The East Carolinian, September 11, 1984






�he
(Earniintan
Serving the East Carolina campus communit
V since 1925
Vol.59 No.6
Tuesday September 11, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Downtown Club
Destroyed In Fire
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
One of Greenville's landmark
nightclubs was lost when the At-
tic, 103 E. Fourth St was
destroyed by fire early Sunday
morning.
According to Greenville Assis-
tant Fire Chief Don Mills, the fire
was reported by a passerby at 3:44
a.m. Sunday and fire fighters ar-
rived on the scene a minute later.
Mills said the blaze was brought
under control a; six a.m but fire
fighters stayed until 12:30 that
afternoon to make sure it was out.
"The fire is under investiga-
tion Mills said, adding he did
relt it was caused by a cigarette.
Mills does not feel the fire is a
result of arson. Three engine com-
panies responded to the fire. No
injuries were reported.
"The building and its contents
are a complete loss said Attic
owner Tom Haines. No im-
mediate estimate of the cost of the
damage is available. The building
itself is owned by Charles
Flanagan of Greenville. Two
items saved were Haines' desk and
a gold record presented to the At-
tic by the Outlaws, due to the ef-
forts of Captain Smith of the
Greenville Fire Department, who
entered the burning building to
retrieve them, according to
Haines. The fire was started by a
cigarette underneath the mixing
board console, Haines said. Ap-
parently, the cigarette smoldered
for some time before the fire
broke out.
"The band had only been out
20 to 30 minutes before the fire
department was called Haines
said. "We had a full house he
added. "Thank God it didn't hap-
pen while everyone was here
Despite the fact that the
building was destroyed, the Attic
will remain open, Haines said.
"We've got some hot bands com-
ing up and we definitely didn't
want to leave the bands in the cold
when bands lose a date it's as
devastating to them as us losing
the Attic
The Attic will open at the King
and Queen North this weekend.
Haines said the same cover charge
will be in effect, although students
will be advised that this is a
minimum cover charge and they
should pay whatever they feel they
can afford.
Haines is uncertain of future ar-
rangements for the club. The in-
surance "doesn't even come
close" to covering the building
and its contents he said, so financ-
ing is needed. As a result, a
Friends of the Attic Fire Fund has
been established. The fund has
been set up for the purpose of tak-
Attic Devastation
NEIL JOHNSON - ECU Photo Lab
Allic Manager Joe Tronlo (above) in from or what is left of the Aflic Af riehl two
Conway Chosen Chair
At Monday Meeting
Bv JENNIFER JENDRASIAK �
N�� r.lilo,
A new Media Board chairman
was selected at the semester's first
meeting of the ECU Media Board
Monday.
IFC President Glenn Conway
was elected chairman for the
1984-85 school year. Conway suc-
ceeds Mark Niewald, who was the
1983-84 chairman.
"As chairman, 1 intend to keep
up the tradition of smooth-
running media Conway said. "I
vant to keep up with the general
managers and be responsive to
their needs "
"Things are going fine now
compared to a year ago when peo-
ple on the board were still getting
their feet wet he added.
Conway said all the media are
in good condition, with the excep-
tion of the tbony Herald but he
intends to remedy that as soon as
possible.
An acting general manager has
been appointed for the Ebony
Herald although applications for
Cheers
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
ECU football fans always have a good time, even when the game
turns out the way last weekend's did.
On The Inside
Announcements2 jssue. Identifying the campus
editorials4 landmarks correctly could win
eatures7 a uc(y freshman a dinner for
uassifieds9 tw0 al Ramada Inn. Two new
ports10 pictures appear in today's
�The photo contest for issue. See page 6 for the pic-
freshmen continues in this tures and contest details.
ing out an advertisement in Roll-
ing Stone magazine making a na-
tional appeal for donations.
"It's (the loss of the Attic) not
just the loss of a club, it's the loss
of an institution Haines said,
adding that the Attic is the oldest
club in a three or four state area
and is what he believes to be the
only club to have a national
broadcast on a major television
network. This took place when
the Pointer Sisters appeared at the
club in 1982.
Haines said there are several
options for relocation of the club.
"One option is rebuilding the ex-
isting building and there are three
or four different locations
available downtown He said he
wanted a location "at least as
good or better" than the previous
location.
However. Haines said, it is not
the building that matters, but the
concept of t he club. "The
building may be gone, but the At-
tic is in the minds of the people �
it is the people he said.
"We had a goal 13 years ago
In National Competition
and it has taken us 13 years to get
what we wanted and we're not go-
ing to stop now because of a
fire
The arrangement with the King
and Queen North will allow
almost all the bands to appear,
although four or five dates are not
possible. Haines said. O'Boy will
not appear Thursday, but Avalan-
che will appear Friday and Satur-
day, the Back Doors will perform
next Thursday, Snow wiil appear
Sept. 22, Secret Service the 2"th
and Glass Moon the 29th. Also,
AN HUMBERT - FCU Photo t D
hast Forward will appear in a free
concert at ECU on Sept. 22.
Haines added 'ha: for those in-
terested, the Attic t shirts that
were salvaged arc available at Ap-
ple Records and maj be obtained
for a donation. "Because of oui
insurance situation, we're going
to be looking for anything and
everything we can get he sa
adding that he'd like to thank
those who hae offered supp
and help.
"Damn it, we are going to con
tinue going he saiJ
Rebel Chosen AH American
Conway
the position will be accepted until
Sept. 17. "I still expect a paper to
be out the 17th Conway said.
In other board action, Kirk
Shelley was selected as a day
representative and Susan Duncan
was appointed general manager of
WZMB
By HAROLD JOYNER
Auttotant New t-dlior
The Associated Collegiate Press
recently awarded The lot4 Rebel
an honor rating of All American,
editor Ellen Moore said Monday.
The Rebel received 54 score
points out of a possible 50 points
(they received four bonus points)
and received four marks of
distinction. They included graphic
design and typography;
photography and art; content
writing and editing; and general
concept oi the literary-art
magazine of ECU. Moore, who is
also editor of the 1985 Rebel, said
she was pleased to hear the
magazine did so well.
According to Moore, the judges
of the ACP have invited the Rebel
to be entered in the National
Pacemaker competition. "We
haven't heard any details, et
Moore said, "but I'm pretty sure
we'll be competing with other All
American winners. She also said
the judges thought the Rebel was
an exceptional literary-art
magazine. Senior Art major Cam
Sloan received special recognition
for her art work in the Rebel.
Moore said the format for the
1985 Rebel will be similar to last
year's. "A lot of emphasis on pro-
of reading our literary works will
be our primarv aim this year.
Also, we are looking for some ex-
ceptional artists to submit their
work to us
Anybody wishing to submit
work to the 1985 Rebel mav Jo so
now, Moore said. The Rebel of-
fice is located on the second floor
of the old cafeteria building,
across from Joyner Library.
Asbestos Not Campus Health Hazard
By HAROLDJOYNER
Auislint Nun rH�l
The recent renovations of
several buildings on campus have
raised some questions concerning
the presence of asbestos in cam-
pus buildings and the safety of
their occupants.
Arthur Colclogh, director of
Occupational Health and Safety
said any asbestos that may have
been present in campus buildings
has since been removed. "Ever
since the guidelines were set by the
state and government agencies for
the amount of asbestos allowed in
buildings Colclogh said, "we
have treated the problem by com-
plete!) removing it (the asbestos)
in plastic bags in compliance with
the proper regulatory agencies
In areas involving a heavy
amount of traffic, Colclogh said
the problem areas were covered
with several layers of paint.
"There is not a problem as long as
the asbestos is not in the air
Colclogh added, "We simply
covered the material to keep it
from falling. It wouldn't be safe
to take the asbestos out, too many
particles would contaminate the
air
Many of the buildings in ques-
tion were constructed in the
mid-1920s. At that time, asbestos
was used in floor tiles, wall cover-
ings, cabinet linings, and ceilings.
The building contracts, which are
on view at J.Y. Jovner I ibrar
University Archives Collection,
stated the buildings would be con-
structed "as fireproof structures
consisting of concrete and brick
along with other top quality
materials One looking closely at
the conraets will f���j the material
asbestos was used in construction
of those buildings.
Colclogh said ECU has been
surveyed by the state agencies
under the Department of Human
Resources. He said all of their
recommendations for treatment
of asbestos "were carried out by
ECU or private contractors
Colclogh also said the joint and
pipe insulation problem stated by
The East Carolinian was cor-
rected. "The renovations he
said, "are not over, vet. There is
going to be a tot of dust down in
the basement of Fleming Dorm
Hunt, Helms Battle In Vicious Debate
WILMINGTON (UPI) � Sen
Jesse A. Helms, R-N.C, and
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. battled
each other Sunday in a rancorous
debate � each accusing the other
of intentionally misleading the
voters of North Carolina.
The two met in the second of a
series of debates in their race for
the Senate, and it was clear from
the start that Helms had heeded
advice from supporters to take the
initiative against Hunt.
Helms, in his opening state-
ment, said he was astonished at
the tone Hunt had taken in their
first debate July 29 in Raleigh.
"The governor came with
boastful claims and with hit-and-
run tactics on my positions
Helms said. "He made the in-
credible claim he has never chang-
ed his position on any issue, a
claim the people of North
Carolina simply know is not
true
Helms, seeking his third term,
said the "foremost issue" in the
campaign is credibility. The peo-
ple of the state know that Hunt
has often changed positions on
the issues, he said.
Any civility between the two
men was quickly dispatched when
Helms asked Hunt about Hunt's
position on a national holiday
honoring the late Dr. Martin
Luther King Jr.
Helms, who led congressional
opposition to the holiday, main-
tained that Hunt had taken out
ads in black-owned newspapers in
support of the holiday and had
not run those ads in other
newspapers. He accused the
governor of attempting to hide his
support of the King holiday from
a majority of the people.
Hunt, describing Helms' charge
as "absolutely untrue said he
supported the national holiday
and that the people of the state
know it. He charged that Helms is
attempting to turn race relations
back.
"Jesse, this is 1984 and this is
North Carolina Hunt said.
"This is a progressive state. We
are not going to go back now and
open those old wounds.
"That is what you want to do.
You want to open the old wounds,
fight the old battles all over
again
Hunt then accused Helms of
standing up for oil companies at
the expense of the taxpayers, pro-
mpting Helms to charge that Hunt
was "demagoging this issue
"You are talking through your
hat, governor, and you know it
said Helms, jabbing his finger at
Hunt.
Hunt replied, "You are getting
all hot and bothered and we have
just started the debate. Just calm
down and let's get on with these
questions
The two also clashed on educa-
tion, with Hunt accusing Helms
of voting against federal pro-
grams that would have improved
North Carolina schools. But
Helms said he had not voted
against education only voted
against federal involvement in
education. He then criticized
Hunt's educational programs.
"You have jerked the teachers
around on pay raises Helms
told Hunt. "They got pay raises
each time you were running for
election or re-election
Both candidates could often be
heard making comments while the
other was speaking, and both
chided the other at times. At one
point. Hunt said he would ask to
be on the Agriculture Committee
if elected to the Senate.
"You won't get there Helms
could be heard saying.
Earlier, Helms had described
Hunt's chances of getting to the
Senate as "an unlikely event
Discussing Hunt's criticism on
Helms' votes on tax cuts, Helms
claimed Hunt is not familiar with
the way the Senate works.
"He always brings up these sort
of things because he really doesn't
understand the process or either
he wants to convolute it or distort
it Helms said.
Hunt attacked Helms on his
positions on disarmament, saying
Helms is opposed to even talking
with the Soviet Union about arms
control.
"People want to see tndr
leaders talk he said. "We have
got to talk to try to find out a way
to keep us from blowing this
world up
But Helms said that Hunt was
mistaken about Helms' record on
disarmament.
?
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 11, 1984
Announcements
AMBASSADORS
WowiiihawooMrMcoodgonorai mootingat5:00
p.m , Wednesday September n In the Mendenhall
Multipurpose room. Wo hove many exciting ac
tlvltlo� to dlKUU.
