The East Carolinian, September 6, 1984






Otoe �aat (Earolmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.5
Thursday September 6, 1984
(.reenville, N.C.
20 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Fleming Renovations
Result In Problems
By HAROLD JOYNER
StaftWrltat
A $700,000 renovation project
at Fleming Residence Hall
creating problems for some of the
residents and the ECU
Photography Lab, which is
located in the basement of the
building.
Neil Johnson, head
photographer for the
Photography Lab, said the pro-
blems of inconvienence are not
half as bad as the potential health
hazards present. He claimed there
is asbestos hanging from the ceil-
ing which is falling tro the floor
due to the construction work.
"We've reported the asbestos pro-
blem to the Campus Health and
Safety Office, but we have not
heard anything,yet The Direc-
tor of the Campus Health and
Safety Office, Arthur Colclough,
was not available for comment.
Johnson added that all of the
photographic equipment had to
be covered because of the large
amount of dust.
Johnson also said much of the
major photography equipment
had to be relocated to the
photographer's homes. "We
were told by the general contrac-
tors that the project would be
completed by August 13. It is
almost impossible to work in the
lab now with the constant noise
and traffic of construction
workers Johnson said.
Freshman Tonya Faulkner, a
resident in Fleming Residence
Hall, said the construction has
caused her a minor interference
with her studying. In addition she
said the electricity in thcdorm had
gone off several times for as long
as 30 minutes. She said, "My
roommate gets pretty mad with
the construction because they
begin to work around 7:30 a.m.
and the drills and saws wake her
up
Faulkner has seen new heating
and air vents installed along with
new rubber baseboards. She also
saw "something that was in a big
roll. I think it was insulation
Faulkner's RA explained to the
residents the inconvience they
would be experiencing and the
work would be going on for
another two weeks. "That two
weeks was three weeks ago
Faulkner said.
Mr. Dan K. Wooten, director
of Housing Operations said he
was unaware of the asbestos pro-
blem Johnson had reported. He is
unsure of exactly who was respon-
sible for the clean up, but he
believed it would be the
mechanical contractors respon-
sibility.
Wooten said three contractors
were responsible for the renova-
tion: J. H. Hudson Company of
Greenville, general contractors;
H. Baker Company of Wilson,
mechanical contractors; and D. L.
Johnson Company of Wilson,
electrical contractors. Wooten
said a new heating unit has be in-
stalled and a new air-conditioning
unit will be in by October. He ad-
ded that the Fleming Dorm
residents had paid $70 for the air-
conditioning and their money
would be refunded pro-rata if the
unit is not used this year.
The delays in completing the
construction work, Wooten said,
are due to late shipments of the
heating and air-conditioning
units. Mr. James Lowry, director
of Physical Plant Operations was
not available to confirm the con-
struction delays.
Johnson said he is hoping the
Media Board will relocate the
photography lab. "We've re-
quested a ditterent place to house
the lab. but they have told us there
is simply no room on campus
available for a photo lab. Right
now, I am concerned with the
hazards the renovation is
causing Johnson added that in-
itial plans to refurbish the
photography lab only include pat-
ching up the walls and replacing a
bulletin board
Ever wondered where all the action on campus is? You've got it,
the automatic teller machines at Mendenhall. Of course, they see a
Give Me All Your Money
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
lot more action at the beginning of the month, but that's a
student's life for you.
Students Seek Support At Convention
(CPS) � The Republican Par-
ty, never known as a haven for
college-aged activists, developed a
key role for youth at last week's
convention:
The signs, banners, well-
rehearsed demonstrations and
chants of "four more years" were
all the work of a scrupulously-
organized group of 2,000 young
volunteers.
On the night of President
Reagan's renomination, for ex-
ample, about 1,000 young people
jammed the convention floor
waving banners and signs, snaked
through the delegates for exactly
15 minutes, and then, on a pre-
arranged signal from a campaign
official, left the floor.
And though the huge delegation
of young people did lend some
moments of spontaneity to the
convention � young Republicans
were responsible for entertaining
sideshows like a group of "Fritz-
busters" commandos and a clique
called "Coneheads for Reagan"
� it was most significant for its
visibility in a party where
previously it had been invisible.
The you'h leaders themselves
attribute it to a growing conser-
vatism among college students.
"People my age have only seen
two administrations, the Carter
failure and the Reagan success
explains Patrick Mizell, 20, the
texas state coordinator for the
Reagan-Bush campaign.
"I think the man has done
miracles adds
Carey Ewing of the Young
Republicans, the more moderate
of the party's two youth organiza-
tions. "I'm better off now than I
was four years ago. I believe in
hard work. I don't believe in get-
ting something for nothing
Fifty percent of the nation's
18-to-29-year-olds would vote for
Reagan if the election were held
today, according to the latest
CBSNew York Times poll.
The party's youth wing has am-
bitious plans to campaign on
about 150 campuses in swing
states to make sure people don't
change their minds.
"We're going out there and
push our case says Jack
Abramoff, head of the College
See GOP, Page 5
ECU Alumni Sponsor Annual National Telefund Sept. 17
Bv ELAINE PERRY
Suff Wrilff
The seventh annual ECU Na-
tional Telefund will begin its an-
nual fund drive on Sept. 17. The
drive will run through Oct. 11
with a goal of $80,000. This year's
theme will be "Go for the Gold,
the ECU Telefund
The Telefund is a vital part of
fund raising according to Cindy
Kittrell, the Annual Fund Direc-
tor. "Private funding makes a dif-
ference between a good university
and a great one she said. "You
can't use state money alone.
Private funds are needed to make
various programs and schools bet-
ter than with just state funds.
Funds received are used for
such things as scholarships and
awards.
"Alumni are the biggest source
of outside funding, however, cur-
rently only 20 percent of the alum-
ni give Kittrell saidECU has a
relatively new fund raising pro-
gram. The goal is to build a net-
work of successful ECU people.
Support in not just dollars but in
time and voice
The Alumni Association relies
heavily on the Ambassadors, a
service organization composed of
students, to help with the Tele-
fund and they make up the ma-
jority of the people manning
phones.
"The Telefund is fun and a lot
of action" according to Kittrell.
Various things will take place each
night. The workers will receive a
nice dinner and a free long-
distance phone call each time they
work. In addition, prizes will be
given each night for the person
who makes the most money, who
gets the most donors and rookie
awards for the best new caller.
The prizes will include dinner for
two at the King and Queen and a
wine and cheese gift certificate.
Every participate will receive a
pirate hat and "Go for the Gold"
buttons.
In addition to the Am-
bassadors, various fraternities,
sororities and residence halls will
be helping. There will be a contest
between the different dorms with
the winner receiving a plaque to
hang in the dorm for a year. Also,
each residence hall and frater-
nitysorority will receive points
towards the best in its respective
class.
When calling, there are three
night captains appointed every
night, each responsible for pro-
viding nine people to man the
telephones.
Fraternity Wins A ward
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
N�w Editor
ECU'S Phi Kappa Tau fraterni-
ty recently won the Roland Max-
well Outstanding Chapter Award.
According to Bill Dawson, vice
president of the fraternity, the
award was given on the basis of
the fraternity's "all-around
superiority
The national organization,
which presented the award, con-
sidered such factors as social pro-
grams, chapter spirit and com-
munity activities in selecting a
winner. Dawson said.
"We've worked a long time for
this award, it's taken us 20 years
to win Dawson said. "It means
as much to alumni as it does to the
undergraduates and th'ey deserve
as much of the credit
Three awards are presented na-
tionwide, one in each size
category. ECU's chapter won in
the second category, which en-
compasses campuses with nine to
19 fraternities. Eighty-seven Phi
Kappa Tau chapters competed,
Dawson said.
"This will be something that
will help us get new members �
it's a positive factor he added.
These two students are relaxing by enjoying an after-class game of
friendly chess at Mendenhall Student Center. Students should
Your Move, Baby
JON JORDAN � ecu Pheto Lab
definitely "check" out the many services offered at Mendenhall
before mid-terms begin. Hey bud, watch out, it's her move now.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features13
Classifieds15
Sports17
�Pictured to the right is one of
the campus landmarks which
appeared in Tuesday's East
Carolinian.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBERS 1984
Announcements
LATTER-DAY SAINTS
You and your friends are Invited to attend this
ye�r's Institute �� Religion class which will be on
tt�e New Testament Every week promises to be
orsat because Bill Evenhuls Is an excellent
teacher Class meets each Thursday from 6 30 to
I 00 pm In Brewster B 305.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Come loin us tor "PRIME TIME'1 this Thurs. at
7 p.m. in the Jenkins Aud. Art Bldg We're com-
mitted to having tun, fellowship and the study of
God's Word. See you nart
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
College Republicans will have a social meeting
tonight at 7 00 Come by, partake ot food and
a ink make new friends, and learn how you can
help our Republican candidates get elected Turn
off 14th Street onto Berkely Drive, past front of
Flcktln Stadium, until you reach circle Drive
II7JI Circle Drive). No admittance without pay
ing 11.00 dues to CR's You know it's worth Itl
AMBASSADORS
We will have our second general meeting at 5:00
p.m , Wednesday, Sept 12 In me Mendenhall
Multipurpose Room We have many exciting ac
tivitles to discuss.
PI KAPPS WELCOME
The brothers would like to welcome everyone
out to me Pi Kapp house for Rush, Sept. 10-13, to
moot all me brothers, and be ready to party
Okay, you Alpha Delta Pi's, the brothers are
ready to iem Friday night for Pref night, we hope
you can hang! A reminder for an the brothers,
brotherhood will be Sunday night at 7:00 at
Mendenhall, instead of Monday night
SOFTBALL
Anyone Interested in playing corec Softball tor
me Department of intramural-Recreational Ser
vices should come by room 204 Memorial Gym or
call 757 637 for more information. Have fun and
participate through "intramurals" the Deadline
tor registration Is 5 00 Sept. 10, 11.
DELTA SIGMA PHI
Welcome back Delta Slgsl I Hope everyone had
a great summer and ara ready to make this year
one to remember Little Sister Meeting this Sun
day. Sept � at I 00 p.m Hope all Little Sisters can
come. See you therel
BICYCLE CLUB
Everyone Is invited to Thursday, super novice
evening ride starting at 630 p m and Saturday
beginner's morning ride at 900 am. Both rides
start a' Elm Street Gym Call Dr Mlyashlta
7ST7553 for more inforr.iation
MAT
Due to Increased charges by the Psychological
Corp the Testing Center at ECU finds It
necessary to pas on the increase to the MAT can-
didates. Beginning Oct. 1.1��4. the test fee win be
$33.
ART EXHIBITION
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Art Exhibition Committee
will hold an orientation meeting on Thursday,
Sept a. 1�4, at 3:30 pm In room 230 of Mendenhall
Student Center. All members and Interested
students are urged to attend
NURSING STUDENTS
In order to receive your Nursing Pin by
December 14, 19B4 orders must be placed In me
Student Supply Store, Wright Building, no later
man September 21, 194 Orders should be placed
at the Jewelry Counter. Orders must be paid In
full when the order Is placed.
PRE PHYSICAL THERAPY
Deadline for 1905 admission to professional
phase is Nov 1, 1904 All general college and
physical therapy prerequisites must be com
pleted by end of Spring, 1905. Allied Health Pro
fesslons Admissions Test must be taken in
November (apply early October) Application
packets are to be picked up Oct 5, 1984 In me
Physical Therapy Department Office (Belk
Building, Annex 3. 757 6941. Ext 261)
ALPHASIGMA PHI RUSH
The Brothers of Alpha Sigma Phi would like to
invite anyone interested in the great experiences
of fraternity life to attend our FALL RUSH.
Beautiful girls, beer, and me opportunity to ioln a
fantastic brotherhood will be yours Be there
Sept 10 12 900 p.m
BINGOICECREAM
The Student Union Recreation Committee is
sponsoring a BingoIce Cream Party to be held on
Tuesday, Sept 11 at 700 p.m in the Mult!
Purpose Room All ECU students, faculty, staff,
their dependents and guests are welcome Admls
sion is 25 cents Play 8 different bingo games for
prizes and eat delicious ice cream
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
Little Sister Rush will be held on Sept 17 and 18
starting at 9:30 p.m. Come out and meet great
guys and super girlsl The Little Sisters look for
ward to meeting any girls interested In becoming
Lambda Chi Alpha Little Sisters themselves! its
a great opportunity! I Call 752-6159 for any Infer
matlon.
CORSOANDNASW
All Social Worx and Corrections Melor and in-
tended Majors are urged to attend. Monday, Sept
17, lf�4 at 4:00 p.m. Rm. 105 Allied Health Get In
volved in fund-raisers, community service and
parties. Come and moot people In the department.
ALL STUDENTS
Undecided about your career path? Stay one
step ahead of the competition by increasing your
social opportunities and knowledge of the work
Ing Do yourself a favor: attend the first meeting
of the Society for Advancement of Management
Refreshments will be served For more informa
lion call: Rick at 752 8787 or Lori at 758 2293 Don't
miss OUtl
PUTT PUTT
intramural Team Putt Putt Is set to tee off on
Mon. Sept 17 Team captains should register
their teams in Memorial Gym on Mon Sept. 10
and Tuesday Sept 11 between 8:00 a.m. and 500
p.m PARTICIPATE RATHER THAN SPEC
TATEIIIII
SLAP
The Department of Speech Language 8.
Auditory Pathology (SLAP) will be providing the
speech and hearing screening for all students
eligible for admission to the upper division of
teacher education on Monday, September 17,
Tuesday, September 18, and Wednesday,
September 19.
The department will be testing from 500 7:30
p.m on the abov? days NO APPOINTMENT IS
REQUIRED The SLAP Department is located in
Belk Annex on Charles Street
There will not be a makeup session Fall
Semester
SPORT CLUB COUNCIL
The first meeting of the Intramural and Recrea
tlonal Services Sport Club Council will be on
September 19, 1984, at 4 00 in Brewster B 103. All
officers should attend
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Placement Service in
the Bloxton House is offering one hour sessions to
help you prepare your own resume Few
graduates get jobs without some preparation
Many employers request a resume showing your
education and experience Sessions to help will be
held In the Career Planning Room at 3 p.m Come
on any of the following dates September 12, 18, 27
or September 19 at 7 p.m.
ZBT BROTHERS
Brotherhood will rx- Sunday at 9:00 p m
Mendenhall Bring your class schedule and
syllabus Dues will be the same as last year! They
will not increase as stated last Sunday!
SKI CHRISTMAS BREAK
Any persons interested in snowskling
December 30 through January 4 at Snowshoe,
W.V should call Jo Saunders at 757 6000 to get
your name on the list for the trip Beginners to
hotdoggers are welcome Ski Instruction is
available for all levels of ability Price depends on
ski package Space for housing on slopes and
transportation Is limited. You are Invited to come
by Memorial Gym 108 on Oct 30 at 4:00 p.m. to
register, see the slides and, talk skiing! A $5 00
deposit at this time will reserve your space.
NAACP
Beginning Monday, September 10th, at 5:30 In
the Coffeehouse located on the ground floor of
Mendenhall, NAACP will meet on me 2nd and 4th
Mondays So come on out and give a little of
yourseld for a great cause! 111
COREC SOFTBALL
IRS (Intramural Recreational Services) Join
the fun Registration dates for COREC SOFT
BALL are Sept 1011 The Team Captains'
Meeting is set for Sept 9, 700 p.m In BC 103
Come by room 204 Memorial Gym to register. Any
one can participate in INTRAMURALS
ALPHA SIGMA PHI
LITTLE SISTERS
The Little Sisters would like to welcome
everyone back from the summer Brothers, lets
make this year as much fun as last! We would
also like to encourage any guys interested in fin-
ding out more about the brotherly circle of the
Alpha Sig's to attend our fall Rush. Sept. 10 12 at
8 00 See you there!
TOGA PARTY
We are having a TOGA PARTY, and it promises
to be lots of fun on Friday, September 7, 1984 at
the Cultural Center from 10-2. Admission will be
50 cents with a toga, 75 cents without a toga, and
$1.00 for non students. This party is sponsered by
the ladles of Alpha Kappa Alpha. Music will be
provided by Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity, Inc.
ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA RUSH
The Theta Alpha Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha
Sorority, Inc will host its formal Rush for Fall
1984 on Thursday, September 6, at 8:00 pm. in the
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room The theme will
be "An Alpha Kappa Alpha Hawaiian Paradise"
Invitations are available In front of me bookstore
or from any AKA You may still attend the Rush
without invitation Please dress appropriately
CHORAL SOCIETY AUDITIONS
Rehearsal for the 15th season of the Greenville
Choral Society will commence at 7 30 p m .
September 11. 1984 at the Immanuel Baptist
Church The Society invites all singers who are In-
terested In participating in the preparation for the
three concerts to be given in 1984 to call Ms
Carolyn Greene Ipock, 355 2717 to arrange for
voice placement auditions which will be held on
September 11 at 7:00 p m at the Church
MARTIN FOR GOVERNOR
Meet and speak to Congressman Martin this
Sat. the 8th. Volunteers and interested persons
meet at Mendenhall on Thurs the 6th, at 5 30 p m
or come to College Republican Social at 7 00 p m
This won't conflict with Sat football game
MARAUDERSARMY ROTC
There will be a mandatory meeting for all
members Persons Interested in becoming a
member are welcome to attend. Time: Wed ,
Sept 12th at 7:30 The place is room 221
Mendenhall Student Center
AIR FORCE ROTC
The Air Force Reserve OHIcers Training Corps,
along with the Red Cross will be sponsoring a
Blood Drive on Sept 18 and 19 In the Mendenhall
Student Center room 244 We urge everyone to
please come donate a pint of life.
TEAM HANDBALL
Anyone interested in playing team handball for
the ECU Club Team should contact Jeff Humbert
(752 9635) or Willie Ehling (757 6387) for more in
formation All levels of experience are welcome
to play
FRISBEECLUB
You've seen one frisbee fly you've seen'em all
Bologna Ultimate, Golf, Double Disc Court Guts,
Freestyle, Max time aloft, K 9, Distance The
ECU Frisbee Club is waiting for you to come out
Tues Thurs Sunday at 500 Bottom of College
Hill Drive General membership meeting Tues
day night 8:00 at Mendenhall Student Center Be
there or be round
ZBT LITTLE SISTERS
There will be a meeting in The Coffeehouse at
5:00 p.m. on Thursday. Sept 6, 1984 Please make
every effort to attend
PSI CHI
All members present and future, are urgeo to
attend General info and motivation topics for
this semester win oe discussed Lets get phycr
ed! Thur . Sept 13, 5 00 p m Also, applications
for Psi Chi membership art now available in me
Psychology Office
RUSH SIGMA NU
Sigma Nu is on a roll! Join us Monday night tor
the rock and roll of Harbor and your favorite
beverages party starts at 9 p m No admission
charge Please bring ECU ID and driver s
license. 1301 Cotanche St behind PTA
FACULTY
A faculty investment club is presently being
formed in our area Trus should be an exciting
tun, educational, and financially rewarding oc
portunity tor all For more information ana
details on an organnationai meeting to be heo
soon, call or write today 355 2025 days and n.ghts
FACULTY INVESTMENT CLUB, P O Box 837
Greenville, NC 27834
LACROSSE CLUB
Come to the bottom of College Hill on Tuesdays
and Thursdays at 3 30 to pie some Lax A '�
looking for a few good men Any questions c�M
Dave Locke" at 752 7136
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Due to limited space, The East
Carolinian requests that orgranizations
submit only important announcements
about up coming events that students
need to know about in advance. Please
submit such messages as "thank you"
and "congratulation" notes to the Per-
sonals section of the classifieds in The
East Carolinian
The deadline for announcements is 3
i.m. Monday for the Tuesday paper
uid 3 p.m. Wednesday for the Thursday-
paper.
They must be typed on an announce-
ment form to be accepted. These forms
can be picked up at our office.
PI KAPPA PHI LITTLE SISTERS
The next meeting will be Sunday. Sept. 9 at 5:00
p.m. In Room 221 Mendenhall Attendance is man
datory All Inactive Little Sisters who wish to
become active, please attend this meeting.
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
We will be having our first Silent Dinner, this
Thurs Sept 6 at 5 00 p m Everyone Is welcome
to come loin us. The place is Mr. Gatti's. so come
on out and have son-e tun with us! Be prepared to
finger sell!
PI KAPPA PHI
LITTLE SISTERS
There will be a mandatory little sister meeting
and rush seminar mis Sunday at 500 in room 221
Mendenhall Also, any inactive little sisters who
wish to be active again, please attend
Opynqnt 193
Kroger S.iv on
Ouantitv Riqnrs Reserved
None Sold To Dealer
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
-DveBTlSf 9 ITEM POUCY
facn ot rne�" advertised items is '
auireo to oe r�aanv avjiuoie tor saie in
e�n xroger sav on except as specincai
iv noted in mis ad it we do run out o�
an item we win otter you your cnoice o
i comparaoie item when avanaoe
reflecting tne same savings or a rain
cnecu whlcn win entitle you to purcnase
trip advertised item at the advertised
once witnin 50 days Only one vendor
coupon win o accepted per item
items ,incl Prices
Effective Thru S.it
Sept a 1984
SENIOR-GRAD STUDENTS
The Career Planning and Placement Service
will meet witti thote interested in learning more
about this service. This general session will en-
courage those graduating In this 194-85 academic
year to picK up registration packets and return
mem. Registration, credentials, and Interview
procedures will be explained. The session will be
held in Mendenhall 244 at 1:00 p.m. on Sept. 11.
FACILITIES CLOSED
Memorial Gymnasium Recreation Facilities
will be cloaed during the home football game on
Sat September 8 This Includes the basketball
courti. equipment room and pool The facilities
will be open on Sunday a normally scheduled.
ISA
Attention ISA Members old, new and new In
forested students! The election tor 'M '�5 new of
fleers will take place on Sat Sept. S at 6:00 p.m
at Mendenhall Student Center. (Ask at Informa-
tion desk tor Rm. no please.) A celebration party
will alto be held fclowlng the election at 9:00 p.m.
at the international House, come and loin usl It
won't be fun without you.
SURF CLUB
The first meeting of the year is scheduled for
Thursday, Sept 6 in room 221 Mendenhall at 7:00
p.m. New officers will be elected and a date for
the team trials at Harteras will be set. New
members, girls, and anyone who enloys the beach
are all welcome. Persons Interested who cannot
attend the first meeting should contact Dave Col-
by at 7S� 7-m
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Welcome back brothers. This semester's
meetings are Thuredey at 5:00 in 212 Mendenhall.
There will be a covered dish supper Sept. 6 at
Denny i Meet ef Mendenhall at 4:45 if you need a
rtoe or direction. Brothers art strongly en-
couraged to attend meeting.
ART EXHIBITION
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Art Exhibition Committee Is
now accepting application for committee
member, for detail, contact Ban Branson at
757-eeU. ext. 310.
KARATE CLUB
Registration for beginning Karate will be In the
dence room of Memorial Gym on Sept. 27 at 7:30.
Ciiwn for advanced yellow belt and up will begin
Sept. n at 7. JO In the seme room KICK your heart
put with the Karate club 111
BALL ROOM DANCING
Mil room donee for faculdtv and staff will
begin on Oct. 2 at noon in Memorial Gym Room
iga. Classes or scheduled for Tuesday and Thurs
gay. Tr ' i� charge. Bring a partner or come
atone and loam basic dance slops In the Fox Trot,
CM Cha. watfi. Rumba and Bopi Contact Jo
latmden at 7S7-O000 or tust arrive to dance.
CADP
Campus Alcohol and Drug Program will bo
apt. a room 211 at 4:00. Anyone ft�
I in lofnlng is urged to attend.
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
important notice The next big brother
meeting has been changed! It will be next
Wednesday afternoon at 3:00 Please be there or
leave a note at the house that you will not be able
to attend, with your name, address. ID no and
phone no
COMPUTER SCIENCE
Work with Defense Department in Washington,
D.C. for computer science malors available for
Spring Semester. GPA of 2.5 required and ap
plication deadline Spetember 15. 19S4 Contact:
Cooperative Education Office, Rawi Building 313.
NATUR1ST INTERN
Position available in Wheeling, West Virginia
tor junior level student interested in working with
children In park setting Expense money plus
housing furnished. Closing date for applications
Sept 7, 1904. Contact: Cooperative Education Of
fice 313 Rawl Building.
STUDENT INTERNSHIP
internship position available with maior
Philadelphia Television Station. Experience in
writing, research, and TV production offered.
Contact: Cooperative Education Office 313 Rawl
Building.
DRIVER AND ORDER TAKER
Local firm has need for drivers and order
takers for peak perlods.Twenty hours per week,
must be li and have own car. Contact:
Cooperative Education 313 Rawl Building.
CO-OP
Northern Telecom, Research Triangle Park,
NC has a co-op opening for students Interested In
human resources development as a career. Must
have a good GPA and be willing to alternate work
alignments. The co-op position begins Spring,
MM,
GENERAL ACCOUNTING OFFICE
A representative from the U.S. General Accoun
ting Office, Virginia Beach, VA will be on campus
October 23, 1904 to Interview coop students who
would tike to work as GAO Evaluators. Accoun-
ting maors who have completed 60 semester
hour and have a 2.9 GPA or higher, should con-
tact the Coop office, 313 Rawl Bldg. to arrange an
interview Immediately.
GAMMA BETA PHI
There will be a general meeting of all Gamma
Mta Phi member, Thur September 6 at 7:00
p.m. in Mendenhall, room 244. The executive
board will meet before the general meeting at
6 � p.m. In Mendenhall room 244.
VOLUNTEERS FOR MARTIN
Call ECU coordinator Sandy Hardy at 757-0711
or me headquarter on W. 6th St. beside
Hollow off rVWmorlal Dr 757 3077.
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Prof Su
(CPS) � A Stanford professor, Gut
angered his class was included in a para
list of easy college courses, has Amet
sued Sews week on Campus, the
national campus paper insert that any
published the list last October, for lawsi
$l million. to
In papers filed with the suit, mags
Professor John Kaplan says the Vi
characterization of his "Criminal serttt
Lav. and the Criminal System" colle,
course as "the easiest five credits l
a Stanford student can earn" in kai1
the article was unfair and un- mam
truthful, and damaged his reputa- Elizj
tion. under
The course was one of 11 listed ford
in the article, "A Giggle of meni
Career Planning
Center Hel
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"Interviews need preparation.
People need to prepare for them.
They need to be able to talk about
their strengths and weaknesses"
said Jim Westmoreland, ass:
director of the ECU Career Plai
ning and Placement Service. The
Placement Center has an audio-
visual room with videotape equip-
ment for practice interviewing.
The equipment was a present
from the 1983 Senior Class.
-
able
how
Coml
Fraternities
May Unite
In Council
B ELIZABETH BIRO
Staff v. rliw
ECU fraternities may develop
an all-Greek council within the
next year for the purpose of ex-
changing ideas and working on
common goals, according to
Inter-Fraternity Council president
Glenn Conway.
Conway said the council would
include representatives from the
1FC, the Panhellenic Council, and
the Society of United Liberal
Students. The purpose of trie
council would be to set up a calen-
dar of events which are common
to all three bodies such as rais -
money for charitable organiza-
tions.
The all Greek council plan was
suggested at an IFC meeting last
January, Conway said, and would
probably come up again this year.
The idea of a fraternity merger
had been suggested in the past b
Greeks, but Associate Dean
Orientation and Judiciary Dr.
Ronald Speier said he did not feel
a merger was feasible due to dif-
ferences between the groups'
rushes and ritualistic activities.
However Speier said he will work
to bring all Greeks together on
areas of common ground, and 1
hopes the organizations can wort
together on philanthropist pro-
jects even if Greeks are not merg-
ed.
conway said he supported the
all-Greek council because it would
provide Greeks the chance to
work together. "We do have
many differences, but we a s
have much in common C
said.
Conway said he was not sure
when the all-Greek council plan
would come up again, because ol
the disorder associated with the
beginning of the school year, and
each fraternity working twoar
membership at the present time
However, Conway said he ex-
pected to see the council plan
come up in an IFC meeting in the
near future.
Computer
Classes
comi
grar
1
anc
Offered
ECU NriM Bu'f�.
Beginning and experienced
computer users in eastern North
Carolina may wish to participate
in one of ECU's Saturday com-
puter seminars this fall.
The series includes: "The Small
Computer Revolution: .An In-
troduction to the Machine Sept
15; "Introduction to dBASE II
Sept. 22; "Introduction to
Multiplane' Sept. 29 and "In-
troduction to Word Processing
Oct. 20.
Each program is scheduled to
run from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. In-
structors are members of the ECU
faculty and staff.
?

