The East Carolinian, August 28, 1984






She lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.2
Tuesday August 28,1984
Greenville, N.C.
18 Pages
Circulation 12,000
WZMB Manager
Resigns Position
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newt Editor
Jim Ensor, the general manager
of WZMB, the campus radio sta-
tion, resigned recently and Susan
Duncan, who has served as the
station's business manager, has
been named acting director, sub-
ject to approval by the ECU
Media Board.
Duncan said she has definite
goals concerning the development
of WZMB, but changing pro-
gramming is not one of them. "1
don't plan on doing a whole lot of
that she said. "Ths the pro-
gram director's responsibility
Improving the station's
business organization is one of
Duncan's main objectives. "Our
operations manual is outdated
and 1 am currently working on a
manual which will more clearly
define the departments, their
duties and the rules governing
them she said.
"As far as students are con-
cerned, our main goal is to in-
crease listenership Duncan said.
She plans to do this through better
exposure for the station, including
getting more involved in campus
activities.
"I'm very concerned about the
number of students who listen to
ZMB, and one of my main goals is
to increase that because it is a stu-
dent radio station and I want
students to feel like we're working
on their behalf Duncan said.
Duncan cited a recent WZMB-
sponsored concert where the pro-
ceeds were donated to charity as
an example of WZMB's campus
and community involvement and
said she hopes to see more con-
certs of that nature in the future.
She added that she would like to
see more giveaways, in coopera-
tion with area merchants.
She also said student input is
important and students are
welcome to call or stop by the sta-
tion with suggestions.
Increased grant generation is
another of the areas Duncan plans
to concentrate on. "Because we
work on a non-profit basis, we
have no ads, but we can accept
money in the form of a donation
and identify the donor on the
air she said. "In the past, this
privilege as a campus radio station
has been under-utilized
Having more grants, Duncan
said, "will take some of the
pressure off the Media Board and
the students in financing WZMB
and will allow us to get more
equipment
��. � i
o
And The Walls Came Tumbling Down
NEIL JOHNSON � ECU Photo Lab
After just one too many late-night party and an overly-large popula-
tion of termites, the Beta house finally succumbed to the ravages of
time and machinery this summer,
parking lot on campus.
However, there is now another
Center For Student Opportunities Receives $460,000 Grant
Bv JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
N�w� Editor
A $460,000 grant was recently
received by the ECU School of
Medicine's Center for Student
Opportunities. The grant was
given by the Department of
Health and Human Services' Divi-
sion oT Disadvantaged Assistance
in order to further a health careers
opportunity program.
According to Dr. Zubie Met-
calf, director of the Center for
Student Opportunity, "the pur-
pose of the program is to provide
an opportunity for disadvantaged
students to receive special services
to achieve objectives that include
facilitation of entry into med
school and increased retention for
early graduation
The grant will be shared with
North Carolina A&T. North
Carolina Central and selected
undergraduate programs at ECU.
The money will be distributed
over the course of three years. It is
an "innovative approach to in-
creasing the representation of
underrepresented people in the
health professions Metcalf said.
The term 'disadvantaged' is a
term which is often
misunderstood, Metcalf said.
"For our purpose, it is defined on
economic, educational or cultural
grounds
Classifying a person as cultural-
ly disadvantaged is the most com-
mon classification according to
Metcalf. "In general, this is a per-
son who comes from an environ-
ment that has inhibited whatever
knowledge, skills and abilities
they will need in school
Educationally disadvantaged
students are identified on the basis
of SAT and MCAT scores, while
those who are financially disad-
vantaged are identified based on
information compiled by the cen-
Refrigerator Rental
sus bureau.
"Most all of the minority
students are eligible nationally on
the basis of the cultural criteria
Metcalf said. "The system has
just not worked in their favor
Part of the grant money will be
used at the three schools, which
are what Metcalf calls "feeder in-
stitutions A coordinator of
educational assistance will be pro-
vided at these schools, along with
supplies and other incidental ex-
penses.
In addition, staff members
from the Center for Student Op-
portunities will visit the various
campuses and hold meetings and
offer workshops. The meetings
will "help improve counseling of
aspiring medical students while
the workshops will concentrate on
"improving basic learning skills
and development Metcalf said.
The staff tries to reach approx-
imately 120 students � 40 from
each campus � each year.
In addition to the on-campus
services, two special programs are
available to the students. The spr-
ing program allows students to
spend several days at the med
school and to see first-hand the
life of a student there.
The summer program has 12
spots reserved for students from
NCC, ECU and AT&T. "It pro-
vides insights into some aspects of
medical school and also em-
phasizes basic skills development
and concepts in the basic
sciences Metcalf said.
Once at school, programs are
also available to assist the disad-
vantaged students. Academic sup-
port is available in the form of
tutorial services and counseling.
The more advanced students
tutor those who are less advanced,
which works to the advantage of
both, Metcalf said.
Service Allegedly Solicits Illegally
By GREG RIDEOUT
Maat Editor
A refrigerator rental service
delivering units on campus ran in-
to trouble last week when it
allegedly tried to actively sell addi-
tional refrigerators. According to
campus officials, soliciting
business on school property is il-
legal.
Greg Miller and Pat Donly of
Student Services Corporation of
Arlington, Va were stopped
Tuesday by ECU Public Safety
officers after complaints from the
SGA refrigerator rental staff that
the company was acting illegally.
After speaking with Miller and
Donly, Director of Public Safety
Joe Calder and Associate Dean
Ronald Speier determined that ex-
tra refrigerators were indeed being
rented. The two drivers said they
weren't actively trying to rent ex-
tra units. Miller and Donly said
they were only responding to in-
quiries.
The for-profit company was on
campus because students ordered
refrigerators from them via a toll-
free number advertised on a flyer
the company sent to dorm rooms.
Student Services was renting their
refrigerators for $39.95, $5.05
cheaper than the SGA models.
Vice Chancellor for Student
Life Elmer Meyer, along with
Calder and Speier, decided to
restrict the Virginia company to
only delivering its refrigerators,
allowing Donly and Miller only to
tell inquiring prospective renters
the toll-free number to call.
SGA refrigerator rental
Manager C. Howard Joyner said
he was disappointed with the deci-
sion not to pursue the allegations
that the company had actively
solicited students. SGA President
John Rainey said he was asked by
Donly and Miller to rent a
refrigerator. Rainey said he didn't
inquire first.