BINGO ICE CREAM PARTY
The S'utfent union Recreation Committee is
sooosir.ng a B'Pgo Ice Cream Pa'ty to be held on
Tuesday. September 11th at 7:00 p.m in the Mult i
Puroose Room All ECU students, faculty, staff,
their dependents and guests are welcome. Admis
sion is 25 cents Piay 8 different omgo games for
prizes and eat delicious ice cream
PHYE MAJORS
aii students who plan to declare physical educa
tion as a major should report t0 M.nges Coliseum
�' 1.00 p m Wednesday. September 19 for a motor
and physical fitness test Satisfactory perfor-
mance on this test is required as a prerequisite for
official admittance to the physical education ma-
ior program More detailed information is
available by calling 757 641 or 6442
PRE PHYSICAL THERAPY
STUDENTS
Deadline for 1985 admission to professional
phase is November l. 1984 All general college and
physical therapy orerequis'tes must bo com
pie'ed by end of Spring, 1985 Allied Health Pro-
fessions Admissions Test must be taken In
November (apply early October) Application
packets are to be picked up October 5, 1984 in the
"ivsical Therapv Department Office (Belk
Building, Annex 3 ?57 awi Ext 261)
ECU ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The ECU Accounting Society will hold its first
- e'ng sep��mN;r it " Interested persor.s are
� -�d attei d Tr� guest stM?�er wiD be Wr
Ptirney James of the ECU Piaroment Office The
ieet "u will te he-d in Mendenho'i Student
r pose Room at 4 30 p m
OIOLOGYCLUB
PERSONAL DEVELOPMENT
Beginning Conversational German, Sept 13, In
termediate Conversational German, Sept 13,
Middle Eastern Oance, Sept 15, Piano For
Adults, Sept 15, Guitar, Sept. 26, Speed Reading,
Sept 27, Contact Div of Continuing Education,
Erwin Hall (757 6143)
CHEMISTRY MAJORS
The American Chemical Society Student Af
filiates will hold their next meeting at 7 30 on
Wednesday Sept 12 in Room 204 Flanagan All in
terested science maiors are invited
BIG BROTHER RUSH
The Big Brothers of Alpha Omicrom Pi will
have an important meeting on Wednesday, Sept
12 at 7 00 p.m at the AOTT house. We will be
discussing Big Brother rush plans, if you cannot
attend the meeting please call Todd at 758 9793 or
the AOTT house
BLOOD DRIVE
The Air Force Reserve Officers Training Corps,
along with the Red Cross will be sponsoring a
Blood Drive on September 18 & 19 in the
Mendenhall Student 'enter Room 244. We urge
everyone to please come donate a pint of life.
STUDENTS FOR HELMES
All interested persons in working for Helmes
Campaign are urged to attend a meeting Tues
day, Sept 11 at 7 00 The meeting will be held in
Mendenhall We will be discussing projects for
this Fall. For any information, call 752 8434
HAPPY HOUR
Alpha Phi Alpha and Alpha Kappa Alpha would
like to announce a Happy Hour. Thursda
September 13th 1984 25 cents draft, $7 00 admis
sion at Papa Katz 10th St ext r 30 until 2 0c
Come on out and lets get live
TELEPHONE WORKERS
Part time telephone workers needed Apply in
person at 308 Evans Street Mail.
OMEGA PSI PHI
The Brothers of Omega Psi Phi Fraternity Inc
would like to invite all interested young men to at
tend their fall Smoker, Thursday, September 13,
8 00 p m at the Ledonia S Wright Cultural
Center 'Friendship is essential to the soul
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
Little Sister Rush will be held on Sept. 17 & 18
starting at 9 30 p m Come out and meet great
guys and super girls! The Little Sisters look for-
ward to meeting any girls interested in becoming
Lambda Chi Alpha Little Sisters themselves! Ifs
a great opportunity Call 752 6159 for any infor-
mation
FRISBEECLUB
Hey Frisbee Players The ECU Frisbee Disc
Club is flying General membership meeting
Tuesday night 8 30 Mendenhall Student Center.
Be there The botton of College Hill Drive Tues
Thurs, and Sun 5 00 everyone is invited Watch
for Natural Light Ultimax on Oct. 20.
DZ BIG BROTHERS
Yes! We are still here and have 32 wonderful
pledges for you to meet All active Big Brothers
will have a very important meeting Wednesday,
Sept 19 at 7 00 at the house Please be prompt and
call if you can't attend
FELLOWSHIP
Fun. faith, fellowship that's what Inter Varsity
Christian Fellowship is all about! Join us this
Wednesday night at the Jenkins Building
Auditorium for our talk on "Missions- "Vized
Hearts for The Lord " The meeting starts at 7:u�.
We hope to see you there, and bring along a
fiend
COR SO & N AS W MEETING
Ali Socdi Work and Corrections Maiors and In
tended Maiors are ui ged to attend Monday. Sept
17, 1984 at 4 00 p m Room 105 Allied Health. Get
involved in 'und raisers, community service, and
part es Come and mee' people in the department.
a stu ients Afo express an interest in Biology
��-( re!afed sciences are cordially invited to
n r c 6 oiogy Out) meef;ng and cookout
Wednei � -otember 12 at 630 p.m The
kout w Be behind the Biology bu;ldmg and
� r�et ng I follow in BN 102 Plans for the
anni v a- - ish w oe discussed and committees
be . � osen or the uocoming ear New pro
spective members and old -nactive members
welcome i �
SURF CLUB-TEAM
rjvje ��- sman turnout at �r.e first meeting, no of
cers �e elec'eo it was decided to hold the
�oam trials this Sunoav at the Rodanthe Pier in
Hatterasaf 00 a - Spectators are welcome All
ers nteresteo should contact johnny Ghee at
� 6667 or Dave Colby at 58 2392 before this Fri
s,�Ce there will be no meerng this week A
rr-ee "q is scheduled to be neia next week and
plans for the fan break trip to Florida will be
ma te them
ASSERTIVENESS WORKSHOP
A 'hree part workshop offered to students at NO
COST by the University Counseling Center Thurs
dav. Seotember 20. 27. and October 4 All three
sessions will be conducted from 3 4 p m in 306
Wight Annex (757 6661) The workshop will focus
or- helping members distinguish between their
assertive, aggressive, and rtonasserti ve
heha ors Participants can'earn how to express
thpr-iselves directly and openly, and respond to in-
terpersonal situations in a manner which neither
compromises individual beliefs nor offends
Others PLEASE CALL COUNSEL'NG CENTER
FOR REGISTRATION (757 6661 I
CSCIMATH MAJORS
Great Co op jobs available for Spring and Sum
mer! Several jobs have application deadlines of
September 25. 1984 Must have GPA of 2 5 or bet
ter and a good grade n at least 1 programming
-ours- Graduate and undergraduate 100s Come
t0 Rawi 313 now to make an appointment to see a
coordinator about these jobs
NIH
A r, -resentative from the National institute of
Health, Be'hesda. MD will be on campus October
1 and 2 to interview students who would like to be
healh research assistants in their Normal
Volunteer Program beginning Spring, 1985
Students will participate m experiments and
rpsearch regarding disease control and the
human body Will receive 112.50 oer day stipend
plus free room and board, and transportation paid
to and f-om NIH Students in the health, natural
sciences, comouter science, and business fields
who may be nterested should contact the Coop
office, 313 Rawl, immediately to sign up for arnn-
terview.
COPING WITH STRESS
ARE YOU UNDER PRESSURE?? COPING
with STRESS A free mini class offered by the
ECU Counseling Center for students: Three Pro-
grams: Program I: September 19, 20, 24, 25 at 3 4
p.m 305 Wright Annex, Program II: October
8 11, 12 p m 305 Wright Annex, Program III:
November 7, 8, 12, 13, 3-4 p.m 305 Wright Annex
No advance registration is required. Call or stop
Py the ni-nseimg Center for further information
(30" Wright Annex, 757 6661)
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Service in
the Bloxton House is offering one hour sessions to
help vou prepare your own resume. Few
graduates get jobs without some preparation.
Many emoioyers request a resume showing your
education and experience. Sessions to help will be
held in the Career Planning Room at 3 p.m. Come
on any of the following dates: September 12, 18, 27
or September 19 at 7 p m.
TRAVEL WITH QUIXOTE
Welcome to ECU Students
Don't forget: Thanksgiving & Xmas travel
Book now and pay several weeks before travel
Ski trips and cruises also arranged.
Call or come by: QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
- 319 Cotanche St.
NCJ Greenville. NC 27834
W Phone 757-0234
� JO
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
Presents
? e7 &'
DRAFT NITE
Tue Sept. 11, 1984 9:00-2:00am
Adm.$1.50 18yrs. $1.00
?
10 c DRAFT ALL NIGHT
COME EARLY
WHY RENT ?
For less than dorm or apartment rent
you could:
1. Buy your own home
2. Enjoy peace and privacy
3. Invest in the future
STOP BY AND SEE HOW

� � �
HOMES
626 W. Greenville Blvd. 756 - 5434
Your Two Best Choices For Printing
"When You Need It � The Way You Want It
The
With Reasonable Prices"
Greenville Printing Company
� Commercial Printing
� 4 Color Process Printing
� Typesetting It Design
811 West 9th Street
-7M-478Q
Specializing In:
Full Service & Self Service
Xerox Copies
� Automatic Collation
� Resumes
� Graphic Camera Service
Located Downtown in
The Georgetown Shops
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
COMMUNITY
Need a place to relax and get together with
friends this Wednesday Then join us at the ECU
Newman Center for a worship service, followed
by a meeting and dinner We'll have a lot to talk
about, including our upcoming beach retreat, so
plan to join us at 5 00 p.m. Wednesday and take a
break among friends!
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of Holy Commu
nion will be celebrated on Tuesday evening, Sept.
11 in the chapel of St. Paul's Episcopal Church,
406 4th St. (one block from Garrett Dorm). The
service will be at 5 30 p.m. with the Episcopal
Chaplain, the Rev. Bill Hadden, celebrating.
RHOEPSILON
All persons interested in Real Estate, please at
tend the first organizational meeting for the Fall
semester. We need new members before loining
the National Organization The meeting will be
Wednedsay, Sept. 12. In Rawl 103 at 300.
BAKE SALE
The Brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha along with
their ladies of black and gold are conducting a
bake sale on Wednesday Sept. 12,1984, outside the
Student Supply Store. Stop by and enoy our edible
delights.
MANAGEMENT
All students are invited to attend the first
meeting of the Society For Advancement of
Management You do not have to be a Business
Major to join. Refreshments will be served!
Meeting will be at 300 on Wed the 12th in Rawl
104. Guest speaker will be Dr Gooding, Head of
the Management Dept
TEAM HANDBALL
Anyone interested in playing team handball for
the ECU Club Team should contact Jeff Humbert
(752-M35) or Willie Ehling (757 6387) for more in
formation All levels of experience are welcome
to play.
RUGBY
Interested In playing this intense sport? Prac
tice begins Tues. Sept u at 4 00. behind the
Allied Health Building Everyone invited, no ex
perience needed Practices are Tues . Wed , and
Thursdays af 4 00 Must be willing to travel and
meet people East Carolina Rugby is ECU'S oldest
club, established 1975 Rugby is elegant violence1
GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE
A representative from the U S General Accoun
ting Office. Virginia Beach, VA will be on campus
October 23, 1984 to interview co op students who
would like to work as GAO Evaluators Accoun
ting majors who have completed 60 semester
hours and have a 2 9 GPA or higher, should con
tact the Co-op office, 313 Rawl Bidg to arrange an
Interview immediately
ALPHA PHI BIO IROTMtRS
The big brothers �rtat to wticwm me sister
purkjei of Alpna Phi Sorority Wo nop to moot
you oil mn Thursday at the house Remember,
me next Big Brother meeting will bo Wednesday
the 12th at 3 00 Call Bob ot 758 0045 If you cannot
attend
CHORAL SOCIETY AUDITIONS
Rehearsal for the 15th season of the Greenville
Choral Society will commence a� 7 30 p m ,
September 11, 1984 at the immanuel Baptist
Church The Society invites all singers who are m
terested in participating .n the preparation for the
three concerts to be gven ,n 1984 �o call Ms
Carolyn Greene ipock. 355 2717 to arrange tor
voice placement auditions which will be heio on
September 11 at 7 00 p m at the Church
SRAH
By ERNEST ROBERTS
Maff Wrlicr
The Department of Residence
Life and the University Counsel-
ing Center will present a program
to help students make a smooth
tr
Gr
is
fr�
adj
Rel
JERRY'S SWEET SHOP
Come see us at our new location in THE PLAZA,
across from Radio Shack on Arlington Blvd. Call us
for your birthday cakes, pastries, cookies,
- and doughnuts.
5? 355 . 2832 A '
9 V
ECU Campu
Help Catch
B HAROLD JOVNER
mtstaat Vt�i MHor
Three ECU campus policemen
recently assisted the Greenville
Police Department in capturing a
�suspected car thief on the ECU
campus.
Detective Gene McAbee of the
Campus Public Safety Office
he and two other campus
policemen received word from the
Greenville Police Department that
a suspected car thief was running
from 5th street to the campuv
The campus police began to chase
the Greenville man past Fleming
Residence Hall, the librarv. and
I
ill
-758-2400
oPfmons
MENS WEAR
and
Khaki
We are not sure about
the validity of the thought
that KHAKI was a World
War II invention, but we
do know that immediately
afterwards there was a
sudden appearance of the
fabric in every young
man's Wardrobe in this
country. The love affair
continues to persist. For
Fall 1984 you can expect
to see KHAKI pants as a
basic for young men on
campus or for any man's
weekend Wardrobe. And.