I
� i � mm
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I Ml-I-AS IAROUNIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 19B4
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9
Prof Sues Because Course Termed Easy
(CPS) - - a Stanford professor
�ed his class was included a
1st oeasy college courses, has
sued ,k,hwA on Campus, the
I n'ampus paper insert that
PuM.shed the l.st last October, for
��� million.
In papers filed with the suit
Professor John Kaplan says the
-naractenzation of his "Criminal
1 a and the Criminal System"
course as "the easiest five credits
Stanford student can earn
the article was unfair and
truthful, and damaged his reputa
tion.
The course was one of 11 listed
in the article. " Giggle of
Career Planning
in
un-
Ciuts The piece's introductory
paragraphs called them "an AI1-
Amencan team of" easy classes.
"At this point, we can't sav
anything" about the article or the
lawsuit, says Ute Lange, assistant
to Jerrold Footlick, the
magazine's managing editor.
Newsweek on Campus is in-
serted six times a year into KM
college papers, and reaches some
1 1 million collegians, I ange said
Kaplan left for a visit to Ger-
many shortly after filing suit, but
Elizabeth Rafferty,
undergraduate secretary at Stan-
ford's political science depart
ment, contends. "I know the
students do not find it an easy
course, what they would call a
Mickey Mouse course
The magazine judged it a gut
course because Kaplan's lectures
are recorded and then broadcast
over the campus radio station,
making lecture attendance un-
necessary.
"Some students might find it
easy because their physical
presence might not be required
Rafferty concedes.
Teachers of other courses nam-
ed in the article were less than
amused, although they have no
current plans to sue.
"We did not appreciate the arti-
cle, says Iran Fowler, depart
ment secretary at Michigan State's
Department ol Health and
Physical Education, which was
cited for offering Beginning
Billiards. "It didn't sit real well
here
She points out "the students are
expected to be in class, rhey are
graded on their skill improve-
ment" in learning to make "a
straight shot and a cut shot
Professor John B. Droste, who
teaches an Indiana University
geology course named in the arti-
cle, isn't sure what to make ot it.
"I thought it was tongue-in-
cheek he says. "But apparently
(Newsweek on Campus) was
serious
Center Helps With Interviews
By El A1NF PFRRY
Staff Wrtlfr
"Interviews need preparation.
People need to prepare for them.
They need to be able to talk about
'heir strengths and weaknesses"
said Jim Westmoreland, assistant
director of the ECU Career Plan-
ning and Placement Service. The
Placement Center has an audio-
visual room with videotape equip-
ment for practice interviewing.
The equipment was a present
from the 1983 Senior Class.
Fraternities
May Unite
In Council
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Staff Writer
ECU fraternities may develop
an all-Greek council within the
xt year for the purpose of ex-
changing ideas and working on
-non goals, according to
Inter-Fraternity Council president
enn Conway.
Conway said the council would
ide representatives from the
he Panhelienic Council, and
Society of United Liberal
Students. The purpose of the
uncil would be to set up a calen-
� of events which are common
to all three bodies such as raising
money for charitable organiza-
tions.
The all Greek council plan was
suggested at an IFC meeting last
January. Conway said, and would
probabiv come up again this year.
The idea of a fraternity merger
had been suggested in the past by-
Greek v but Associate Dean of
Orientation and Judiciary Dr.
Ronald Speier said he did not feel
merger was feasible due to dif-
ferences between the groups'
rushes and ritualistic activities.
wever Speier said he will work
ng all Greeks together on
common ground, and
opes the organizations can work
aether on philanthropist pro-
ts even if Greeks are not merg-
conway said he supported the
ail-Greek council because it would
v ide Greeks the chance to
work together. "We do have
many differences, but we also
have much in common Conway
said.
Conway said he was not sure
when the all-Greek council plan
� ild come up again, because of
the disorder associated with the
beginning of the school year, and
fraternity working twoards
membership at the present time.
H wever, Conway said he ex-
see the council plan
me up in an IFC meeting in the
near future.
Computer
Classes
Offered
i I Sc Bureau
Beginning and experienced
computer users in eastern North
Carolina may wish to participate
in one of ECU's Saturday com-
puter seminars this fall.
The series includes: "The Small
Computer Revolution: An In-
troduction to the Machine Sept.
15; "Introduction to dBASE II
Sept. 22; "Introduction to
Multiplan Sept. 29 and "In-
troduction to Word Processing
Oct. 20.
Each program is scheduled to
run from 9 a.m. until 4 p.m. In-
structors are members of the ECU
faculty and staff.
The system will aid students
who wish to practice their inter-
viewing skills. Students who
register with the service will be
able to attend workshops showing
how the system can aid them.
Companies also make informa-
tional tapes available for the
students benefit.
Companies will send interviews
concerning the jobs they have
available and students can look at
the tapes to see if they are in-
terested in the jobs. Students can
sign-up for interviews with certain
companies. However, the pro
gram is still in the beginning stage
Ideally, students will be able to
come to the center and practice in-
terviewing by using trial questions
and talking things out and then
watching themselves on T.V.
Students are able to see how they
come across to others. "It's nut
like a mirror, because you can see
the little mannerisms that need to
c changed" Westmoreland said.
The Placement Service invites
classes and clubs to make use of
the equipment on a regular basis.
While practice interviewing,
students learn the do's and dont's
o( an interview.
For example, go alone. Don't
join forces with a friend. Know
what the company does or makes
and learn the interviewer's name
and use it.
For additional information,
contact the ECU Career Planning
and Placement Service.
Droste is aware students
sometimes refer to his course as
"Rocks for Jocks" and "Land
scape Appreciation and notes
that "any civilized person would
be ol fended by the article.
But he stresses that "professors
are human folks. They don't mind
having fUn poked at them, for
they indeed poke fun at others.
But something that is presented
factually is gross. It makes an
enormous difference for people to
know this (article) is a fun thing
Consequently, "I don't blame
the guy (Kaplan) for suing says
Dr. Gail Mikles, head of MSU's
Health and Physical Education
Department. "Most of the people
who write these articles don't
know what the hell they are talk-
ing about
Mikles points out Newswttk on
Campus was "very careful not to
mention the name of the student
they talked to" in assessing the
courses.
Students were quoted by name
in describing four of the article's
11 courses, including Kaplan's.
The other courses were Ap-
prehension Reduction at
Oklahoma, Human Sexuality at
Colorado, Metropolitan Los
Angeles at UCLA, Structure of
the New York Mambo at Yale,
Recording Arts Workshop at
Southern Cal, Theater Apprecia-
tion I at Florida, and
h�colate at Cal- Berkeley.
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Qttfc ISaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, General ����,�
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak. sews�d�or J.T. Pietrzak, ova Advtnutm
Randy Mews, �� em� Anthony Martin, bus,� Manager
TINA MAROSCHAK, Features Editor KATHY FUERST, Production Manager
Bill Austin, gmwm rrrmr Linda Vizena, mwiwi ���
September 6, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Women V.P.
The Price Is Too Much
Can a woman run for vice presi-
dent? Silly question 20 years ago.
But now, as we know, a woman is
doing just that. Rep. Geraldine
Ferraro is on the campaign trail at
this very moment. Yet the question
remains. Can she run? Consider
the climate Ferraro is being sub-
jected to as she roams the country
in her quest for Blair House. Is it
conducive to a healthy society?
Is America willing to fully part
with the so-called traditional role
of women? For all the leaps and
bounds of progress, the answer
seems to be no. Because of this,
Ferraro is undergoing the most in-
tense scrutiny the country has ever
seen save the inquiry into the
assasination of President Kennedy.
The consensus appears to be,
"let's see if she's man enough to
take what we can give her Socie-
ty's yearnings, in this case, are
manifested by the press.
We feel newspapers, TV sta-
tions, magazines, etc etc are ac-
ting too harshly. They sense a big
story if something negative can be
found. Thus, they are stretching
the bounds of good journalism.
Very much so. What the media
have done is to make it impossible
for most people to run for a high
public office. Many who are overly
qualified just don't see the
justification for the intense
scrutiny they would be under.
What you will end up getting are
the power-crazy and the gluttons-
for-punishment running for office.
The problem is compounded
when a woman is involved. And
although the extraordinary
character of Rep. Ferraro has
enabled her to withstand the
tremendous pressure on her and
give a splendid performance at her
recent press conference (read grill-
ing), most women � or man for
that matter � can't take it. What a
questionable tenant in a building
her husband used to own has to do
with the way she will help run the
country is not relevant. Tradition
dictates that a wife is connected to
her husband but the reverse is not
true. So no one digs deep into Joan
Mondale's private or business life.
The tangents the press, and
ultimately society, has gotten off
to are way off base.
The price of power is too high.
Too few good people are willing to
pay the going rate. The people wat-
ching Ferraro's experience,
especially women, may decide they
don't want to play the game. The
country will suffer for it.
STRANGE 7OT5 W WS MIP-AIR COLLISIOH 7W5 Htift,
It Just Sounds Too Funny
No More Pee Dee
The Olde
SAL
The
All AB
In exchange
ticket sU-b,
wich of our
of equal or
FREF
THREE 11
PK IAU
Happ
4pm ui
10pm ui
m�mH�MmErmH,TmiwsRprW,
By GREG RIDEOUT
Today, my "Things I Thought
Of column switches to one topic.
Yes, I know this is rarely done, but
the subject is important. Today, let's
all think about that unlovable
character � Pee Dee. Let me set the
scene.
Some friends and I were sitting
around talking about the football
game and, well, just Pirate athletics in
general. The talk was subdued follow-
ing the Florida St. thrashing, and
much of it naturallly centered around
why we lost.
"Well, heck, Greg, I just don't
know what happened said Sam the
ROTC man. 'i got up to use the
sandbox in the first quarter and when
I got back ol' Ed was drawing X's
and O's for the Temple game. Goldar-
nit! I think it's a !$&?��� Com-
munist plot by the Cubans � who are
infested in Florida anyway � to
humiliate us God-fearing, good guys
here in the real United States. If Jesse
had been there, we'd have won
Big Bob said, "I think we should
have played Pittsburgh first. We need-
ed a little warm up. Ah, it was just an
off day. If Ed had let me QB, I'd a
shown'em
thought for a moment. I knew
they both had plausible explanations,
but, alas, they were both wrong. What
it was � the it being why we lost �
was � that, that, that GUY. The,
gulp, our mascot. Pee Pee. Dip Dee.
Dee pee � ah shit, you know what
I'm trying to say. That unmenacing,
unfierce, unstrong, uncool, small pur-
ple thing the half-baked athletic
department wants us to rally around.
PEE DEE. (Give me a break!)
Where did the people who approved
this leave their brains when the deci-
sion was made. It's bad enough the
thing sounds like a breakfast cereal
character. It's bad enough everytime I
say the name someone points me in
the direction of a John. It's bad
enough people are confusing the darn
thing with the tweetie bird cartoon.
BUT, for gosh sakes, the short,
stocky, ugly guy looks just like the
Carolina Ram, the Georgia Tech
Yellow Jacket and the N.C. State
wolf!
C'mon. Can't we at least try to be
original. This off-the-rack-at-Krogers
stuff is unbecoming of an up-and-
coming sports program.
But, it's not too late to get our old,
fierce Pirate back. Which, incidental-
ly, was drawn after many hours of
research on North Carolina pirates by
an ECU student. Let's be university
enough to admit we made a mistake.
No one likes it. Not the students I'e
talked to. Not any of the faculty I've
talked. And, from the grapevine, the
alumni aren't to hot about the darn
thing either.
I, this paper, and the students are
ready to wage war on Pee Dee. (Gee,
sounds like we're planning an invasion
of the toilet bowl.) We will not rest
until ECU Public Safety bans the
short, smug, arrogant thing from ever
again setting foot on this campus.
So, remember let's keep those let-
ters coming in support of the Get-Pee -
Dee-Out-Of-Here campaign. Yes, a
world without Pee Dee is a safer one.
Republican Zealots Confuse Everyone In Dallas, America
ByTRB
Tkc New RepuWtc
The Games of the Ilnd Reaganiad opened of-
ficially with the hitherto and henceforth unknown
Katherine D. Ortega settling for a bronze medal in
women's freestyle orating.
Judges rejected a challenge to Jeane
Kirkpatrick's gold medal after urinalysis showed
no trace of Democratic impurities in her system.
The general level of competition was low.
There was a reception in honor of Mrs.
Kirkpatrick and the two other women in President
Reagan's cabinet, Elizabeth Dole and Margaret
Heckler, at Dallas' famous Neiman-Marcus
department store. Entertainment was provided by
a conga line of nearly naked black ladies who
weaved through the crowd to the beat of a bongo
drum, whooping and chanting. Honest.
The chant was imcomprehensible, but I suppose
it translated roughly as, "See? Who says the
Republican Party doesn't respect women?"
To the young turks who took over the 1984
Republican platform, and seem well on their way
to taking over the party � Reps. Jack Kemp and
Newt Gingrich leading the pack � this convention
is the kickoff not merely of an election campaign
but of something they call the "Conservative Op-
portunity Society which will extend long beyond
Reagan's second term.
The chief feature of the "COS" will be the vir-
tual disappearance of taxes. In this sense, the con-
vention is a foretaste of life in the Conservative
Opportunity Society, since almost all the lavish
celebrating that went on in Dallas (as well as, to be
fair, at the Democratic convention) was paid for
with tax-free dollars as somebody's "business ex-
pense
We saw in Dallas how the miracle of capitalism,
when unburdened by taxation, can supply almost
unlimited quantities of food and drink to
thousands of ravenous politicians and journalists,
at no apparent cost to anybody. I never saw a
dollar change hands.
Two episodes involving a lowly comma illustrate
the difference in self-confidence and clarity of pur-
pose in the two parties. The Democratic platform,
in its discussion of affirmative action, originally
denounced "quotas, which are un-American and
cause cancer or some such ringing formulation.
The Jesse Jackson forces demanded removal of the
comma, leaving the suggestion that some kinds of
quotas are OK. The final version avoided all direct
reference to quotas.
The Republicans had the exact opposite ex-
perience on the topic of taxes. The original draft
read, "We therefore oppose any attempts to in-
crease taxes which would harm the recovery" and
cause cancer, etc etc. The Gingrich-Kemp zealots
demanded that a comma be added before the
"which In this case, the zealots won, thus put-
ting the Republican Party firmly on record as
believing that all tax increases cause cancer. (Or
were delegates swayed by grammar? Without a
comma, the word should be "that and not
"which)
The Republicans are equally unequivocal about
quotas. They say, "We oppose attempts to dictate
results Quotas are the most insidious form of
discrimination But in another passage, about
encouraging entrepreneurship, they brag about
how much they've expanded the 8(a) program of
the Small Business Administration. This program
guarantees a fixed percentage of government con-
tracts for minorities. It is � how you say? � a
quota.
But this is a rare lapse into self-contradiction in a
document that generally knows its own mind.
More telling is a contradiction between this year's
platform and the Republican platform of 1980.
Four years ago, the platform charged that the
Democrats "seek to derail our nation's money
creation policies and swore, "The independence
of the Federal Reserve System must be preserved
This year's version declares that "The in-
dependence of the Federal Reserve Board's
destabilizing actions muststop It demands
"coordination between fiscal and monetary
policy and hints that it's time for a gold stan-
dard.
Inflation has subsided mainly because Volcker
squeezed it out with a painful recession. This was
not the best remedy, but it was the only remedy
anyone was prepared to administer. Volcker's
recession set the stage for Reagan's recovery.
Renewed confidence in the currency is more
responsible than tax cuts for the present boom in
long-term investment.
The Republicans take credit for curbing infla-
tion. "We did it their platform says. But they
blame the recession on a two-headed beast called
"Carter-Mondale A COS manifesto issued on
the eve of the convention demands "an absolute
commitment to pursue honest money which it
correctly calls the key to lower interest rates and
long-term growth. Yet Gingrich says with con-
tempt that. "One way we could in fact gain
(against) the Japanese is to loan them Paul
Volcker.
The gold standard is supposed to be an antiseptic
solution to the problem of avoiding inflation
without causing stagnation. As an "automatic
pilot" device that avoids the risks of both human
ineptitude and political pressure, it has some ap-
peal. But a gold standard doesn't avoid the pain of
tight money. It is tight money, as William Jennings
Bryan memorably reminded an earlier convention.
And while the gold standard avoids human
vagaries, it has unpredictable vagaries of its own,
which allowed rapid inflations and deflations long
before Richard Nixon shut the gold window in
1971.
The Republican's platform gloats that "those
earning more than $50,000 pay a larger percentage
of total income taxes than they did in 1980 An
Urban Institute report released the same week
reveals why.
It's not the "free lunch" promised by supply-
side economics � more revenue from lower taxes.
Affluent people pay more of the income tax
because affluent people have more of the income.
Theirs has risen from 8.7 percent while that of the
poorest faith has declined by 7.6 percent and the
median family's has stayed about even.
But this is all traditional economic thought,
which Gingrich dismisses as "geriatric economics
for a dying industrial economy What we need, he
says, is "pediatric economics for a baby-boom
economy Goo-goo.
let. IH4, I tit Feature Syndicate. I�k.
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Sept 12th, P

