The East Carolinian, September 4, 1984






Bhz
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
20 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Faculty Productivity
Increasing Steadily
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newt Editor
Following a trend set during the
past few years, faculty productivi-
ty at ECU increased once again
last year, according to Angelo
Volpe, vice chancellor for
Academic Affairs.
During the 1983-84 school year,
there was a 5 percent increase in
articles published, a 16 percent in-
crease in research, university
grant funding increased 65 per-
cent and extramural funds award-
ed increased 81 percent.
A total of $3,271,000 in outside
funding was received by ECU
faculty during 1983-84, compared
to $1,806,000 during 1982-83.
Volpe said he considers the
number of articles published, the
increase in research and the
amount of extramural funds
awarded to be the major in-
dicators of faculty productivity.
"These give a solid indication
Volpe said, adding that the "over-
whelming majority" of these
items are "peer-reviewed
For example, he said, "pro-
posals undergo close scrutiny with
emphasis on the quality of work
being done
Volpe said faculty productivity
has increased consistently. "In the
past several years, there's been a
steady increase he said.
"It's a natural evolution of the
university where we have become
more research-oriented, although
not at the expense of our excellent
teaching Volpe said.
The administration is constant-
ly striving to bring in more fun-
ding for research, Volpe said, ad-
ding that as a "logical extension"
of this a wider sphere of research
will be generated.
"We need to increase funding
across the board Volpe said.
Volpe terms as particularly
significant the fact that ECU's
growth in funding has continued
in spite of decreased federal ex-
penditures.
In addition. Volpe said he feels
increased funding for research
will help the expansion of ECU's
graduate program.
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Up, Up, And Away
When the Kappa Sigs throw a party, they really throw a party. last week. Shown are some of the passengers of a hot-air oalloon
This is one of the scenes from their Darryl's Day Massacre provided by Darryl's.
In Recent Crackdowns
Drug, Alcohol Arrests Rise Rapidly
Student Injured
In Accident Friday
By STEPHEN HARDING
S�ff � rtlfr
The recent increase in drug and
alcohol-related arrests in Green-
ville will continue to rise due to
greater enforcement by the Green-
ville Police Department according
to Ted Holmes, Chief of Police.
The number of drunk driving
arrests has risen 88 percent over
the same period last year, from
185 to 348. White males are the
predominant group at 27 percent.
Arrests of college-age persons ac-
counted for 22 percent. When a
person is arrested, the police
department only determines his
age, not his status as a student.
"It is not necessarily a student
proble.nmore of a city-wide
problem Holmes said.
One step being taken is the
establishment of roadblocks. The
Police Department plans approx-
imately one roadblock per month.
The roadblocks will usually be
nci up on Fnday or Saturday
nights. Sometimes the roadblocks
will be set up at one location and
later moved. They not only find
drunk drivers but also driver's
license violations and vehicle
registration violations. Homes
said he hopes it will "scare people
into not driving while drunk and
take that extra step of
precaution
The police department is also
cracking down on the street sale
and use of drugs. The Narcotics
and Vice Unit has added a third
officer. Drug-related arrests for
the first sixth months of this year
Early Registration Urged
For Career Planning
By ELAINE PERRY
Staff Writer
Seniors and graduate students
planning on graduating in the spr-
ing, are encouraged to go by the
ECU Career Planning and Place-
ment Service. The service is
designed to aid students in the
process of locating jobs.
Assistant Director Jim
Westmoreland said students are
encouraged to register early in the
academic year. Registered
students will receive a packet con-
sisting of a resume, reference
forms, location preferences and a
basic information form. With the
information from the packet on
file, decisions concerning resumes
and job offers can be made over
the phone.
There are several benefits in be-
ing registered with the Placement
Service. Students will have a
credentials file with on-hand
references from professors. The
students will receive a monthly
listing about jobs both in-state
and out-of-state. Also, they will
have the opportunity to talk to
campus recruiters. The recruiters
come to the campus because they
need people to fill their jobs. They
often specify who they want to
talk to.
In addition, three resource
rooms are located within the
center. Students can find informa-
tion about companies before the
interviews. There are also aids in
findings summer jobs. Graduate
school pamphlets, teaching ap-
plications and books on career op-
portunities are also available in
the resource rooms.
Interviews usually take place
from October to April. Interviews
are conducted by companies such
as as Xerox, Carolina Power and
Light and various textile firms.
The introductory meeting for
seniors and graduate students will
be Sept. 11 at 3:00 in Mendenhall
244. There will also be various
workshops on the preparation of
resumes and interviews. These
times will be in the announcement
section of this paper.
are up 340 percent. Several
methods are being used to pin-
point drug users. Undercover per-
sonel are used to attempt to pur-
chase drugs. Officers are also
checking parking lots for drug
use.
The department also receives
leads from persons who call the
Crimestoppers telephone pro-
gram. A majority of the drug pro-
blem is from persons coming from
out of town, not from students,
Holmes said.
Last weekend the Greenville
Police Department made eight
alcohol-related arrests and one
drug-related. Statistics for cam-
pus arrests were not available.
Another problem of the
downtown area is the use of IDs.
Only four types of ID are valid for
the purchase of alcohol which are
N.C. Driver's License, N.C. ID
card, a Passport, and a Military
ID. A student ID or birth cer-
tificate cannot be used. Nightclub
owners are very careful about this
ccording to Tom Haines, Vice
President of the Downtown Club
Association.
A club can have its license
suspended for violation of ABC
laws. The three ABC laws that are
violated most often are serving
after hours, serving someone
underage, and serving someone
intoxicated.
Some bars are still letting 18
year olds in but requiring them to
wear a wristband and a different
hand stamp. The Attic is also
making them leave their ID and
are able to get it back only when
they return the wristband.
Haines also reminds students to
have two IDs. If there is a ques-
tion about an ABC accepted iden-
tification, the other is there as a
backup. Some clubs also give
Special rates to persons with stu-
dent IDs.
Both Holmes and Haines feel
the real problems will come when
the drinking age is raised to 21 in
several years. Enforcement will
have to be stricter. The use of fake
IDs will also increase. Hains add-
ed, "Eighteen, nighteen and twen-
ty year olds are not going to stop
(drinking), they'll just be doing it
in different ways
By HAROLDJOYNER
Staff Writer
An ECU student was seriously
injured early Friday morning
when he was struck by a vehicle.
According to the Greenville
Police Department, 20-year-old
Arthur Alan Griffin, a junior ma-
joring in business administration
was struck at 12:52 a.m. on
Hooker Road in Greenville. Grif-
fin was leaving a toga party at the
Pi Kappa Phi House when the ac-
cident occured.
Greenville Police arrested Terry
Micheal Smith of 122-D Concord
Drive at 2:30 a.m. Smith was
charged with driving while im-
paired. He was also charged with
leaving the scene of an accident
which resulted in personal injury,
police said.
According to Chris Cohen,
Griffin's roomate, he and Griffin
were leaving the party shortly
before 1 a.m. "We were walking
on the side of the road. I stopped
to pick up something and the next
thing I heard was a loud thud.
Cohen also said Griffin suffered
skull injuries and he may lose the
sight of one eye. Griffin's parents
were not available for comment.
According to one Pi Kappa Phi
fraternity member, none of the
fraternity brothers saw the acci-
dent. President Steve Hall was not
available for comment.
Cohen added, "I thought the
accident could have been avoided
had the driver not been intox-
icated. The guy didn't even stop
after he hit Arthur, he just kept
going
Griffin is still hospitalized in
serious condition.
Record Enrollment
East Carolina University has
a record enrollment of students
on campus for the fall
semester, registrar J. Gilbert
Moore announced last week.
The official tally is 13,827
students, which is 470 above
enrollment for fall semester last
year or a 3.52 percent increase,
Moore said. Included in the
total are 254 students in the
School of Medicine, Moore ad-
ded.
The 1983
13,357.
enrollment was
On The Inside
r�Uncenients2 �&� �bout the a8�ny and
P torials4 ecstasy involved in eating
di choc�jate mousse in Features'
sports5 pftge
Ashmen in today's blue For Plratcsoss t0 Fl�rldt St8t7�n
Stalls, see page 6 Saturday. See Sports, page 15.
Loyal Pirate Fans
Despite the fact that ECU lost to Florida State, there were still many
loyal fans watching the game. Drinking beer and watching football, a
favorite student pasttime. Watch
throughout the football season.
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
for this scence to be repeated





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 4, 1984
Announcements
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
The Brothers of Aipna Ph, Alpha Fraternity
trie would HM to nvte an interested young men
to ateno their fan SMOKER Sunday Septemoer
� 1 30 p m at the Lefloma S Wright Cultural
Center Freshmen are welcome Cowards never
start Weak men never a'r.ve. only the strong sur
vive
ALL STUDENTS
unoecioea aeout y0ur career path? stay one
s'ep ahead of fie competit.on Dy increasing your
social opportunities and unowieoge of the work
ng Do yourjeit a tavor a'teno 'he t.rst meeting
o the Society �or Advancement of Management
Refreshments wm Be served' For more nforma
t.on can Rickat75l887orLor1at 758 2N3 Don t
m.sj out' i!
ALPHASIGMA PHI
The Brothers of A pha S gma Pn. would like to
welcome everyone Back to school, especially our
i tt'e ssters who help oS so much Don t torget
Pref Night with the A O Pi's tn.s Friday Sept
7th This W'll Be a maiOr hrow down1 ' Attention
Rush Begn$ Won . Sept 10 12 PREPARE'
VICTORY JAM
The Brokers of Aipha Phi Alpha Fraternity
-c would ke 'o nvte everyone to a viCTORv
.AM following the football game. Saturday at the
edoma S Wr.ght Cultural Center, 10 p.m 2
a m
NAACP
Beg npmg Monday Sept 10. at 5 30 m the Cot
feehouse 'oca'ed on the ground floor of
Menoenha-l NAACP w.n meet on the 2nd and 4th
Monoa�s So come on out and give a little of
yOur$�if for a great cause
GAMMA BETA PHI
The execuT ve Board of Gamma Beta Phi will
ave a meeting on Tuesoav Sep1 4 at 7 00 p m at
Or Duniop s house There will Be a general
meeting of an Gamma Beta Phi members on
Thursday Sept 6 at 7 DO p m m Mendenhall
rOOm 244
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal sevice of Holy Communion
will be celeBrated on Tuesday evening. Sept 4 m
�he chapel of St Paul's Episcopal Church. 404 4th
St (one Block from Garren Dorm) The service
will oe at 5 30 p m with the Episcopal Chapiam,
me Rev Bill Hadden, celebrating
SLAP
The Department of Speech Language S.
Auditory pathology SLAP will be oroviomg the
soeech and hearing screening for ail study's
eligible tor admission to the upper aivivon of
teacher education on Mon Sept 17, Tues , Sep1
�8 ano Wed Sept 19
The department will be testing from 5 00 7 3C
pm on the above days There will not be a make
jo session Fall Semester
PHI KAPPATAU
LITTLE SISTERS
There will be a little sister meeting this Thurs
a�v �i 7 00 p.m. at ttve house we have s lot of big
plans for this semester, so please fry to come See
you there
BEACH RETREAT
'ired of the pressure of school already? Want to
get away from it all tor once? 1 nen ioin the ECU
Newman Community on our Annual Beach
Retreat coming up the weekend of Sept 14 16 at
Emerald isle We'll be heading there that
weekend for some fun. sun. and even some serious
stuff We 11 be having discussions on study skills,
gelling along with other people, and other topics,
and we also invite you to join us and meet the
members of the ECU Newman Community and
our new coordinator. Rev Terrence (Terry) Col
hns The cost is only $25 00 per person, with a
110 00 deposit due on Sept 9. which will pay for
your food and lodging dust provide clothes and a
sleeping bag) For more info , contact (Cathy Col
bert or Rev Collins At the ECU Newman Center.
E 10th St (752 4214)
SENIOR GRAD STUDENTS
The Career Planning and Placement Service
will meet with those interested in learning more
about this service This general session will en
courage those graduating In this 1984 85 academic
year to pick up registration packets and return
them Registration, credentials, and interview
procedures will be explained The session will be
held m Mendenhall 244) at 3 00 p m on Sept 11.
1984
SURFCLUB
The first meeting of the year is scheduled for
Thursday, Sept a in room 221 Mendenhall at 7 00
p m New officers will be elected and a date for
the team trials at Hatteras will be set New
members, girls, and anyone who enjoys the beach
are all welcome Persons interested who cannot
attend the first meeting should contact Dave Col
by at 758 2392
MAT
Due to increased charges by the Psychological
Corp . the Testing Center at ECU finds it
necessary to pass on the increase to the MAT can
oidates Beginning Oct l 1984, the test fee will be
S23
LACROSSE CLUB
Come to ttve bottom of College Mill on Tuesdays
and Thursdays at 3:30 to play some Lax We're
looking for a tew good men Any Question call
Dav Lockett
EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE
Employment ft available to qualified person
wtto r Interested In Becoming Personal Car
Attendant to students in wheelchair Reader.
roofradert, Tutors For further aeta'ts, con
tact Office of Handlcspped Stvd�nt Services, 21J
Whlcnerd �ulldlng. or call 757 e7?�
FOREIGN STUDENTS
if you ere interested in taking an English Se-
cond Language course (non credit) men tgn up
in me Writing Center Austin 309 Students wfll be
contacted about cJaaa scheduling
FACULTY
A faculty Investment club is presently befog
formed In our art This should be an exciting,
two, educational, end financially rewarding op-
portunity for all For more information end
details on en organliatlonai meeting to be hetd
�eon. ceM or writ, today 3SS-W2S day end ntght,
FACULTY INVESTMENT CLUB. P.O. Sox 9377,
Greenville N C 27834.
FELLOWSHIP
We're all looking for a little understanding in
our lives, that's true so why not try and find it
with us? Join us this Wednesday night and find out
what peace of mind is really all about! Along the
way, you just might find some good friends, too
and it's all possible when the ECU inter Varsity
Christian Fellowship meets this Wednesday
night Why not ioin us and see what happens?
We'll be looking for you Wednesday night at 7 00
p m in My auditorium of the Jenkins Art
Building, so please ioin us and bring a friend, OK?
PHI BETA LAMBDA
Phi Beta Lambda will hold its first annual
meeting on Wed , Sept 5 in Rawl 341 at 4 00 p m
All old members, and anyone wishing to join are
encouraged to attend Be a part of Phi Beta
Lambda and help make this a successful year!
ARTEXHIBITION
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Art Exhibition Committee is
now accepting applications for committee
members For details, contact Bari Branson at
757 6611 ext 210
CATHOLIC COMMUNITY
Looking for a place to get together with friends
this week? Join us this Wednesday at the ECU
Newman Center and bring a friend We will have
a worship service, followed by our group meeting
and dinner There will be plenty for us to talk
over, so do find time to stop by this Wednesday at
5 00 p m at the ECU Newman Center on E 10th
Street (just past the Music Building). We hope
you'll ioin us!
SIGN LANGUAGE
This Thursday, Sept 6 at 5 00 at Mr Gatti'swe
will be having a silent dinner New students are
encouraged to join in on the fun During dinner we
will be using only finger spelling, so come on out
and join us in the fun
FACILITIESCLOSED
Memorial Gymnasium Recreation Facilities
will be closed during the home football game on
Sat . September 8 This includes the Basketball
courts, equipment room and pool The facilities
will Be open on Sunday as normally scneduied
GAMMA BETA PHI
There will be a general meeting of all Gamma
Beta Phi members Thursday, Sept 6 at 7 00 p m
m Mendenhall, room 244 The executive board will
meet before the general meeting at 6 30 pm in
Mendenhall room 244
STUDENTS FOR HELMS
All interested persons in working on the Helms
campaign are urged to attend a meeting Tuesday,
Sept 4 at 7 00 The meeting will be in room 242
Mendenhall We will be discussing projects for
this fall For any information Call 752 8434
ISA
Attention ISA Members old, new and new in
terested students! The election for 84 '85 new of
ficers will take place on Sat Sept 8 at 6 00 p m
at Mendenhall Student Center (Ask at Informa
tiondesk for Rm no pleaseA celeoration party
will also be held following the election at 9 00 p m
at the international House, come and ioin us! It
won't be tun without you.
PUTT-PUTT
intramural Team Putt Putt Is set to Tee off on
Men , Sept 17. Team Captains snouid register
ftieir team In Memorial Gym on Man Sept. N)
and Two Sept n between 1:00 a.m. end S p.m.
PARTICIPATE RATHER THAN SPtCTATCIIt
CO RECSOFTBALL
join ttve fund Registration dates for Co-P.ec
Softball are Sept 1011. The Team Captains
Meeting Is set for Sept �, 7:00 p.m. In ic I0J
Com be Room MM Memorial Gym to reaJstpr.
Anyone can participate In INTRAMURALV"
DINNERVOLLEYBALL
Each Monday night at i Xp.m the Baptist Sty
dent Union loins together for an evening of fun.
Ptrsf mere Is a homecoofced meal for tt 00 follow
ed by games of volleyball
RETREAT
ioin us for an exciting weekend of fun,
tetkwsnlp and Bible study at Emerald Isle. The
taptlst Student Union Is going Sept. 7- A charge
of tx help pay for transportation, meets, and
TEAM HANDBALL
attention 111 ECU Team Handball Club.
Anyone Interested in playing team handball for
the ECU Club Team should contact Jeff Humbert
(7S3-M3S) or Willie Ehling (757 437) for more in
formation. All levels of experience ere welcome
to play.
ICE HOCKEY
If you art interested In playing ice hockey at
ECU this yaar, please contact George at 752 �525
Wa need to hear from new people as well as those
from last yee to set up a meeting time as well as
practice dates and etc. It Is most Important that
those from last year call us so we know that tttey
still exist I
STUDENT SAVINGS CARDS
SGA Student Savings Cards are here I You can
pick up yours at Mondenhall's lobby. The Croetan
and the Student Store. Take advantage of great
savings offered by Greenville merchants and get
your card now)
PHI ETA SIGMA
Phi Eta Sigma will be having It first meeting
Thur Sept 6th at 515 p.m et Mendenhall
(Pteese ask for the room number at the Informa-
tion deskAll new member art urged to attend.
The I going to be a greet year so we hope you will
loin us
ARTEXHIBITION
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Art Exhibition Committee
will hold an orientation meeting on Thursday,
Sept 6. 1984, at 3 30 pm in room 238 of Mendenhall
Student Center All members and interested
students are urged to attend
ALPHA PHI OMEGA
Welcome back brothers. This semester's
meetings are Thursday at 500 in 212 Mendenhall
There will be a covered dish supper Sept. 6 at
Danny's Meet at Mendenhall at 445 If you need a
ride or directions Brothers art strongly en
couraged to attend meetings
Get down to business faster.
With the BA-35.
If there's one thing business
students have always needed,
this is it: an affordable, busi-
ness-oriented calculator.
The Texas Instruments
BA-35, the Student Business
Analyst.
Its built-in business
formulas let you perform
complicated finance,
accounting and statistical
functions - the ones that
usually require a lot of rime
and a stack of reference books,
like present and future value
C 1V81 Texas Instrument
calculations, amortizations
and balloon payments.
The BA-35 means you
spend less time calculating,
and more time learning. One
keystroke takes the place
of many.
The calculator is just part
of the package. You also get
a book that follows most
business courses: the Business
Analyst Guidebook. Business
professors helped us write it,
to help you get the most out
of calculator and classroom.
A powerful combination
Think business. With
the BA-35 Student
Business Analyst.