1 suppose, we all know
that there is no friend like
that' special pair of
KHAKi pants that have
been washed until they are paper thin, .and who
cares about the wrinkles' At all of our Coffman's
stores we are going to be offert g. a special value
to the true KHAKI customer
100 Cotton Khaki Pants
IT Duckheads Z pair for O .ZD
IT our own Coffman's SC7 Cd
Fine Quality Khakis Z pair for O . 37 D
Fresh
Are you interested in winn
Ramada Inn. See page t
contest. Pictures appeared pre
issue of The East Carolinic
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 11. 1984
tPMAPHI BIO BROTHERS
ofmr �itfi o �com� m� Mstsr
la ��� Sorority w� hop to rnoct
f - -U Ka� al 1� rtouaa Rummbtf
B 0 B'o" T���infl urtll &� Wednesday
1a Sot a 'Si OtUJ (f you cannot
SOCIETY AUDITIONS
� the Gi enviile
ence at MO p.m
� l H�l Baptist
� - gc �. who are in
� fen for fn
to -an Ws
l ang� tor
t� "eia on
SRA Helps Freshmen Adjust
Student Supply Store
Has Banned Books Week
By ERNEST ROBERTS
Staff Writer
The Department of Residence
Life and the University Counsel-
ing Center will present a program
to help students make a smooth
transition to college life.
The program is entitled Road to
Graduation: which way to go? It
is designed to assist entering
freshman and other students in
adjusting to university life.
Residence Life and the counseling
ECU Campus Police
Help Catch Car Thief
r shop
n in I UK PI K,
n Blvd. C all us
b ies t ookies,
By HAROLD JOYNER
Ml�nni Stwi Kdllor
Three ECU campus policemen
recently assisted the Greenville
Police Department in capturing a
suspected car thief on the ECU
campus.
Detective Gene McAbee of the
Campus Public Safety Office said
he and two other campus
policemen received word from the
Greenville Police Department that
a suspected car thief was running
from 5th street to the campus.
The campus police began to chase
the Greenville man past Fleming
Residence Hall, the library, and
finally into Mendenhall Student
Center.
McAbee said the suspect,
Theodore Jones Jr was hiding in
the lobby of Hendrix Theatre.
"He saw us McAbee said, "and
ran out the north lobby door
The suspect was chased to
Green Dorm where he was caught
by Lt. Stan Kittrell. McAbee said
Jones was charged by the Green-
ville police with theft of auto and
driving while impaired. Greenville
police also charged Jones with
resisting arrest and showing a
false identification. Jones is not a
student at ECU.
y As
Freshmen
Are you interested in winning a free dinner for two at
Ramada Inn. See page 6 for more of our photo
contest. Pictures appeared previously in the Sept. 4
issue of The East Carolinian.
SOFT
CONTACTS
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Price includes
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At The Campus �East Carolina University
BRAND NEW RENTAL UNITS AVAILABLE
LOCATEV NEKT TO CAMPUS
WALK TO CLASSES AND DOWNTOWN
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FULLY FURNISHED ANV ACCESSORIZED
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RINCXOLD TOWERS
919) 35J-28
center will present introductory
sessions highlighting such topics
as handling stress, identifying
campus resources, and working
with advisors.
The general introductory ses-
sions are Sept. 10 in 244
Mendenhall at 3 p.m Sept. 11 in
Jenkins Auditorium at 4 p.m
and Sept. 12 in Tyler I obby at 5
p.m.
Special interest sessions,
academic savvy, social adjustment
and goal setting will also be of-
fered. Registration for these in-
terest sessions will be during the
general sessions Sept. 10-12.
According to Janet Johnson,
area coordinator for West cam-
pus, the interest sessions will be
divided into three parts. These are
academic, social and goal setting.
Academic will emphasize study
skills, attitudes and note taking.
Social will focus on building rela-
tionships, what to do in Greenville
and other activities. The impor-
tance of setting goals, kinds of
goals and goal setting exercises
will be discussed in goal setting.
The interest sessions will be
Sept. 18-20. Tyler Lobby will host
the interest sessions on Sept. 18
with academic at 3 p.m social at
4 p.m. and goal setting at 5 p.m.
On Sept. 19, the sessions will be in
Jenkins Auditorium with social at
3 p.m goal settings at 4 p.m. and
academic at 5 p.m. On Sept. 20,
the sessions will be at 244
Mendenhall. At 3 p.m. is goal set-
ting, academic at 4 p.m. and
social at 5 p.m.
"This program is an extension
of orientation Janet Johnson
said. "We would really like
students to come out and join
The ECU Student Supply Store
is participating in Banned Books
week 84, an event cosponsored by
the American Library Association
the American Booksellers
Association, the Association of
American Publishers, and the Na-
tional Association of College
Stores. 0
George Orwell's 1984 is the
theme of this year's Banned
Books exhibit during the week of
Sept. 8-15, focusing on Big
Brother and the subject of
thought control.
A display of banned books in
the Student Supply Store will be a
prominent feature of this event
along with an extensive list of
books banned to date. Professors
currently using banned books or
authors in the classroom have
been notified and asked to en-
courage students to familiarize
themselves with this issue.
Everyone is urged to view the
display at the Student Supply
Store, Sept. 8-15.
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BUt SEaat Cto0ltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, amiNtw
GREG RlDEOUT, Managing tduor
Jennifer Jendrasiak, Htm mm J .T. Pietrzak, d� 4 ,�����
Randy Mews, spom && Anthony Martin, Busmen Manager
TlNA MAROSCHAK, heaiur aSW KATHY FUERST, Production Manage,
Bll L AUSTIN, Circulation Manager LlNDA VlZENA, Advertising Technician
September 11, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
The Attic
Tradition Down But Not Out
The Attic � gone. Somewhat
hard to believe. For all of the
rock'n'rollers on campus, Green-
ville just won't be the same. Just
four hours of fire during the early
Sunday morning hours took away
13 years of ECU tradition. But a
eulogy is not what the students or
Tom Haines, the owner, wants.
For, although the building may
be gone, the Attic lives on in spirit.
It's that spirit that we cannot let
die. Now is the time for all of us,
veterans and freshmen, to take the
memories of the Attic and use
them to build a new Attic. As a
stunned Haines said as he watched
his club go up in flames, the Attic
will be back.
The first thing hard-class "At-
tickers" should do is be patient.
Rock'n'Roll at home or at a
friend's � don't give your
allegiance to another club. ECU
and King and Queen North are
helping out and showcasing some
of the bands that were scheduled to
appear at the Attic, but a new
regular place will be a long time
coming. Haines says his insurance
can't begin to cover his losses, so
it's up to us to help him as best we
can, just as Haines has helped us.
A Friends of the Attic fund has
been started, and anyone who can
give should. The man we will be
helping is someone who has always
helped ECU. No one fought
harder for freshmen when the
N.C. General Assembly arrogantly
and hastily raised the drinking age
to 19. He believed that all students
deserved the courtesy to choose
whether or not they wanted to
drink alcohol.
Haines and the Attic each year
sponsored the Rebel magazine con-
test, encouraging students to
display their artistic abilities.
Without that support, the Rebel
would have not been able to
achieve the level of superiority it
has today.
We could say more, but the
point is that the Attic cares about
ECU and its students. ECU, Mr.
Haines, appreciates the concern
you have showed for us over the
years. We now offer any help that
we can give to help get the Attic
back on its feet again.
Jim And Jesse
Political debates are what they
used to be. Back in the good old
days when bosses ruled the wards
and kingpins ran the country,
mudslinging was the rule, heated
debate the norm and hatred for the
other guy commonplace. Now all
that is back, courtesy of Mr.
Helms and Mr. Hunt. Listen:
"You are talking through your
hat, governor
"You getting all hot and
bothered Just calm down
Not real bad, but worse than
normal. Maybe all the other races
across the land possess a note of
civility, but don't look for it here
in North Carolina. Sen. Jesse
Helms is fighting for his life and
Gov. Hunt for his political career.
The dislike for one another shows
through each time we see them
together. And now it's being
vocalized.
Sure, it's not like saying you've
sired an illegimate son, as a can-
didate did in a presidential race last
century, but it's meaner than say-
ing, "Now you're a gentlemen,
but
What good this display by our
two leaders is doing us is hard to
tell. One could say the two-party
process is alive and well and thriv-
ing in North Carolina. Or one
could just as easily argue it's a sad
sign of the times that everything is
so geared towards getting elected.
Hunt and Helms would do
anything for that seat in the Senate
short of murdering the other guy
� or at least it seems. We advise
that you take the debates with a
grain of salt. Doubtless, you have
your mind made up anyway.
I wepeuRepouTTHe
MOST EFFECT? V�
WATDUSETWe
61 BOMBER
AGAINST me
I RUSSIANS,
� ii m �
Ron's Paradox Congenial
By SIDNEY BLUMENTHAL
Tk� Nf� Republic
Ronald Reagan's hypocrisy works so
effectively because he doesn't know he's
a hypocrite. At least that's how some of
his senior advisers explain it.
While he rails against the breakdown
of traditional values, his political
operatives point to his daughter Patti,
the anti-nuclear activist married to a
yoga instructor; to his son Ron, the
ballet-dancer-turned-freelance-writer;
and to first daughter Maureen, the
divorced feminist.
Reagan's handlers understand that in
the eyes of voters the president's public
intolerance is softened and contradicted
by his private tolerance. Without his
hypocrisy, they assert, he would be
perceived as brittle and threatening. And
because he lacks self-consciousness
about his inconsistency, he can perform
his political chores with convincing
sincerity.
The hypocrisy that works so well for
him on social issues also helps him sell
his economic policies. His federal deficit
encapsulates his hypocrisy. He religious-
ly condemns the sin, but it's what's mak-
ing him happy. He has MasterCarded
the recovery: Re-elect now, pay later.
To conservatives such as Reagan,
Keynesianism has been more than an
economic doctrine, the cultural conse-
quences of Keynesianism meant the
destruction of the Protestant ethic and
the self-regulating market. If Keyne-
sianism worked, then the old gospel of
success must be humbug.
By deficit spending, one could get
something now and never be punished.
Prosperity no longer could be traced to
the moral character of striving in-
dividuals, as in Horatio Alger's
novellas, the kind Reagan grew up on.
Thus, only by suppressing big govern-
ment could America be restored. Then
wealth would again be dependent on
positive thinking. Reaganism is the mind
cure for the bad dream of Keynesianism.
When we believe, the good dreams of
the past will come true. While Reagan
waits for Utopia, there's a free lunch.
Reagan is more a hero of consump-
tion than production. Old-fashioned
production means sacrificing oneself to
an impersonal process, while modern
consumption means personal transfor-
mation through appearances.
Reagan represents consumption
without guilt. And through his rise in the
entertainment industry and the leisure
class, he's been ironically able to con-
vince us that he embodies the old
ideology of a productive class. His free-
market rhetoric gives a license to unfet-
tered consumption.
The clue is that pain and denial, the
stock-in-trade of economic puritanism,
never figure in Reagan's formula. Some
of his top aides appreciate that this junc-
ture between his words and results ac-
counts for much of his political magic.
He allows us to have whatever we want
so long as we give credence to an ob-
solescent ideology. He's a permissive
father. Ask Patti.
The two sides of Reagan don't in-
validate each other, but exist in a com-
fortable coalition. Only he holds the
disparate themes together, as the
Republican Convention demonstrated.
The parade of 1988 hopefuls signaled
that the party will splinter when Reagan
moves on. And more than future fac-
tionalism was obvious: The incoherence
of Reaganism itself was revealed. Whe
not enveloped by Reagan's most relaxec
persona, the new themes stood out ii
frightful relief.
For the first three nights of the con
vention, intolerance and greed were or.
conspicuous display. Then Reagar
abandoned his attractive hypocrisy and
joined in the spirit of conservatisrr
triumphant.
The convention was the apotheosis o:
the "Me Decade For the Republican-
the rich have the same function that the
poor have for the Democrats: They are
objects of compassion and even pity
Since a majority of GOP delegates had
annual, incomes in excess of $50,000.
their concern was empathetic.
For them, a vote for Reagan is a vote
for immediate gratification. In thi
respect, thev are true legatees of the
1960s.
The 1960s promised both self-
fulfillment and community, but a com-
munity without any sense of duty or
public virtue, a community whose
ethereal harmony was natural.
Since this harmony was elusive, it
couldn't be sustained. The impulse for
community remains, however, in par-
tially bureaucratized form in the
Democratic constituency groups. In the
meantime, the self-fulfillment aspect has
triumphed within the Republican Party
And Reagan has emerged as the avatar
of a new age of narcissism, where the
pursuit of happiness has been reduced :
the ruthless pursuit of money.
What hedonism and unbridled
capitalism have in common is the
repudiation of the social contract. When
the conservatives say "me they don't
say it like the Me Generation, satirized
by Tom Wolfe, who meant a supra-
consciousness beyond the material
world, a cosmic union in the noosphere.
