIVE COZUMEL,
MEXICO 8 days, 7 nights on the beautiful
Yucatan Penninsula Drift diving on the Palancer
reef will be one of the most exiting experiences
From Raleigh, price including air fare, meals,
lodging and diving 1820 00 special price for non
divers $720 00 Air travel provided by Mexicana
and Eastern For registrations and further infor
mation, call Ray Scarf. Dir of Acquatics 757 6441
SCUBA
Christmas vacation Dive Penny Camp Na
tionai Underwater Park in fabulous Key Largo
The Florida Keys are the only natural coral reef
In the Continental US This five day trip. Dec
16 21st includes lodging and two dive boat trips
dally Tanks, backpack, and weight belts are pro
vided Cost is $200 00 per person, two to a room oc
cupancy and $175 00 per person, four to a room oc
cupancy For further information, call Ray
Scharf, Dir of Acquatics, 757 6441
SNOW SKI
Any persons interested in snowskiing Dec 30
through Jan 4 at Snowshoe, W V should call Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 to get your name on the list
for the trip Beginners to hotdoggers are
welcome Ski instruction Is available for all levels
of ability Price depends on ski package Space
for housing on slopes and transportation is
limited You are invited to come by Memorial
Gym Room 108 on Oct 30 at 4 00 p m to register,
see the slides, and talk skiing! A $5 00 deposit at
this time will reserve your space
SOULS
The SOULS organization will be meeting
Thurs , Sept 20, 1984 in Multi Purpose Room at
4 00 p m MSC Be a part of an organization that
can make a difference on your campus "It's time
for a change "
SPEECH AND HEARING
SCREENING
The Department of Speech Language and
Auditory Pathology (SLAP! will be providing the
speech and hearing screening for all students
eligible for admission to the upper division of
teacher education on Monday. Sept 17, Tuesday.
Sept 18, and Wednesday, Sept 19 The depart
ment will be testing from 5 00 7 30 p m on the
above days NO APPOINTMENT IS REQUIRED
The SLAP Department is located In Belk Annex
on Charles Street There will NOT be a make up
session Fall Semester
SOCCER
Any ECU women interested in playing Club Soc
:er, please come to the first meeting on Sept 18,
984, at 4 00 m Memorial Gym, Room 102 We
teed to know you are interested!
DELTASIGMA PHI
Anyone interested m becoming a little S'Ster? If
you want to learn more about being a little sister
for Delta Sigma Phi you are invited to a Little
Sister Orientation meeting Th.s meeting will be
Sunday night at 8 00 p m at the Delta Sigma Phi
House See you there
MARSHALLS
There will be a meeting of all 1984 85 Marshails
on Thursday, Sept 13. 1984 at 4 30 n Room 247
Mendenhall if you Are unable to attend contact
Sarah Coburn at 'S8 7031 by noon Thursday
Please attend'
INTRAMURALS
The first meeting of the intramural ara Re' rea
tionai Services Sport Club Council will be on Sept
19. 1984, at 4 00 in Brewster B 103 Ail offers
should attend
NURSING STUDENTS
To all Nursing students and Faculty.
E.C.A.N S Invites you to our first Annual
Chicken Plckln on Saturday, Sept 15 from
3 00 8 00 at the Mall Tic�ets are on sale In the
Nursing Building for $3 00 per person Live enter
tamment
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Hey! Leadership, friendship and service is
what it's all about Come iom a Nat.onai Co ed
Service Fratermt APO Meet-ngs are
Thursdays at 5 p m In Mendenhall' An Brothers
please attend!
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Anyone interested m lommg a National Co ea
Service Fraternity can iom an APO meeting or.
Thursdays at 5 p m m Mendenhall if you believe
in leadership, friendship and serv e Wtetf ome
check us out!
RUSH
The ladles of Eta Mu Chapter of Sigma Gamma
Rho Sorority, inc would like to invite all In
terested ladles to attend their formal Rush on
Sept 13. at 7 30 p m in Room 247 at Mendenhall
Be someone special Get involved with 'ne adies
of S G R ho
BETA KAPPA ALPHA
Beta Kappa Alpha will hold a meeting Tr,rS
day. Sept 13 in Rawi 101 at 3 00 for Finance
Banking, and other interested B js ness Ma ors A
speaker on career piann.ng nas been scheduled
ISA MEMBERS
The 194 85 election for the new officers will be
held on Saturday, Sept 15 at 6 00 p m at
Mendenhall Student Center. Room 221 Be rrere'
TKE LITTLE SISTERS
Don t forget little Sister Rush Monca nigtit arc
our meeting Tuesday a' 5 00- Congraauiat ons oo
a great Rush brothers of Tau Kappa Eps on
FRISBEE CLUB
irates play Wilmington Gail Force at 2 00.
Sunday on UNC W mtramjrai fields Team prac
tice is Wednesday n gn. at 9 00
CAMPUS SERVICE
The Fountain of Lite Christian Fe a-
be having their first mornmg se ethil
Sept 16 it win be ne'd n Jenkins Aud
beginning at 10 30 So don I worr, arou' .��
go plan to attend this Sunday morn ng ��� .
and come on out ana e�pe a bless
Lord
PAPAKATZGREEK NITE
Alpha Kappa A'pr.a along th ts
organization Alpha Pf :
Greek N te a1 Papa fa � ,rsda�
from 8 30 p m 2 00 I ' s ' ' � 1. .
beer .s 25 'ent 5,41. Come out arm
Greeks
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Beg nmng Conversat onai Gea
termediate Conversational Gem-a-
Middle Eastern Dance Sept j p
Adults. Sept 15. Guitar Sept 26 Soeec -
Sept 27 Contact Dv of Con- nuirtg Ec
Erwin Hall 757 6143
NTE CORE
'he Nationa Teache' E"�" ra- -r,
'er y will be ottered a'Eas'Caro na Jr .� '
Saturday. Oct 2? '984 Application I - �
oe completed and mailed to the Ed
Testing Serv.ce Box 9ii R p- rtcetor N
to arrive tf Sept 24 '984 Apt a- r mj,
oota-ned from tre ECU Testing Center - -
Speight Bunding
GMAT
The Graduate Manager-e' a m v,
GMAT) win be offered at Eas Ca-
slty on Saturday, Oct 20,1984 App
are to be completed and manec; �-
tionai Testing Service. Box 966 � Pt
08540 Applications must oe pos'�a -
than Sept 17. 1984 Appi canons may be
from the ECU Testing Center Boo"
B� dmg, Greenville. N C 27834
DAT
The Denta; Ap� �ude Tes' will be crHe'ec: �
on Saturday Oc3 '984 Application blanks a-
�0 oe ma. ,eo n � me to te rece ed D . the Divisc
os Educat.one VraSi'fft, Amer
Association. 211 East Cn,cage a
6001' by Sept 17 iv84 Applications mat -
�a ed from the EC Tes "�; � Spe
B . ding Room 105
GRE
e G'sca'f Beco'C E�a -a" or -
'erec a' Easf Caroi a Un s � 5a
Oc 13 '984 App ca on b a-�.s ar� "c be
pie'ec ac ma todtoEducal or a Tti ng Se
Box 966 R, Pr ncetor- N J 08S4C App
must oe postmarked no ijter �na- c,ec. 13 19
Applications may be obtained i-or 'he E
"Tes'ig Center Bx" "OS Spegn�B ding
Read the
Classifieds
IIK0 presents
n
r
A
U
I ret lu Service
BUS SERVICE
Bus Strvice u 11 be provid-
ed to Pi Kappa House and
back from College Hill.
& West Campus.
Pick-up from 11:00 to
1:00. Return 6:00 until.
PLACE: Pi Kappa Phi House
I fixiki r Ri ,ul
DATE: September 15th
TIME: l:OOto6:00
ADMISSION: S2.00 per person
Tickets Available at
PI KAPP HOUSE
or
Contact any Pi Kapp Brother
BEST LEGS CONTEST
1� PRIZE S200O0plUS
2nd PRIZE SVS.OOplu
y
3rd PRIZE S50 OO plus
�to n -v .
I
COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY College ID Required
Welcome to Miller Time
RAIN SITE -
PAPPA KATZ
1 '�� �� immt .�� I
Student
B Kl AINKPFRRV
suit Uriin
With
tivities ranging from
to fine a
' � tainrnent. the I
A ttorney
Discusses
B H !Br TH BIRO
Staff n�.
ted 1
-

r .
Superioi
People Are
Good Part
Of Hurricane
( ontinued rrom Page 1
ced bunch
from Bog . .
-
Or-

stayed
"We're onh
nger pi
ese peop
1 ieae. Others came
p Reportei
� seemed

TV and rad
tate sent
n t -v am c Beac
K ilmington area :
ory. The wire
id people in the area, trying
: .er the storm for people acT
the United State-
Bu: with Diana
me in and give
- formed getht vap
j latest on ha: wa
d when nothing was ir
capping life stones. Eve
ts just waiting, not wa
rm so much, but jus -
mi � Aould happen
Au' � a
Beach and Atlantic Bea.
tel) were bu prep- .
rst Bu: thej
eryone,
J neede. - itest
�ncare to the p
It was wet. It was c Id .
.ar Bu: the peor - ive
actual. . storm a:
such a vulnerable to
make the each
other. As one the rac
reporter said iftei delays in the
storm forced -ome aj bbing
"that Diana
Crafts, Art
Offered A t
Mendenhall
B El MM PbRRN
Located i Mend(
dent Center, the ai
center is open
students, studeni sp ises ind
staffaculty anc
The center charges a v !
semester membe-
includes free worl
v-heck-out, craft b ks
magazines, and s
center. The center a
ment and facilities I
tiMties such as phoi
stained glass, quilting;
weaving wood carving
ceramic
Thr center is open Monday
through Friday from 5-10 p I
and 1-5 p.m. Saturda anc v
da. For more information, call
757-$611 et. 260 or et 2 aftei
c p. m
PLAZA
SHELL
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-4 hour 7owmg Sen. lef-
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"
A
r i
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13. 1984
CAMPUS SERVICE
s' an Fellowship win
� ng service this Sunday
� a �� � �� fcud v Art Bldg )
ao' � v about where to
' � " �" ft ng service
. - I : ess ig trom the
PAPA KATZGREEK NITE
B �itr -s brother
sponsor a
Sept 13
' � 00. ana
support the
PERSONAI DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
' D' 13 p
"an sept 13
'5 Piano For
U eo Reading
�� f�0 Education
NTE CORE
� � - nations Core Bat
tt U tl versity on
�1 m blanks are to
Hie Eaucafiona'
- � e'on N J 08S4!
a'ions may be
. enter Room 105,
GMAT
- ' " ssion Test
KOllna Univer
� "PC aon blanks
� ed 'o GMAT. Efluca
Box �a� � o. nceton N j
�1 re cvjs'markec no later
� �s �a. re oota.ned
. i" Room 105 Speight
N : W34
DAT
� -�e'ed at ECU
�1 Mi blanks are
redby tnc Division
tftfi fcm�f can Dental
fi cago, ill
l a� be ob
enter Speight
GR E
be of
- a�uraa�
to be com
. Service.
M tS4C App cations
13 l S
an the ecu
Read the
Classifieds
ts
�n
-
Tickets Available at
PI KAPP HOUSE
or
jontact any Pi Kapp Brother
BEST LEGS CONTEST
st PRIZE S2O0 00plus I , ,rr�.
!
r.d Prize S75 00pluS. ,�M
� V-
jrd PRIZE S5000plus (-month
uired
rTime
4
I
�J
���

ms
B ELAINE PERRY Carolina Student Union is the
Sto"Wrtu' university's principal programm-
With atiw ,ng organization. The Student
maio con lr c,CtS rngmg fr�m Union plans and implements a
Sural erne � fme artS and vaTicty of Programs, events and
cultural entertainment, the East activities for the entire ECU cam-
Options
pus.
Getting more people aware of
an involved in the Student Union
is a major goal, according to
Regina Hardee, who is serving her
second term as Student Union
A ttorney General Candidate
Discusses Victim's Rights
B ELIZABETH BIRO
Suff W rlier
Democratic candidate for N.C.
attorney general Lacy Thornbury
visited ECU and met with SGA
President John Rainey and other
SGA officers Tuesday.
Thornburg has served six years
in the N.C. General Assembly and
16 years as a N.C. Superior Court
People Are
Good Part
Of Hurricane
Continued From Page 1
mixed bunch. One, like a Marine
from Bogue Field, is looking for
action. "I don't care what anyone
says. 1 think this is exciting
Other residents just refuse to
give up the fort, like the owners of
the Fisherman's Inn, who just
stayed to protect their business.
"We're only leaving when we can
no longer protect our boats
These people ignored warnings
to leave. Others came to get the
scoop. Reporters and authorities
always seemed to be together,
hoping to get the latest to bring
back to their readers, listeners and
viewers.
TV and radio stations from
across the state sent reporters
down to Atlantic Beach and the
Wilmington area in order to get
the story. The wire services also
had people in the area, trying to
cover the storm for people across
the United States.
But with Diana just refusing to
:orne in and give them some news,
thej formed together, swapping
the latest on what was happening
and when nothing was happening,
swapping life stories. Everyone
was just waiting, not wanting the
storm so much, but just wishing
something would happen.
Authorities in Wrightsville
Beach and Atlantic Beach
definitely were busy preparing for
the worst. But they helped
everyone, especially the reporters
who needed to get the latest on the
hurricane to the public.
It was wet. It was cold. It was
dreary. But the people who have
to actually sit out the storm at
such a vulnerable point try to
make the going easier for each
other. As one of the radio
reporters said after delays in the
storm forced some adlibbing,
"that Diana is no princess
Crafts, Art
Offered At
Mendenhall
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Witter
Located in the Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, the arts and crafts
center is open to full-time
students, student spouses, and
taffaculty and their dependents.
The center charges a $15 per
semester membership fee. The fee
includes free workshops, tool
check-out, craft books and
magazines, and use of the crafts
center. The center also has equip-
ment and facilities for many ac-
tivities such as photo processing,
stained glass, quilting, basketry.
weaving wood carving, and
ceramics.
Thr center is open Monday
through Friday from 5-10 p.m.
and 1-5 p.m. Saturday and Sun-
day. For more information, call
"57-6611 ext. 260 or ext. 271 after
' p.m.
) PLAZA
SHELL
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judge.
Speaking to the officers about
restitution for crime victims,
Thornburg said more emphasis
should be placed on restitution.
He suggested a victim's bill of
rights which might give the victim
input in passing a sentence. He
also said he supported a victim's
impact statement; a list of per-
sonal damages submitted by the
victim.
"The court system has to
realize the victim is there through
no cause of his own Thornburj
said. "We should let them know
the court system recognizes then
and their part
The Democratic candidate alsc
discussed undercover operations
North Carolina is an idea
distribution place for drugs
because of its coastline he said.
However, he said the attorney
general must avoid violation of
some laws in order to enforce
others.
On determining criminal
sentencing, Thornburg said
discretion should be given to the
judge instead of utilizing
catagorized sentencing. He also
said he supported community ser-
vice work because it gives judges
an alternative to jail in less severe
cases.
Thornburg said North Carolina
prisons were not overcrowded
with hard offenders. Therefore.
lower cost dorm-like facilities
could be built closer to campuses
and work relief areas alleviating
crowding and transportation
costs.
"All agencies need to work
together on common goals
Thornburg said. He said agencies
become protective and don't want
to exchange ideas, but leaders
need to get together and discuss
ideas.
Thornburg also said he would
work for consumer protection and
intervention into utility rate cases.
While in Greenville'Thornburg
also attended a tobacco sale at the
Independent Warehouse in Green-
ville.
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For less than dorm or apartment rent
you could:
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2. Enjoy peace and privacy
3. Invest in the future
STOP 3Y AND SEE HOW
11

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resident. This past year at
tresnmen orientation, brochures
and student union t-shirts were
passed out in an effort to make
People more aware of the Student
Union. The Student Union also
sponsers Barefoot On The Mall
and the Fall Fling.
( This year all programming will
be under one organization, the
Student Union. Although a deci-
sion has not yet been made, there
are several possibilities for a ma-
jor concert this year. Also, last
year, East Carolina showed
several "sneak preview" films
brought to ECU with the help of
the Student Union.
There are four new committees
this year within the Student
Union. They include the Produc-
tion committee, the Public Rela-
tions and Publicity Committee,
the Forum Committee, and the
Recreation Committee. The Pro-
duction Committee is responsible
for programs including Madrigal
dinners, Dinner Theatre, and Stu-
dent Center decorations. The
Public Relations Committee
packages publicity and coor-
dinates total promotion of the
Student Union. The Forum Com-
mittee provides lectures, sym-
posiums, or other related pro-
grams, geared toward current and
educational topics, the Recreation
Committee plans and promotes '
various recreational events.
Positions are open for chairper-
sons and committee members for
each of the listed committees. In-
terested persons can apply in
room, 234 of the Student Union
Offices or at Mendenhall Infor-
mation Desk. A student must
have a 2.0 GPA to be a committee
member or a 2.25 GPA to chair a
committee. Applications will be
accepted through Friday, Sept
21.
For more information, see the
announcement section of The
East Carolinian.


4
�� C
A greeting card makes
a birthday happier!
Creative excellence is an American traditio
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 7 days a week - 9:30 to 9:30
!YOU CAN MAKE
DIFFERENCE
Student Government
Elections are being held
Wednesday, September
26th. If you are interested
in running for class officer,
dorm representative or day
representative you may file
in the SGA office by 5:00
Friday
September 14th
�MMMMMOi

� � M
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N
i





uUje iEaat (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, owoMono,
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing tduor
Jennifer Jendrasiak. m. bc j.t. Pietrzak, ����mmmi
Randy Mews, m & Anthony Martin, ��,�, mm
Tina Maroschak, mm. a Kathy Fuerst. ������. Manager
Bil l Austin, am ��,� Linda Vizena, w,Um� r�-n,r,fln
September 13, ls84
Opinion
Page 4
Hurricane
Officials Extend Helping Hand
When disaster strikes, there is
never enough time. No matter how
much warning a place is given or
no matter how prepared it is, you
can always use an extra couple of
hours or few days. Hurricane
Diana, the stubborn storm system
that finally chose to batter the
North Carolina coast late last
evening, gave authorities in several
counties a chance to disprove this
theorem. In our eyes they did.
The mayors, fire chiefs, police
chiefs and everyone else involved
in the Atlantic Beach and
Wrightsville Beach areas were well-
prepared. Sure, they probably all
wish they could have done more,
but this morning when Diana came
roaring through they knew they
had done their best. The 100 mph
winds that plastered Wrightsville
Beach earh this morning did so on
a nearly deserted island.
In Atlantic Beach, members of
the Police Force and Fire Depart-
ment, along with the Highway
Patrol, constantly swept through
the area Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday telling residents they
better get off the barrier islands
now or their lives were in danger.
Although not legally allowed to
force people off, subtle tactics
employed usually worked for all
but the die-hards.
Other measures taken, such as
advising residents to board or tape
up windows and to tie lose objects
down, may be the difference bet-
ween having something blow away
or not.
But what stood out about all the
men and women we talked to as we
traversed the coast early Wednes-
day evening is the courtesy and
helpfulness that they extended us.
Most of them had already been
asked the same questions by
several different reporters
throughout their busy day. Yet
they always answered.
What was even more surprising
to us is the respect given to us as
journalists by the officials. They
treated each of us as professionals,
just as they would the reporter
from Raleigh or Charlotte. They
gave us free roam of their facilities
and trusted us to act responsibly as
we toured restricted areas. Because
they did their job so well our job
was just that much easier to do.
The other reporters on the scene,
who are probably still there while
we had to come back to put out
our paper, treated us as equals and
showed us respect that we very
much appreciated. They shared
tips and suggestions, sort of like a
big brother would.
Right now they and the whole
area are taking a terrific beating.
No longer are the men and women
who helped us out just faceless
names. They are friends. Our con-
cern for their safety is genuine. We
know they did the best they could
for their respective community's
safety; we only hope they did the
same for themselves.
ECU salutes the efforts of the
two communities we visited today.
Godspeed.
Zaccaros Befriend IRS
TRB
I hr Not Republic
One question raised by the Zaccaro
family tax returns is whether anyone in-
ept enough to pay 40 percent of her in-
come in taxes is qualified to be vice
president of the United States.
Through bad timing, slow-wittedness
or perhaps a simple lack of patriotism,
Geraldine Ferraro and her wealthy hus-
band have almost totally failed to use
tax breaks designed specifically for peo-
ple like them.
They are a disgrace to Reaganomics.
Of course this 40 percent figure is
suspect. Even without seeing John Zac-
caro's business tax returns, we know
that it doesn't count income from up to
$170,000 of property the Zaccaros have
put in trust for their children, or the in-
terest on Ms. Ferraro's $150,000 or so of
municipal bonds.
Nor does it include the non-taxable
portion of their long-term capital gains.
In 1978, this alone added $42,000 to
their reported combined income of
$110,000.
But the very fact that 1978 was their
big year for capital gains shows what
party poopers the Zaccaros have been;
1978 was when all the fun started.
If they'd waited until November 1978,
when the first "supply-side" tax cut for
capital came into effect, instead of
selfishly taking their gain in August
1978, they could have excluded three-
fifths of their profit, instead of just half,
and saved themselves several thousand
dollars in taxes.
This, according to supply-side
physiologists, would have released
special greed enzymes in their
metabolisms, leading the Zaccaros to
enrich themselves further. Instead, con-
fiscatory taxation drove Mrs. Zaccaro to
abandon her family in despair and ac-
cept a government handout for a
"make-work" job in Washington.
To see how far we've come since those
benighted days, consider Ms. Ferraro's
recent painful discovery that the couple
underpaid their 1978 taxes. She bought a
half-share in a building in May of that
year, then sold it in October for a quick
$68,000 profit on her $25,000 cash in-
vestment.
But her accountant, overlooking an
assumed mortgage, miscalculated the
profit at only $6,000. Ms. Ferraro had to
cough up almost $30,000, plus another
$23,000 in interest, to square things.
If the same transaction had occurred
in 1984, the tax consequences would be
much more pleasant. In 1978 the capital-
gains excluding was enlarged. In 1981
the top-bracket tax rate was reduced.
Just this year, the "holding period" for
long-term capital gains was reduced
from a year to six months.
If Ms. Ferraro could hold on to the
property for just three more weeks, the
overdue tax on her profits would be
about $10,000 instead of $30,000.
The highest tax rate on capital gains is
now 20 percent, just a shade higher than
the very lowest tax rate on wage income,
including Social Security. The idea is
that tax breaks for capital profits will
stimulate productive investment. If you
can see what's so productive about buy-
ing a seedy warehouse and then selling
it, unchanged, six months later, the
Republican Party has a platform it
would like to sell you.
(Ms. Ferraro, by the way, has a sterl-
ing record of voting against these
mindless favors for her own ilk.)
John Zaccaro has never built a
building in his life. ("We buy property
and it appreciates. That's what America
is all about his wife nicely put it.) Yet
his business � owning and managing
buildings that already exist � is tailor-
made to benefit from recent tax changes
ostensibly aimed at the "supply-side
Buildings generate huge "deprecia-
tion" deductions on the fiction that
they're wearing out, even as they
become more valuable. They are the
classic tax shelter.
Zaccaro, though, has neglected his
civic duty to use his buildings the way
God and the Reagan administration in-
tended. Five of his six buildings are held
in the name of a corporation, which
means that phony losses can't be used to
reduce his personal tax burden.
Zaccaro bought most of the buildings
years ago, when they were cheap, and
has failed to trade ihem in for buildings
that would give him a higher "basis" to
write off and an opportunity to use the
lavish Reagan-era depreciation for-
mulas, which only apply to purchases
since 1981. He has hardly even "leverag-
ed" his holdings by borrowing against
them to buy more.
What kind of American is he?
There is one building Zaccaro
half of in the form of a partnership the
usual tax-shelter arrangement.
here, though, he sort of misses the ;
The partnership bought the building
a Manhattan loft warehouse, in
(bad timing once again � just a few
months before the Reagan revolution
for $50,000. In 1980 and in 1981,
building generated very satisfaci
"losses" for Zaccaro of $25,000 and
$30,000. including an estimated $12,5 �
of depreciation each year.
Zaccaro duly subtracted tl
"losses" from his other income. B fc
1982 his "loss" was down to less tl
$4,000, and last year he actually h
fully taxable profit of $38,504.
This is outrageous. Zaccaro mus: ;
his bit for the nation's prosperitv b
ing this building to someone who car
depreciate it fair and square under th�
Reagan rules.
Zaccaro can use the money to buv i
new building, and do the same. Even
the building is still worth only $750,001
Zaccaro's half interest would pro
$25,000 a year in phonv depreciati
"losses" alone ($45,000 the first year
they convert the loft into residences
Thus, many thousands of dollar
would remain where they are happie-
in the private sector, rather than be g
cruelly forced to toil for the govern:
in the cesspools of waste, fraud and
abuse.
In 1983, his best vear, with an inc
of over $200,000, John Zaccaro manag-
ed to come up with a mere $5,2
deductions for travel and entertainment
In 1982, the figure was onlv $2,280. A
doctor fresh out of internship car
better than this. Zaccaro doesn't even
seem to have a business car. Thai s
nothing less than an insult to everv other
real-estate mogul and Mercedes dea
the country.
To be fair, Zaccaro did deduct $6,445
last year in mortgage interest payments
on the family's third home, a
dominium in the Virgin Islands. 1 i
was dizzy talk early in the Reagan ad-
ministration of eliminating the mor: i .
interest deduction for third homes.
Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed
to. 1��4. I nitrd Iraturr S�diralr. l�c
Coke Is The Real Thing In Guatemalan Labor Squabble
By ANNE MANUEL
The New Republic
The Coca-Cola bottling plant on the
outskirts of Guatemala City is surround-
ed by a chain-link fence and a cement-
block wall with barbed wire and shards
of broken glass.
Since Feb. 17, when the owners an-
nounced their decision to shut down the
plant and lay off 460 employees, the wall
has beer ecorated with large banners
proclaiming, "This management action
i, only one of many aimed at destroying
the union" and other pro-labor slogans.
That day the plant's workers, clearly
prepared for the announcement, oc-
cupied the plant, and they have been
there ever since. The owners claim the
plant is bankrupt, but even local
businessmen agree that the intention of
the closing is to break Guatemala's
strongest union.
Given Guatemala's violent political
climate, in which frequent murders of
trade unionists have driven almost the
entire labor movement underground, the
occupation is a bold and surprising
move. It also seems, so far, to be a suc-
cessful one.
On Sunday, May 27, Coca-Cola's
Latin American subsidiary reached a
broad agreement with the Guatemalan
union. Job security of the occupying
workers is guaranteed while Coca-Cola
searches for a new franchise operator. In
the meantime, the occupation will con-
tinue.
Most important, the agreement
guarantees the continued existence of
the union. To Rodolfo Robles, secretary
general of the union, the initial success
of the occupation marks the "rebirth of
the Guatemalan labor movement
The workers and Guatemala's power-
ful business class recognize that the fate
of the union will help determine the
future of labor organizing and political
freedom in Guatemala. Both have been
severely curtailed since the CIA arrang-
ed the overthrow of the reformist,
democratic government of Jacobo
Arbenz in 1954.
Guatemalan unionists have long seen
the Coca-Cola plant as a symbol of
repression. John Clinton Trotter, an at-
torney from Houston who managed the
Guatemala City franchise from 1956 to
1980, earned an undisputed reputation
as one of the toughest union-busters
around � no easy feat in Guatemala.
According to union sources, by the
end of 1978 Trotter had hired three
Guatemalan Army lieutenants to serve
as the directors of the plant's personnel,
warehouse and security. According to
the workers, Trotter and the three of-
ficers each made numerous death threats
� and workers began to die.
In December 1978, the union's finan-
cial secretary was shot to death on his
delivery route on April 5, 1979, by
unknown assailants armed with knives
and an iron tube. On Dec. 13, 1979,
plant manager Lt. Francisco Javier
Rodas warned the entire union executive
committee that it would not live to see
the benefits of another union agreement.
By this time the murders had attracted
the attention of the Geneva-based Inter-
national Union of Food and Allied
Workers, which began to press Coca-
Cola headquarters in Atlanta to take ac-
tion to stop the violence. In February
1980, Coca-Cola announced that it
would search for a new owner for the
plant.
In the first six months of 1980, while
Coca-Cola was insisting that a solution
was imminent, four more union
members were murdered. Edgar Rene
Aldama, a member of the union's ex-
ecutive committee, was gunned down on
the plant grounds in view of police
guards on June 20, 1980, and his body
was carried away in a car owned by the
bottling plant.
On that same day, 27 leaders of the
National Workers' Confederation � in-
cluding two leaders of the Coca-Cola
union � met in downtown Guatemala
City to seek a solution to the turmoil at
the plant.
As uniformed National Police officers
sealed off the block, armed plainclothes
men driving a jeep smashed through the
door of the confederation's office,
located one block from the National
Place. In full view of numerous
witnesses, all 27 leaders were dragged
off in unmarked Toyota jeeps. None
have been heard from since.
In July 1980, pressure from I.U.F. led
Coca-Cola to take a step unprecedented
in international labor relations: An
agreement was negotiated between a
multinational company and an interna-
tional union.
Coca-cola had already arranged to sell
the Guatemalan bottling plant, but the
company also promised to retain an
unspecified measure of "management
control" over the plant until 1985, to
guarantee "full respect of trade union
rights
In addition, with Coca-Cola's en-
couragement, the new owners agreed to
set up a fund to provide a monthly sti-
pend of $30-$50 each to families of
murdered union leaders. The agreement
brought the company and the union four
years of an official and uneasy labor
peace. The announcement of bankrupt-
cy last February broke the 1980 agree-
ment and ended that interlude.
The militant spirit of this year's oc-
cupation has prompted the most union
acitivism in Guatemala since 1980. To
help organize support for the Coca-Cola
workers, 27 labor leaders formed a steer-
ing committee in late February charged
with the task of building a National
Confederation of Trade Union Unity.
Meanwhile, Coca-Cola workers plan
to celebrate their victory by organizing a
march through the streets of the capital
as soon as the plant is ready to renew
operations. "We are going to invite
many other unions and organizations
Robles explained, "because the victor)
decidedly belongs to all Guatemalan
workers, not only to us This is another
bold step, considering that as manv as 90
workers were kidnapped from
Guatemala's last labor demonstration
on May 1, 1980.
Although no Coca-Cola workers have
come to harm since the plant occupa-
tion, the union recognizes that its efforts
to use its own victory to inspire wider
labor activism is a dangerous undertak
ing. Robles insists, however, that the
leading role of the union is absolutelv
necessary.
"This union has always been the
vanguard of Guatemala's unions he
says. "If it were to fail, any 'other
organizing efforts would be easilv
destroyed in a very short time
The risks of labor's renewed struggle
in Guatemala are vividly captured in the
cafeteria of the Coca-Cola plant
Workers linger at long tables drinking
their coffee, the wall around them
dominated by eight larger-than-life
photographs of murdered union leaders.
(Anne Manuel, a New York writer
worked for two years at a weekly
business publication where she covered
Central America and Colombia.)
c. 1W4.1 MM Fcaian SyMIci K.
feL
Before Hurricane Man
the coastal area. �hovn ah
evacuated areas. In the ceo
center: Tom Plough, mav
1fcl
��ji
l
lAtflF
Alcoft
Sailboats
Dl
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I
i h i i i k n i n
i MBI �
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bble
.
-
i �

ipa-
re Aider
: rtak
� al the
absolutely
een the
he
: . other
1 he easih
time
cued struggle
a tured in the
� i ,d plant.
ibles drinking
� ill around them
ght larger-than-life
lei ed union leaders
i Ne I rk writer,
a weekly
ht covered
. ��.� :mhta )
. m .ndhtir In.
ua��i
fc
Before Hurricane Dian i II, came ashore earl) rhursda: there wait already much damage and action in checking damage on a pier. At the bottom left is a siKn of wishful thinking lefi bv an evacuating store owner
the coastal area, shown above i- one of the man. police blockades set up to prevent people from entering on Atlantic Beach. At the bottom riht is one of a number of piers in ttrightsville Beach damatjed bv Diana's
evacuated areas In the .enter row, from left, are Henrv Hutu. senior citien staving at an evaluation tirst brush with the coast. (All photos bv Garv Patterson!
center: Tom Plough, ma Beach; and three members of the Atlantic Beach Police Department
atoMM

r





Iheeastca ,L1N
IAN
SEPTEMBER 13, i84
More Challenges
iAMAD
� INN
V
The East Carolinian 'Name The Landmark' Contest
The two pictures on this page are famous places on the ECU campus. One lucky freshman can
win dinner for two at the Ramada Inn by correctly identifying these two landmarks plus six
Others that wiil be run in the next three issues. Entries that correctly identify all eight will be
thrown into a hat and a drawing will determine the winner. Be precise. When you think you 've
got it, bring the entry form by The East Carolinian office in the old South Building across
from the library. All entries are subject to verification by the managing editor. Good luck!
2.
6.
In Anticipation
Carolinian
Campus Waits For Diana
By HAROLDJOVNER
Vuaiint Nf�, Editor
Althoug Greenville has hot yet
received any dangerous effects of
Hurricane Diana, ECU students
and Greenville residents prepared
for the worst by instituting
emergancy evacuation plans and
general preparations.
Pitt County escaped the ex-
pected high winds of Diana Tues-
day night, but a tornado warning
remained in effect until early
Wednesday morning. At 7 p.m.
Wednesday, the Greenville
Utilities Commission reported the
level of the Tar River was 2.8 feet
above sea level. A spokesman for
the water plant said this was nor-
mal for the river. However, if the
Pamlico River should flood, the
Tar River can be expected to rise.
Students in dorms also took ac-
tion in case the hurricane moved
inland. According to Inez
Fridley, area director of College
Hill, many dorms taped up their
windows to prevent possible high
winds from shattering the glass.
She also said the student staff was
on standby in case an evacuation
was necessary.
Area Coordinator for the West
Campus, Janet Johnson, said the
Public Safety Office provided
campus residents with any details
needed. Johnson also said
students were advised to stay in
their rooms and listen to local
weather reports on radio or televi-
sion. WZMB remained on the air
both Tuesday and Wednesday
nights, releasing information
three or four times an hour.
"The campus police were also
ready to record the water levels of
the parking lot located by 10th
Street Fridley said. "If it had
rained more, Green Mill Run
would have overflowed, causing
the parking lot to flood she
said.
A Tyler Dorm Resident Ad-
visor, Jenny Meador, said most of
the students were worried about
their parents and friends living
near Wilmington and Atlantic
Beach. "Everyone was aware of
the procedures in case we had to
move to lower floors. We remain-
ed calm, sat around the TV to
listen to weather reports, and got
scared together
One immediate effect of the
storm was the fact that parties be-
ing held for this week's fraternity
rush were cancelled early Tuesday
evening.
Chancellor John Howell
reported he took some precau-
tionary measures to protect his
beach cottage, located near Wilm-
ington, against damaging winds.
"I haven't heard anything yet as
to the extent of the damage Hur-
ricane Diana has caused Howell
Buy, Sell
And
Trade With
Classifieds
said, "but I'm more concerned
about the students' safety than I
am about the house
Area businesses also took
precautions of the approaching
hurricane. Bill Hooper, manager
of J. C. Penneys in Greenville,
said windows were taped up Tues-
day night and employees were told
to go home early. He said plans
for Wednesday night remained
uncertain, "but we are prepared
to act, if necessary K-Mart
manager Herman Johnson said,
"we've done a lot of praying and
hoped for the best. We'll be alert
to any warnings and prepare for
any emergancies Johnson also
said the situation is more of a
"wait-and-see type of thing
Elsewhere in the area, Pitt
County Fire Marshal Bobby
Joyner reported 13 schools were
opened at 10 p.m. Tuesday night.
The schools were available for
emergency shelters in case people
had to evacuate their homes.
Joyner said everything went
smoothly and the buildings will
continue to be open on standby.
Area farm crops may benefit
from the rain Diana is bringing,
according to Pitt County
Agricultural Extension Service
Chairman Leroy James.
Check Out
The
Library
TRAVEL WITH QUIXOTE
Welcome to ECU Students
Don't forget: Thanksgiving & Xmas travel
Book now and pay several weeks before travel
Ski trips and cruises also arranged.
Call or come by: QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
4 319 Cotanche St.
f Greenville, NC 27834
r . Phone 757-0234
S QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
WELCOME TO GREENVILLE AND ECU
When you get settled In, come and vis us Sunday
morning.
JARVIS MEMORIAL
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
510 S. Washington Street
Downtown just off campus on Reode Circle
8:45am Early Worship
9:45am Sunday School
11:00am Worship
Phone:752-3101
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refle .
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prac: ica
Newspa
Bv UN MR1
Sometimes you meet �
spills ovei
after I talked �
toonisi Allan Gin w j
Alan has done
throughout his I
artists, describes -
TM: Can
AG: I can't rea. I've
remember when I �
book of the old m
remember looking at his si
get the me ertec: when
that. 1 ,ust looked a: those draw
possibilities opened up that I ne-
have always wanted to be an artisi
TM: How long he
AG: I've on! done the strip for t'r
strips tor newspapers back in higl
hometown paper in Virginia V
my art work � al! my life.
TM: How did you become intei
AG: Basically, its just what I'vealwayj
my grandfather was an architect, 5
I just doodled. I remember also, be
ing through the paper on Sundav a