Texas
Instruments
Creating useful products
and services for you.
SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS
A beginning American sign language cless will
be held every Wednesday night, starting Sept 5,
from � 00-f 00 p m In 6 OS (MEOlA ROOM) of
Joyner Library The cless is free end open to ell
individuals interested In Sign Language It Is
sponsored by the Progrem for Hearing Impaired
Students end the Sign Language Club No
registration required, lust show up the first night
NEWTIME5
Catholic mass is now offered ef 11 30 AM. In
the Biology lecture hall, rm 103. and at� 00 PM
at the Newman Center Every Wednesday at the
Newman Center mess is celebrated, followed by a ,
meeting, a shared meei and fellowship, beginning
at 5 00 P.M C'mon and loin the funt
KARATE CLUB
The East Caroline KARATE CLUB will hev Its
first meeting on Thursday, August X. I904. at 7 30
in Memorial Gym dance room This meeting is tor
those of yellow belt renk and up Bring your Gl
Beginning clesses will begin in Septemoer
FLAG FOOTBALL
Anyone Interested in playing tleg football or
starting up a team PAY ATTENTION The IRS
Oept. wants you to participate' Register for in
tramural Flag Football on Sept 45 The team
Captains meeting is Sept 6 at 7 00 p m in Rm 103
in the Biology Building Come to Rm 204
Memorial Gym to sign up PARTICIPATE
RATHER THAN SPECTATEH
STUDENT ATHETIC BOARD
There will be en orlenfetlon meeting of the ECU
student athletic board on Tues , Sept 4. IM4 at 5
p.m. In Room 244 Mendenhell Student Center
Anyone Interested In lotnlng should attend this
orientation meeting. For more info ebout the
organization, contact Pern Holt at 757-4417
RECREATION TRIP
Anyone who loves having FUN outdoors shouiej
contact the intr.�,0f,t 0ufJoor RcrMfll
Center and re�lttf ,0, f- upcom
BACKPACKING T � mu�
madebyl 00 pm. Frway sept 7 the UWHAK-
R.E NAT.ONAL FOREST �� �. �,
the e�c.hne�t Jut c.� �� M �, com
room 104 Memorial Gym
SPORT CLUBS
Anyone interested In part
Ciub Progrem c.n go ,0 v.�"9 �"
for turther information N G'm Hoow �
available Umr" '��� era

SIGMA IOTA EPS.LON
Sigma lota Ep�ilon, ecu , ��,
fraternity, will hold its ��, " mL '
meeting on Wed Sept 5 m � ,�, ��"
All member, ,r. encourage ,0 Mfyj �
HONORS SEMINAR
All umvers.ty facuit, 8r,a lt(jri
ticlpeting in the Honor, p, vm ,r ,
their opportunity of des.gn.ng � r T
Honor Seminar of their cno.c The Honor, ri
mitte mekes the final selection �r0m among ,
posals submitted each semester s r
topic oriented and often IMgrdhxlplinery
team taught Proposals for courses -o b taJ
spring semester I9�i must be subrrvrteo bef,
Frl . Sept 7, 1�4. to Dr Oav-o Sanoer, 0�y
of the Honors Program, co Eng�h 0,pt Ztf
pus For further information see D' Sanoer,
Ragsdaie 212 or can 757 4373
I Classifieds
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v
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STtllfl Students With Presentation
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F orme
ALEIGH (UPf)
h on in North Carolina to i
V w charge for compu.
5 cause he tar;
� er system ar �,
Mate I.niv- Carolina
Mate umversit)
freshman at the
lastr o " "s arrested
last year or f �
fyslem"0" 5 c
sy siem , i c
freshman " 'ar"
in textile, , �onn
l- . 8-ices v-ere not
h,gh c' '� 'or the
iji aJTl
leg' ; 'lotographv
and computer programming
W of the 150 hours of cornm
IL O Pro,
Although other language
organizations have been a pa
the history of the foreign lamj .
deparment for the past 20 y
Xhe h a! La- .
Orga
having been founded in 198
II 0
tion
Governmej ciatior
therefore recognized bv the SGA
as an ECL affiliated n i
tion.
The purpose of the ILO
promote
and :
Hubot The
A Future 7
SAN FRANCISCO -
Hubot the robot �
$4,000 � isn't an R2D2
Hubot can't make coffee,
has a tray to carr-
someone else bres it. He
doesn't do windov.
floors or do the dish
But the 4-foot r -
around leaving deep
on carpets or speak throug
voice synthesizer, rej
whatever words are
keyboard. Sort of.
Instructed to say, "I ar
robot during a demc
at a San Francisco store, Hubot
blinked his 16 red g
ed his plastic mo.
"I am a rowboat.
am a rowboat. I am a r
Robot inventor Mike I
said 32 Hubots hae beer, pi-
ed by Hubotics Inc a San D s
County firm that has order-
450 more.
"Hubot is for people
S50.000-a-year incor-
Forino. "Hubot is n
everyone
Red Dawn
Rated Most
Violent Film
(UPI) � The National Co,
tion on Television Violence
condemned the summer hit Red
Dawn as the most vi
ever made. The right-wing far.
about Russian and C
invading a small (
averages 134 a . ence per
hour, according to the n -
organization headed by Ur ersitj
of Illinois psychiatrist Thomas
Radecki. The NCTV s
overall, this summer's releases
the most violent in th
the industry, averag g
violent acts pe-
tion has creates
system because v
Picture Assotia
ratings are inadequate
Radecki. "The MPAA has
totally irresponsible Rated bj
the coalition were "Red
"Indiana Jones" arc 5
summer flicks.
ATTIC :
Tlturs.
Sec- 6fn
r.r-
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THKEASTCAROl INI AN
SEPTEMBER 4, 1984
RECREATION TRIP
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With Presentation
September. . .
Former Computer
RALEIGH (UPI) - The first
person in North Carolina to face a
felony charge for computer crime
because he tapped into the com
uter system at North Carolina
State University now is a
freshman at the university
Alan Clegg, who was arrested
last year on charges of illegally
getting into the school's computer
system, is an 18-year-old
treshman from Raleigh majoring
in textiles. His grades were not
high enough to qualify for the
university's computer science pro-
gram.
Clegg also teaches photography
and computer programming as
part of the 150 hours of communi-
ty service he agreed to serve as
part of his sentence of misde-
meanor charges. The felony
charge against him was reduced in
a plea-bargain agreement.
"It all ended in kind of a splat-
ter Clegg said.
He said he was motivated by
natural curiosity and temptation.
"Some people cruise the
highways. We cruised the
telephone lines Clegg said.
He first learned about com-
puters in high school in Japan,
while his father worked there for
the government. When he return-
ed to Raleigh, his fascination with
computers grew and he became an
expert at Athens Drive High
School.
Clegg set up a computer at
home complete with disc drive
units and a modem, a device
allowing a home computer to
communicate with other com-
puters through telephone lines.
His first run-in with the North
Carolina State computer occurred
while he was a high school senior
attending a basic computer course
at the school in the fall of 1982.
The computer was new and while
experts were tinkering with it,
Clegg learned he could do some
exploring on his own.
Officials noticed something
funny was going on, traced it to
Clegg and told him to stop. He
did for almost a year.
JutJust before the start of the
1V83-84 school year, Clegg dialed
i, . university's computer and
hooked his home computer to it.
Typing in the name of a friend
who still had access, Clegg found
a way to get into other files.
In one, he found names of
authorized users and their
passwords. He told a friend and
they continued exploring the
system.
"If there's a bomb ticking, you
don't walk up and pick it up
Clegg said. "But we did and it
blew up in our faces
Phone company officials traced
the calls to the friend's home and
ILO Promotes Interest In Languages
police entered the case. The friend
identified Clegg as the person who
showed him how to get into the
system.
University officials said no
damage was done and no illegal
profits were made, but the two
were simply using up computer
time.
Clegg told police he stopped us-
ing the university's system two
weeks earlier. He was charged,
but his friend was not.
He said North Carolina State
officials could have impressed
him without taking him to court.
"They were looking for a
publicity stunt and they got it
Clegg said.
Don Martin, chairman of the
school's computer science depart-
ment, said "I don't want to say
we made an example out of him
But Martin said, "To the best we
can detect, it has not happened
again
Clegg said he hopes to improve
his grades and enter the universi-
ty's computer science program.
He also hopes to finish his proba-
tion next month.
He still has access to modems,
he said, but his interests have
shifted to software and to the
campus newspaper, where he
designs ads.
Although other language
organizations have been a part of
the history of the foreign language
department for the past 20 years,
the International Language
Organization is relatively new,
having been founded in 1981. The
ILO has its own proper constitu-
tion as specified by the Student
Government Association and is
therefore recognized by the SGA
as an ECU affiliated organiza-
tion.
The purpose of the ILO is to
promote interest in the history
and culture of each language of-
fered here at ECU. In the past this
has included a lecture series of
various countries, as well as a
number of social events such as
the German Oktoberfest, and the
Spanish Noche Latina. Wine and
cheese parties, ice cream socials,
and bake sales have been held as
fund raisers to sponsor these very
special foreign holidays.
Our first meeting of this
academic year is to be held on
Wednesday, September 5 from
the hours of 2:00 p.m. to 3:00
p.m. in room BC 306. If you
would like to become a member,
but have a conflict of schedule at
this time, please leave your name
and phone number with the
secretary of Foreign Languages.
Students in foreign languages are
urged to attend this meeting. You
need not be a foreign language
major or minor to become a
member of this organization
September 5th meeting will in-
clude the elections of officers and
faculty sponsors, the re-
quirements for membership, and
the time and dates of future
meetings. Also, any suggestions
regarding future fund raisers,
andor foreign language oriented
festivals that we could sponsor
"�" � �-��� �- vvuiu JV'�1JV1
The topics of discussion at the would be very much appreciated.
Hubot The Robot;
A Future Trend
SAN FRANCISCO (UPI) �
Hubot the robot � on sale for
$4,000 � isn't an R2D2.
Hubot can't make coffee, but
has a tray to carry it around in if
someone else brews it. He also
doesn't do windows, vaccuum the
floors or do the dishes.
But the 4-foot robot can roll
around leaving deep wheel tracks
on carpets or speak through a
voice synthesizer, repeating
whatever words are typed into a
kevboard. sort of.
Instructed to say, "I am a
robot during a demonstration
at a San Francisco store, Hubot
blinked his 16 red lights and open-
ed his plastic mouth.
"I am a rowboat he said. "I
am a rowboat. I am a rowboat
Robot inventor Mike Forino
said 32 Hubots have been produc-
ed by Hubotics Inc a San Diego
County firm that has orders for
450 more.
"Hubot is for people with
S50,000-a-year incomes said
Forino. "Hubot is not for
everyone
Red Dawn
Rated Most
Violent Film
(UPI) � The National Coali-
tion on Television Violence has
condemned the summer hit Red
Dawn as the most violent movie
ever made. The right-wing fantasy
about Russian and Cuban troops
invading a small Colorado town
averages 134 acts of violence per
hour, according to the non-profit
organization headed by University
of Illinois psychiatrist Thomas
Radecki. The NCTV says that
overall, this summer's releases are
the most violent in the history of
the industry, averaging 28.5
violent acts per hour. The coali-
tion has created its own rating
system because it feels the Motion
Picture Association of America's
ratings are inadequate. Says
Raderki, "The MPAA has been
totally irresponsible Rated X by
the coalition were "Red Dawn
"Indiana Jones" and 15 other
summer flicks.
iaas����V$$4� '
ATTIC
During the demonstration,
Hubot informed passers-by that it
was 12:10 p.m. It was 3:35 p.m.
Hubot was equipped with a
television � black and white �
radio with slightly fuzzy sound, a
video game machine and a ther-
mometer 14 degrees off.
Forino said the time will come
when every American home will
have a robot like Hubot. But he
admitted the time may not be
now.
"Hubot doesn't do the dishes,
wash the windows or make the
bed Forino said. "Hubot is not
R2D2. He's Hubot
Hubot agreed:
"I am a rowboat
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�lje iEaat Ear0luuan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. HUNTER FISHER, Central Manager
Greg Rideout, M.���ii,w
Jennifer Jendrasiak, a,&�� J.T. Pietrzak, d,�� ��
Randy Mews, � &� Anthony Martin, Mm m�
TINA MAROSCHAK, Fmlmm Editor KATHY FUERST, Producnon Manager
BlLl AUSTIN, Circulation Manager LlNDA VlZENA, Advertising Technician
September 4, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Labor Day
ECU Students, Profs Miss Out
At ECU it was just another day.
Nothing special. Go to class, take a
couple of notes, maybe go to the
library. But no one else was here.
We had to cut our weekends short
on the most traditional of three-
day holidays just because a learn-
ing institution in eastern North
Carolina thinks it can forget
holidays. Why?
Well, good question. We guess
they just want to be different from
the rest of the country which stops
to observe Labor Day. It's just not
right when our sister institutions
across the state give their students
the day off.
Sure, it's true we do have a fall
break which the administration
uses to justify our sitting in class
vesterday. But it comes in mid-
October when the beach is too cold
and the mountains are too warm.
We know a day had to be taken up
somewhere, but to pull it out of a
traditional three-day weekend is
wrong.
Everyone makes plans for Labor
Dav � if that everyone doesn't at-
tend ECU.
So, as we've said, it should be
business as usual at ECU, right?
Wrong. Yes, we did have classes.
But we can't cash a check or buy
books or supplies at the book
store. Secretaries are nowhere to
be found; offices are closed, etc
etc.
Of course, these people deserve
a day off, especially after the hus-
tle and bustle of the first weeks of
school. They need a little time to
relax before heading full-tilt into
the semester. But a campus
operating at half-speed is
somewhat senseless. It takes
everyone to do the job.
We find it hard to believe that
Monday was the only day that
could be used to satisfy the
semester's requirements. Surely,
other possibilities exist. We could
have started a day earlier or a day
later. A day at either end means
very little because of the way
they're both staggered anyway. No
one really notices an extra day.
Why not have two three-day
weekends, one on Labor Day and
one in October? The administra-
tion could still call it "fall break"
if they want to.
But, alas, Labor Day 1984 is
behind us. So is the Fourth of July
which summer school students
spent in the classroom. (The na-
tion's birthday!) Why do we gripe
about moot points? Well, ad-
ministration, there's still next year.
Labor Day was first celebrated
in New York in 1882 under the
sponsorship of the Central Labor
Union. Peter J. McGuire of the
Knights of Labor came up with the
idea.
Toga Parties And Life
Student Recounts Accident
THEN A BIG SCARV RUSSIAN &6AR CAME 0U7OF M WOOPS
ARM6P WITH 3,000dONG-RAMGE NUCLEAR WARHEAPS
By CHRIS COHEN
Caution: going to toga parties may be
hazardous to your health. But then is life
ever really safe? Arthur Griffin was
unarmed when it happened. He didn't
have his ton-and-a-half weapon wrap-
ped around his fragile human body. Ac-
cident? Most definitely, but the result
was the same. Malice intended? Most
assuredly not. How could anyone intend
malice on such a nice guy as Arthur?
But, as the unwitting assailant left the
scene, Arthur lay crumpled in a heap off
the edge of the pavement where a second
before he had been walking and talking
to a new female friend.
Campus
Spectrum
Perhaps it was a false sense of security
or a naive faith in human nature that
made Arthur feel that drivers of these
hunks of rolling tin would feel the
responsibilty of operating one of these
potential weapons � especially in an
area where dozens of fellow flesh-and-
blood creatures were walking near the
path of travel.
The law did Arthur no good in this
situation � the one that says that a
pedestrian always has the right of way
on N.C. roads. True, Arthur was slight-
ly on the edge of the road, but so were
dozens of others. The only law that
would seem to have protected Arthur
was the law of common sense and the
awareness of changing road conditions
to automobile drivers especially alcohol
impaired ones.
Fortune is a fickle lady, and on the
night of Aug. 30 � the night of the Pi
Kappa Phi party � my two roommates,
Arthur and Andy, and I had just left the
party about 1 a.m. I left by myself and
my two friends left while talking to two
ladies. The subject arose how Arthur
had had bad luck in the past. What with
being struck by a train while in his car
three years ago and then being shot in
the back of the head some months later,
Arthur was just recovering from this bad
string of luck.
I had just bent down to pick up
something in the road when I heard a
thud. Now the fun of the evening was
spoiled; at 20 years of age, Arthur's luck
seemed to be holding out one more time.
We were in shock and ran about knock-
ing on doors to try and summon an am-
bulance. It arrived quickly, and after
three days and an operation to fix his
fractured skull, Arthur is off the critical
list and in stable but serious condition in
Pitt Memorial.
I spoke to him Sunday, and he
acknowledges some of my questions
though he won't open his eyes � yet. I
told him I thought the man upstairs was
looking out for him. He chuckled and I
I Campus Forum
asked him if that was funny He
ly said, "no So I think
fine. It will take a little time .
tors think his chances are gv
strong individual.
The car that left the see
driver were found several :
The car was parked in a dr:
had a dent in the fender and
hair on the windshield. It va-
the police through a descr
car. The driver has been cha
Driving While Intoxicated and
run. Though I'm sure the dr:
fellow student is regretful oi
dent, as we all know, the :
done.
Please, people, be careful -
drive.
(Chris Cohen is a junior bus
jor from Long Island. V Y i
Media Positions Open
The following is an open letter to
students from ECU Media Board
Chairman Mark Siewald.
I hope that each of you had an ex-
citing summer and are now ready to
begin a productive and fun year at
ECU. The Media Board is now
recruiting general managers for both
The Ebony Herald and WZMB. I
would like to give a brief description of
the duties of each of these interesting
and challenging student held positions.
At WZMB the general manager is
responsible for the overall operation of
the station. This includes overseeing
staffing, payroll, programming, grant
recruitment and compliance with FCC
rules and regulations. This position
provides an opportunity to gain
valuable management experience.
The general manager for The Ebony
Herald will also be responsible for the
overall operations of the paper. He or
she will oversee budgeting, staffing,
recruitment of minority stories and
production and distribution of the
paper. As many of you are awa-
Media Board set up a special c
tee to evaluate The Ebony Her
make recommendations for up.
the paper last year. These recor
dations, aimed at improving the
ty of the paper, were impleme:
late January and seemed to be w
very well. This is an excellent
tunity for a student to provide p
input into producing a high
paper for ECL's minoritv stude
As you can see, both of the
tions are challenging and wil -
a great opportunity to gain valua
perience while in school. Be.
volved. It's your campus me.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes
expressing all points of view. vfaj
drop them by our office in the P
tions Building, across from
trance of Joyner Library.
South African Judicial System Undeserving Of U. S. Praise
By NEIL LEWIS
The New RepabNc
Last year the State Department went
out of the way to praise the South
African judiciary for a ruling that ap-
peared to advance the civil rights of that
country's oppressed black majority.
The official statement spoke of the
values shared by South Africa and the
United States, as exemplified by South
Africa's system of an independent
judiciary operating under the rule of
law.
This description summons up a splen-
did image of South African judges
heroically enforcing justice despite
prevailing attitudes, as U.S. federal
judges did in the South during the 1950s
and 1960s.
To anyone familiar with South
African courts, that is preposterous.
Beyond the fact that the judges wear
black robes, there is little resemblance to
a system of justice as we know it. Con-
sider the following cases, which occur-
red during the last 15 months:
� A white youth who battered a black
man to death with karate sticks was
ordered to serve 1200 hours in prison on
weekends. The judge said the youth
could be partially excused for his actions
because he was upset that his parents
were considering a divorce.
� Three young white men were tried
for kicking a black man to death because
they thought he might have been
tampering with a car. They mt t
sentenced to five cuts with a cane, a
punishment still used in South Africa. A
Johannesburg newspaper quoted one of
the defendants saying he laughed after
the caning because he got off so lightly.
� Earlier this summer a South African
judge acquitted a white man on murder
charges for having killed a black man
who was apparently attempting to steal
49 cents of milk money. The judge said
the defendant had performed a civic ser-
vice and that he probably deserved a
medal, since a rash of milk money thefts
in the neighborhood had ceased since the
killing.
� In contrast, two black musicians
were sent to jail for four years because
security police detected that during a
concert they included in their music
some verses praising Nelson Mandela,
the leader of the outlawed African Na-
tional Congress, who is serving a life
sentence for subversion.
� In another case, a black factory
worker was given an 18-month sentence
because his tea mug was inscribed with
an A.N.C. slogan. The judge said he was
"tempering justice with mercy" by
suspending a further 18 months in jail.
Statistics show that apartheid is main-
tained even at the gallows. Out of 100
people hanged last year, 99 were black.
According to a study published in the
South African Law Journal, the major
factor determining whether someone
will hang is not his race but the race of
the vii tim. The study concluded that if a
black murders a white, the probability
of a trip to the gallows is high.
One finds the same brand of justice in
Namibia, which South Africa rules in
defiance of the United Nations.
� Black leaders in Namibia were
outraged when a white farmer was given
a six-year jail term with the clear
possibility of time off for good behavior
after being convicted of torturing a
black worker to death. In passing the
sentence, the South African judge noted
in mitigation that the murderer was hav-
ing trouble with his wife and had been
drinking.
� Also in Namibia, two soldiers were
fined $40 each after having been found
guilty of beating a black villager, raping
his wife, and roasting him over his own
cooking fire.
The South African court ruling that
the United States praised so fulsomely
involved a black man named Tom
Rikhoto. Because he had worked for one
white employer continuously for 10
years, Rikhoto was granted the rare
right to live in the black township ad-
joining the city in which he is employed.
Under the Pretoria government's
long-range scheme most blacks will be
moved to "tribal homelands typically
in remote areas, and will lose their South
African citizenship.
The minister in charge of black affairs
had threatened to have Parliament over-
turn the ruling, as it had done many
times in the past when a court decision
appeared to threaten the government's
discretion in regulating blacks. But
following the praise from the State
Department, the South African govern-
ment abandoned this approach.
Instead, it enacted a law stating that
anyone obtaining "urban rights" must
demonstrate that he has legal housing in
the black township. Since there is a
backlog of thousands of housing ap-
plications and a waiting list of 10 years
or more for the black townships, this ef-
fectively undercut the court ruling.
Although South Africa fully
acknowledges that its society is based on
race, the laws are supposed to be applied
without regard to color. Yet, despite all
the day-to-day evidence of bias in the
South African courts, most people �
white and black � rarely question the
prevailing view that courts are sanc-
tuaries of justice in an otherwise unjust
society.
So Helen Suzman, the longest-serving
opposition member of Parliament, caus-
ed a storm of controversy recently when
she suggested that some judges are
notoriously biased against blacks and in
favor of right-wing offenders.
She singled out some judges well-
known to lawyers for those views. She
noted that one judge, H.P.Van Dyk,
sentenced a young white woman to 10
years in jail for being a member of the
A.N.C, even though she was a first of-
fender and was not charged with any
violent acts.
Mrs. Suzman compared
another case heard by the same judge "
which members of the neo-fac
Afrikaner Resistance Movement
found in possession of grenade-
mines and AK-47 rifles, and tried do ter-
rorism and arms charges � received
suspended sentences.
Mrs. Suzman cited evidence, brough'
out in a related trial, that the organiza-
tion had planned the assassination oi
black churchmen, including Bishop
mond Tutu, an outspoken opponent
apartheid and head of the South Africa"
Council of Churches.
Th Afrikaner Resistance Movements
a violent white supremacist orga:
ion, she said, with a swastikalike sy
ool and a salute modeled on that c
Nazis But Van Dyk had ruled that DO
useful purpose would be served by sp-
aing the defendants to jail, since thev are
cmlized and decent people
m-f.T31 outra�ed members of Pariia-
Z rom the ruling National Partv
22ft t0u rulc Mrs- Suzman out d
cSmJ?" fe remarks, saying that the
criSr!5 JUd8CS deSCrVcd PSe
�m�h is aPPndy what the VS
8overnrnem believes.
an L?Wis' wno recently spent a y
TLl half in S�� 'Africa, is I
Washington writer.)
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 4, 1984 5
111
Program Simulates Space Shuttle Missions
HI NTSVI1 i I (UPi) .v
eek aftei announci g . , rogram
give adults a three dav
simulated space shuttle ex-
�cnenc the earth's largest space
museum alread) had inquiries
� w�uld-b( astronauts,
no end in sight
Alabama Space and Rocket
Center officials in north Alabama
say the suspeel many of the ap-
plicants anging from grandpas
5ewives se program
a wa5 �1 til) being
chosen foi the real thing uid
maj be right.
1 r�ckel c ,nth
announced an aduli version oi the
populat I s sav jamp a fjve.
ia program that in three ears
ed J tn � idren from
across the United States.
The first adult version will be
Oct. 19-21 and is a trial run.
Twenty adults � for $200 each �
will train at the space camp's
simulated mission control and
take part in a three-hour
simulated space shuttle flight.
Many of the inquiries have
come from pilots, but rocket
center spokesman Lee Sentell says
requests have come from people
in all walks of life who have the
money and time to participate in
the program.
The center had planned to host
(he adult series in the fall of 1985,
but now anticipates beginning the
space camp as early as January
and conducting the series for nine
months because of the response.
Center Director Ed Buck bee
says the children who have par-
ticipated in the popular U.S.
Space Camp have probably spark-
ed the interest of adults. That pro-
gram is for children 12-16 who
spend five days at the camp and
are housed in dormitories in the
basement of the 25,000-square-
foot building at the center.
The children are taught the
history and mechanics of
rocketry, work with robot arms
and run through four shuttle mis-
sion simulations.
"1 think we found out that all
that enthusiasm has fired up an
interest in adults Buckbee says.
"Six hundred people in the last
week have contacted us. They've
ranged from housewives to (Na-
tional Aeronautics and Space Ad-
minstration) personnel says
Sentell.
The center has sent out ques-
tionnaires and will select a "cross-
section" of the population in the
next week or so, he says.
"One woman wants to give it as
a birthday present for her hus-
band, who's 61 Sentell says.
And a pilot in New Jersey "of-
fered to fly down with a check im-
mediately
Sentell says there's little doubt
folks asking about the space camp
hope to one day get on the real
shuttle, and he admits the ex-
perience could help their chances.
"Anyone wanting to go on the
shuttle will explore this possibili-
ty. It would not hurt their chances
of being selected he says. "Our
program involves the basics of
how the shuttle operates" in what
he called a "serious
environment
Buckbee agreed.
"If you had experience at the
space camp, you would have a leg-
up (for the shuttle program). It
would be a plus he says.
The adult program will be con-
densed with one mission instead
of four and with the emphasis
placed on historical factors and
"high interest" activities.
On the first day, there's an
orientation session and an in-
troduction to rocketry and life-
support systems. Adult space
campers will don space-suits and
tour NASA facilities at the nearbv
Marshall Space Flight Center.
On the second day, they will be
given special space shuttle
assignments, with some chosen as
pilots, others payload specialists
and others payload specialists and
others mission specialists.
"They won't get their pick.
We'll have to look at their
backgrounds and come up with
some way of choosing. We don't
want everyone to be a pilot
Buckbee said.
On the last day, the teams will
particpate in simulated space mis-
sions. Buckbee said the missions
will be realistic.
"If they lift off and the red
light comes on, they will have to
make decisions said Buckbee.
Doonesbury Returns After 20 Month Absence
be
The
He's a
ts
. � . . .
and
and
I 2
'� hit and '
-
� the
- is