When they say "Me they mean me,
myself and mine. They don't mean
anything as altruistic as an interest
group, which inevitably means others.
They're not an interest group, but
America; and they define America as
themselves. Others can join them b
becoming them.
All one needs is the membership fee.
(Sidney Blumenihal is national political
correspondent for The ew Republic.
(c. IW4. I ailed Fniin Stwllcatr. lac.
What A Day!
f
4j�$-
By GREG RlDEOUT
I never thought so much abuse could
be thrown my way. I certainly wasn't ex-
pecting it; heck, it was Monday, and my
motor functions weren't going 100 per-
cent. Yet, it happened. And I figured
out it could happen to any student. My
gripe � how come some people on this
campus treat students like dirt. Afterall,
we are why the whole place exists, aren't
we?
Now, today may have been an off day
for the people I had to deal with, but
some of the things that occurred yester-
day have happened before. Let me tell
you how it went.
First, I got out of bed and it rained. (I
know the latter started because of the
former, afterall I am a student.) Rain
has a funny way of making you and your
books wet as you walk to class. So I
stopped in the Student Supply Store
snack bar. Funny how those people
never smile. And they never like it if you
don't snatch up your change in record-
breaking time. C'mon people, if we
weren't here you wouldn't get to sit in
those funny seats.
Well, next on my agenda was class.
Now, I have three classes on Monday,
Wednesday and Friday, and the teachers
I have right now are pretty okay about
helping everyone out. But, boy in the
past, I've had some teachers that
thought they were doing us a favor by
spouting out a lecture. So to those guys
and gals I say, "Go get a job in industry
or something if students are a bother,
okay
Now, after class I had to make a
phone call to a secretary. Now, most are
pretty all right, but the one I got hold of
today thought answering my questions
was an unusual favor. Listen, lady, I
sure hope you get the same treatment
someday. Students pay your salary.
Oh boy, next I went to my favorite
place � Mendenhall's dining facility.
Talk about some sour pusses. To tell you
the truth, I've never seen more rude
treatment of customers in my life. They
use the here's-your-food-get-the-hell-
out-of my-sight-approach. Now, you
don't have to be all bubbly, but, geez,
could you just be courteous. There are
exeptions to this over there, but they are
too few to make much difference. Get
your act together.
Like I said, this is not to be taken as
typical, but it does exist. I just wanted to
let those people who come in contact
with students and treat them badly know
that they are, in my opinion, very rude.
If I had my way, all faculty and staff
who treated students rudely would be
fined or something. And for those say-
ing, "hey wait a second vice versa ap-
plies, too.
I do like to discuss the good things,
but this was the time to gripe � it being
a bad day and all. The library staff does
an excellent job, along with most people
on campus. But, guys, those few bad ap
pies can tend to spoil the whole barrel
Let's take care of it, okay Spilman.
Campus Forum
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in the
Publications Building, across from
the entrance of Joyner Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number and signature of the
author(s). Letters are limited to two
typewritten pages, double-spaced or
neatly printed. All letters are subject
to editing for brevity, obscenity and
libel, and no personal attacks will be
permitted. Students, faculty and staff
writing letters for this page are
reminded that they are limited to one
every five issues.
Student Opinion
Pee Deel
Moore
Roger-
Program
Aids Deaf
Students
B MARUAKI FREEMAN
The hear g
ment of student
directed by Ton :
many ways to help the E:
students cc
college life.
The purpv
paired depart nv
port to the �' 1 ieal
at ECU. Schreiber . j
they are fror
similar programs or from
schools devoted re. I
deaf. There are two rc
preters offered by the der a i
The first consists ol 1
who translare lecture
language and the secoi
oral interpreter a
lecture so the deal
read lips more clearly.
terpreters are
hearing impa:rec s
necessary
"because : h.
strongly stresses
Students with
ficulties haN.e voluntarih
other deaf
tutors and n
tutors and note takers d
the ability
language. The
assistance in
deaf student nee-
takers take note-
so, whether the deal studt
reading lips r s
language. h d .
to take notes 11
diverts his att(
struct or or
miss some vita
Schreiber said. II
interested in bein al
taker the should
hearing impaired
Brewster A. room 114.
How To Treat Students Nicely I
mm � iw
1
Zet
I
I
1
5.

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f
I
I
.





I III I ASI AKOI INIAN
SEPTEMBER 11, 1984
Hr
muf,
� HB s A
" i
VI
enial
ed When
's mosi relaxed
d out in
- ts of the con-
greed were on
Then Reagar
hypocrisy and
- ervatism
ic apotheosis of
e Republicans,
. function that the
rats: They are
md even pity.
OP delegates had
excess of $50,000.
i pathetic.
Reagan is a vote
cation. In this
legatees of the
-ed both self-
tmunity, but a corn-
sense of duty or
mmunity whose
latural.
ion was elusive, it
The impulse for
a ever, in par-
: form in the
groups. In the
llment aspect has
e Republican Party.
ged as the avatar
sm, where the
een reduced to
mone)
and unbridled
common is the
contract. When
"me they don't
aeration, satirized
- meant a supra-
nd the material
n in the noosphere.
"Me they mean me.
They don't mean
.is an interest
means others.
terest eroup, but
define America as
an join them by
i
t membership fee.
nai political
r The V k Republic.)
id. air Iih
Nicely
time to gripe � it being
The library staff does
ng with most people
e few bad ap-
the whole barrel.
re of it, okay Spilman.
mpus Forum
orum Rules
st Carolinian welcomes let-
jessing all points of view.
rop them by our office in the
ns Building, across from
fee of Joyner Library.
loses of verification, all let-
include the name, major
tyfication, add-ess, phone
and signature of the
Letters are limited to two
n pages, double-spaced or
ited. All letters are subject
for brevity, obscenity and
no personal attacks will be
Students, faculty and staff
?tters for this page are
yhat they are limited to one
issues.
Student Opinion
Pee Dee, Pirate Or Wimp?
Moore
By STEPHEN HARDING
Staff Wrlttf
In the wake of student unrest
concerning Pee Dee the Pirate,
The East Carolinian went in
search of student opinion of the
irascible old fellow and found few
supporters.
"It's great if you want a car-
toon character for a mascot. "
Ellen Moore, Junior, Art.
"I liked the first one better.
Something about him is just not
right, especially the name Pee
Dee. That's the killer Vern
Wesson, Sophmore, Industrial
Technology
"Looks funny to me W.J.
Rogers, Senior, Industrial
Technology.
"Hell, now that I think about
it, I do look kind of wimpy and
my name does sound like a new
strain of herpes. Let's get rid of
me. Pee Dee, Freshman. Physical
(Education.
Wesson
Rogers
Dee
Program
Aids Deaf
Students
By MARUAKE FREEMAN
Stiff Wrtltr
The hearing impaired depart-
ment of student life and affairs,
directed by Tony Schreiber, has
many ways to help the ECU's deaf
students cope with the stress of
college life.
The purpose of the hearing im-
paired department is to offer sup-
port to the 30 or 32 deaf students
at ECU, Schreiber said, whether
they are from high schools with
similar programs or from special
schools devoted specifically to the
deaf. There are two types of inter-
preters offered by the department.
The first consists of students
who translate lectures into sign
language and the second is the
oral interpreter who mouths the
lecture so the deaf student can
read lips more clearly. "These in-
terpreters are offered only if the
hearing impaired student feels it is
necessary said Schreiber,
"because the program very
strongly stresses independence
Students without hearing dif-
ficulties have voluntarily helped
other deaf students by being
tutors and note takers. These
tutors and note takers do not need
the ability to communicate in sign
language. They are only aiding
assistance in classes where the
deaf student needs help. The note
takers take notes for the student
so, whether the deaf student is
reading lips or reading sign
language, he does not have to stop
to take notes. If the deaf student
diverts his attention from the in-
structor or interpreter he may
miss some vital information,
Schreiber said. If any students are
interested in being a tutor or note
taker they should contact the
hearing impaired department in
Brewster A, room 114.
Brody's For Men has a position open for a
part-time salesperson. An understanding of
men's fashion and previous experience is
preferred. Must be available for Saturday work.
Apply to L. Kinley at Brody's - The Plaza Mon
Fri 2-5pm.
bif@d)iyj
The Plaza
20 OFHESS
Thru September 28th
ECU STUDENTS AND FACULTY ONLY
V ST PRESENT COUPON WITH ORDEP FOR DISCOUNT)
20 JSenior Citizen's Discount
(Ad must accompany order for discount)
Call Us For An Eve Examination
Wen Tne Doctor Ot Your Choice
GREENVILLE STORE ONlY
pucians
Locations In:
KINSTON
315 Parkview Commons GOLDSiORO
WILSON
Or-en 9AM 5 30 PM Mon -Fri
Bee nei Kirkley Dispensme Optician
m
m
RUSH
Zeta Beta Tau Fraternity
A few years ago a
group of ambitious
young men founded a
Zeta Beta Tau chapter
at ECU, Since that time
we have built Zeta Beta
Tau with the same am-
bitious students which
first gave ZBT life.
Today we still seek
those individuals with
the initiative to look for
a challenge and the
dedication to overcome
it.
Mendenhall Student Center
September 10, 11, 12 from 7-11pm
Call 752-5895 for details
!
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JMjASTCARpL,N1AN
SEPTEMBER 11, 1984
Contest Continues
Challenge Number Three
The East Carolinian 'Name The Landmark' Contest
The two pictures on this page are famous places on the EC I: camn� n� h�t f .
win dinner for two at the Ramada Inn byc�de� Cm
others that wtil be run in the next three issues. Entries thatZry ZayTeillt
thrown mto a hat and a drawing wUI determine the w,nner Be TrTnvautLnl �
ZmtheZJ �nJ7f�rm ty THe EOSt Car�Unian � hrSouL"ZgoT "
from the Itbrary. All entnes are subject to verification by the managing editor. ZodlucZ
1.
3.
5.
2.
8.
�k
w&-
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Challenge Number Four
$
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ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
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specifically noted .n this ad
PR'CES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT SEPT 15 AT A&P IN GREENVILLE NORTH CAROLINA
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634 �
Greenville Squore Shopping Center 703 Greenville Blvd.
The
B SI sAN I Kl
Mind f ' .
was expcci .
ordinar
called "M
the Jcnl
Sunda.
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sculpt U1
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Charlie Ing .
"detenruneci ar.c e
Ob Sunda. Sept. 16 saxaphor
ECU School of Music. Brad I
8:15 p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher
credits to his name, including
this month hy Educational Mul
accompany Fole on the pianr
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I Hi l AST (ARCH INIAN
Entertainment
SEPTl MHi R 1984 Page
The 'Garden Lady' A bused
By SUSAN I A KFR
M�ff Wrllrr
lmdv Machanic, assistant pro-
of Environmental Design,
vas expecting nothing out of the
ordinary when she set up a piece
led "More Garden Dreams" in
the Jenkins Fine Arts Building last
ida night. The environmental
rk, featuring a life-size soft
ilpture doll called the Garden
I ad. was "a ei personal piece
art said Machanic. "This
ce w.4s a comment on gardens.
d dreaming, and how people
I about being away from home
d things like that � sort ol
obiographical, as a matter of
cause I haven't been here
"1 put the ; I adj there
S u n d a night c o n t i n u e d
some people saw
a midnight. Monday morning
. was already gone. They didn't
e her a chance to be seen.
. " Thinking
rank, Machanic put up a
ibove the Garden 1 ady's
seat that said. "Anothei
irden Dream Stolen. Please br-
back the Lady of the
�den She sent word to the
U Carolinian that the doll was
ne and an item asking f
turn was printed in the next
er.
That night, however, a ran-
te appeared above the Gard
- seat. Printed on poster
board, the note said, "The Lady
of the Garden is in good hands.
She will not be hurt if you meet
our demands. Please send us a list
ol all possibly gay art majors
and a take post office box was
given Attached to the bottom of
the ransom note was a piece of the
Garden I ady's skin and hair. The
note added that if the demands
weren't met. the Garden Lady
would bum, piece by piece, and it
was signed "The Garrett Girls
"1 got Hist furious said
Machanic "1 understood that this
� is now a theatre piece, a little bit
ol process art, but it was like 'let
me in on it before you do it. for
ens sake So I answered the
ansom note with a note of my
own 'Deai Garrett Girls No
deal. Enhance you future. Bring
her back hero, now today And 1
d it the 'Phant . acher
The next communication from
the kidnappt shocked
Machanic. "It wa; this big postei
at Phanton Teacher
Our Bottom I ine and it had
� in drai
.ither a . and in
I d they're doing
hing different to her. In
one. they're beating her with
- In one they were pointing
rig like a sword at her. In
another the were aiming a
blowtorch at her. And in another
; hands tied behind her
and the) hung her by her neck
from a noose. In the final one
they showed her all crumpled up
in a corner. It was sicko. It wasn't
funny anymore. And the worst
part of it was she's wearing my
clothes. So it looked like me being
hung. It actually hit me in my
gut Machanic said.
