The East Carolinian, August 30, 1984






Otoc lEast CHarnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.3
Thursday August 30, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 12,000
Ebony Herald Manager Resigns;
Different News Format Planned
BRYAN HUMBERT � ECU Photo Lab
When
things
More Neat Things To Do With A Newspaper
ou're done with today's paper you ought to try this � obviously a better way to get more use out of
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nrwi MHor
"I want all the students to read
the Ebony Herald said John
Deaver, the Ebony Herald's new
general manager. Subject to ap-
proval by the ECU Media Board,
Deaver will replace Ruben In-
gram, who resigned the general
manager's position to accept an
internship in Washington, D.C.
Deaver said he is very concern-
ed with altering the format of the
Ebony Herald, which is the
minority newspaper for ECU.
"My number one objective as
general manager of the Ebony
Herald is to present a paper to the
students that they don't mind
reading he said.
Included in this objective are in-
creasing the size of the paper and
offering students information all
of them need. "The paper is not
limited to minorities Deaver
said.
Although he doesn't intend to
produce a paper solely for minori-
ty students, Deaver said he does
intend to highlight minority
students and their activities. "We
will report on minority groups
and what they have to offer all the
students. This will make the
organizations work to the benefit
of all the students he said.
The Ebony Herald's news needs
to be more student-oriented and
designed to assist students in their
college life, Deaver commented.
Instead of dealing with the same
subjects dealt with by the Daily
Reflector and East Carolinian,
Deaver wants to branch out into
new areas.
"I want to deal with current
events, entertainment and news in
eastern North Carolina which will
be of interest to all students he
said. Included in this will be cur-
rent trends, both locally and na-
tionally. "The Ebony Herald
should be more than just a paper,
it should be something students
can enjoy he said.
Among the features Deaver has
planned is a story on North
Carolina's new movie studio in
Wilmington. This is the studio
where Firestarter was filmed. He
said he also hopes to have a col-
umn in each issue for students to
express their opinions.
One problem the Ebony Herald
has always had is lack of revenue.
"One of my main objectives is to
have a paper that produces an in-
come. We won't just spend the
students' money he said.
Antoinette Gibbs, who was just
named business manager, said she
intends to help Deaver and the
director of advertising obtain
more advertisements. "I'm con-
cerned with improving the Ebony
Herald in any way that I possibly
can and that means working with
all the staff members
New Library Computer System To Provide Greater Access
B ELAINE PERRY
Staff Witts
The purchase of an OCLC
Computer System for Joyner
Library and the Health Sciences
Librar will benefit ECU students
by giving them greater access to
the materials within both
libraries, said Dr. Ruth Katz,
director of Academic Library Ser-
vices.
The new computer was pur-
chased from the OCLC, a Na-
tional Service Center. Katz said
the OCLC system is "a not-for-
profit computer library service
and research organization. It
operates computer and telecom-
munications systems that support
major library activities. In addi-
tion, OCLC is developing local
automated library systems that
will permit independent process-
ing by a single library
A committee composed of five
people gathered information on
various systems and decided
which system would best suit the
needs of ECU.
Changes will be noticed as soon
as the first installation is com-
pleted in January of 1985, Katz
said. An implemented circulation
system will be the first part install-
ed. When checking out books, in-
stead of filling out cards, barcode
labels on the books' sides will be
used. A small pencil-like object
picks up the codes on the labels
and automatically records the in-
formation in the computer. Infor-
mation about the borrower will be
taken from barcode labels on the
new student I.Ds. However, the
system will not be used until
January 1985 so current library
cards should not be discarded.
Approximately one year after
installation of the circulation
system, the second phase will be
installed. This will consist of an
on-line catalog, replacing the cur-
rent card catalog system. The on-
line system will allow the
materials from all three ECU
libraries � Joyner, Health
Sciences and the Music Library �
to be accessed from the computer
terminal. Students looking for
books will know where the book is
located, whether or not it is cur-
rently checked out and if it is on
reserve.
Katz said the new system will
allow students to have access to
more information and to search
more convienently. It will also
provide the libraries with more ac-
curate record keeping.
The cost of the computer
system is estimated at $400,000.
That figure includes all licenses,
installation and initial fees. An
additional annual fee will be paid
for maintenance of both hardware
and software. The money for the
project came out of the regular
state budget for the libraries. The
yearly maintenance fee will be
divided between Joyner and the
Health Sciences Library.
According to Katz, the instaila
tion of the OCLC Computer
System has generated some
publicity for ECU. Other colleges
and universities within Eastern
North Carolina have expressed in-
terest in how the program works
here.
Katz said the system will offer
the university better service, more
management information and bet-
ter long-range planning.
Rainey Planning Leadership Conference, Aide Program
By ELAINE PERRY
l�f� Writer
"It's a time consuming effort,
but it means a lot to me. It's
challenging, frustrating and ex-
citing Those were the words us-
ed by Johnny Rainey who is settl-
ing into his job as the 1984-85
SGA President.
Rainey has already started
working on the goals he set for the
student government. With the in-
itiation of the Freshman Aide
Program, he said he hopes to get
more students involved in ECU's
fudent government. The major
purpose behind the program is to
serve as a "stepping stone" for
new students interested in SGA.
Students will have various respon-
sibilities including two hours of
SGA office work per week and
serving as a page at two legislative
meetings per month. The benefits
will be a chance to get involved
with student life at ECU and the
opportunity to become familiar
with the SGA.
Another program supported by
Rainey is the Book Exchange Pro-
gram. While the idea was not very
successful last spring, Rainey said
he feels it could be in the fall. The
Book Exchange Program is exact-
ly what it implies; the exchanging
or buying of books from other
students. There will be a bulletin
board at the Student Book Store
where interested students will be
able to find out which books are
being offered by other students.
Rainey will also talk to the Facul-
ty Senate in an attempt to con-
vince professors to use certain tex-
tbooks longer.
Rainey is planning to hold a
Leadership Conference before the
annual budgeting meeting ten-
tatively scheduled for Oct 8. He
hopes to explain how to prepare a
fiscal budget. It will also draw
representatives from all organiza-
tions together to show them how
to get SGA appropriations and to
swap fund-raising ideas and pro-
blems.
The student information center
is in an in-between stage at this
point. The SGA is exploring
possibilities of what kind of
equipment will be needed and how
it will work. However, it takes
time to implement the system. The
money appropriated from last
year's budget went towards
research of the "right" type of
system.
Ideally, the system will
ultimately provide students with
information about campus life
through one phone call.
The SGA elections will be Sept.
26 with a two-week filing period
prior to that date. The first
legislative meeting will be October
1st. Freshmen and all interested
students are urged to attend.
Alumni Association Awards
Mathews, Biehn Win Teaching Awards
ECU New Bureau
An anthropologist widely
known for her studies of "root
doctors" and folk medicine in the
South and a playhouse director
who sometimes assumes a stage
role himself were presented East
Carolina University's annual
teaching effectiveness awards
Monday.
Winners of the prestigious ECU
Alumni Association awards for
1984 were:
Dr. Holly F. Mathews, assistant
professor of anthropology, whose
studies have focused on systems
of folk medicine and beliefs in the
rural South.
Donald E. Biehn, associate pro-
fessor in Theatre Arts and an ac-
claimed director of ECU
Playhouse productions.
"I am, primarily, a teacher of
acting Biehn said. "My audi-
tionsacting roles are for the sole
purpose of keeping my acting
equipment oiled
A native of Atlanta, Ga Dr.
Mathews was a summa cum laude
graduate of Georgia State Univer-
sity in 1975 and received the PhD
in anthropology at Duke Universi-
ty in 1982. She held instructor-
ships at Duke, Georgia State and
N.C. State University before join-
ing the ECU faculty in 1982.
She teaches medical and
psychological anthropology,
culture and personality, ideology
of sex roles in cross-cultural
perspective and conducts a
seminar on peasant societies.
In 1976 she won attention with
a paper, "Science as a Belief
System at the 53rd annual
meeting of the Georgia Academy
of Science. In 1978 and 1980 she
presented research findings on
high and low blood pressure and
its implications in folk medicine
and a paper on "Stress as a Factor
in the Treatment of High Blood
by Southern Black Root
Doctors These were presented
before meetings of the Society for
Applied Anthropology in Denver,
Colo and Merida, Mexico.
She has continued research and
scholarly publication of findings
in the field of folk medical beliefs
and "root" medicine practices.
She has presented papers on the
subject at the School of Medicine,
Duke Medical Center, and the
University of South Carolina
School of Medicine, Charleston,
S.C.
Biehn, of Westover, W. Va
joined the ECU drama faculty in
1973, having been assistant pro-
fessor at the Goodman School of
Drama, Art Institute of Chicago.
He holds the Master's of Fine
Arts degree from Goodman
School of Drama, and had two
years of private instruction at the
Neighborhood Playhouse, New
York City, and studied the
teaching of acting with Uta
Hagen.
He has directed off-Broadway
and has acted in three profes-
sional repertory companies. At
ECU, his Playhouse productions
have included "Who's Happy
Now?" "The Italian Straw Hat
"A Scent of Flowers
"Dracula "Indians and
others. He directed "One Flew
Over the Cuckoo's Nest" in its
Chicago premiere at the Good-
man School of Drama and in 1980
directed "Wait Until Dark" at the
West Virginia University Theatre.
The awards were presented at
the annual faculty convocation.
The recipients are selected on the
basis of a survey of student opi-
nion of instruction.
Students Parked Illegally In Greenville
Can Expect To Have Their Cars Towed
Hanging Around
Hey, we're cod. We go to ECU.
By STEPHEN HARDING
Staff WrHcr
According t0 the Greenville
Police Department, students can
expect increased towing of illegal-
ly parked cars on city streets.
In prior years, a person has
been employed only part-time to
enforce the city's towing laws. A
full-time position has now been
added to the payroll. Greenville
ly for several weeks and then have
their car towed. "That's not
right Holmes said.
A majority of the problem is
cars parked in residential areas
not leaving space available for
residents. "This is a typical pro-
blem of any college community
where the college doesn't provide
enough parking" Holmes said.
There is an ordinance that
allows an area to have controlled
Police Chief Ted Holmes said the
advantage of this is that people
will not get used to parking illegal-
residential parking if several
criteria are met. This allows decals
to be issued to residents permit-
ting them to park anytime and
restricts other vehicles to two-
hour parking. Controlled residen-
tial parking covers almost all the
area within the north side of 5th
street, said Assistant City At-
torney Mac McCarley and added,
"This is a parking regulation that
authorizes towing
There are also proposals before
the city that would increase tow-
ing fees. The department is sug-
gesting the $5 city fine dropped so
that persons only have to pay the
towing charges. Holmes said,
"We don't want to create a finan-
cial burden but we have to enforce
the traffic laws
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Features7
Classifieds8
Sports11
�You'll be amazed at the things
Greg Rideouf has thought of
this week. See Editorials, page
L
�The Lady In Red, a recent
movie release is reviewed today
In Features, page 7.
�ECU Is preparing for this
weekend's match with Florida
State. For Sports Editor Randy
Mews predictions, see Sports,
P�g� 11.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 30.1984
9B
Announcements
PUTT-PUTT
intramural Team Putt-Putt la set to Too off an
Man Saert. W. Taam Captain tnovtd raalttar
�a4r tamm m ��am Gym on Mon Sap W
an� Two faart. n oatwaaw l:M a.m. ana? I p.m.
�A�TC!��ATS RATHER THAN SRBCTATBIM
CO-RIC SOFTBALL
Join the fwnll Registration data for Co Rec
Sofikatt are Saot iou Tha Taam Captains
Waatlfie. h Ml for Sept. ?. 7:00 p.m. In BC-ltt.
Coma fea Room 104 Memorial Gym to ragtatar.
Anyone can parttclpat m tNTRAMURALS
DtttMIRVOLLIYBALL
eacti Monday ntgftt at S: JO p.m. the Baptist stu
enf Unfon rfo topatnar for an evening at fun
First there fa a homecoofcad maal for tt.ee follow
ad by pamaa of votteybatr
RKTRBAT
Join wt far an excttmp weafcand ef fun,
�niannlf) and Rfbta ttwdy at tmarafd Iota. Tne
�ap�t ttvdint union ft going Sept. 7-9. A charge
of 00 hataa pay far transportation.
RfJACC COMMITT1R
The Oroanviffa faaca Cammrttoa ia concernad
wit tte R�i that affact we dotty � 9na nuctaar
arms bvttd-ve). Cantraf Amarica, fvrtnor eacala-
M�n af American Troops on foreign soft, draft
reg�tretian. teo. if you are concernad about your
�utvra and the fvture of our planet, pleate lain us
Fridayete:Kp.m. aims Rim Street, lust east
o� tne campus Or call TSt 40.
RRRfONAL DEVELOPMENT
COURSES
Scuba � Sept. 4-Sapt. 37 Asscrtlv Com
mwnkatiom � Sopt. 4-Saot. 35; Small Camputar
�Sept t. Oanca Factory � Sopt. 13-Nov. IS. Con-
tact ovw ef Contlnufng education, erwfn
Hall, 757 4143.
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Pioaae loin wt for our first "PRIMS TIME"
fellowship this Thurv, Aug. JO. at 7 p.m. In
Jenklna Awd Art Bidg. We are featuring a film by
Joan McDowell entitled "THE SECRET OF LOV-
�NG" The gellep poll rated McDowell as tha matt
popular speaktr on the American college campus,
rcme loin in tha fun. We are looking forward to
meeting you.
NAVIGATORS
Check if out! The Navigators Bible study
fellowship Brewster D Wing, Room JOI. every
Tuesday. '30 PM, beginning August M.
LACROSSE CLUB
Came to The bertom of Collage Hill on Tuesdays
aj Thursdays at 3:30 to play some Lax. We're
'inking for a few good rwart. Any questions call
Oave Locket
EMPLOYMENT AVAILABLE
Emptoyrnent H evettebte to qwattfled persem
mo ere interested In becoming: Personal Care
At9ene)ente fa students In wheelchairs. Readers.
Proofreaders, Tutors. Por further attain, con-
tact: Office af Handicapped Student Services. )1
PORStON STUDENTS
it vow are interesfed In taking an English Se-
cond Lanpuape course (non-credifi then sign up
n tha Writing Confer, Austin 309. Students wfft be
contacted about class scheduling.
PACULTY
A faewtfy Inwartmant cfwb Is prasantty being
tormod m our area. This showfd bo an ewcHtng,
tvn. educational, and financially rewarding op-
portunity far aM. Por more Infer mallow end
details an en erpenliaMonal meeting to bo hafd
vw. can or write tedev JS� 3031 days and nights.
FACULTY INVESTMENT CLUR, P.O. Row W7T
Oreenvifta, N.C. TTU.
MINORITY ARTS
COMMITTEE
Th Student Union Minority Arts Committee
will meet en Wednesday, August 19, r04, at S:00
P M m room 347 of Mendenhall Student Center
ah members and Interested persons are urged to
attend
SPECIAL CONCERTS
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Special Concern Committee
win moat on Wednesday. August 39, 194, at 4:01
P.M. in Room 343 of Mendenhall Student center
ah members and interested persona or urged fa
SPECIAL EVENTS
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Special Events Committoe
win meat on Thursday, August 10, 194, at $30
PM m Roam 343 of Mandanhali Student center
All marrfbers and Interested parsons are uregod to
COMMUTERS
student who commute to class from outside the
Crsenlife aram and need rides or rtden. contact
commuter Sorvleos, Whlchard in, 7S7-M1.
LACROSSE PRACTICE
There will be the first official Lacrosse practice
at tha bottom of College Hill this Thursday the
30th Tha time to be there Is at 3:30 pm, if you can-
not coma please call Chris Tomasic at 752 4999
Wa witl practice Tues Wed , and Thurv of each
weak this fall and. also there will be some mat
ches too.
STUDENT ATHETIC BOARD
There will be an orientation meeting of the ECU
student athletic board on Tues Sept. 4, 1904 at 5
p.m. in Room 244 Mendenhall Student Center.
Anyone Interested In loinlng should attend this
orientation meeting. For more info, about the
organliatlon, contact Pam Holt at 757 6417
MUSIC
Tune In to your campus radio station this Sun
day morning for your chance to win free B.J
concert tickets 1 The Contemporary
I Show airs 4-10 am every Sunday morning
featuring the newest artists In Contemporary
Christian Music. That's on WZMB 91.3 FM.
YOUTH FOR HELMS
Many students have expressed a desire to help
with Senator Jesse Halms' re-election campaign
Our headquarters Is located at 600 E. 10th Street
fetes to Oarryl's). Please stop by tor literature,
signs and to sign up for volunteer slots, or phone
US at 790-4361 Welcome back to ECU, and
wet come to our campaign.
PI KAPPA PHI
LITTLE SISTERS
O.K. girls. If s party timed I Be out at the nous
at 1:30 for one great TOGA PARTY tonight Look
for upcoming announcements on the place and
date of our next little sister meeting
KARATE CLUB
Registration for beginning Karate will be !n the
dance room of Memorial Gym on Sept. 27 at 7 30
Classes for advanced yellow belt and up will begin
Sept. 30 at 7:30 In the same room. KICK your
heart out with the Karate Clubl I!
TEAM HANDBALL
ATTENTIONI 11 ECU Team Handball Club
Anyone Interested in playing team handball for
the ECU Club Team should contact Jeff Humbert
(7SJ-94M) or Willie Ehllng (757-6387) for more In
formation. All levels of experience are welcome
to play.
ICE HOCKEY
If you are Interested in playing ice hockey at
ECU this year, please contact George at 753 8525
Wa need to hear from new people as well as those
from last yeaY to set up a meeting time as well as
practice dates and etc. it is most important that
those from last year call us so we know that mey
stHf exist!
STUDENT SAVINGS CARDS
SGA Student Savings Cards are were! You can
pick up yours at Mandenhall's lobby, The Croatan
and fh Student Store. Take advantage of great
savings offered by Greenville merchants and get
your card now!
PHI ETA SIGMA
ti �?� Sigma will ba having Its first moating
Ttturs Sept. 6th at 5:15 p.m. at Mendenhall
ffaoaa ask for the room number at the Informa
tfan doe All new members are urged to attend
TM is going to be a great year so we hope you will
rSnu.
FLAG FOOTBALL
Anyone Interested in playing flag football or
starting up a team PAY ATTENTIONI I The IRS
Dept. wants you to participate! Register for In
framural Flag Football on Sept 45. The team
Captains meeting is Sept 6 at 7:00 pm InRm 103
in the Biology Building Come to Rm 304
Memorial Gym to sign up PARTICIPATE
RATHER THAN SPECTATEM
ZBT Brothers
The first Brotherhood meeting will be held Sun
day, Sept. 1 from 7:00 to 10:00 pm Everyone
must attend even if you plan to go Inactive this
semester. Coats and ties required I The meeting
will be In 321 Mendenhall.
NCSL
To all interested students: the first meeting of
ECU'S delegation to the N.C. Student Legislature
will be held on Mon Sept 2, In Mendenhall Stu
dent Center at 7:00 p.m. No obligations, come
check us out! For more Info, call Braxton O'Nell
355 2662, Sandy Thurmond 756 8669, or Tina Rossi
7587614
DELTAZETA
The sisters and pledges would like to welcome
everyone back to school and are hoping for a sue
cessful Rush for all Greeks! Reminder to Delta
Zeta sisters to be at the house by 4:15 today.
LATTER-DAY SAINTS
You and your friends are invited to attend this
year's Institute of Religion class which will be on
the New Testament Every week promises to be
great because Bill Evenhuls is an excellent
teacher. Class meets each Thursday from 6:30 to
8:00 p.m. in Brewster B 305
SIGN LANGUAGE CLASS
A beginning American sign language class will
be held every Wednesday night, starting Sept. 5,
from 6:00900 p m In B 05 (MEDIA ROOM) of
Joyner Library. The class Is free and open to all
individuals Interested in Sign Language. It Is
sponsored by the Program for Hearing Impaired
Students and the Sign Language Club. No
registration required, lust show up the first night.
OCCUPATIONAL THERAP
All students interested In Occupational Therapy
are invited to attend the first O.T. Club meeting
Tues Sept 4 at 5:45 in Rm. 203, Allied Health
Building. Hope to see you there.
SIGMA IOTA EPSILON
Sigma Iota Epsllon, ECU'S honor management
fraternity, will hold Its first organizational
meeting on Wed Sepf. 5 in Rawl 102 at 2:00 pm.
All members are encouraged to attend.
CADP
Campus Alcohol and Drug Program meeting to
be held Aug. 30 at 4:00 in Erwin Hall room 218. All
officers, members and anyone interested in join-
ing are urged to attend
RECREATION TRIP
Anyone who loves having FUN outdoors should
contact the Intramural Outdoor Recreation
Center and register for the upcoming
BACKPACKING TRIP Reservations must be
made by 5:00 p.m Friday, Sept 7 the UWHAR
RIE NATIONAL FOREST will be the sight for all
me excitement. Just call (757 6911), or come by
room 204 Memorial Gym.
HONORS SEMINAR
All University faculty and all students par
tlclpatlng In the Honors Program are reminded of
their opportunity of designing or requesting the
Honors Seminar of their choice The Honors com
mlttee makes the final selection from among pro
posals submitted each semester Seminars are
topic oriented and often interdisciplinary and
team taught Proposals for courses to be taught
spring semester 1985 must be submitted before
Frl Sept. 7, 1904, to Dr David Sanders, Director
of the Honors Program, co English Dept , Cam
pus. For further Information see Dr Sanders In
Ragsdale 212 or call 757 6373
ISA
Welcome back members and new students! You
are cordially Invited to attend our first meeting
and dinner on Saturday, Sept 1 at 6 00 pm af the
international House. 306 East 9th St All old
member and new Interested students are en
courogod to �ttand. Hope to see you all there!
NEWTIMES
Catholic mass is now offered at 11 30 AM in
the Biology lecture hall, rm 103, and at 9 00 P M
at the Newman Center Every Wednesday at the
Newman Center mass is celebrated, followed by a
meeting, a shared meal and fellowship, beginning
at 5:00 P M. C'mon and join the fun!
KARATE CLUB
The East Carolina KARATE CLUB will have its
first meeting on Thursday, August 30. 1984, at 7 30
in Memorial Gym dance room This meeting is for
those of yellow belt rank and up Bring your Gi
Beginning classes will begin in September
AEROBIC EXERCISE
Get PHYSICAL with the Intramural
Recreational Services Aerobic Exercise Ciaaaai
Register for the first session of classes AUG $?
27 31 from � 30 4 30 in Room 204 Memo at om
Exercise through the IRS
JOBS
The Department of intramural Recreation,
Services has iobs available for Flag Foot
BALL OFFICIALS NO experience is necess,),
A CLINIC is held In which rules position,ng ,�
all other aspects of the iob are taught A' -y
and women who are interested m oHir,itlf,6 or
iust earning some extra money snoula con t.
the 1st clinic AUG Ml OOpnn Rm 103 Memory.
Gym THE ONLY JOB YOU'LL EVER lO;c
SPORT CLUBS
Anyone interested in participating In th $
Club Program can go to Memorial Gym Roorr )0J
tor further information Numerous clubl ��
available
GBA
All Graduate Business Students ar.d cro�Msor,