pen
ild and
ent
vaiuabk
t
a.
rum Rules
omes letters
Mail or
hi Publica-
m the en-
K. Praise
mpa ed 'his to
ie judge in
e neo-facist
Movement �
f grenades, land-
id tried on ter-
� receded
.�nee, brought
it the organiza-
� assination of
tding Bishop Des-
- opponent of
South African
ice Movement is
ipremacist organiza-
iwastikalike sym-
ite modeled on that of the
� nad ruled that no
ild be served by sen-
-jr,dams to jail, since they are
I and decent people
itraged members of Parlia-
� 3m the ruling National Party at-
) rule Mrs. Suzman out of
1 for her remarks, saying that the
judges deserved praise, not
is apparently what the U.S.
fnment believes.
til Lewis, nho recently spent a yeOr
half in South Af ica, is
'ngton writer.
� ' nlted ttaiwt ,ndtcat. Inc
FAIRWAY, s. � G is
rrudeau's Pulitzer Prize-winning
comic strip Doonesbury returns to
newspapers Sej 84, John
P. McMeel, presidei i of i �
al Pre; -� unced

with
questions about h
McMeel. "Garr felt his
characters needed some time to
make the journey from 'draft beer
and mixers to cocaine and
herpes On Sept. 30, when the
Doonesbury saga resumes,
readers will see just how well they
have fared he said.
In announcing his leave of
absence from the first and only
comic strip to win the Pulitzer
Prize for cartooning, Trudeau
-a,d. 'Mv characters are
SGA Election Date
Set For Sept. 26
By JENNIFER Jl vmAK
Th
!
Raine)
represent i ind 25
reside
tions
g
preside;
rhese positions are open in the
freshman, sophomore, junior,
senior and graduate classes.
Applications will be available in
the student government offices
ed on the 2nd floor of
Mendenhall Student Center from
Sept. 4-14. Applicants must main-
tain a 2.0 gpa and be in good stan-
- with the university.
There will be a candidates'
meeting the 17th after which cam-
paigning w ill commence.
teStvIe Artists n
r& of
La Kosmetique
B . ity Salon
Welcome Bock ECU Students
Current Trends
O.

4
Bod
3$
A .i -i i"
Waxing
Sculptured Nails
Manicures & Facials
Debbie Lewis
Brenda Carraway
er & tv st
2600 E 10th Street 752-3419
understandably confused and out
of sorts. It's time to give them
some $20 haircuts, graduate them
and move them out into the larger
world of grown-up concerns
It was the development of the
Doonesbury characters that pro-
vided the perfect counterpoint to
the political satire in this strip that
debuted in 28 newspapers (Oct.
26, 1970) and went on sabbatical
when it was running in 726
newspapers (Jan. 2, 1983).
It was the antics of these
characters that generated un-
precedented controversy when
traumatized editors refused to run
certain sequences and moved
them to editorial pages or tried to
bury the controversial strip in the
classified section.
One week readers read about
the Watergaters; the next, Joanie
Caucus' problems with law
Stolen
Life-Size Sculpture Doll
A soft-sculpture doll was stolen from a new art piece located in the
lobby of the art building sometime between midnight Sunday and
Monday morning. The doll is over five feet tall and is dressed in
navy slacks and a blue-and-white striped shirt. Mindy Machanic
(ph. 757-1933) requests that it be returned to the art piece.
school, or Zonker's conversations
with his plants. The various
strains, sometimes separate and
other times together, became a
tightly interwoven story of the
'70s and early '80s.
The results were novelistic, and
many an observer noted that
where Doonesbury departed from
other strips was that it was written
� and read � much like a novel.
The characters moved through
time and events, and readers
quickly adopted their favorites,
eagerly anticipating the strip's
next episode.
Often prescient � with
historical events forecast in
Doonesbury even before they oc
curred in real life (such as the end
of the energy crisis or Gerald Ford
winning the Republican nomina-
tion over Ronald Reagan in 1976)
� Doonesbury became a national
guide to this country's political
future.
"There are only three major
vehicles to keep us informed as to
what's going on in Washington:
the electronic media, the print
media and Doonesbury � not
necessarily in that order said
former U.S. President Gerald R
Ford.
oto express
TARLANDING SEAFOOD
p. - � " Combination Special:
viT i Shrimp, Trout & Deviled Crab
FF or Baked Potato,
Cole Slaw & Hush Puppies - $3.9�'
105 Airport Road 758-0327
X. NIGHTCLUB r y.
Friday Night
September 7
ECU CHEERLEADERS
PRESENT
PRE-GAME
VICTORY PARTY
" '���' � N'ghtCIul Cai naEasH entre
Color Print Film Developing
COUPON
Applies to HO, 126, 135 and Disc
Color Print (C-41 Process)
One Print Two Print
12exp 1.99 2.99
15exp 2.49 3.49
24 exp 3.99 4.99
36 exp 4.99 5.99
Offer Good Sept. 4,5,6,7,1984
foto express
10th&CotancheSt.
Hours: 9-6 Mon-Fri
10-2 Sot -7
ICl �� i �� i 1
Sp �� i �� ; . � . . : , : �
7 30pm Um
WITH BOUNCING B( B WILSON
B Dan M ism in Tow Sc Top 4
Hot and I hors d'oeuvres
& A Bee. 2 foi 1 Highballs a ,hi K
Flip over the 1984 Pirate Attack by supporting
the spirit behind ECU
Proceeds ivill berw hi the ECI Cheerleaders
Wednesday Night
Come Shag With Us!
Shag Lessons
Intermediates at 7:00 p.m. Beginners at 8:00 p.m.
� S:x ueek course meets every Wednesday
Wednesdav Night "Happv Hour' 6 to 9
2 For 1 Hiyhbalis
$2 00 Pitchers of Boer
mmim
RENTAL UNITS
At The Campus �East Carolina University
Thursday Night
LADIES NIGHT: LADY MEMBERS FREE
D.J. KIRK WILLIAMS
94 WRQR playing your favorite Rock & Roll�Top 40
Happy Hours 6 9
Highballs 2 For 1 Free Wine �) 11
$2 00 Pitchers of Beer
Saturday Night
Come Bop til you drop with
STEVE HARDY'S ORIGINAL BEACH PARTY
Free Draft Beei b til 9:30!
Hot and cold hors d'oeuvres at 8 00 catered bv Darryl's
BEAU'S
Phone 756-6401 Located in Carolina East Centre
Beau �. private i lub tor member and quett onlv AM ABC Permits Memberships available al the I
door
Guests Are Welcome.
� BRAWP NEW REWTAl UNITS AVAILABLE
� LOCATEV WE XT TO CAMPUS
� WALK TO CLASSES AND VOblNTOm
� EFFICIENCIES, J 6 2-BEVR00H UNITS
� FULLV FtiRAISHEP ANV ACCESSORIZED
� CARPETEV AHV AIR CONDITIONED
� KITCHEN APPLIANCES FURNISHED
� LAUNDRV FACILITIES
� 0N-S1TE MANAGEMENT
� NIGHT SECURITY PERSONNEL
� RESIDENT PARKING STICKERS
RINGGOLD TOWERS
919) 3J5-2W8
4
1
r t
V
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 4, 1984
Contest
Challenge Number One
Win A Dinner For Two
Courtesy Of Eamada Inn
The East Carolinian Name Ihe Landmark' Contest
The two pictures he Ed campus. One lucky freshman can
win dinner for ;u Ramada In i ntify ing these two landmarks plus six
others that will be run in the next th issu � Em ies that correctly identify all eight will be
thrown inn a hat and a drau lner Be precise. When you think you've
got it, bring the e rm by The Ea lian in the ,id South Building across
from the library. All entr ificc by the managing editor. Good luck!
1. ?
3.
5.
7.
Challenge Number Two
k
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readii,
sale at or below the advertised price in each AAP Store
specifically noted in this ad
)
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8
JTHEEAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 4, 1984
State Campaign Update
Martin
RALEIGH (UPI) - Rep.
James Martin, R-N.C, Monday
described his Democratic oppo-
nent in the gubernatorial race as a
candidate who tries to pit region
against region in North Carolina.
Martin, who said Attorney
General Rufus Edmisten changes
his stance on road building in
North Carolina as he travels
across the state, appointed a
"truth squad of volunteers" to
follow Edmisten's campaign ap-
pearances.
"Our 'truth squad' will correct
his misleading statements by
holding news conferences or issu-
ing statements in order to present
the true facts Martin said. "We
will welcome his monitors at our
public events
Martin has accused Edmisten of
overpromising highway im-
provements in different areas of
the state.
Martin's position is that he is
committed to the completion of
the Interstate 40 link between
Raleigh and Wilmington. Ed-
misten also has said he recognizes
the importance of completing the
interstate but that other highway
needs could not be shortchanged
in the process.
Hunt
RALEIGH (UPI) � Gov.
James B. Hunt, Jr. Monday
marked the official Labor Day
startup of his Senate campaign
against incumbent Republican
Jesse A. Helms by calling for a
federal balanced budget amend-
ment.
Hunt said he wants to en-
courage economic growth by
reducing the deficit with a
"balanced combination of spen-
ding cuts and tax loophole clos-
ings that will cut the deficit in
half" the first year Hunt would
take office if elected.
"But we've got to go farther �
we've got to make fiscal respon-
sibility a part of our
constitution Hunt said. "As
governor, I helped make a balanc-
ed budget amendment part of our
state constitutiion. As a senator, I
will work for a federal balanced
budget amendment
Hunt said Helms also says he is
for balancing the federal budget,
but the two candidates have
"sharply contrasting ideas" about
the process.
Hunt blasted Helms for giving
tax breaks to oil companies and
the wealthy and for cutting educa-
tion, Social Security and medicare
as a way to cut the budget.
One of Hunt's plans to reduce
the deficit is the elimination of
waste and inefficiency in military
contracts.
Hunt said that if elected he also
would fight for North Carolina
industries, including textiles,
agriculture and furniture.
CRs To Hold Convention Here
By HAROLDJOYNER
Staff Writer
The ECU College Republicans
will host the Fall Platform Con-
Business Club
Aids Graduate
Students
By HAROLD JOYNER
The Graduate Business
Association promotes ECU
graduate students' interests within
the Department of Business and
the East Carolina Community,
said Glenn Dixon, president of the
Association.
"Membership in the GBA is
very beneficial to the graduate
student Dixon said. "Also, by
lobbying the Student Government
for assistance in purchasing
equipment, the graduate student
has better access to current
business machines The GBA is
responsible for acquiring a Mcln-
tosh computer and programming
the Student Government's data
base, Dixon noted.
Vice-President Ken Hooper
said members of the GBA pro-
vides members with a study
lounge, somputer cards, and lab
manuals. "Not only is the lounge
a quiet place to study Hooper
said, "but a member has access to
coffee and business magazines
The GBA is under the direction
of Charles Broome, associate
dean of Graduate Studies in the
School of Business and meets
every month Dixon also said the
members are informed of various
activities in the area through the
Association's newsletter, The
Rawl Street Journal. The next
meeting has been planned for Oct.
12, Dixon added.
vention of the Executive Board of
the North Carolina Federation of
College Republicans on the
weekend of October 5th.
According to Dennis Kilcoyne,
ECU's College Republicans chair-
man, the convention will be held
at the Ramada Inn in Greenville.
The convention is open to
members of the federation only.
He said the weekend's agenda will
include an all day platform debate
and a Saturday luncheon to be ad-
dressed by the keynoter.
Kilcoyne is hoping to get
Georgia Congressman Newt
Gingrich to speak at the banquet
dinner. Also, retiring Senate Ma-
jority Leader Howard Baker has
been contacted to deliver the
keynote address, Kilcoyne added.
One of the main reasons the
Board chose Greenville for the
convention site, Kilcoyne said,
was because of extensive prepara-
tion by the ECU group. He also
said, "the Federation has never
held a convention in the east and I
think it's about time
Presently, there are 88 students
at ECU who are members of the
College Republicans.
EAST CAROLINA COINS & PAWN
Corner 10th & Dickinson Ave.
Instant Cash Loans
We Buy Gold & Silver
GUNS BUY-TRADE BICYCLES JEWELRY
TVs
USED
fO�
tore 752-0322