"So I wrote across the poster
'Violence Against Women � Sex-
ist and Sick said Machanic.
But suddenly another group
decided to get into the action.
Machanic said, "A note appeared
from the 'Jarvis Jocks' saying,
'Dear Garrett Girls We will
meet your demands. Meet us by
the bench under the magnolia tree
in front of the art building � List
for the Lady They were going to
give them a list of all possibly gay
art majors I guess. So the Jarvis
Jocks offered to rescue her
"The next morning all the
posters were gone said
Machanic. The Garden lady's
shoe, nailed to this block of
wood, was in my mailbox and it
said, 'We mean business which I
think was pretty nasty. I found
her in a plastic bag, all heaped up
in the office. Every bone in her
body was broken. She had a com-
plete skeleton with joints and
hinges and all, and she's hurt real-
1) bad
Machanic continued, "And
there was this letter from the Gar-
rett Girls saying 'Dear Mindy �
This was not an act of violence. It
was a statement on man's in-
humanity to man, and the violent
and criminal acts that are a part of
our turbulent world today. By the
way, we really are great admirers
of your work and would not
damage it in any way. She became
one of the girls. (Signed) The Gar-
rett Girls. P.S. We had to get rid
of her. She was eating us out of
house and home
Intended or not, the Garden
Lady was injured. She'll have to
undergo surgery to correct the
damages to her skeleton. Will she
be back? "I hope so said
Machanic. "But she may come
back with casts on her body, and
slings
"At this point, I don't really
want to know who the Garrett
Girls are said Machanic. "I'm a
pacifist, which was part of my
response to them. It stopped being
funny when the violence showed
up
Last week the Garden Lady sat
for two days after her return in
her wilted garden, unable to hold
her head up and slouching limply
in her seat. Friends and well-
wishers stopped by, reading
Machanic's answer to the kidnap-
pers on the wall above the Lady's
head. She slumped under a thank-
you note to the "Jarvis Jocks
who got her back whole, if not
sound.
Machanic said, sighing, "I'm
glad she's back, but I'm sorry-
she's hurt
Maybe even imaginary gardens
aren't safe anv more.
B�YAK HUMBERT ECU Photo Le
After ransom notes and abuse, the Gardtn Lady as returned
ECU Cheerleaders Instill Pride And Spirit
By JENNY MEADOR
suff W riter
The art of cheering is p
gressively becoming a nationally
recognized sport. Although cheer-
ing for reams or friends in com-
cheerleaders on the purple (varsi-
t) squad. The second-year
cheerer admitted he was more or
less drafted by someone who
noticed his interest in gymnastics.
"The needed guys so I went and
tried out, met the people there.
practice three nights a week for
two-and-a-half to three hours and
are also required to workout at
the Nautilus at least twice a week.
Practice and workouts are just a
small part of the cheerleaders'
busy schedule. The squad is a ma-
The Varsity C heerleaders fired Pirate fans 'up' during the first
ions has occured throughout
"He centuries, the skills, strength,
reputation, formality, and
toriety of refined cheering is
eadily increasing.
The quiet, yet vibrant blue-eyed
harlie Ingle is one of the most
determined and enthusiastic"
and loved it. I never had formal
training in gymnastics before
then, but 1 was always interested.
I knew Jonathan Rose and he
helped with with training said
Ingle.
The six-woman, six-man team
is a hard working bunch. They
JON JORDON. ECU Photo Lab
season pep ralley.
jor public relations contributor
for ECU and the athletic teams as
well. The PR work and duties in-
clude events like judging
cheerleading tryouts at local high
schools, teaching seminars and
mini-courses, coaching the gold
(junior varsity) squad, making
personal appearances at local
stores (for example, at Rose's'
grand opening), and, of course,
cheering and instilling school
spirit at pep rallies. One catchy
cheer they use to promote school
spirit is "What do you do to any
Pirate you meet? You get down
on your knees, you can't pray on
your feet. Ask a mighty Pirate for
his mercy to give, and maybe, just
maybe, he'll let you live
School spirit is the major driv-
ing force of a cheerleader. "I like
being involved said Ingle.
"We're not out there to perform
or provide entertainment � we
solicite pride in the purple and
gold A main goal of the
cheerleaders is to break down the
wall between themselves and the
student body. They want as much
participation as possible out of
the crowd.
Four-year ECU cheerleader
veteran and coach, Jennifer
Cooper, echoed Ingle's comments
saying, "School spirit means
sticking with your team good or
bad. Purple and gold is all over
the town because commercial
sponsers have helped so much
Cooper gives credit to Pam Holt
for being the squad's number one
supporter. "She's a real
motivator. She gets us member-
ships to places, gets prizes for pep
rallies, solicites for shoes and
sweat suits and really tries to get
the community and businesses in-
volved with the cheerleaders and
ECU said Cooper. Ingles also
noted her initiative and said, "If it
weren't for her, we wouldn't have
the amount of potential that we
do now
Cooper is the first head
(cheerleading) coach to be
Fall Football Fashions Both
Stylish And 'Comfortable'
MARIANNA BAiNES ECU New! Bureau
On Sunday, Sept. 16 saxaphonist and Acting Assistant Dean of the
ECU School of Music, Brad Foley, will present a faculty recital at
8:15 p.m. in the A.J. Fletcher Recital Hall. Foley has numerous
credits to his name, including a solo recording that will be released
this month by Educational Music Services. Donna C oleman will
accompany Foley on the piano.
By AMY BONESTEEL and
TINA MAROSCHAK
At any ECU football game you
can expect to see a diverse selec-
tion of clothing and styles �
Saturday's game against Temple
was no exception. Everything
from semi-formal dresses and
pearl necklaces to ripped Pirate
t-shirts were prevelant. It just goes
to show that ECU's student body
is not a cloning and conforming
group like those at many other
universities.
Wandering around the Pirate
bleachers you are likely to find
even the preppiest apparel. In the
greek block sections you may find
yourself surrounded by brightly
colored sportscoats, an occasional
pair of obnoxious plaid slacks,
and an array of designer fashions.
Typical female assesories include
twist beads, scarves, and hats.
Venturing through the general
admission seats you're bound to
find both the fashion-conscious
crowd and also the laid-back,
"comfortable" crowd. "Comfor-
table" can be defined a couple
ways. First, there are those who
dress in their Pirate t-shirts, faded
jeans and tennis shoes. Second,
there are those few who dress in
their army fatigues and Pirate
t-shirts. Finally, there are those
who fall in between comfortable
and dressy. These students wear
either designer jeans or dress
pants, short-sleeve sweaters and
loafers.
Some of the more daring Pirate
fans added an extra touch to their
football attire � purple and gold
hair. An occasional "ECU" also
highlighted the faces of a few en-
thusiastic fans.
Alumni andor parents were
easy to spot. These Pirate-backers
were attired in purple and gold,
and many even carried their ECU
foam cushions with them.
A few coordinating accessories
employed by the u; ther-
wise, they have had coaches .
in on a volunteer ba-is because the
athletic budget simply could
afford to pay i
Some of the sp tsers that 1
provided passes, uniforms, shoes,
and t-shirts have been Nautilus,
Overton's, Papa Katz, Wash
House, and Beau Sponsors, at
this point, are resp nsible for pro-
viding the general clothing, warm-
up suits and tennis shoes; but the
team is still in desparate need of
another uniform. In a couple
weeks the Sportsworld Skating
Rink will sponser the cheerleaders
by having a college night open to
everyone. All the proceeds will go
to the cheerleaders to raise money
for another uniform.
Because of Holt, sponsers,
Cooper, and the dedicated
cheerleaders, the squad is steadily
growing. "The program has
grown tremendously over the last
four years. We're a new squad
this year because four seniors left
last year. So this year we have a
few sophomores and freshmen.
We're at a building stage, but
everyone is really determined and
they have a lot of ability, skill and
enthusiasm said Cooper
The cheerleaders' reputation is
changing too because of the
school's and community's in-
volvement � it's even changing
nationwide. For the first time,
cheerleading is being recognized
as a sport in itself and has na-
tional rules regulated by the
NCAA. "Last year national com-
petitions were held in Hawaii
Right now we are putting together
a video to be sent to Nationals
said Ingle. "It's really becoming
competitive. We've had to com-
against schools like Chapel
Hill. Delaware, and Floride 5
rs said Cooper.
The ulty of the stunts
creasing each routine pras"
"Scott Perry, captain, and Karen
Hall, co-captain, are the
stumers. They have been working
together for the last two years and
can throw any flip said Ingle.
"There are no prep stunts in our
routines, we just do staight lifts to
a full position Some of the.r
stunts include the toss n
shooting star, bird, perdue up.
liberty, heel stretch, and the c
flip.
"The guys have come so far
Cooper said. "They all started out
with nothing and have just w. rk-
ed so hard to improve their
strength and impressiveness. They
are the most improved of the team
this year Not only
cheerleaders have to have strength
and shouting power, they also
have to be alert to the game
because there are cheers for eve.y
move the football team ma-
There are defense, offense, kick,
all occasion, and victory cheer- I
be chanted at every turn. It takes a
concentrated effort to become a
good, united squad, and it takes a
lot of time, effort and enthusiasm
to pump up school spirit � that's
why the cheerleaders do not feel
like they should be the only ones
in action. "Being supportive and
proud of who represents school
and classmates is what having
school spirit is all about. You
should -ake pride and satisfaction
in seeing your friends compete.
It's just being proud of where you
are. I love it Ingle concluded.
JON JORDON ECU PNato Lao
Fads come and go. but F( I students always set the trends.
which cannot be overlooked in-
clude Pirate-colored flasks, pur-
ple and gold pom-poms, and of
course, the annoying-but-
attention-getting yellow bugles.
ECU will continue o make its
own way, I'm sure. This is not on-
ly apparent in the fashion phase
of the ECU student body, but in
every other phase as well. Where
else in North Carolina could vou
go and find such diversitv and
originality as seen in Greenville?
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H
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T-Bone Shines, Folk- Style
R
H l)VMI)MIH�RIN(.()N
Sl�f Wrllci
1 in the world is r-Bone
ett? Well, for those of you
he know, lei me inform
Bone Burnett is the most
d toik rocker on the scene to-
� don't get me wrong.
Hes lewcomer at all. This
rexan has been in
n music since 1965, when
his own recording
Initiall a record pro-
Burnett ha- worked with
nent names as Delan
Honme. 1 ai Mahal. . and
McClinton.
70's I Bone toured
master himself. Bob
in of the Rolling
tier wards, he
o .alled the Alpha
ncluded fellow
en Soles and
Mansfield.
80, Burnett has been a
solo act. releasing three strong
albums, I ruth Decay. Trap Door.
and Proof Through The Night
His simple tunes contain complex
hues. T Bone's moral overtones
are unpredictable, sometimes
revealing the dark, even
dangerous, side of human nature.
Sunday night I Bone Burnett
brought his music (and everybody
else's) to the Cat's Cradle in
chapel Hill. Accompanied onl
In acoustic guitar, Burnett open
ed the show with a peculiar!
straight reading of 'There's No
Business 1 ike Show Business
He then launched into a set ol
some of his best compositions, in-
cluding "After All These Years"
and his own unique arrangement
of the show -bi classic,
"Diamonds Are A Curl's Ik's!
friend
In "Baby Fall Down I-Bone
Burnett takes on the problems of
the world: "When the nieht
E. Carolina Playhouse
Season Tickets On Sale
e gone on sale
arolina Playhouse
is als, dramas
be presented in
According to
ieneral Manager Scotl
� season
he variety it
be ause each
" iductions will be
tmily will en
ngsters, senior
I everyon e i n
on to sa,
ap dancing
i 1930's comedy
; in New York
. and sentimental
II town in middle
11 b a 1!
� and �
e 1 ngli
. i
- a
. ft
� gl I930's
comedy classic Anything
Goes, rins tap dancing romp over
the Atlantic Ocean introduced
me of the most popular tunes of
e century. "I Gel a Kick Out ol
V on "You're the lop "It's
Delovel; and "Blow Gabriel,
Bleu " The New ork produc-
n was an enormous hit in 1934
and ran for more than 4(H) perfor-
mances before it was made into a
Mock buster movie staring Bing
Crosby and Ethel Merman i hi-
ECU Playhouse produc:ion will
Uure a cast o some 35 actors,
singers and dancer- (already in
fiearsal), a full pit orchestra and
all aboard a luxury liner
ind for England.
Stage Door follow - as the next
�duction on the McGinnis
Novembei 27-30, and again
Decembei I. Written by
- ' s K � dna
Stage Door is a lively
: ed; abi it i group I aj
set- EXC ELLEN I. Page 9.
tails It falls on me When the day
breaks I'm in pieces Has he bit-
ten off more than he can chew?
You won't think so when you hear
the conviction in his voice.
However, when Burnett
thought the evening was getting
too serious, he displayed his ironic
wit with a cover of everyone's
favorite singalong.