i





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I HJ I V. i Kitl INIAN
StyJe
SEPTI MHI K 13, 1YX4 1'aue 7
Fashions, Feelings, Fads, And Feet
Footloose Feet Evidence Of More Than Just A Footsize
H Jl Ml OK
Miff Wnirr
'M Inend has a whole closet
people are really into
shoes i . niel
t even match
e arc com
eall) a lay per-
suess these look like an
ol laziness said
e Graves.
. isons one wears
-iik, especially
Several ECU students inter-
viewed commented on the com-
fort factor of then shoes, but
senior Matt Popkin was a little
more specific about his answer.
"This is ihe Tve 1 eague' look I
I have an eight like to be different, look prepp
jusl put these he said Perhaps dress for
graduate school, from his
tortoise-shell glasses to his "lvev
I eague" shoes, is like dressing for
Vale.
On a slightly more casual level,
uniors Chip Wooten and John
Reibel chose topsiders for their
Along with I . �k goes
a variety of sports shoes.
Kangaroos is just one brand that
hops out at you � ! unique
design pockets. Deb Gembecki,
SRA president, wears Kangaroos
for running and h :i keys
or money at the san e Mine.
"These things tre '
These were $30 aid lembecki.
Angie Hill gas an honest
answer about the price ol jellies.
"Jellies are cheap they're
comfortable too. 1 ea ties
go with anything, - uc
The boots worn by industrial
tech major Ted Sumey display his
taste in Western fashion. T just
like Western-style clothes and not
just the boots. The boots are hot,
but that doesn't bother me �
they're comfortable
For the last two or three years
Greenville has seen the more
outragious fashions of punk fade
and resurge from time to time.
Even the "hard core punk" has
hit the streets of Greenville.
Sophomore Hugh Eckermann not
only had a mohawk. but had on
Patricia Thomas, declared she
never wore flat shoes. "I wear
these (black high heeK) shoes
because I'm working. We have to
have the dressy look. I never wear
flat shoes Thomas said. Pro-
fessor Francis P. Belsic also
agreed that he liked to look pro-
fessional, but said if he were going
for a walk, he wouldn't ordinanlv
wear those "executive" type of
shoes.
Sometimes shoes are just as im-
portant to one's major as to one'
profession. Dancer Jessica Tavlor
treshman Iimmy Sherrill doesn't
think so. "I don't like shoes 1
don't wear them. In the winter i
only wear them if there i snow
the ground. I like to be different, 1
know - maybe I'm jusl
naturalist said Sherrill.
Perhaps you're mon
otic type like Catherine Sea.
and go for the "sloppy" floj
Katie Thompson who likes
"unusual" checkered O P. .
There is a pair of shoe- waitii .
be bought. What fits vour
JON JORDON ECU Photo Lab
hi vhoes are stylish among dance students as well as other E I
students.
:r'N JOROON, ECU Photo Lab
Hard-core punks displa their uniqueness from head to toe.
This pair of shoes is evidenth "checking" things out around
campus.
iej are dressed in a par-
ar manner. Although choos-
shoes rarely relies on
potential ability or skill to
because of the new
lide-ons or slip-ins, and
available, it often
e degree of self ex-
ii . more importantly
wear. "Comfort is the main
thing, " said Wooten and Reibel.
The comfort of good topsiders
will mv run anywhere from $40
to S6o. Although topsiders and
loafers are generally known for
their "preppiness not ever vine
agrees. But Duane Coleman still
acknowledges it. "1 like loafers
he said. "Thev are tust mv style
But then again, price doesn't
have anyth: do with one's
choice of shoes. Intramural
athlete John Scott, said his Con-
verse hightops arc tberapuetic. "1
just wear them to keep my ankles
from hurting. Hightops are rather
expensive so I don't guess anyone
is going to buy them unless the
are going to use them
pair of soft, black leather boots
laced with silver chains and a red
bandana. With much enthusiasm
he said, "1 like to be different. It's
an expression of myself and I like
attention
Some people just don't have
time to "punk out" � they have
to be serious and go to work. The
sophisticated graduate student.
wore a pair of $20 jaz shoes to
her class. "I'm wearing these
shoes because I have blisters all
over my feet from dance class and
they are comfortable. They help
me out when I'm dancing. Point
shoes are different � thev are for
ballet
Shoes are important to most of
us for comfort and fashion, but
schedule?, your style?, your per-
sonality? Or more importantlv. in
your closet? Look in the mirr
anu men check out vour fool e
the personality, the reason, :
die size �
pression.
wear it, with ex-
Newspaper Cartoonist Shares Enthusiasm
piiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiii
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
Frilurr Witnr
mes you meet someone whose enthusiasm for their work just
: brightens up your day. That's exactly the way 1 felt
- I talked with sophomore art major and East Carolinian car-
toonist Allan Guy. With only a few years of experience behind him,
Uan done numerous works both during high school and
roughout his stay here at ECU. Alan, who comes from a family of
:i ibes his thoughts and goals in the interview that follows.
i M.an vou pinpoint a specific age when you started drawing?
V, I can't really say � I've just always known what I'd be. 1
remember when 1 was about four or five � I was looking through a
ok of the old mastersLeonardo da Vinci is my favorite artist. I
remember looking at his sketches and I was blown away. Some people
effect when they listen to a new band or something like
it. I just looked at those drawings � I can still remember � and
sibihtie opened up that I never knew existed. And even though I
e always wanted to be an artist, that stuck in my mind.
I M: How long have you been a serious drawer?
(r I've only done the strip for the paper since last year. I did some
strips for newspapers back in high school and a couple things for the
hometown paper in Virginia. As far as cartooning, I've done it with
my art work � all my life.
IM: How did you become interested in drawing cartoons?
AG: Basicallyits just what I've always done. My dad is an artist and
mv grandfather was an architect, so it ran in the family. A lot of times
I just doodled. I remember also, besides my dad's influence, just look-
ing through the paper on Sunday and seeing Doonesoury - I always
loved Doonesury. And it just came naturally � I thought it was neat.
The good thing about cartoons is that I can do that maybe on the side
and just see how it works out. That can kind of be on the side until 1
think its time to move forward. I'll be happy to get one picture in a
museum. I also want to write a book and travel. So those are my three
things.
TM: Is your father happy about vour work? I know every
would like his son to follow in his footsteps.
AG: He's happy, but it's not like he forced me into it.
t'athei
TM: Do you want to become a professional cartoonist?
AG: I think I might � it's hard to say. It's a temptation because it's so
fun. And I can develop, I think, what I have if I just take the time. But
then again I also have other things I want to do. I'd like to develop the
fine art side because I am an art major. So 1 probably will do a lot
more with it � it's just too soon to Tell.
TM: So you've done other things besides cartoons?
AG: I've done illustrations � my grandmother is a writer and I il-
lustrated some books for her. Cartooning has not really been the only
thing. If people have an idea, I'll be happv to do it. I've had a couple
people ask me to do some works to hang on the wall and I've done
them when I can.
TM: Do you just do pen and ink drawings or do you create colored
ones also?
AG: I have done some (color) but usually papers I've drawn for can't
afford the colors. Ink and paper are so basic and so compatible that if
you do it right, the beauty in the mark is just unsurpassed. So I eniov
doing it.
See TM E1TI. Pajj

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i






JHEEASTCARQL1NAN SEPTEMBER 13. 1984
Allan Guy
Talented Artist Creates Strips That
Capture The Hearts Of Students
Continued From Page 7.
IM: Can you estimate how many drawings you've done?
AG: I've done things for a couple yearbooks, like in high schooland
I've done stuff for ads around town. 1 guess it's more than 100 � I
don't know.
1 M: H here do (u get ideas for your cartoons?
AG: A lot of times I'll sit down at a desk and think "Well, I've gotta
get a couple things done � let's get working here and I'll think and
think about what frustrates me � for example, if I saw something to-
day But then it doesn't really click a lot of times until you start draw-
ing. Then the characters, a lot of times, work out themselves. If I
come against a block, I'll go take a showerI'll go eat. And just by
not consciousl) thinking about it, it opens a dam and things come
hrough. So 1 tell people I have my ideas in the shower and they laugh.
But it's true.
TM: Do vou have "employers" come to vou after they've seen your,
work?
AG: A lot of times, like back home, people come to me Also
whenever my friends need things (a bunch of them are in bands) I do
things like backdrops for them. A lot of times people come by word of
mouth. The thing is, I just don't have enough time to do everything I
want to do.
TM: Are you always poking fun of things in your cartoon strips or are
you trying to make specific points?
AG: I'm going to start doing some serious ones � these are all just
poking fun. They're nothing really serious. And that's good in a way
You need to have that. I've a very personal person � I guess maybe
I'm shy when it comes to people seeing my stuff before it's done. I
don't want anybody to look at it until it's ready. I'm going to try to
get more sophisticated, though. I don't want to let the serious ones out
unless I'm really, really sure they make a good point and people will
get it and think its funny at the same time. I think the people out here
deserve a good paper, and I think I owe it to myself to take the time to
put out something good.
CoNC�Pfiiu& rne ecu s-qoir�l Pooation
I IT 5AYS " PP-OP OVfc
Lunches, tcm aroumd,
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5 PM � 9 PM
SHONEYS
Only
$4-99
$5 99 with Salad & Fruit Bar
Special Children's Prices
205 Cmnvflf Blvd.
GramvilU, NC 27834
754-21W
757-1971
KINGSTON PLACE . . . luxury condominums. . .
fully furnished and accessoried �WE�wTlL MOVfI
heated pool, club house, laundry facilities, i YOU FREE
tennis courts "
150.00mon. per person
� IN PITT COUNTY
I With this coupon
l Expires 10184
jk
Pitt Cou
BvTINA VlAROsr HAk
Thousands of people in
County rely on the sen
support of some 29 comn
service agencies U,
thought in mind, it seem
propriate to mention an organ
tion that make all th he ;
ble � The Put Coun
Advocacyenter for hi:
Ldacadon and Parent rrvtntn
l-WO-532-535
(919)821-2048
Provider train .
public infora i
vice to pare-
The Redross
752-4222
Trauneo a I
Aid, CPR ai
491 umtv
�Jihtarv : -
the eveni
20() fami
American Social Health ,
l-0O-227-�922
Toll-free V
referra;
Strategic-
treatmer
bmnsmii -
Association for Retarded
la Pin Countrv
757-3084
Works to a
menrally reta
ty. Apr-
tended the ARC bi
Also provides
and pub
Boys Club Pitt Couim
355-2345
Sen?- 87
guidance thr
tiona recreai
chara.f-
Sei wno'
C.flOi
- �
c
- �. - 1 �
Meridc.ihc
t'JSl
� - -
Buffet Lovei
Pick of The Piz
Lunch Buffet - 11
All the pizza, spagi
can eat
Dinner Buffet - 5-8
All the pizza, spagoj
can eat
f





Population

-V
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 13. 1984
�'
I CHIL0REN1 tfl
C ANYTIME l-y
OVIES
ig C�nt�r ,
S PG
K

P(13
L MOVE �
REE i
:ounty5
coupon !
110184 �
Pitt County United Way Kicks Off Campus Campaign
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Fcalarta Milor
Thousands of people in Pitt
County rely on the services and
support of some 29 community
service agencies. With this
thought in mind, it seems ap-
propriate to mention an organiza-
tion that makes all this help possi-
ble � The Pitt County United
Way. Today marks the kick-off
for the United Way campus cam-
paign. ECU'S 1984 goal of
$35,000 ($23,000 main campus;
$12,000 Medical School)
represents approximately five per-
cent of the overall goal of
$681,32. Last year ECU collected
$29,400. "The students really put
a lot into helping the agencies
go said Lou Folger, executive
director for the Pitt County
United Way.
The United Way, started in
1887'by two ministers, a priest
and a rabii, is an organization that
raises money for various service
agencies. Some of the more
popular organizations that United
Way helps are the American Red
Cross, the Boys Club, the Girl
Scouts, Home Delivered Meals
for the Elderly, Hospice of East
Carolina, the Mental Health
Association, Operation Sunshine,
and the Real Crisis Intervention
Center.
According to Folger, the United
Way operates for two main
reasons: 1). To consolidate cam-
paigns 2). To allow agency staff
members to do their job � help
others without having to worry
about raising money.
No minimum donation is need-
ed to contribute to the United
Way. Students and faculty
members will be collecting pledges
until the Nov. 7 deadline; Folger
stressed, however, that donations
will be gladly accepted after that
date. Miriam Quick, assistant
professor of Nursing, will be the
campus chairperson and SGA
President John Rainey will act as
vice-chairperson. "Every penny
you give is doing something for
somebody concluded Folger.
y�oc�c Center for Children's
Question and Parent Training
l-HOO-532-535
(1 9)8 2 1 - 2048
P ides training, technical assistance,
public information and education, and ser-
vict to parents of handicapped children.
t he Red Cross
-2-222
i a total of 1,876 persons in First
�Vid. CPR and water safety. Collected
4,791 units of blood and served 267
arj families. Also provides service in
he event of a disaster. Assisted more than
.nilies following the 1984 tornadoes.
American Social Health Association
I S0O-227-8922
1 ill-free VD Hotline for information and
referral. Also involved in research and
oategies for control, prevention and
eatment for VD and other sexually
�ransmitted diseases.
Association for Retarded Citizens
in Pitt Country
ISl-ImM
Works to assure services for the 3,000
mentally retarded individuals in Pitt Coun-
t) Approximately 100 retarded adults at-
tended the ARC bi-monthly social events.
Mso provides information and referral
and public education.
Bovs Club Pitt County
355-2345
Serves 870 bovs ages 6-18 providing
guidance through health, social, educa-
tional, recreational, vocational and
character development programs.
Camp Rainbow
Summer camp for children with cancer
and their siblings. Served 60 children ages
7-18. Jointly sponsored with Pitt County
Memorial Hospital and ECU Pediatrics.
Children's Home Society
752-5847
l-�00-432-1400
103 cases from Pitt County were handled
through its counseling and adoptive pro-
grams. Also has a toll-free line for ready
access in problem pregnancy counseling
cases.
Day Camp for Handicapped Children
72 mentally andor physically handicap-
ped children ages 5-17 attend Camp Sun-
shine during the summer.
Epilepsy Association
of North Carolina
(919)834- 2876
752-3769
Program consists of community health
education, individual and family educa-
tion, information program of consumer
education for persons with epilepsy, and
chapter social development. Local chapter
provides self-help skills and service in an
advocacy role.
Farmville Child Developmental Center
753-4742
Serves 25 children in developmental day
care and educational placement ranging in
age from 6 weeks to 16 years. These
children generally function in the
moderate to severe range of mental retar-
dation or developmental delay.
Servinm hreakfasi daihj
choose from: eggs any style
ho.m, sausage or bacon,
grits hash browns
fien-ch toast or pancakes
Mendenhall Snack Bar
r'asL enroling dtnt.n services
Buffet Lovers, take your
Pick of The Pizzas at Mr. Gatti's
Lunch Buffet - 11:30am-2pm Eh
All the pizza, spaghetti and salad fm
can eat
$3.09
-rf
Dinner Buffet - 5-8pm MonAWed
All the pizza, spaghetti aid salad you
can eat $3.19
w
mm
Spaghetti - 5-8pm Thins. A& fpe.
spaghetti you can ea $2.65
M
&0
Free Delivery?
30 minute service
guaranteed! 1
video Games V
Big Screen TV l
�mer of
it
FREE
Extra Cheese
or one additional
ingredient on any
largepizza
r" 75rierTjoWtrT5efivery
Or In Store
758-3100
Florence Crittenton Services
of North CArolina
(704)372-4663
Provides a residential facility for the unw-
ed expectant mother. Twenty persons were
served through its counseling and expec-
tant mother programs.
Flynn Christian Fellowship Home
752-2961
Served 94 men in 1983 through its program
of recovery for alcoholic and shelter for
the homeless. Additional services include
public education, counseling with families,
information and referral.
Girl Scouts
(919)734-6231
433 girls were served through educational,
leadership and character development pro-
grams. In addition 140 adult leaders were
trained to serve in the scouting program.
Home Delivered Meals for the Kiderlv
752-1717
Through United Way support, the Pitt
County Council on Aging can provide
18,000 more meals each year for many of
the homebound elderly.
Hospice of East Carolina
758-4622
For advanced cancer patients and their
families, Hospice provides direct volunteer
services ranging from food preparation to
respite care, emotional support and
counseling to meet their individual needs.
Provides coordination and referral to ex-
isting resources, and is available to the
family for a one year bereavement period.
Hospice served 90 patients and 98 families.
Hospice of North Carolina
1-800-662-8859
Serves as a service support organization to
local Hospice programs.
International Social Services
(212)964-7550
Works with all agencies to solve individual
and family problems which cross national
boundaries.
Medical Research Fund of North Carolina
United Way
East Carolina, as well as the other three
medical schools in North Carolina,
receives a block grant for medical
research.
Mental Health Association in Pitt County
752-7448
Through its citizen volunteers, it works
toward the prevention of mental illness
and the improvement of attitudes, legisla-
tion and services for the mentally ill. Pro-
vides public education promoting mental
health and provides services to improve the
quality of life for the mentally ill who are
hospitalized. Programs reach out to serve
all persons in Pitt County.
National Council on Aging
(212)687-6815
Provides a grant to the Pitt County Coun-
cil on Aging to fund 11 service positions
for older unemployed or underemlpoyed.
Concerned with policies, research and pro-
grams of the elderly, as well as training
and materials for local agencies.
National Cystic Fibrosis Foundation
1-800-682-6858
Concern with prevention, control and
treatment of cystic fibrosis and other lung
damaging diseases. Provides funding for
treatment center at ECU.
North Carolina Society for Autistic
Adults and Children
(919) 828-4772
Conducts a summer camp for autistic per-
sons, has a Summer Teacher's Program,
works with Division TEACHH for special
workshops and conducts programs for
parents groups.
North Carolina United Wav
(704)375-0222
Provides services, workshops and training
for staff and volunteers of local United
Way organizations in campaigning,
budgeting and planning. Convenes budget
sessions for state-wide agencies and con-
ducts periodic evaluations of state-wide
agencies.
Operation Sunshine
758-5315
Served 220 girls through its after school
and summer-program. Particular em-
phasis is on attracting girls who are usually
neglected by existing or traditional pro-
grams.
Pitt County Boy Scouts
Served 1,360 boys through its programs of
educational leadership development, 454
adul's involved in the program. Explorer
P'ogram serves 261 teen boys and girls.
Pit- I ounty 4-H Council
Real Crisis Intervention Ctnter
The alvatinn Arm
l.ited Health Services
12 OZ
99 I
LIMIT 24 CANS
PLEASE
BUY ANY 2
Deli-Fresh Pizzas
AND RECEIVE A
1
I
I
Bicj K l AND RECE,VE A i
soft Drinks 8 2 Ltr- peP�' Cola �
1 FREE!
LA AA
I
I
I
� Thick Crust � Thin Crust S
� Pan Pizza 1
COUPON MUST ACCOMPANY ORDER
VALID THRU SEPT 15, 1984 5
INCLUDES 6 ROLLS
wishbone
Fried Chicken
U.S. NO. 1
WISCONSIN RUSSET
Baking
Potatoes
$77
Lb.
Bag
FANCY EASTERN
RED OR COLO
Delicious
Apples
88
ft
X