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I Ml hAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1984
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Continued Prom Page 1
Republicans, the party's conser-
vative youth group.
The College Republicans hope
to register nearly 200,000 ouths
before the election.
Abramoff is behind the "Fritz-
busters" campaign as well, which
will also tour campuses this fall.
Armed with $25,000 worth of
buttons, t-shirts and
bumperstickers, the group en-
joyed a bull market in Dallas and
quickly recouped its investment,
Abramoff says.
A supporter donated an old am-
bulance to transport the four
Fritzbusters, and Yale student
Paul Erickson wrote lyrics, sung
to the "Ghostbusters" melody,
that goes in part: "If there-
something strange in America,
who you gonna call? Fritz-
busters! If your tax rates are high,
way up in the sky, who you gonna
call? Fritzbusters
A GOP delegate hopes to make
a Fritzbusters video for M-TV, ac-
cording to Fritzbuster Kim
Manifold, who by day is a Univer-
sity of Texas student.
On a more -omber note,
Reagan vouth leaders also will
stage a "Liberation Da" on Oc-
toer 25th, when American
students who were in Grenada at
the time of the 1983 U.S. invasion
will speak at more than 100 col-
lege rallies around the nation.
Man of the young delegate
were looking farther into the
future, in the rite speculation
about who would be the 19s-
GOP nominee, Rep. Jack Kemp
of New York was a clear favorite
among the ouih group-
Kemp was the featured speaker
at a youth rally at the convention,
where he told the enthusiastic
crowd the Republicans can
become a majority party.
He urged the oung people to
provide "a leader that will la)
this party into the next century
'We are the part ol these r
pie's future echoed Abram I
later. "We're going to explain U
them to .ote for technology, ex
pansion. The Democrats are tht
party of no hope. We're growth
oriented, carine about solutions
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THE EASTCAROl INIAN
SEPTI MBKK6. 1984
L ' "W
The Fraternity Experience
Fraternity life-offers U gjHerKf of a com
tnnation of different stages It involves rushing,
pledging, being a brother, and finally, being an
alumnus after graduation trom college.
What is Rush?
The first and foremost stage is iha! o! the frater-
nity rush. As a student at ECU, rush is very im
portant. because joining a fraternity depends on
this stage Each fraternity at ECU is different
Each stresses different qualities which may or may
not appeal to sou Therefore, deciding which
fraternity you would like to join is an important
decision to make.
Fratermts rush at East Carolina is informal and
open An individual has the freedom to look at all
of the houses during this period. There arc three
days that all houses are open for rush During that
time, you will want to visa each house at least
once Men are encouraged to participate fully in
these three davs, to meet as many of the members
a possible. After these three days, a man should
have a good idea of what houses interest him.
The purpose of rush is not only to have a good
time; it also gives you a chance to meet new people
and for them to meet sou. Rush is a meaningful
experience that can lead to iong-iasting college
nendships
hat is Pledging?
Pledging consists of an educational process that
familiarizes voi ujrh your individual fraternity's
history This period will last from eight to 10
weeks I ike rush, this will be a period of time for
you to make a final decision on whether fraternity
life is right for you. You will have the chance to
paiucipate in chapter functions. The activities of
pledges vanes from house to house but is
guaranteed to be a most enjoyable time.
What is it like
to be a Brother?
As a mother, von uill do most ot the same
ih t, flat ffgrt do4 tfunafrjyouitpfc dgtBguprsk
vice to East Cuioliiui and the surrounding cbm
jnumty is a top priority of all fraternities. Also,
social calendars must be planned at least a
semester in advance to allow the brothers to get all
their studying done beforehand. Participating in
serenades, dances and sorority mixers provides
many opportunities for making new friends and
for taking a break from school during the
semester.
The allumni and intramural programs are also
important parts of the fraternity. An active alum-
ni program keeps graduates involved in the
chapter. Intramurals helps to bring out that com-
petitive spirit which lies deep within us all.
Another experience in fraternity life that can help
you to become a better person is the respon-
sibilities and leadership capabilities that are learn-
ed by being an officer.
Most important of all is the feeling of
brotherhood, of knowing that there are always
several around whom you can depend on in time
of need or simply have a good time with.
What is it like
to be an Alumnus?
Upon graduation, as an alumnus, one of your
first benefits from having been in a fraternity will
be vour use of job-finding opportunities, which
every fraternity has. Applying the leadership
qualities learned as a member of a fraternity is
always a plus when looking for a job. Also, as an
alumnus, you will always be welcome to return to
your fraternity house at ECU to reminisce about
your college days to the new undergraduate
brothers.
Of course, if you would like to be even more ac
tive, then you may wish to join your chapter's
alumni association. This organization will keep
you in touch with your fraternity as well as with
vour school.
Greek Week U oother event enjoyed by ail Gr�ek
Sigma Tau Gamma Tug-o-war.
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Active - An inib�f�d r.ember of a fraternity, who is still active at
(hecolie ge
Kidding - Inviting a rushec to join a fraternity
Chapter - The local unit of a national fraternity
Fraternity - A Greek letter organization based on brotherhood
and honor
Creeks - Sorority or fraternity members
Hazing - Unethical initiation practices frowned upon by Greek-
letter societies
Honorary - A fraternity which bases its membership on scholarship,
achievements, and other prerequisites
Housemother - The chaperone or house director who lives in the
fraternity house
independents - Students who are not members of social fraterni-
ties
Initiation - Ritualistic ceremony by which pledges are made active
members
� nterfratemity Council (IKC) - College organization of men's
fraternities
Finning - The act of bestowing a fraternity pin of a man upon the
girl of his choice
Pledge - A man who has accepted the bid of a fraternity and who
ha taken the first step toward full membership
Preferential bidding - A system used during the last days of rush
by fraternities to indicate their choices
Professional fraternities - Specialized fraternities which confine
its membership to a special field of professional or vocational
education Om may he a member of both a prdfesstonal and
a social college fraternity
Sorority - A Creek letter sisterhood, also called a fraternity
KU
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Lambda Chi Alpha
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1984
3�ter3rrtt
ItMDtNi
j (Lumtctl
GLENN CONWAY
take to
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Fraternities At ECU I
Fiction
Fact
Fiction:
I dont care anything about fraternities; all they
do is drink and party.
Fiction:
I can't join a fraternity because I'm not rich. All
fraternity brother are rich.
The Greeks participating in one of the many philanthropic
projects held during the year.