"Ghostbusters " No kidding!
The audience heartily shouted the
chorus as T-Bone asked, "Who
vou gonna call?"
There were other great
moments of spontaneity. As
T-Bone restrung his guitar, he
asked the audience to sing an
acapella version of "Twist and
Shout and in unison they
obeyed!
With his trusty guitar back,
I-bone ripped through inspired
versions of "I Wish You Could
Have Seen Her Dance "Trap
Door and the entrancing
'I atally Beautiful He then per-
formed a moving song that he co-
wrote with U2's Bono, aptly titled
"Having a Wonderful Time,
Wish You Were Her
1 Bone revealed his country in-
fluences with beautiful renditions
of Don Williams' "Amanda
and Dolly Barton's "1 Will
Always Love You adapting the
lyrics to his Dylanesque vocals.
Don Dixon, formerly of Ar-
rogance and currently R.E.Ms
chief engineer, joined T-Bone on
stage and sang a blues tune,
"Have You Heard the News?"
The pair then teamed up for Bud-
dy Holly's "Not Fade Away
T-Bone finally left us with a
reveting "La Bamba
After this most enjoyable even-
ing, it was obvious that T-Bone
had the crowd in the palm of his
hand as they clamored for more.
Now, after this joyous celebra-
tion, I must come to the bad news.
Due to disappointing record sales,
Warner Brothers Records recently
dropped T-Bone Burnett from
their roster. It is a sad thing when
the public is deprived of a talent
of his calibre. I urge each and
everyone of you to seek out this
man's records. They are worth the
effort. Then, unless you have ear
trouble and aren't thrilled with.
every song, please write to Warner
Brothers in protest of T-bone's
contract termination.
MITCHELLS BEAUTY
SALON
303 S. Mills St.
Winterville, NC 756-904
Specialize in all hair t are
10 percent discount to ail ECL
Students with ID
Barbara Mitchell - Owner
Canon
a
a
PROGRAM
Nobody else makes
fine photography
this simple
$219.95
art 4 cofejero hop
�S SOUTH COTAN HE SIRFr
GREENVILI F NC 2 7R (4
?1 OfiRB
Ray Ban Wayfarer Available. Normally
$42.95 Reduced To $32.95 Thru
September 28th.
All Other Ray Ban Sunglasses
By Bausch & Lamb

� � �
r: NVIiL� STC RE ONO
I
pucians
5 PorV v ie Commons
Open 9am.5 30pm Mon-Fr.
Beeche- Kirtdey D-spens.ng Optician
LOCATIONS IN
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WILSON
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i
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I Fully Assembled Fully
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i
BACK T
T-Bone entertained enthusiastichap.l Hill tan-
A NEW'
CONTRACEPTIVE
IS HERE.
TOI )AY
Bring your favorite beer mug the beer's on
Happy Hour 8:30-10:30
For more inf onnation call 75S-557D
TlwCOHb a private dab for
.ssvvvvw�.�.VAs

OOL
ROCK ENROLLMENT IS UP AND THE PRICES ARE DOWN
THESE AND MORE ON SALE THRU SEPTEMBER 19
$3.99
3S9.99
NVJIR-WW
m
IEEal
1 HIK l) II11 SK )
m
MovfrawOord
�Z�
PITT PLAZACAROLINA EAST MALL
Record Bar
RECORDS, TAPES & A LITTLE BIT MORE
WWWyWWJ
Excel)
onlinued from
York,
Classifi
V M!
PAH
FE
-
A AN
FEMALE
FEV
: 51
s VI K
FOR SAlE FRENCH PR
GIRLS BICYCLE FOB
shape 18C S
FOR SALE
BEAuT Fl
af t�
FOR SALE
"5 -
FOR SAE
Pr ce neg i
FOR SALE
fit only
- ry
CRAIG

aftei -
I os) wn
KOI M
LOST
pa. j0hns
-
LOST
Pt1m;tttt
tC nfl� th
von
r v
rmTua s famou
MngingAmpping dancinj
but for
WRITE:
General Manager
East Carolina Plavhousl
Greenville, NC 27834
itttttt
'
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTtMBI R
I9K4
ught
PARTY
JONES
WN.
Ij 4 VI
LOOK SHARP!
Ftt R A DISE THEATRE
.WWAV.VAVA

Excellent Theatre Productions Scheduled
Continued From Page 8.
iruck young actresses who invade
Broadway in quest of acting jobs
on the Great White Way. A big
success during its run in New
York, Stage Door was also made
into a popular movie with
Katherine Hepburn and Ginger
Rogers in the leading roles.
Also set in the 1930's, The
Diviners transports its audience to
the homes, fields and gathering
places of the mythical southern
Indiana town of Zion, population
40. It is a touching, sentimental
drama about a special and
trusting relationship between a
teenager and his preacher. First
presented in 1980 by the Circle
Repertory Company, The
Diviners is now being produced by
most of the nation's leading
regional theatres. The ECU
Classifieds
wanted
MISC
PART TIME SOCCER COACHES
tor various Pitt County Schools Con
tact M.ce or Barry at 752 6106 il in
�erested
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
on smoker, washer dryer provideo
ew mobile home Rent $165
ties private room and private
Call 7566151.
PARTTIME WORD PROCESSOR for
ocal law firm: IBM PC AT Salary
.�nensurate with experience Call
'58 6200
ROOMMATE WANTED $125 per
month, private bedroom, 1 block from
campus 308 Student St. Please stop
oy
WANTED: FEMALE ROOMMATE
nonsmoker to share 2 br. apt ,
$137 mo. a utilities. Call 757 0344
after 4:30 weekdays; anytime
weekends
FEMALE ROOMMATE: to Share fur
nisheo condo, washer dryer facilities,
24 hr. security, A C, private bedroom,
1 3 utilities 7S7 1272.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
to share new mobile home in nice
park Own room with private bath.
Would like clean person with pleasant
disposition No smokers please. Rent
plus share expenses Call 7521568
fter 6 p.m.
LOANS ON & BUYING TV's, Stereos,
cameras typewriters gold & silver,
anything else of value Southern Pawn
Shod. 752 2464
IF YOU NEED ANY TYPING done
please can 756 8934 after 5 30 p.m
Ver reasonable rates
CAPTURE YOUR COLLEGE DAYS
AND NIGHTS on video cassette VHS
or BETA, excellent color pictures and
swell Hi-Fi Audio Join our video club
and enjoy the Jacksons, Michael, Jer
maine, Prince, Pink Floyd, Van
Halen, Cyndi Lauper, The
Pretenders, Cheech & Chong, The
Time, The Alan Parson Project,
Duran, Duran, and much, much
more We make video's � John
Deaver Video Recording Services.
Cat; 758 6344
DON'T MISS YES Road Trips
Unlimited still has tickets available at
Apple Records to YES in Greensboro
Fri Sept. 14 Get there the comfor
table way.
NEED EXTRA MONEY? Free lance
artist needed for local silk screening
firm. Will pay cash for designs. Call
756 9058.
PERSONAL
PI KAPPS Loved your flying
billboard. Some things are better left
unheard! Sku!
LYNN It's really me this time! Just
wanted to say I love you more with
each passing day! Always, Sugi
SIG EPPS We had a great time at the
pre pref night party Let's do it again.
Good luck in RUSH Pi Kapps.
RIDES
WANTED: Ride to DC. the weekend
of Sept. 14-16. Arlington, Va. area.
Will help with gas. Please contact
Theresa, 758-1388, between 8:00 and
10:00 p.m.
Playhouse production will be
presented on February 6-9.
Immediately following The
Diviners will be the very popular
Tast Carolina Dance Theatre,
scheduled for February 20-23.
Composed of talented students in
the professionally-oriented dance
programs at ECU, The Dance
Theatre is known across the state
for its programs of variety featur-
ing modern, ballet and jazz,
choreographed by members of the
ECU Dance Faculty.
Rounding out the season on
April 16-20 will be Shakespeare's
towering masterpiece, Hamlet.
The verbal magic, macabre
humor, the fire, love and tragedy
are all magnificently displayed in
this giant among the world's
plays. After having seen the late
Richard Burton in the title role,
one critic was moved to advise his
readers, "Don't see it for culture
� But for a w hale of a jolting ex-
perience
Edgar Loessin, Chairman of
the ECU Theatre Arts Depart-
ment commented, "With this
the My
DIViNERS
season we are going back to the
wonderfully fertile era of the
1930's, the theatrical genious' of
George Kaufman and Cole Porter
and, of course, to the Bard
himself. Some of these shows
have such large casts, extensive
sets and costumes, it would be
very risky to produce them in the
commercial theatre; however,
here we are so fortunate to hae
not only the support of a rather
large theatre-going community,
but also that of the University
Season tickets may be purchas
-d in the Messick Theatre Arts
Center, Monday through Fridav,
from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. or ma
be ordered through the mail b
writing the ECU Playhouse,
ECU, Greenville, NC 27834
Tickets may be reserved by calling
57-6390. All performances will
begin at 8:15 p.m.
Come Play The Indian
This Fair
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC
Brody's For Men has a position open for a part- time
person needed to work in men's displays. Person must
have display experience and understanding of color
and design. Apply to L. Kinley at Brody's - The Plaza
Mon-Fri 2-5pm
brr@d)tyj
The Plaza for men
SALE
FOR SALE. FRENCH PROVINCIAL
dining room set with four chairs, oak
wood ana rattan. Asking $200 00, out
negotiable. Can after 5pm 758 7C90
GIRLS BICYCLE FOR SALE Good
� K8C Negotible Caw 758-5012
FOR SALE: Pho'ograph.c enlarg'ng
m developing equipment, $235
758 1598 after 6 p.m.
BEAUTIFUL MOROCCAN wall hang
ngs Very reasonable Call 754 9273
a'er 5.
FOR SALE: Wood and Chrome Din-
ng Room set $150 firm Call 758-6125
between 2 and 6 p.m.
FOR SALE: Rattan Dresser (new)
Mirrow and glass surface included.
Price negotiable Call 7S6 2766.
FOR SALE: Afjustable bike rack, will
I only car. also U bolt type lock
$40.00 for both or best offer Call
'57 3484
CRAIG AMFM CASS. with Coaxial
speakers. $100 neg. Must Sell. 758 3531
after 6:00 pm. Ask Zelton.
� COO
rilTlI MAXELL OR PD MAGNETICS
rnaxBll
1 �ivT;Wr 3 Tapes for $9.99
iMSXtlni� lH1�1 Free T Shirt or
Koozie Cooler with coupon
"98-1
&
vt The Style Artists 0
WP of
La Kosmetique
Beauty Salon
Welcome Back ECU Students
O.


Specializing in Current Trends
Haircutting
Body Waving & Texturizing
Hair Coloring & Frostings
Waxing
Sculptured Nails
Manicures & Facials
Mary Katherine
Ann Haut
Lori Hout
Debbie Lewit
Brenda Carraway
2800 E. 10th Street 752-3419
Night Appointments Available
Todd's stereo
R. Cherry Stokes, Attorney At Law
Announces
That He Is Now Located
At His New Office
119 West Third Street, Suite 205
P.O. Box 1712
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: (1) book, Modern Times, by
Paul Johnson. (2) Glass marked ZBT
Charter Banquet, December 6, 1983 If
tound, please return immediately to
Joe Admire, 103 Umstead, 758 7906.
LOST: Spanish gold coin on a chain in
aowntown Greenville area. Reward
offered Call collect (919) 275-5684.
Greenville, North Carolina
Tel: 752-0054
MILLER HIGH LIFE
ITI 1f T T T11111 I 1 If f t TTTTT
W
0i& THE EAST CAROLINA PL A Y HOUSE
C& 4lce presents
uO A SEA SON OF SINGING, DA NCING, COM ED Y
& POWERFUL DRAMA
ge Door
Nov. 27-30Dec. 1
A 1930's comedy about
show-biz Ufe in NYC
Oct. 24-27 4 29
America's famous
singing&tapping danehi
musical
April 16-20
Don't sec it for culture-
but for a whale of a Jolting experience
DIViNERS
Feb. 6-9
A touching &
sentimental drama
about middle-America
Feb. 20-23
Dance at its best,
"excitingsolid achievement
�Dally Reflector
Only Subscribers
Are Guaranteed:
1. Great Price-Save 21
2. Exchange Privileges
3. Ticket Insurance
4. Priority Seating
5. Tax Deductible
Ticket Return
WRITE: CALL: 757-6390 COME BY-
General Manager Messick Theatre Arts Center
East Carolina Playhouse 5th and Eastern Streets
Greenville, NC 27834 Monday-Friday, 10am-4pm
ITfTMIflllMMIIlIlllIIITtMfT
IIK0 presents
Ict liti Seriice
BUS SERVICE
Bus Service will be provid-
ed to Pi Kappa House and
back from College Hill.
&. West Campus.