10
THTEAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 13, 1984
How Not To Act Like A College Freshman
By PAT MOLLOY
Staff Writer
Often, when I meander back in
time, I wince as I remember a few
of my more asinine antics � most
associated with being a freshman
in college. Now that I have sur-
passed all the absurdities, and
entered my junior year, 1 wish
there had been some kind of guide
to tell me how not to act like a
newcomer to college society.
Therefore, since I have such a
high regard for humanity, I've
prepared a few notes for the
lowest group in colleges' educa-
tional heirarchy on how not to act
like a freshman.
First oft, I'll start with the
guys. Yeah, 1 used to cruise into
the bars � your local "Country
Comfort" or nearby "Gilley's
feeling like a macho stud, strut up
to a young lady and inquire,
"You know what I'd really like to
see on you?" The girl would roll
her eyes toward the ceiling as if
she were looking for some divine
guidance, and say, very sar-
castically, "I can't wait Then,
while bobbing my head as If I had
Parkinson's di ease, trying to
look casual, I'd reply, (ever so
smugly), "me This line never
did work, and I owe John
Travolta for all the slaps in the
face I received. Sorry fellas, but
forget all that you ever learned
while watching "Welcome Back
Kotter" reruns; go, instead, for
the Richard Gere approach � try
sincerity. Don't become so honest
that you qualify for sainthood.
Just talk to the lady as if you
respect her. I wish I had known
that my freshman year � I could
have saved a few dozen trips to
the emergency room for treatment
of facial misalignment. And, of
course, as with the men, freshmen
women have certain undesirable
traits.
Ladies, ladies, ladies, never
leave for an evening of rocking
and rolling carrying a purse.
There's something about the extra
appendage that says, "Look at me
� I'm a freshman Besides, the
only girls who wear purses
downtown look like Aunt Bea;
and I seriously doubt that a
woman would want a man who
Classifieds
looks like Floyd the Barber hitting
them up for a date.
Another aspect I've noticed in
my vast research, and from past
personal experience, is that only
freshmen, and those who are into
serious intestinal problems, eat at
the school cafeteria. I fail to com-
prehend what puts these people op
a death wish, but there they are
stuffing themselves into oblivion
with cardboard food and Pepsi.
This leads me to an amazing
phenomenon.
"The Freshman Ten no mat-
ter who you are � male or female
� if you have been, or are now a
"newbie" to college life, you have
experienced it. Gaining weight
while in your first year of college
is easy � losing it isn't. I've seen
this happen more than once: An
attractive young lady enters col-
lege at the perfect weight of 110
pounds. Then, three months later
WHAPPO! Out of nowhere, she
looks as if she found the lost city
of Atlantis and ate it. Freshmen
� watch what and how much you
eat.
Gentlemen, (and I use that term
with great reserve), regardless of
what your pals tell you, yelling
from the balcony of your dorm to
the girK down below doesn't real-
l turn the ladies on. If a girl
walks by, don't yell out, as I have
heard so many times, "Hey baby,
do you want a burger with that
shake?" That definitely labels you
as a freshman � and an ass.
Also guys, while you're in the
dorms, respect the cleaning ser-
vice that the campus provides.
Don't trash the corridors with
beer cans, and don't keep the
music boom-booming until 1 a.m.
Remember, the person next door
may have an early class � and an
early temper.
My last tip, and probably my
best, is to watch how much you
drink. More than once, I've seen
people get so drunk that they get
sick in the bar. I don't know
about other guys, I really don'i
think that Richard Gere would do
anything so drastic to get a ladvs
attention.
So freshmen, I hope my per-
sonal experiences and insights
have been of some help to you � I
wish someone had enlightened
me. If you enjoyed this bit of in-
formation, you can look forward
to my current work in progress
oh Xot to Act I ike a Junior in
College
��
SALE
BEAUTIFUL MOROCCAN wall hang
mgs Very reasonable. Call 756 9273
afte- 5
FOR SALE: Rattan Dresser (new)
Mirrow and glass surface included.
Price negotiable Call 756 3766.
FOR SALE: Afiustable bike rack, will
t only car also U bolt type lock.
$40 00 for both or best offer. Call
757 3484.
FOR SALE 11 x 12 Spring Green rug
and pad. 8 x 12 Brown and Black
varigated rug with pad with runner.
S60 each. 2 for $100. Three Lane inlay
Tables (2 end and 1 coffee). All 3 for
S50. Call 757 0712
MISC
LOANS ON & BUYING TV's, Stereos.
:?-eras, typewriters, gold 8. silver,
anything else of value. Southern Pawn
Shcp. 752 2464.
CAPTURE YOUR COLLEGE DAYS
AND NIGHTS on video cassette-VHS
or BETA, excellent color pictures and
swell Hi-Fi Audio. Join our video club
and enioy the Jacksons, Michael, Jer-
mame, Prince, Pink Floyd, Van
Halen, Cyndi Lauper, The
Pretenders, Cheech & Chong, The
Time, The Alan Parson Project,
Duran Duran, and much, much
more. We make video's � John
Deaver Video Recording Services.
Call 758 6344.
NEED EXTRA MONEY? Free lance
artist neeaed for local silk-screening
firm Will pa cash for designs. Call
756 9058
YES FANS: Put some excitement in
our weekend and pickup tickets at
Aople Records for the YES Concert in
Greensboro Fri Sept. 14. Ride the
comfortablke RTU bus to one of he
finest rock bands in history. Bus will
leave at 4:15 from 4th and Evans.
NEED FRENCH TUTORING0 Call
the French Assistant after 3 p.m.
758-8124.
HOUSE FOR RENT. 5 minutes from
ECU. 4 bedrooms, gas heat. Ideal for
3 4 to share $260 per month, partly
furnished. 752-2615.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICEwWORD PROCESSING. Spell
ing electronically checked. Term
papers and Dissertations $1.75 a page.
Paper included. Call Mark After 5 at
757 3440.
PERSONAL
RABBIT, Monday morning you'll
p robably have an incredible
hangover � but I promise to nurse
ou back to health with hugs and
kisses, and Tylenol. Happy 21st! Love
c;sh
THE SIGMAS WOULD LIKE TO
THANK the Phi Tau's for a fantastic
pret night party! The sisters want to
congratulate our 34 new pledges. We
love you!
BILL D. invites all his "buddies" out
to the new Papa Cats.
DAWN, Although the time we get to
spend together is short, the wait is
worth it. Todd.
a Computer
Football
to7theopell�
"�. i .o'i r are oHererj ,r gane
age SFl 'ou an3 your friends w�
a - ' -caevng your favo"te teas
agas' ea 3thv " ensj and 6 deten&v
D"a�s are icijdeo vou �tii agree that m every
� - If s s "e "ios! realistic game you haveeve'
riayeO nd � .a reaver arvj leaf stats are laou
Mad ;v re r. c dj'er sc an you nave to orry aoou'
ttXing .� .� ;c.ooneni
fH 'rAMS This game conta-rs the mosi
- : I � v i learns you m lino � a lootDai
jame are-e Each teams oai' handlers are
�a:�: � x -eausticaliy ust as mey CW m rea'
ieo are'2'current doiiege and Pro Teams
ring -e '8 '984 USFl Teams Also avaiiaDie
are '45 awege and 8 NFL Teams ot the oast
Gae -j or 43 Aoote V lie lie or tl rXus '
3s- :0S r3 3
" ' 'cots game naudnvg 75 83 College
28 33 NFL Teams 18 W jSFl Teams
24 99
'eams or separate diskette '45 59-
82 Co"eqe Teams ol oast 48 .50- 82 NFl
tan to 00
:ash Cnecu Money Order
LANCE MANNER GAMES
PO Br. -00594
Nasr. e Tennessee 37210
RIDES
WANTED: Ride to DC. the weekend
of Sept. 14-16. Arlington, Va. area.
Will help with gas. Please contact
Theresa, 758 1388, between 8:00 and
10:00 p.m.
RIDE & RETURN tofrom New
Orleans over fall break or within 1 hr
distance or so Will help wgas, etc
John 758 7098.
NEED RIDE TO CHARLOTTE Fri
day 914 84. Call Susan 752 9542
Buy, Sell And Trade With Classifieds
WANTED
: PART TIME SOCCER COACHES for various Pitt County Schools. Contact Alice or Barry at 752-6106 if interested. PARTTIME WORD PROCESSOR for local law firm: IBM PC AT Salary commensurate with experience Call 7-w-Aonn
&
& Look For Sub Station II
Coupons In Your Phone Book
Yellow Pages On Page 7!