the Graduate Business Association u sponsor,
a volleyball party at 4 00 Fnaay, Ajguj- n�
located at the corner of 14m. st anr Charles �
across from Kash n Karry
PAUSE
The Baptist Student Union will noic ,f,r , -(t
PAUSE of the semester Thursday niqtrt � ,
p m Highlighting the evening . Br c
violmist Join us for this inform, m .
WZMB-FM
Is Presently Taking Applications For:
Classical Director
News Director
Production Manager
Sports Director
Apply Monday-Friday 12:00-2:00
2nd FloorOld Joyner Library
THE SHOE
OUTLET
Name Brand
Athletic Shoes $12.88pr.
Leather TopSiders $15.00
2 pair $20.00
Walking Distance From Campus
203 W. 9th Street
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potato orfmnch fries and bread
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We want you to come
taste the Western Szzlin
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coupons below and
bring a friend to
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Visit the display in the Intramurals Gym.
PHt Plaza
Stop in at Brody's jewelry counter and let
us show you the latest in fashion
jewelrythe TWIST BEAD!
Choose from several colors
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dJ�S) Llke a11 th� other
delegations and interest groups at
Moscone Center the da befo?e
nnm.n l"815 n3mcd eir
nonunee, the Young Democrats
- the youth and student arm of
me party - continued to hear the
candidates' last-minute appeals
for their votes.
Sen. Gary Hart spoke first,
evoking some enthusiastic ap-
plause by challenging the Young
Democarats to redouble their
voter registration efforts.
Rev. Jesse Jackson got a
spirited response, too, by charg-
ing the somewhat-sedate, clean-
cut students and recent grads to
fight for a change in direction
Discomfor: spread around the
room, however, as the 100 Young
Democrats stopped clapping for
Jackson and began waiting for
Walter Mondaie.
Stop-gap speeches didn't stop
an angry resolution to end the
meeting from passing. Most of the
people had left the room when so-
Greeks Reil
Guidelines
B ELIZABETH BIRO
NUtf �mrr
The ECU Interfraternity Coun-
cil decided last spring to reinitiate
serving alcoholic beverage during
the 1984-85 fraternity rush.
According to IFC President
Glenn Con way, the dry rushes
were started to avoid the problem
of checking all rushee's identifica-
tion, and eliminating those who
attended because of alcohol. Con-
way said the fraternities which
were most successful last year
were those which held big all-
campus parties before the drv
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Mondale Has Limited Appeal For Students
(CPS) � Like all the other
Moscone Center the day before
the Democrats named their
nominee, the Young Democrais
- the youth and student arm of
thPy7C0ntinuedt� hear the
candidates' last-minute appeals
tor their votes.
Sen. Gary Hart spoke first,
evoking some enthusiastic ap-
plause by challenging the Young
Democarats to redouble their
voter registration efforts.
Rev. Jesse Jackson got a
spirited response, too, by charg-
ing the somewhat-sedate, clean-
cut students and recent grads to
"tight for a change in direction
Discomfort spread around the
room, however, as the 100 Young
Democrats stopped clapping for
Jackson and began waiting for
Walter Mondale.
Stop-gap speeches didn't stop
an angry resolution to end the
meeting from passing. Most of the
people had left the room when so-
meone rushed in, seized the
microphone and announced that
two Mondale representatives were
indeed on their way.
But by the time the Mondale
representatives � Massachusetts
Rep. Barney Frank and Atlanta
Mayor Andrew Young � arrived,
only a handful of Young
Democrats remained to hear their
pitches.
So has gone Walter Mondales's
largely unsuccessful courting of
the American student vote.
While the Hart and Jackson
campaigns stirred impassioned
voter registration drives on a wide
variety of campuses during the
campaign � Jackson in particular
led busloads of students to
register after speeches at Southern
University, southern Mississippi,
the University of the District of
Columbia, Xavier, Tuskegee In-
stitute and other campuses �
even college Democrats greeted
Mondale's nomination with a lack
of enthusiasm.
I don't think (Mondale) as an
individual excites young people
says Arthur Wang, a 23-year-old
law student who was a Hart
delegate.
While Wang says he'll vote for
Mondale, he adds, "I'd vote for a
dead dog over Ronald Reagan
"I'm still not convinced as of
right now that I'm going to get
out in the street for Mondale
adds Georgia State student and
Jackson delegate Mable Thomas.
John Edelman, a Hart sup-
porter and Northwestern business
student, pledges to "definitely
support the Democratic nominee
and vote for him but notes
Mondale doesn't excite him the
way Hart does.
Edelman reports he has friends
who supported Hart, however,
who won't vote for Mondale.
Others fear the limp appeal of
Mondale to students may even
drive most of the student vote,
which has never been much of a
factor in presidential campaigns,
to Ronald Reagan.
"Right now, Reagan is appeali-
ng to a lot of the youth says
Greg Moore, president of the U.S.
Student Association, which is run-
ning an ambitious nationwide stu-
dent voter registration drive.
"Unless (Mondale) makes that
inroad to the youth community,
he's almost guaranteed to lose the
election because we're registering
record numbers of young
People Moore predicts.
A June New York Times poll
found Reagan led Mondale by 18
percentage points among 18-to-
24-year-old voters.
Mondale nevertheless has
strong ties to education. One
brother is a professor at George
Washington University. Another
is an official with the National
Education Association, the na-
tion's largest teachers' union.
In his policy statements, the
former vice president has long ad-
vocated increasing federal educa-
tion and student aid, pay increases
Greeks Reinstate Wet Rush;
Guidelines Will Be Followed
B ELIZABETH BIRO
Miff Writer
The ECU Interfraternity Coun-
cil decided last spring to reinitiate
serving aL oholic beverages during
the 1984-85 fraternity rush.
According to IFC President
Glenn Conway, the dry rushes
ere started to avoid the problem
checking all rushee's identifica-
tion, and eliminating those who
attended because of alcohol. Con-
way said the fraternities which
were most successful last year
were those which held big all-
campus parties before the dry
rush period.
Former Associate Dean of
Orientation James Mallory said if
organizations followed guidelines,
they should not have any pro-
blems.
New Associate Dean of Orien-
tation Dr. Ronald Speier cited
guidelines each fraternity is ex-
pected to follow during wet rush.
Each guest should be carded and
stamped, he said. Dean Speier
also said he is encouraging faculty
and alumni advisors to attend
rush parties to ensure the
guidelines are followed. A bus ser-
vice will be provided to prevent
guests from drinking and driving,
said Speier.
Although Speier said he did not
prefer a wet rush, he assumed the
IFC approved it for a good
reason. However,
"Alcohol becomes
the parties instead
serious people.
Both Mallory and Conway said
passage of the 21-year-old drink-
ing age will make the question
academic. "It will be a reality
soon said Conway. "why not
give them a chance to use the beer
as a tool now?"
Speier said,
the focus of
of generating
Don't
Drink
And
Drive
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626 W. Greenville Blvd. 756 - 5434
vwvwsnvsjwysssssssssssjysrrwss
WATCH ECU BEAT FLORIDA ST AT
AT THE WASH PUB
Saturday Night - Large Screen TV
with
Super HAPPY HOUR Puces - 35 cent draft
for teachers ana protessors, and
establishing a "Fund for Ex-
cellence" to help schools experi-
ment.
None of it, though, seemed to
attract many student volunteers or
much student enthusiasm.
"We miscalculated concedes
Ted Mondale, the candidate's
son, in an interview about the
campus campaign. "We didn't
spend enough time
The younger Mondale, toying
with an unlit cigarette and looking
very much like his father, thinks
student voter registration and the
student vote will come around
when youth sees Reagan policies
won't help them "unless you hap-
pen to inherit a multinational cor-
poration
As for getting students excited
during the general election cam-
paign, "Geraldine Ferraro is a
pretty good answer Ted Mon-
dale, 26, says.
Indeed, the little genuine youth
excitement at the convention
generated by the Mondale cam-
paign seemed to emanate from the
vice presidential candidate.
"I'm not real hot on
Mondale Brian Lawson, a
21-year-old UCLA student and
Hart volunteer, says. "Ferraro, of
course, helps that out
Classifieds
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Central Book and News
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��� Men who never grow up
�ON WINGS OF EAGLES by Ken Follett
Theodds-lf you had to calculate them-You didn't go.
�FATAL VISION by Joe McGinnis
Electrifying true story of Dr. Jeffrey MacDonald.
� WHO KILLED THE ROBINS FAMILY by Thomas Chastin
Finally, the answer to the $10,000.00 question.
�THE AUERBACH WILL by Stephen Birmingham
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�1?� iEaat (Earnlmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hi N I E R FlSHHR. Ocnrral Manager
Gkhti RlDtOL'T, Hwumm Trillin
JENNIFI R JENDRASIAK. ,�,� J.T. PlETRZAK. a,A
R Asm Mew s. v �� Anthony Martin, a. Mnqtr
TINA MAROSCH K, f� KAIHY FL'ERST. Wu.�0� nm
Bll I Al SI IN, I � Manage, L.INDA VlZENA, �� r�cMcMH
AugiW JO, 184
Opinion
Page 4
Football
Season Opener Starts Frenzy
The time has come to firmly
ate that the Pirate football team
in a contender. Coach Ed Emory
and his staff along with the men
who suit up in the Purple and Gold
have been fighting a long time for
respect, and with three tough
schedules behind them and the
years ahead filled with name op-
ponent, the road in front of
Emory and the team is filled with
numerous chances for glory.
Emory's artful and diligent
recruiting is paying off in big ways
for him, the school, :he fans and
eastern North Carolina. A Top-20
team has frenzied Pirate mania in-
to a hot topic of conversation and
helped place the school on the
an. We are now arguably the best
he state.
But, as the new season is about
to begin, we can't afford to live on
the glory of the past. Fans and
students should be proud of the
budding tradition but must not
Ice it for granted. Support by all
the school and the eastern part of
North Carolina should be uncondi-
Tial, no matter how the season
urns out. We must think Purple in
der to win the Cold come the
beginning of January. When the
Pirates know that all of us are
behind them, they will give that ex-
tra effort that is desperately need-
ed in the upcoming season.
For those of you new to ECU,
the old loyalties to other schools in
the state should be shed; commit
yourself to Pirate football and the
rewards will be many. You must be
an all-weather Pirate fan, ready to
defend the school and all its sports
programs at the drop of a hat. Be a
fan through the good times and the
bad.
We don't know about Coach
Emory and the football players,
but we know the fans and students
are ready to go for it all this
season. We have a strong feeling
he is, too. A notch in the "W" col-
umn after the Florida State game,
along with one from the Pittsburgh
contest will surely put us in conten-
tion for the top spot at the end of
the year. Pirate supporters are
ready to rock Ficklen Stadium,
and, with the help of area fans and
the Pirate Club, we are ready to fill
the thing to the brim.
So, Ed Emory and crew, we just
want you to know that you have
the school's unwavering support as
you embark on your flight to
Florida. Win or lose (we know it
will be win) we are behind you. Go
for it.
WEREPUBUWIS
ARE STJO-
SAD Mi
mm M�
FINANCE , EPjMFESe
in