Pick-up from 11:00 to
1:00. Return 6:00 until.
PLACE: Pi Kappa Phi House
1 iiKikcr Road
DATE: September 15th
TIME: l:OOto6:00
ADMISSION: S2.00 per person
9
High Liff:

Tickets Available at
PI KAPP HOUSE
or
Contact any Pi Kapp Brother
BEST LEGS CONTEST
1st PRIZE S200 00plus I
Paaa ��� Tvx AtUi
2nd PRIZE S75.00 plus 6-mornh
Paaa m l"hi -m
3rd PRIZE S5O.0O plus 3-murah
Pans 10 rh( Vm.
COLLEGE STUDENTS ONLY - College ID Required
Welcome to Miller Time
RAIN SITE - ATTIC
MMMMMMfc
ft





I HI t NI l -k l INIAN
Sports
I PI 1 MM H ! I 1984
Cage 10
Temple Defense Scores Shut Out
tii CD
Jt$
ECU
MICHAEL SMITH ECU Photo L�b
quarterback Robbie Bartlett is about to go maWes a shoestring tackle in his team's 17-0 victon
d wn a Iemple defensive lineman Tim Hanlej over the Pirate football team.
George Mason Shuts Out Booters
By RANDY MEWS
Sp�r1� Milir
The ECU football team was
humiliated in their home opener
Saturday night as Temple quarter-
back lee Saltz completed 13 of 20
passes for 112 yards to lead his
team to an unimpressive 17-0 vie
tory.
"1 want to apoligize for our
display of what an offense is sup-
posed to be Pirate head coach
Ed Emory said in a post-game
press conference. "There is no ex
cuse for the way we played tonight
� I was embarassed for our of-
fense
ECU only managed seven first
downs the entire game and was
held to a meager 125 yards worth
of total offense.
"Ninety percent of the problem
was the offensive line Emory
said. "They're beat up. young
and hurt, and they got beat to the
line of scrimmage almost every
time
The unsettled quarterback
situation compounded problems
as none of the three candidates v y-
ing for the starting job were able
to move the offense.
"I can't say that I saw anv
bright spots from our quarter-
backs Emory said. "It's reallv
frustrating when you can't get the
ball to the great receivers we
have
Ron Jones go; the start for the
Pirates, but he was unsuccessful
on four passing attempts with one
interception before he was replac-
ed by Robbie Bartlett on E I
last possession f the half.
Bartlett added new life to the
Pirates' attack as he moved the
Hues from their own 35 to the
Temple 33-yard line, but he was
intercepted by Anthony Young
with onlv 43 seconds left until in-
termission to put an end to on
one o' two Pirate scoring threa
during the first half.
ECU'S other opp -me
when defensive tackle David PI
deflected a pass on the Ten
40-yard line, caught it in mid-air,
and then was tackled just inches
shy of the goal line.
Fullback Reggie Branch was
stopped cold on the nefct tw0 nfaA
that went straight up the middle
and then on third-and-inches,
Tony Baker fumbled into the end-
zone. Young grabbed the ball
before it hit the ground, and
brought it out to his own six-vard
line.
Iemple scored the onlv
touchdown of the first half when
Salt engineered an eight play
66-yard drive on the Owls' second
series of the game I he drive was
highlighted b) a 24 yard pass
from Salt to Russellarter and
runs of 11 and 12 yards by
Roderick Moore and Paul Palmer
respectively. Brian Slade got the
touchdowi ,rd plunge
over the lii i
Emory decided to open the
cond hall with Bartlett at
Pirate hell the third period
proved to be inning of the
end as th B i er� unable
pick Lip a entire
quarter and netted negative P
ffense.
Salt wenl I � igain in the
closing mome I I -he third
quark' Iemple fielded a
Jefi Bolch punt on thier ov
40-yard line. The sophomi
qua pleted
passe- � hat
wa capped I i 21-ya
�ied Willie
Marshall.
It I� -
finally goinj
� Williai
returned the en e kickofl
. Ba quid
1 moved H ! into Iemple ter-
ritory on a 2! :eption
Chris j �� Then,
U the Owl
Bat eh again
connected Ricky Nicl
a 12-yard picl
The hree plays only netted
SIX j,
came d
-
20-yard lin
attempt fell si
Ten
ba
e Pirai
have one
wh I) w ai ;ked a K
Shenefelt punt with :40 re
ing.
ECU took over just 25 yards
from the endzone. but in ju
'tJtree ntpys Tertfple managed to
pusll � i Bucs all the wa ba ?
midfield. A fake punt was then at-
tempted, but Keith Ford w
caught just six yard- pas the line
j
� scrimmage to end anv hope
a Pirate comeback.
1I got the bail ba -
than three minutes left
game as Darrell Speed m l 1
first appearance at quarter'
Speed, however, wa; als
ful at moving the offer. �
the Pirates couldn'i g
nete yardag
� "h down atten
Th
. iown the k a at
p � .�� � thi
but thev added
field g'
remaining tor the final marg

ECU nov
I
Michigai
I I MPIT f MAROI IS
Rushes-
: 2 .
Rtr:
Pa
Punts-V 7-4
Penalties-Ti at
fime f P
I
mple

-
:
B SCOTT POY ERs
ssbtan SporU Mlli.r
rhe E( I sam couldn't crack the I
George Mason defense Friday, dropping a 5-0 deci-
sion on 1 U '$ ��. arsitj field.
"We are getting the opportunities, but we're
capitalizing on them Pirate he I coach Steve
Brody said.
The Pirates -y-d the Patriots tough thr
of the first half, but George Mason got on the
ard on a penalty kick by Fred Thompson aftei
ECU goalie Jesse Daughters was called for a viola
n.
The Patriots added two more goals in the first half
on shots by Mike Reynolds and And) Hav, with
Thompson getting the assist, to take a 3-0 lead at
halftime.
In the second half, George Mason struck quickly
to up their lead to 4-0 on a shot by Mike Jong.
it looked as if the Pirates were going to get on the
board midway through the half, but thev had a goal
allowed when thev were called for a violation
before the ball went into the net.
The Patriots closed out the scoring late in the game
a .en Bruce 1 obdell put a shot pasl Daughtery as
time was r;
"George Mason played well Brody said. "As far
as I'm concerned though. I think our guvs gave 110
percent.
"Right now we're something he added.
"We played well up and down the field, but we're
missing one ingred - and r sure what that
is
Daughter) had save: tor the Pirates, while
ECU had seven shots on goal against the Patriots.
George Mason, one oi the better teams in the nation,
has yet to give up a goal this season.
"The defense played well except for those first two
goals thev scored Brodv said.
As far as the offense was concerned, Brodv was
overly pleased. "We're not making enough runs
up front. We're getting some shots but we just can't
seem to put the ball in the net he said.
"We had a lack of concentration out there todav,
and we can't have that. We're just going to have to
work harder
The Pirates will have another chance to break into
the win column Wednesday when they travel to
Wilson to take on Atlantic Christian College before
reutrning to Greenville next Saturday to host
Christopher Newport.
Scoring
T � Slade,
Ma :
per � :
T - FG
Individual Statistics
Ru g: T � Pa.
: :
5-11, McHugh I-
Morris 7-23, F
� Bartlett 3-(-24
26, v
-
Pa
� ECU �
4
I, S 6-2-18
Receiving. I � V
Palmer 4-24. Ermert 1-8. Cartel
3-40. Slade l-(-l). Ma -21,
McMullin 1-3 Prim is 1-16; I
� S. Adams 1-12, Bunn 1-?,
2-2 Mel
Attendance: 51.479
M
�� �
i
i
1
I he Pirate soccer team dropped their second straight match of the season 5-0 against a powerful George
Mason team Frida afternoon.
�fife� 1 m- Santa Cruz Leads Respectable Defense
JT WMKImStSSSkI- B Ki( Mi)?i'ri�,)RMA and enJoyed m visit so 1 decided defense "pla with more intensitv Saturday" he said
�- aSik' � to come " hr� caiH unH m,ir -j. i w,m �� � '
?
s
" -
r o m mm, MICHAEL SMITH - ECU Photo Lab
Chris Santa Cruz led ECU with seven tackles against Temple in the
Pirates' 17-0 loss over the weekend.
B KlCk.MeCOKMAC
siaff WHtrf
Hie EC I defense, led by Chris
Santa Cruz's seven tackles, held
Temple to 158 yards rushing as
they greatly improved upon their
season opening performance at
Florida State.
Santa Cruz, a 6'5" 230-pound
senior noseguard who bench
presses 325 pounds and runs the
forty-yard dash in 4.79 seconds,
came to ECU last year as a junior
college transfer.
While at Hinds Junior College
in Raymond, Mississippi, Santa
Cruz played with current Pirate
teammate Tyrone Johnson. While
in high school, Santa Cruz started
at linebacker for two seasons and
was named all-State and
honorable mention All-America
his senior year.
In coming to ECU, Santa Cruz
chose the Pirates over such
notables as Florida State, Wit-
chita State and many other four
year schools.
Santa Cruz said in deciding
which school to attend he prayed
quite a bit, hoping the Lord would
guide his decision. "1 came to
ECU and really liked the people
and enjoyed my visit so I decided
to come he said.
Upon arriving, Santa Cruz
spent time at the linebacker and
defensive end positions before set-
tling in at noseguard four games
into last season. Santa Cruz said
that "transferring was like
anything else new, it takes a while
to get used to it
Last year, in a backup role to
Gerry Rogers, who is now playing
professionally in Canada, Santa
Cruz had 31 tackles, 19 of which
were unassisted. He also had two
tackles for minus yardage, and
two quarterback sacks as well as a
fumble recovery.
His seven tackles against Tem-
ple was a single game high for
Santa Cruz, with his previous high
being six against SW Louisiana.
Santa Cruz felt the defense
"played better but not good
enough
After giving up 48 points to
Florida State in the season
opener, the Pirate defense had a
demanding week of practice in
preparation for Temple.
"We ran a lot stated Santa
Cruz, who felt the difficult week
of practice made the Pirate
defense "pla with more intensitv
and more as a team
Although the defense plaed a
good game. Santa Cruz refused to
place the blame ov. an offense that
did not score anv points. I don't
blame the offense. I'm sure last
week the offense was wondering I
we were ever going to stop Florida
State. It was a team loss and if we
would have shut Temple out the
game would have been a tie
Santa Cru is a senior on a unit
that was heavilv hit b gradua-
tion, and he is depended on for
leadership. Santa Cruz leads b
example and admits, "I am not
the type of gu to jump around
and yell a lot. Mavbe sometimes I
will say something like 'come on'
to keep a teammate going, but
there are times when my team-
mates keep me going
This week the Pirates will take
on Central Michigan University,
who is favored to win the Mid-
American Conference, and accor-
ding to Santa Cruz, the Pirates
had better be prepared.
"They are as tough as Temple,
maybe tougher. We really need to
work on what we are having pro-
blems with to be ready for next
Saturday he said.
After only two games, Santa
Cru said that the season should
not vet be considered fai ure.
"We are going to take all of our
games one at a time, try to get bet-
ter each week, and b the enc;
the ear we'll be there
One reason for Santa Cruz's
optimism is the youth of
defense. As the season progresses.
he is sure they will improve "1
have a lot of faith in Coach
Throckmorton and all of our
defensive coaches, and thev will
figure out what we are doing
wrong and ways to improve upon
them. We will be a good team
Santa Cruz, a driver education
major from Lillian. Alabama, has
no doubts about the talent of this
year's team. "The talent is here I
hope the fans don't lose faith in us
because we will get better "
Head coach Ed Emorv praised
Santa Cruz as well as the enure
detense for their performance
against Temple.
'The only thing that kept this
game from being a total failure
was the play of the defense "
Emory said.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 11. 1984
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Southern Mississippi Only ECU Foe To Lose
By BILL MITCHELL
Huff Writer
Florida State: Florida State, who
defeated ECU 48-17 September 1,
had an open date.
Central Michigan: Central
Michigan, who beat Northern
Michigan last week, also had an
open date. ECU plays the Chip-
ewas this Saturday.
Georgia Southern: Geogria
Southern easily defeated
Presbyterian i the road, 41-6.
I'he Eagles played well, with the
defense setting a new school
record by causing seven tur-
novers, five of them interceptions.
Quarterback Tracy Ham, an
All-America contender, had 160
yards of total offense, with two
touchdown passes, including a 21
yarder reception by Melvin Bell
and a 29 yarder by Herman
Baron. He also had a rushing TD.
Bell also returned a punt 71
yards for a touchdown. Dexter
San ford, a freshmen also had 56
yards rushing. ECU plays Georgia
Southern in Ficklen Stadium on
Sept. 22.
N.C. State: The Wolfpack crush-
ed their opening game opponent
Ohio University 43-6 on Saturday,
scoring on seven of its first eight
possesions. State kept punter
Craig Salmon on the sidelines un-
til the third quarter. The score was
36-0 in the fourth quarter when
Ohio finally marched 52 yards for
their only touchdown.