Paul Jost, owner of Student
Services Corporation with his
brother, Henry, said last Tuesday
the restrictions placed on his com-
pany by the administration were
unfair and too restrictive. Jost
phoned his complaint to Universi-
ty Attorney David Stephens
Wednesday. That afternoon
Stephens advised Vice Chancellor
Meyer and his staff that the policy
used Tuesday was too restrictive.
The policy was changed Wednes-
day to allow the company to again
rent refrigerators to students who
inquire.
Meyer said the solicitation com-
mittee will be meeting this year to
avoid any problems like this next
year.
SGA refrigerator rentals ended
Thursday. Student Services Cor-
poration planned to stay on cam-
pus through last Friday. SGA of-
ficials say there was no loss of
business because of Student Ser-
vices Corporation.
LES TOOD - ecu Nowi BurMu
The Faces Of Drop-Add
I Whatever the emotion, drop-add brings it out. A picture's worth a
thousand words.
UNC Searches Mortician 9s Records
For Evidence Of 11 Missing Cadavers
On The Inside
Announcements2 For a review The Graphic,
Editorials4 which appeared at The Attic
Features8 Sunday night, see Features,
Classifieds12 page 8.
Sports13
�The City of Greenville has an- -WITN will televise ECU's
nounced that it will enforce a season-opener at Florida State,
strict towing policy for cars For details, see Sports, page 13.
parked illegally in the vicinity
of campus. See story on Thurs-
day, .jhe Freshmen Records for the
Class of 1988 have arrived and
are available in the Buccaneer
�Warner Brothers' fall releases office, located on the 2nd floor
are previewed in the features of the Old South Building,
section, page 8. from noon to 5 p.m.
GREENSBORO (UPI) � An
exhaustive search of records has
turned up no evidence that ashes
from any of 11 missing cadavers
donated for research were return-
ed to the University of North
Carolina Medical School, officials
say.
The administrator in charge of
anatomical remains at UNC has
been indicted on charges that he
embezzled 11 bodies. The fruitless
search of records by UNC of-
ficials is the latest development in
the case.
Miami mortician Fred
Richardt, the last person known
to have possession of the bodies,
has said some of them were
cremated and the ashes sent to
UNC to be returned to relatives of
the deceased.
"We can find absolutely no
written documents supporting
that said Dr. William Huffines,
associate dean for basic research
at UNC. Huffines said school of-
ficials spent more than a week
checking various files.
Richardt could not be reached
for comment Friday.
UNC officials said they will
continue efforts with Richardt
and Wade Barber, Orange County
district attorney, to recover the re-
mains of bodies for families that
requested their return. Six of the
cadavers had not been authorized
for transfer out of UNC, a univer-
sity spokeswoman said.
The university's curator of
anatomical remains, Lester
Sandlin, 42, was suspended from
his post shortly before he was in-
dicted Aug. 6.
Medical school officials have
said Sandlin acted improperly in
agreeing to send 11 bodies to
Richardt.
Sandlin has said Richardt told
him the bodies were to be sent to a
medical school on the West Indies
island of Martinique, but French
authorities say there is no medical
school on Martinique.
Sandlin has contended he acted
within his authority in allowing
the bodies to be transferred to
Richardt. The bodies he sent were
of no use to UNC and were
designated for cremation, he said.
Sandlin said he sent the bodies
through his private company,
Professional Mortuary Service of
Durham.
Richardt has denied he told
Sandlin where the cadavers were
to be sent, but has acknowledged
he picked up the bodies at Miami
International Airport and sent
them out by boat. He would not
disclose where he sent them.
Barber said the cadavers are
"somewhere in the West Indies
but would not say where.
However, he has said he plans to
speak with the families and "get
all their questions answered
The confusion surrounding the
fate of the cadavers bothers UNC
officials, Huffines said. When
people donate a body to research,
the school agrees to honor certain
requests including returning ashes
to those who want them, he said.
"It's part of the donor pro-
gram, and we always have tried in
the past to keep every commit-
ment that was made Huffines
said. "We are of course continu-
ing our efforts to correct the situa-
tion" and trace the missing
cadavers.

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H-






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28,1984
Announcements
AMBASSADORS
welcome back! we really missed you this sum
mer but and exciting semester Is already under-
way Our first general meeting will be Wednes
day. August 29 In the Mendenhall Multipurpose
room We have many prolects to discuss and we
will also discuss the retreat We're looking tor
ward to seeing all of you there
GBA
Attention All Graduate Business students and
professors, the Graduate Business Association Is
sponsoring a volleyball party at 4 00 Friday.
August 31st. located at the corner of Wth St and
Charles Blvd across from Kash n Karry
COMMUTERS
Stv" its who commute to class from outside the
Greenville area and need rides or riders, contact
Commuter Services. Whichard 211. 757 6881.
PAUSE
The Baptist Student Union will hold the first
PAUSE of the semester Thursday night at 7:00
p.m Highlighting the evening will be a guest
violinist Join us for this informal worship.
KARATE CLUB
The East Carolina Karate Club will have its
first meeting on Thursday. August 30. lVW, at 7:30
in Memorial Gym dance room This meeting Isfor
those of yellow belt rank and up. Bring your Gl.
Beginning classes will begin in September.
NEWMAN CENTER
The Catholic Newman Center will hold its
regular mass at 500 Wednesday, August 29th.
Dinner will be served afterwards. Please loin us!
SPORT CLUBS
Anyone interested in participating in the Sport
Club Program can go to Memorial Gym Room 105
for further information Numerous clubs are
available
SPECIAL EVENTS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Special Events Committee
will meet on Thursday August 30, 1984 atd 530
p M in Room 242 of Mendenhall Student Center.
All members and interested persons are urged to
attend
LACROSSE PRACTICE
There will be the first official Lacrosse practice
at the bottom of college hill this Thursday, the
30tn The time to be there Is at 3:30 pm. If you can
not come please call Chris Tomasic at 752-4999
We will practice Tuesday. Wednesday, and Thurs-
day of eacr. week this fan and. also, there will be
some matches too
ISA
Welcome back members and new students! You
are cordially invited to attend our first meeting
and dinner on Saturday, Sept 1, at 6:00p.m. at the
international House, 306 East 9th St All old
members and new interested students are en
couraged to attend Hope to see you all there!
NEWMAN COMMUNITY
Looking for a place to get together with friends?