mmw
a

Reagan Flunks Education
By GREG RIDEOUT
President Reagan blaming Walter
Mondale and the Democrats for pro-
blems in education is somewhat
ridiculous, even for politics. And taking
credit for anything good that's happen-
ed since he's lived in the White House is
close to preposterous. Reagan does not
feel strongly about education; his con-
servatism works against it � except
when re-election time comes around.
But you can't hide the record, and the
falsehoods in his argument against the
Democrats are easily explained.
Ronald Reagan implied Tuesday that
the Democratic Party is responsible for
the decline in test scores over the last 20
years, and because of this, any money
spent on education during that time was
wasted. Well, Reagan is right: test scores
have fallen off. But not because students
are stupider now than in the early '60s,
but instead because more students have
the opportunity to attend college. The
Democrats opened the doors.
Now, not just the brightest and those
with economic advantages get to go.
Everyone has a chance. And as a result,
test averages have tuned themselves in
with the general public. Democrats and
moderates did this � not Reagan's con-
servatives. In fact, scores are now rising
in certain areas because the government
activism of the '60s is paying off.
But Reagan says government should
stay out of the classroom. Government,
he intones, is harmful. Yet, he uses
government to shape education when it
will help his political constituency. He
pushed for tuition tax credits for
families who send their children to
private schools, but fought against tax
breaks for faculty members who get tui-
tion breaks for their families. This,
along with government as a moralizer, is
okay.
Reagan will let big brother come to
school to force children to pray. And
then, while they are praying, he will let
school officials violate their civil rights
so their lockers can be searched. The
president would rather have a law-and-
order type teacher who prays than pay
another one and have two instead.
When Reagan promises the teachers
of America that he will send one of them
into space, he is treading on familiar
ground: the Reagan administration has
been trying to launch education pro-
grams into the ozone for the last four
years. Financial aid would have been cut
more than 40 percent if he had had his
way, and all but the ketchup bottles in
the school lunch program would have
gone up in space if things had went
right.
All these factors point to a serious
disregard for education and higher lear-
ning. The only thing Ronald Reagan has
done right is not abolish the Department
of Education. Faculty members whose
grant opportunities have been cul ki
only all too well that the preserr
ministration has no right to the cl
that it is a champion of education.
It boils down to politics. Reagan' �
to say something, but in his hear-
knows that he really doesn't care to help
all of America become educated.
even if he did, he couldn't begin to take
credit for something that involves
many factors. Sorry, Ronnie.
Things I Thought Of
By GREG RIDEOl T
Whether you like what I thought of last week or not, I'm about to think
again. It's not easy, but someone's got to do it. Yep. here comes another
"Things I Thought Of
First of all, I have to tee off on Pee Dee the Pirate again. Gee, just saying
it makes me feel like I just drank a case of beer. It's so stupid it makes
more sense backwards. Write in and tell us what you think of Pee Dee for
our once-every-so-often "What Pee Dee Means To Me" column.
Oh yeah, the Buccaneer people asked me to announce that the 1933-34
yearbooks are in. You can either come by and pick them up or have them
delivered td the resthome of yonr choice. There is a 10-percent senior
citizen discount.
Everybody's wearing those funny-colored, baggy shorts on campus. Why0
Is it because there's so much room you can convienth carry your lunch in
them? Is it because you can avoid using the toilet until vou get back to your
dorm room? I guess people are getting less selfish because there's certainly
room for a friend in those babies.
Do underwear commercials make you lose faith in the human race0 Heck
they sure make me want to slink away every time I see one. Hev, c'mon ad
guys in the big apple, do you have no dignitv. I mean business executives in
crowded elevators extolling the virtues of their briefs to every one aboard �
surely there are other ways.
And while we're on the subject. Can't they make no-stick underuear for
girls so they don't have to always pull it out of unmentionable places It kin-
da" gets embarrassing at parties when the girl vou're with is reaching into
her shorts every 10 minutes.
Do you know any Driver's Ed majors? Second question, do vou know am
with an IQ over 65? If you do, don't admit it � even if his IQ's 'Oor
But do ask him if this has been a life-long career goal If he replies yes
check for damage to the brain and immediately call Gage and DeSoto
Did you know that carrying your backpack by one strap hung loosely over
the left shoulder signifies that you like to eat whale blubber and mavonaisse
sandwiches? C est vrai. And if you carry the thing with both straps "it
means you enjoy the company of muleskinners who drink Lowenbrau
Did you know that people who live in Liechtenstein don't give a shit that
the Cubs are in first place. I guess they don't understand that the last time
this happened Mrs. O'Leary's cow was just a pup.
I think the guys on the third floor of Aycock misunderstand the meaning
of "higher education Fellas, I'm afraid the term has nothing to do with
bongs and hallucinogenic tablets. Good try, I'm sure you'll learn one of
these days.
Well, a word of reminder for those of you who got this far. Don't forget
to lambast that ridiculous new mascot in upcoming issues. Remember a
world without Pee Dee is a safer one.
Mail
TRB
Th� New Rrpublu
"Caution shrieked the envelope in
bright red, "the Enclosed Information is
Extremely Damaging to the State of
Israel
Oh my gosh! My first thought was to
dash to the bathroom and douse it in a
tub of water. Instead, I took a deep
breath and opened what turned out to be
a fund-raising appeal for North
Carolina Gov. Jim Hunt, who is trying
to knock Jesse Helms out of the Senate.
The letter described Helms' copious
anti-Israel activities.
This "package" (as they're called in
the direct-mail business) was prepared
by a Milwaukee firm called AB Data,
which specializes in raising money on
Jewish themes. The owners claim to
have developed a unique computer pro-
gram which can find the Jews in any
mailing list. The piDcess�they call it
"ethnication" � uses surnames, ZIP
codes and comparisons with other lists.
For cynical manipulation, deception
and sheer malarkey, political mailings
make even the wildest TV commercials
look like models of Socratic discourse.
Many of these techniques were
developed by the magazine industry.
Having been involved in both the
editorial and business sides of
magazines, I'm sometimes unnerved by
the contrast between what you assume
about your readers as a journalist and
what you assume about your customers
as a businessman.
As a journalist, you assume your
readers are intelligent, rational, discern-
ing.
As a businessman in search of those
readers, you assume that they will really
believe they've been especially selected
to receive this limited offer; that they
need a package full of little items to play
with, such as a reply card that's too big
for the return envelope unless they tear
off a pointless stub; that they'll respond
better to a long form letter with the word
"you " several times in the First
paragraph, occasional passages framed
by little stars, and at least one "P.S at
the end. These are just a few standard
tricks of the trade.
Here is a package AB Data prepared
for the re-election campaign of
Michigan Sen. Carl Levin. It's directed
at people who've already contributed
once, and the envelope says, "You have
to be a little meshuga Meshuga
means crazy in Yiddish.
The pitch, signed by Levin, is that he
knows it's crazy to ask people for money
a second time, but he's doing it anyway.
Bruce Arbit of AB Data explains the
theory behind claiming to be crazy while
asking to be re-elected to the U.S.
Senate: "You're dealing with a man of
incredibly high integrity, unflinchingly
honest, and I think his donors ap-
preciate that
This nicely illustrates the difference
between "honest" in the political con-
sultant's sense of projecting an image
and honest in the more traditional sense
of telling the truth.
The first letter is called
"prospecting and almost always costs
more than it brings in. The payoff comes
when you hit up givers again. Roger
Craver, the dean of Democratic mail
mavens, says that in a typical campaign
he hits a proven donor once a month un-
til six months before the election, then
two or three times a month until voting
day. And then, like chattel slaves, the
donors are rented out to new candidates
and causes.
Craver denies that these are gimmicks.
'There's a difference between a gim-
mick and the effect of a mailing piece
Well, what, in Craver's opinion, is a
gimmick? He showed me a package
from a fundamentalist church in which a
woman claims to have seen Jesus in her
napkin, and actually includes a paper
napkin with Shroud-of-Turin type
markings on it.
OK. There's a difference between
hamless mood-setting devices and
outright deception. But how much dif-
ference is there between the holy napkin
and this mailing from Craver for the
DNC?
The outside envelope is official-
looking gray and says, "Urgent! Federal
Election Commission Data Enclosed
Inside, along with a letter from Manatt,
is what appears to be a green-and-white
computer printout from the FEC, com-
plete with little hole up the sides, repor-
ting how much money the Republicans
are raising.
A footnote confesses that these are
"figures compiled by the DNC But,
apart from this, every effort has been
made to make the sheet look like an of-
ficial document. "Document
441104-001-XBN it proclaims. "Page
79. Summer Sheet PC50114
The phony FEC report is included in
the package, Craver amiably explained,
"to give it credibility Once again
that's "credibility in the sense of be-
ing worthy of belief.
As people become injured to each new
gimmick, maintaining "credibility" re-
quires ever-higher levels of guile. A re-
cent fund-raising package from the
Mondale campaign, for example, begins
with a letter from Timothy Finchem, the
campaign finance director.
"Dear Mr. Softtouch it says, "Mr.
Mondale asked me to send to you a copy
of the attached campaign
memorandum Attached is an ostensi-
ble memo from Finchem to Mondale
("Interoffice Communication"), urging
Mondale to overcome his reluctance and
ask "our generous longtime supporters"
for more money. Scrawled across the
top in blue ink are the words, "Boss �
Can we distribute this? Tim
So far, standard B.S. But how about
this? There's another message scrawled
at the top in what appears to be hand-
writing: "Tim � c.c. Mr. Bob Beckel,
Mr. Jim Johnson, Mr. Stanley Soft-
touch, Mr. John Reilly � Fritz The
other names are top Mondale campaign
officials.
Mondale's direct-mail consultant,
Robert Smith, told me it was "a
rewrite" of a real memo, then, when
pressed, said, "I don't recall it might
have been a couple Of course, Fin-
chem never asked Mondale's permission
to distribute it, and Mondale never ask-
ed Finchem to send a copy to Stanley
Softtouch.
Yet Smith seemed genuinely dumb-
founded by my suggestion that the
package could be considered
"deceptive "People increasingly want
to be dealt with one to one and more
personally he said sincerely.
"Technology permits you to do that
(cj. I9t4, Vmtttd Featurr Syndicate, Inc
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-ent ad-
! claim
on.
3,3 - v
eart he
help
fd. And
1 take
- es so
Why?
in
inl
� Heck,
ad
es in
l: kin-
vk anv
�el over
inaisse
ips, it
ill.
nil that
me
the meaning
i with
.me of
Don't forget
ember, a
tches
,hed is an ostensi-
hem to Mondale
nunication"), urging
me his reluctance and
longtime supporters"
Scrawled across the
� are the words, "Boss �
: ibute this? Tirr
Jard B.S. But how about
mother message scrawled
a hat appears to be hand-
Mr Bob Beck el,
Johnson, Mr Stanley Soft-
I John Reilly - - Fritz The
rc top Mondale campaign
direct-mail consultant,
told me it was "a
a real memo, then, when
1 don't recall it might
a couple Of course, Fin-
asked Mondale's permission
it, and MondaJe never ask-
lem to send a copy to Stanley
mith seemed genuinely dumb-
by my suggestion that the
e could be considered
"People increasingly want
salt with one to one and more
1 he said sincerely.
)iogy permits you to do that
!9g4. t mm Feature Svuiicair. Inc
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30. 1984
IV Student Offers Peers Fake Mail Service
died FaHh he"Ba the dog
Gannon ?b5 �?,le8e Studcn
�n a 1" , f heard about i
tfsisfrom h�me that
em on m 0n0UsChl,d"and
ep sorrow CXPreSS ��
S1n'r;hff-locked by the dog's
ddZmiSC rote a reply that
SbLS: parems �f
Sound cold and unforgiving
Maybe, but Kirchoff's parents
bL'T' the death " eve"
Barky himself are just inventions
M i . N! Enterprises, Ron
V1er s "fak
college
ce mail ' service for
students suffering from
empty mailboxes.
For a modest $2 a semester,
Mader will write his subscribers a
monthly letter to help them ward
off loneliness with hometown
gossip. The only catch is that
nothing � the family writing the
letter or the gossip � is real.
Mader, 20, a telecommunica-
tions major at Indiana University,
created his fake family letters
when friends complained they
never got any mail.
"The concept of writing fake
letters really lends itself to a lot of
questions Mader admits. "But
it's news from home, family and
neighbor gossip
Letter ideas originate in his
copious note taking.
"I take very different kinds of
notes he says. "They're
obscure. If anyone looked at
them, they would think 'very
Yellow Jackets, Hornets
Sought By Scientists
I i. I New Bureau
Most people go out of their way
to avoid a confrontation with an
anar hornet or yellow jacket. But
a pair of scientists at the ECU
School of Medicine are once again
collecting these creatures in the in-
terest of medical research.
In a continuation of work
begun, last summer, the scientists
are asking residents of Greenville
d surrounding areas to call
them if they know of a hornet nest
or ground-dwelling yellow jacket
colon that they wouldn't mind
being rid of. The scientists will do
e hard part � come out and col-
lect the insects for use in the lab.
The scientists need a supply of
the living creatures to study
human hypersensitivity to insect
�tings, a research project of
medical school pathologist Dr.
Donald Hoffman.
Unlike last year, the scientists
are only interested in hornets and
yellow jackets. Other kinds of
bees and wasps are not being col-
lected, according to Robert
Jacobson, an entomologist work-
rtg with Hoffman.
Area residents who think they
might be able to help the ECU
researchers can best identify the
desired insects by their dwellings,
Jacobson said. White-faced
hornets, which are black with
white markings, make their nests
in large gray bag-like structures
often found suspended from the
eaves of buildings and from tree
limbs. Yellow jackets, on the
other hand, are almost always
found living in holes in the
ground, and are sometimes refer-
red to as "ground bees
Jacobson stressed that the in-
sects need to be alive and in good
condition to be useful in the
research. Yellow jackets con-
taminated with insect spray or
gasoline, for example, would not
be acceptable.
Jacobson, who received more
than 100 calls from helpful
residents last summer, said the
peak season for stinging insects is
just beginning and should con-
tinue through the fall.
"I suspect that there are quite a
few of them out there said
Jacobson. "This year will pro-
bably be better than last year for
these kinds of insects
r
WELCOME TO GREENVILLE AND ECU
When you get settled in, come and visit us Sunday
morning
i ARVIS MEMORIAL
UNITED METHODIST
CHURCH
510 S. Washington Street
Downtown just off campus on Reade Circle
8:45am Early Worship
9 45am Sunday School
1 1:00am Worship
Phone: 752-3101
"A place to go and grow"
CATERING
We cater
all occasions
campus or
:itt carbliiiaciihing service
strange If I hear anything parents, who typically begin their
unusual, even in class, I'll write it letters with a Dear Trouble"
down and turn the story around to salutation, outsell the supportive
make it funny
Last year, his first in business,
Mader wrote and photocopied all
the letters for his 26 subscribers.
This year he has a computer to
help him personalize the cor-
respondence.
"It takes about two hours to
write one letter he explains.
"Then another three hours to pro-
cess and personalize them
He began by offering
subscribers letters from a "generic
suburban family and then bran-
ched out to offer subscribers a
choice of friendly or hostile
parents at the head of the family.
Mader says the "suspicious"
parents, who begin their letters
with "Dear Glorious Child
"I like writing the suspicious
ones better he adds.
IU student Scott Anderson
subscribes to the suspicious family
for himself and to the nice family
for a friend.
"I don't get nearly enough
mail he explains. "So I looked
forward to getting the letters.
They're a parody of a typical
American family from suburbia
Mader recruits his subscribers
during campus orientation week,
posting signs in IU's dorms. Last
year, the campus newspaper ran a
story about his service as well.
Most of the subscribers actually
have Mader write to friends in-
stead of themselves.
"It's definitely a unique gift
says IU junior Deborah Freed-
man. "The letters are personal
enough you can laugh over things
that really could be from your
family
She compares the letters' tone
to the homey, innocuous humor
of the "Leave It To Beaver" and
"Ozzie and Harriet" TV shows.
"You could see families writing
letters like these Freedman
adds.
Only three subscribers have
replied to Mader's fake families
so far, but those responses were
"very creative he says. He
hopes to encourage more students
to "write home
"I would love that he laughs.
Freedman, for one, intends to
resubscribe for a friend this year.
She'll have a wider choice than
last year, too, since Mader is of-
fering to write from three new
fake families.
Students can be the oldest child
from a New Paltz, N.Y family,
the second youngest child in a
family from Santa Barbara, Ca ,
or the child of a Fort Wayne,
Ind single-parent family.
"It's filling a void Mader
says. "I actually like writing, and
this is one way of doing it
Besides, he sees the letters as a
good alternative to typing term
papers or working in the cafeteria
as a money-making venture.
Charles R. Hardee
and
G. Wayne Hardee
are pleased to announce the
formation of a partnership
for the practice of law.
HARDEE & HARDEE
319 South Cotanche Street
Greenville, North Carolina
(919) 752-5565
General Practice of Law
10POTT
ADDING LIFE
TO CAMPUS LIVING.
� � �
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POSTERS
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WINDOW SHADES
CANDLES
UNUSUAL GIFTS
CALENDARS
STATIONERY POUND
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Large
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BRUT. WHITE
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Assorted Pops
BUY ONE
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ASSORTED FLAVORS
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r
6 CT. PKG. FRESH
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when you buy one 1 Lb.
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99 m
ONE 14 OZ. BAG
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when you purchase 1 Lb
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Nacho Cheese
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INCLUDES FREE 4 ROLLS
AND 1 LB. POTATO SALAD
Wishbone
Fried Chicken
-& ii
$5
69
TENDER YELLOW
Sweet
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10
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Seedless
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69�
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� fii - K�1 fl
- '
n
V I
!
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 30, 1984
Student Association Leadership In Disarray
(CPS) � For at least the third
administration in a row, the
leadership of the American Stu-
dent Association has fallen into
disarray, with former officers
resigning in anger and complain-
ing the group was ineffective.
The group, founded in 1978
and marketed to colleges nation-
wide as a "conservative alter-
native" the U.S. Student Associa-
tion, aimed to help lobby in Con-
gress on student and education
issues.
Its Washington, D.C. phone is
now disconnected, though its ex-
ecutive director and new president
both contend the organization re-
mains viable.
But in the last few months.
President Lori Hand resigned in
anger, claiming ASA owed her
SI. 000.
The Texas Student Association,
a group representing many stu-
dent governments in Texas, decid-
ed to withdraw from ASA, largely
on the recommendation of Dave
Galyon, ASA's national vice
president.
Last week, New Mexico's state
student association voted to
secede from ASA.
Student presidents at Min-
nesota, Michigan and Pan
American universities say that,
while they have not officially
withdrawn from the group, to
which campus student govern-
mnets pay $95 a year to support
lobbying efforts, they do not plan
to renew their memberships in
ASA.
In the last year, moreover,
previous President Michael
Gallegos resigned, complaining
ASA Washington, D.C. consul-
tant Jim Newton had asked him to
loan the organization money.
Gallegos had come to power
when his predecessor, Michael
Chapman, quit the ASA presiden-
cy because of suspicions about
Newton's effectiveness and the
amount of money the organiza-
tion owed to staffers and
creditors.
"The people who are in control
of (ASA) now have no interest in
students Galyon contends.
Galyon, who officially should
have become ASA president when
Hand resigned, was surprised to
hear former Albion College Presi-
dent Craig Kirby was now presi-
dent, working out of a
Philadelphia address.
Kirby promises ASA's debts
will "be squared away and
hopes to revitalize the group
"because of the (better) com-
munication that will take place,
and because of the rapport that
Jim Newton and I have
Newton, recently elevated from
Blue Lights Mean Safety
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Sl�ff Unicr
The ECU Department of Public
Safety reminds students again this
ear that campus is not immune to
crime and security precautions
must be taken.
The department suggests a
number of ways students may
avoid becoming victims of crime.
The ECU Department of Public
Safety ha- provided students not
only with campus policemen
patrolling the area but also with
blue lights a! various locations on
campus
According to Francis Eddings,
assistant director of security, the
blue lights should only be used in
emergency situations. Each light
has a phone which is directly link-
ed to campus security and which is
activated by simply picking up the
receiver. "The student only has to
give us an idea as to the extent of
the emergency, we will already
know where he is located he
said.
Since the installment two years
ago, Eddings said the blue lights
have not been used extensively
but, "if they serve a purpose iust
once then they have been suc-
cessful
Edding suggested that students,
particularly females, always avoid
walking alone or in dark areas.
Other precautions the department
suggests students take are registra-
tion of bicycles with the depart-
ment, keeping dorm rooms locked
at all times, never leaving valuable
property in vehicles, and repor-
ting all crimes promptly.
"We have a whole list of dif-
ferent campus crimes said Ed-
dings. "and we must deal with it
on a daih basis
19 Alcohol-Related Citations Issued
B HAROLD JOYNER
Muff Wnirr
Nineteen persons, many of
whom are ECL students, were
Study Habits'
Classes Set
For This Fall
B MARIJAKE FREEMAN
Staff ttrllrr
� series of classes based on
ategies for "studying smarter"
will be coordinated this fall by
Drs. lone Ryan, Steve Deters and
Will Ball of the University-
Counseling Center. The
unselors said they are encourag-
ing freshmen to attend the classes
but added that anyone who would
like to learn more with less effort
should attend. The course is aim-
ed at helping students discover
hovA to study more effectively.
Ball said he feels this course will
be a confidence builder for
students who find what they are
already doing is saving them time
and helping them learn more.
"Students who have practiced
what these sessions teach tend to
learn more by studying smarter
Ryan said. These classes are a way
to prevent bad study habits by
teaching the student better study
skills.
For the convenience of the stu-
dent, classes will be held at dif-
ferent times. The first session will
be Sept. 3-8 from 3-4 p.m the se-
cond will be Sept. 4 through Oct.
4 from 1-2 p.m. on Tuesdays and
Thursdays. All classes will be held
in room 305 of the Wright Annex
building located in Central Cam-
pus.
cited for various alcohol and drug
charges in Greenville parking lots
last Friday and Saturday night,
according to the Greenville Police
Department.
Greenville Police Chief Ted
Holmes said officers of the State
Alcohol Law Enforcement agen-
cies, in cooperation with the
Greenville Police Department,
issued citations for illegal posses-
sion of alcohol by underaged per-
sons.
Two persons were charged with
the illegal purchase of alcoholic
beverages and three persons were
arrested for providing alcohol to
minors. Holmes also said one per-
son was arrested for the posses-
sion of marijuana and drug
paraphenalia.
Holmes said, "Downtown
parking lots, particularly on
weekends, are a problem In
weeks to come, officers will con-
tinue to concentrate efforts in
downtown parking lots, he added.
ECL"s Director of Public Safe-
ty, Joseph Calder said student
should be aware of the fact that
"openly consuming" an alcoholic
beverage while on campus is il-
legal. He said if an officer should
see a student displaying an
alcoholic beverage, the student
will be arrested.
Here s A Great
Combination
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rTHE
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WELCOME BACK STUDENTS!
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Rent a 19 in. Color TV
for as low as
$19.95 per month
TVVCRStereo Rentals
Short Term Rentals Available
RENT TV
758-9102
2905 E. 10th St.
consultant to ASA's executive
director, has been at the center of
the controversy for the past year
and a half.
Various student leaders around
the country reported in April,
1983 that Newton had led them to
believe he was a lawyer, which he
is not.
Others got the impression from
conversations with Newton that
he had ties to the Reagan ad-
ministration, the Moral Majority,
the Young Americans for
Freedom, the College
Republicans, and the U.S.
Department of Education, but
none of the contacts at those
organizations had heard of
Newton at the time.
Asked to respond to Galyon,
Hand and University of Min-
nesota student officer Mike
Olmstead's negative remarks
about ASA's stability, Newton
Don't
Discard
Old
Library
Cards
did reply, "No one but me is able
to officially comment for ASA,
and that includes Craig Kirby
Newton now refuses to talk
with College Press Service about
ASA affairs.
"I would have no official com-
ment to College Press Service un-
til I could teach you responsible
journalism he says.
Olmstead says Minnesota's pro-
blems began at last October's
ASA convention in New Orleans.
"We sent them a check for an
admission of six people, but only
two attended he says. "They
were promised they would be
reimbursed for the four who did
not attend. They gave us a check.
I called Jim Newton, and told him
'Your check bounced He said,
'Okay, send it through again But
it still didn't clear
Former President Hand's com-
plaint was similar.
"Jim called one Friday in a
panic, and told me he needed
$1,000, so I wired him $1,000
from my personal account
Hand recounted in a phone inter
view in May.
"He has essentially told me
forget about getting the mone
back she reported
Since then, Newton has repaid
her. Galyon, student president a'
the University of Texas at El
Paso, says it was because "1 made
him. That's why he doesn't tali
me anymore
ASA President Kirby was un
sure how many schools still
belong to ASA.
"1 have no letters in the lasJ
year from any schools withdraw!
ing Newton says. "If I tell voJ
ASA has 100 member schools, if"
will end up in a headline 'AS
Membership dwindles to 0
schools
"Technically, we are a
member Minnesota's Olmsteaf
savs. "But spiritually, we art
not
TARLANDING SEAFOOD
r J 4.� . '
AvrfjAlAMEAl
Combination Special:
Shrimp, Trout & Deviled Crab
FF or Baked Potato,
Cole Slaw & Hush Puppies $3 9(
105 Airport Road 758-0327
B. J. Thomas
&
Logos
FRIDAY SEPT.14
DOORS C'N AT 7:00
ATTKE "RERNLEAF
ON S. MEMORIAL
Tickets Available At:
This Way Up
Record Bar
Apple Records
Christian Bookstore
WBZQ
WRQR
All Proceeds Of Concert GoToThis Way Up A Nonprofit
Christian Nightclub In Downtown Greenville-Corner Of
5th and Cotanche
Writing Certit
New
Hv IEYN1 U OOR