Qs
Hours 9:00am-6:00pm Mon Sat
Welcome to our
� heartwarming place!
Dclinht We ve got the foow"
ICE CREAM 8
COUPON�,
Hearts Delight
Open 12 - 2 Daily
Buy any size sundae
and get an extra
topping FREE j
218 E. 5th St. 752-5878
I
24 fantastic flavors
26 tasty toppings
Gift certificates
Friendly & fun staff
Unique decor
Free soft drink with
purchase of any size
sundae-on Saturdays
Friday Happy Hour
Staff Cartoonist Allan Guy's humorous look at the
facets of ECU life returns in this issue. Look for the
strip to be a regular feature in this semester's East
Carolinians.
jf
Special Trout Dinners $1.99
Shrimp DINNER $2.49
Also Serving A Variety Of Sandwiches
Wrthr Breakfast Served From 7-11
North Green St.
Across From King & Queen V 752-8611
flfo
��
"Welcome Back ECU"
SPECIAL
bJ6
Jiz
the beau shoppe �$ffir
1 MONTH
3 MONTHS
$1Q95
I X (Reg. $24)
14995
t (Reg. $60)
(Additional 10 DISCOUNT with
aOR MORE JOINING TOGETHER
CALL OR COME BY TODAY
FOR A FREE WORKOUT
1530 E. 14thfSt.
Greenville
758-7564
� bring in this ad for an extra week
with your membership
mmmmmmm
mmm
Get theSPIRITmoving to the lobby of Student
Supply Store for "Meet the Coaches Day
Many of the coaches will there from 10:30
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. on Thursday, September 6,
1984, so come on over and join in.
The Pep Band, Cheerleaders, and the
Student Athletic Board, will be there to help
start the fall sports season off right. To make
this occasion complete, all we need is you!

Belvoir
Factory Outlet
. . . h (id Belvoir Schoolhou:� Hwy 33
Thurs & Fri M
Toms sToqo
SPORTSWEAWr T PLAY y WEAI
Located Between Bethel & Tarhoro on Hu b4
Hours 9 5 Mon Sat We Accept Visa & Mastercard
We Also Wholesale
looiuK logs
Factory Outlet
Located in Old Grimesland School House
Ob Hwy 33 Hours: �Ved. -Fri 9 30-5
Sat 930-3:00
Shop Our Outlet Store Nearest You For Back-To-Schooi Specials
SPONSORED BY: THE STUDENT
ATHLETIC BOARD
(SAB)
&
STUDENT SUPPLY
STORE
Wright Building
Owned & operated by East Carolina University
Girls Jeans
Reg $18
"GOOM MICg. MM
��Mortf thermal ���r M.M
Hooded Name
Brand T-Shirts
With Sleeves And Prints
13
Off Reg. Price
Many More Items Arriving For Girls, Boys, Ladies And Men For Fall At
Discount Prices.
$9.99
Group Of
Assorted Tops
For School Days Ahead
$2
Boys
Camouflage Pants
Reg $12 99
$9.99
Natio
DURHAM (UPI)-The
has failed to turn around it
tered U.S. foreign polic
sus � a remnant of the -I
War � almost 10 years
Americans pulled outl
loutheast Asia, two pol
ientists say in a new book
Researchers Ole R. Hoisl
uke University and Jame
osenau of the University
uthern California sav
breign policy is in disarray,
nly the truest of true be'li
Preside
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (Ul.
�'He's forgotten from -
came House Speaker Th
P. O'Neill said of P
Reagan in a television interv
as if Reaga
chmouse p
days of the six-da) worl
O'Neill, like untold
America- -erned
perpetuating what sociaj
Edward Pessen calls
Cabin Myth" - the pot.
belief that the majority
tion's presidents were born
ACROSS
11 Aft
-
- -
� �

� el
con
-
� - �
- " -
- -ronoun
I
43 G- '
M �
47 S
4� Sri
m if
DOWN
t Or
ger-
cleat
aA-
T-
TTT
TTi
1 "r�
X
DRINKING
CAN KILL
r
PET
fctVILLAi
W Msci
ECU ID and
Complete
water fish aqi
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Vf





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 4. 1984
is look at the
Look for the
tester's East
r11' i
rs SSi.99 2.49
Of Sandwiches
m7 - 11
752-8611
1530 E. UthSt.
Greenville
758 7564
tor an extra week
tm&ership.
fby of Student
oaches Dav "
from 10:30
y, September 6,
join in.
the
be there to help
?f right. To make
re need is you:
TUDENT
D
LY
V
jm
�w
Ina University
ing
837648
809960
846372
Nation Fails To Turn Foreign Policy Around
DURHAM (UPI)- The nation �1 � "
DURHAM (UPI)- The nation
has tailed to turn around its shat-
tered U.S. foreign policy consen-
sus - a remnant of the Vietnam
War - almost 10 years after
Americans pulled out of
Southeast Asia, two political
scientists say in a new book
Researchers Ole R. Holsti of
Duke University and James N
Rosenau of the University of
Southern California say U S
foreign policy is in disarray, "and
only the truest of true believers
Si.
any longer believe that Reaganite
nostaJgia and nostrums will create
order out of shambles
Holsti, George V. Allen pro-
fessor of political science at Duke,
and Roesnau, director of the In-
stitute for Transnational Studies
at USC, are the authors of
'American Leadership in World
Affairs: Vietnam and the
Breakdown of Consensus
The book is based on two
surveys in 1976 and 1980 of more
than 2,200 American political
leaders, military officers, foreign
service officers, labor officials,
business executives and others,
Holsti said Saturday.
The study originated in the
suspicion that political fallout
from the Vietnam war would last
beyond its conclusion, Holsti
said. Among the major findings:
American leaders remain
"strikingly divided" on a broad
range of foreign policy questions,
far exceeding any divisions that
existed between Pearl Harbor and
the mid60s;
The Vietnam war was a turning
point in American history, and
among its casualties are 20-year-
old foreign policy precepts that
were regarded as "virtually self-
evident truths about international
affairs" and America's role in the
world;
The effects of defeat in Viet-
nam indeed have lasted well
beyond the end of the war in 1975.
Holsti said that despite missteps
in Lebanon and other places,
NEW HAVEN, Conn. (UPI)
He's forgotten from where he
ndmeA.K HnUSe Speaker Tnoma
O Neill said of President
Reagan in a television interview �
as if Reagan's family were chur-
:hmouse poor in the good old
lays of the six-day work week.
O'Neill, like untold numbers of
Americans, seemed to be
perpetuating what social historian
Edward Pessen calls "The Log
: abin Myth" � the popular
belief that the majority of the na-
:ion's presidents were born into
Mythid
poor or modest circumstances.
It's a variation on the current
campaign theme that says hard
work never hurt anybody, which
may come as a surprise to those
who buy lottery tickets trying to
avoid it.
"Despite what generations of
writers, politicians, and orators
have said to the contrary, poor
boys have rarely risen to the top
of the heap in this country said
Pessen, a history professor at the
City University of New York, who
lectures worldwide.
1 Sword
6 English
streetcars
1 1 Affirm
eremony
14 Booty
15 Wooden box
17 French article
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m forest
20 Inlet
2 i Symbol for
tellurium
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23 Storage
compart-
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2 Stockings
26 Steep.
rugged rock
29 Discharges
of gun
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3-1 Defeat
35 Brag
2 Century
plant
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4 For example
abbr
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lambda
and nu
10 Salty
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19 Twelve dozen
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CROSS
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DOWN
1 One negli-
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1983 United Feature Syndicate. Inc
U.S. Department of Transportation K�TI
DRINKING AND DRIVING
CAN KILL A FRIENDSHIP
DONNA EDWARDS
Owner
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He presents his case in "The
Log Cabin Myth" (224 pp.
$16.95), a book on the social
backgrounds of the presidents,
published by Yale University
Press.
He says well-off presidents have
been poor-mouthing themselves
since George Washington put the
touch on somebody for $500
before taking off for New York
City and the presidency.
John Adams worried about his
wife's finances. A successful
Thomas Jefferson said he was
tapped out. So did James
Monroe. Theodore Roosevelt, of
all people, complained in his
youth of not having "butter and
jam" for his bread. William
Howard Taft talked about the
"happiness of poverty
Reagan has been heard to hum
the hard times dirge, too: "We
were poor, but didn't know it at
the time
Yes, he has said, his family
didn't exactly live on the wrong
side of the tracks, but they could
hear the whistle.
The president has said his
father bought a new car just once
and the family had never lived in a
house they owned. But Pessen
says the houses they lived in were
attractive and situated on tree-
shaded streets.
At various times, Reagan's
father earned his living as a
salesman, a general store
manager, or shoe store partner.
His mother gave "regular
readings for the various ladies'
societies and visited jail inmates
and the indigent, a role not usual-
ly associated with the truly needy.
The president asked at a news
conference in June 1983 how he
could be charged with lack of
sympathy for the poor when his
own youth was marked by pover-
ty.
"And yet Pessen said, "the
president's own evidence has led
one of his few biographers to
describe Reagan's as a 'picture-
book boyhoodout of an old
Norman Rockwell cover for the
Saturday Evening Post a youth
typically marked by good times,
attractive housing, and solid
middle-class comforts
The son of an impoverished
New York farmer, Millard
Fillmore, the 13th president, was
the first president actually born in
a log cabin. He worked in a
sawmill as a kid. But he became a
lawyer and after that, it was as if
he were to the manner born. He
died wealthy.
"In the politics of a true social
democracy Pessen says in his
book, "one would expect to find
the highest office occupied by-
men and women who represent a
cross-section of the society,
socially and occupationally
For The Record
In an August 30 East Carolinian article concerning the Ebony
Herald, John Deaver was identified as the acting general manag-r
of that paper. According to Media Board Chairman Mark
Niewald, no general manager has yet been appointed and Deaver is
acting as business manager. Applications are still being taken for
the position.
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blaming all the nation's foreign
policy woes on the Republican
Reagan administration is
misleading because Democrats
"have demonstrated neither
greater unity nor notably creative
solutions to these problems
He said the fundamental issues
besetting U.S. foreign policy ap-
pear to go beyond the leadership
abilities of recent presidents and
their parties.
"All recent administrations,
whether Democratic or
Republican, have failed in efforts
to forge a post-Vietnam consensus
on foreign policy Holsti said.
"Since Vietnam, we've been a
badly divided country on foreign
policy issues, and that's why we
haven't had many foreign policy
triumphs. Much of the division
has been along clear ideological
lines
Holsti and Rosenau noted in
their book that it is no secret
Americans were divided during
the war itself. But they said it was
"far from self-evident in 1975"
that the war would continue to
divide Americans almost 10 years
after the United States pulled out
of Vietnam.
Today, both supporters and
critics of U.S. policy in Central
America, the Middle East and
elsewhere cite "the lessons of
Vietnam" to buttress their
arguments, they said.
Vietnam remains a mother lode
from which to "extract nuggets of
wisdom" to guide foreign policy
in the world's trouble spots,
Holsti and Rosenau found, but
"those engaged in the enterprise
seem unable to agree on which
nuggets are real gold, and which
are merely fool's gold
The Vietnam experience
abounds in ironies, "not the least
of which is that an American ef-
fort to prevent the unification bv
force of Vietnam ended in a
unified Vietnam.
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355-2125
Anne Sneed
758-6610
756-5195
Marchia Mav
355-6939
Tickets Also Available at
The Diet Center, The Book Barn, Gandalf's
Andalusia Interiors, The Kitchen Cupboard
and Quixote Travel
Live Lobster-$7.00 Boiled Lobster-$8.00
Ticket Sale Ends: Sept. 17, 1984
St. Timothy's Episcopal Church
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October 6,1984
Saturday, 9am-2pm
(No refunds-Lobster must be picked up by 2pm)
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V M
THE EAST C AROLINIAN
Entertainment
SEPTEMBER 4, 1984 P��e 11
An Interview With Glassmoon
Reaching For More
By DAVID WITHERINGTON
Staff Writer
The name Glassmoon is very
familiar in North Carolina, as
well it should be. This progressive
rock band, led by singer-
songwriter Dave Adams, has been
playing the club circuit for over a
decade. Now, I'm glad to say the
band has a major record deal with
MCA Records and a hot new
album called Sympathetic Vibra-
tion. Recently, Glassmoon's bass
player Bob Patterson, of Farm-
ville, North Carolina, took some
time from his busy schedule to
give me an insight into what
makes Glassmoon tick. The
following is our conversation:
DW: How long have you been
playing bass?
BP: It's been about ten years,
basically. When I got serious, I
guess I was about 12 or 13.
DW: How many of those years
have you been performing profes-
sionally?
BP: Well, you always think that
when you're a kid, but I was never
naive about the possibilities. I've
always gone after it with the same
dedication I have today. I still
don't know if it's the center of my
life � I mean, it is right now, but
two years from now, who knows?
That's the way I've always looked
at it.
DW: Who were your initial
musical influences early in life?
BP: The Beatles, and, believe it or
not, Chicago (laughs).
DW: Well, we all have to start
somewhere (more laughs).
DW: Let's talk a bit about the
history of Glassmoon. I realize
the band has been playing the
North Carolina club circuit for,
what, 10 or 12 years now?
BP: I think it's more like 20 or 30
(laughs).
DW: Dave Adams is the lead
singer and songwriter of Glass-
moon. Is he the only original
member left in the lineup?
BP: So to speak, but he's not ex-
actly an original member himself.
He joined the band a few years
after it started. It slowly evolved
to where he took over control of
the songwriting.
DW: So, as far as Glassmoon is
concerned, today's lineup is an
entirely new band from the unit
that played in the mid-70's. You
just kept the corporate name?
BP: That's right, but the influence
of the original idea is still evident
in the music.
DW: How is the structure of the
band? Is it pretty much Dave's
band with the rest of you just pro-
viding the backing for his songs?
BP: Yes, but as we go along, we
get more and more creative input.
We know Dave's always got the
final production control. If we are
overplaying or underplaying, he
would say so.
DW: How long has Glassmoon
actually been recording?
BP: The band has been recording
about four years now. They had
basically broken up, but then
landed a production deal with
Electric Lady Studios. After the
band had pretty much abandoned
it, it was convenient for Dave to
take over the songwriting.
DW: How many albums has the
band got under its belt now?
BP: There are three albums. The
first two were on Radio Records,
a rather obscure label.
DW: So, MCA is your first major
contract?
BP: Right, but it's ironic that our
biggest hits, "Carousel" and
"Telegram were both on the
smaller labels.
DW: Well, maybe the best is yet
to come. Sympathetic Vibration is
still relatively new. Maybe a year
from now they'll still be pulling
singles from it.
BP: Let's hope so! Another
Thriller (laughs)!
DW: Why did you go to England
to record this album?
BP: The band basically has an
English sound, and the British
producers are so much better.
Many of the studios give better
sound. We have an unlimited ac-
cess to compressors, limiters, and
computer mixdowns. If you went
for that in a New York studio,
you'd pay twice as much.
DW: "Cold Kid" was the first
single from the new album, right?
BP: Yes, it garnered an impressive
review from Billboard.
DW: What will be your foliowup
single?
BP: We'll probably go for a dif-
ferent direction, Instead of aiming
for the AOR market, we'll go for
a wider audience through the
crossover stations that will play
anything from Kenny Rogers to
Culture Club to ACDC. I think
we'll go with a slow song, "Day
After Day
DW: Rumor has it that MCA is
financing a video for the band. Is
this true?
BP: Hopefully, that is in the
works. I think we should have
The Ecstasy And Guilt Of
Eating A Chocolate Mousse
BV SUSAN TACKER
Suff Writer
Let's face it � guilt was created
to balance out rapture. Guilt gives
you something to experience after
eating a chocolate mousse. But
there is a way to eat your mousse
and enjoy it too. It just takes a lit-
tle bargaining with yourself.
First, you must decide that
you're worth it. If you're not,
save it and let someone who
deserves it have it. You must tell
yourself that mousse is meant for
you because you were nice to
Aunt Edie for a whole week
without gagging. You see,
mousses (meese?) are meant to be
rewards, not simply deserts. If
you ate one just any old time, they
wouldn't be so sinfully good.
Second, you must decide that
your diet can handle that many
calories at one fell swoop. Ask
your doctor. One way to handle
this is to go without breakfast,
lunch and dinner. Any woman
will tell you this is a common way
to handle small luxuries � go
without some small necessity and
you'll remain virtuous.
Third, you must caution
yourself to go slowly. You have
sacrificed for that mousse �
YOU WILL ENJOY IT! So take
time to prepare for that moment.
A linen napkin, a silver spoon (an
heirloom hidden from the
Yankees in the family well is best),
quiet music, the phone off the
hook, and you are almost ready.
The chocolate mousse is in
front of you. Is it centered? With
your fingers at the base of the par-
fait glass, rotate the mousse. It
should look thick yet light,
chocolatey yet playful, innocent
and non-pretensious. Is one swirl
a little nonsymmetrical? This is
the swirl you will taste first.
With the appropriate, shy
hesitation, take up the spoon.
This is the moment � the music
swells you take a breath and
plunge the utensil into the very
heart of the mousse. Get control
� slowly take a small spoonful.
Don't fill up the spoon, now; you
want this dessert to last. Bring the
spoon to your mouth. Take a tiny
taste onto your tongue. Rub it in-
to the top of your mouth,
breathing with your mouth open
to taste every little chocolatey bit
fully. This is why you should only
eat mousses in the privacy of your
own home; otherwise, people tend
to avoid you.
Eating slowly with tiny bites,
rotate the mousse and mold it into
pleasing mousse sculptures. Eat as
slowly as you can or as fast as you
dare � choking on your mousse
takes some of the fun out of it.
When you're Finished, you can
lick the glass clean � there's no
one to tell you differently.
This ritual should only be at-
tempted once a year. Live for it �
plan for it � enjoy it � but don't
overdo it.
Glassmoon
Dave Adams, Doug Morgan, Bobby Patterson, and former member Rob Dash especially enjov listening
to the sounds of the new English groups.
really made the video as soon as
we came out of the studio. Right
now, we need to get a new single
out, and we're trying to line up a
tour schedule.
DW: I understand you'll be tour-
ing with Chris de Burgh. Is this his
choice or a record company
move?
BP: It's really a record company
and management move.
DW: So, there are no plans to ac-
tually collaborate with de Burgh?
BP: No, we'll just be opening his
dates.
DW: Getting back to the history
of Glassmoon, who influenced the
band early on, even before you
joined?
BP: The English progressive
bands of the day, namely Genesis
and Yes.
DW: can see how modern
technology has dressed your
sound through the years.
BP: Yes, getting a synthesizer,
which used to cost $10,000, and
now costs a fraction of that, into
the hands of a creative person has
really made all the difference.
DW: The technology is develop-
ing so fast that an album recorded
today can obscure one recorded
two years ago. After all the years
of playing the club circuit, to in-
different crowds, how did it feel
to finally land a major record
deal?
BP: I felt like it was a big break
and that we were Finally making
headway, although I had only
joined the band Five months
before we got the contract. I felt
like I was right where I should be,
after a certain amount of time.
DW: What do you think this con-
tract holds for Glassmoon, if the
album is successful?
BP: Even if it isn't successful, you
know, you just keep plugging
away � you go in, you do it
again, and you try to do it better.
I see the group continuing as a
unit but maybe some solo projects
can come from it also. I'm always
writing, and so is Doug, the drum-
mer. And, of course, Dave wants
to do some production work, so
he'd be in and out working with
other people.
DW: Do you think we '11 ever see a
Bob Patterson solo album?
BP: I'd love to do one, not so
much solo, but at least with my
songs.
DW: Have you and Dave ever
written anything together?
BP: Not really, but each band
member takes Dave's ideas and
works up an arrangement.
DW: Who influences your per-
sonal songwriting?
BP: A lot of the new bands �
XTC, King Crimson, Aztec
Camera, and numerous others.
DW: I'm sure your new deal will
open many doors for you. Is there
any musician you would like to
work with?
BP: Well, let me go down the list;
no, I think Paul McCartney more
than anyone else. But, don't get
me wrong. I don't want to make a
record like "Say, Say, Say
DW: Okay, we'll leave it at that.
Who does Dave listen to?
BP: Once again, a lot of the
obscure English bands. I wish I
could get him to make me some
tapes. He has listened to so much
stuff. That's one reason he can
handle the production side. He
co-produced this album with
David Lord, who produced the
last Peter Gabriel album. So, in
effect, he got to work with so-
meone close to his major in-
fluence, Gabriel being from
Genesis.
DW: Well, Bob, I thank you for
your time, and I want to wish
Glassmoon the best of luck in the
coming year. Is there any closing
comment you'd like to make!
BP: Yes. Readers, it's apparent
that this newfound success has not
affected one Bob Patterson. But
seriously, Glassmoon is a band on
the way up and well worth listen-
ing to.
Their new album, Sympathetic
Vibration, is available at the
Record Bar in Carolina East Mall
and the Plaza.
Marvells, Rivers Perform For Opry Fans
WV AN HUMWOTT, ECU
Chocolate Mousse may not be the best diet food, but oooh is it ever delectable.
By BRIAN RANGELEY
Staff Writer
Rock and roll comes to coun-
try. The Carolina Opry House, as
you may already be aware, has
started featuring groups that play
the best of early rock and roll.
For example, this past
weekend, the Marvells performed
their arrangements of old rock
and roll. Their floor show, as
usual, was exciting; the nine-
member group delighted the
crowd with their comedy and
dance routines. Members of the
group dressed up as performers
such as Sonny & Cher or Buddy
Holly and performed medlies of
their hits.
Johnny Rivers (remember
"Secret Agent Man circa
1966?), the main attraction, pack-
ed the house last Friday night.
However, after the colorful, high-
energy performance of the
Marvells, Rivers was disappoin-
ting to the audience.
Rivers never established any
rapport with the people. He ap-
peared on stage and sang his
songs, beginning with his newer
material, then moved on to his
past hits. He spoke only to give
the name of the next song. After
one set, he just said "See ya'U
later and left. Nevertheless, if
you didn't mind his lack of per-
sonality, his musical performance
was enjoyable.
But while the Opry House has
added early rock and roll, the
management has not forsaken
country music. Those of you who
are dedicated country fans need
not despair.
The rock and roll will merely
supplement the regular format at
the Opry House. Thursday and
Friday nights will feature 50's and
60's rock, Wednesday and Satur-
day nights, country.
"The 5,000 to 5,500 members
we now have became members
because we were a country night
club says Opry House manager
Buz Ledford. "We don't want to
alienate them
As business manager for the
Super Grit Cowboy Band, Led-
ford keeps up with music trends in
the U.S. He said that he has noted
a fascination and hunger for 50's
and 60s rock across the nation.
Night clubs featuring old rock
tunes are springing up
everywhere, like Atlanta's own
"Studebaker's the "heartbreak
Hotel" in New York, and
"Packard's" in Dallas.
"We try to go basically from
the Buddy Holly, Bill Hailey and
the Comets era around 1953 to 54
and up" said Ledford, "through
the Motown sound and the
Beatles, 1967 or '68
Even people who consider
Boston an old group are listening
to early rock and roll. Many are
curious about what mom and dad
listened to in younger days. The
crowd last Friday was a fairly
even mix of people whose ages
ranged between 19 and about 50.
And the older folks clapped and
yelled as much as the rest.
The growing craze for 50's and
60's music is growing quite evi-
dent on radio, too; local and na-
tionally syndicated oldies shows
can be found on any station that
airs popular music.
However, the popularity of
oldies doesn't mean that country
music fans are forsaking country
music. In fact, the reverse maybe
true.
"I see country music moving
away from country music said
Ledford. "1 see more pop in-
fluence Ledford referred to the
increase in crossover hits like
those by Dolly Parton and Kenny
Rogers, which have strong pop
flavors. Many industry people in
Nashville are concerned that the
traditional sounds are fading.
In spite of all the concern, Led-
ford feels that what goes around
comes around, and traditional
music will never disappear. By the
same token, oldies have come
around to the Opry House, too.
To usher in the new trend, the
Opry House has put up some
posters of 50's celebrities and a
DJ spins discs from the front end
of a red '57 Chevy. Ledford says
that he is looking for a couple
more old cars to use as booths. He
is looking hard for a '57 chevy
ragtop, a rare item indeed.
Plans for stage dance segments
from ECU'S Dance Department
are forming. Ledford is consider-
ing the possibility of having
waiters and waitresses dress in
50's style costumes and
See CAROLINA, Page 14.
?
!
t
N