I NO ONE ADMITTED
WITHOUT
ECU ID & DRIVER'S
I LICENSE
Fiction:
1 don't want to join a fraternity because they all
dress and act the same. I want to be myself.
Fiction:
If I do join a fraternity, I'll do bad in school,
maybe even flunk out. Fraternity brothers' grades
are always terrible, and they never study.
Fiction:
I'm scared to rush a t.aternity, because if I go to
one, I'll have to join.
Beta Theta Pi
Pi Kappa Phi
��
Fiction:
If I do join a fraternity, I'll lose all my old
friends and won't be able to get involved in other
campus activities.
Sigma Phi Epsiion
Fact;
Contrary to popular belief, drinking is not a
prerequisite to joining a fraternity. The consump-
tion of alcohol is a decision that is left up to the in-
dividual. Partying is only one aspect of fraternity
life. The total fraternity experience involves par-
ticipation in scholarship, service, athletic activities
and most importantly, brotherhood.
Fact:
A common misconception that often prevents
college men from joining a fraternity is that the
fraternity experience" is too expensive.
However, on the average, fraternity life will pro-
bably save you money. The greatest advantage ap-
pears in room rent. For the 1983-84 school year
dorm rent is listed at S430 per semester, while the
average room rent in a fraternity house is $340 per
semester. Also, as a fraternity member, most of
your social activities will be paid through your
dues Individual social expense! can add up to
much more. Although fraternities are reputed to
be expensive, a closer look can show a more effi-
cient and meaningful use of your money.
Fact:
While fraternity members do live together,
share common goals and interests and participate
in many of the same activities, no one ever
demands that you dress one way, nor that you act
m a certain manner. Most fraternities pride
themselves on diversity. Just as there are dozens of
types of students at ECU. the same applies to
members of each fraternity.
Fact:
Not true, a top priority of most fraternities on
campus is scholastic achievement. National
studies show that members of fraternities are more
likely to graduate than non-members. This is pro-
moted at ECU through the assistance and en-
couragement of fellow brothers. Perhaps the
greatest academic advantage the fraternity system
has to offer are the individual houses themselves.
Being in a fraternity brings one into contact with
as wide variety of people who possess a wide range
of knowledge in different academic areas.
Fact:
A fraternity does not consider a visit during
rush to a house a commitment to join. As a matter
of fact, you are encouraged to rush more than one
fraternity to see which one. if any. is suited to you
The more contact one makes with a fraternity is to
the advantage of everyone concerned.
Fact:
As was stateu before, fraternities don't seek to
take over and control your life; they are merely a
group of men bonded together in brotherhood by
common goals and ideals. Fraternities are places
to make new friends, not to forget the old ones
you have. Yon are also encouraged to get involved
in campus activities. Of all the factors in a univer-
sity environment, fraternities offer the greatest
opportunity for leadership development. In fact,
the continued successful and efficient operation of
a fraternity demands that leadership be developed.
�����-tv��� �'�
Tail Kappa Epsiion
Phi Kappa Tau
Sign Ta� Gamma
Alpha Sigma Phi
experience
ECU Rush
September 10-12
1. Alpha Sigma Phi
2. Beta Theta Pi
3. Delta Sigma Phi
4. Kappa Alpha
5. Kappa Sigma
6. Lambda Chi Alpha
7. Phi Kappa Tau
8. Pi Kappa Phi
9. Sigma Nu
10. Sigma Phi Epsiion
11. Sigma Tau Gamma
12. Tau Kappa Epsiion
13. Zeta Beta Tau
14. Theta Chi Colonv

I





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1984
Early Indian Campsite Discovered In Area
MONROE, N.C. (UPI) - Ar-
chaeologists plan to investigate
next year what may be the earliest
known Indian campsite in the
Carolinas and possibly the
Southeast, a site that is said to
date back about 11,000 years.
If the site near the Rocky River
in Union County is that old, the
discovery could help revolutionize
archaeologists' view of early
man's devlopment in North
America. Archaeologists said the
North Carolina discovery could
support the theory of Floyd
Painter, an archaeologist with the
Virginia Museum of Marine
Sciences in Virginia Beach, Va.
For years, Painter of Norfolk,
Va has theorized that a group of
Indians known as the Clovis peo-
ple developed from another
culture in the Southeast, and not
from some unknown culture in
the West as had been supposed.
The North Carolina finding by
a group of amateur archaelogists
is thought to be so significant that
archaeologists Dennis Stanford of
the Smithsonian Institution and
Vance Haynes, a radiocarbon-
dating specialist with the Universi-
ty of Arizona, have agreed to ex-
cavate there next year.
They are expected to establish
whether the early date is correct.
For two decades, archaeologists
had believed the Clovis people,
known by a scattering of peculiar-
ly fluted, leaf-shaped spearpoints,
had been the first Indians to use
the stone-tipped spear. Clovis
sites have been radiocarbon dated
at about 9,500 to 11,500 years old.
Archaeologists had believed
another culture, the Hardaway
people whose campsite was
discovered in Union County, lived
after the Clovis people. But
researchers now say charcoal
from the site � radiocarbon
dated to 11,100 years ago � in-
dicates the Hardaway people may
have coexisted or preceded the
Clovis people.
The Hardaway people would
Teachers May Get Raise
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) � The
state Board of Education today
plans to consider a statewide
career development plan that
would raise teachers' salaries, in-
crease benefits and provide an an-
nual salary of about $45,700 for
top teachers.
The 1984 General Assembly
had ordered the state to adopt a
career plan by October. The
General Assembly is expected to
select several school districts
across the state to test the plan.
The proposed plan by the state
Board of Education would
establish five levels of teachers
with each level including salary in-
creases and additional benefits.
The plan also would include
teacher evaluation committees,
composed of teachers and ad-
ministrators.
A statement accompanying the
plan said the board "intends to at-
tract the best candidates into
teaching, to develop and retain
teachers in the profession for
longer periods of time, reward ex-
cellent instruction, as well as
create career options
The statement said currently all
teachers are treated alike, based
on certification and level of ex-
perience, regardless of their effec-
tiveness.
Under the proposed plan, a
teacher at the Initial Level would
be paid a base salary, estimated to
be $15,680, and would be given a
two-year, non-renewable cer-
tificate to teach. The teacher
would be closely supervised and
would be periodically evaluated
by a team of educators.
To qualify for a continuing cer-
tificate, the teacher must be
recommended by the evaluation
team.
The next salary step � the Pro-
visional Level � would pay a
teacher about $17,150. After two
years at the Provisional Level, a
teacher would be recommended
for the Career Status I level, at
which he would receive a
10-percent raise. The salary could
range from $18,790 for teachers
with at least two years experience
to $34,620 for teachers with 31
years experience.
A Career Status I teacher could
earn an additional 5 percent every
other year if he completes at least
tour continuing education credits
during a two-year period.
After two years as a Career
Status I teacher, a teacher may ap-
ply for Career Status II teacher
would receive a 10-percent pay
supplement and also be eligible
for an additional 5-percent pay
supplement for completing conti-
nuing education courses.
The state estimates salaries for
Career Status II teachers would
range from $20,540 to $29,952. A
Career Status II teacher would be
eligible for 11-month employ-
ment, receiving an additional
month's salary.
After 12 years of teaching, a
Career Status II teacher would be
eligible for a one-year sabbatical
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After two years as a Career
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A Career Status III teacher
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year for taking continuing educa-
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Teachers also would be given a
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14 years experience.
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then possibly be the earliest
culture in North America to have
used the so-called stone ar-
rowhead, archaeologist said.
Amateur archaeologist Heath
Baucom of Oakboro discovered
the North Carolina site as he
walked with his two grandsons on
his cousin's farm in August 1979.
"I though it would be a good
place to pick up some ar-
rowheads Baucoms said.
Baucom soon found one ar
rowhead, but he also discovered
stone chips and charcoal imbedd-
ed in the clay and sand, indicating
Indians had camped there over an
extensive period.
Within weeks, one of Baucoms
sons found a scarce type of spear-
point used by the Hardaway peo-
ple, a culture once concentrated in
the Piedmont and spread thinly
across the South.
Knowing there was no date for
the Hardaway culture, Baucom, a
66-vear-old millworker, and
Rodnev Peck, a Duke Power Co.
design supervisor, contacted the
state Department of Cultural
Resources for help in excavating
and dating the site.
The state declined to help the
pair because of a lack of funds.
So Baucom. Peck and other
amateur archaeologists � mostly
members of the Charlotte-based
Piedmont Archaeological Society
� continued digging.
A: a depth of 8 feet. thev
discovered hearths that contained
Hardaway point.
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EAST CAROLINA'S OLDEST AND
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Buildin
(CPS) � ChemisTr student
Columbia University in New
sometimes can't complete lab ex-
periments because mine-
deposits clog the decades-old
plumbing system in the scho
laboratories
Last semester, c
sity of Maryland students pc
tioned to get their rent mone
back because of
dorm conditions like h -
"(jjows that are neer repa
water that cuts out in mid-
and legions of a
the buildings
Administrators ai (
State colleges and universitic
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neglected campus buil
suffering from igg
poor firing, and . �
actuallv pose potential
student and facult
Such camp .
blcms. n seems a
at schools nation
enter what man expc
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maintenance dilem
"The need to renew
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critical, nationwide pi
war Hare kaise-
dent for facilities ma: i
"Syracuse University, a
of "Crumbling
Banning
� A public forun
in Education Frc m K
Through Lniversit
at ECU Thursday S
p.m
The foruir
ECL Departi
Science in cooperati r - Peo
pie for the .American w
tionai citizens' group
First Amendme- �
sponsors are the N.C
Committee, the N.C. Li
Association's In
Freedom Committee a :N.(
Association of Eduv
Barrv Hager. din
N.C. Office o Pi
American Way and
moderator, said the Gre
forum land similar pr
Asheville and Durham "g:
Srbur concern that there is a cen-
sorship danger in North i a
today
"High quality be �
ed and sometimes
our classrooms anc es
said. "All of us �
the First Amendment, about
right to read and think foi
ourseKes. need
about this problem arc h a
respond to it
Dr. Gene Lamer, pi
library science at ECl
forum panelist, noted
Greemille forum coim ck
national Banned Books Weel
Sept. 8-15.
Lanier said cens rshipatteri
at North Carolina
universities have beet:
such diverse books as
Grapes of Wrath "The Dm
Anne Frank "Catche-
Rye "Huckleberr Finn
tic Red Riding Hood "Th
Living Bible
Copies of a 1983 People
American WA) reP�rt
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mcentrated in
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
i
SEPTEMBER 6. 1984

V
WS5ff�
:c
idake.
e I've
he ultvI've
grthe
)Ol. - dirn
2 Sare
Pe : cGee,
ur: an inasion
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thing fromeer
11 campus
.eep thoseiet-
Of the Ge-Pee-
Mign es3
� is saferone.
d
ica
ith con-
' gain
lo; them Paul
to in antiseptic
avo ling inflation
"automatic
of both human
ft has some ap-
oid the pain of
rilliam Jennings
(ier convention,
avoids human
ries of its own,
deflations long
lold window in
gtofcs that "those
a larger percentage
II in 1980 An
he same week
sed by supply-
m lower taxes.
ie income tax
of the income,
hile that of the
ercent and the
ven.
omic thought,
atric economics
hat we need, he
a baby-boom
Buildings Decaying On Many Campuses
(CPS) � Chemistry students at
Columbia University in New York
Nometimes can't complete lab ex-
penments because mineral
deposits clog the decades-old
plumbing system in the school's
iboratories.
I ast semester, over 240 Univer-
sity of Maryland students peti-
tioned to get their rent money
back because of "deplorable"
dorm conditions like broken win-
dows that are never repaired, hot
ater that cuts out in mid-shower
ind legions of ants and roaches
he buildings.
Administrators at Colorado's
itate colleges and universities wor-
ied publicly last week that
eglected campus buildings �
tiering from sagging roofs,
wiring, and cracked walls �
actually pose potential hazards to
dent and faculty next fall.
s ich campus building pro-
teins, it seems, are cropping up
schools nationwide as colleges
enter what many experts have
bbed "the deferred
ntenance dilemma
The need to renew and update
d eplace campus facilities is a
critical, nationwide problem
arns Harvey Kaiser, vice presi-
dent for facilities management at
Syracuse University, and author
"Crumbling Academe a
book on the campus building pro-
blem.
"The problems include not only
buildings, but grounds, utiltiy
management, and equipment �
right across the board he adds.
Overall, Kaiser estimates the
nation's colleges must spend a
minimum of $40 to $50 billion in
the next decade to upgrade and
replace dilapidated buildings and
other campus facilities.
UCLA Chancellor Charles
Young would call Kaiser's
estimate conservative.
The University of California
system alone, Young says, needs
over $4 billion to repair and
replac its facilities. He recently
told a congressional committee
the problem could cost the
nation's colleges as much as $60
billion over the next ten years.
The experts trace the crisis to
colleges stalling routing
maintenance for many years.
"Many buildings are simply
reaching their half-lives
observes Janet Jackley, with the
National Association of College
and University Business Officers.
"Half the college physical
plants in the country were built
right after Sputnik (the first or-
bital satellite launched by the
Soviets in 1957), when there was a
big push on education and
research she says.
Much of the post-Sputnik cam-
pus building boom, though, was
financed by federal loans and
grants that no longer CAist, leaving
school to maintain the buildings
on their own.
In addition, Kaiser points out
that "very little attention was paid
to older, existing buildings on
campuses" during the boom.
Now, "when administrators
have been faced with the decision
of firing faculty or repairing a
building, they've opted to keep
their faculty Jackley explains.
The little money schools have to
maintain buildings and equipment
often has gone into urgent,
government-mandated programs
to remove hazardous materials �
such as asbestos � or to retrofit
buildings for handicapped
students, Kaiser adds.
So Colorado State University
now estimates it needs $30 million
just to get its existing facilities up
to par. The state legislature,
however, has given the school on-
ly $77,000 for maintenance this
year.
"At our present funding rate,
it'll take 500 years to get our
buildings structurally sound
says Dick Conard, director of
CSU's architecture and engineer-
ing group.
Banning Forum Scheduled
fcCl News Bureau
A public forum, "Censorship
i ducation: From Kindergarten
.ugh University will be held
ai ECU Thursday, Sept. 13, at 7
The forum is sponsored by the
ECU Department of Library
rice in cooperation with Peo-
ple for the American Way, a na-
il citizens' group devoted to
First Amendment issues. Other
sponsors are the N.C. Freedom
i mi t tee, the N.C. Library
Association's Intellectual
iom Committee and the N.C.
ssociation of Educators.
Barry Hager, director of the
N.C. Office of People for the
American Way and forum
moderator, said the Greenville
forum land similar programs in
Asheville and Durham "grow out
of our concern that there is a cen-
ship danger in North Carolina
"High quality b oks are attack-
ed and sometimes banned from
lassrooms and libraries he
"All of us who care about
� ;rs! Amendment, about the
to read and think for
urselves, need to learn more
lit thib problem and how to
respond to it
Dr. Gene Lanier, professor of
ibrary science at ECU and a
rum panelist, noted that the
rreenville forum coincides with
national Banned Books Week
Sept. 8-15.
1 anier said censorship attempts
North Carolina schools and
ersities have been aimed at
-uch diverse books as "The
Grapes of Wrath "The Diary of
Anne Frank "Catcher in the
Rye "Huckleberry Finn "Lit-
tle Red Riding Hood" and "The
I iving Bible
Copies of a 1983 People for the
American WAy report outlining
cases of censorship attempts will aspect of public education
be distributed at the forum, he Hager said.
said. An informal coffee hour will
"We hope many citizens will percede the forum at the Willis
turn out to discuss this important Building, First and Reade Streets.
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"We're holding things together
with baling wire and duct tape,
but we can't do that forever.
Sooner or later, some of these
systems and buildings are going to
go down and become unusuable
And while faculty salaries and
tuition freezes continue to take
precedence over maintenance fun-
ding, Conard says, "we're even-
tually going to find ourselves hard
pressed to use faculty if they have
no place to teach
Many colleges share CSU's lack
of maintenance funds, inspiring
many experts to call for federal
and private-sector aid to keep the
country's college campuses from
falling apart.
A federal funding program "is
desperately needed says Kaiser,
as well as state and corporate
assistance to help colleges main-
tain their facilities.
Of the dozens of federal pro-
grams that helped build campuses
in the late fifties and early sixties,
though, "only one federal pro-
gram exists right now" to aid
campus building budgets, says
NACUBO's Jackley.
An average of 300 schools app-
ly for that federal aid each year,
she adds, but "maybe 20-25
schools" get money.
But "the current congress and
the administration have given lit-
tle indication" they'll expand the
maintenance aid, she says.
In the meantime, some schools
are scrambling for maintenance
money.
Columbia University, for in-
stance, paid a Washington, D.C.
lobbying firm to get it a $20
million federal grant for a new
chemistry center.
The University of Southern
California sold an unused hotel �
once student housing � to help
finance dorm renovations.
And Kaiser's Syracuse Univer-
sity recently sold a $3.2 million
painting to fund long-awaited
building improvements there.
"Schools need to become much
more innovative, and a lot of at-
tics need to be cleaned out he
advises.
Your Official ECU Class Ring
$20 Deposit Required
Date: � 5�-7tfc Time: 9:00 -
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1984
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College
(CPS) � In a case that "serves
notice that colleges are responsi-
ble for students' safety, New
York's highest court has ruled the
State University of New York-
Stony Brook was partly to blame
for the rape of a student in one of
its dorms.
The ruling repeats recent � and
increasingly urgent � warnings
from legal experts that courts are
making colleges responsible for all
safety and security on their cam-
puses, and that colleges are going
to have to change in order to meet
those responsibilities.
In response, man colleges are
imposing strict new regulations on
student behavior ranging from
drinking to dorm visiting hours
epart
B ERNEST ROBERTS
S4�fT Vkni�
The ECU Public Safety De:
ment recently announced a
crime prevention offue:
Arthur Eugene (Gene) McA
31, was renamed crime preve-
officer after being a detect
lieutenant since April, 1982
replacing Corporal Rr
Gurley. Cpl. Gurley will be
ing McAbee this year, particula
with the development ol
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i' t

v.