The A
Bv low
-
Tom Hame

f
A
Sho
B M BONr "l Y H
n
hope
t -
-
i
Release, -i h onum h
fair
king
genera, c
Such an expo
movie jusi does
ahe viewe. 's epe.
Gene Wilder - i I H wo"
In Red as The d
.typical middle g
-advertising executive �
b companions that a
but tranquil. The
aconsists of an r
Srife (Judith Ivej a
tha; date a punk
plete with a
piohawk).
- His friends are equa
que � Joseph B.
married playboy, M
d 1 e s t o n portrays
Theodore's buddies wh
XMth a doctor's wife wh
doctor) is in surgerv, an,
prodin portrays his ga frie
Gilda Radner plays the part
�gn office co-worker who,
tfatuated with Theodore, v
beserk when she thinks that
Stood her up. kelh le Brock i
The Woman in Red"
'beautiful model who Theodore
spots one day when she walks over
:a drafty vent. To his delight, shel
.shows up at his advertising of!
From that moment forth, the
chase is on (reminiscent of Bo
Derek and Dudley Moore in Iff)
:nly instead of a chase on sunn
Reaches, this one takes place or
horseback and in various bar
m
f ?





f
?
array
10, no 1 wired him $1,000
n mv personal account "
d recounted in a phone inter-
Mas
le has esentially told me to
ixnil getting the money
. reported.
hen, Newton has repaid
on, student president at
liversit) of Texas at El
- il va because "I made
h he doesn't talk to
fti ir�
s dent Kirby was un-
an schools still
ave no letters in the last
schools withdraw-
says "If I tell you
member schools, it
a headline 'ASA
kindles to 100
v e are a
Minnesota's Olmstead
tually. we are
EAFOOD
iol:
De iied Crab
pies $3.99
.8-0327

Thomas
&
ogos
Y SEPT.14
rN T 7:00
i "RESNLEAF
MEMORIAL
You Will
ireasure!
pecial $10
Discount
Ring
w

THF FAST C AROLINJAN
Writing Certificate Being Offered
style
AUGUST 30. 1984 Page 7
New Program Benefits All Concentrations
B JENNY MEADOR
surf w rim
Probably one-fourth to one-
halt of ECU students will obtain a
Bachelor of Arts degree upon
graduation. Perhaps many these
students will be worried about
what the future holds for them in
the way of available careers.
Recently there has been rumors
that the social sciences, i.e.
pscholog and sociology, as well
as the arts and especially English,
hae little promise for an exciting
Oi interesting career choice. But,
alas, these fields are growing as
well as the demand for specialists
in the health and human service
fields, and now the demand for
those with English degrees and
writing abilities is steadily increas-
ing.
Technical writing incorporates
many aspects of one's writing
abilities. Not only does one have
to be creative and logical, but one
must be extremely accurate and
careful when recording events,
technology and terminology!
Often research and scientific
orientation play a major role in
the organization of articles. But
it's not all cut and dry. The job
opportunities are astounding.
"The job outlook is, in fact, ex-
cellent. If you've looked in the
local papers for the last two years
in the Sunday want ads, there
have been plenty of jobs available
for publications managers, full-
time technical writers, and editors
working for publishing houses,
and even establishing your own
freelance communications firm
said Dr. Bertie Fearing, Professor
of English and Co-director of the
Technical Communications pro-
gram. Other options include such
areas as governmental or in-
dustrial research, working for
civic or cultural organizations,
and of course, writing, editing
and directing in public relations
for businesses.
Being a relatively new program
and pet project of Fearing and Dr.
Keats Sparrow, Professor of
English and Co-director of the
Technical Communications pro-
gram, it allows both
undergraduates and graduates to
become certified writing techni-
cians. Students have already
shown an avid interest in the
Writing for Business and Industry
class. "We normally run three
sections of 3880. This fall we
started with seven sections and
went to nine, still having to turn
People away. We will offer at least
nine sections next semester and it
may go to twelve Fearing said.
For undergraduates interested
in writing, five of eight specific
courses are offered to obtain the
"Certificate in Business and
Technical Writing These
courses are: Business and Profes-
sional Speech, Functional Gram-
mar, Advanced Composition,
Scientific Writing, Introduction
to Editing and Abstracting,
Writing for Business and In-
dustry, Introduction to Nonfic-
tion, and Practicum: Careers in
Writing. The certificate for
undergraduates was designed to
entice students from all majors,
whether it be political science,
geography, business, physics, or
English. "Of course
undergraduate writing majors
would have the best preparation,
but we do not exclude those who
did not major in English as an
undergraduate. An engineer or so-
meone from business could take
the program Fearing said. "My
philosophy is that a good liberal
arts background would certainly
enhance one's knowledge and
ability to write even in a technical
field, but most importantly is that
one has an interest in technical
communications
As for the graduate level
Master's program, a diverse cir-
riculum is offered to cover both
the technical and communitive
aspects of writing. The overall
course load is 30 hours, and
graduate assistantships are
available. With a limited enroll-
ment, it is a competitive program.
Technical production, com-
munications, research, literature,
and linguistics are the concentra-
tions covered. Fearing com-
mented, "There are only nine
graduate level programs in the
United States, and there are none
in the Southeast. The closest
graduate programs I know of
would be Carnegie Mellon in Pen-
nsylvania, R.P.I, in New York,
University of Oklahoma State,
and University of Minnesota in
St. Paul; so we are among the
forefront
The Attic Celebrates Its 13th Anniversary
By TONY BROWN
Staff � rtler