n





12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER4, 1984
ECU Graduate Opens A 'Spicy' Nightspot I Sorori
?
f
By SUSAN TACKER
Suff Writer
Downtown's newest nightspot
combines the warmth of a small
local bar with the spice of New
Orleans jazz and blues. Piquant
Alley is dedicated to providing
"jazz at its widest scope said
owner and ECU alumnus Jay
Steinberg. "I've always been an
appreciator, not necessarily a
musician
Steinberg received his master's
degree in clinical psychology from
ECU in 1967 and taught here "off
and on for about five years he
said. "I liked Greenville and
decided to stay
Piquant Alley is Steinberg's se-
cond go-round with a downtown
nightclub � JJ's Music Hall was
his first, offering live, innovative
music. "I've always liked music
said Steinberg, and his newest
club reflects it.
A piano sits in the front of the
club, ready for customers and im-
promtu singing groups. Tables
and chairs are arranged informal-
ly, and the club is small enough
for good acoustics. "This place
lent itself to New Orleans at-
mosphere said Steinberg.
Wrought iron, hanging plants,
mirrors, and new carpeting add to
the effect.
The entrance to Piquant Alley
is up an alleyway. "When you
think of blues, you think of alleys
� like Tin Pan Alley said
Steinberg. "And when we were
Classifieds
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: (1) book, Modern Times, by
Paul Johnson. (2) Glass marked ZBT
Charter Banquet, December 6, 1983. If
found, please return immediately to
Joe Admire, 103 Umstead, 758-7906.
PERSONAL
LYNN: life's a beach. Let's do it
again soon � like Sunday. No flies.
L.R.G The time was right, the sun
was bright. The day was made for
special birthdays. Happy 21st. Love
Sandbar. Molson and I.
PHOTOGRAPHERS NEEDED with
Photo Specialities; 35mm, wor wout
experience, good personality a must.
Evening-parties! Part-time hrs. with
excellent pay! Photo Specialities.
Serious only! Call NOW; John
757 3563
PHI KAPPA TAU LITTLE SISTERS:
Be ready to RAGE all day and all
night this Saturday We're going to
start this year with a BLAST!
WANTED
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
rent, Va
4:00 p.m
utilities, Call
on weekdays.
3556933after
FEMALE STUDENT NEEDED
to share furnished condo. Central
airheat, washerdryer, $150.00
plus v3 utilities. Apt. 1-1 Cannon
Court. Call 758-7090 after 5 pm.
PART-TIME SOCCER COACHES
for various Pitt County Schools. Con
tact Alice or Barry at 752 6106 if in-
terested.
BABYSITTER NEEDED in my
home: T-W afternoons from 3
p.m6:30 p.m. for 2 year-old girl.
$41mo. Call 758-0805 after 6 p.m
WANTED GRAPHIC ARTIST to
work witn ijcal advertising agency
parttime. Junior level student prefer
red. Send resume to Graphic Artist,
P.O. Box 210, Greenville, N.C.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
immediately. Rent $105, V3 utilities.
Call 758-6224. Ask for Karen or Nancy.
HELP WANTED: Need Cocktail
waitresses. Beau's, Carolina East
Centre, across from Plitt Theatres.
Apply Wednesday and Thursday from
6:30 to 8:00. 756 6401.
OVERNIGHT DORM COUNSELOR
full time or parttime. Will monitor ac-
tivities of mentally, physically,
andor emotionally handicapped
clients in resident dorm and prepare
reports. Hours: 4 p.m. to 8 a.m. Full
time Sunday through Thursday �
$9,300yr. Parttime Fri. and Sat. �
$3.35hr. Apply in person at Eastern
Carolina Vocational Center, Station
Road, Greenville, N.C. AAEEO.
RECONDITIONED &
NEW TELEPHONES
STANDARD DESK
U-TOUCH
Reconditioned $39.97
New $46.89
PAIR'S
107 Trade Street
Phone 756-2291
MonFn. 8:30-5:30
Saturday 8:30-12:30
moving this place, we looked for a
word to evoke spicy foods, spicy
music, New Orleans. 'Piquant'
was perfect "Spicy" will be Pi-
quant Alley's trademark.
Steinberg hopes to offer hot hor
d'oeurves, served with picante
sauce, naturally.
"Greenville has evolved to a
point where there are enough peo-
ple who enjoy this type of place to
support one believes Steinberg.
The crowd that turned out last
Friday night to hear Mike
O'Keyes' tribute to Ray Charles
seemed to agree. And when
O'Keyes finished, two members
of the audience got up for an
unscheduled piano-trumpet set.
Fruit mixed beverages will be a
specialty when Piquant Alle .
private, but until then, try the
George Killian's Red Ale on
draught.
Look for Lahn and L
September 7 and 8, Mike
Lightnin' Wells on the 20th, I
Rutabaga Brothers and the La
mon Sisters on the 21st and 22nd,
and Raleigh Grey and Sunfire. a
reggae band, on September 28
This Friday is the official grar 1
opening at Piquant Alle,
Steinberg isn't revealing wha-
has planned. "Let's just say we'
going to bring in this club in I
right way said Steinberg. Be i
hand at 5:30 p.m. Friday foi
special opening.
JON JORDOV ECI Pkolo 1 �b
SALE
FOR SALE
tress and
752 1649.
New Box Springs, mat
bed frame. $50. Call
Piquant Alley owner Jay Steinberg brings his appreciation for music
into his business.
'MM
IM7
MOTORCYCLE BMW R906 Fairing,
dual plugs, elect, ignition � many ex-
tras. Geg 355-2390 12-7 pm.
FOR SALE: 8 x 11 room size rug,
brown and white. Also 2 brown hall
rugs. All for $35. Call 758 1598 after 6
pm.
2 BURNER RANGE Excellent condi-
tion. Perfect for dorm rooms. Call
Maria at 752 6706.
KINGS'S SANDWICH
DELICATESSEN
MISC
LOANS ON & BUYING TV's, Stereos,
cameras, typewriters, gold & silver,
anything else of value. Southern Pawn
Shop, 752 2464.
DON'T MISS ANOTHER CONCERT!
Road Trips Unltd. is taking a busload
Sept. 14 to Yes in Greensboro. Pick up
your tickets at Apple Records soon.
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
VICEWord Processing. Spelling
electronically checked. Term Papers
and Dissertations. $1.75 a page, paper
included. Call Mark after 5 at 757-3440
YARD SALE: Furniture, clothes,
household items, etc. 317 Glenwood
Ave Sat Sept. 8, 8 a.ml p.m.
�R
"
Happy Hour 2:00 8:00pm
$ 50 Beer
$2.50 Pitcher
$ 10 00 Coupon 1 5 Percent Off
For One Year
27 E. Tenth Street
7524279
Now Open til 8:00pm
NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS
General Managers
Needed For
WZMB & Ebonv Herald
Interested persons
may apply at the Media
Board Office - Located
in the Publications
Bldg.
Phone: 757 - 6009
Filing Dales: 8-28-84 9-7-84
BACK TO
OOL
ROCK ENROLLMENT IS UP
AND THE PRICES ARE DOWN.
CASSETTE OR LP
Jfe&U&eeU City
Includes
You Might Think
Magic
Dnve
A
BILLY SQUIER
Signs Of Life
.1
PLUS THE LATEST BY: Peter WolfQuiet RiorSpandau Ballet
Box Of FrogsScandalElton JohnRolling StonesTwisted Sister
Lindsey BuckinghamJohn WaiteJacksonsGlenn Frye
THESE AND MANY MORE ON SALE THRU SEPTEMBER 19
Record Bar
RECORDS, TAPES & A LITTLE BIT MORE.
CAROLINA EAST PITT PLAZA
� ��!��! Ml �.
tm
Wmi
ByHNAMAROSCHAK
If you happened to be arounc
Mendenhall Student Center lasi
night you ma have noticed
caravan of smarjv dre
anxious-looking young corner.
What were they doing? Par
Greenvilh
Dr. Rhonda Fleming, mu-
director of the Greenville
Socie has anno-
rehearsals for the S
seascr. at 7:3
September 11a:
Ba:
Gues'
1984-h .ea -
E
'Anything
Singing a
for the East Care
production
ter music :
Goes, are �
da and 1
and 6, in the V
Center. The aud
a: 7:30 p.m. n i
Anything Goes.
of the 193
theatrical
�em
t
Besti
Fiction
1. The Fourth Protocol -
2. First mong FquaK -
3. Job: A Comed of Jui J
4. Tough Gays Don! Danc(
5. '�And ladies of the �. i
6. Lincoln: A Novel � I
7. The Miko � Fric �
8. The Aquitaine Progress!
9. Revenge of the Robin
10. The Passion of Moth
Non-Fiction
1. Loving Fach Other -
2. Webster's II New Rive- j
3. Eat To Win � Ror
4. The Book (Living Bible
5. Nothing Down � Ri
6. 1985 Guide Book to I SJ
7. Zig Ziglar's Secret of Ci
8. Random House Co
9. Webster's Ninth Rt
10. Webster's New Work
Mass Paperback
1. On Wings of Eagles
2. Savannah � Eugenia .
3. The Auerbach Will -
4. Wicked Day � Mary ttj
5. Fatal Vision � Joe M I
6. The Secret of the S I
7. August � Judith Ro-
Dav of Dissonance -
The Bitch � Jackie I olu
8.
9.
10. Thurston House
Ranking based on compi
800 Waldenbooks stori
r
I
ii
1
J
I
I
I
f
I
I
I
1
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I

20
Thru Sep
ECU STUDENTS
20 Senior
(Ad
I






tspot
aity when Piquant Alley g0es
ite, but until then, try th
ge Killian's Red Ale 0n
1!
� foi Lahn and Loftm
and 8, Mike
Wells on the 20th, The
:c:s and the Lem-
rtc 21 st and 22nd
and Sunfire, a
d, on September 28.
he official grand
Piquant Alley, but
revealing what he
Let's just say we're
ig in this club in the
Steinberg. Be on
Friday for the
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 1984
13
TIONS
ianagers
i For
ony Herald