LOST AND
FOUND
ROOMMATE WANTED $125 per
month, private bedroom, 1 block from
campus. 308 Student St. Please stop
by.
608 GEORGETOWN APARTMENTS.
Female roommate noeded. $95mo
'3 utilities, furnished, washerdryer.
Stop by or call 752 1343 anytime.
LOST: (1) book, Modern Times, oy
Paul Johnson (2) Glass marked ZBT
Charter Banquet, December 6, 1983. If
found, please return immediately to
Joe Admire, 103 Umstead, 758 906
LOST: Spanish gold com on a chain in
downtown Greenville area. Reward
offered. Call collect (919) 275 S.S84
LATE
SHOW
FRI & SAT
11:15pm
With this ad $2.00 5
Without ad $3.00
THE BIG
CHILL
ADMISSION
With this ad $2.00
Without ad $3.00
Once you've tasted
Killian's Irish Red,
you may never
go Dutch again.
Now don't get us
wrong. The Dutch
make some pretty fine
beers. But they don't
slow-roast their malt
like we do.
So no Dutch beer
has the color, the
character, the rich,
incredibly smooth taste
of Killian's Red Ale.
So the next time
you're about to order
your favorite Dutch
beer, try a Killian's
Red, instead.
You may never go
Dutch aain.
yTLUANSggp)
ris4 Adolph (
tipam (.olden ���d S04III Hrr w, r l I ,nc (,u.Im hVcrv Sintc 11,71
Your Two Best Choices For Printing
"When You Need It - The Way You Want It - With Reasonable Prices
The
Greenville Printing Company
� Commercial Pi nting
� 4 Color Process Printing
� Typesetting & Design
211 West 9th Steet - Greenville
-752-47 20-
�&
'4 �1
Specializing In:
Full Service & Self Service
Xerox Copies
� A itomatic Collation
� Resumes
� Graohicsnvra Service
Located Downtown in
The Georgetown Shops
-758-2400
1IMMIITT
tf0Vna THE EAST CAROLINA PLAYHOUSE fc
presents
A SEASON OF SINGING, DANCING, COMEDY
c POWERFUL DRAMA
$
5uje Door
Nov. 27-30&Dc. I
A 1930s comedy about
�ho-blz life in NYC
Oct. 24-27 6 29
America's famous
singing&tapping danci
musical
DANCE
Feb. 20-23 THEATRE
April 16-20
Don't see it for culture-
but for a whale of a jolting experience
DIVIDERS
Feb. 6-9
A touching &
sentimental drama
about middle-America
Dance at its best,
"excitingsolid achievement:
-Daily Reflector
Onl Subscribers
Are Guaranteed:
1. Great Price-Save 21
2. Exchange Privileges
3. Ticket Insurance
4. Priority Seating
5. Tax Deductible
Ticket Return
CALL: 757-6390
n l'M C ALL: 757-6390 COM1 BY
General Manager Messick Theatre ArU
East Carolina Playhouse 5th and Eastern Streets
Greenville, NC 27834 Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm
llllllllliiiiiiiiiiinif ttrr
B. J. Thomas
&
Logos
FRIDAY Sl-PT.14
DOORS OPN AT 7:00
ATTr "i:NLEAF
ON S. MEMORIAL
Tickets Available At:
This Way Up
Record Bar
Apple Records
Christian Bookstore
WBZQ
WRQR
Xif
All Proceeds Of Concert GoToThis Way Up A Nonprofit
Christian Nightclub In Downtown Greenville-Corner Of
5th and Cotanche

ofc
-TO
2
I -
he'
-�
L-

�'�
F

s
s
s
2
Cent
B RAMn Mr Vs
Although -he Easi
football team a "en
17-0 in their home
Temple lasi weel
. coach d Emon,
'should not ,
failure
"We've lug
j ell, but m
year head coach
mid-aftemot
"I've neer been
thier I i �� game
Florida
as a coacl I
I'm glad �
one we have I
En
eve:
game I I
chaiie: ;
plaer art
ever.
"Vv e have i e
good people .
tinued. Our �
and ta
positive The pia
they want tochanj
"want to g
themselves a
of doing '
Although i n
, better think:
� future, he ip .
Temple game I
"displav ol
supposed �
The Pii �.
fir d �
were held to a rr.
worth
which came
Emorj
for the wav
formed. "I've
associated �
ing game � .�.
trolled the line
A large pan F
line's ineffectiveness can
tributed to the loss
starters John Floyd, 3
son. Terrv Long and V
Vann, but Emon -vaid that
at.
Reid
B SCOTT POWER
; ��Uil sports I
It's not verv v - .
.see two brotl.
same team, much less
ECL has a ma
Donald and R
Donald is I
ihi year -
Ronald backs
linebacker T I
both made
to EC I tog
Last vear Ro i
year a- the stan -
before a knee
.for the sea " He ,
eighth in tack i
with 45
Dor.
a a back i i
was move
ly in the season. He .
tackle in a ba �
high of seven
I
win Brothers Donald and Roi
�who have mutual respect for d





hman
HI
tation II
V,
'hone Book
n Page 7!
mting
PY
f in
n Shops
OQ:
mm
4 Y HOUSE
n ny
&
l
DANCE
THEATRE
11 ba
olid irBlevfmfni:
Dmilv Rtflector
ah Nubcrtbn
re (.mrmterd
GmA Pncf-Save 2!
ange Privilege
kel Insurance
Pnontv seating
Tat IVducttble
Ticket Return
COME BY:
Theatre Arts Center
and Eastern Streets
� -Friday, 10am-4pm
Thomas
&
ogos
y tPT.i4
Q?ZN aT 7:00
S MEMORIAL
liable At
ray Up
Bar
Records
Ian Bookstore

ass and an
ibl !1!
much you
mce, I've seen j
i he) get ;
� n't know
I really don't
w ould do
. lady's
lope my per-
and insights
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I HI EASTCAROi INIAN
Sports
SEPTfcMBtR 13, 1V84
Page 1 1
Central Michigan Anticipating ECU
By RANDY MEWS
Sporti tdltor
Although the East Carolina
football team was "embarrassed"
17-0 in their home opener against
remple last weekend, Pirate head
coach Ed Emory said the season
should not yet be considered a
failure.
We've dug ourselves a deep
well, but we'll dig out the Fifth-
year head coach said in a Tuesday
mid-afternoon press conference.
"I've never been 0-2 (ECU lost
thier first game of the season to
Florida State) in my entire career
i- a coach Emory said, "but
I'm glad it's with a team like the
one we have here at ECU
Emory went on to say that
everybody associated with the
game of football is in it for the
;hallenge, and now he says his
players are more challenged than
o er.
"We have a good program, and
good people in it Emory con-
inued. "Our kids have character
and talent, and their attitude is
positive. The players mood is that
they want to change things � they
want to get better and prove to
themselves what they're capable
of doing
Although Emory is hoping for
better things from his team in the
future, he apoligized after the
Temple game for his team's
"display of what on offense is
supposed to be
The Pirates only managed seven
first downs the entire game and
were held to a meager 125 yards
worth of total offense, only 58 of
which came on the ground.
Emory said there was no excuse
for the way his offensive unit per-
formed. "I've never been
associated with such a poor runn-
ing game � we never once con-
trolled the line of scrimmage
A large part of the offensive
line's ineffectiveness can be at-
tributed to the loss of last year's
starters John Floyd, John Robert-
son. Terry Long and Norwood
Yann, but Emory said that's just
the beginning of the problem.
Jeff Autry and first-team juinor
college All-America Ken
Bouswald were lost for the season
at the beginning of fall practice,
and last year's starters Tim
Dumas and Norman Quick have
been strugling with injuries since
mid-August.
According to Emory, that
leaves about seven players who
are expected to step right in and
do a respectable job despite the
fact that they have had virtually
no game experience.
Emory said the inexperienced
offensive line has also compound-
ed problems concerning the unset-
tled quarterback situation. Three
players have been vying for the
starting job since spring drills
began, and it appears ECU
coaches are still struggling to find
someone that can move the of-
fense.
Juinor college transfer Robbie
Bartlett started aginst Florida
State, while Ron Jones opened
against Temple, but the two have
only combined for a miserable
nine completions in 30 attempts
for both games, while third can-
didate Darell Speed has seen
relatively little action.
Emory said none of three
quarterbacks have been given a
fair chance because they haven't
had adequate protection, but he
did say at this point in the season
Robbie Bartlett will be considered
the number one quarterback
because of his age and game ex-
perience.
The one bright spot for the
Pirates in Saturday night's loss
was the play of the defense.
Emory said there weren't many
missed tackles, and the unit's play
was much improved over their
performance against Florida
State.
The head coach also said if
Pirates plan on coming home with
a victory from Central Michigan
this weekend, the offensive play
MICHAEL SMITH � ECU Photo UC
ECU head football coach Ed Emory said his team shouldn't be rusher Tony Brown returns from last ear. The Chippewas overwhelm
counted out yet, but Central Michigan has other ideas as 1,431-yard ed Northern Michigan 45-22 in thier only game this season
would have to match that of the
defense.
Central Michigan is led by
quarterback Ron Fillmore who
accumulated over 1,500 yards
worth of offense as a freshman
last year, and tailback Tony-
Brown who rushed for 1,431
yards.
The Chippewa defense is also
solid with the reutrn of their top
three tacklers from a year ago.
They include Mike Bevier (140).
Kevin Egnatuk (112) and Jim
Bowman (8 and eight intercep-
tions), who Emory calls one of the
finest free safeties in the country.
Central Michigan stands 1-0 on
the season after disp
thern Michigan 45-22 their
season opener, and
have the Chippewa- listed as
three-point favorite oser ECl g
ing into this weekend's game.
Reid Brothers Tight
By SCOTT POWERS
VuiManl Sports Kdllnr
It's not very often that one will
see two brothers playing for the
same team, much less twins, but
ECU has a matching pair in
Donald and Ronald Reid.
Donald is a starting linebacker
this year for the Pirates, while
Ronald backs up the other inside
linebacker Tyronne Johnson, and
both made their decision to come
to ECU together.
Last year Ronald started the
year as the starting linebacker
before a knee injury put him out
for the season. He still ended up
eighth in tackles for the Pirates
with 45.
Donald started the 1983 season
as a backup defensive end, but
was moved back to linebacker ear-
ly in the season. He was in on 21
tackles in a backup role with a
high of seven tackles against
William & Mary.
They feel no added pressure
when they are in the game at the
same time, in fact they feel more
at ease. "We know where to play
each other. 1 know that if I'm not
going to be there, then he will
Ronald said.
"Both of us can do the same
thing on the field. When we're out
there together, he's just another
guy on the field Donald added.
As far as the defensive play is
concerned, both feel that the
defense is improving, but still has
a way to go. "We didn't think
that we played well at Florida
State. We improved last week, but
we just have to keep getting better
if we want to be one of the top
teams in the country Donald
said.
The brothers are not happy
with the team's performance thus
far in the season, but they are not
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Twin Brothers Donald and Ronald Reid are two ECU football players
who have mutual respect for each other.
ready to lay down and die yet.
They know that the season is more
than just two games long, and
have faith that things will turn
around.
"I'm disappointed that we're
0-2, because I feel that we've that
we've been working hard
Donald said. "I guess we'll just
have to start working a lot harder.
"We can't keep looking at the
first two losses, they're behind us.
Right now we have to pick up the
pieces and play as hard as we can
the rest of the season he added.
"It hurts to lose. We should
have won last week but we made
too many mistakes on offense and
defense Ronald added. "But I
still think that we'll turn it
around
When it comes to Central
Michigan, both of the brothers
know that the Pirates will have to
play well to win. "We played
them in 1982, and they gave us a
pretty good game Ronald said.
"They've been winning about 75
percent of their games since then,
so we know they'll be tough
"Central Michigan will be
tough. Right now we're 0-2 and
that means that we can't take
anybody lightly. I know they'll be
ready for us, so we'd better be
ready for them Donald added.
Defensively, Ronald thinks
"we've got to get wild. We've got
to drive more and more. We did it
some against Temple, but we have
to be more aggressive if we want
to win
After their college playing days
are over, they both have dreams
of making it to the pros, but both
know that they will be able to do
other things if that dream doesn't
come true.
"If God's willing, I hope to get
a professional contract, but if not,
I will pursue a career in correc-
tions, which is my major
Donald said.
Ronald, who is majoring in
driver's education, hopes to coach
or teach if he doesn't make it to
the pros.
One might think that after liv-
ing and playing together for so
many years that they may have
some trouble getting along, but
the brothers remain as close as
ever.
"We've been together all our
lives and a lot of people can't
believe that we can get along, but
we're a close knit family. We have
our disagreements, but we can get
over our arguments because we
love each other
BRYAN HUMBERT - ECU Pnoto L
Offensive coordinator Don Murry said the ECU football team has suffered because inexpereince has erased
the Pirate offense to make metnal mistakes.
Offensive Coordinator Talks
About Ineffective Offense
Bv DON GROSS
Sttff Writer
In their first two games against
Florida St. and Temple University
the ECU offensive football unit
has only managed to put 17 points
on the scoreboard � last year
they scored 70 points agianst
those same two teams.
First-year offensive coordinator
Don Murry said the offense hasn't
played with much emotion, and
that their inexperience has caused
them to make many mental
mistakes. He adds that the blame
cannot be put entirely on the
players. "We're in this together
Murry said. "We, the coaches,
haven't done a good job, and we
won't be able to say we have until
we start winning
The game plan seemed to be as
basic as a Pop Warner's team �
on first down run up the middle,
on second down run the option
and on third down and long play
action pass. Temple was doubtful-
ly surprised by anything the Bucs
tried. "The coaches should have
come up with a better game
plan admitted Murry.
The starting quarterback job is
again up in the air. Ron Jones, the
starter against Temple, had a
miserable night. He went 0 for 4
with one interception. Robbie
Bartlett, who started against the
The offensive line hasn't pro-
vided much protection due to a
number of reasons. Injuries have
kept out potential starters Brad
Henson and Tim Dumas. Tim
Mitchell, Norman Quick and Rich
Autry have all been playing hurt,
which slows them considerably.
"Our offensive line is beat-up
physically states Murry. "It
would be unfair to put all the
blame on them. Right now things
aren't cohesive on offense.
Breakdowns have occured
everywhere � the line, the
quarterbacking, the recieving and
Seminoles, came in at the end of
the second quarter to replace
Jones. He was able to add some
spark by going 3 for 6 with one in-
terception and 49 yards.
Bartlett is working with the first
team this week, but Murry says
that even third-string quarterback
Darrell Speed has a chance to
start. Speed came into the game
against Temple with less than
three minutes to play. He went 2-6
with one interception and 18
yards.
"Our quarterbacks haven't
played well said Murry. "They
have a lack of confidence due to
their lack of success. All three are
excellent athletes, but they are
having problems with their con-
sistency and leadership
the running
The running game can he ea
summed up: two vards and a gra
stain. Reggie Branch, Ec I
number one fullback carried I
ball ten times for just 2t vard-
Tailback Jimmy Walden also ra
the ball ten times but foi onl 2
yards. Tonv Baker, who shares
time with Walden at tailback, a:
ried the ball six times for 15 vard-
"We didn't want to get into
third and long situations com
mented Murrv, "but Temple was
very good at turning all oui
rushing attempts back to the ii
side
The excellent recieving corps
the Pirates possess has bet
sparsely used. The Bucs ended the
game against Temple with onl 61
yards in the air. "We've had no
success with the long ball sav
Murry. "We have to exploit the
defensive backs with our speed
But again, there is no consistent
There are either problems with the
protection, the throwing or with
inconsistent route running
"To win, we need that com
bonation of intensity and per
mance adds Murry. The
players and coaches all care about
the way we've performed V c
so much in need of establishing a
strong team. We definetly have:
done what we are capable of i
was just a pitiful showing