I HI FAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6. 1984
11
.Lish

S j
:hpaste

'XTUVJ
iirrnt qt
Colleges ResponsibleTor Students' Safety
(CPS) - In a case that "serves
notice that colleges are responsi-
ble for students' safety, New
ork's highest court has ruled the
State University of New York-
Stonj Brook was partly to blame
tor the rape of a student in one of
its dorms.
The ruling repeats recent � and
increasingly urgent � warnings
trom legal experts that courts are
making colleges responsible for all
safety and security on their cam-
puses, and that colleges are going
to have to change in orde. to meet
:hose responsibilities.
In response, many colleges are
imposing strict new regulations on
student behavior ranging from
drinking to dorm visiting hours.
A growing number are toying
with the idea of banning or severe-
ly limiting fraternities, a frequent
source of campus injuries.
"1 think (the New York deci-
sion) reinforces other cases
throughout the U.S in which
colleges have been found liable
for student injuries, says Leonard
Territo, a criminologist and
liability expert at the University of
South Florida.
While the suits involve
everything from grade disputes to
hazing deaths, students are now
winning many of the rape cases
they're bringing against their
schools, Territo explains.
The Hastings Law Center in
San Francisco, for example, was
forced to pay $215,000 in
damages several years ago to a
student who was raped in a
women's restroom there.
Similarly, Catholic University
in Washington, D.C had to pay
$20,000 to a student raped on its
campus several years ago.
Students now have analogous
suits pending against the univer-
sities of Washington, South
Florida and Cal State at Chico,
among others.
Because some lower courts had
ruled against the Stony Brook
rape victim, legal observers have
been watching the case closely.
The Stony Brook student,
Madelyn Miller, was attacked and
raped in 1975 in her campus dor-
mitory basement.
Before the incident, Miller and
other students, including the cam-
pus newspaper, had complained
repeatedly about the lack of
security on campus, according to
Martin Rubenstein, her lawyer.
In 1980, a lower court agreed
the university had failed to secure
the residence hall well enough to
stop criminals from entering,
found Stony Brook negligent, and
awarded Miller $25,000 in
damages.
University lawyers argued the
school could not be sued because
of the doctrine of sovereign im-
munity, which prevents private
citizens from suing government
agencies. However, the judge rul-
Department Promotes McA bee
B FRNFSTROBFRTS
suff Wrllft
The ECU Public Safet Depart-
ment recently announced a new
crime prevention officer.
Arthur Eugene (Gene) McAbee,
il, was renamed crime prevention
officer after being a detective
lieutenant since April, 1982. He is
replacing Corporal Rhonda
Gurley. Cpl. Gurley will be help-
ing McAbee this year, particularly
vith the development of rape
prevention programs.
McAbee has been on with the
department since August 1980.
McAbee, as the new crime
prevention officer, will be in
charge of crime prevention pro-
grams on campus. He will also be
investigating police records and
training police reserves or student
officers.
McAbee's main objective is to
educate students about preventing
crime. "I want students to realize
and understand that crime
I
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I
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I
I
I
J
I Support
The Pirates
At Ficklen
I Saturday; j I
� i 5 � � i !
T
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
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exists McAbee said. He also
plans to work with the media,
SGA and the Resident Life
Association to set up programs to
aid in crime prevention. He is
already planning a program called
Operation Identification where
students can register by serial
numbers their valuables such as
stereos and televisions with the
Public Safety Department.
McAbee commented that
crimes should be reported.
"Reporting crimes is verj impor-
tant because it aids in recognizing
patterns of the criminals. It also
aids in recovering stolen property
like bicycles
McAbee graduated from ECU
with a B.S. in Social Work and
Correctional Services in 1976 and
a M.S. in Administrative Services
in 1982. He's had extensive train-
ing in criminal investigation,
fingerprinting, search warrants
and sex crimes
ed the university had the same
responsibility as a private
landlord in maintaining safety
and security for on campus
residents.
An appellate court later ruled
the university was indeed exempt
from being sued, citing a state law
which prevents citizens from suing
because police fail to prevent a
crime, explains New York Assis-
tant Attorney General Julie
Mereson, one of the attorneys
representing Stony Brook.
But last summer the New York
State Court of Appeals upheld the
original court decision, agreeing
the school had a landlord's
responsibility to provide a safe
and secure living environment for
its students.
"Thus, a student who is injured
in a criminal assault in a state-
operated college dormitory" can
sue the college if the student can
prove school officials were
negligent in preventing the attack,
the New York judges ruled.
Although Miller,
students, and the
other
school
newspaper had warned ad-
ministrators the dorm was unsafe,
"the doors at all of the ap-
prosimately 10 entrances to the
dormitory were kept unlocked at
all hours the judges admonish-
ed. Such inaction "was a prox-
imate cause of the injury
"Ten years ago Rubinstein
speculates, "this case could very
well have been lost. Now, we feel
very strongly it will add momen-
tum to the trend of holding col-
leges more responsible for student
injuries. It has certainly served
notice to attorneys in similar
situations
If attorneys and administrators
heed such warnings to make their
ampuses more secure, "they'll
certainly save themselves a lot of
time and money in the long run
Territo adds.
"Colleges are very vulnerable
now he says. "And their defen-
sive posture will sure be a lot bet-
ter if they can say 'We've done
everything we can' to make a safe
environment
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The COH is a private club for members & guests
All ABC Permits





12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 6, 1984
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I IH I AM (. AKi till
Style
SI rllMBhkft,
Page i 3
Bo Shows All Except Talent
B BRIAN RM;M M
Bo Derek is one ol th
consistent performers in motion
pictures today. In Bolero, she
again looks beautiful but flatly,
delivers her lines like she doesn't
know what the words mean
But 1 know that's not
you're waiting to heai So, for
you skin flick efficianados, yes,
Bo makes it in this movie, and you
get to watch 1 he sex is tastel
done � directoi lohn D
wouldn't want to sp
primary model with Hus
photograph
I don't think
entirely her fault
husband, Jol
writer o the I
par' �e blame
contrived,
so met imes,
sometime tails ap
some of the scenes
. ry
The ston
howe Bo's
the
I he dia
even
s t o r .
thine

meets hei " I 10 He's a
winery, ownei and parttime
bullfighter named Angel from a
tin Spanish town
1 he two meet, she tells him
it the sheik he sas she
should've come to Spain first, i he
romance hens up a little because
Kngel's jealous gypsy lover,
but he and Bo do finally get
get her 1 sex the morning
at dawn M i some Spanish
lal he nevei xplained it.
I he wholi . Fail moves in-
credibly fast; the couple fall in
love quickei than two teenagers in
lowever, heat is
exac tlj vhai the intimate scenes
lack Some put pas
sion into the picture gain, it was
probabh pooi direction and emo-
tions ie actual sex
es had ark. no .�
mem a couple g nj
thro motions with about as
as tv o people shar-
id doughnuts at
a
ing
take,
and a
cues,
theti
'lie
a co . age
et in the early
a s
fell
or the
irginit G
1, Bo
aie beg
s
� obablj �
are for the
I he mo ie is
� g d
- n8
nion. B sn'
p .
-
w ea
Bolero
h to
sokii
I
tion seems to r
at Bo. He hand
kill a;
edibility
ten
v well.
Like most girls I
Bo is in Ic e w
;he wants ti
"Sheik a real one. and otter
him the "gift' of her irginit) . Of
and
B
isn't entirely
� . gifl He
i bet ore he
milk and
course, the sheik
s'upid; he accepts
takes the blond �
her offer, but :
much haprv weed
finishes licking
noney off of her stomach.
Jus' - re that anticlimatic
moment, howevei Derek's
pad direction realls shines. He has
Bo wa ing her hands in quick mo-
tions around her head and face
like the "Solid Gold" dancers
sometimes do 1 still can't figure
that one out � i never saw a girl
do thai in a moment of pleasure.
These kinds of confusing little
details, which littered the movie,
added nothing to the story and
left you .sondenng why they were
there in I e first place.
By now the movie is more than
halfway through, and Bo finally

. I
I I
� ere well
le everyone
-
ide If
e ple who
Bo Derek, this
you. You
( film's
a and
My
tax of the mo ie
: � Kngel was im-
upward thi ust of a
hull's hern into the groin. He
It �� I � mm l .� - f� .s.v t tT ��� I - j . , .��-
Cli C v � �� - vu ,iv. L vJ I igC J iiilC IsCa,
but Bo promises him he will be
earns how to fight
moke big cigars. 1
knov doesn't connect too well,
but that's what happened.
Meanwhile, Angel stays in bed
all the time. The sheik reappears
long enough to steal back his
"gift but she is saved, not by a
heroic action from her lover, but
by simply parachuting out of the
biplane. No real conflict, just a
hint.
Finally, after dodging the issue
for a while, Bo enters the
bedroom, sa a ants to find
ecstacy ers the spelling
"extasy" - ai d well, you know
whal happens But you'll be
disappointed I he scene is
Bolero'
Bo Derek does everything but act in the revealing release.
'Bolero
One critic attribute, her poor performance to the direction of her
husband. John Derek
laughable.
rek is a lovely
woman and John knows how to motion picture. This case is one a: aracter development The ac-
make her look good on film, but 1 where the anticipation is better po ting needs personality and Das-
think the Playboy photos were than the fulfillment. Bo and hub- on. I was bored, but 1 didn't fall
more erotic than sex scenes in the by are a model and photographer As Bolero ia.ks asleer
Plans For Homecoming '84
Already In The Making
America's hottest comedian, Gallagher, is bound to land a sell-out show here at ECU.
Gallagher, The Master Of Comedy
Heading For ECU On October 4
You've probably seen him on
the Tonight show or on one of his
many cable specials. This master
of comedy, this Wizard of Odd,
the one and only inventor of the
Sledge-O-Matic will be perform-
ing at ECU on Thursday, October
4. America's hottest new come-
dian, Gallagher, sponsored by the
Student Union Special Events
Committee, will perform at 8
p.m. in Wright Auditorium.
For two hours or more, this
mustached funny man (who
rollerskates on stage generally at-
tired in a black-and-red shirt,
black pants, and black tarn) im-
merses his audiences in his off-
beat brand of honest observa-
tions. He calls his comedy
satire because all my comedy
is truth, and the truth is funny. I
vent frustration in society He
uses an arsenal of inventions and
props, including a hat with clapp-
ing hands, a car you drive stan-
ding up (to save space), a pant leg
and shoe he dangles out of a car,
and a Playboy magazine for mar-
ried men � the same girl every
month. He dabbles in semantics
and has uncanny powers of obser-
vation; for example, did you
know that most home economics
teachers are divorced? Without
question, he is best known for his
Sledge-O-Matic, but if you don't
know what that is, you'll have to
wait until his show at ECU to find
out.
In between gags, Gallagher
disperses chocolate kisses,
cookies, and candy to the au-
dience, and the audience heartily
accepts his edible gifts as easily as
they accept his unique gift of com-
edy. Gallagher is undoubtedly one
of the freshest, brightest talents in
the wide, competitive world of
comedy. His seemingly irreverent
sense of humor will carry him a
long way. You can bet a smashed
watermelon on it.
On October 20, 1984. ECU will
host East Tennessee State Univer-
sity for Homecoming '84. This
year's theme is "ECU '84 � A
Part Of Your Life The parade
will begin at Rose High School at
10 a.m. All organizations in-
terested in entering a float in the
parade or participating in house
or dorm decorating must commit
themselves in writing. Applica-
tions should be submitted to Mr.
Jon Curtis' office (Room 204 �
Mendenhall Student Center) by
September 29. This written com-
mitment should include the title of
your organization, which
contest(s) you will participate in,
how and who to reach if needed,
and should be signed by your
respective advisor.
Each float entrant will be allow-
ed $150 to put toward expenses,
and each house and dorm will be
given $40. These monies may be
secured through the Student Fund
Accounting Office (Room 222 of
Mendenhall Student Center) after
October 10. Please apply as soon
as possible, as there is only
enough money for 15 floats and
15 decorations: first come, first
served. All entries will be judged
on design, color combination,
originality, completeness of
theme, workmanship, and overall
evaluation. Awards will be given
for first, second, and third place
floats, first place house decora-
tion, and first place dorm decora-
tion. In addition, monetary
awards will be given for floats as
follows:
- First Place � S200
- Second Place � SI00
- Third Place � $75
All awards will be presented
during halftime of the football
game. All entries (floats and
decorations) must be cleaned up
Monday, October 22. 1984.
The Student Homecoming
Committee urges you to make the
most of this opportunity to join in
on "ECU '84 � A Part Of Your
Life
No organization can combine
their efforts with another
organization in either the float,
house, or dorm competitions.
Procedures For
Delegate Registration
1. Nominees must be E.C.U.
students and only one student
may represent each organization.
2. All candidates must submit an 8
x 10 black and white, glossy
photograph, along with their
name, address, and telephone
number (written on the back side
with a felt tip pen) to:
Jon Curtis � Co-Advisor
Room 204 � Mendenhall Student
Center
East Carolina University
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
Telephone: 757-6611, Ext. 210
3. All candidates must have their
photographs taken at the
Photography Lab. You will be
contacted as to the date and time
pictures will be taken.
4 All information must be sub-
mitted no later than September
28, 1984, by 5 p.m.
Voting Procedures
1. Voting will be held in the lobby
of the Student Supply Store on
October 9, 10, 11, from 9 a.m. un-
til 4 p.m.
2. Any student with a valit ECU
l.D. and Activity Card is eligible
to vote.
3. An eight-student court will be
selected after votes are tabulated
and notified Friday, October 12,
1984. Transportation will be pro-
vided for the court. All court
members are exDected to ride in
the parade and attend the game
with an escort. Any other par-
ticipants in the Homecoming
Pirate Contest may ride in the
parade, however, they must pro-
vide their own transportation.
4. All eight court members and
their escorts will be presented at
half-time.
All organizations are urged to
submit an entry so that the court
will represent all students at ECU.
If there are any questions,
please contact Mr. C.C. Rowe,
212 Whichard Building, telephone
� 757-6799.
iV
A

�Y





14
THE EAST CAROLONIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1984
I
Need Something To Do With Your Time?
Greenville May Be Better Than You Think
By AMY BONESTEEL
Staff Writer
So you think you're stuck in a
small little town with nothing to
dobelieve it or not, ECU and
Greenville offer a wide range of
activities for students to get in-
volved in. There are opportunities
to earn money, get in shape, and
to meet a lot of new people while
you are here in school.
For one, the excellent in-
tramural system at ECU gives
students the opportunity to par-
ticipate in various sports. It also
provides employment oppor-
tunities, co-recreational sports
(both men and women), and
sports medicine services (besides
helping you keep in shape).
Throughout the semester, frater-
nities, sororites, dorms, clubs,
and various independent teams
compete against each other. There
are also ten active sport clubs on
campus. These include: Archery,
Raquetball, Rugby (men and
women), Soccer, Surfing,
Lacrosse, Frisbee, and Team
Handball(men and women).
These clubs are an ideal way to
make new friends and at the same
time feel a part of ECU.
You don't necessarily have to
go far to find something to do
near campus either. Within walk-
ing distance of most dorms are
Mendenhall Student Center
(which has everything from bowl-
ing to video games), the park and
the Town Commens near Tar
River, and the various shops sur-
rounding the downtown area.
Since not everyone here packs
up and heads home on the
weekends, you may be inclined to
feel bored and restless. Instead of
wasting a weekend just sitting
around watching TV, it's a great
chance to catch up on
homework??
There are many clubs on the
ECU campus, some which relate
directly to your major. For the
campus politicians, The SGA
(Student Government Assoc.) is a
good way to learn a little about
the legislature while getting direct-
ly involved with other campus ac-
tivities and organizations.
If you have a way to get around
town, there are spas, roller
skating rinks, movie theatres and
a fairly large number of shopping
centers.
So don't get depressed yet
Greenville newcomers, there is
much more to do here besides par-
ty.
The Plantation Mistress And Southern Belles
(UPI) � Single daughters of
planters swirled across ballroom
floors in hooped skirts, using flir-
tation to catch the attention of
eligible young men who would
fight for the right to become their
husbands.
The scene is perhaps the only
accurate stereotye that has been
applied to southern plantation
women prior to the Civil War.
The rest of the picture has been
somewhat fuzzy historically.
Catherine Clinton's The Plan-
tation Mistress sets the record
straight with in-depth research in-
to the lives of southern plantation
owners' wives. Clinton's research
turns to letters, journals, books,
and public records to unravel the
attitudes and everyday lives of
women whose past has been ig-
nored except in fiction.
Young girls did, indeed, play
the debutante in hopes of making
the right match. They knew � as
did their mothers that southern
women were legal non-entities,
totally dependent on men for
identity and power.
Once married, however, their
lives changed shockingly and
usually for the worse.
Many were taken to new ter-
ritories where land was cheap and
the men felt their fortunes were
waiting to be made. Young brides
pined in vain for the security of
Unique Claims
(UPI) � Beginning next year,
Taiwanese men will be able to
claim tax deductions for their
mistresses � but only if the
women are under 20 or over 60
years old.
Expenses for concubine upkeep
became eligible for tax deductions
in a new provision to the income
tax law announced recently by the
Finance Ministry.
The provision adds "family
members" to the list of people
taxpayers can claim as
dependents. Previously the
defendents list was limited to
"relatives
According to Taiwanese civil
law, "family members" include
"people living together in the
same household and aiming to live
together until the end
Concubines fall within this
category.
Taxpayers, who have been able
to claim a dependent deduction of
$750 for their wives, will now be
able to deduct an extra $550 for
each concubine � and some men
keep as many as four.
The Finance Ministry said
"family members" eligible for the
deductions were restricted to
those "below 20 years old and
over 60 who have no ability to
make a living
A Finance Ministry official said
he does not expect many people to
file for such deductions since
"first, most men do not want
their spouses to know the ex-
istence of their mistresses and se-
cond, those who can afford keep-
ing concubines probably won't
mind paying a little more tax
their parents and siblings, pouring
out heartfelt homesickness in hun-
dreds of letters.
Separations from husbands
were frequent, as well, as planta-
tion owners delved into politics or
the business of running other
plantations. And, once alone on
the plantation, the wife could not
leave its boundaries without
violating the strict social codes of
her day.
Social and sexual restrictions
were inhibiting beyond belief.
"Cultural prescriptions concer-
ning behavior clearly divided
along gender lines Clinton
writes. "Morality ruled in the
public domain; both sexes
subscribed to the same ethical
standards. In the private sphere,
however, men might bend or
break the rules at their own discre-
tion. Such a division resulted in a
strict regulation of women's ac-
tivities and correspondingly lax
attitutes toward male affairs
In the absence of her husband
from her plantation, the mistress
was a virtual prisoner with the
slaves and children. And her
burdens for the household were
overpowering. She was responsi-
ble for the feeding and clothing of
white and black family members
alike.
the numerous tasks of ante-
bellum housekeeping kept planta-
tion mistresses busy: gardening,
dairy activities, salting, pork,
preserving fruits and vegetables,
mixing medicines, the making of
candles, soap, rugs, pillows,
linen, bedding, and so on
One matron complained in a
letter to her husband: "As for
myself I am constantly astonished
that after the fatigues of the day
(which are not trifing) that I am
able to sleep sound and rise
without a headache. For the last
three or four days I have been
very busy with my hogs and all the
troubles that the season brings.
Now at half past 10 o'clock I am
watching a corn husking in fear
lest some mischief my happen
Women also lived in fear of
childbirth and disease - whooping
cough, smallpox, yellow fever and
cholera.
"The death and desolation on
plague ridden plantations was
enormous. Epidemics took their
toll both in lives and in the mental
health of the survivors; overwork
and worry subjected women to
fretful exhaustion if not actual
disease. In 1833 a young
woman reported to her cousin of
the affliction within her home:
'We have had three sick rooms for
the last three weeksI have not
taken off my clothes for the last
month except to change
The Plantation Mistress should
be the starting point for historians
and writers who want to accurate
ly depict life in the Old South.
752-1411
HOI ChAcles
SAVE
$
THE CREAMERY
Introducing our new money saving meal
plan. Custom made to stretch your
budget.
Stop by The Creamery and find out how
just one dollar can earn you
4 FREE MEALS of your choice and
alot of FREE Pepsi Cola!
Affordable
Daily
Mon-Thurs 7-12am
Fri-Sat 7-2:30am "Go Pirates"
The Olde Towne Inn
SALUTES
The Pirates
All ABC Permits
In exchange for your ECU
ticket stub, buy one sand-
wich of your choice, get one
of equal or lesser value
FREE
'THREE LUNCHEONDINNER
SPECIALS DAILY"
Happy Hour
4pm until 7pm
10pm until 2am
This Week's
Special
Oil & Filter Change $13.50
FRAM Oil Filter & Valvoline Oil
. Good Thru Sept 13th
2616 E.TENTH JT. 758 7676
WELCOME TO GREENVILLE AND ECU
When you get settled in, come and visit us Sunday
morning.
JARVIS MEMORIAL
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
510 S. Washington Street
Downtown just off campus on Reade Circle
8:45am Early Worship
9:45am Sunday School
11:00am Worship
Phone:752-3101
"A place to 90 and grow
a
Belvoir
Factory Outlet
i ai?d In Old Bekoir Schoolhouse Hx il
Thurs & Fn 1
TovvU Toqo -c
SPO�TSWEARr Q PLAY �'WEAfl
I rxrated Between Bethe! & Twtoroon Hx M
Hours 9 5 Mon Sal Wv Accep' Vis�j &. Maslev a'd
We Also Wholesale
loOjtUff lugs
Factorv Outlet
Located in Old Grimesland School House
On Hwv 33 Hours: ed. Fit 9:30-5
Sat 9:30-3:00
Shop Our Outlet Store Nearest You For Back-To-School Specials
j3E
"Good irref uw braa
tklow thermal were" $.�
Hooded Name
Brand T-Shirts
With Sleeves And Prints
13
Girls Jeans
Reg $18
$9.99
Group Of
Assorted Tops
For School Days Ahaad
Mm Each
Boys
Camouflage Pants
Reg $12 99
$9.99
All Summer Merchandise
12 off
Off Reg. Price
Many More Items Arriving For Girls. Boys, Ladies And Men For Fall At
Discount Prices.
Infant Sleepers
Irregs. 1
Gift Sets
$2.99 To $4.99
RUSH '84
Monday Sept. 10 Original Bunny Nite
Tuesday Sept. 11 Toga Tuesday
Wednesday Sept. 12 ECU Night
1984 Intramural Champions
Kappa Sigma 700 E. 10th St.
Beside Darryls
Classified
. "fl'ta0mtf
MISC
LOANS ON A BUYING TV's, Stereos,
cameras, typewriters, gold & silver, vi
anything else of value Southern Pawn ai
Shop, 752 2464 R
CAPTURE YOUR COLLEGE DAYS
AND NIGHTS on video cassette VHS
or BETA, excellent color pictures and
swell mi Fi Audio Join our video club
and enjoy the Jacksons, Michael, Jer
maine, Prince, Pink Floyd, Van
Haien, Cyndi Lauper, The
Pretenders, Cheech & Chong, The
Time, Tne Alan Parson Project,
Duran, Duran, and much, much
more We make video's � John
Deaver video Recording Services
Call 758 6344