The Attic is rock & roll, and as
long as owner Tom Haines is in
charge, that's the way it'll be.
Begun in the attic of a building
"Usually a name change in-
dicates a different approach or
new ownership, that's why we
kept the Attic name even though
the club is no longer in an attic
Haines said. "We continued the
same high quality rock sound we
Tom Haines is the proud owner of the Attic.
on Fifth Street in Greenville 13
years ago this week, the nightclub
has enjoyed steady growth over
the years as evidenced by the
move to the old Colonial Super-
market building on Forth Street it
now occupies.
had worked so hard to be
recognized for, so it didn't make
sense to change the name
ECU has always been the prime
source of their customers and
employees, but with the tough
new drunk driving laws and the
lowered drinking age, the em-
phasis has become even greater.
In response to this need to at-
tract ECU students, Tom Haines
and The Attic have increased their
ties to the university by several
means. The club regularly spon-
sors charity events in conjunction
with campus fraternities,
sororities and other organiza-
tions.
Currently Haines is looking for
dormitory councils and organiza-
tions wanting to participate in
such events and asks that in-
terested parties call 752-7303 and
leave their name and number so
he can work with them.
Another way The Attic is at-
tracting ECU students is through
student special discounts. Those
with ECU ID's are now charged
only one dollar every night
bufconcert" nights. This price
applied 21 out of 23 nights in
August.
Certain ECU groups also
benefit from the prices. Every
Thursday night is either free or
discounted for ladies; female
dorm students get in free every
night except during special events.
A new attraction for ECU (and
Pitt Community College) students
is the admission of 18 year olds
for $1.50. "We're experimenting
right now with this idea Haines
said. "It will be in coordination
'A Woman In Red' Falls
Short Of Expectations
By AMY BONESTEEL
Staff Writer
An older married man falls
.hopelessly in love with a beautiful
girl and will do anything to get her
� sound a lot like Iff? Well, it's
iiot. It's Orion Picture's new
release, A Woman In Red � a
fair comedy filled with a cast full
of talented actors but lacking in
general comedy and content. With
such an experienced cast, the
movie just doesn't measure up to
ahe viewer's expectations.
Gene Wilder stars in A Woman
In Red as Theodore Pierce, a
lypical middle-aged San Francisco
advertising executive surrounded
i�y companions that are anything
fcut tranquil. Theodore's family
consists of an insanely jelouse
wife (Judith Ivey) and a daughter
jthat dates a punk rocker (com-
plete with a red and blue
inohawk).
1 His friends are equally as uni-
que � Joseph Bologna portrays a
jnarried playboy, Micheal Hud-
dleston portrays one of
Theodore's buddies who sleeps
Vith a doctor's wife while he (the
doctor) is in surgery, and Charles
Xirodin portrays his gay friend.
Giida Radner plays the part of
$n office co-worker who, in-
fatuated with Theodore, goes
fceserk when she thinks that he
tood her up. Kelly Le Brock is
?The Woman in Red" � a
rfeeautiful model who Theodore
spots one day when she walks over
a drafty vent. To his delight, she
ihows up at his advertising office,
prom tha' moment forth, the
jJBhase is on (reminiscent of Bo
j)erek and Dudley Moore in 10),
jjnly instead of a chase on sunny
Reaches, this one takes place on
'horseback and in various bars
"A Woman in Red " is playing at the Buccaneer Movie Theatre.
around San Francisco.
In several romance scenes, the
movie features new tunes by
Stevie Wonder and Dionne War-
wick.
The acting is mediocre all
around � Radner doing her best
with a very limiUdrole1Wilder
not nearly as funny as he was in
Young Frankenstein or Stir
Crazy. Le Brock does her best ac
ting with her mouth shut.
Although it's certainly not the
best or funniest movie Wilder has
ever done, his die-hard fans will
surely enjoy it.
r ��'�.
- � � - -
with The Elbo's wristbandonly
a stamp will be required to enter
one or the other after a wristband
is acquired.
'This will last as long as it's not
abused. If people start removing
the bands and wiping off the
stamp indicating they're under
age, the privilege will end
Haines added. There's another
incentive to keep the 18 year olds
honest �the 18 year olds in the
general population will possibly
get the same right if the experi-
ment is successful.
"We're making every effort
possible to bring good, live rock
music to as many people as possi-
ble Haines said. "We've added
a snack bar and constantly work
to make the atmosphere one
which will attract responsible
adults who know how to behave
A check with some local police
officers bears testimony to the At-
tic's ability to maintain peace
among its customers. "We have
very little problem inside the At-
tic several related. "We have
less trouble there than with other
downtown nightclubs
This fact is even more im-
pressive considering the Attic
features live rock & roll music
every night they're open, which
currently is Thursday through
Sunday nights, generally at 9 p.m.
Since the Attic is on the "A"
band circuit, the finest bands on
the club tour are available. "The
bands which consistently drew the
best in the past year or so were
Sidewinder, Skip Castro and
Maxx Warrior Haines said.
"These are the types of 'show
bands' we like to feature on Fri-
day and Saturday night. On
Thursday we generally have
straight forward rock & roll and
lesser-known groups, but we
always get the best group
available
"Right now we're open on Sun-
day nights, featuring alternative
music, such as new wave, reggae
and so on Haines said. "If peo-
ple come, we'll keep it goingif
not, we won't.
IJVU J
I
The Attic
For 13 years the Attic has been a source of rock'n'roll entertainment
for many ECU students.
Making Money Off Books
(UPI) � Ingram Book Co. has
revolutionized the book selling
business in the past decade and
confounded even the most
change-resistent segments of the
industry by becoming a sort of
literary Federal Express.
That assessment of the
Nashville-based firm comes from
Harry McCullough, director of
sales for the Scribner Book Com-
panies in New York.
Speed is money in the book
business because of the pickle
nature of the public's buying
habits. A book sought today may
be a book forgotten two weeks
hence � the time it normally
takes publishers to deliver.
"Ingram has revolutionized the
business said McCullough,
whose only accounts are Ingram
and Baker G. Taylor, another
wholesale firm that deals more
with libraries.
Ingram is by far the biggest
middleman between the 400 or so
publishers, mostly based in New
York, and the estimated 15,000 to
20,000 book stores throughout the
United States.
But Ingram is not resting on its
success, exemplified by 40 percent
annual growth rates in the past
few years. The company has em-
barked on ambitious programs to
further entrench itself with
booksellers and is vigorously pur-
suing the new video and computer
software markets.
Ingram views itself as a sort of
tail being wagged by the book
retailers in the United States and
that is one of their secrets of suc-
cess.
Company officials have
vigorously pursued a policy of
catering to the wishes of the
bookstores because, without
them, there wouldn't be an In-
gram.
Phillip Pfeffer, the company's
dynamic board chairman and
chief executive officer, said in an
interview, the book business in the
United States is an $8 billion a
year industry and lngram's sales
last year were about $250 million
� so there is plenty of room for
growih. Fifteen years ago, it had
sales of only $600,000.
lngram's strong suite is it can
get books it has in its 65,000-title
stock to anywhere in the United
States within a matter of days,
often the next day after an order is
placed by telephone. The com-
pany distributed 43 million books
in 1983. Ironically, the
booksellers can buy books
cheaper from publishers so In-
gram has to provide a service that
is worth the extra cost. That's
where speed comes in.
Some Ingram officials feel that
the now developing and still
unstructured video and computer
software markets may eventually
eclipse the book business within a
few years.
Pfeffer symbolized the down to
earth atmosphere at Ingram. The
39-year-old board chairman
greeted every single employee he
met (many by their first names) as
he guided a visitor through cor-
porate offices that resembled a
large suburban insurance office
more than a giant book
distributor.
This relaxed atmosphere is only
on the surface and could be
deceiving.
Ingram Book Co. has a svelte
management structure. And there
is a sharply focused definition of
role among its young managers.
"The book business is like
this explains Margaret
Langstaff, a vice president of the
firm. "The retailers need the
books fast. We get them to the
stores faster than the publishers
Ingram has three warehouses
from which shipping originates �
Jessup, Md which services the
Northeast; Nashville, which
serves the country's midsection
and Southeast; and City of In-
dustry, Calif which serves the
West.
Ingram buys its books at a dis-
count from the publishers �
anywhere from 40-43 percent. The
company sells them to the
booksellers at a discount based on
volume � an average of 10 per-
cent.
Ingram processes orders by the
thousands each day, mostly over
the telephone. (The company's
telephone bill will run about $2
million this year.)
There may be as many as 80
operators on duty. On an average
day during the summer about
3,000 orders from all over the
country are taken on computer
terminals. The average order is
about 115 books at a unit price of
$4, company officials said. The
orders are delivered mostly by
truck, some of them company
owned.
Ingram is a subsidiary of In-
gram Industries, a firm known
worldwide as a barge manufac-
turer, but which also has in-
surance and other in interests.
McCullough said there was
much skepticism about Ingram by
the New York publishers at the
start.
"I never thought it would
work. They did something amaz-
ing. The bookstore people are set
in their ways, but Ingram com-
pletely changed everything. It
took them a couple of years. They
made books available quickly
through microfiche. A bookstore
can see what is in stock and get it
in a couple of days. I don't think
anything will ever make the im-
See INGRAM, Page 10.
wn .m$m
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1
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8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 30, 1984
'Ingram Has Revolutionized The Business'
tumilMIHIHIMIINIIIINIIHIIHlMHIIIIIIMHluiiiiiiHUlliUHt
I
YO
Continued From Page 7
pression on the book business that
Ingram has made McCullough
said.
The Scribner executive said In-
gram doesn't make a lot of money
per unit so they have to do
volume.
"You ask the bookstores, par-
ticularly the independent
bookstores. Many will say they
couldn't survive without Ingram.
They are stocking more and more
titles in Superstock. I would be
shocked if anyone had anything
bad to say about Ingram. They do
something that the publishers
can't do. They have been great for
the publishers and the
bookseller he said.
Pfeffer talks with pride about
the company's history.
In the 1960s, he said, the library
aid programs of President Lyn-
don Johnson began to dry up
because of the Vietnam War.
Harry Hoffman, then president
of the company and now head of
Waldenbooks, wondered why In-
gram couldn't sell books direct to
retailers.
Classifieds
SALE
FOR SALE '75 Ford Grand Torino.
Runs good, rides good, stereo, C.B
AC. Call George 758-7240 after 4 p.m.
FOR SALE: 1977 DATSUN B210 Hat
chback 5 speed Runs well. Call
756 8253 after 6. Needs bodywork Best
offer
7 VOLARE, FULLY LOADED, EX-
CELLENT CONDITION. 756 8356
RIDES
WANTED
DESPERATE STUDENT needs ride
to Northern Va. area. Will help pay
gas. 758 8326. Ask for Al.
PERSONAL
FOR SALE
'ress and
752 1649
New Box Springs, mat
bed . frame. $50. Call
MISC
LOANS ON ' BUYING TV's, Stereos,
cameras, typewriters, gold ' silver,
anything else of value. Southern Pawn
Slop, 752 2464
DON'T MISS ANOTHER CONCERT!
Road Trips Unltd. is taking a busload
ept 14 to Yes in Greensboro Pick up
our tickets at Apple Records soon.
FREE KITTEN, 4 months old, very
� endlv. tortoise-colored. Free cat, l
vear old, gray and white. Both
female Call 752-5483.
'HE SGA STUDENT SAVINGS
CARDS are now in! Pick yours up at
e Student Supply Store, The Croatan
and at the Mendenhall Student Center
obby. Take advantage of great sav-
gs and get your card now!
NEED A FRENCH TUTOR? Tutoring
service available for serious students.
Able to instruct all levels. Fee
negotiable. Call: 757 3281
COMPUTERIZED TYPING SER-
�JCEWord Processing. Spelling
electronically checked. Term Papers
and Dissertations. SI.75 a page, paper
included. Call Mark after 5 at 757-3440
HOUSE FOR RENT. Ideal for 34
r ends. 5 minute walk from campus,
-art furnished. CHEAP-S260 plus
deposit Water included. 752 2615.
"�vailabie Now.
HELLO LATTER-DAY SAINTS
A footnote to remind you of all
the great activities just for you
and your friends.
1. Church Servire:Every
i Sunday 9-12, 3" Mor-
I tinsborough Rd.
Te' 756 5890
2 Institute Of Religion:
ffJTipUi or Brewster 30 5 B
Tlriw" -t Septmbpr
6th ' t 6:30-8:00pm.
The Course- THE NEW
TESTAMENT.
Call Bro. F.venhuis tor
jinore information
756-1473
Young Adult Activities-
Call Amy Brew 355-6364