� 84 9-7-84
Sorority Rush Draws Largest Response Ever
By TINA MAROSCHAK
t Man Mltor
If JT!?1111 to around
Mendenhall Student Center last
night you may have noticed a
caravan of smartly dressed
anxious-looking young women.
What were they doing? Par-
ticipating in the 23rd annual
Panhallenic Sorority Rush.
Associate Dean and Director of
Residence Life Carolyn A.
Fulghum said that this was the
biggest rush ever. "There are
some 360 or so rushees this year
Fulghum said.
So what is sorority rush? First
of all, formal rush is a recruiting
period for the seven ECU Greek
sororities. For one week, the girls
who signed up for rush last week
will visit all seven of the sorority
houses, get to know the members,
and hopefully pledge somewhere.
Last night the rushees visited
half of the seven houses. Tonight
they will visit the remaining ones.
On Wednesday night or "Open
House the rushees will tour the
houses, receive financial informa-
tion and seek answers to questions
they may have about pledging. On
Thursday night sororities will pre-
sent an original, thematic skit.
And finally, on Friday night,
rushees will visit just two houses
� one of which they will pledge at
f they so choose. The traditional
ceremony for new pledges will be
held on the mall Friday night.
Fulghum said that for various
personal reasons, usually about 40
percent of the rushees drop out
after Wednesday night, but it was
difficult to predict what would
happen this year. "From what
I've heard from Panhallenic Ad-
visor Laura Sweet, Rush Chair-
Greenville Choral Society Announces Rehearsals
Dr. Rhonda Fleming, musical
director of the Greenville Choral
Society, has announced that
rehearsals for the Society's 15th
season will begin at 7:30 p.m
September 11 at the Immanuel
Baptist Church.
Guest conductor for the
1984-85 season is Carolvn Greene
Ipock of the Performing Arts
Department at D.H. Conley High
School. A native of Virginia,
Ipock completed her
undergraduate and graduate
studies at the ECU School of
Music. She has performed with
the Robert Shaw Chorale and as
soloist with the Atlanta Sym-
phony Orchestra. She is frequent-
ly called upon as a guest choral
clinician in Virginia and North
Carolina.
The Society plans a series of
three concerts � a Christmas con-
cert on December 9, a winter con-
cert on February 24, and a spring
concert on April 25. The program
for the first concert will include
"Allelulia" by Randall Thomp-
son, seasonal motets by Jan P.
Sweelinck and Tomas Luis de Vic-
toria, and several international
Christmas carols. The winter con-
cert offering will be Franz
Schubert's "Mass in G Or-
chestral accompaniment will be
provided by the Greenville
Chamber Players under the direc-
tion of Mamie Dixon.
Singers interested in joining the
Greenville Choral Society are in-
vited to call Ms. Ipock at
355-2712.
man Lisa lager, and Panhallenic
President Cindy Fairbanks, this
seems to be a group that is really
interested in rush Fulghum
said.
Support The
Businesses That
Support The
East Carolinian
East Carolina Playhouse
'Anything Goes9 Auditions Begin Tomorrow
Singing and dancing auditions
for the East Carolina Playhouse
production of the famous Cole
Porter musical comedy, Anything
Goes, are scheduled for Wednes-
day and Thursday, September 5
and 6, in the Messick Theatre Arts
Center. The auditions will begin
at 7:30 p.m. in room 206.
Anything Goes, one of the fun-
niest and most tuneful comedies
of the 1930s, is a milestone in
theatrical history for several
reasons. First, it once-and-for-all
established Cole Porter as
America's number one writer of
songs of fashion and sophistica-
tion. Second, based on her
tremendous success in the role of
Reno Sweeney, it led to the
discovery of Ethel Merman. And
finally. Anything Goes introduced
two of the most popular songs of
the century � "You're the Top"
and "I Get a Kick Out of You
Two other tunes from the show
Best-Sellers
also enjoyed long favor on the Hit
Parade � "Blow Gabriel, Blow"
and "It's Delovely
There are 35 roles open for
casting, and according to Director
Edgar Loessin, "We have a varie-
ty or roles available for the show.
We certainly want to encourage
ECU students, ficulty and staff to
audition. Local .esidents 17 years
of age or older are also welcome
Auditioning singers should
prepare a song of their choice and
bring their music. An accom-
panist will be provided � no "a
capella" singing will be permitted.
Dancers should also sing and
bring rehearsal clothes and shoes
(including tap). They will be given
standard routines by
Choreographer Mavis Ray.
Anything Goes will be the first
production of the ECU Playhouse
season and will be performed in
McGinnis Theatre, October 24-27
and again on October 29.
For further information, call
757-6390.
Fiction
1. The Fourth Protocol � Frederick Forsyth
2. First Among Equals � Jeffrey Archer
3. Job: A Comedy of Justice � Robert Heinlein
4. Tough Guys Don't Dance � Norman Mailer
5. And Ladies of the Club" � Helen Hooven Santmver
6. Lincoln: A Novel � Gore Vidal
7. The Miko � Eric van Lustbader
8. The Aquilaine Progression � Robert Ludlum
9. Revenge of the Robins Family � Thomas Chastain
10. The Passion of Molly T. � Lawrence Sanders
Non-Fiction
1. Loving Each Other � Leo Buscaglia
2. Webster's II New Riverside University Dictionary
3. Eat To Win � Robert Haas
4. The Book (Living Bible)
5. Nothing Down � Robert Allen
6. 1985 Guide Book to U.S. Coins � R. S. Yeoman
7. Zig Ziglar's Secret of Closing a Sale � Zig Ziglar
8. Random House College Thesaurus
9. Webster's Ninth Red Collegiate Dictionary
10. Webster's New World Dictionary
Mass Paperbacks
1. On Wings of Eagles � Ken Follett
2. Savannah � Eugenia Price
3. The Auerbach Will � Stephen Birmingham
4. Wicked Day � Mary Stewart
5. Fatal Vision � Joe McGinniss
6. The Secret of the Sixth Magic � Lyndon Hardy
7. August � Judith Rossner
8. Day of Dissonance � Alan Dean Foster
9. The Bitch � Jackie Collins
10. Thurston House � Danielle Steel
Ranking based on computerized sales reports from more thai
800 Waldenbooks stores in all 50 states. (I PI)
Featuring Our
HAPPY HOUR
It's Always Happy Hour At
Sub Station II With
$1.50 pitchers Bud & Nat. Lite
Ample FREE Parking
752 - 2183
Comer of Reade A 4th Sts.
tv on
����-� Bes
. : oid to De.i ers
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Creenvill
AOVtRTiStD item POUCV
Ear o tries ianea 'tmj 15 r�
to o� � � IS JvJIIIDie �c- SJ't I"
eacn Kroger sa� on eicept � vpct�icji
'v notea in tnis �o if e ao run out 0'
m item we win ower you your cnoice o'
i comoarjoie item wnen jyjnaoie
reflecting tne vame savings or a rain
cnecu wnlcn win entitle you to puroase
�ne aovertneo item at tne advertised
once witnin sc days Only one vendor
coupon will De accepted per item
"1S ana Price.
ective Turn s,i
on Frames
& Lenses
Thru September 28th
ECU STUDENTS AND FACULTY ONLY
MUST PRESENT COUPON WITH ORDER FOR DISCOUNT)
20 Senior Citizen's Discount
(Ad must accompany order for discount)
Ca'i Us For An Eye Examination
With The Doctor Of Your Choice 1
GREENVILLE STORE ONLY
I
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PILLSBURY ORICINAL
. FLAVOR
Microwave
Popcorn
BRUT WHITE
CHAMPAGNE OR
Andre
Cold Duck
FREEZER PLEEZER
Assorted Pops
BUY ONE
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FREE!
Ltr.
Btl.
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Whole
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10.5
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99
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12 Ct.
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KROGER
HOT DOG OR
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99
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Deli-Boiled
Ham
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Location In:
KINSTON
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Open 9 A M 5 30 P M Mon.Fri.
Beecher Kirkley Dispensmp Optician
315 Parkview Commons
I
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99

ONE 14 OZ. BAG
Nacho Chips
when you purchase 1 Lb
or more
Nacho Cheese
Sauce
$299
Lb. fc
V
INCLUDES FREE 4 ROLLS
AND 1 LB. POTATO SALAD
Wishbone
Fried Chicken
5!
CHek
U.S. NO. 1
ALL PURPOSE
white
Potatoes
NORTH CAROLINA
NEW CROP GOLD OR
Red Delicious
Apples
10
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88
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99
LIMIT ONE BAG PLEArF
jfcyiM�M�� " ��������� � �.�� � ' ' ' tm
� �-
��mtmi

t





14
THE EAST CAROLOMAN SEPTEMBER4, 1984
George Jones A rises
� -�- JON JORDOV EC1 Photo L�b
Ceorge Jone s album "Burn The Honky-Tonk Down" contains ballads full of emotion and sombernt
less.
By DAVID WITHERINGTON
In the often mundane world of
country music, George Jones is a
unique figure. Here is a man who
can take the most trite, simple
lyrics and mold them into a work
of art. Jones sings with a soulful
intensity that none of his contem-
poraries can touch. This is one
reason I was thrilled to learn that
Rounder Records has just released
two compilations of selections
from George's years with the
Musicor label, 1965-71. There
were so many tracks recorded dur-
ing these seven years that only
about half of them were actually
released. One of the most appeal-
ing factors of this new project is
the fact that these tracks are
presented just as they were record-
ed, raw and exciting. If producer
Billy Sherrill had his way, these
songs would be obscured beyond
recognition by strings and backing
vocalists.
The first Rounder album, Burn
The Honky-Tonk Down, features
a variety of rockabilly raveups
and tearjerking ballads. Among
the highlights are "A Good Year
for the Roses" and "The
Selfishness of Man in which
George ponders the thought of a
little boy's hands growing up to be
those of a killer. Jones sings this
song with a somberness that chills
to the bone.
Of course, it can't all be good.
The rockabilly tunes are more like
novelties, in one ear and out the
other. They're not offensive, but
they just don't demand your at-
tention.
George Jones' strength clearly
lies in the ballads, and the second
LP, "Heartaches and
Hangovers is the perfect
reference source for loneliness
and despair.
"I Threw Away the Rose"
finds Jones drowning his sorrows
in the bottle as his love bids him
farewell: "I kept the wineBut I
threw away the rose
In the moving "Say It's Not
You George's voice cries with
desperation as he begs his girl to
confirm her loyalty: "Darling
there' talk around townAbout d
girl who spreads
aroundWith soft lips and eveJ
crystal blueDarling, say it's not
you
Titles like "The Blue Side
Lonesome" and "Lonely Streei
speak for themselves This
George Jones at his depre
best. Sometimes I think G
missed his calling as a
singer But. then again, the peda
steel backing makes his voice �
much more compelling. With th�
increasing number of country.
crossover artists, George Jones
one of the few singers left �
remembers his roots. A
vocalist, he is in a class of I
own. Both of the Rounder
releases. Burn The Honky-Tonk
Down and Heartaches And
Hangovers, are available thi
the Record Bar at Carolina Ea
Mall and the Plaza.
Carolina Opry House
Planning Innovations
Continued From Page 11.
periodically jump to the stage for
a short dance set. Anyone who is
:crested and experienced in 50's
swing-style dancing can contact
te ECU Drama Department bv
calling 56390.
The Opry House is scheduling
more 50's and 60's style bands.
Coming soon a blue-eyed soul
band called Downtown.
Downtown played on the ECU
campus earlier this year. The
group has been keeping people
waiting in line on Saturday nights
al the Wax Museum, one of
Washington, DCs most popular
night spots.
Ledford sees no problem with
blending oldies with country
music. "You can look back in
record history, in the 50's, when
Jerry Lee Lewis, Elvis Presley,
and Buddy Holly were playing.
Their music hit both charts
Consequently, the country fans
will be familiar with the music.
The Carolina Opry House is
simply continuing to set trends in
the "Down East" area instead of
following them. After all, they
were a country club almost a year
before Urban Cowboy. If the
crowd that saw Johnny Rivers is
any indication, young and old
alike will embrace the change.
PRESENTS
6th Annual
BEST LEGGS
CONTEST
Tue. Sept. 4, 1984 9:00pm til 2:00am
Adm.Sl.00 18yrs. $2.00 All cans $.80
PRIZES:
1st - $125.00 cash plus 1 year's free pass to the Elbo
2nd - $50.00 cash plus 1 year's free pass to the Elbo
3rd - $25.00 cash plus 1 year's free pass to the Elbo
Entries can call 758-4591 or come by
the club to sign up.
COME EARLY
IMfffflT
DESIGNS
ADDING LIFE . . .
TO CAMPUS LIVING.
i MYLAR BALLOONS
? POSTERS
? MUGS
WINDOW SHADES
CANDLES
UNUSUAL GIFTS
i CALENDARS
STATIONERY POUND
ICARDS
WICKER
WIND CHIMES
GAG GIFTS
FIFTH & READE STREETS
LX)WNTOWN GREENVILLE
ZZ
12-3
8-10
10-12
12-2
ROCK ROCK ROC I
ROCK ROCK ROCkW
Classical
X
Gospel
TassicaT
ROCKJI
WASH
PUB
JAZZ
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�VW'IPerm.
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ROCK
Attic Ladies
Lite Nite
Perm.
Wave
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INNER
RYTHMS
Vle k0CK R0CK R�C ROC
V JROCK ROCK ROCK ROC
Electric ROCK roc
Rainbow
Radio
Show
1
���1r�rrnr
Are your tired of hearing the same music? Your campus Radio Station, WZMB 91.3FM
stresses variety. With specialty shows, giveaways, and happy hours, WZMB provides an
interesting alternative. You even have the chance to be a DJ yourself on Radio Free
Greenville. Give us a call at 757-6656 and let us know what you would like to hear.
r

MWIIIIIIIIII,MBMIIMMWBWBMWBWWMWBB8
The picture ��as it all. Nothii
football team last saturda a m
ECU Bo
B SCOlTPOvUK-
The soccer se i
for the Pirates quite t
new head coacl 5
hoped as the EC1
49'ers of UN
score ol
thusiast ;
Even thoug
tie lopsided, :
timistic ar
for the rest I
some thing
that made him
"We had a few
today, esp
Hamilton, Larr E
Kime Brod said
freshmen and the
themselves we!
The team had
breaking tl
Charlotte defer
when the �
goal, as evidenc
the t i on �
goal in th

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ECU swimmer Chema Larra)
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rises
'oyalt �'Darltng
iround io�n About a
Treads iOVc
s ft lips and eyes
Darling. sav it's I10t
Th
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'I onely Street"
elves rhis is
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as a blue,
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eorge Jones s
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Rounder
Honky-Tonk
Heartaches Anj
liable through!
irolina Eas;
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Sports
SEPTEMBER 4, IV84
Fage 15
Florida State Rolls
Over Pirates 48-17
The picture says
football team last
it all Nothing nent right for the ECU Heisman Trophy candidate GAIliMdVhViorful
saturda as the Here defeated 48-17 by Florida State Seminoles. po�ertul
ECU Booters Fall Short, 5-2
By RANDY MEWS
Sports f-dltor
The ECU football team did not live up to
preseason expectations Saturday night as
Florida State rolled to an impressive 48-17
victory.
"I just want to give all the credit in the
world to Coach Bowden and his staff
Emory said in the post-game press con-
ference. "He had his players ready to play.
They had great execution and also did a great
job defensively
Emory's biggest concern going into the
game was the quarterback situation, and that
unfortunately proved to be the Pirates'
downfall. Three players had been battling for
the starting role throughout spring and fall
practice, and it was not announced until
moments before the game who would be the
starter.
Bartlett got the nod, and did a respectable
job as he drove the Pirates into Florida State
territory on ECU's first possession. The
result was a a 52-yard Jeff Heath field goal to
tie the score at three.
The Citrus, CA, Juinor College transfer
wasn't as successful on the Pirates second
drive. He was unable to move the team
downfield, and as a result, Emory opted to go
with red-shirt freshman Ron Jones on the
Bucs third sereis.
Jones took over immeidately following the
Seminoles only touchdown of the first
quarter, but he was intercepted by safety
Brian McCrary who returned the ball nine
yards to his own 49-yard line. From there, the
Seminoles marched 51 yards downfield to
make the score 17-3.
On the ensuing kickoff, Henry Williams,
who returned a punt and touchdown against
Florida State in last year's contest, delighted
the 54,211 partisan fans by running into one
of his own blockers and fumbling the ball.
Seminole Bruce Heggie recovered the loose
ball on the 14-yard line, and three plays later
FSU's quarterback Eric Thomas connected
with Hessan Jones in the endzone.
On ECU's next possession, Jones came in
and attempted the Pirates' second pass of the
game, but this one was picked off by corner-
back Eric Riley. It only took the Seminoles
five palys to march the remaining 68 yards
this time, as Thomas closed out the first half
scoring at 31-3 with his second passing
touchdown of the game.
"Three (turnovers) in row, � vou don't
play Florida State that way Emory said.
Although the Pirate quarterbacks couldn't
produce, Emory said the biggest problem ot
the night was controlling a Florida State of-
fense that produced over 500 yards worth I
total offense.
"What happened tonight was exactly what
was afraid of happening Emory aid
"We've got so many young guys up front
that they were outmatched
Only one out of five starters from the
defensive line returned from last year, and
the Pirates inexperience was evident a
Heisman Trophy and Ail-American can-
didate Greg Allen rushed the ball 17 times for
113 yards and one touchdown.
"We jus; couldn't stop them Em-
said. "Thomas did a great job of directing
their offense, and Allen was great everv time
he touched the ball
The Pirates played a much better second
half as they were only outscored 17-14. M
way through the thrid quarter Robbie Bartlett
broke away on a 59-yard run from scrimmage
that gave ECU a first down on the Seminole
20. The Pirates were unable to advance the
ball any further, so an apparent field goai at-
tempt, holder Jeff Bolch pulled up and con-
nected with Jeff Pattonin the endzone to nar-
row the margin to 31-10.
ECU then attempted their famo .
kick � the Bamm-Bamm pla � Hut an EC1
player touched the ball before it rolled the
quired 10 yards, thus giving : to the
Seminoles.
The Pirates' final scoring drive came in the
final four minutes of the fourth quarter, w i
Jimmy Walden capping off the drive with
five yard touchdown swet
Although ECU's performance �
Mdered a failure b many, Emory is still op-
timistic about what the future h
for his Pira
"In the second half we did a lot of things I
get ready for the season he said "We
going to be a good football team, in fac
we're going to be as good as we were a year
ago � it's just a matter of time
B st Ol I POWERS
The soccer season didn't open
for the Pirates quite the way that
new head coach Steve Brody had
hoped as the ECl fell to the
49'ers of UNC Charlotte bv the
f 5-2 before a very en-
thusiastic home crowd
Even though the scoi i lit-
tle lopsided, Brod) was still op-
timistic about the team's chances
for the rest of th, a and saw
some things from his team's play-
that made him optimistic.
"We had a few nice surprises
today, especially the plav ,) Rand
Hamilton, Larry Bennett and Jeff
Kime Brody said. "They are all
freshmen and they really showed
themselves well today
The team had some problems
breaking through the UNC
Charlotte defense, especiallv
when they were attacking the
goal, as evidenced by the fact that
the team only had one shot on
goal in the First half. On the other
hand, ECU goalie Greg Brandle
was victimized for two goals and
made eight saves in the first half.
Using an effective ball control
' tense and tenacious defense, the
49'ers took a 2-0 lead in the first
half on goals by Eddie Griesmer
and Robert Edwards, the latter
deflecting off of a Pirate
defender.
Tommy Kay increased the
I NCC lead to three with a goal
early in the second half before
Bennett put the Pirates on the
bonrd mid way through the half
with the help of freshman Matt
Markel's assist.
The 49'ers increased their lead
to 5-1 on goals by Robbie
Hofsteter and John Griffith late
in the half with ECU's scoring
closed by Matt Hermes with a
goal in the closing minutes.
"Our second goal was scored
because of pressure that we were
putting on themBrody said.
Even in defeat, Brody refused
to be down on his team. "This is a
minor setback as far as I'm con-
cerned Brody said. "I have no
complaints about the way we
played today. Everybody worked
really hard and put a good effort
into the game
He did see some facets of the
game that the team needed im-
provement, however. "We moved
the ball real well up to 25 yards,
but we couldn't get it in any
closer, and we need to work on
our defense. I think a lot more
coaching needs to be done on my
part
Senior forward David Pere
didn't seem to be to concerned by
the team's showing. "I think that
we were under a lot of pressure,
and that hurt our performance.
I'm sure that we will work
ourselves out of that pressure as
the season goes on he said.
The team will be back in action
Friday, September 7, when they
will host George Mason, a team
that is one of the best in the coun-
try.
The ECU' soccer team lost their first game of the season to UNC Charlotte, but head soccer coach Ste.e
Brody wasn't disappointed with his team's performance.
Economy Keeps Larranaga In Stands
ECU swimmer Chema Larranaga went to the Olympics, but was
unable to compete becuase of insufficient funds
By PETER E. FERN ALD &
DEE PERRY
Staff Wrttcn
The Peru Olympic team that
competed in the 1984 Olympic
Games in Los Angeles this sum-
mer was significantly reduced in
size not for "political reasons, but
for economic ones said Chema
Larranaga, an ECU swimmer who
made the trip as a member of the
Peruvian team.
"Peru didn't have sufficient
funds to compete in all of its
events Larranaga said. "I
qualified for the Peru Olympic
swim team back in the second
week of May at the South
American Championships, but
the government had to cut the
team size down because it lacked
the necessary funds.
"Originally, eight guys
qualified for the swim team, but
then the team was cut to three
swimmers said Larranaga, who
was one of the eight original
qualifiers that didn't make the
final cut.
The original Peru Olympic
teams consisted of swimming,
volleyball, track and field,
shooting, cycling and boxing. But
only athletes in two events �
shooting and swimming � com-
peted in the summer games.
Some of the Peruvian athletes
not competing went as observers
with all-expense paid trips as a
result of private donations. "In
July, after realizing that the
athletes would like to attend even
if they couldn't participate,
private industry donated money
to send members of the National
team to observe Larranaga
said.
Larranaga was a participant, ana
the 1984 Los Angeles Olympics,
Larranaga said the Moscow
games were more international. In
the opening ceremonies they had
dancers representing every coun-
try participating, featuring
original music from each
country
According to Larranaga, in
L.A the Olympics were done
"Peru didn't have sufficient funds to compete in
all of its (Olympic) events. 1 qualified for the team
in the second week of May, but the government
had to cut the team size down. "
�Chema Larranaga
At the Olympics, Larranaga
said he had a great time. "I really
enjoyed it and did a lot of sight
seeing. We toured Los Angeles
and saw the opening ceremonies. I
watched volleyball, swimming
and one of our guys get a second
in shooting. It was an interesting
experience
Citing differences between the
1980 Moscow Olympics, in which
"the American way" with people
and ideas representing the fiftv
states.
"The security was the same
Larranaga said in reference to the
tight measures the Soviets and
Americans took to protect the
athletes at both games.
Remembering one bad thing at
the Moscow games, Larranaga
commented: "At the closing
ceremonies Breshnev said
'although America boycotted us
in '80. we will still participate in
'84 but they boycotted the '84
games anyway
Larranaga has also participated
at the 1982 World Games in addi-
tion to the South American games
of '84, and the "80 and '84 Olym-
pics.
In 1981. he enrolled at Daytona
Beach Community College where
he became the 1982 National
Junior College Athletic Associa-
tion champion in the 500 and
1650-yard freestyle events.
In 1983. Larranaga came to to
ECU as a junior in computer
science. He has broken many of
his records and set some Peruvian
records in world competition.
Larranaga will start practice
with the ECU men's swim team
today and practice twice daily in
preparation for their upcoming
season.
"We have a hard schedule this
year � probably even harder than
last year's heaid. "In March,
we have a big meet against
Cleveland State in Cleveland
Ohio.
"It'll be a pretty tough
season Larranaga continued.
"We've got some new guys and
our goal is to do well at the na-
tionals. My goal is to better my
times