!
TYPING SERVICE neat fast
reasonable Call 355 2062
SIGMA NU LITTLE SISTER CAR
WASH Sat , Sept. 8 9 00 a m
Texaco, corner of 14th and Cotancr
TO THE BROTHERS OF SIGMA NU
wishing you lots of luck �lttl
Love, Sigma Nu Lit Sisters
YES FANS oon't delay: Get our
tickets now at Appie Recoras for YES
in Greensboro Friday. Sept 14 Roac
Trips Unlimited is Greenv lie's con
cert bus
FRESHMEN Mom and dac paid z
bucks for our Frehsman Recorc sc
pick it up from 12 5 pm at me Year
nook office
1
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: (l) book. Modern Times, by
Paul Johnson. (2) Glass marked ZBT
Charter Banquet, December 6, 1983 11
found, please return immediately to
Joe Admire, 103 Umstead, 758 7906
WANTED
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
rent, '2 utilities, Cad 355 6933a"e'
00 p.m on weekdays
FEMALE STUDENT NEEDED
to share furnished conaoCeT-3
airheat, washerdryer,$ SC X
plus ' 3 utilities. Apt. 11Car"
Court. Call 758-7090 after5 pm 1
PART-TIME SOCCER COACHES
for various Pitt County Scnoois Con
tact Alice or Barry at 752 6106 n
teresteo
F�MAkE ROOMMATE NEEDED
immediately. Rent $105, 3 utilities.
Call 758 6224 Ask for Karen or Nanc �
OVERNIGHT DORM COUNSELOR
ull time or parttime. Will monitor ac
tivities of mentally, physica �
and'or emotionally handicapped
clients in resident aorm ana prepare
reports. Hours: 4 p.m. to 8 a.m. Full
time Sunday through Thursoa �
59 300yr. Parttime Fri. ana Sat �
$3 35hr. Apply in person at Easfe
Carolina Vocational Center Sta
Road, Greenville, N.C. AA EEO
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Non-smoker, washer dryer pro. ded
new mobile home Rent $165 :
utilities, private room ana privare
oath. Call 756-6151
PARTTIME WORD PROCESSOR
local iaw firm: IBM PC AT Sa a
commensurate with experience Call
758-6200.
DISABLED MAN seeks par" m�
help: half day or whole day wee. �
Light housekeeping, shopping Wus1
be able to drive shift car Call 756-4&;
for details.
NEED EXTRA MONEY? freelance
artist needea for local siikscree-
firm. Will pay cash for designs Ca
756-9058
,)



Sea Storv on sale
Book Barn and otl
Gordon Fulps

UNB
Tempoi
ssw�vw-x�
i
I
7 i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 19M
15
Think
ed ith other campus ac-
and organizations.
u have a va to get around
here are spas, roller
rinks, movie theatres and
v number of shopping
get depressed yet
nters, there is
ere besides par-
Belles
historians
ant to accurate-
the Old South.
me Inn
ur ECU
h u sand-
re , get one
Is r alue
)N DINNER
il V
m
r
lunny Nite
;day
;ht
pions
hSt.
Classifieds
Do People Really Believe?
MISC
LOANS ON & BUYING TV's, Stereos,
cameras, typewriters, gold & silver,
anything else of value. Southern Pawn
Shop, 752 2464.
CAPTURE YOUR COLLEGE DAYS
AND NIGHTS on video cassetteVHS
or BETA, excellent color pictures and
swell Hi-Fi Audio. Join our video club
and enjoy the Jacksons, Michael, Jer
maine. Prince, Pink Floyd, Van
Halen, Cyndi Lauper, The
Pretenders, Cheech & Chong, The
Time, The Alan Parson Project,
Duran, Duran, and much, much
more. We make video's � John
Deavc Video Recording Services.
Call 758 6344.
TYPING SERVICE neat fast
reasonable. Call 355 2062.
SIGMA NU LITTLE SISTER CAR-
WASH Sat Sept. 8 9:00 a.m. until.
Texaco, corner of 14th and Cotanch.
TO THE BROTHERS OF SIGMA NU
wishing you lots of luck with Rush!
Love, Sigma Nu Lil' Sisters.
YES FANS don't delay! Get your
tickets now at Apple Records for YES
in Greensboro Friday, Sept. 14. Road
Trips Unlimited is Greenville's con-
cert bus.
FRESHMEN! I Mom and dad paid big
bucks for your Frehsman Record, so
pick it up from 12-5 pm at the Year-
book office.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: (l) book. Modern Times, by
Paul Johnson. (2) Glass marked ZBT
Charter Banquet, December 6, 1983. If
found, please return immediately to
Joe Admire, 103 Umstead, 758-7906.
WANTED
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED Vj
rent, 'A utilities, Call 355-6933after
4:00 p.m. on weekdays.
FEMALE STUDENT NEEDED
To share furnished condo. Central
airheat, washerdryer, $150.00
plus 'a utilities. Apt. II Cannon
Court. Call 758-7090 after 5 pm.
PART-TIME SOCCER COACHES
for various Pitt County Schools. Con-
tact Alice or Barry at 752-6106 if in-
terested.
FEMAIJE . ROOMMATE NEEDED
S mediately. Rent $105, V3 utilities.
II 758 6224. Ask for Karen or Nancy.
OVERNIGHT DORM COUNSELOR
full time or parttime. Will monitor ac-
tivities of mentally, physically,
andor emotionally handicapped
clients in resident dorm and prepare
reports. Hours: 4 p.m. to 8 a.m. Full
time Sunday through Thursday �
$9,300yr. Parttime Fri. and Sat. �
$3.35hr. Apply in person at Eastern
Carolina Vocational Center, Station
Road, Greenville, N.C. AAEEO.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
Non-smoker, washerdryer provided;
new mobile home. Rent $165, Va
utilities, private room and private
bath; Call 756-6151.
PARTTIME WORD PROCESSOR for
local law firm: IBM PC AT Salary
commensurate with experience. Call
758-6200
DISABLED MAN seeks parttime
help: half day or whole day-weekly.
Light housekeeping, shopping. Must
be able to drive shift car. Call 756-4840
for details.
NEED EXTRA MONEY? Freelance
artist needed for local silkscreening
firm. Will pay cash for designs. Call
756-9058.

S
h

PERSONAL
THE ALUMNI OF KAPPA DELTA
would like to wish the best of luck to
all who are included in the Fall 1984
Rush and that all your dreams may
come true.
SARAH, I love you. Jeff.
RANDALL F. With all my hugs and
kisses I'm hoping all your birthday
wishes come true. Happy Birthday
this Saturday and remember, I love
you! Donna H.
ALPHA DELTA PI Pref night is here.
Are you all ready to jam Let's see if
you all remember how to party-Let's
get wild Pi Kapps
TWEET the Roses were red, the sky
was blue, thanks a bunch, from me to
you!
SALE
1980 FAIRMONT 2 door, with blue
vinyl top, good tires. Call 752-3837 or
7568745.
SCHWINN LIGHT WEIGHT BIKE 10
speed, quick release front and rear,
leather saddle, center point brakes
front and rear, high frame. Call
752 3837 or 756-8745.
FOR SALE:
tress and
752-1649.
New Box Springs, mat-
bed frame. $50. Call
FOR SALE: Photographic enlarging
and film developing equipment, $235.
Call 758-1598 after 6 pm.
YARD SALE: furniture, clothes,
household items, etc. 317 Glenwood
Ave Sat Sept. 8 from 8 ami pm.
1980 RENAULT LECAR 38,000 miles
great condition. Must Sell 758 4655.
(UPI) � Dr. David L. Hocking
wants every one to know that God
truly exists, and the reports of His
death have been greatly exag-
gerated.
Hocking, senior pastor of the
non-denominational Calvary
Church in Santa Ana, Calif said
talks he has had with laymen
about God prompted him to write
The Nature of God in Plain
Language Word Publications, 180
pp $8.95.)
"I took the questions that
laymen asked me about God and
formulated them into a book
said Hocking in a telephone inter-
view. "I wanted to communicate
with the average man on the street
about the wonder and beauty of
God's love for us all
"God is the great unknown to
many of us Hocking writes.
"We want to believe that He ex-
ists, but to most of us He seems
unknowable and impersonal
Hocking writes of one person
who told him, "Of course I
believe in God, but I don't want
Him telling me what to do
The book is written in a clear,
direct style, devoid of the
theological jargon that creeps into
most books that attempt to ex-
plore the subject of God's ex-
istence. Each chapter concludes
with a series of probing questions
that make the book ideal to be us-
ed as a tool for group discussion.
Hocking does not duck the hard
questions that philosophers and
theologians have been asking for
centuries: Does God exist? If so,
where is God, and why does it
matter to us? His answers have a
special authenticity to them
because they come from his own
life experiences and those of the
searching, questioning people he
has encountered.
Hocking said the modern world
views God as being far away and
unrelated to the events of our
everyday lives. This lack of
knowledge concerning God has
led us away from true meaning
and purpose in our lives, and has
plunged us into mental and
spiritual darkness, he said.
"To many people, God is a
security blanket writes Hock
ing. "He is no more personal to
them than a chair or table. They
hope He exists, but they have little
knowledge of Him and no per-
sonal contact with Him. To such
people, God is an 4it' rather than
'He They regard God as the
'force' which they hope will be
'with them
Hocking said the basic ques-
tions of life can only be answered
by a knowledge of God. While
people throughout the world re-
main very religious, he said,
tremendous differences exist in
their concepts of God.
"I have a little saying to the ef
feet that the root of most of our
problems in life is a misunderstan
ding or misconception of who
God is and what He can do said
Hocking. "Through my work in
counseling people on their per-
sonal and family lives, I began to
see that so many of our problems
were directly related to this lack of
knowledge about God and his at-
tributes
Hocking took the questions
laymen asked him about God and
began to research for answers
through prayer, meditation and
study, using mainly the Bible. The
book is full of scriptual
references, sometimes two or
three to a page, taken from the
New King James Version.
"When people ask me where I
was educated, I tell them I was
educated in the Bible said
Hocking. He graduated from Bob
Jones University in Greenville,
S.C. and received his doctorate in
theology from Grace Lake
Seminary in Wisconsin.
Hocking grew up in Long
Beach, Calif and spent four
years as minister of a church in
Columbus, Ohio. He is the radio
bible teacher on the nationwide
BIOLA hour. He has been pastor
of Calvary, a 3,000-member
church, for the past two years.
FOOTBALL TICKETS FOR
SALE 2 reserved seats for this
Sat. game. Section 26 Row B.
Paid $11.00 a piece but will sell
for $10.00 a piece or less. Call
752-9787
FOR SALE: FRENCH PROVINCIAL
dining room set with four chairs; oak
wood and rattan. Asking $200.00, but
negotiable. Call after 5 p.m. 758-7090.
GIRLS BICYCLE FOR SALE Good
shape. $80. Negotible. Call 758-5012.
PERFECT FOR DORM ROOM: 1.6
cu. ft. refrigerator excellent condi-
tion. $69. Call Ron at 758-4850 (after 5
p.m. please).
19" COLOR TV cable ready, excellent
condition. $75. Call 752-1866.
&
f

SANDWICH SHOP
Featuring Our
HAPPY HOUR
Q.
& 4& It's Always Happy Hour At
x
Sub Station II With
$1.50 60 oz. PITCHERS OF YOUR
FAVORITE BEER!
'&?
&
'We want to be your night spot
every nite
WELCOMES
THE CLASS OF 1988
TO ECU
Doors Open: DST 9:00-2:00 a.m. Est. 8:30-1:00 �.m
MONDAY �
TUESDAY -
CLOSED � Open for private dorm socials and special Mondays, i.e.
first week of each semester.
WEDNESDAY -
THURSDAY �
FRIDAY �
SATURDAY �
SUNDAY -
CRAZY TUESDAY � Different events each week from Bikini Contest to
Ait Band Contest to Draft Nite. Each Tuesday is always different
& always fua .
HUMP NrTE � Pre admission to ECU student ($1.00 18 yr. adm )
All cans 55 till 1 1:00 p.m 80 till closing.
COLLEGE NITE � $100 admission for ECU students ($2.00
18 yr. adm.). All cans 55 till 11:0O p.m 80� till closing.
End of the Week Party � Friday Afternoon-3:30 till 7:30 - Free
admission ;$1.00 18 yr. adm). All cans 55 till 5:15 p.m 80� cans
till 7:30. FRIDAY NITE � $1.00 admission ($2.00 18 yr. adm.) All
cans80� till 11:00 p.m.
Best in Dance Music � $1.00 admission ECU students
($2.00 18 yr. adm.).
LADIES NITE � For 15 years our favorite way to wrap up the weekend
Free admission for ladies ($1.00 18 yr. adm.), & Nickel Draft while il
lasts.