Maybe me ECU Newman Catholic Center Is the
place for you! This Wednesday, we will have our
first meeting for this year, so why not come down
and ioin us? All our new friends are invited to
attend help us welcome our new coordinator.
Father Terry Collins, and find out about our up-
coming beach retreat and Encounter weekends.
There will be a short service, followed by a
meeting and dinner it all happens this Wednes
day at the ECU Newman Center, located on East
10th Street (iusdt pasdt the music building) We'll
be looking for you!
INTER-VARSITY
The East Carolina Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship would like tor you to get to know your
neighbors! So why not loin us out on the mall for a
cookout on Tuesday, August 28th? We'll provide
the food-you supply the fun! Join us as we begin
another year of reaching out to people-come on by
and bring a friend to our cookoutgoing on all day,
Tuesday, August 28th!
Also, the East Carolina IV group will hold Its
first meeting of the year on Wednesday, August
29th. We Invite all our old and new friends to stop
by the auditorium in the Jenkins Art Building and
help us keep the good times rolling along! Want to
know what we're all about? Come on down and
find out! I
HONORS SEMINARS
All University faculty and all students par
tlclpatlng In tt e Honors Program are reminded of
their opportunity of designing or requesting the
Honors Seminar of their choice. The Honors Com-
mittee makes the final selection from among pro-
posals submitted each semester. Seminars are
topic oriented and often interdisciplinary and
team taught. Proposals for courses to be taught
spring semester 1985 must be submitted before
Friday, September 7, 1984, to Dr. David Sanders,
Director of the Honors Program, co English
Department, Campus. For further Information
see Dr Sanders in Ragsdale 212 or call 757 6373.
ZBT LITTLE SISTERS
There will be a very Important first meeting
Thursday, August 30 in the Coffeehouse at
Mendenhall 500 p.m. Everyone needs to attend
ZBT LITTLE SISTERS
There will be an executive board meeting Tues-
day. August� at 7 p.m. at 211 North Oak St. Apt.
no. 4. if you need more Information call Renee at
7524695.
FRISBEECLUB
First meeting tomorrow night August 29,
Mendenhall Student Center room 247 at 8 p.m. All
13,463 of you are invited! Ultimate and massive
frisbee play Tuesday, Thursday and Sunday bot-
tom of College Hill Dr Be there or be sorte
oblong.
GOLDENHEARTS
Goldenhearts. welcome back. Hope everyone's
summer was great. Our first meeting will be
Thurs Aug. 30 at 8:00 P.M. In the party rm. Ex-
ec, board please meet In the chapter rm. at 6:45.
We will try to make the general meeting as short
as possible. Hope to see everyone there.
PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers of PI Kappa Phi welcome back
everyone to school, especially our Lithe Sisters.
We both remind everyone to go to our annual
throwdown. the PI Kappa Phi TOGA PARTY! 11
The party Is Thursday night, the 30th, at the PI
Kapp House, we also wish everyone a successful
year.
CADP
Campus Alcohol and Drug Program meeting to
be held Aug. 30 at 4.00 Erwln Hall room 218. All of-
ficers, members and anyone Interested In lolnlng
are urged to attend.
NEW TIMES
Catholic Mass is now offered at 11:30 A.M. In
the Biology lecture hall, rm. 103, and at 9:00 P.M.
at the Newman Center Every Wednesday at the
Newman Center mass Is celebrated, followed by a
meeting, a shared meal and fellowship, beginning
at 500 P.M. c'mon and loin the funl
SIGN LANGUAGE
The Sign Language Club will be having Its first
meeting Thurs Aug. 30th at 6L3C p.m. at
Mendenhall. (Please ask for room no. at the
desk.(All new students are welcome to attend.)
No previous knowledge of sign language Is
necessary. We will be electing officers for this
year. This is going to be an exciting year for us
and we hope you can come ioin us in the fun!
FACULTY
A faculty Investment club is presently being
formed in our area. This should be an exciting,
fun, educational, and financially rewarding op-
portunity for all. For more information and
details on an organizational meeting to be held
soon, call or write today i 355-2025 days and nights,
FACULTY INVESTMENT CLUB, P.O Box 8372,
Greenville, N.C. 27834.
PHI SIGMA PI
welcome back, brothers! The Softball
gamecookout was an Inspiring experience-such
athletic ability in a few of us excuses usother poor
slobs Executive Council meeting this Wednes-
day night at 7 pm at 402 Rotary. Our first business
meeting will be Wednesday, Sept. 5, In 132 Austin
at 5:00. Looking forward to 111
OUTDOOR TRIPS
Anyone who loves having FUN outdoors should
contact the Intramural Outdoor Recreation
Center and register for the upcoming
BACKPACKING TRIP. Reservations must be
made by 500 p.m Friday. Sept. 7. The UWHAR
RIE NATIONAL FOREST will be the sight for all
the excitement just call (757 6911), or come by
Room 204 Memorial Gym.
FLAG FOOTBALL
Anyone Interested In playing flag football or
starting up a team PAY ATTENTIONIU The IRS
Dept. wants you to participate! Register for In-
tramural Flag football on Sept. 45. The team
Captains meeting Is Sept. 6 at 7.00 p m In Rm. 103
In the Biology Building. Come to Rm. 204
Memorial Gym to sign up. PARTICIPATE
RATHER THAN SPECTATE! 111!
AEROBIC EXERCISE
Get PHYSICAL with the Intramural
Recreational Services Aerobic Exercise classes.
Register for the first session of classes August
27-31 from 8:30-4:30 In room 204 Memorial Gym.
Exercise through the IRS.
SPORT CLUB COUNCIL
The first meeting of the Intramural and Recrea
tionai Sevlces Sport Club Council will be on
September 19, 1984, at 4:00 In Brewster B 103 All
officers should attend.
GOSPEL CHOIR
No Auditlonsl Students Interested In loining the
ECU Gospel choir should meet at the Ledonla
Wright Culture Center on Aug. 29 at 5:00 P.M. If
you are Interested and cannot make the first
meeting you should contact Wesley at 758 9624
MAJOR ATTRACTIONS
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Melor Attractions Commit
tee will hold Its first meeting on Thursday, August
30, 1984, at 5:00 P.M. In room 212 of Mendenhall
Student Center All members and Interested
students are urged to attend.
SCHOLARS PROGRAMS
Guidelines and application forms for the
Younger Scholars Program of the National En
dowment for the Humanities are now available
for photocopying In the Placement Office. The
program will award up to 100 grants nationally to
students under 21 to conduct their own research
and writing prolects in such fields as history,
philosophy, and the study of literature.