Quarterback Tim Esposito went
12 of 21 for 167 yards, with two
touchdown passes to Ricky Isom
for 21 yards and Vince Evans for
29 yards. Tailback Joe Greene led
the Wolfpack rushers with 122
yards on 14 carries.
The defense aided State's first
half offensive play by holding
Ohio to four first downs, thus giv-
ing State favorable field position
time after time.
Head Coach Tom Reed called it
a "fine opener. We did the things
we wanted to do. We played a lot
of young kids. That's going to
help down the line
Tuba: The Golden Hurricane
were idle last week.
East Tennessee State: East Ten-
nesse State beat Tennessee Tech
10-3.
ETSU had 285 yards rushing to
64 for Tech in a game that was
more one-sided than the score in-
dicated.
The defense played well, with
Tennessee Tech only getting a
Tigers Rout Cavaliers, Now Stand 2-0
(UPI) � Clemson coach Danny
Ford says his Tigers weren't trying
to run up the score in their 55-0
ictory over Virginia, but simply
working at executing and winning
football games.
The fifth-ranked Tigers' win
Saturday was their 20th straight
ctory over an Atlantic Coast
onference foe. For Virginia, it
was the Cavaliers' worst loss ever
a Clemson squad.
Despite the score, Ford says his
gers still are trying to solve pro-
ms in their game.
We're not trying to be No. 1
run up the score Ford said.
v e're just trying to execute and
football games. We've got
parries left and still have a lot
: weaknesses to iroii out
errence Flagler and Ray
ims scored two touchdowns
to lead the Clemson victory.
Although Clemson's win may
the South Carolina school
imb in national ranking, it won't
the Tigers get on live televi-
Clemson still has one year of
probation for recruiting
violations that prevents the team
from going to a bowl game of be-
ing on live television. The proba-
tion is particularly galling to
Clemson fans because it's a year
longer than the probation impos-
ed by the NCAA.
In other ACC action Saturday
night, Maryland lost 23-7 to
Syracuse, North Carolina State
beat Ohio 43-6, Duke beat In-
diana 31-24 and Wake Forest lost
to Virginia Tech 21-20.
Wake Forest place-kicker Doug
Illing missed two fourth quarter
attempts, including a 40-yarder on
the final play of the game.
Virginia Tech had gone ahead
with 2:08 left on a six-yard
touchdown run by Eddie Hunter
and an extra point kick by Don
Wade.
The Duke-Indiana game also
was a close one, with tailback
Julius Grantham scoring on a
one-yard run with 1:33 remaining
to give Duke the victory. Gran-
tham, who earlier this month had
been listed as doubtful for the
game because of a broken hand,
carried the ball seven straight
times on the scoring drive.
"We didn't play very well of-
fensively at times and defensively
we didn't play that well, but we
made enough big plays that we
were able to stay in the game
said Duke coach Steve Sloan.
North Carolina State fans, still
smarting from a 3-8 season last
year, hoped the game against
Ohio would be a rout and they got
their wish. The Wolfpack scored
on seven of its first eight posses-
sions.
The score was 26-0 at the half
and 36-0 before Ohio marched 52
yards for its only touchdown.
Coach Tom Reed described the
game as a "fine opener
"We did the things we wanted
to do he said. "We played a lot
of young kids. That's going to
help down the line. We had a
relatively error-free first half, but
then we lost some of our concen-
tration
field goal while managing only 64
yards rushing. ETSU scored on a
26-yard field goal by Herbie
Campbell and a 50-yard run by
tailback Jerry Butler. ETSU plays
Kentucky at home next week.
Pittsburgh: Pittsburgh was idle
after losing to Brigham Young in
their opener, 20-14.
South Carolina: South Carolina
barely squeaked by The Citadel,
31-24. They scored the winning
touchdown with 1:02 left in the
game on a 40-yard halfback pass
from Quinten Lewis to Chris
Wade.
Mike Lewis of the Citadel then
returned the ensuing kickoff to
the South Carolina 18 where The
Citadel could have tied the game
if not for a game saving intercep-
tion by Otis Morris.
Quarterback Allen Mitt
went 13 or 21 for 278 yards ana
one interception. He threu. a
50-yard touchdown pass to Ira
Hillary as the Gamecocks had 4
yards of total offense.
The Gamecocks trailed 21-14
after The Citadel scored as the
half ended. The defense didn't
play well in the first half.
buckled down in the second '�
Southwestern Louisiana: I si
barely beat Louisiana Tech in a
tight game, 17-16. The Ragin
juns host ECU on November 3
Southern Mississippi: The C
Eagles gave Georgia a run foi
money but the Bulldogs prevai
26-19. The Golden Eagles played
well defensively, but were jusl
good enough to hold ofl
highly ranked Georgia team.
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Color Print Film Developing
Major League Stats S
Batting
National League
wynn, SD .351
-p.dbrg.CH .320
Hrnndz. NY .316
Puhl.Hou .314
Cruz. Hou .313
Ray, Pitt .309
Raines. Mn .308
Haves, Phil .306
CDavis.SF .305
Brenly, SF .304
American League
Winfild, N .352
Mttngly, NY .349
Murray, Bit .328
Hrbek, Mnn .318
Boggs. Bos .318
Trammell, D: .315
Barrett. Bs .309
Easier, Bos .309
Ripken, Bit .309
Bell, Tex .306
Home Runs
National League � Murphy,
Atl 31; Schmidt, Phil 30; Cey, Chi
2C; Carter. Mtl 24; Durham, Chi,
I nard, SF and Strawberry, NY
American League � Armas,
� 36; Kingman, Oak 34; Thorn-
ton, Clev 30; Brunansky, Minn,
Murphy, Oak and Parrish, Det
Runs Batted In
National League � Carter, Mtl
100; Schmidt, Phil 95; Cey, Chi
B9; Cruz, Hou and Hernandez,
NY 88.
American League � Kingman,
Oak 113; Rice, Bos 111; Murray,
Bait 105; Armas, Bos 103; Davis,
ea 102.
Pitching
Victories
National League � Andujar,
StL 19-11; Gooden, NY 15-8;
Lea, Mtl 15-10; Sutcliffe, Chi
14-1; Soto, Cin 14-7; Knepper,
Hou and Show, SD 14-9; Niekro,
Hou 14-10; Koosman, Phil 14-11.
American League � Bod-
dicker, Bait 18-9; Morris, Det
17-10; Bleyleven, Clev 16-6;
Niekro, NY and Wilcox, Det 16-7;
Petry, Det 16-8.
Earned Run Average
'Based on 1 inning x number of
games each team has played)
National League � Pena, LA
2.44; Candelaria, Pitt 2.49;
Hersmiser, LA 2.52; McWilliams,
Pitt 2.63; Lea, Mtl 2.82.
American League � Stieb, Tor
2.38; Boddicker, Bait 2.69;
Niekro, NY 2.91; Davis, Bait
2.93; Byleven, Clev 2.98.
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12
HI I S1RO INIAN
Mill MBER 11, 1984
McEnroe Wins His Fourth U. S. Open Title
NI U YORK (I PI) � Were if
noi tor a fit of temper, John
McEnroe might be staring at a
Grand Slam.
Since he has been beaten only
twice in 68 matches this year, it
isn't difficult for McEnroe to
recall those two dark das with
' illiani clantv.
One. in particular, will rankle
a long time to come.
In the final of the French Open,
McEnroe won the first two sets
from Ivan i endl with the loss of
onl five games, but I endl turned
d magnificently to capture
v three sets.
Mel nroe feels he hurt his own
. that da b arguing too
much and expending too much
energ racing around the court.
Their first meeting since then
came Sunday in the final of the
U.S. Open, and once again
McFnroe took the first two sets.
This time, though, there was no
letup in the final set, and
McEnroe emerged with a 6-4, 6-3,
6-1 victory, dooming Lendl to his
third successive setback in the
Open final.
"Certain things like the wasting
of energy and the controversy,
maybe it hit me there (in Paris)
that I hae to stay away from it
McEnroe said after winning the
Open for the fourth time.
"That's the lesson 1 learned
there. Hopefully you learn a
lesson every time you lose
Inasmuch as he won
Wimbledon, had he conquered
the French as well, McFnroe
would be sitting today with three
legs of the Grand Slam. Don
Budge (1938) and Rod Laver twice
(1962 and 1969) are the only men
to have won Wimbledon, the
U.S French and Australian in
the same year.
"1 suppose I could say it got
away if 1 win the Australian
McEnroe said, But I don't
think you can look back. You
have to look ahead.
"If I do win the Australian, I
guess that gives me a shot at the
New York
Dallas To
Giants Humiliate
Stay Undefeated
They know the party
: :o last another week. So
� . the Kansas Citv Chiefs
Nev 'i ork Giants are enjoy-
defeated status.
� .a" we won onl one
i road and we've
'uo on the road this
Kansas City coach John
. aid Sundav after his
f edged the Cincinnati
IS3 -v .which vv hipped the
T5 '�7-27 in Pittsburgh last
ipped its record to 2-0
� to Todd Blackledge
S k ! owery.
� edge, a second-vear NFL
back filling in for injured
mey, lofted touchdown
46 yards to Anthony
-s and 19 ards to Carlos
1 owery provided the
inal points on field goals
ards KC also got a
; D run from Theotis
Chief
week, ;
Bowl
es Raiders
king fi
-
ally play at
will be agairw
champion Los
rward
1 going
'r.iieint:
town
"W e're going to
get after them
With their 28-7 rout of the
Dallas Cowboys Sunday, the
Giants are off to their first 2-0
start since 1968. Linebacker Andy
Headen sprinted 81 yards with a
fumble recovery and Phil Simms
fired three TD passes to lead the
Giants. (
Even inside linebacker Harry
Carson, who bolted training camp
last month, is happy to be a Giant
these days.
'They made me feel very proud
of being next to them Carson
said, this has to be one of the
highlights of my Giants' career.
They've been beating us ever since
I've been here
New York faces the other Super
Bowl team, the Washington Red-
skins, next week in their first road
game of the season. The Giants'
rejuv mated offense has the club
confident, however, especially the
uay Simms has been throwing.
After three injury-plagued
seasons, Simms has thrown for
594 vards and seven touchdowns
in two games and hasn't been in-
tercepted in 50 passing attempts.
Elsewhere, Miami smashed
New England 28-7, St. Louis
crushed Buttalo 37-7, New
Orleans nipped Lampa Bay 17-13,
Chicago blanked Denver 27-0,
Detroit edged 27-24 in overtime,
Philadelphia edged Minnesota
19-17, the Raiders hammered
Green Bay 28-7. the Los Angeles
Rams nipped Cleveland 20-17,
Grand Slam. In my mind, you
have to win it in the same year,
but if you can do it four in a row,
that's pretty impressive. I'd be
more than happy to take that
The way he has been playing
this year, it is difficult to imagine
McEnroe not achieving his goal.
On Sunday he came back follow-
ing his 3 hour and 45 minute
marathon of the previous night
with Jimmy Connors, and
although feeling very Weary he re-
quired only an hour and 40
minutes to dispose of the world's
No. 2 player.
Not only did McEnroe zealous-
ly protect his serve the entire
match, only in one game was
Lendl able to reach break point.
That came in the second game of
the second set when a pair of dou-
ble faults by McEnroe set up dou-
ble break point.
McEnroe saved both, and made
sure not to give Lendl another
chance.
"The only realistic change is to
return his serve better Lendl
said when asked about beating
McEnroe, to whom he's lost in
nine of their last 11 games.
McEnroe used a break in the
he turned the match into a rout
with three breaks in the third set
Lendl, far more comfortable on
the baseline, changed his strategv
by following his serve to the net 25
times, winning 13 of those points
In contrast, McFnroe went to the
net 54 times and won 37 points
McEnroe said he had felt very
tired all day leading up to the
match, and the winner's check of
$160,000 didn't do anything to
help that condition.
"I really leel exhausted right
now he said.
"I took my time and 1 didn't
get angry at anything because 1
knew that I needed every ounce of
energy I had I'm glad it was
three sets
Martina Navratilova, winner of
the women's singles on Saturday,
teamed with Pam Shriver Sundav
to capture the women's doubles 'i-
tle from Anne Hobbs and Wendv
Turnbull, 6-2. 6-4.
It was the second consecutive
year the top seeds won, and
Navratilova has captured the title
live times with three partners.
B winning $160,000 in singles
and S2,000 in doubles,
Navratilova boosted her earnings
Ui 1984 to $2,025,256 and her
career total to $3,409,345
Navratilova and Shriver are
unbeaten in doubles since April
1983, since then winning 14 tour-
naments and "0 consecutive mat
ches.
Manuela Maleeva and Tom
Gullikson won the mixed doubles
title from Elizabeth Savers and
John Fitgerald 2-6,7-5, 6-4
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 11, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 11, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.358
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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