"BRING YOUgJFRIENDS & COME EARLY
Get the
word out
�You must be 16 to enter the club
N C. Sute l�w prohibits persons under 19 to purchMe �or.on beverages
Persons under 1 v required to wear a wristband while on he premiaes
Alternative Beverages are provided
'Excludes 1st Wednesday at each semester







Come Play The Indian
This Fall"
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
tt WELCOME BACK STUDENTS!
Hurry In For The Best Deal In Town
Rent a 19 in. Color TV
for as low as
$19.95 per month
TVVCRStereo Rentals
Short Term Rentals Available
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC
RENT TV
mmmm
758-9102
29051.10th St.
OtoMft
4-
fe
s�
Escape with a laugh
over the outrageous
crew of the S. S. Vaga-
bond in Ken Hele's
comedy novel Sea Story.
They're as different
from the Love Boat
crew as sailors can be.
DAY STUDENTS
YOU WANT TO
MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
Sea Story on sale now at Student Supply Store,
Book Barn and other locations.
.���.
&:&:&
NOW OPEN
Gordon Fulps New Golf, Ski & Tennis Shop
103 Trade St.
UNBELIEVABLE PRICES
Temporary Hrs. 2:00-8:00 Mon-Sat j
Phone 756-1033
Located Beside Todd's Stereo
Apply now for position of
Day Student Representative on the ECU Media Board.
Help set policies for
operation of WZMB,
THE REBEL, THE EAST CAROLINIAN,
BUCCANEER, THE EBONY HERALD &
THE PHOTO LAB.
Apply in Media Board Office 757 - 6009
Filing Dotes 82384 thru 9784
QX$
�"���"��
&
�.�'j.
P

I
j





16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 6, 1984
A Hot Item
Corvettes Are Likely Targets
(UPI) � The sporty Chevrolet
Corvette is popular with car
thieves and Boston is tops for
cities where autos are most likely
to be stolen, a consumer magazine
says.
Other cars found especially ap-
pealing to thieves were the
Cadillac Seville, Eldorado or
DeVille, the BMW 3201, the Audi
4000S and 5000S, the Lincoln
Continental Mark VI and the
Pontiac Firebird.
The Corvette Tuesday topped
Consumer Magazine's list of most
stolen cars in America while
Boston headed the list of cities
where autos are most likely to be
stolen.
Motorist who like to see their
cars where they last parked them
may want to invest in the Subaru
DL and the Pontiac Phoenix.
Other makes with a slim chance of
being stolen are the Ford Fair-
mont, Honda Civic and the
Toyota Corolla, the magazine
said.
Boston ranked first among the
cities for car thefts with popula-
tions of at least 50,000.
Other high-risk cities were
Hartford, Conn Cleveland; Pro-
vidence, R.I Detroit and
Southfield, Mich Newark,
Cam den and Lawrence, N.J and
Inglewood, Calif.
The magazine said the highway
Data Loss Institute arrived at the
car theft figures by averaging the
number of thefts against the
number of models on the road.
IHt t
BRYAN HUMBERT ECU Photo Lr.
According to a consumer magazine, Chevrolet Corvettes are likely targets for thieves in Boston and some of the larger cities
Coping With Old Problems
Anorexia and Bulimia has
become increasingly common in
our thin-is-in society. Although
they are primarily female eating
disorders, they also affect males,
scientists say.
Major reasons for binging,
purging and compulsive starva-
tion among men and women ap-
pear similar except for one thing:
more male victims may be
homosexual and uncomfortable
about it, according to a team at
Massachusetts General Hospital.
"It's not unlike the issues for
females. What was novel about
this particular thing was the con-
flicted homosexuality, which was
not noted among females said
Dr. David Herzog, head of the
hospital's eating disorders unit
and a principal author of the
study.
Anorexia, or more precisely,
anorexia nervosa, affects an
estimated one in 100 to one in 250
teenage girls, but grown women
also are victims. Anorectics sever-
ly restict their food intake, many
times becoming skeleton-like and
risking death.
Some scientists estimate 1
million to 3 million Americans
have Bulimia, uncontrolled eating
followed by use of laxatives or
self-induced vomiting.
Many victims of both syn-
dromes have intense fear of
fatness and an unjustified feeling
they are overweight. Since pro-
longed starvation inhibits sexuali-
ty and holds off menstruation in
females, psychiatrists who have
studied young female victims say
the girls may actually fear sexual
maturity and adulthood.
Males make up an estimated 4
to 14 percent of anorectics, the
Massachusetts team wrote in the
American Journal of Psychiatry,
and have been infrequently
studied. Bulimia among men and
boys has been explored even less.
In two studies of university
students, males made up 0.4 to 5
percent of Bulimics.
Herzog and colleagues studied
13 anorectic males age 16 to 32
and 14 Bulimic males age 13 to 41,
comparing them to the first 142
females evaluated after the unit
opened in 1981.
"There were significant dif-
ferences between the overall male
and female samples in sexual
behavior the team wrote.
"Males with eating disorders
were significantly more likely to
have had no sexual relations and
to report being homosexual and
were significantly less likely to be
currently involved in an active
heterosexual relationship
"Not only were the males in our
sample extremely limited in their
sexual activity both in terms of
past and current sexual activity,
they were significantly more
limited than were their female
counterparts
Twenty-six percent of the males
were homosexual, compared with
4 percent of the females. Of the
seven homosexual men, five
acknowledged they felt conflicted
about their sexuality.
Herzog said homosexuals might
be more at risk than other males
because of the pressure to be thin
and attractive.
The disorders may go
undetected among males because
they suffer fewer secondary symp-
toms, the team wrote. Women,
when starved, may stop
menstruating.
The researchers said males may
also be reluctant to seek help for
"these stereotypically female
disorders" and ma also feel
ashamed or anxious about
aknowledging sexuality-related
problems to a professional.
Other studies have found that
boys afflicted with anorexia tend-
ed to be poor students and were
more resistant to therapy than
female anorectics.

�Hit HK w vw w VK"
:xk jhk:
Western Sizzlin Has Eyes FotYoiL
Ribeyes,
CUTTHICK,
FRESH AND COOKED
.THE WAY YOU
LIKE IT
11
Advertise With
The
East Carolinian
Jj ON ICE
Short 65 Tall 70'
HAPPY HOUR
DAILY
4:00-7:00
Sept. 6
COMEDY NIGHT
with
ALSMITH
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BOBBY BOWEN
Can Bud $.50 8-10
Fri & Sat, Sept 7 & 8 - Unknown Blues Band
513 COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE. NIC
V'QeQ. P.naa'i. B �
confused about
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I � �� "Coupon���
I
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Present this coupon I
with ECU ID and I
receive $5.00 off
each $50.00 Purchase I
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Expires Sept. 30,19841
! Coupon i
$5.00J
331 Arlington Blvd.
756-5844
RushisSepI 10 II, 12 M'i
Parties Begin At 9:00
Please Brinj ID
Hop OB the I.I .1 . Ku-h bu, or calk ,vf .
757-3516
Our House is located at
422 W. 5th St.
Fhone-7520019
Capy Cental
Our
offers 5 service which includes
enlargement and reduction capabilities
OPEN
7 Days A Week
We invite you to drop in and compare
our selection of fine wines in
1
Corner 10th & Evaf St.
8 lb. bag$ .59
Uj 50 to. bag$2.79
'Area merchants: Contact us for information
on discount rates on 50 lbs. bags of ice.
Think Big
Gdlf ALPHA SIG
Alpha Sigma Phi Fraternity
To barter ths man
frttbrt Printing 1v
Jones Wl
Temple
B RNm Mr VA
Despite completing on.
throwing two interceptions in
loss to Florida State. Ron
Carolina's starting quarterback h
Temple in their season opener 5
'It"s time we decided on one
head coach Ed Eirn
afternoon press conference
me and executed better wru
feme (against Florida
R .bbie Bare? -tar
.placed him or. I
the remainder of t:
amount in the second half,
given the opportur '
tire game
"Robbie showed
"but Ron wa
better
Emory said Bar
ins might even get a loot
Darrell Speed, but
based on the prodi.
at the Pirate helm.
Other tha:
gesi era goir
negative effect the
on his p
"Tf we had won in !c
age to pla
Jones Face
B XOlTPcUhRs
When Ron J
for the Pirate this S
the Temple 0
game
The f:
ed the starter in this Sa
by Cc ach Ed Emoi
Florida State
"Ron Jones exe.
nst Florida Sta En
"and he will si .
against Temple
at
NEil .OMMSOH - ECU e
Ron Jones ill start aganit Teml
saturdav night.
Sherma
Bv 1 ONV BROWS
Great exj
opening of the '84 ECl
schedule, according to Dr Pat
Sherman, me:
head coach
"I see a great deas of in
ment over las: year's teams
overall strength she -
"Despite hav.ng few juni
seniors to serve in leade
roles, the improvement I've seen
in our returning players will help
greatlv.
"The number one rated dm
player graduated, she said.
each of the returning nine
move up at leas: one positio
The first cut has been made.
two more must go to get down to
the 12 man limit. Survivors.so far
are: David Creech. Dan LaMont,
Galen Treble. Greg Willis. John
Anthony, Scott Avery. Davis
Baglev, Pat Campanaro. Hank
Kinne, John McDade. Bill Paul.
Kevin Plum, David Turner and
Greg Loyd.
"Creech, LaMont, Treble ana
Willis currently are the top four in
overall ability Sherman stated.
"but as the season progresses that
rating could easily change as we
� � mw
-i mnt
mmtm
����� �
mmtm







�"�bfe
8H AM HUMBERT ECU Photo Lah
of ihe target citii 5.
HAPPY HOUR
DAILY
4:00-7:00
Sept. 6
NIGHT
Band
out
I
SIG
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
SEPTEMBER 6, 1984
Page 17
Jones Will Get Start Against
Temple Despite FSU Debut
By RANDY MEWS
Sports Uiior
Despite completing only six of 18 passes and
'rowing two interceptions in last weekend's 48-17
s to Florida State, Ron Jones will be East
arolina's starting quarterback when the Pirates host
Temple in their season opener Saturday night.
"It's time we decided on one quarterback ECU
ead coach Ed Emory said in a Tuesday mid-
ternoon press conference. "Ron was more produc-
e and executed better when he was running the of-
fense (against Florida State)
Robbie Bartlett started against the Seminoles, but
ones replaced him on ECU's third series and played
e remainder of the first half. Both played an equal
amount in the second half, yet Bartlett was only
given the opportunity to attempt two passes the en-
� ire game.
"Robbie showed poise in Tallahassee Emory
said, "but Ron was quicker and handled the option
better
Emory said Bartlett will play aginst Temple, and
( l fans might even get a look at third candidate
Oarrell Speed, but the decision to start Jones was
aed on the productivity of the offense while he was
at the Pirate helm.
Other than the quarterback situation, Emory's big-
gest concern going into the Temple game is the
legative effect the score of the FSU game will have
on his players.
"If we had won in Tallahassee it would been an ad-
age to play Temple, but now it's a
disadvantage the fifth-year coach said. "They
didn't play over the weekend, so they've had all year
to prepare for us.
"They're a low-key ball club Emory continued,
"but they're one of the most powerful teams in the
East. We couldn't be playing a tougher team at this
stage in our season
Emory made note of Temple's near upsets of Penn
State and Georgia last year, and said the Pirates
would have to play far better than they did aginst
FSU if they plan on beating the Owls.
Temple is led by ECAC rookie of the year and
Associated Press all-East choice Paul Palmer, who
led the Owls in rushing, receiving and scoring last
year. Palmer, however, didn't give the Pirates any
problems last year as he only managed 23 yards on 11
carries.
In that game, the Pirates improved their record to
5-1 on the 1983 season, as former ECU and present
Canadian League quarterback Kevin Ingram com-
pleted 12 of 19 passes to lead his team to a 24-11 vic-
tory.
Although many people are writing the Pirates off
this year after their dismal performance against
Florida State, Emory is confident this year's team
will produce.
"We're exactly where we were last year � 0-1. We
have just as much speed, strength and talent as we
did in 1983, but we're still inexperienced Emory
said. "What people don't realize is it takes time for a
team to blend together and to do things by habit in-
stead of thinking about.
"We're going to be a good football team, in fact,
we're going to be as good as we were a year ago �
it's just a matter of time
Jones Faces Biggest Challenge Yet
B SCOTT POW ERS
VuisUot Sports Fdiior
When Ron Jones steps on the field
the Pirates this Saturday against
Temple Owls, it will be the biggest
ie of his young college career.
The freshman quarterback was nam-
! the starter in this Saturday's game
Coach Ed Emory because of his per-
nance in last week's dissapointing
ss to Florida State.
- "Ron Jones executed well on offense
tins! Florida State Emory said,
and he will start for us this Saturday
nst Temple
0
LWjL
i
-
NEIL JOHNSON � ECU Photo Lab
Ron Jones will start aganist Temple
Saturday night.
Jones, a redshirt last year,
had an illustrious high school
career at I.e. Norcom High in
Portsmouth, Virginia. He was
named player of the year by
the Portsmouth Sports Club
and was a second team all-
state quarterback his senior
year. He also was all-city in
basketball and all-district in
baseball, winning a total of
seven varsity letters.
He was slightly confused
about being redshirted at first,
but got over that quickly. "I
knew about Kevin (former
Pirate quarterback Kevin In-
gram) before I came, but I
didn't know about John
Williams (last year's backup
quarterback) he said.
"I was a little discouraged
about being redshirted at first,
but the coaches said that I'd be
helping the defense, so it was
all right. I think that it worked
to my advantage
Jones was a highly recruited
quarterback out of high
school, but said he came to
ECU because "it was like a
home away from home.
Everybody was so close, just
like my team in high school
When he First entered the
game against FSU, he had a
few problems. His first two
passes were intercepted, one
off of the hands of an ECU
receiver.
"The interceptions didn't
really get me down, but they
didn't help any either, because
when I went in, I went in to
move the football he said.
One might expect that there
would be some hard feelings
between Jones and fellow
quarterbacks Darrell Speec
and Robbie Bartlett, all 01
whom have been competing
for the starting job, but that's
not so.
"We get along fine � in the
game or in practice he said.
"The competition is good for all
of us
He knows that just because he
is the starter this week, he can't
afford not to do his job, because
Speed and Bartlett are both ready
to come in and do the job.
"Right now, I have to do the
job if I want to keep starting he
said. "Both of the other quarter-
backs are real good and will be
ready to come in
The 5-10, 180 pounder doesn't
feel that his height puts him at any
disadvantage in the ECU passing
offense. "We run a sprint out
type pass offense that I think is
suited more for the smaller,
quicker quarterback he said.
Jones missed last year's spring
game with a knee injury he sus-
tained on the last day of practice
before the game. He had never
taken snap in a game situation un-
til Saturday night, something that
offensive coordinator Don Murry
thinks may have put him at a
disadvantage.
"He needs playing time, game
time Murry said. "He has the
innate skills but hasn't had the op-
portunity to develop them fully
Jones knows that he has yet to
reach his peak. "Right now I just
have to get better and better every
practice and every game he
said.
As far as the Temple game is
concerned, Jones feels that the
Pirates will be ready. "There
shouldn't be any problems with us
not being ready he said. "I
know that we'll all be pumped
up
Concerning the rest of the
season, Jones sounded a warning
to future opponents. "We can't
go by the first game. We lost it
last year. But this team knows
how to lose and what it feels like,
and we don't want to feel that way
any more
EIL JOHNSON - ECU Photo Lab
Pirate head coach Ed Emory should have plenty to tion for their home opener against Temple Saturday
tell his players during practice this week in prepara- night. Game time is 7 p.m.
Miami Ranked No. 1
NEW YORK (UPI) � The
United Press International Board
of Coaches Top 20 college foot-
ball ratings, with first-place votes
and records in parentheses (total
points based on 15 points for first
place, 14 for second, etc.).
1. Miami (30) (2-0) 513
2. Nebraska (4) (0-0) 425
3. Texas (0-0) 337
4. UCLA (0-0) 330
5. Clemson (1-0) 311
6. Auburn (0-1) 233
7. Penn State (0-0) 230
8. Ohio State (0-0) 221
9. Michigan (0-0) 215
10. Oklahoma (0-0) 198
11. Alabama (0-0) 183
12. Brigham Young (1-0) 172
13. Arizona State (0-0) 168
14. Iowa (1) (0-0) 133
15. Notre Dame (0-0) 128
16. Boston College (1-0) 76
17. Southern Methdst (0-0) 66
18. Washington (0-0) 65
19. Florida State (1-0) 60
20. Pittsburgh (0-1) 25
Charley Pell, Florida; Danny
Ford, Clemson; Bobby Bow den.
Florida State.
MIDLANDS � Tom Osborne,
Nebraska; Barry Switzer,
Oklahoma; Jim Dickey, Kansas
State; Warren Powers, Missouri;
John Cooper, Tulsa; Mike Cot-
tefried, Kansas.
SOUTHWEST � Fred Akers,
Texas; Ken Hatfield, Arkansas;
Jackie Sherrill, Texas A&M; Sam
Robertson, Southwestern Loui-
siana; Grant Teaff, Baylor; Bob-
by Collins, Southern Methodist
MOUNTAINS � LaVell Ed-
wards. Brigham Young; Farry
Smith, Arizona; Joe Lee Dunn,
New Mexico; Chuck Stobart,
Utah; Al Kincaid, Wyoming;
Leon Fuller, Colorado State.
PACIFIC - Rich Brooks,
Oregon; Claude Gilbert, San Jose
State; Jack Elway, Stanford; Don
James, Washington; Terry
Donahue, UCLA; Jim Sweeney,
Fresno State.
Note: By agreement with the
American Football Coaches
Association, teams on probation
by the NCAA are ineligible for the
Top 20 and national champion-
ship consideration by the UPI
Board of Coaches. The teams cur-
rently on probation are Arizona.
Illinois and Kansas.
Here by sections are the coaches
who comprise the UPI College
Football Board:
EAST � Don
Virginia; Serafino
Pittsburgh; Dick
Syracuse; Jack Bicknell. Boston
College; Jim Young, Army; Gary
Tranguiil, Navy.
MIDWEST '� Earle Bruce.
Ohio State; Dave McClain,
Wisconsin; Gerry Faust, Notre
Dame; Mike White, Illinois;
Hayden Fr, Iowa; Dan Simrell,
Toledo.
SOUTH � Ray Perkins,
Alabama; Vince Dooley, Georgia;
Dick Crum, North Carolina;
Nehlen, West
"Foge" Fazio,
MacPherson,
Sherman Anticipating Pirate Tennis Season
By TONY BROWN
Suff Writer
Great expectations mark the
opening of the '84 ECU tennis
schedule, according to Dr. Pat
Sherman, men's and women's
head coach.
"1 see a great deal of improve-
ment over last year's teams in
overall strength she said.
Despite having few juniors and
seniors to serve in leadership
roles, the improvement I've seen
in our returning players will help
greatly.
"The number one rated men's
player graduated, she said, "so
each of the returning nine will
move up at least one position.
The first cut has been made, but
two more must go to get down to
the 12 man limit. Survivors so far
are: David Creech, Dan LaMont,
Galen Treble, Greg Willis, John
Anthony, Scott Avery. Davis
Bagley, Pat Campanaro, Hank
Kinne, John McDade, Bill Paul,
Kevin Plum, David Turner and
Greg Loyd.
"Creech, LaMont, Treble and
Willis currently are the top four in
overall ability Sherman stated,
"but as the season progresses that
rating could easily change as we
continuously evaluate the team
Assistant coach Laura Redford,
who played four years at ECU,
feels that Greg Willis is the most
consistent server, but notes that
several men are close behind.
"The biggest difference from
last year is greater depth she
said. "With nine men returning,
each of the 12 players should be
better this year
On the women's side of the net,
the clear leader in the eyes of
Coach Sherman is Janet Russell,
the only senior. "Russell is
definitely our number one woman
player she said. "We expect her
experience to help greatly
Now at the 12 player limit, the
squad members are: Russell,
Heidi Bunting, Ann Manderfield,
Susie Brown, Sheila Feeley, Karla
Hoyle, Susan Montjoy, Ty Myers,
Kris Sammons, Laura Zaloudek,
Cisi Bolton and Laura Conway.
"Manderfield is rated second
after the top two (Manderfield
and Bunting). The abilities are so
close it will take some competition
to determine rankings.
"Both teams worked hard dur-
ing the summer and I see a lot of
improvement Sherman said.
"We're pleased with their pro-
gress so far.
Hopefully she's right, because a
strong schedule is set for the fall
for both squads, with the men
opening at powerful Old Domi-
nion.
The home season opens on
Tuesday, Sept. 25 as ECU hosts
Campbell. Three home contests
end the regular season for the men
Sept. 15-16
Sept. 21-22
Sept. 25
Sept. 28-29
Oct. 2
Oct. 5
Oct. 11
Oct. 26-28
ECU MEN'S TENNIS
FALL SCHEDULE
atODU
at Guilford
CAMPBELL
at UNC-Wilmington
ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN
HIGH POINT
N.C. STATE
at ECAC-South tournament
9p.m.
TBA
3 p.m.
TBA
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
TBA
ECU WOMEN'S TENNIS
FALL SCHEDULE
Sept. 22 UNC-GREENSBORO 1 p.m.
Sept. 24 ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN 3 p.m.
Sept. 27 Campbell 3 p.m.
Oct. 3 UNC-WILMINGTON 3 p.m.
Oct. 6 at Davidson 11a.m.
Oct. 7 at UNC-Charlotte 12 noon
Oct. 9 at Peace 2p.m.
Oct 11 at High Point 3 D.m.
with Atlantic Christian, High
Point and N.C. State coming to
Greenville. The ECAC-South
tournament closes out the fall
slate.
ECAC-South members par-
ticipating in men's tennis are:
Navy, Richmond, William &
Mary, James Madison, George
Mason and UNC-Wilmington.
Each one is tough, so it will be
quite a challenge for the young
Pirate team.
The women's schedule is equal-
ly difficult, with such powers as
Davidson and Peace College to
contend with. The Lady Pirates
are set to open their season
hosting UNC-Greensboro on
Sept. 22.
Two other home contests are
scheduled for the fall with Atlan-
tic Christian on Sept. 24 and
UNC-Wilmington on Oct 3.
"We want all the fans to attend
our matches that we can get
said Sherman. "It really helps to
have fans cheering us along. It's
nice to have people who can see
what effort the players put forth
for ECU
Over the summer a weight pro-
gram was followed to strength
specific muscles for tennis. So-
called "tennis elbow" is
sometimes caused by bad stroke
techniques and hitting too much
without proper conditioning as
Sherman sees it, and so those are
areas to be worked on to avoid in-
juries.
The women's team did lost
three of last year's team member's
to knee injuries, and one will
undergo surgery soon. No serious
physical problems have occurred
since then, but two players are in-
eligible for fall due to academic
problems.
With limited funds available for
tennis, as well as all minor sports,
recruiting is a problem for ECU.
"We get most players by word-of-
mouth or as volunteers Sher-
man said. "Some write to us and
we correspond with them through
videotapes or other methods
Kevin Plumb, from Ontario,
Canada, was attracted by Coach
Sherman's knowledge of the
game. She has authored several
publications on tennis and has
been involved in the sport since
the 50's.
With the dedication shown by
the teams so far, prospects are
bright for a good season in the fall
of '84.