JOBS
The Department of Intramural Recreational
Services has lobs available for FLAG FOOT
BALL OFFlCIALSIl! NO experience Is
necessary. A CLINIC is held in which rules, posl
tloning, and all other aspects of the ob ere taught
All men and women who are Interested In of-
ficiating or lust earning some extra money,
should come to the 1st clinic Aug. 30, 600 p.m
Rm. 102 Memorial Gym. THE ONLY JOB
YOU'LL EVER LOVEII
CAMPUS CRUSADE
Please loin us for our first "Prime Time"
fellowship this Thurs Aug. 30 at 7 p.m. In Jenkins
AudArt Bldg. We are featuring a film by Josh
McDowell entitled "THE SECRET OF LOVING"
The gallop poll rated McDowell as the most
popular speaker on the A mer lean college campus
Come loin In the fun. We ere looking forward to
meeting you.
FOREIGN STUDENTS
if you art interested in taking an English Se
cond Language Course (non credit) then sign up
In the Writing Center, Austin 309. Students will be
contacted about class schedules.
PRE MED
Attention: All Pre-Med, Pre-Vet, Pre Dental
Pre Pharmacy, there will be an important
meeting held in Mendenhall, room 221, Tuesday,
Aug. 28th at 7:00. Refreshments will be served.
MINORITY ARTS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Minority Arts Committee
will meet on Wednesday, August �, 1984, at 5:00
PM. In Room 247 of Mendenhall Student Center
All members and Interested persons are urged to
r
O TV DA
VAN BROWN
"YELLOW BYRD"
ECU '78
BOB BARHOIR HONDA IN
3 300 S Memor i a I Dr drrrnvllu N (
Bus is non
7M.I4
Charles R. Hardee
and
G. Wayne Hardee
are pleased to announce the
formation of a partnership
for the practice of law.
HARDEE & HARDEE
319 South Cotanche Street
Greenville, North Carolina
(919) 752-5565
General Practice of Law
Kings's Sandwich Delicatessen
L
Happy Hour 2:00-4:00pm
$ .50 Beer
$2.50 Pitcher
$10.00 Coupon-15 Off For One Year
2711B. Tenth Street
752-4279
SPECIAL CONCERTS
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Special Concerts Committee
will meet on Wednesday, August 2?, i?fM, at oo
P.M. In Room 242 of Mendenhall Student Center
All member and Interested persons art urged to
attend.
BALL ROOM DANCE
Ball Room Dance for faculty and staff will
begin on Oct. 2 at noon In Memorial Gym, rm. 108.
Classes are scheduled for Tuesday and Thursday.
There Is no charge. Bring a partner or come alone
and learn basic dance steps in the Fox Trot, Cha
Cha, Waltz, Rumba and Bopl Contact Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 or lust arrive to dance.
AEROBICS
The Physical Education Department will offer
free Aerobics for Faculty and Staff at noon on
moo Wed Fri starting Sept 10. Classes will be
held In Memorial Gym, rm. 108. No experience Is
necessary. Wear comfortable work-out clothes
Let's get back In shape together.
JUDICIAL OPENINGS
There will be several openings to serve on The
University Honor Board and Public Defender
Staff. There will be an organizational meeting on
Tuesday. Aug. 28th at 4:00 in Mendenhall Student
Center, room 221 This Is your chance to get In
volved In student government. If you are unable
to attend and are still Interested call Scott at
752 5W5
CHEERLEADERTRYOUTS
Anyone Interested In trying out for the 1984-1985
Gold Cheerleader Squad, must attend an
organizational meeting on Tues Aug. 28th at 500
pm, Mlnges Coliseum. Practice Clinics to be an
nounced. Guys and Girls welcomedl
LACROSSE CLUB
Come to the bottom of college hill on Tuesdays
and Thursdays at 3:30 to play some Lax We're
looking for a few good men. Any questions call
Dave Lockett
SKIING
Lef s spend New Years In wild wonderful West
Virginia at Snowshoe. You can register for PHYE
1150, 1151, 1152 and receive 1 hour's credit or you
may go non-credit � the ski lodge where we stay
is located right on the slope-equipment is provid
ed and ski lessons by the Ski Academy are
available In beginner, intermediate, and advanc
ed levels. Contact Jo Saunders at 757 AOO0 for fur
ther Information or drop by her office In
Memorial Gym 205 to talk skiing
HANDICAPPED SERVICES
Employment Is available to qualified persons
who ara Interested in becoming: Personal Care
Attendants to students In wheelchairs, Readers,
Proofreaders, Tutors. For further details, con
tact: OFFICE OF HANDICAPPED STUDENT
SERVICES, 212 Whichard Building, 757 6W
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of Holy communion
will be celebrated on Tues evening, Aug 28th in
the chapel of St. Paul's Episcopal Church. 406 4th
St. (one block from Garrett Dorm) The service
will be at 5:30 p.m with the Episcopal Chaplain,
the Rev Bill Hadden. celebrating
PEACE COMMITTEE
The Greenville Peace Committee Is concerned
with the issues that affect us dally, the nuclear
arms build-up. Central America, further escala
tlon of American Troops on foreign soil, draft
registration too If you think you want fo help, if
you are concerned about your future and the
future of our planet, please ioin us Fridays at 6:00
p.m at 610 S. Elm St or call 758 4906
MEN'S GLEE CLUB
The ECU Men's Glee Club invites all men in
forested in singing In the '84 85 Men's Glee club to
meet Thurs , Aug 23rd at 12 00 In Room 101, flet
cher Music Center, or to call Mr Glenn at 757 6331
for further Information The Glee club Is open to
all men campus wide, and will be performing
locally as well asin Fayettevllleand Raleigh, dur
Ing the fall semester A tour of N C � VA Isplann
ed for the spring The Men's Glee club meets
Mon Thur at 12 00 for 1 hr credit
SPORTS MEDICINE
Anyone interested in working with intramural
Sports Medicine should attend the organizational
meeting on Tuesdey. Sept 4 at 4.00 p.m. In Room
111 (training room), Memorial Gym if you are
unable to attend but still interested, contact m�
intramural Recreational Services Department
NAVIGATORS
Check it out! The Navigators Bible stud
fellowship Brewster D Wing, room 202, ever,
Tuesday. 7:30 PM, beginning August wth
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� TENNIS COURTS AND PARKS JUST ACROSS THE STREET!