IT'S GREAT TO HAVE
OUAT ECU.
J.W. Thanx for a fantastic summer.
You made it for me. Looking forward
to spending more time with you this
semester. Let me check my calendar
first. I'll see if I have time for you.
Hope you have a big 21st Birthday!
Love, Piggy
JAMIE BIGGERS AND K. KIMBER-
LY please get in touch with the
REBEL.
LYNN PAGE I hope to see you and
Fran out a1 the Pi Kappa Phi house
for the TOGA party tonight. B.S.
PI KAPPS if you see a little sister this
week, give her a kiss � they deserve
it.
PIANO PLAYERS WANTED reper
toire should include Jazz, Blues,
Rags, Dixieland. Call 752-1341 or come
by Piquant Alley.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
Non smoker-washerdryer provided;
new mobile home, rent $165, Va
utilities; private room and private
bath; Call 756 6151.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDEO ��
rent, Va utilities, Call 355 6933af ter
4:00 p.m on weekdays.
FEMALE STUDENT NEEDED
to share furnished condo. Central
airheat, washerdryer, $150.00
plus 'a utilities. Apt. 1-1 Cannon
Court. Call 758-7090 after 5 pm.
BABYSITTER NEEDED In my
home: T W afternoons from 3
p.m6:30 p.m. for 2 year-old girl.
$41mo. Call 758 0805 after 6 p.m.
PHOTOGRAPHERS AND
PHOTOGRAPHER'S REPRESEN-
TATIVE needed to work with local
fraternity and sorority parties. Earn
$l5-20hr. Send resume to: Picture
Perfect, 101 Woodland St Morgan
ton, NC 28655.
NEEDED: PART-TIME SOCCER
COACHES for various Pitt County
Schools. Contact Alice or Barry at
752-6106 if interested.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED to
share 2 bedroom townhouse apart-
ment, $140 month plus Va utilities.
Carpeted, air, furnished,
dishwasher, laundry facilities and
pool. Deposit required. Call 758-1263
after 5 p.m.
POSITION WITH SALES
AVAILABLE. Excellent opportunity
for extra money. No experience
necessary. Flexible work hours. Call
Ron at 752-7039.
By 1970, the company's sales to
bookstores totaled $1.4 million.
In 1972, Ingram introduced its
microfiche program, which gives
individual bookstores a weekly in-
sight into the books that are
available and in what quantities.
The bookseller can rent or pur-
chase a device for viewing the
microfiche. They can telephone
their orders in and have the books
on the shelves in a matter of days.
"This is information the
booksellers never had before
said Pfeffer.
In 1976, Ingram purchased
Raymar, a west coast book
distributor, and that solidified its
claim as a national wholesaler of
books.
Ingram began Superstock in
1982. That program is what the
name implies. The company add-
ed 35.000 titles in its inventory for
faster availability to customers
throughout the United States.
Pfeffer said an order placed
Friday afternoon from San Fran
cisco from Superstock will arrive
at the store Wednesday.
Superstock's warehouse is at
Jessup, which is near most of the
warehouses of the New York
publishers. Superstock contains
the "second tier" of books in de-
mand, and this service has placed
thousands of books days from a
retailer where they had always
been weeks away at best.
2BLO
"i
211 JA
1
Western Sizzlin Has Eyes For Yon
Ribe yes, TTiat Is
)CUTTHICK
FRESH AND COOKED
JHEWAYYOU
LIKE IT
Fri, Sat & Sun
For Only
S3.99
Wt PUT rT ON THE PLMT
I
I
PUTT
THEATRES
WELCOME STUDENTS!
PLITT
CAROLINA EAST CENTER
756-1449
DISCOUNT MOVIE TICKETS
You can purchase Plitt Theatre tickets at a 40
discount that are good for any movie seven days a
week. These tickets may be purchased at:
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
SHOWING THIS WEEK:
'TIGHTROPE'
7:05 9:20 R
THE PHILADELPHIA EXPEMMEHl
7:009:00 PG
"RED DAWN"
7:00 9:15 PG-13
HOUSE BY THE CEMETARY
7:309:15 R
"We want to be your night spot
every nite
� js
&.
o ,
WELCOMES
THE CLASS OF 1988
TO ECU
Doors Open: DST 9:00-2:00 a.m. Est. 8:30-1:00 a.m.
MONDAY �
CLOSED � Open for private dorm socials and special Mondays, i.e.
first week of each semester.
CRAZY TUESDAY � Different events each week from Bikini Contest to
Air Band Contest to Draft Nite. Each Tuesday is always different
& always fun.
HUMP NITE � Free admission to ECU students ($1.00 18 yr. adm.).
All cans 55� till 11:00 p.m 80C till closing.
COLLEGE NITE � $1.00 admission for ECU students ($2.00
18 yr. adm All cans 55C till 11:00 p.m 80S till closing.
End of the Week Party � Friday Afternoon-3:30 till 7:30 - Free
admission ,$ 1.00 18 vr. adm.). All cans 55� till 5:15 p.m 80t cans
till 7:30. FRIDAY NITE - $1.00 admission ($2.00 18 yr. adm.). All
cans80� till 11:00 p.m.
Best in Dance Music � $1.00 admission ECU students
($2.00 18 yr. adm.).
LADIES NITE � For 15 years our favorite way to wrap up the weekend.
Free admission for ladies ($1.00 18 yr. adm.), 6 Nickel Draft while it
lasts.
"BRING YOUR FRIENDS & COME EARLY
'You mutt be 18 to enter the club.
NC. Slate law prohibits persons under 19 to purchase � . wverages
Persons under 19 required to wear a wnstband while 0. uses
Alternative Beverages are provided
�Excludes 1 st Wednesday of each semester
TUESDAY -
'WEDNESDAY �
THURSDAY
FRIDAY -
SATURDAY
SUNDAY -
All New Deli Dog
Daily Specials
DELI SANDWICHES � HEROES � SOUPS
C ADS � VEGETARIAN SANDWICHES
FRESHLY BAKED BREADS
HAPPY HOUR DAILY
4:00pm to 7:00pm
UVE ENTERTAINMENT
FRI AND SAT
AUG 31 & SEPT 1
FEATURING:
The G-MEN
513COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE. NC
Video. Pmball. Billarrjs
OVE
MENS WEAR
and
Khaki
We are not sure about
the validity of the thought
that KHAKI was a World
War II invention, but we
do know that immediately
afterwards there was a
sudden appearance of the
fabric in every young
man's Wardrobe in this
country. The love affair
continues to persist. For
Fall 1984 you can expect
to see KHAKI pants as a
basic for young men on
campus or for any man's
weekend Wardrobe. And.
I suppose, we all know
that there is no friend like
that'special pair of
KHAKi pants that have
been washed until they are paper thin and who
cares about the wrinkles? At all of our Coffmans
stores we are going to be offeri g. a special value
to the true KHAKI customer
100 Cotton Khaki Pants


Duckheads
our own Coffman's
Fine Quality Khakis
�w pair for O . -70
lL pair for O . 37 3
o&maris
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall � Rocky Mount
������ "2?
Overt , �
m it P -

t woe � J
ocetoroer
.1 cheeks i.
f&0 10 ci
Skectf -
Oert�
?.S.
i.
COCA
COLA
2 LITER
BOTTLE
$�99

o S�h� iw
I"
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FRI
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SUNG
WITWAM'T'
MAMI
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MHtflMIHHIWimilMIHMIW Mini
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 30, 1984 9
ess
Ingram began Superstock in
2. That program is what the
le implies The company add-
I3V000 titles in its inventory for
pr availability to customers
ughout the United States.
teffer said an order , uced
ia afternoon from San Fran-
o from Superstock will arrive
ho store Wednesday.
fi;perstock's warehouse is at
sup, which is near most of the
J-ehouses of the New York
hshers. Superstock contains
second tier" of books in de-
ld. and this service has placed
LNdnds of books days from a
iler where the had always
eeks awuv at best.
1
HAPPY HOUR DAILY
4:00pm to 7:00pm
VE ENTERTAINMENT
FRIANDSAT
AUG31&SEPT1
FEATURING:
The G-MEN
3COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE. NC
Pna" e
ao?
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�tmi�tmi�mnnmtBitn�sf�tiiiwiit�tnit�nn�tiiiin�wtmnmit,�it,fl,alata�J�laa�����,��,�Illn
W T 4 W T W TT5TT!Sr�����������111.11�.��,�������,��������,
YOUR ONE-STOP SHOPPING
HEADQUARTERS
HMHMHlHlHHIItlHIH.
12 BLOCKS
FROM ECU
211 JARVIS ST.
CORNER
3rd AND
JARVIS ST
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET, Inc.
UNIVERSITY ECONO WASH
r busy now
�S� �-
,U�P� � �" home.
��� � �� your home ��� ' n�,
TW,� A� V" h,Vt W .ECU ID card and ou
to"0" . .

in��� mm
w,��H.o,P� (Overt0ns.e.
. wttf Bl0re
Co� �� '
receive your
l0o Discount
Summit
Jarvis
OVERTON'S
COCA
COLA
" SatStpt. i��

STROH'S BEER
6pk-12oz. cans $1,69
Case price $6.59
(Mew ��� ru So fapt Ut
BUSCH BEER
6 pk-12 oz. carii $1.99
Case pnce $7.59
Mom affectfe ru Sat S� 1m
OVERTON'S FINEST
HEAVY WESTERN
SIRLOIN STEAKS
Sirloin Steaks
lb. $1.99
T-Bone ib.$2.19
Me������ thru So�Sw l,
WE CARRY A FULL LINE
PARTY SUPPLIES AND KEGS
BudweiserBeer
6 pk12 oz. cans $2.29
Limit one case please.
SlFRITO LAf
RUFFLES I
80Z.
BAG
$.89
�Mecttve wvd Sot.
f
PRE
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Rl
MM! ��eth� ru SatSret In
5 3?
Expirm 9884
I
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FERARRI
SUNGLASSES
WffHTHB COUPON AND A SJD.00
POOD OROfR AT OVIRTONS SUPERMARKET INC
SOMY. KM PURCHASE EXCLUDED PROM TNB
OPPOL LIMIT ONI MR IUNOLASSO MR I.D.
NUMtfft. TNB COUPON NOT VALID M CONJUCTION
WITH ANY OTHER OFFER OR DEMOUNT.
OfftRUMffTIO TO STUDENTS ONLY1
ID NO.
.AMT. PURCHASE
I
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FREE CUP!
Expirw 9884
ECU 10 DISCOUNT!
PRESENT THIS COUPON FOR ONE FREE 30 OZ.
PLASTIC TUMBLER WITH
A $10.00 GROCERY
Limit One Froo
THIS COUPON NOT VALID IN CONJUCTION WITH
ANY OTHER OFFER OR DISCOUNT.
Name
ON ALL FOOD ORDERS
OVER $10.00 u-���f
PRESENT COUPON i
TO CASHIER FOR 10
DISCOUNT ON GROCERIES I
Name.
5
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I
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Address
Addrtss
E R
I.D. Number.
I.D. Number
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10
r HEEAST CAROLINIAN
jMJGUST 30, 1984
N
S
O
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a

'The Empire Strikes Back' Showing On Campus Tonight
By MATTHEW A. GILLIS
surf v ritrf
Are you looking to wet your
whistle with some adventures that
are out of this world? Can't resist
leading the forces of good against
the forces of gulp-eternal
darkness? Then hold on to your
hats and your lightsabers because
The Empire strikes again this
weekend � at Hendrix Theatre,
that is! The Empire Strikes Back,
the second of George Lucas' three
very successful Star Hars sci-fi
film series, blasts off once more to
that galaxy "far, far away" as
young Jedi warrior Luke
Skywalker (Mark Hamill) and
company continue their battle
against the evil forces led by the
man we love to hate maybe even
more than J.R. Ewing � "Mr.
Mean" himself, Darth Vader!
As the film gets going, we find
many of our old friends from Star
Hars on the run again from Vader
and his army of nasties. For-
tunately, for a time, they do
manage to escape, with Han Solo
("Indiana Jones" himself, Har-
rison Ford), Princess Leia (Carrie
Fisher), Chewbacca the wookie,
and the humanoid droid C3PO
safe at the planetary hideaway of
Han's old space smuggler friend,
Lando Calrissian � one of two
new main characters introduced
into the series and played by Billy
Dee Williams. Still, there does
seem to be something wrong with
Lando
Anyway, what happened to
Luke? Well, he and R2D2, his
other droid companion, have
headed to the planet Dagobah to
receive training in using the
mysterious powers of "The
Force" from the spirit of Ben
Kenobi (Sir Alec Guinness) and
the wise old Jedi master named
Yoda. If Yoda turns out to be one
of the wildest creations you've
ever seen, don't be surprised �
the character was created especial-
ly for this film by one of the noted
"Muppet masters Miss Piggy's
"mentor Frank Oz. (Incidental-
ly, he also performs as Yoda in
the film as well.)
Yeah, they're safe for now �
but Vader and those bounty
hunters are sure closing in fast!
I won't reveal too much more,
but you've seen it, haven't you?
Not Well, here's a golden oppor-
tunity to see a film that you might
even take your bratty kid sister to
see! Maybe that sounds a bit
ny, but The Empire Strikes fiah
offers a fun-filled, power-pa �
story of the battle bet wet .
and evil, filled with cliff!
perils, surprises galore, o
this-world characters, and the
wildest special effects any
(with a bit of cute an : leve
dialogue and even a little I
romance thrown in for
measure). Now, true, it wili never
match the success r 'he :
of Star Hars, but it ha -
going for it to make it ano
box-office smash worthy
the successful sequel of one i
. irwies of all time (as
! -� "sequel Return of
the Jed Hut, then again, I'll let
. ige this weekend!
pire and companv
� -rekend only. The
lay, Friday and
� p.m. and" 9:30
Hendrix Theatre in
idem Center Ac
� free to I L Students
f with either your EC L
. ard or MSC
And, need I saj
' rce be with v
ou!
ECU Poetry Forum To Meet Sept. 6
By TIM GILES
SUff Wrtlrr
Peter Makuck
Where amoungst ECU's in-
tellectual hubbub can the former
high school literary phenomenon
find the comradeship of like
minds? If he or she is or wants to
be a poet, then ECU's Poetrv
Forum has much to offer.
Sponsored by the English
Department, the Poetry Forum
will hold its first meeting on
Thursday, Sept. 6, at 8 p.m. in
Mendenhall, room 248.
Leading the Forum is Dr. Peter
Makuck, author of a short story
collection, Breaking and Enter-
ing, and a book of poetrv, Where
We Live. Makuck has published
extensively, and his work has ap-
peared in many major literary
magazines.
The Poetry Forum is a
workshop for student poetry.
When a poem is presented to the
Forum, the author passes out
copies to the other members.
After reading his work aloud, the
poet sits back while Poetry Forum
members tell him what they did
and did not like about the poem
and suggest ways to improve it.
Meetings usually last until 9:30
p.m. and often spill over to a
nearby restaurant.
Students are inviti :
Poetry Forum meetii .
feel shy about reading
first time. Meetinj
semester are scheduled for St-
and 20, Oct. 4 and 1 - '
and Dec 6.
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Last ea:
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higher
three other :
draft for careers
CFL
The eight NF.
highest total in sch
but this ea tea
many players who have
professional career
The follow, g . � loo
seen seniors who appea
prime candidates
NFL draft:
Henry Williams: i: there is
one player who put exoitementi
to the Pirates' attack last ea:
would have to be Williams w I
known for his infamous flip a:
every- touchdown he scores
The First time that the
180-pound sparkplug ee: j
ed the ball in varsity competrjf
for the Pirates, he broke l
a 56-yard touchdown on
return against the Florid S J
Seminoles Later in the al
game, he ran a kickoff back I j
99-yard score.
He led the nation last vear
kickoff returns with a 31.1
average and was named seccJ
Stefon Adams
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r