V
iz
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 13, 1984
Pirates' Eight-Game Winning Streak Broken Wan
HOME STREAK ENDS: The
Temple Owls were able to do what
no other team since William &
Mary could � beat East Carolina
in Ficklen Stadium.
The Owls tagged ECU with a
17-0 loss last week in Ficklen
Stadium, snapping the Pirates'
eight-game home winning streak.
Prior to last week, ECU's last
home loss was a 31-21 setback to
William & Mary on Nov. 14,
1981.
The Pirates' record in home
openers dropped to 16-6 with the
loss since ECU moved into he
friendly confines of .Ficklen
Stadium in 1963. East Carolina's
record in home openers dipped to
11-2 in the last 13 years while
Head Coach Ed Emory's mark
fell to 3-2 in the season's first
game in Ficklen Stadium since
becoming head coach in 1980.
RARE SHUTOUT: Last week's
shutout was a rarity in East
Carolina football during recent
years. THe last time an ECU team
was held scoreless prior to Satur-
day night's loss to Temple was
56-0 at the hands of North
Carolina back in 1981.
The last time a Pirate team was
shutout at home was 1971 when
the University of Toledo, a Mid-
American Conference school (as
is this week's opponent, Central
Michigan), tagged the Pirates
45-0.
The shutouts by North Carolina
and Temple are the only two in Ed
Emory's five years as head coach.
FIRST LOSS TO NON-
FLORIDA SCHOOL: The set-
back to Temple also ranked as
ECU's first loss to a non-Florida
opponent since dropping a 30-3
decision to West Virginia in 1982.
Prior to the Temple loss, the
Pirates had lost only four games,
all to Florida schools (Florida
State twice, Florida and Miami-
Florida).
SLUGGISH OFFENSE: East
Carolina could manage only 125
yards of total offense against
Temple, which ranks as the
Pirates' worst showing since their
63-7 loss to Florida State in 1980
when the Pirates could manage
only 102 yards of offense.
East Carolina's 58 yards
rushing was the lowest total since
a 1971 loss to the University of
Tampa (43-7), when ECU rushed
for just 32 yards.
SECOND MEETING: This
week"s meeting between the
Pirates and Central Michigan
marks the second time the two
schools will meet in the last three
seasons. East Carolina captured
the first meeting, a 24-6 victory in
Ficklen Stadium during the 1982
season.
CENTRAL MICHIGAN 1-0: The
Chippewas of Head Coach Herb
Deromedi opened the season in
impressive fashion on Sept. 1 with
a convincing 45-22 victory over
Northern Michigan in Mt. Plea-
sant, MI.
THE LAST TIME: The last time
the Pirates dropped the first three
games of a season was 1971, Son-
ny Randle's first season as head
coach. ECU dropped decisions to
Toledo (45-0), William & Mary
(28-10) and Bowling Green
(47-21). Ironically, Bowling
Green, a Mid-American Con-
ference school, was responsible
for the third loss, and the Pirates
play a MAC opponent this week.
The Pirates also lost the first
three games during the 1970 and
1969 seasons. During those three
seasons of losing the first three
games, the Pirates posted record
of 4-6 (1971), 3-8 (1970) and 2-7
(1969).
THE DEROMEDI ERA: Head
Coach Herb Deromedi has com-
piled an impressive 50-15-2 record
during his seven years at the helm
of CMU. He has won Mid-
American Conference Coach of
the Year honors for his 9-2 MAC
champion team of 1980. The
Deromedi Era reads:
captured twa conference titles and
placed second twice, including last
year's second-place tie with
Toledo.
ECU VS THE MAC: The Pirates
own a 4-3 record against Mid-
American Conference opposition.
ECU is 1-0 vs Central Michigan,
2-2 vs Toledo and 1-1 vs Bowling
Green.
STATE VS STATE: East
Carolina is 1-0 vs the State of
Michigan, with Central Michigan
being the only school from
Michigan the Pirates have ever
faced. CMU is 0-1 vs the State of
North Carolina as EC L is the only
school it has taced.
WORST START. This is the
worst start for Head Coach Ed
Emory since taking over at East
Carolina in 1980. The Piraies
under Emory have never lost the
first two games of the season until
1984. Emory's 1980 team won its
first game over Duke 35-10 before
dropping the next three. His 1981
club also won its first game before
losing the next two while both his
1982 and 1983 teams lost their
first game but bounced back to
win the next two.
1978
1979
1980
1981
1982
1983
The
9-2-0
10-0-1
9-2-0
7-4-0
6-4-1
8-3-0
Chippewas
2nd MAC
1st MAC
1st MAC
3rd MAC
4th MAC
2nd (tie) MAC
are an over-
in pre-season
whelming favorite
polls to capture the MAC title in
1984. During Deromedi's six
season prior to 1984 CMU has
Henry Williams will try to improve upon his return yardage as the Pirate football team takes on Central
Michigan this weekend.
Flag Football Champions Forecasted
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Staff Writer
Although Hurricane Diana has
broken the temperature
somewhat, football fever has hit
the Intramural fields. With 135
teams signed up in Sorority,
Fraternity, Resident Hall and In-
dependent leagues, this season is
sure to be a most competitive and
enjoyable one for all.
The men's defending cham-
pions Third Regiment, are back
and under a new name, Bombs-
quad. Is the new alias an omen �
or has the powerhouse returned to
truly defend their title? Only ti.ne
will tell?
In women's action, the long
defending champion Heart-
breakers decided to retire the
name on a good note witha
Chancellors Trophy under their
belt. Sources say, however, that
old Heartbreakers Never die and
some will be out on the gridiron
under a different name. Word has
it that most of the competition is
more than glad to see the heart
broken!
Well, he had to do it Sneaker
Sam has once again forcasted the
outcome of the 1984 IM�REC
Flag Footbal competition. And
here are his picks
MENS DIVISION
1. BOMBSQUAD
2. MAGNUM FORCE
3. BROOZERS
4. KAPPA SIGMA "A"
5. GARRET FIVE-O
WOMENS DIVISION
1. THE NATURALS
2. THE ENFORCWRS
3. ALPHA DELTA PI
4. TYLERS TERRIFIC
5. SIG EP GOLDEN HEARTS
11 Here is an update of rules par-
ticipants will need to know to en-
joy the season and make it safe
for all!
1. No article of clothing may
cover any portion of a players belt
(5-yard penalty)
2. A pass attempted from the end
zone on a kick-off which falls in-
complete will result in a safety
3. Only one forward pass may be
thrown on any scrimmage play.
4. Roughing the passser is a 15
yard penalty and an automatic
first down.
5. Quick kicks are illegal (15
yards)
Rose Resurrecting
Lowly Cincinnati
(UPI) � Pete Rose picks his
spots better than a car thief.
Since taking over as manager-
player of the Cincinnati Reds, the
43-year-old Rose has used himself
sparingly, mostly choosing to play
against those pitchers he feels he
can best handle.
So far, it has proved to be a
regular steal for the National
League's all-time hit king.
Rose had four hits for the
fourth straight game that he's
started and sparked the Reds to a
7-3 triumph Tuesday night over
the San Francisco Giants.
Rose singled home the Reds'
first run in the first inning off Bill
Laskey and doubled home their
second run in the fifth, again off
Lanskey. He also doubled in the
eighth for the 723rd double of his
career, leaving him two behind
Stan Musial's all-time record.
Rose, who has hit .414 since retur-
ning to the Reds Aug. 26, now has
4,086 hits, 105 behind Ty Cobb's
all-time mark.
But rather than dwell of his
achievements, Rose talked about
rookie center fielder Eric Davis,
who rocketed a three-run homer
for Cincinnati.
"That ball was a bolt Rose
said in describing Davis' sixth
homer in his last eight games, a
drive that ricocheted off the ce-
ment facing below the red seats in
left field well over 400 feet from
home plate. "I've never hit a ball
that far, and they'd have an in-
vestigation of it if I did.
"He's going to be a real
player
"Come Play The Indian
This Fall"
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC
6. Punter must be at least five
yards behind the Hne of scrim-
mage when receiving the snap.
7. Once a blocker has fallen to
hisher knees or below, they may
not attempt to screen block an op-
ponent (illegal block - 15 yards.)
To check for other rules you
may be unsure of, come by Room
204 Memorial Gym and pick up a
copy. Remember: Intramurals is
for evervone
M-F
Minges
3 p.m7 p.m.
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F7 a.m8 a.m.
M-F12Noon-l:30p.m.
M-F3:30-6:30 p.m.
Sat1 p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M-W-F8 p.m9:30 p.m.
Sun.1 p.m5 p.m.
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th9a.m8 p.m.
Friday9a.m5:30p.m.
Sat Sun1 p.m5 p.m.
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th 10 a.m12 noon
M-Th 2 p.m6 p.m.
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3 p.m5:30p.m.
SatSun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
M-Th 9 a.m9 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
MF 9 a.m11 a.m.
1:30 p.m5 p.m.
T-W-Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
Operational Hours Adjusted in
accordance with the seasons.
SUPPORT
PIRATES!
?rf COME SHAG WITH US!
The Prize Winning
Team Of
Judv Bazemore
&
Charlie Wombel
Classes beginning Sept. 18 for 6 weeks
i �� -it. .1 �roiuM hasie�u�
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THE ORIGINAL FAMILY STtAK HOUSE
By TON BRO
Is some wack rel
building a modern i
Stonehenge to b
�'Woodhenge' on the
pus�
Has some ar
bonkers with a work
Crete and wood?
Could it be a sii
aliens to give directiol
forces of evil lurkinj
heavens?
If these possibilities
to your mind upon
posts set in concre
like arrangement
Minges Colesium �
wrong.
What it happ
physical condmor. g
ed for hanc
mainl the m
question to Bill
David Poratta.
and designed the a
from some
Poratta, the Dirt
Physical Educ i
unit, found thai ECt
facilities I .
to thee
physic i
might -
Univers
COLUMBIA. SC
The Univei
has endec the
disputes with tormet
paying a J178,00
settlement
coach Richard Bv
The settlement -
about 11.1 million t
South Carolina has p
head coaches who hav
or forced to -
five years.
.And the last three d
cost the school
S267.000 in legal
penses. a Columbia
reported Tuesda
Bell received a
SI78,000 last week,
torney David Ratchfoi
university decided not
settlement hammerel
federal court
2B
FR
F
SU
KK t
NAMI
�MO.
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(r





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t
i
Broken Handicapped
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTFMBLR 13, 1984
13
80 I hi Piraies
osi the
he season until
am won its
Duke $5 10 before
ee His 1981
1 game before
� Nile both his
si t heir
e : batk to
5
" 4
m. -
fakes onentral
ORT
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6 weeks
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3.19
1