� OTY UtRARY NEARSY!
� COMPUTE LAUNDRY FACILITIES ON SITE!
� CAMPUS AND CITY BUSES
� PUNTY OF PARKING ON SITE!
� LOTS OF SOCIAL AND RECREATIONAL ACTIVITIES YEARROUND!
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Call or Stop By Our Sales and Rental Office Right Away!
2820 East Tenth Street
Greenville, N.C.
Telephone 757-1971
KINGSTON
PLACE
Infirma
By HAROLDJOVNER
Suff wniw
ECU's Student Health Center
offers more free medical services
and lower health fees than any
other university m the Sun Belt,
according to Dr. James Mc-
Callum, director of the Student
Health Center.
Departmei
By STEPHEN HARDING
Suff �rti�r
Thougn the Intramural-
Recreation Services is currently
without a director, programs
should continue to operate nor-
mally, according to its assistant
directors, who will of their in-
dividual sections of the depart-
ment.
Pat Cox is in charge of the In-
formal Recreation and Outdoor
Recreation programs. Informal
Recreation directs the use of in-
door and outdoor recreation
facilities which include Memorial
Gymnasium, Minges Coliseum,
playing fields, tennis courts, and
picnicparty areas. With an ECU
photo ID, 63 different types of
recreational equipment are
available for check-out, free of
charge.
The Outdoor Recreation Pro-
gram offers equipment for rent,
resource information, and adven-
ture trips. Equipment for almost
every camping need is available on
a daily, weekend, and weekly
basis. Maps and pamplets on
I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28. 1984
DENS.
DU

19
MPAKC?
nt-Oriented
Village!

"IONS
REET
YEARROUND!
Arrangements
way!
&M
Infirmary Offers More Services For Less
By HAROLD JOYNER
Suff Hrlut
ECU's Student Health Center
offers more free medical services
and lower health fees than any
other university in the Sun Belt,
according to Dr. James Mc-
Callum, director of the Student
Health Center.
The $49.50 health fee included
in the student's tuition provides
him with the most complete out-
patient medical care available,
McCallum said. Among the ser-
vices offered at the Center include
blood tests, throat cultures, or
allergy shots. A student may also
receive information on high blood
pressure, eating disorders, birth
control, or cancer.
Currently, the Center employs
four full-time employees, four
physician extenders, and a large
staff of nurses. However, many
students have experienced a long
wait to receive personal medical
care. McCallum explains that the
long wait is due to the large
number of students wanting to be
served. Also, he explained it takes
time for the culture or blood test
to come back to the doctor from
the lab. McCallum added that the
Center treats about 50,000 cases a
year.
A new plan was started this year
and involves the student bypass-
ing the regular channels of the
Center when he is not seriously ill.
Department Has Equipment, Programs
By STEPHEN HARDING
Stmff Writer
Thougn the Intramural-
Recreation Services is currently
without a director, programs
should continue to operate nor-
mally, according to its assistant
directors, who will of their in-
dividual sections of the depart-
ment.
Pat Cox is in charge of the In-
formal Recreation and Outdoor
Recreation programs. Informal
Recreation directs the use of in-
door and outdoor recreation
facilities which include Memorial
Gymnasium, Minges Coliseum,
playing fields, tennis courts, and
picnic party areas. With an ECU
photo ID, 63 different types of
recreational equipment are
available for check-out, free of
charge.
The Outdoor Recreation Pro-
gram offers equipment for rent,
resource information, and adven-
ture trips. Equipment for almost
every camping need is available on
a daily, weekend, and weekly
basis. Maps and pamplets on
r ��
i

I
q
i
i
r
i
i
?
t
i
i
3
i
recreational information are
available free of charge.
The Outdoor Recreation Pro-
gram also sponsors Adventure
Trips for weekends of activities
such as backpacking, canoe-
ingcamping and while-water raf-
ting. Horseback riding, and canoe
clinicsoutings are offered
periodically throughout the year.
"The rental fees from the Out-
door Recreational Programs go
for paying salaries, repairing old
and buying new equipment. We
don't make money on the pro-
gram Pat Cox said.
Sports Medicine Services,
Physical Fitness Programs, and
the Adapted Recreation Program
are headed by Jamie Moul. The
Sports Medicine Services provide
preventive taping, immediate
first-aid care at intramural ac-
tivities, injury evaluation, and
rehabilitation. They work closely
with the Student Health Services.
The Pepsi Physical Fitness Club,
Swim and Stay Fit Program and
Instructional ClassesClinics are
provided under the Physical
Fitness Program. The Adapted
Recreation Program works with
the Office of Handicapped Stu-
dent Services and the Department
of Health, Physical Education,
Recreation and Safety so that
handicapped students are provid-
ed recreational oppertunities.
Vanessa Higdon is in charge of
the Sport Club Program as well as
publicity nd promotion and coor-
dination of student and part-time
personnel. Higdon has recently
taken on these responsibilities.
The 15 clubs help develop skills in
one particular area or sport. "It is
somewhere between intramurals
and athletics" Higdon said.
Intramural Activities and
Special Events are the respon-
sibilities of Bob Fox. Twenty In-
tramural Activities are being of-
fered fall semester.
Aerobic Exercise Classes,
Weightlifting Conditioning Train-
ing, and Aqua Aerobic Classes are
offered during the semester.
These programs are $8 for
students and $15 for faculty and
staff.
According to the staff, there arc
no plans for the hiring of a direc-
tor at this time. "Each area is
clearly defined and the assistant
directors know their jobs so things
should not change much this
year" Cox said.
McCallum said that a student who
comes in with a cold may go
directly to the pharmacy to re-
quest his medication. The phar-
macist will then explain the proper
use of the medication and answer
any questions. If the student
would rather see a nurse or doc-
tor, he can always go through the
regular procedure, McCallum
said.
McCallum said he hopes this
new plan will not only serve the
student better, but educate him in
proper medical treatment. Also,
the student will be more indepen-
dent by making his own decisions.
Future plans include employing
a full-time psychiatrist. Mc-
Callum said it is difficult to find
one who understands a student's
mental health. Presently a part
time psychiatrist is employed by
the Center.
McCallum would also like to
see the addition of an X-ray
machine to the Center. He ex-
plained with the expansion of the
athletic department and the stu-
dent body, broken bones and
sprained muscles are much more
common. He added that ECU is
the only major university that
does not have an X-ray machine
in its Health Center.