night
THE EAST C AROL INI AN
es ol all time (as
el Return of
igain, I'll lei
his weekend'
compai
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9:30
I heatre in
.
Students
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ECU
Sports
AUGUST 30, 1984 Page 11
� � si
'TOES
3
By RANDY MEWS
port� Kdlioi
lorida State has defeated ECU's football team
iree consecutive seasons, but Pirate head coach Ed
�or sa.d that this Saturday his team will make
ehevers out of the boys from Tallahassee
We re only going down there for one reason -
that s to win. Emory said in a Tuesday mid-
noon press conference.
it's a great challenge to play on the road against a
like Florida State, but we're better prepared for
s game than any team I've ever had the opportuni-
coach.
oi was as bold to say that this club had more
nan last year's team, eleven of whom are now
mg professional football, but admitted that the
rience wasn't there.
Pirates' inexperience will be most evident at
back, a position in which a starter has yet to
ted. Three candidates are vying for the starting
and Emory has been disappointed with how
iave progressed thus far.
scrimmaged over the weekend, and not a
quarterback could get our receivers the ball "
'I think we have the finest receiving corps'in
in Stefon Adams, Ricky Nichols, Henrv
Williams and Damon Pope, but if we're to be suc-
cessful through the air, we've got to find somebody
who can get them the ball
Emory briefly mentioned several lineman who sus-
tained minor injuries during practice, but exuded
confidence when describing the other facets of the of-
fensive game.
Defensively, the Pirates' biggest worry will be All-
America and Heisman Trophy candidate Greg Allen.
Last year Allen romped over ECU for 154 yards on
33 carries, while also picking up three touchdowns.
"He's burned us for three years Emory said.
"Our defensive line is going to have to get to him and
then stop him
Teaming with Allen in the FSU backfield will be
Junior Roosevelt Snipes. An extremely powerful run-
ner, Snipes ran for over 600 yards in 1983, and
averaged an impressive 6.6 yards per carry.
"I know our kids won't back down from anything
or anybody Emory said, "but we're really hurting
up front
To compound matters, defensive ends Curtis
Wyatt and J.C. Plott, both of whom were battling
for starting positions, will miss the game because of
injuries.
Although the productivity of a quarterback and
Former Player Looks Back
the containment of Greg Allen are Emory's primary
concerns, they are still things that can be worked on
m practice.
"We've practiced to the point where we can't be
any better prepared than we already are Emory
said, "But the one thing you can't practice is how to
P'ay in front of 70,000 people
Considering the fact that none of the ECU quarter-
backs has ever taken a snap in a varsity football
game, how the pressure will effect his signal caller is
Emory's biggest concern going into the game.
Although ECU is a relatively inexperienced team,
rlorida State is not soon to forget their come-from-
behind victory over the Pirates last year.
"I've never seen anything like this one Seminole
Coach Bobby Bow den said after the contest.
"Nobody was able to stop each other on defense
There were 948 yards worth of total offense in the
game, but ECU All-America candidate Henry
Williams stole the show by returning the only punt of
the game for a touchdown, and then opening the se-
cond half with a 99-yard TD kickoff return.
Emory said he doesn't expect Florida State to let
Williams do the same thing to them again this year,
so he's come up with a very basic game plan.
"We're going to go all out on each play � and if
we win enough plays, we'll win the game
ECU must stop Florida State's Heisman Trophv
candidate Greg Allen this Saturdav
00 9 CO
10 900
y
t place
OL
Bv TONY BROWN
NIaff Wrtl�
Bumgarner was a dif-
kind of athlete from the
hat go through the
ittending college while
their futures on pro
he wanted to know
arh as a player to
. school coach and I
took more than just
ick ig and catching
"I made sure I
reasons we block-
or why certain
d in specific situa-
after practice I
es what their
. through that
ed a lot of
ting, but it
-ate me as a
d what
i "d in the overall game
" full use of this
went on to set
rds in his davs as
a receiver at ECU in 1964-65. He
is still standing second in passes
caught and fourth in career yar-
dage even though he played on the
last of the single-wing teams in the
country. He was a major force on
Coach Clarence Stasavich's teams
in the years ECU won the now-
defunct Eastern Bowl and the
Tangerine Bowl.
He was named to the all-state
team and honorable mention All-
America and was signed by-
Toronto of the Canadian Football
League. As a starter in his first
season, he caught 25 passes for
four touchdowns and had an im-
pressive debut for a rookie, but
found something was lacking.
"It just wasn't what I thought it
would be he said. "There was
so much travel involved and
things they had promised didn't
happen � so after one year I
decided to follow my goal of
becoming a high school football
coach and got a job in the
Edenton-Chowan school system.
"That's when I really
began to understand the impor-
tance of a broad education. I
taught classes from eighth to 12th
grade in such courses as English,
math, spelling, literature, history,
health and physical education,
geography and economics � all
while serving as head baseball and
assistant football coach
It was Bumgarner's educational
background that made this and
subsequent upward career moves
possible � not football. "The
best thing a college athlete could
do would be to examine their
motives for playing and plan ac-
cordingly
"In the past you could pretty
much get by on coaching and
teaching P.E but today the
school budgets are so tight that
only those qualified in physical
science, math and other courses,
as well as coaching, are being
hired
In 1968 Bumgarner decided to
take the next step toward his goal
and obtained a job at Greenville's
Rose High School as a social
See BUMGARNER, Page 14
Best Appointed As
Baseball Assistant
JON JORDAN � ECU Photo Lab
Billy Best (swinging bat) is ECU's
new assistant baseball coach.
By DON GROSS
staff W rt(r
Success sometimes takes a toll.
Last year's Pirate baseball team
won the ECAC-South tourna-
ment, and then came within two
games of going to the College
World Series. They ended the
season ranked 20th in the nation.
Head coach Hal Baird rode the
success of his team to a better
coaching job at Auburn Universi-
ty, leaving the helm to last year's
assistant coach Gary Overton.
To replace the assistant
coaching void, ECU hired former
Pirate star Billy Best. He played
centerfield for the Pirates from
1977 to 1980.
Best was then drafted by the
Kansas City Royal organization.
There he rose to AA ball, playing
for Memphis in the Southern
League.
Due to his age (26) and the fact
that the Royals drafted three new
promising outfielders, he
to take the assistant coaching job.
"I'll miss pro ball Best sai
"but I've always wanted to come
back to mv alma mater and do
this
Best thinks that the team has a
good nucleus of players and come
spring they all should be healthy
enough to go after another con-
ference title.
"Coach Overton is a very
knowledgable man commented
BestThere are essentially few
changes in the running of the
team
Best will concentrate on instruc-
ting the outfielders and will also
help with hitting and baserunning.
With his experience in profes-
sional baseball, Coach Best will
make a great addition to the
coaching staff.
"I really want to stay here for a
long time added Best. "It's
good to be back
ECU Once Again Sports NFL Candidates
B. s( OTT POWERS
Miff Writer
aiss of 12 players to
fessional football ranks
ear, many feel the Pirates
be lacking potential All-
cans and professional draft
is, but this year's team has
seniors that have the ability
careers for themselves in
" t ball,
t year's team produced nine
draft choices, the third
� total in the country, while
other players skipped the
' careers in the USFL and
he eight NFL draftees was the
� est total in school history,
but this year's team also has
players who have a shot at
'essional careers.
The following is a brief look at
seven seniors who appear to be
me candidates for the next
NFL draft:
Henry Williams: If there is any
ne player who put excitement in-
the Pirates' attack last year, it
would have to be Williams who is
known for his infamous flip after
every touchdown he scores.
The first time that the 5-6,
180-pound sparkplug ever touch-
ed the ball in varsity competition
for the Pirates, he broke loose for
a 56-yard touchdown on a punt
return against the Florida State
Seminoles. Later in the same
game, he ran a kickoff back for a
99-yard score.
He led the nation last year in
kickoff returns with a 31.1 yard
average and was named second
team All-South Independent and on the team In addition to his
second team return specialist in 4.4 speed in the forty, Adams
Sporting News. He is obviously also possesses strength � lifting a
the premier return man in the na
tion.
Although he only caught four
passes for 62 yards as a flanker
last year, his 4.2 speed in the
forty-yard dash also makes him a
deep threat.
Stefon Adams: Adams returns
to his split end position as a se-
cond year starter after leading the
team with 20 receptions for 277
yards and an average of 13.9
yards per catch last year.
His longest catch was for 39
yards against Missouri. As a
sophomore, Adams made 12 cat-
ches for 185 yards averaging 15.5
yards per catch.
As far as athletic ability and
talent is concerned, coach Ed
Emory calls him the "best player
total 1,489 pounds in four lifts
the bench press, squat, hang
clean and the push press.
Ricky Nichols: Nichols, who is
one of the group of receivers that
Emory calls the best in the coun-
try, will be back for his third year
as starting flanker, a position
which he will share with Henry
Williams.
Last year, Nichols was the
third leading receiver on the team
with 15 catches for 222 yards and
an average of 14.8 yards per
catch and two touchdowns. His
biggest catch of the year was a
27-yard touchdown against
Missouri, which assured the
Pirates of a 13-6 victory.
He's an excellent athlete with
4.3 speed to make him a deep
threat, and he's also a member of
the ECU baseball team.
Damon Pope: Pope is likely one
of the most underrated players on
this year's team, but he has ex-
perience, playing in every varsity
game for the Pirates in the last
three seasons.
He had seven catches for 83
yards and one touchdown for the
Pirates last vear in his backup
roll. His size � 6-3, 230 pounds
� and blocking ability should
make him a strong pro prospect
this season.
Pope is expected to be one of
the leaders on offense this year
and with a good year he could
really make a name for himself.
He's also considered one of the
fastest tight ends in the country
with 4.4 speed.
third year as a starter for the
Pirates after being forced into a
starting role as a sophomore after
injuries depleted the linebackers.
The 6-2, 230-pound Jordan
was the third leading tackier on
the team last year with 90, which
included 48 primary tackles and
three quarterback sacks. His best
games were against N.C. State,
when he had 14 tackles, and
against Missouri, when he had
four tackles behind the line of
scrimmage.
Jordan has played in all but
one of ECU's varsity games since
he arrived at the school. He's ex-
pected to be one of the premier
defensive players on this year's
team.
Tyrone Johnson: Johnson alter-
nated at the linebacker spot last
vear. but with Mike Grant now
Ricky Nichols
Damon Pope
playing with the Memphis
Showboats of the USFL, he will
inherit the starting job alongside
Jordan.
Johnson transferred last year
from Hinds Junior College and
proceeded to be the seventh
leading tackier for ECU in his
first season with 56 tackles,
which included 3? initial hits and
four quarterback sacks.
He is very strong, as evidenced
by a 365-pound bench press and a
600-pound squat, which will
make him extremely hard to
block.
Chris Santa Cruz: Santa Cruz
also transferred from Hinds
Junior College last year, and in
his first season for the Pirates he
played linebacker, defensive end
and noseguard.
Noseguard will be his home
this year, and with heavy losses
on the defensive line, he will have
the opportunity to prove to
everybody what the coaches
already know.
Last year's statistics of 19 in-
itial hits and 12 assists are not in-
dicative of the important role he
played on last season's squad. He
is very' quick and mobile for a
defensive lineman, and has a
good nose for the football He
had his best game of the season
last year against Florida, wher
he had four tackles and one
quarterback sack, while also
keeping Gator quarterback
Wayne Peace under constant
pressure.
All-America Candidate Henry Williams
Tyrone Johnson
Chris Santa Cruz
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12
THE EAST CAROL IN I AN
AUGUST 30. 1984
Pirates, Seminoles Prepare For Saturday
TV AND FLORIDA STATE:
The Pirates' garni with Florida
State in Tallahassee will be televis-
ed, but on a tape-delaved basis.
WIIN-TV (Channel 7,
Washington, NC), an NBC af-
filiate, will carry the game, but
sas forced to opt for a tape delay
in compliance with the College
ootball Association's night-time
IV window.
In Monday's edition of The
East Caroinian, no mention was
made of the fact that the game
was on a tape-delayed basis. This
was the direct result of a WTTN
news release which stated "the
game will be broadcast direct
from Tallahassee
The release gave the time WTTN
as going to air the game, but
tailed to mention the game actual-
started at 7:00 and failed to
mention the game was on a tape-
wlayed basis.
ESPN owns the night-time win-
dow rights, and no exempt
telecast can begin any earlier than
30 minutes after ESPN's broad-
cast goes on the air. On Sept. 1
FSPN will carrv Miami vs.
orida from Tampa, Fla which
ks off at 7:30 p.m. (EDT).
iN.C. State
Tickets
Go On Sale
rickets for the ECU-North
C aroiina State football game went
sale yesterday.
kets will be sold from 8
5 p.m. through Friday at
Minges athletic ticket office,
Dnl) ECU students with a
valid ID and Activity card are
eligible to make the purcha-e.
A maximum number of two
tickets per ID will be sold. Cost is
12
FSl AND ECU: ECU and
Florida State will do their best to
replay last year's thrilling 47-46
season-opener, which was also
played in Tallahassee.
The Seminoles and Pirates com-
bined to set records for most
points scored by both teams (93),
most touchdowns scored by both
teams (13) and most points in a
defeat for ECU (46).
The Pirates have never beaten
Florida State, sporting an 0-3
mark in Tallahassee's Doak
Campbell Stadium. The
Seminoles have outscored ECU
166 to 70 in those three games.
ECU AND THE STATE OF
FLORIDA: ECU not only has
had problem with Florida State,
but the State of Florida as a
whole. ECU is 3-12-2 vs Florida
competition, but that includes a
1-5 record vs Tampa and a 2-0-0
mark vs Stetson. Both schcjls
have since dropped collegiate
football.
Against Division I competition
within Florida, the Pirates are 0-7
(0-3 vs Florida State, 0-3 vs
Miami, and 0-1 vs Florida). Three
of those seven losses came during
the 1983 season, ECU's only three
losses on the season (FSU 47-46,
Florida 24-17 and Miami 12-7).
FSl AND THE STATE OF
NORTH CAROLINA: The
Seminoles. 7-5 in 1983 and 28-3
winners over North Carolina in
the Peach Bowl, sport an im-
pressive 20-6-1 record against the
State of North Carolina. Their
last victory was the Peach Bowl
win.
ALIEN LIKES
COLD: Florida St
Trophy candidate
seems to thrive on
Gold. The juinor t
Milton, Fla has
Pirates, rushing for
45 carries in the two
played.
PURPLE &
ate Heisman
Greg Allen
Purple and
ailback from
burned the
214 yards on
games he has
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Allen has also scored six
touchdowns, which gives him a
gaudy 107-yard-per-game average
against ECU, while also averaging
three TDs a game. Allen has also
had two straight 200-plus vard
games against LSU, whose colors
also happen to be Purple and
Gold.
COMMON OPPONENTS:
ECU and Florida State share two
common opponents on their 1984
schedules. The Pirates meet Tem-
ple in Ficklen Stadium and South
Carolina at Columbia, SC. The
Seminoles also host Temple while
playing South Carolina on the
road.
This year's meeting between the
Seminoles and Pirates will be the
team's last until the 1987 season,
when Florida State is scheduled to
play in Greenville, NC. The two
teams have met four of the last
five years including this season's
game.
ECU AND SEASON
OPENERS: ECU has compiled a
23-24-1 record in season openers
during its 48 years of playing col-
legiate football. ECU has cap-
tured six of its last eight openers,
but has dropped its last two �
North Carolina State in 1982 and
Florida State in 1983.
This will be the second straight
season the Pirates will open the
season with a Florida school, and
only the third time in the school's
history. ECU opened the 1953
season with a 40-6 victory over
Stetson under the guidance of
former ECU head coach Jack
Boone, who passed away earlier
this year.
FSU AND THE RANKINGS:
Florida State occupies a spot
among most of the 1984 pre-
season Top 20 polls, while the
Pirates, 20th in last year's final
Associated Press poll, are absent.
The following are the publications
which rank FSU among their Top
20:
Game Plan: 13th
Playboy: 17th
The Pirates, although not rank-
ed among the nation's Top 20, are
picked as favorites in nine of their
11 games this season by Street and
Smith Magazine. That publication
also selected guard Norman Quick
and flankerkick returner Henry
Williams to its All-Atlantic Coast
team.
The only games Street & Smith
ranked ECU as underdogs in were
Florida State and Pittsburgh
NO HOME FOR HENRY
Senior Henry Williams, the na-
tion's No. 1 kick returner in 1983
(31.1 average), has been selected
to several pre-season all-
conference teams. Williams was a
Southern Living All-South pick, a
Playboy All-South pick and a
Street & Smith All-AC C pick.
But of those three, only one
chose Williams as a return
specialist Southern Living and
Playboy plugged Williams in a'
split end or flanker Why not a
kick returner on the All-America
teams?
And Now
For Something
A Little
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I
The New
MMiovia
Banking Card
Ti II II
' ' E - i
Mendenhall Student Center Campu;
Pitt Plaza Highwa) 261 Bypass
I niversit 802 E! 10thStreet
Bank around campus
get cash around
the country.
With the new Wachovia Banking Card, you can
bank anytime at Teller II" machines around campus
and at more than 125 locations statewide. And now
you can use it to get cash and check your balances
at thousands of other automated teller machines all
across the country. Just look for the Relay symbol
at participating financial institutions in North Carolina.
South Carolina and Virginia or the CIRRI IS; symbol
at banks nationwide.
The new Wachovia Banking Card comes with
every Wachovia checking or Statement Savings
account at no extra charge. One more reason to make
Wachovia your bank. A Personal Banker can tell
you more - and why you shouldn't settle tor less.
Included among North Carolina financial institutions
participating in the Relay network are:
Wachovia Bank & Trust
First Union National Hank
Northwestern Hank
First Citizens Hank & Trust
Southern National Hank
United Carolina Bank
Planters National Bank
Peoples Bank& Trust
Wachovia
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Member F.D.I�.
Pirates
FUTURE sc HUM its
pirates, 20th �- the final 1983 AP
poll and 17th in the Sport
iustrated poll, face an
tougher 1985 schedule. Next
season sees ECU face 1983 na-
tional champion Miami-Florida at
home, along with Sou- :ina
Tulsa and Temple A fifth I
game will be piaed,
ponent to be named.
The Pirates' 198!
ma be one of the toughest it
nation. ECU
Auburn, LSU, P-
Southwe
Editoria
I received
amourv
several EC1
athletic admin
column that appeared
day's sports section
Carolir ii
The s le pu
cle was
besi '
of Noil
jest of �
The conti
id, "v. �� �
me: tracl
doesn't ha
�n worth n �
The staten �
. :�
"Come Play
This
Students
Weekday
Wee- e�
Indian Trail
Grifl
Applications are
now being accepted
for persons interested
in assisting the Pirate
during athletic eveni
drive socials, banqu
miscellaneous duties
For more information
Chris Wray, Studen
757-6178 or stop b Pir
Located Behind Fickle
Deadline for applicants in VI
for
Color Print Fil
Applies to 110 12(
Color Print C
One
12 exp
15exp 2
24 exp
36 exp �i
Offer Good Sept
fotoexi
lOth&CorancheStl
Hours: 9-6 MorvFt
10-2