i
v.





18
JJJgjAgJjCAROLINlAN SEPTEMBER 6
1984
ECU Has Impressive Home Opener Record
ECU AND HOME OPENERS:
East Carolina sports an im-
pressive 16-5 record in home
openers since the Pirates moved
into the friendly confines of
Ficklen Stadium in 1963. The
Pirates' first win in Ficklen was a
20-10 defeat of Wake Forest on
Sept. 21, 1963.
ECU has captured 11 of its last
12 home openers while Ed Emory
is 3-1 in the season's first game in
Ficklen since becoming head
coach in 1980.
ECU AND FICKLEN
STADIUM: Saturday's home
opener with the Temple Owls will
mark ECU's 22nd season in
Ficklen Stadium. During the
previous 21 years the Pirates have
put together 16 winning seasons
and 10 undefeated seasons, in-
cluding 1983's 4-0 mark.
The Pirates also own an eight-
game winning steak in Ficklen
stretching over the last two
seasons. The last time ECU lost a
home game was Nov. 14, 1981 �
a 31-21 setback to William &
Mary.
ECU has suffered through only
five losing seasons in Ficklen's
21-year historv. Those are:
1968 - 2-3 record
1969 � 1-4 record
1970� 1-3 record
1971 � 3-4 record
1980 � 2-3 record
Owls will be the first of two Penn-
sylvania independents East
Carolina will play in 1984. The
other is the University of Pitt-
sburgh, which ECU visits on Oct.
6 in Pitt Stadium.
IMPRESSIVE: Even with the
Pirates' 48-17 season-opening loss
to Florida State, ECU still sports
an impressive 15-8 record in its
last 23 games (.652 winning
percentage). The Pirates have now
won 11 of their last 15 games
dating back to Nov. 6, 1982, a
40-24 victory over Texas-
Arlington in Arlington, TX. That
works out to a .733 winning
percentage.
TEMPLE NO. 1: The Temple TEMPLE ON A ROLL: Temple,
Adapted Program Introduced
By JEANNETTE ROTH
SUff Writer
In recent columns written for
the East Carolinian, the Depart-
ment of Intramural-Recreational
Services has tried to inform the
ECU public about several of the
major programs being offered.
There is one program which has
not yet been mentioned � the
Adapted Intramural Program.
This is perhaps one of the most
beneficial and least publicized
programs the IRS offers.
The IRS Department works
closely with the Office of Han-
dicapped Student Services and the
Cooridnator of Adapted Physical
Education Programs in providing
a variety of recreational activities
for all handicapped individuals.
Specialized services and programs
have been developed for mobility,
as well as visual and hearing im-
paired individuals. Organized
sport tournaments as well as in-
formal recreational activities such
as canoeing, exerciseweight
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services would like
to reiterate the importance of par-
ticipation for all. The Adapted In-
tramural Program is just one of
the many services the IRS depart-
ment offers to all the ECU facul-
ty, staff and students. Check into
Intramurals � we have something
for everyone.
under second year coach Bruce
Arians, brings a two-game winn-
ing streak into Ficklen Stadium
dating back to the 1983 season. In
their final two games of '83, the
Owls defeated Louisville 24-7 and
Rutgers 24-23. Temple, in fact,
has won three of their last five
games, with the only losses com-
ing against Georgia and West
Virginia. Besides independent
East Carolina, the Owls will take
on other Division I powers such
Pittsburih, Florida State, Boston
College, Virginia Tech and West
Virginia during the 1984 season.
PALMER IMPRESSIVE: One of
Temple's top returnees for 1984 is
tailback Paul Palmer, who earned
ECAC "Rookie of the Year"
honors a year ago.
Palmer led the Owls in three
categories in 1983:
� Rushing � 141 carries for 628
yards (4.5 average), 6 TDs
� Receiving � 33 receptions for
271 yards (8.2 average), two TDs
� Scoring � 50 points (eight
touchdowns and one two-point
conversion)
Palmer was also second in
kickoff return yardage with 125
yards on seven attempts for an
average of 17.9. His long was 24.
Palmer, an Associated Press all-
East choice, did not have a good
game against the Pirates in 1983.
He rushed for only 23 yards on
11 carries, caught three passes for
only six yards and returned two
kickoffs for 30 yards.
COMMON OPPONENTS: East
Carolina and Temple share two
common opponents on their 1984
schedules. The Pirates opened
1984 with Florida State and will
meet Pittsburgh on Oct. 6. The
Owls also travel to Tallahassee,
FL to meet the Seminoles while
hosting Pittsburgh in
Philadelphia's Veterans Stadium
Sept. 22.
Pitt beat the Owls 35-0 in 1983.
TEMPLE VS. THE STATE OK
NORTH CAROLINA: Temple
has met only four North C arolina
schools in its 85 years of inter-
collegiate football. The Owls are
on the short side of a 1-3 record,
with two of those losses being to
1 atarolina.
I he lone victory came against
Wake Forest in 1930 (36-0)
E( I VS THE STATE OF PENN-
SYLVANIA: Temple is the only
Pennsylvania school 1 I
Carolina has ever faced in its
48-year football history The
Pirates sport a 2-0 record against
the Owls (23-10 in 1982 and 24-11
in 1983)
The Pirates will play Pittsburgh
later in 1984 and Penn State joins
ECU's schedule in 1985 and 1986.
training, swimming
horseback riding are offered
and
Saturday Sellout
Wins Oldsmobile
By DEE PERRY &
BILL MITCHELL
SMI Urilm
During Saturday's game with
Temple University, if Ficklen
stadium sells out its capacity of
35,000, someone in attendance
will win a 1984 Oldsmobile at
half time.
At this years home opener Sept.
8 at 7:00 a 1984 Firenza SX Coupe
(special Pirate edition) will be
given away in a drawing com-
pliments of Buddy Holt and Holt
Oldsmobile of Greenville.
With the interest in ECU foot-
ball, hopefully there will be a
sellout, a first for the Pirates. The
rest of the home games have a
good chance of being sold out
too.
Season ticket sales have been
going good, but there still needs to
be a lot of walk-up ticket sales and
students coming to the game.
Things were at a peak for
everyone before the FSU game,
and the fans might be a little let
down now. However, the coaches
and players have experienced no
let down.
According to Dave Hart, the
plan to give the car away is to help
"involve people in the social at-
mosphere of game day This is
also the plan behind other promo-
tional events, such as the tailgate
contest and free limousine use.
Dave Hart also states that "the
football program needs the
students' enthusiasm at the
games. They spread the excite-
ment in the stadium that helps the
Pirates win
The closest ECU has ever come
to a sellout was homecoming last
year against East Tennessee State
with a crowd of 33,767.
Ficklen originally started with
only the south stands, but was ex-
panded to a capacity of 20,000 in
1968. Then in 1978 it was expand-
ed to its present capacity of
35,000.
The ECU athletic department
wishes to thank Buddy Holt and
Holt Oldsmobile for donating the
car and being such a staunch sup-
porter of Pirate athletics.
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The
ECU - TEMPLE
CLEMSON - VIRGINIA
DLKE - INDIANA
MARYLAND SYRACI sh
WAKE FORES1 IR(,IM
ALABAMA BOWON i
FLORIDA I S!
MISSOURI Ml IM)s
NOTRE DAMI pi rim
PLNNSTAIF R17(,FR
Moorman
RAl EIGH N '
North Carolina S
freshman football
with rape and I
ed Tuesday on S5.0O
Pero Rob t M
Danville, Va harg
first-degree I
degree rape stemn . I
cident early Saturday A
arrested Moorma
he remained in 'he W
Jail under $:� ��
heanr
Judge I V. Pa - � n
reduce tht bond v
after del i
ball coach Tom Ree
guarantee Moorman
at hi; trial.
Reed planned
Bruce R Poull
chancellor, to de
man will be a
fielc Moorman,
recruited quai
Washington High Sv
wile, has been sid
weeks by a
suffered in practice
Following M
Reed had said V.
not actively par �
Moorman lee
team to the state sen
senior last year. H
1.27"7 yards and 1?
and ran for 955
touchdowns.
� � �
RALEIGH. N
Athletic oi'
Carolina State Univei
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ecord
H CAROLINA: Temple
rl only tour North Carolina
5 sears of inter-
football. The Owls are
of a 1-3 record,
-v osses being to
came againt
)30(36-0).
HI ST ATI OK PENV
1 nple is the only
school I .a v t
faced in its
history. The
ord against
982 and 24-11
ay Pittsburgh
State joins
85 and 1986.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 6, 1984
19
The Panel Of Experts Pick 'em
ECU �TEMPLE
CLEMSON - VIRGINIA
DUKE - INDIANA
MARYLAND - SYRACUSE
WAKE FOREST - VIRGINIA TECH
ALABAMA � BOSTON COLLEGE
FLORIDA - LSU
MISSOURI - ILLINOIS
NOTRE DAME - PURDUE
PENN STATE - RUTGERS
RANDY MEWS
ECU
Clemson
Indiana
Maryland
VirgmaTech
Alabama
Florida
Illinois
Notre Dame
Penn State
GREG RIDEOUT
ECU
Clemson
Indiana
Maryland
Wake Forest
Boston College
Florida
Missouri
Perdue
Penn State
SCOTT POWERS
ECU
Clemson
Indiana
Maryland
Virginia Tech
Boston College
Florida
Missouri
Notre Dame
Penn State
JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
ECU
Clemson
Indiana
Maryland
Wake Forest
Alabama
Florida
Illinois
Notre Dame
Penn State
SAD SAM
ECU
Clemson
Indiana
Maryland
Virginia Tech
Alabama
Florida
Illinois
Notre Dame
Penn State
Moorman Story Tops Football Notes
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) � A
North Carolina State University
freshman football player charged
with rape and burglary was releas-
ed Tuesday on $5,000 bond.
Percy Robert Moorman, 18, of
Danville, Va is charged with
first-degree burglary and second-
degree rape stemming from an in-
cident early Saturday. Authorities
arrested Moorman Monday and
he remained in the Wake County
Jail under $10,000 bond until his
hearing.
Judge L.W. Payne agreed to
reduce the bond for Moorman
after defense attorneys said foot-
ball coach Tom Reed would
guarantee Moorman's appearance
at his trial.
Reed planned to speak with
Bruce R. Poulton, the university's
chancellor, to determine if Moor-
man will be allowed back on the
field. Moorman, a highly
recruited quarterback from
Washington High School in Dan-
ville, has been sidelined in recent
weeks by a dislocated shoulder
suffered in practice.
Following Moorman's arrest,
Reed had said Moorman would
not actively particpate in football.
Moorman led his high school
team to the state semifinals as a
senior last year. He passed for
1,277 yards and 13 touchdowns
and ran for 955 yards and 10
touchdowns.
� � �
RALEIGH, N.C. (UPI) -
Athletic officials at North
Carolina State University an-
nounced Tuesday the Wolfpack's
Sept. 22 game with Wake Forest
has been rescheduled for televi-
sion.
The game in N.C. State's
Carter-Finley Stadium was added
to the Atlantic Coast
Conference's television package
and will start at 12:15 p.m. in-
stead of 7 p.m officials said.
Wolfpack coach Tom Reed also
announced the election of outside
linebacker Frank Bush and offen-
sive tackle A.V. Richards as co-
captains for the 1984 season.
The two seniors were chosen by
a vote of players.
Bush, a native of Athens, Ga
is a three-year starter on defense
and led the team in quarterback
sacks last season. Richards, who
is from Henderson, was moved to
offensive tackle last season and is
a three-year letterman.
� � �
DURHAM, N.C. (UPI) �
Duke coach Steve Sloan Tuesday
announced the selection of Drew
Walston as the starting quarter-
back in the Blue Devils' season
opener Saturday against Indiana.
Walston, a junior from College
Park, Ga has played in a backup
role for the past two seasons and
served as a holder for Duke
placekickers.
Sloan said senior Ron Sally also
will see action against Indiana.
� � �
INDIANAPOLIS (UPI) � No
suds will be flowing Saturday at
the Purdue-Notre Dame football
game in the Hoosier Dome.
A ban against the sale of beer at
the game was requested by of-
ficials at th University of Notre
Dame at South Bend, which lists
the date as a home game on the
school's schedule.
"We just felt in light of the fact
that this is a college game, that
this (sale of beer) didn't seem to
fit the Rev. E. William
Beauchamp said Tuesday.
"Most of the student body is
under age (21 in Indiana) he
said. "We don't serve beer at our
stadium. We think it's un-
necessary and inappropriate for
college football
� � �
WINSTON-SALEM, N.C.
(UPI) � Wake Forest football
coach Al Groh Tuesday named
Jamie Harris as the starting
quarterback for Saturday's
opener with Virginia Tech.
Harris, a sophomore from Dan-
ville, Va had been battling with
junior Foy White for the starting
spot since spring practice last
March.
Groh said both Harris and
White "played on a first-team
level during our entire training
camp
Although Harris will be the
starter, Groh said he expected
White to play against Virginia
Tech Saturday night in Winston-
Salem.
The 6-foot-l, 193-pound Harris
transferred to Wake Forest last
fall from Georgia. He has not ap-
peared in a regular season game
since his senior year at George
Washington High School in Dan-
ville.
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EVERY FRIDAY 9-
Well, the talk has already started
on the Panel of Experts. "Just who
is the college football expert around
here, anyway?" Everybody will
soon know.
Will it be Randolph Siegfried
Mews, the cocky sports editor who
by his own admission is ECU's own
Jimmy The Greek. Or will it be the
redhead � what little hair he has �
managing editor Greg Rideout? Or
could it be the calm, but incredibly
conceded assistant sports editor
Scott Powers? What about news
editor Jennifer Jendrasiak (that's
o.k. I can't say it either), who is still
trying to figure out what color
jersey is supposed to win? It could
even be Sad Sam, the unknown out-
sider.
Next week world renowned Tina
Maroschak will join the panel, so
check us out every Thursday to see
who will be crowned "The Expert
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 6, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 06, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.357
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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