The Student Health Center en-
courages input from the students.
'0 OFF
on Frames
& Lenses
Thru September 28th
ECU STUDENTS AND FACULTY ONLY
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Call Us Fot An Eve Examination
With The Doctor O' Your Cnotce I
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Locations In:
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The New
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convenient to East Carolina
Mendenhall Student Center Campus
Pitt Plaza Highway 2(S t Bypass
University 802 E. 10th Street
Bank around campus
get cash around
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With the new Wachovia Banking Card, you can
bank anytime at Teller II8 machines around campus
and at more than 125 locations statewide. And now
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Every Wachovia checking or Statement Savings
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Southern National Bank
United Carolina Bank
Planters National Bank
Peoples Bank & Trust
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i





3Jj� East (llarulmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, owManager
GREG RIDEOUT, Managing Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak, News Editor j.T. Pietrzak, Director0j
Randy Mews, wm �,�, Anthony Martin, boi m�v
TINA MAROSCHAK, Features Editor KATHY FUERST, Production Manager
BILL AUSTIN, Circulation Manager LlNDA ViZENA, Advertising Technician
August 28, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Renting Fridges
Get Your Unit From SGA
We believe you should rent
refrigerators from the Student
Government Association, not
from companies who come on
campus seeking only to make a
profit and leave. And although the
time to rent refrigerators has pass-
ed, a word or two about the rental
system will help you decide where
to get one next year.
Last week Student Services Cor-
poration from Arlington, Va was
on campus delivering refrigerators
to students who had ordered them.
The company was also trying to
rent more while here. There are
two things wrong with renting
from this company or any one like
it. First of all, the money they get
from you is taken off campus, and
secondly, the company is bending
the rules while on campus to rent
more fridges.
Rent them from the SGA
because the money it takes in goes
to you � the student. Two years
ago, this money was used to help
start Pirate Walk, a successful
escort service for females on cam-
pus. Last year, the money helped
fund a night transit system, enabl-
ing students to go downtown
without having to worry about
driving home. Every penny, less
expenses, goes back into the cam-
pus � to help groups and
organizations do things they other-
Soviet Truths
wise couldn't do.
But, you say, "What about free
enterprise?" We say that's all
right, businesses can hock their
wares on campus, as long as they
do so according to the rules. For
instance, if they are only supposs-
ed to be delivering, extras
shouldn't be brought along. Does
Dominos bring a dozen extra piz-
zas when it comes to Belk dorm
with an order. If they arc only to
deliver, then they should just
deliver, and if they are caught do
anything � anything � else, they
should be immediately kicked off
school property.
Student Services Corporation
got let off easy. The administra-
tion decided not to pursue claims
by SGA President John Rainey
that employes of the company ask-
ed him to rent a fridge without his
inquiring. Rainey, as spokesman
for the students, should at least be
heard out. We, like those in the
SGA, think more should have been
done to investigate any illegalities.
But, even if a company is as
clean as Pat Boone, students
should do business with students.
The money you spend will come
back to you when you do this.
Next time your group gets a grant
from the SGA, think about where
your refrigerator came from.
Sometimes it seems like there are
more sides to a political issue than
there are Rubik's Cube combina-
tions. But sometimes issues are
clear-cut, with only approaches be-
ing different. We feel the recent
wave of rantings by the Soviet
Union is one item most people can
agree on � almost everyone thinks
they are unfair and untrue.
Now, before you retaliate with,
"We do it, too let us agree that
is true. But, the extent to which we
do it is incomparable, sort of like
apples and oranges. When the vast
propaganda machine of the USSR
gets cranked up, there is no telling
what's coming, but you better roll
up your trousers and put on some
hip-waders.
We think students should know
how the government of the Soviet
Union works. First of all they lie to
their own people. Soviet
newspapers repeatedly tell their
readers that Americans are roam-
ing the country day and night in
planes, trains and cars trying to
carry out missions of espionage.
Get this � ordinary citizens are
urged to be on the lookout for such
foreigners and report them to the
police.
Soviet citizens are discouraged
from having foreign friends, and
those who do are considered
suspect � along with their families
and friends.
Ample evidence of the USSR's
ploy to make their people think of
us as public enemy number one is
New Party For New Right
available right here in the United
States. The flimsy excuse by the
USSR for not attending the Olym-
pics shows how they can just tell
their people that we are going to
rape and pillage their athletes �
and be believed without question
by most of the masses. We all
know it's untrue, but those out of
the ruling hierarchy of the Soviet
Union don't.
When an American is roughed
up by a Soviet agent, as one
Marine embassy guard was recent-
ly, they always say the person is a
"hooligan What the heck's a
hooligan?
What we're trying to say is that
their people have no chance to
know the truth. We, as Americans,
can learn the intricacies of foreign
affairs if we so desire, the informa-
tion is unavailable to the average
person in Moscow. In fact, Soviet
school children don't even learn of
the crucial role we played in saving
their country in WWII; it's just not
in the books.
We still advocate cooperation
with the Soviet Union. But, we just
want the students to know, as we
know, where the leaders in the
Kremlin are coming from. They
are always jockeying for position,
willing to lambast the U.S. one day
and kiss us the next. To paraphrase
Lenin about achieving his
goals: take two steps backwards to
one forward if it gets you where
you want to go.
JOHN B. JUDIS
The New Republic
The ultimate conservative put-down is
to compare a liberal to Neville
Chamberlain, the British prime minister
who ceded central Europe to Adolf
Hitler and who was finally replaced by
Winston Churchill.
So when Howard Phillips, chairman
of the Conservative Caucus and a leader
of the New Right, describes the role to-
day of the conservative movement,
whom does he cast in the Chamberlain
role? "Churchill had his Chamberlain
Phillip savs. "We have our Reagan
Other New Right leaders share his
view of the Reagan administration. They
charge Reagan with one deviation after
another from conservative principles
and attribute these deviations to
Reagan's cooptation by the "Eastern
establishment" or the "Wall Street
wing" of the Republican Party,
represented by Vice President George
Bush.
Like most Washington politicos, they
expect that Reagan will be re-elected,
but they are already preparing for the
"hour of crisis" in his second term Said
Terry Dolan, director of the National
Conservative Political Action Commit-
tee: "1986 is going to be a disaster for a
large number of conservatives because
of the Reagan administration. It will
continue to move to the left and fuzz
issues and therefore will take a massive
beating in the 1986 elections
But Phillips; Richard Viguerie, direct-
mail wizard and publisher of Conser-
vative Digest; and Paul Weyrich, presi-
dent oi Coalitions for America, are
designing a vessel they hope will weather
the storm: a new, third party called the
Populist Conservative Party.