4
SJ






?
day
THE EAST CAKOLINlAN AUGUST , IVH4
'illiams to its All-Atlantic Coast
ram.
The only games Street & Smith
nked ECU as underdogs in were
florida State and Pittsburgh.
NO HOME FOR HENRY
Senior Henr Williams, the na-
n's No. 1 kick returner in 1983
1.1 aerage), has been selected
several pre-season ali-
enee teams. Williams was a
uthern I iving All-South pick, a
laybo) All-South pick and a
smith AJJ-ACC pick.
But oi those three, onlv one
;e Williams as a return
; southern Living and
' vwd Williams in at
Hanker. Why not a
k returner on the All-America
Our
lOl'R
pp Hour At
II With
d & Nat. Lite
i trking
udent Center Campus
Highway 26 i Bypass
K02 . I Oth Street
ited �
r th( Reh �
itin in vv ithC irolina,
he CIRRUS1 symbol
with
r Statement S i
tomake
il Banker tell
uldn I sett �
chovia
Bank&Trust
Pirates Face Tough Road Schedule In 1985
KITDRE SCHEmirpc. . � .
13
HTDRE SCHEDULES: The
Pirates, 20th in the final 1983 AP
poll and 17th in the Sports Il-
lustrated poll, face an even
tougher 1985 schedule Next
season sees ECU face 1983 na-
tional champion Miami-Florida at
home, along with South Carolina
Tulsa and Temple. A fifth home
eame will be played, with the op-
ponent to be named.
The Pirates'1985 road schedule
ma be one of the toughest in the
nation. ECU will travel to
Auburn, LSU, Penn State
Southwestern Louisiana
Southern Mississippi and North
Carolina State.
Over the next three seasons the
Pirates will face three former na-
tional champions (Pittsburgh,
Miami-Florida and Penn State) Southwestern Louisiana'becomes
na six teams that have been to the third offensive coordinator in
bowl games the past threee
seasons (Penn State, Pittsburgh,
Miami-Florida, Florida State,
Auburn and LSU).
season. Joining ECU for 1984 is Jeff Autry.
Don Murry, who succeeds Art Caparas left the team last week
Baker as offensive coordinator, for personal reasons while Plott
Murry, who came to ECU from suffered a shoulder injury over
1983 and 1984 opponent the summer and Wyatt underwent
surgery last week for a hernia.
Autry, who missed the entire 1983
Division I school in the state can 33,767 fans that witnessed ECU's
match. Last season's 8-3 record 21-9 victory over East Tennessee
helped ECU pass North CaroUna State during last year's
State, who has had nine winning Homecoming game
seasons during the same period. The Pirates boast an eight game
The other three Division I schools home winning streak. ECU's last
in North Carolina have had less loss in Ficklen Stadium was a
31-21 setback to William A Mary
to dose the 1981 season (Nov. 14).
�mm j73mZ7i� STZTBTCWS
last live. was not given doctor's clearance Carolina and Duke)
Linwood Ferguson joins the to play this season. Autry put his
ECU staff from North Carolina arm through a glass window HOME OPENER SEPT. g The ON THF ROAD in r
rnA-uiM- -�t A&T� where he was defensive before spring practice in 1981 and Pirate un �T.u � ini L THE ROAD AGAIN: East
Coach ff CHAN Head coordinator and secondary coach the arm requiredSen ?ve surgery schSulTw tnhVrJi0�' CvM face its Mcond
?�achEd Emory we comcs tw� for two seasons (1982-83). to correct the nmhLTlvesurgcry SS?? the JcmPc Owls in straight season of seven road
Coach Ed Emory welcomes two
new faces among his assistant
coaches for the 1984 football
Editorial Notice
I received a considerable
amount of criticism from
several ECU coaches and
athletic administrators for a
column that appeared in Tues-
day's sports section of The East
Carolinian.
The sole purpose of the arti-
cle was to promote ECU as the
i Kt football team in the state
ol North Carolina, not to make
i jesl of the other athletic teams.
The controersial statement
j read. "With the exception of
men's track and baseball, ECU
; doesn'1 have an athletic pro-
cram worth mentioning
The statement was not made
j to undermine the efforts of the
coaches and players on the
other teams, but to merely
point out that football, track
and baseball are the only teams
a person would mention if they
were asked to name possible
national contendors.
I'm sure that all the athletic
teams at this University put
forth the same amount of ef-
fort in preparing for their
season, but it is my opinion
that football, track and
baseball are the only teams at
ECU at this time that have the
ability to compete for a na-
tional title.
�Randy Mews j
"Come Play The Indian
This Fair
Students Welcome
Weekday's $5.00
Weekends $7.00
Indian Trails Country Club
Griffon, NC
Applications are
now being accepted
for persons interested
in assisting the Pirated Club
during athletic events, membership
drive socials, banquets and other
miscellaneous duties.
For more information call:
Chris Wray, Student Assistant, at
757-6178 or stop by Pirate Club Office -
Located Behind Ficklen Stadium.
Deadline for applicants is Wed, Sept. 4, 1984
!�������������
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Offer Good Sept. 4,5,6,7,1984
foto express
lOHi&CotoncheSt.
Hours: 9-6 Mon-Fri
10-2 Sot
for two seasons (1982-83)
Ferguson, who played his college
football at East Carolina, was PITT KICKOFF CHANGED:
defensive coordinator at Elon The time for East Carolina's Oct.
College before his stop at A&T 6 game with the University of Pitt-
and helped Elon to the NAIA Na- sburgh has been changed from
tional Championship twice. 1:30 p.m. EDT to 12:20 p.m. The
change was made �y Pittsburgh to
VETERANS MISSING: Four
veterans of East Carolina's 1983
team will be missing when the dow in the event the game has
Pirates kick off Sept. 1 versus some television appeal.
Florida State. They are senior cor-
nerback Rally Caparas, senior 10 IN 12: East Carolina has ex-
defensive ends Curtis Wyatt and perienced 10 winning seasons in
J.C. Plott and offensive tackle the last 12 years, a mark no other
kickoff, will also boast a car
givaway if Ficklen Stadium is sold
out.
Since being expanded to 35,000
seats in 1978, Ficklen has never
sold out. The largest Ficklen
coincide with the College Football Stadium crowd to date w� the
Association's afternoon TV win-
Ficklen Stadium Saturday, Sept. games. A year ago the Pirates fac-
8. Jne game, set for a 7:00 p.m. ed the same task they do in 1984,
with only four of the 11 games
scheduled for Ficklen Stadium.
The Pirates, however, will be
home five times in 1985, including
games with 1983 national cham-
pion Miami-Florida, Tulsa and
South Carolina.
Sat's4P�-P
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14
THEEAST CAROLON1AN
AUGUST 30, 1984
Informal Recreation Hours Announced
JON JORDAN KCU PIWNj L�b
Football player Isaiah Hill enjoys pizza at Tuesday's welcoming get-
together for ECU athletes.
Area's Merchants
Sponsor Welcome
Bi RICK McC ORMAC
Starr u rlirr
On ruesday Sept. 28, the ECU
student Athletic Board, in con-
tion with area merchants,
nsored a welcoming get-
togethei for over 500 athletes.
Domino's Pizza, Pepsi Cola of
Greenville, Substation II and Ser-
omation ail donated goods and
services to the fourteen sports
s, coaches, cheerleaders and
ports medicine personnel.
This was the second time that
ill of the athletes from the athletic
rtment have got together for
teni since the merger of the
nen's md women's programs in
mid seventies.
1 oraine T ter, president of the
jAB, vaid the purpose of the
gathering was to allow all athletes
he opportunity to become well
tinted with one another, to
ss the concern of the SAB
ill sports are equal con-
iributors to our entire athletic
family and lo acquaint the student
ithletes with the Pirate Club and
s role in their athletic careers at
I CU ��
Chancellor Dr. John Howell at-
tended the get- together with his
�ire, and 'hought it was a good
idea to get all of the athletes
ogether for such an event. "I like
all of the athletes from the
lifferent sports are here Howell
"It's a good place for
athletes to meet each other on
lal terms. Football gets most of
the attention but I like all the
rts Howell went on to say
athletes are just like everybody
�e they like Domino's pizza
All oi the athletes seemed to
like the idea of having their peers
together tor an event of this
nature. Senior football player
ESEARCH PAPERS
I '89 to f-oose from � all subnets'
� S; recurrent 306-pagecata-
: jstom research & thesis asss-
ta � 1 s .i.a :ao!e
Research 3. daho Avft. �206 JC,
Vngeies.CA90025(213)477 8225.
Ricky Nichols said "It's a good
way to meet the freshman athletes
who are just coming in. The food
is good too
Tim Dumas, a sophomore of-
fensive tackle on the football
team, explained that there was
nothing better than "meeting new
people and eating lots of good
food
Chris Santa Cruz, a senior
nosegaurd, said he had a really
good time. "You get to meet the
athletes from the other sports and
it's just a really good way to meet
new people
The SAB has participated in
the Pitt-Greenville Special Olym-
pics and in the Pitt-Greenville
Senior Games. They also provide
media releases, and help sponsor
the Converse Lady Basketball
Classic.
By JEANNETTE ROTH
Staff Writer
For those of us who are laid
back, never enjoying those team
sports where grit and pain go
hand in hand; for you in-
dependently spirited souls who
would rather do it alone than with
a teammate; the Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services
has something for you � INFOR-
MAL RECREATION.
Informal Recreation is "drop
in" play in which nothing is plan-
ned except for the amount of time
You plan to spend playing! The
IRS Department has several
facilities open for your conve-
nience during a variety of hours
every day including weekends.
Swimming pools, weight rooms,
gymnasiums and the Intramural
Equipment Center are all open for
you to enjoy.
By simply bringing your school
I.D. you can check out everything
from bowling pins to horse shoes.
All equipment must be returned
by 3:00 p.m. the following day
before a late fee will be charged to
you. The Informal Recreation
hours for fall semester 1984 are as
follows:
SWIMMING POOLS
Memorial Pool
M-W-F 7a.m8a.m.
M-F 12Noon-l :30 p.m.
M-F 3:30-6:30 p.m.
Sat. 1p.m5 p.m.
Minges Pool
M-W-F 8p.m9:30p.m.
Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
maxeil
niiixMIML C!iO
WEIGHT ROOMS
Memorial
M-Th 9a.m8
Friday 9 a.m5:30
Sat Sun. 1 p.m5
Minges
M-F 3p.m7
SPORTS MEDICINE
SERVICES
M-Th 10a.m12
M-Th 2p.m6
VC'L OR PD MAGNETICS
3 Tapes for $9.99
Free T-Shtrt or
Koozie Cooler with coupon
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
p.m.
noon
p.m.
I
I
I

.� � i
Todd s stereo
NA UTIL US, INC.
758-9584
Weight Training Center WAerobic Classes Daily
Within walking distance from ECU campus
PLAZA
SHELL
COMPLETE
Al TOMOTIVE
SERVICE
M0 Gnrnvtfle Blvd.
"500? jI- u BBS
-4 hoUr Towing Service
I -Haul Rentals
Available
Gym Hours:
Mon-Thurs 10:00-9:00
Friday 10:00-8:00
Saturday 10:00-5:00
Sunday 100-5:00
Our Gym Has:
Rates:
100.00 Semester-indiv.
85.00 Semester-Group of 3 or More
Add 20.00 for Aerobic Classes
Just Aerobics - 60.00 Semester
(Unlimited Classes)
6.000 lbs. of Olympic Weights
Complete Nautilus Circuit
Tanning Booth
SaunaShowers
Good Supervision on Nutrition
and YES we have air conditioning
lautilus
Bring This Ad In For A Free
Trial In Both Aerobics
And Weight Training
THE
FITNESS
CLUB
for men and women
1001 EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE. N.C. 17��4
Kings's Sandwich Delicatessen
Happy Hour 2:00-4:00pm
$ .50 Beer
$2.50 Pitcher
$10.00 Coupon. 15 Off For One Year
271 IE. Tenth Street
152-4279
MEMORIAL GYMNASIUM
M-Th 3 p.m4:45 p.m.
(4:45-10 based on availability)
Friday 3 p.m5:30 p.m.
SatSun. 1p.m5 p.m.
EQUIPMENT CHECK-OUT
CENTER
(Memorial Gym 115)
M-Th 9 a.m9 p.m.
Friday 9 a.m5:30 p.m.
Sat Sun. 1 p.m5 p.m.
OUTDOOR RECREATION
CENTER
MF 9a.m11 a.m.
1:30p.m5 p.m.
T-W-Th 2 p.m4 p.m.
Operational Hours Adjusted
accordance with the seasons.
in
Even you people who plan to
practice for the big Intramural
Hag Football game of the week
can check out all the practice
equipment you need.
Informal Recreation is for
everyone, as well as all it's related
services. Take advantage of us
USE US. The IRS Department is'
especially for you Participate in
our Informal Recreation pro-
gram. Your smile will brighten as
your muscles tighten
Bumgarner Tells His Story
Continued From Page II
studies teacher, head baseball and
assistant football coach so he
could attend ECU and gain his
master's degree.
Any ideas that he was sliding by
on his sports background
evaporated as he was named
Educator of the Year in his first
year at Rose High; then he finally
realized his dream and became
head football coach, replacing
long-time coach Bud Philips.
Bumgarncr's college football
experience showed itself as he
coached his 1975 team to the N.C.
state championship and runner-up
in 1979. Now began the true
lesson for college athletes �
reaching out for more.
"I really enjoyed coaching, but
it's hot out there he said. "Dur-
ing football season I was either
practicing with the team or plann-
ing for 16-18 hours a day. I was
missing time with my children and
I needed another challenge
That's when Bumgarner set an
example any athlete would be pro-
ud to follow � he applied and
was hired as the principal at Rose
High School. "I enjoy this job
more because there's greater
responsibility and more time for
my family, but I still miss
coaching sometimes he said.
"I would advise college athletes
to look beyond sports and work to
later they will
themselves.
want more for
This story is an unusual one to
find in the sports pages, but it's
more important than most
because of the inspiration it gives
to college athletes to excel in the
classroom as well as in their play.
In years to come, people will
tell him "I didn't know you
played football but D�v
give themselves a good Bumgarner will just smile because
background for advancement ,n he's no longer an cT-athlc -
ojier fields, because sooner or he's an educator
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES
Youth Soccer Coaches work part-time 10-20 hours
weekly beginn.ng Monday September 10th Hours are
normally 3:30-7:30pm Monday thru Friday with occa
sional Saturdays. Salary rate $3 45hr Knowledge of soc
cer skills and the ability to coach young people ages 9-15
T-Jfi?'?" Greenville Recreat.on and Parks Dept
at 752-4137 (ext d 248, 220, 259) Deadline for applica-
tions is Friday August 31st.
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DOUG CLARK AND THE HOT NUTS
Presents the 3rd Annual
ALL CAMPUS
TOGA PARTY
ADMISSION REQUIREMENTS:
Toga, I.D $1.00, B.Y.O.B.
THURSDAY AUGUST 30 8:00 PM
Hooker Rd.
Lake
Stop-N-Go
BUSES TO
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7:30-9:30,11:30-12:30
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 30, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 30, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.355
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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