I ltKISISTLAK5
By TONY BROWN
SUff Writer
Is some wacky religious cult
building a modern version of
Stonehenge to be called
�Woodhenge" on the ECU cam-
pus?
Has some art major gone
bonkers with a work titled con-
crete and wood?
could it be a sinister plot by
aliens to give directions to the
forces of evil lurking in the
heavens?
If these possibilities popped in-
to your mind upon seeing the
posts set in concrete with a maze-
like arrangement adjoining
1mges Colesium � you were
wrong.
What it happens to be is a
phsteal conditioning area design-
ed for handicapped students,
mainly the vheelchair-bound. A
question to Bill Cain led to Dr.
Daid Poratta, who conceived
and designed the area, using input
from some handicapped students.
Poratta, the Director of Special
Physical Education for the P.E.
unit, found that ECU was lacking
facilities to give physical training
o these students and also for
physical education teachers who
might be teaching in this area.
"We identified a need through
talking to teachers and
wheelchair-bound students
Poratta said. "We checked with a
commercial firm who pre-
packages similar structures, but
the costs were too great.
"We decided to design our own
course. With two thousand
dollars provided by C.C. Rowe of
the handicapped services depart-
ment and the help of Billy Dunn
and the ECU maintenance people,
it became feasible.
"Since this area is really geared
for the outdoors, it is fitting that
everyone has access to physical
conditioning facilities. The ten
different stations designed with
specific fitness components in
mind will allow exercise that
wasn't available before
According Dr. Poratta, there is
a great need for such exercise.
"Cardiovascular problems can be
reduced or eliminated with exer-
cise he said. "There is a need to
work on flexibility and certain
joints also. This course is designed
so that virtually every wheelchair-
bound student can participate in
some way.
"Part of the course is arranged
to increase mobility with the
wheelchairs. The location next to
Highlight Show To Begin
"
The Department ol Universitv
Unions at East Carolina Universi-
ty will sponsor a weekly ECU
Pirate football post-game
highlight program each Monday
during the football season. The
program will feature Coach Ed
Emory and his coaching staff.
In addition to providing infor-
mation on each future opponent,
game film from the previous con-
tests will be shown.
All of the programs will be held
in Room 221, Mendenhall Student
Center except for the September
17 program which will be held in
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse
Room. There will be no program
on October 15th because of the
Fall Break.
Kickoff time will be 12:30 p.m.
Persons attending may bring their
lunch or visit the Buffet Dining
Room located in the Student
Center. There is no admission
charge for the highlight program
and the public is invited to attend
the special P.E. offices will in-
crease the amount of supervision
available.
"We also plan to do some field-
initiated research in connection
with this added Poratta. "We
want to find out what effect such
a facility will have
The project is now 90 percent
complete and is expected to be
finished soon. "We've had so
many breakdowns in the dorms
said maintanance person Billy
Dunn, "we just haven't been able
to finish. We expect to have it
done by the end of the month
When completed, each training
station will have a sign depicting
the activity for it. The signs were
painted by Warren Chamberlain,
a retired art professor, according
to C.C. Rowe
Dr. Bob Gantt and Dr. Ray
Martinez were other key backers
of the plan that helped push it
through. "Without their support,
it couldn't have been done said
Poratta.
In addition to the special
physical education department's
effort to help the handicapped
with physical training, the Depart-
ment of Intrmural-Recreational
Services provides a variety of
recreational activities for the han-
dicapped in the adapted program.
These specialized services and
programs are for all handicapped
students and were developed for
wheelchair-bound, as well as
visually and hearing impaired
students.
Included in the activities are
organized sport tournaments, in-
formal recreational activities such
as canoeing, exercise and weight
training, swimming, horseback
riding and many others.
The adapted program, as well
as the physical training project is
only the latest for ECU as it
strives to provide the best in han-
dicapped services to its students.
Maryland Hopeful
�� �� iicauunai activities tor trie
University Of South Carolina Settles Disputes
COLUMBIA, S.C. (UPI)
The University of South Carolina
lias ended the last of its legal
disputes with former coaches by
paving a Si78.000 federal court
settlement to former football
coach Richard Bell.
The settlement brought to
about 11.1 million the amount
'h Carolina has paid to four
d coaches who have been fired
'orced to resign over the past
�e years.
�nd the last three court battles
st the school more than
S26000 in legal fees and ex-
penses, a Columbia newspaper
reported Tuesday.
Bell received a check for
$178,000 last week, said his at-
torney David Ratchford, after the
university decided not to appeal a
serflement hammered out in
federal court.
A jury found in July that
Athletic Director Bob Marcum
violated the coach's contract
when Bell was fired in 1982.
Jurors awarded Bell $150,000
and U.S. District Judge Clyde
Hamilton added $21,000 in in-
terest. Ratchford said the univer-
sity agreed to contribute $7,000 to
Bell's legal fees.
Marcum said fired Bell, now
defensive coordinator at Duke
University, for insubordination
after the coach finished with a 4-7
record and refused an order to fire
four assistant coaches.
Bell claimed in his lawsuit that
the school unlawfully dismissed
him for having a poor season and
used Marcum's order as a lever to
get rid of him.
The coach was not available for
comment on payment of the set-
tlement.
Besides the Bell settlement, the
school paid nearly $507,000 to
former athletic director and foot-
ball coach Jim Carlen, $20,000 to
former women's basketball coach
Pam Parsons and $400,000 to to
former basketball coach Frank
McGuire.
Carlen was fired in 1981 after
serving seven years in top athletic
and football posts.
Parsons, who resigned under
pressure from school officials in
1982, accepted $20,000 to drop a
lawsuit over her firing.
She later filed a lawsuit against
Time Inc publishers of Sports Il-
lustrated, which ran an article
charging she had a lesbian rela-
tionship with one of her players.
A federal jury in June rejected her
claims against the publication.
McGuire was replaced in 199
and was paid $100,000 a year for
four years.
Information The Columbia
Record obtained under the state
Freedom of Information Act in-
dicates the school paid outside at-
torneys $231,459.60 in cases in-
volving Bell, Carlen and Parsons.
The Columbia law firm of
former Gov. Robert McNair
represented South Carolina in all
three cases.
South Carolina also paid
$35,717.21 in legal expenses to
reimburse lawyers and witnesses
for travel expenses, photocopying
and taking statements from par-
ties involved in the cases.
"The legal fees reflect money-
paid to outside lawyers said the
university's general counsel Paul
Ward. "The figure does not take
into account for the time the
university's staff lawyers spent on
these cases
COLLEGE PARK, Md. (UPI)
- Four lost fumbles and a pair of
interceptions were enough to leave
Maryland football Coach Bobby
Ross shaking his head Tuesday,
but not upset enough to bang it
against the wall of his office.
Those mistakes, among others,
sent the Terrapins reeling to a 23-7
loss to Syracuse last Saturday.
Despite the margin and the way it
came about, Ross has not vet
reached for the panic button.
"Oh, we're going to get better
before we get worse Ross said
Tuesday. "But it's going to come
from within.
"We just have to get our kids
concentrating on themselves and
their jobs, not our opponent. I'm
not mad, not at the players or
anyone. We've just got to get
back playing to our fullest
abilities
Ross made no personnel
changes Tuesday as the Terrapins
went to work preparing for
Vanderbilt, which visits Byrd
Stadium Saturday afternoon. The
Commodores, 1-0, downed Kan-
sas State. 26-14, last week.
He did, however, throw the
tight end spot up for grabs among
seniors Bill Rogers, who transfer-
red from Navy two vears ago
Ron Fazio and red-shirt freshman
Ferrell Edmunds. Rogers started
last week, but all three plaved.
Juniors Tony Edwards and
John Maarleveld will battle this
week for the left tackle spot, too.
"We need better control of the
line of scrimmage at the point of
attack Ross said. "That's
something we didn't have last
week.
"So we'll let our tight ends bat-
tle it out this week. We need their
play at a high level to be able to do
the things we need to do offen-
sively
The Terrapins also need to hang
onto the football. Their turnovers
led to three field goals and a
touchdown for Syracuse.
Most upsetting to Ross were the
turnovers that weren't caused by
the Orangemen, but by Terrapins
Two of the fumbles were just
dropped by Terrapins. Two of the
fumbles were just dropped by
ball-carriers, another was on a
muffed kickoff and one intercep-
tion was on a pass that quarter-
back Frank Reich overthrew by 10
yards.
Ross watched films to discover
exactly what happened, but then
set about working toward the
Commodores. First, however he
talked to the players about what
lies ahead.
Ross emphasized the "little
things" he said weren't executed
properly against Syracuse, but
must be performed this week.
"Maryland football is still alive
and thriving Ross said. "Our
defense played well despite the
pressure situations it was forced
into.
"Offensively and on special
teams, though, we were a mess of
inconsistencies. We had one
player calling a blocking scheme
and another lineman didn't hear
it. We had a lineman who didn't
step the right way to make a
block. Both of those mistakes cost
us lost yardage and kept us from
moving the football
Ross smiled broadly as he look-
ed at the blank paper that normal-
ly would have contained the Ter-
rapins' injury list.
"We didn't have anyone in-
jured in the game, so that's
something to build on right
there Ross said.
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�THE EAST CAROLONlAN SEPTEMBER 13.
1984
Are The Experts Really Experts ?
ECV at CENTRAL MICHIGAN
VMI at VIRGINIA
VANDERBILT at MARYLAND
NAVY at INC
ALABAMA at GA. TECH
FIRMAN at N.C. STATE
APPALACHIAN STATE at WAKE FOREST
AUBURN at TEXAS
MIAMI at PURDUE
OKLAHOMA at PITTSBURGH
NOTRE DAME at MICHIGAN STATE
KENTUCKY at INDIANA
WEST VIRGINIA at VIRGINIA TECH
ARKANSAS at MISSISSIPPI
RANDY MEWS
5-5 .500
ECU
Virginia
Maryland
UNC
Alabama
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Auburn
Miami
Pittsburgh
Notre Dame
Kentucky
Va. Tech
Arkansas
JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
4-6 .400
ECU
Virginia
Vandy
UNC
Alabama
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Texas
Miami
Pittsburgh
Notre Dame
Kentucky
Va. Tech
Mississippi
SCOTT POWERS
5-5 .500
ECU
Virginia
Maryland
UNC
Alabama
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Auburn
Miami
Oklahoma
Notre Dame
Indiana
Va. Tech
Arkansas
GREG RIDEOUT
5-5 .500
ECU
Virginia
Maryland
UNC
Alabama
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Texas
Miami
Pittsburgh
Notre Dame
Kentucky
Va. Tech
Mississippi
TINA MAROSCHAK
5-5 .500
ECU
Virginia
Maryland
UNC
Ga. Tech
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Texas
Miami
Pittsburgh
Notre Dame
Kentucky
Va. Tech
Arkansas
SAD SAM
5-5 .500
Central Michigan
Virginia
Vandy
UNC
Alabama
N.C. State
Wake Forest
Auburn
Miami
Oklahoma
Notre Dame
Kentucky
Va. Tech
Arkansas
Steinbrenner Involved In Latest Gator
Violations, NCAA brings 107 Charges
GAINESVILLE. Fla. (UPI)
The other shoe has fallen on the
University of Florida's football
program with disclosure that the
NCAA has brought 107 charges
against the Gators and its ram-
bunctious boosters, including
New York Yankees owner George
Steinbrenner.
Strict sanctions are sure to
follow, observers said today.
University President Marshall
M. Criser reported Tuesday the
NCAA has charged Florida's
coaches, officials and "represen-
tatives of the university's athletic
interests" illegally provided
players and recruits with moen.
junkets, automobiles and meals.
The allegations, contained in a
74-page "letter of inquiry" Criser
received Tuesday, cover a period
from 1976 into the current season.
They result from a 21-month-lorg
investigation of Florida's football
program that gave ise to
numerous leaks of inf mation.
The NCAA asked the ? ool for
explanations by Sept 18.
News of the charges caused
football coach Charley Pell to
tender his resignation Aug. 26
with a request to remain in his job
Grant ham,
Richards
Win Honor
GREENSBORO, N.C. (UPI)
� Julius Grantham, who came
off the bench to lead Duke to a
31-24 win over Indiana, and
North Carolina State tackle A.V.
Richards have been named the
Atlantic Coast Conference's of-
fensive players-of-the-week.
Offensive back honors went to
Grantham, while Richards was
recognized for his performance on
the line.
Grantham, a 6-foot, 185-pound
sophomore from Belleville, 111
suffered a thumb injury 19 days
ago. That prevented him from
starting but the tailback came in
to rush for 141 yards on 31 car-
ries. Grantham carried the ball all
seven plays on the Blue Devils'
final 40-yard drive, which proved
to be the winning touchdown.
During the game, he also caught
three passes for 29 yards.
Richards, ,a 6-foot-4,
270-pound senior from Hender-
son, received a grade of 88 percent
for the game as the Wolfpack
racked up 533 yards of total of-
fense against Ohio University. On
pass blocking, Richards earned a
grade of 91 percent as North
Carolina State completed 16 of 26
pass attempts for 202 yards.
The selections were made by a
special committee of the Atlantic
Coast Sport writers Association.
through this season, ending Dec.
1.
C riser refused at his news con-
ference to comment whether he is
considering dismissal of ell
before the current season en 1-
Pell, who has hired by FK ida
in 1979, was charged with arrang-
ing for students to get $935 for
work not performed. He also was
accused of arranging for two peo-
ple to purchase complimentary
season football rickets from
numerous players for amounts
"substantially in excess of face
value of the tickets the NCAA
said.
The NCAA alleged the players
sold the complimentary tickets for
amounts ranging up to S800.
Pell also was charged with
authorizing assistant coaches to
file false expense vouchers for
funds to provide prospective
athletes with university caps,
T-shirts and other paraphernalia.
H? was accused of establishing a
$4,000 fund for activities pro-
hibited by the NCAA, including
scouting and salary supplements
for assistant coaches.
From 1976 through 1980, the
NCAA said, Steinbrenner gave
players trips to a Tampa race
track, up to $500 cash for the
players' complimentary football
tickets, board and lodging for a
player employed at Tampa Downs
race track and a junket to the race
track.
Names of the players involved
were blacked out in copies of the
letter furnished reporters.
The letter asks the university to
clarify the reasons Steinbrenner
acted the way he did.
Criser told the news conference
a former assistant academic ad-
viser, Michael Brown, had admit-
ted to university lawyers he spied
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illegally on a number of Florida
opponents before games. Criser
said he has apologized to the
presidents of six universities that
had been scouted illegally by
Brown and offered to forfeit six
games involved.
Those games were played
against the University of Califor-
nia at Berkley, the University of
Mississippi, Mississippi State, the
University of Louisville and
Auburn in 1980, and Florida Stae
in 1981.
"The existence of this illegal
scouting has been previously
denied by our coaching staff to
the NCAA investigators and to
our attorneys Criser said.
Assistant football coaches were
charged with lending cars to
players for as long as a semester,
and boosters with providing low-
rate loans for cars and selling cars
below wholesale.
The Sports Staff
Salutes
Ronald Reagan
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 13, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 13, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.359
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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