None of the New Right leaders are op-
posing Reagan's re-election. But
Phillips, Viguerie and Weyrich are spen-
ding much of 1984 planning the new
movement and party.
The roots of the New Right's disen-
chantment with Reagan and the
Republican Party go back before 1980 to
the circumstances of its emergence as a
movement. From George Wallace's suc-
cess in the South and the urban North,
they concluded that conservatives could
win over blue-collar Democrats with the
kinds of social and anti-elitist appeals
that Wallace made. If, through their
conservative economic policies, they
could also hold the allegiance of Main
Street Republicans, then they could
hope for a new majority coalition.
The New Right leaders had, and con-
tinue to have, differing views on impor-
tant political questions. But they share,
from the experience of the early 1970s, a
commitment to building the old Nixon-
Wallace majority.
In the first decade, they achieved
dramatic successes. They helped make
the Panama Canal treaty and abortion
explosive national issues. They drew the
right-to-lifc movement and the white
Southern Christian evangelicals into a
political alliance. And they helped
defeat numerous liberal Democrats in
1978 and 1980.
But the New Right leaders have played
a torturous role in Republican presiden-
tial politics. In the 1980 Republican
primaries, they did not back Reagan.
After Reagan was nominated, they of-
fered only conditional support.
But there is a credible political ex-
planation for the behavior of the New
Right leaders. They do not believe the
Republican Party can unite Wallace
Democrats with conservative
Republicans unless it amputates its Wall
Street wing. Weyrich explained, "If
these blue-collar Democrats look at the
Republican Party, and they see the
country clubs, the big banks, and
business ao usual, they will not go over
and vote for the Republican ticket
From Reagan's First year in office, the
New Right leaders established a separate
identity from the administration.
After
the Republican defeats in the 1982 elec-
tions they went a step further. They
began developing "populist conser-
vatism or tellingly, "Pop-Con
The New Right leaders' first venture
on behalf of their new identity has been
a Populist Conservative Tax Coalition
to promote a 10 percent flat income tax.
They attack big business only for its
sponsorship of television shows they
deem immoral or for its support of loans
to communist and Third World coun-
tries.
At its height in the 1880s, the original
Populism movement was interracial, but
the New Right leaders inherited the all-
white constituencies of Wallace's
presidential campaigns as well as
Wallace's ambiguous relation to the race
issue. Although New Right leaders like
Weyrich make a point of declaring their
eagerness to recruit blacks, some politi-
cians identified with the New Right such
as Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C, tread a
thin line on the subject of race.
Viguerie, Phillips and Weyrich plan to
launch the party in early 1985 with
meetings in each congressional district.
But they remain uncertain about the role
and objective of the party.
According to Weyrich, the new party
would not oppose conservative
Republicans or Democrats, but would
run candidates in districts where there
was no conservative candidate.
Although Weyrich foresees electing only
a few initial House members, he believes
that in close votes they could wield con-
siderable influence.
Phillips is more ambitious. He
believes that the new party might be
"able to mount a credible and legitimate
presidential candidate in 1988, if the
Republicans are perceived to have fail-
ed
The proposal for a Populist-
Conservative Party has renewed decade-
old controversies within the conservative
movement. At stake in this controversy
are two starkly opposing views of the
Republican Party: the party as the leader
of a conservative realignment and the
party as hopelessly divided between Wall
Street and Main Street and therefore
capable of winning over only a minor it
of voters.
Oddly, there is some truth in both i
these views. Reagan's nomination and
election in 1980 did complete the con-
quest of the Party by conservatives thaT
began in the early 1960s.
But the New Right leaders also have a
point. Reagan may win re-election, but
Republicans will not win control of Con-
gress, and they are not likely to do so
during the 1980s
The Republican Party conservatism
� identified with Wall Street as well as
Main Street � will have difficult cap-
turing the hearts of Americans in the
lower tax brackets. It can temporarily
win their allegiance, but it cannot hold
thern in a majority coalition.
And if Reagan and the Republicans
cannot, neither can the New Right
Populist conservatism is, in the end, not
an alternative to the conservatism of the
Republicans, but a new way to market
it.
Kevin Phillips, a young aide in the
Nixon administration who has increas-
ingly become an observer of, rather than
participant in, the New Right, put it
simply in a recent article: "Conservative
populism is an intriguing ideological
mix. But on economic issues, it is a lot
more conservative than it is populist,
and its appeal is limited accordingly
(John B. Judis is senior editor of In
These Times. He is currently writing a
biography of William F. Buckley Jr.)
tc). 1984, L nited Feature Syndicate. Inc.
Campus Forum
Christian Guides Set
I would like to thank The East
Carolinian and Brian Rangeley for
the article in the Aug. 23 edition
concerning campus ministries. The
ministries on the campus of ECU
were very helpful in my four years
there, and I want to say "job well
done" to Mr. Rangeley for his
report.
But, there is something I feel I
need to point out about the title of
the article versus the list of
organizations at the end. The title
mentions Christian groups, but the
list of groups at the end are not all
Christian.
I realize Mr. Rangeley probably
could not do the article without
listing all of the good religious
groups in it so I pray you will allow
me to do what he could not. I do not
wish to say this group is right or that
group is wrong, but I would like to
list some guidelines for selecting a
Christian group to be in.
First of all, a Christian group's
standards should be based on what
the Bible says and any books or
other "revelations" which conflict
with basic Bible teachings should be
avoided; therefore, a group that
supports any books or revelations
which conflict with basic Bible
teachings should also be avoided by
people who truly want to be Chris-
tians.
Secondly, according to the Bible,
Jesus Christ was born of a virgin,
and He was God in the flesh while
on this earth. A Christian group has
to believe this or it is not a Christian
group.
Thirdly, a Christian organization
needs to take solid stands the same
way the Bible does concerning in-
take of alcohol or other drugs and
the proper sexual relationship of a
male and a female. (That does not
mean the entire group is perfect, but
it does mean the group knows what
the Bible says and supports that.)