16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 4, 1984
ECU Foes Have Varied Success In Openers
By BILL MITCHELL
Staff Wriltf
This is a quick look at how
ECU'S opponents for the 1984
season fared in their games last
Saturday:
Temple University: The Owls,
who the Pirates open at home
with next week, were idle.
Central Michigan University:
CMU easily disposed of upstate
rival Northern Michigan by the
score of 45-22. Running back
Curtis Adams ran for two
touchdowns and quarterback Ron
Fillmore fired three scoring strikes
to wide receiver John DeBoer to
lead the Chippewas to a 38-6
halftime lead.
Georgia Southern University: The
Golden Eagles pulled of a major
upset in defeating Florida A"M in
a home game 14-0. They were led
by standout quarterback Tracy
Ham, who put together what may
have been the best game of his
career.
N.C. Stale University: Intrastate
rival N.C. State was idle with their
opening game next Saturday when
they host Ohio University.
Pittsburgh: The Panthers fell to
the Cougars of Brigham Young by
the score of 20-14 with their
young defense doing an excellent
job of holding the explosive BYU
offense in check for most of the
game. Their offense rolled for 344
yards of total offense but could
Pirate Radio Network Expands In '84
East Carolina University foot-
ball games will be heard in more
areas over more radio stations
than at any time in history during
the 1984 football season.
Of special interest is the fact
that the Pirates Sports Network
will air for the first time ever in all
of Tidewater Virginia (WNSY-
AM, 1310) in Charlotte (WGIV-
M, 1600) and in the
GreensboroHigh
Point Winston-Salem area
(WGOS-AM, 1070).
Some 29 stations had indicated
plans to air all or part of the 1984
football season by mid-August.
Others may well be added later.
"We are just elated with our
coverage for 1984 says Ken
Smith, coordinator of the Pirate
Sports Network. "Our objective
was to totally cover Eastern North
Carolina, which we have; and to
expand as best possible into all of
Tidewater, Charlotte and the
Triad areas. We have succeeded in
doing that at least in part.
"Never before has the Pirate
Sports Network come close to
Season Ticket Sales
At A Record Pace
Season ticket sales for East
Carolina University football
games in Ficklen Stadium are
-loving at a record pace to date.
Already, tickets sales have sur-
passed the total season ticket sales
of 1983, a year in which new at-
tendance marks were set in
: lcklen Stadium.
"Activity has been brisk for
season tickets said ticket
manager Brenda Edwards. "We
are well past last year's season
ticket sales and appear headed for
a very good year
With the increased season ticket
ale business, Pirate Club
members who have not yet pur-
chased tickets are urged to do so
as soon as possible. Best seats are
now being filled on a first come-
:irst served basis.
With the finest home schedule
in school history slated for 1985,
reason ticket purchases this year
are even more important. Those
with tickets already assigned will
be in line for the best seats in
1985. So the sooner you purchase
� his year, not only the better seats
you will have for 1984, but also
the better you will have 1985 when
the likes of Miami, South
Carolina and Tulsa visit Ficklen
Stadium.
Road game tickets have also
been selling very quickly, thus
those planning to follow the
Pirates on the road this season
should order road game tickets
immediately!
Obviously, in record numbers,
Eastern North Carolinians are
"Flipping Over the Pirates At-
tack" for 1984. Have you flipped
as vet?
having as many stations as we
have for 1984, nor has there been
anything close to the potential au-
dience of 1984
The Network will again
originate for football and basket-
ball via the facilities of WITN-
FM, 93.3, Washington. A new
three-year agreement has been
solidified with WITN-FM and
ECU athletics for this feed ar-
rangement.
WITN-FM operates with max-
imum FM power, 100,000 watt
FMs, WVBS-FM in Wilmington
and WKTC-FM in Tarboro.
"Basically, one should be able
to get a very good signal for most
Pirate football games from
Williamsburg, VA, to the north,
to Myrtle Beach, SC to the
south added Smith. "All areas
from the Outer Banks inland
through RaleighDurham are
covered. Then, dependent upon
location, most of the Triad will
have all day games, while
Charlotte will have all games ex-
cept Florida State, which could
not be aired due to a previous sta-
tion commitment
Heavy alumni involvement in
Wilmington, Tidewater, the Triad
and Charlotte have made possible
the big expansions this year.
"We greatly appreciate the
outstanding help of several key
Pirate Club members and alumni
members in these new out-lying
areas says Smith. "Without
their help in securing advertising,
the Network would not have ex-
panded. Unfortunately, as in
many areas, the bottom line in
securing radio stations most often
is dollars. But our faithful have
again shown just what East
Carolina is willing to do to push
the fine Pirate product
Pirate football games will air
each week 20 minutes prior to
kickoff. Dave Hart will return to
handle color work, while Ken
Smith enters his initial year as
play-by-play voice for football.
only manage one touchdown,
their other score coming on a 78
yard interception return.
University of Tulsa: The Golden
Hurricanes got off to a good start
in their quest for a fifth straight
Missouri Valley Conference title
by defeating last year's NCAA
Division 1-AA titlest Southern Il-
linois 23-10. Quarterback Steve
Gage led the offense with a 12 for
25 passing performance as Tulsa
rolled for 423 yards of total of-
fense.
East Tennessee State: Homecom-
ing opponent ETSU opens their
season next week on the road at
Tennessee Tech.
University of South Carolina: 1 he
Gamecocks were also idle, hosting
The Citadel in their opener next
week.
University of Southwest Loui-
siana: The Ragin Cajuns fell to
the Catamounts of Tennessee
Chattanooga by the score of 9-7 in
a defensive struggle. The game
was decided on a questionable
safety call in the second half.
University of Southern Mississip
pi: USM also had an open date,
opening vMth the Georgia
Bulldogs next Saturday
SOCCER COACHES
Youth Soccer Coaches work part time. 10 20 hours
weekly, beginning Monday September 10th Hou.s are
normally 3:30 7:30pm Monday thru Friday with occa
sional Saturdays Salary rate $3 45hr Knowledge of soc
cer skills and the ability to coach young people, ages 9 15
needed. Contact: Greenville Recreation and Parks Dept
at 752-4137 (ext d 248, 220. 259) Deadline for appl.co
tions is Friday August 31st
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I

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Your Official ECU Class Ring
$20 Deposit Required
Date: ���.�. Time: 9:00 -
Place: StndwitSuPPyStor.WrithtBBading
m
Curry,
ATLANTA (UPI) The
Georgia Tech Yellow Jackets are
tired of losing
"Enough is enough said
junior linebacker Pat Swilling
"We don't want to be 'close'
anymore. We didn't come here
for that. You win or lose That's
the way it is. We're tired of com-
ing up in the loss column
Georgia Tech was once a foot-
ball power. But the Yellow
Jackets have had only seven winn-
ing seasons in the past 18 and been
to only one bowl game in the past
11 years.
Bill Curry, a center back in the
years when Tech, under Bobby
Dodd, was a constant winner,
returned to his alma mater in 1980
with high hopes, but has put
together an 11-32-1 record in four
years.
"I had no idea when I took this
job how far Georgia Tech had
fallen said Curry. "But, believe
me, we are making progress
When we got here in 1980.
Georgia Tech was dead last in
everything. We had nothing.
"This past year, we averaged
fourth in the overall sports stan-
dings in the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference. We came from terrible to
mediocre. We were third in foot-
ball in the ACC last season, but
outside the conference we were
still terrible
Since Clemson, probably
strongest ACC team for this fail,
is on probation and that game
won't count in the conference
standings, and since Tech does:
play Maryland, another ACC
power, Curry honestly feds
Yellow Jackets have a shot at �
ning the ACC title.
"But, to do this, our offense
has to be productive early said
Curry. "I don't know if our
defense will improve early. We'll
find out when we line up against
Alabama (which Tech hosts in its
opening game on Sept. 15).
"The good news is that we're
bigger and stronger at Georgia
Tech than we have ever beer
said Curry. "The bad news is so is
everybody else
"We got off to a horrible star:
(0-4) last year, but came along
pretty good at the end (when the
Jackets, who wound up 3-8, won
two of their last three games and
lost by only three points to 4th
ranked Georgia in the other)
said Tech junior quarterback
John Dewberry.
"The big difference is that last
year we had too many changes
from the previous year (when
Tech was 6-5i. We didn't have
those turnovers this year and
that's giving us more
confidence
Georgia Tech opened its 1981
campaign with an upset victory
over Alabama, then lost even-
other game that season.
"Starting with Alabama, you
find out where you are, quid
said Swilling. "But, win or lose. I
don't think you'll see a repeat
'81. We have more players, mere
talent, than they had when the
beat Alabama and then lost IC
a row. We think we know hou �
play Alabama and then p
another week
"1 think we're getting better
players than when I first came to
Georgia Tech said sen
tailback Robert Lavett, one of the
most prolific offensive performers
in Yellow Jackets' history "Higt
schools are upgrading the
academics and that's enabling
to get blue chippers we couldn
get before.
Lavette. who has rushed
for
2,877 yards, caught 91 passes, and
scored 32 touchdowns, almost
oropped out of Georgia Tech dur-
ing that '81 losing steak.
"I came from a winning high
school program and couldn't
understand it he said. "It was a
very depressing time. I though.
about going to another school,
but Curry, the great salesman,
talked me out of it. I stuck it out.
but it was hard to take "
Lavette feels Georgia Tech �
Car To Be
Given Away
For Sellout
Despite the Pirates disappoin-
ting performance against Florida
State over the weekend, ECU
athletic administrators are still
hoping to sell out Ficklen Stadium
this Saturday against Temple.
If such is the case, a 1984 fully
equiped Oldsmobile Firenza SK
Coupe will be given away at
halftime. The automobile was
donated to ECU compliments of
Holt Oldsmobile of Greenville,
and all ticket holders are eligible
to win.
A complete story on the give-
away will appear in Thursday's
edition of The East Carolinian.
?
?
r
v
i'





IHEEASTCAROI .INIAN
?s
V
! o v �
�' thai

1
I
NN
(j,
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C�rrv, F(eoH' Jackets Aim For ACC Title
17
Ml NTA (UPI)
rgia Tech Yellow Jackets are
tired of losing.
"Enough is enough said
unioi linebacker Pat Swilling
Ue don wan to be 'close1
nore. We didn't come here
You win or lose. That's
a it is. We're tired of corn
v up in the loss column
orgia Tech was once a foot-
Power. But the Yellow
ts have had only seven winn-
asons m the past 18 and been
) one bowl game in the past
I Curry, a center back in the
when Tech, under Bobby
was a constant winner,
�ed to his alma mater in 1980
"� hopes, but has put
�ei an 11-32-1 record in four
had no idea when I took this
fai Georgia Tech had
Naid Curr. "But, believe
are making progress.
we got here in 1980,
Tech was dead last in
ng We had nothing.
This pas? year, we averaged
in the overall sports stan-
in the Atlantic Coast Con-
wee. We came from terrible to
c We were third in foot
the ACC last season, but
the conference we were
terrible
Clemson, probably the
�CC team for this fall,
ttion and that game
unt in the conference
and since Tech doesn't
Maryland, another ACC
Curry honestly feels the
ow Jackets have a shot at win-
'ie ACC title.
to do this, our offense
be productive early said
"I don't know if our
nse will improve early. We'll
out when we line up against
ima (which Tech hosts in its
g game on Sept. 15).
I news is that we're
d stronger at Georgia
than we have ever been
The bad news is so is
- b d � else
"We got off to a horrible start
4) last vear, but came along
- d ai the end (when the
�a � Aound up 3-8, won
� their last three games and
only three points to 4th
in the other)
junior quarterback
e a errv.
:rence is that last
i many changes
"mous year (when
We didn't have
overs this year and
ng us more
Tech opened its 1981
with an upset victory
ibama, then lost every
-me that season.
ng with Alabama, you
where you are, quick
ling. "But, win or lose, I
? you'll see a repeat of
We have more players, more
an they had when they
Alabama and then lost 10 in
We think we know how to
Alabama and then play
week
think we're getting better
nan when I first came to
rgia Tech said senior
h Robert Lavett, one of the
lific offensive performers
low Jackets' history. "High
are upgrading their
and that's enabling us
blue chippers we couldn't
�� "
who has rushed for
ards, caught 91 passes, and
32 touchdowns, almost
ed out of Georgia Tech dur-
that '81 losing steak.
came from a winning high
ol program and couldn't
ierstand it he said. "It was a
depressing time. I thought
going to another school,
( urry, the great salesman,
me out of it. I stuck it out,
was hard to take
avette feels Georgia Tech �
Car To Be
Given Away
For Sellout
Respite the Pirates disappoin-
v performance against Florida
ae over the weekend, ECU
thletic administrators are still
g to sell out Ficklen Stadium
Saturday against Temple.
such is the case, a 1984 fully
!ped Oldsmobile Firenza SK
upe will be given away at
alftime. The automobile was
donated to ECU compliments of
Holt Oldsmobile of Greenville,
and all ticket holders are eligible
win.
A complete story on the give-
away will appear in Thursday's
edition of The East Carolinian.
which includes Alabama.
Auburn, Tennessee and Georgia
in the non-conference portion ol
its schedule � needs to be more
realistic about who it plavs.
"I don't understand the gu
who made our schedule he said
"It seems like teams that are rank
he easiei
ed ever) yeai have
schedules
"It's tough starting out with
Alabama said senior linebacker
Dante Jones. "Playing them
anytime would be tough enough
But that will be oui first game and
they will already have a game
� Hege) under their
(Boston
belt
There's been a turnaround in
attitude at Georgia Tech said
Swilling. �'We believe we're going
win the ACC. That's the bot-
'�"i hue. That's what we're here
for. Coach Curry made that
prediction and it's up to us to pre
ve he was right.
"Last year, we had better talent
than the year before but not a
good an attitude said Swilling
"We didn't have the leadership
�e needed last year, everyone
was looking around for someone
tep forward, but no on :
"No i ne cami
charge when il . igh in
third and fourth quarte
that wav last year We
people who a .
leadership this time and .
to make a differen
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18
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 4, 1984
No. 4 Hurricanes Rally To Beat Gators 32-20
TAMPA, Fla. (UPI) � No hur-
ricane could ever manufacture a
wave as big as the one the Univer-
sity of Miami football team is
riding.
The Miami Hurricanes have
been riding atop that wave since
January, when they drenched then
� No. 1 Nebraska in the Orange
Bowl and won the national cham-
pionship.
Last Monday, the Hurricanes
swamped No. 1 Auburn and then
Saturday night, in a miraculous
last-minute come-back, Miami
blew away their fiercest rivals, the
Florida Gators.
"Don't ever count them 'Canes
out shouted Miami offensive
tackle David Hefferman as he ex-
alted his teammates on the way to
the locker room after Saturday's
32-20 victory over the Gators in
Tampa Stadium.
No one could dispute his claim.
The Hurricanes now stand 2-0
for this young season and appear
destined to move even higher than
their current No. 4 spot in the
polls. They also have a 13-game
winning streak, longest in the na-
tion.
However, it appeared for a time
that the Gators � the last team to
beat Miami � would do it again.
Freshman quarterback Kerwin
Bell connected with Frankie Neal
for a 5-yeard touchdown pass and
Bobby Raymond added the extra-
point to give Florida a 20-19 lead
with 41 seconds to play.
But strong-armed sophomore
quarterback Bernie Kosar, the
biggest throwing hero in Miami
since Bob Griese, carried the Hur-
ricanes to the Gator 12 in only
four plays. He then lofted a
perfect pass in the deep left corner
of the end zone that Eddie Brown
grabbed with his fingertips for the
winning score with 7 seconds left.
A 59-yard touchdown intercep-
tion return by Tolbert Bain on the
last play of the game gave Miami
its final Margin.
"Words can't describe the feel-
ing said Kosar, who completed
25 of 33 passes for 300 yards.
"We never lost our confidence.
This is a class operation
"We knew what we had to do
said sophomore tight end Willie
Smith, who grabbed 11 passes for
152 yards. "And we got it done
Some wondered why Miami
Coach Jimmy Johnson went for
the touchdown pass from Kosar
to Brown when the Hurricanes
were positioned neatly at the 12
and kicker Greg Cox already had
tied a school record with four
field goals. .
"There was no doubt in my
mind said Johnson. "I saw it in
Bernie's eyes
After Johnson gave Kosar the
go-ahead for the touchdown try,
the quarterback turned to his
coach and said, "Thank you
"He's just a great player
Sport Clubs Swing
Into Fall Action
By JEANENETTE ROTH
suff v -it�
The Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services has so many
exciting programs to offer ECU
participants, that some people are
never able to get involved in all of
them. One such program may be
the Sport Club program. There
are many Sport Clubs including:
N. C. State Gridder Moorman
Arrested For Rape, Burglary
RALEIGH. N.C. (UPI) � Per-
cy Moorman, a freshman quarter-
back for the North Carolina State
niversity football team, was ar-
rested early Monday on rape and
burglary charges, authorities said.
Moorman, 18, of Danville, Va
was being held in the Wake Coun-
ty jail on charges of second-degree
rape and first-degree burglary, a
magistrate said. Bond was set at
S10.000.
Details of the incident were not
immediately available, but the
magistrate said Moorman was ar-
rested on a complaint issued by
the N.C. State campus police of-
' C�
Arrest warrants charged Moor-
man with entering a room in
Sullivan Dormitory and raping a
female resident between midnight
and 2 a.m. Saturday.
A campus police spokesman
declined to discuss the matter and
referred calls to the school's news
bureau, which was closed Monday
because of the Labor Day holi-
dav.
Riley Wins
Welsh Golf
Scholarship
East Carolina golf signee Chris
Riley, a freshman out of Virginia
Beach, Va, has been awarded the
first annual Dick Welsh Golf
Scholarship. The $1,000 scholar-
ship was given by the Lake Wright
Golf Club Men's Association
located in Norfolk, Va.
In making the announcement,
the Association recognized Riley,
"not only for his fine personal
achievements in the sport, but the
contributions he has made
In other golf news, seven of the
ten members of last years squad
maintained at or above the 3.0
grade point average. Paul
Steelman led the Pirates with a
perfect 4.0 mark. Dennis Hart
had a 3.6; Mark Arcilesi pulled
down a 3.4; Roger Newsom main-
tained a 3.2; while Bill Dubose,
Mike Bradley, and Michael Helms
all had 3.0 averages.
North Carolina State football
coach Tom Reed declined to
discuss the matter in a statement
released through the school's
sports information office.
"I will not pre-empt the judicial
system because all of the facts are
not available and will not be for
some time Reed said.
"At the present time, Percy
Moorman will not be actively
practicing or participating in foot-
ball. However, he has not been
suspended from the squad Reed
said.
Moorman, a highly sought
recruit, had been sidelined in re-
cent weeks by a dislocated
shoulder suffered in practice.
He was named to a number of
All-America teams while at
George Washington High School
in Danville, where he led his team
to the state semifinals as a senior
last year. Moorman passed for
1,277 yards and 13 touchdowns
and ran for 955 yards and 10
touchdowns.
Archery, Frisbee Disc, Karate,
Lacrosse, Racquetball, Rugby-
Men, Badminton, Chess, Cycling,
Fencing, Field Hockey, Gym-
nastics, Rugby-Women, Soccer-
Women, Surfing, Team
Handball-Men, Team Handball-
Women, Outing, Snow Ski,
Water Polo, Water Ski, Wind
Surfing, and Wrestling.
There is bound to be at least
one club that interests you. No ex-
perience is necessary � just the
desire to have fun, travel, get in-
volved and meet new people from
other Sport Clubs across the na-
tion. These clubs are open to
anyone interested Hundreds of
students participate each year.
For more information regarding
the ECU Intramural Sport Club
program come by Room 105
Memorial Gym and talk to
Vanessa Higdon. Check the an-
nouncement section of the East
Carolinian for upcoming Sport
Club meetings. Get involved
through INTRAMURAL SPORT
CLUBS
marveled Johnson.
Said Kosar, "It was exciting,
just like I felt on the 2-point play-
in the Nebraska game That
2-point play gave Miami its 31-30
victory.
Even the Gators, 0-1, were not
too downhearted about the loss.
After last week, the fact they led
Miami in the last minute was con-
solation enough.
Last Monday, Coach Charley
Pell admitted he violated NCAA
rules and announced he would
resign at the end of the season.
The next day, starting quarter-
back Dale Dorminey suffered a
knee injury and was lost for the
season.
"I was so proud of this team,
said Pell. "To come from behind
as they did and go ahead of a
great Miami team Gosh, that
was something
Somewhat lost amid all the
heroics and comebacks was the
fact that Florida spoiled Miami'
bid for a perfect season last year
with a 28-3 whipping in
Gainesville.
"We felt like we owed them
said senior wide receiver Stanley
Shakespeare, an unabashed Gator
Hater. "It meant a lot to beat
them
Miami plays at Michigan next
Saturday, while Florida entertains
Louisiana State.
it
Come Play The Indian
This Fall"
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC
� maxell
sssi
t
MAXELL OR PD MAGNETICS
3 Tapes for $9.99
Free T Shirt or
Koozie Cooler with coupon

1984
1 ?JLJ-1LLL' X�utrl&r
p $�$��?
I
I
I
I
I
V
I
I
v sd
Todd's stereo
WZMB-FM
Is Presently Taking Applications For:
Classical Director
News Director
Production Manager
Sports Director
Apply Monday-Friday 12:00-2:00
2nd FloorOld Joyner Library
All New Exercise
Facility in Downtown
Greenville
All Olympic weights and
machines, nutritional
programs and
supervised workout
programs available.
GYM
STARTS AUGUST 15
Gym Hours: Monday-Friday - 10:00am-8:00pm
Saturday 2:00pm-6:00pm
Sunday 2:00-6:00pm
� Monthly Memberships - $25.00month
�Special Semester rates August 15-December31
(4 months) $70.00
�Air Conditioning ALL THE TIME
Located in the Downtown Mall
Next to The Aerobic Workshop
FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION CALL 758-4359
PROUDLY PRESENTS
The Motown Sound
The Souths Hottest Hooky Tonkers
� �
Don't miss our
FREE ALL NIGHT
Keg & Toga Party
Thursday Night!
Super Grit Cowboy Band
Wednesday, Sept. 5th
Downtown
Thur A Fri, Sept. 6th & 7th
"They pump late '60s Detroit A Phllly
classics like s high-octane Poatiac cruiser
Nickel Draft & Happy Hour
til 10:30!
The COH is a private club for members & guests � All ABC Permits
For more information call 758-5570
DINNER SPECIALS
5pm - 10pm
$3.95
Tuesday - Beef Tips wGravy, Spaghetti or Turkey and Dressing
Wednesday - BBQ Beef Ribs, Williamsburg Chicken or Pork Chops wGravy
Thursday - Meatloaf, Pork Tenderloin wGravy or BBQ Chicken
Friday - Fair field Flounder Filet, Pork Chops wMushroom Sauce or Ribeye
Saturday - BBQ Beef Ribs, Williamsburg Chicken, Spaghetti
Sunday - Turkey and Dressing, Beef Tips wGravy, BBQ Pork Chops
Monday - Meatloaf, Ribeye, BBQ Chicken
Specials include:
Homemade Rolls, Two" vegetables, choice of
beverage and your first drink fi m our tavern for.50
2041.9th St. 7M-1427
dpan Mon-Sot 10-�
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Happy Hour Every Night .
4pm-7pm Daily Selection
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ALL ABC PERMITS
Of
Gant E
DARLINGTON, SC il Pi,
Harn Gant refused to stroke
Chevrolet during Sunda
Southern 500, but at the sa
lime he didn't take an
mecearv chances in earning
first win in the annual Labor D
class u
� abused the car more than 1
jbould have Gant said "1 turn
ed the engine plumb out of the
frame. 1 as more corned about
jOtnething on the car b-
litii going into the wall. I let
gOine in the third turn on the
lap
�3ant. who start r:
for the 35th ann . at the 1
3B-mile track, dominated
evtnt for his second wir.
jeaon and his second ai 'heolde
Tperspeedw,a m NAS( -R
rand National circuit.
His win, before ai
owd of 70,000, made
le fourth driver t
but hern 500 from the
kydiver:
WHEAT RICH I
- Three skd c:
i jumping exhib � �
ver the wet
hroud lines became
ending the darede-
the ground.
Two of the si
still attached to I
parachutes that �r
jnfurled V ti
jumper broke I
and did a
ground
e hea
p 1 air
Tvsv
lead at the
.1 .
vpital v
- the 12:32
ient, Police 1: G
The dead ere
n Brown, v
mpion in 191
�ss Smith �
ficials saio
skydivers, n :
Freedom Para
completed n
amps.
�.uav.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
SEPTEMBER 4, 1984
19
v 32-20 ffjant Edges Out Richmond In Southern 500
J) vJlU dllU JiV
earn
team,
behind
ahead of a
Gosh, that
?si amid all the
mebacks was the
a spoiled Miami's
� season last yeai
na in
ved them
a de receiver Stanley
. an unabashed Gator
cant a lot to beat
M , h ga i . k
ains
Indian
If"
elcome
$5.00
$7.00
ountry Club
, NC
iw Exercise
Downtown
snville
veights and
nutritional
is and
id workout
available.
ecember31
758-4359
Dressing
Pork Chops wGravy
v Chicken
loom Sauce or Ribeye
thetti
Pork Chops
of
tor.50
iy Selection
?memade Desserts
of
JAKUNGTON, S.C. (UPI)
fcrr Cant refused to stroke his
�he;roIet diinng Sunday's
m T Hbut at the same
lie he didn't take any un-
cessary chances in earning his
rsl win in the annual Labor Day
lassie.
�I abused the car more than I
lould have, Gant said. "I turn
the engine plumb out of the
fame. 1 was more worried about
hnething on the car breaking
ban going into the wall. I let off
me in ih. third turn on the last
Gant, who started on the pole
� the 35th annual race at the 1
8 nnle track, dominated the
Kent tor his second win this
Reason and his second at the oldest
iperspeedway on NASCAR's
National circuit.
His win, before an estimated
j owd of 70,000, made him only
fourth driver to win the
j thern 500 from the pole posi-
tion.
m "I raced the track Gant said.
"I never considered I was over-
driving it
"You keep thinking, the
Southern 500, the Southern 500
said Gant. "That's all 1 wanted
Gam's success Sunday boosted
nim from fifth to second in the
battle for the national driving
championship. Terry Labonte
now holds an 82-point lead.
"We were just fortunate today
that we were in the right place at
the right time and didn't get in-
volved in any accidents Gant
said in victory lane. "The Lord
just looked after us and brought
us through here today
Gant, driving a Chevrolet,
finished 1.65 seconds ahead of
Tim Richmond in a Pontiac. Bud-
dy Baker finished third in a Ford
followed by Rusty Wallace in a
Pontiac, two laps off the pace
and Ricky Rudd in a Ford, three
laps behind Gant.
"1 couldn't drive it any harder
than I did Richmond said. "We
were a little down on power an
then the header on the left side got
some holes in a couple of the
header pipes
A blown engine on Cale Yar-
borough's Chevrolet with 40 laps
remaining eliminated most of
Gant's competition. The crippled
engine dumped oil in the fourth
turn and sent Bill Elliott's Ford,
and the Chevrolets of Lake Speed
and Joe Ruttman into the wall.
At the time, Elliott was second,
Speed was third, and Ruttman
was fourth.
"It's hard to talk or think right
now because I'm really
frustrated Elliott said. "We had
that mileage problem and lost the
race at Michigan despite the fact
Skydivers Bite Dust
WHEAT RIDGE, Colo. (UPI)
I hree skydivers performing at
iping exhibition were killed
the weekend when their
d lines became entangled,
ding the daredevils plunging to
ound.
o of the skydivers fell while
attached to the rigging of
ichutes that were only partial-
infurled. Witnesses said one
per broke free of the tangle
id a spreadeagle free-fall to
ound in front of 200 spec-
at the Wheat Ridge Friend-
t air.
vo skydivers were pronounc-
ead at the scene and the other
.hutist was taken to a nearby
ii where died about an hour
the 12:32 p.m. MDT acci-
Police Lt. Gary Mars said.
dead were identified as
l Brown, U.S. Parachute
son in 1973 and 1974, and
. s Smith and Bob Vance. Of-
said that together, the
livers, members of the High
dom Parachute Club, had
.pleted more than 3,800
.ins
"Apparently in some fashion
the shroud lines became entangl-
ed Maas said. "They lost con-
trol and one individual broke free
and did a free-fall to the ground
That skydiver apparently tried
to open an emergency parachute
but lacked sufficient altitude,
witnesses said. Before the accident
two members successfully ex-
ecuted a two-man stack.
There were carnival style
booths with exhibits and
refreshments near a stadium that
contained the jumpers' landing
target. The skydivers fell in the ex-
hibit area. About 150 people were
gathered in the stadium and there
were about 50 more people in the
festival area, officials said.
"It was incredible, stark
realism said one witness.
"They settled on top of one
another as they were coming
down and something got fouled
up on one side and they started to
spin. They lost control. The one
on the bottom fell free and went
down, and the other two stayed
with the chutes, but the chutes
weren't catching much wind
we had the best car there. Then we
wrecked at Bristol (Tenn.) on so-
meone else's oil and had the same
thing happen here today
Gant, 44, earned $48,430. He
led seven times for 276 laps of the
367-lap race, including the final
37. There were 17 lead changes
among eight drivers.
Gant averaged 128.270 mph in
a race slowed by caution flags for
58 laps.
A high attrition rate during the
race's first half eliminated several
top contenders.
David Pearson and Darrell
Waltrip left the event just shy of
the 30-lap mark with engine pro-
blems in their Chevrolets. Other
drivers whose cars experienced
engine problems were Richard
Petty, Dale Earnhardt, and Neil
SOFT
CONTACTS
$7)00
Price inr ludes
lenses & care kit
fyjWTfTTil
Bonnett.
An incident involving Kyle Pet-
ty and Buddy Baker sent Petty in-
to the wall between turns one and
two. Baker tapped the back of
Petty's Ford with his Ford in turn
one and Petty's car went high and
crashed into the wall.
Petty is expected to replace
Baker next year in the Wood
Brothers car.
"I don't know what Baker's
problem is said an irate Petty
after reaching the garage area.
"The son of a gun just came up
behind me, he's lapping me, I'm
trying to get out of his way. He
dives down and knocks the heck
out of the rear of my car an
knocked it up into the corner.
"It's the second car I've torn up
down here this week. I don't
know what the problem is. I'm
going to drive that car (Baker's)
next year more than likely and I
don't know if he's upset about it
or what. But he better get his hat
on right before we get to Rich-
mond (Va. next week)
Baker said his car did hit
Petty's but it was an accident.
"Yeah, I hit Kyle Baker said.
"I didn't mean to, but he swung
up like he was going to give me
room and I moved. Then he
swung right down and I didn't
have much chance.
"It's unfortunate the situation
is the way it is because more will
be made of it than there was, but
I'm sorry. If he wanted to punch
me in the nose, he would have
every right to, but I'd defend
myself, too
LARGE SELECTION OF
FRAMES
SENIOR CITIZEN
DISCOUNTS
NOW
REDUCED
I
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12
PRICE
COUPON
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1 O OFF ANY
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� EYE GLASSES
Must present coupon with order for dl
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good with other advertised specials
scount. Not
CONCERTS
THEATER A
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OPTICAL
Phone
756-4204
PALACE
703GreemillBKd Across From P.tl Plaa �� o ERA Realty)
C.arv M Hams I k ensrd Optician Op�.n 9 30 a m lobpm Mon I n
WE'RE OPEN LATE!
Stop in at Subway after your late night fun. Try one of our
great tasting foot-long sandwiches. We have 17 mouth water-
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seven days a week.
3UBWT
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208 E. 5th St. 758-7979
ASK ABOUT OUR
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WELCOME BACK ECU
STUDENTS
Flip Over the Pirates
Compliments of C.O.Tankard Co.
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�1983 Miller Brewing Co Milwaukee
Proud Sponsor of the Great
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�Hi

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20
JHE EAST CAROLINIAN SEPTEMBER 4, 1984
JL
lit
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te f bwer which costs so much to brZQndPr0r,
, otr Vw00d Aqeinq produces a tQftt� w nd '
hwood Aqeinq produces a taste. ci ?n OqV
five B'nto uou will find in no oth
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IBlJflP

Student Athletic Board presents
4th Annual
Budweiser Pep Rally
THURSDAY, SEPT. 6,1984
6:30 - 8:00 P.M.
- FICKLEN STADIUM -
FREE ADMISSION TO ALL
OVER $7,000.00 WORTH
OF FREE PRIZES
TO BE GIVEN AWAY
SPONSORS:
UBE � OVERTON'S � BONDSH.L HODGES
BEAU'S � KRISPY KREME � ACCU COPY
MARSH'S SURF-N-SEA
PIZZA TRANSIT AUTHORITY (P.T.A.)A
Budweiser
KING OF BEERS
�p
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Title
The East Carolinian, September 4, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
September 04, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.356
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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