And finally, the group should
know and teach the Bible way for
salvation which is realizing that sin
causes eternal death and that death
can be erased by accepting Jesus
Christ as Saviour or as Romans 10:9
says: if you confess with your
mouth, "Jesus is Lord and
believe in your heart that God raised
Him from the dead you will be sav-
ed
You are right Mr. Rangeley,
"Campus Christian Groups (do)
Offer Support but Jesus Christ
and the correct understanding of
how salvation is received is the best
support of all.
Matthew Cox, Graduate
Greenville
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes let-
ters expressing all points of view.
Mail or drop them by our office in
the Publications Building, across
from the entrance of Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all
letters must include the name, major
and classification, address, phone
number and signature of the
author(s). Letters are limited to two
typewritten pages, double-spaced or
neatly printed.
Wome
RALEIGH (L PI) - A group
of women voters Monday blastedj
Republican Sen Jesse Helms'
record on issues concerning!
'Aomen and endorsed Gov. Jamesj
B. Hunt Jr. in his Senate race
against Helms
"What working women need
today is hard-working and effec-
tive representation in Congress
said Susan Law of Winston
Salem, president of the Nortl
Carolina Day Care Association.
"What we hae is a SenatoJ
Village G
B TIN MAROSCHAK
Ittiiim Anot
Though the explosive disastj
�hat leveled a section of
Village Green Apartment compli
in March of 1983 may
,omewhat forgotten by many,
victims of the incident are still uj
igling the mess and seekil
answer-
v least 12 lawsuits filed agai
Village Green landlords ana
panies responsible for the tragej
� at killed one ECU student aj
ured at least 11 others are sj
pending, and Greenville attoi
Kenneth E. Haigler said r-
immediate resolution.
One development m the :aj
Lot Protested
Area Zo
BylENNIFERJENDRASl
An attempt to alleviate s
ECU'S parking problt
undergone what appears t bel
ly a temporary setback.
Earlier this summer, EC
ficials pur. property loci
next to the Department of Ft
Safety on Fifth Street A
located or - property was
and plans to make the
tor parking lot were - I
However, members of
River Neighborhood ss
c
F
Honor Boa
Seeking 10
New Memb
B JENNIFER JENDRA'
Applicants are cur
souch: for positions oj
1984-85 ECU Honor Boat
cord - Scott Sutker,
attorne general.
Sutker "said there
and 12 positions a
board, which h
tion in all case- ng,
cheating ano ither violatj
the university's code ot
and disciplinary offenses
A meeting for all thl
terestedm applying will b�
4 p m. toda ' room
Mendenhaii Si Cent
plkants will be informed
the camp 1
the functi - f ca�.
Those applying will re nl
ed by the SGA Exec
tee later this week.
Sutker stressed it
terim board and will i
final approval until
Legislature is in se
tober. The interim b
be chosen by the end oi
and will begin function
thereafter.
Members must mainu
g p.a. and be in gooc.
with the university. HorJ
meetings are on Thursd
3 m. and "are not
irolving Sutker said
Belvoi
Factory O
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28, 1984
Right
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ersy
� the
-ider
the
:en Wall
ore
both or
and
I e a
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ap-
the
HTVS
Right.
u1 it
alive
-
:eath
10:9
tl vour
(do)
l hnst
andmg of
'he best
.ate
rum Rules
n welcomes let-
� points of view.
our office in
Building, across
entrance of Joyner
fication, all
ie the name, major
address, phone
nature of the
etters are limited to two
pases, double-spaced or
ited.
Women Attack Helms'Record, Endorse Hunt
RALEIGH (UPI) A group
oi women voters Monday blasted
Republican Sen. Jesse Helms'
record on issues concerning
women and endorsed Gov. James
B. Hunt Jr. in his Senate race
against Helms.
"What working women need
today is hard-working and effec-
tive representation in Congress
aid Susan law of Winsto'n-
Salem, president of the North
Carolina Day Care Association.
"What we have is a Senator
who is too busy with his own
special crusades to listen to us or
represent our concerns in
Washington. That's why we, as
North Carolinians and working
women, support Jim Hunt for the
United States Senate she said.
Ms. Law, who also is executive
director of Northwest Child
Development Council, cited
Hunt's support for education, day
care, pay equity, Social Security,
environmental issues and a reduc-
tion of the chance for nuclear
war.
Six women joined her at a news
conference to discuss their sup-
port for Hunt. They said many of
the points they raised should not
be considered simply women's
issues, although they affect
women the most.
Eugenia Rochelle, an English
instructor at St. Augustine's Col-
lege in Raleigh, said, "I think any
politician should be comprehen-
sive in their approach. I think at
times, women should receive
Village Green Suits Pending
B TIN A MAROSCHAK
femur MHor
Though the explosive disaster
that leveled a section of the
Village Green Apartment complex
in March of 1983 may be
somewhat forgotten by many, the
victims of the incident are still un-
tangling the mess and seeking
answers.
At least 12 lawsuits filed against
illage Green landlords and com-
panies responsible for the tragedy
hat killed one ECU student and
injured at least 11 others are still
pending, and Greenville attorney
Kenneth E. Haigler said he sees no
immediate resolution.
One development in the cases
Lot Protested
was the issuance of a "Con-
solidated Discovery Order This
order insures that anything
discovered for one case can be ap-
plied to all cases. "It considerably
saves time and expense. You don't
have to have lawyers representing
every deposition Haigler said.
He added that the defendents
have served the plaintiffs two sets
of interrogatives to which they
have 60 days to reply; one set of
interrogatives has also been issued
to each defendent. "They contain
everything from A to Z Haigler
said.
The complaints, filed a little
over a year ago, accuse persons in-
volved in the sale, installation.
maintenance of a clothes dryer
(which was located in the base-
ment of the building and was
named as the cause of the explo-
sion), of negligence. Those
responsible for supplying gas to
the dryer are also named. The ex-
plosion is said to have occured
when a large amount of liquid
propane gas leaked out of the
dryer system and was ignited by
an electrical device on a hot water
heater.
As of last August, damages be-
ing sought totaled $3.8 million in
compensatory and $1.9 in
punitive.
For the victims of the explo-
sion, no end is in sight.
Area Zoning Uncertain
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nr� fdilor
A
1 (I
next
Safe
H
n attempt to alleviate some of
1's parking problems has
;rgone what appears to be on-
irj setback.
lis summer, ECU of-
- purchased property located
to the Department of Public
m Fifth Street A house
the property was razed
i is to make the lot into a
parking lot were finalized.
awever, members of the Tar
r Neighborhood Association
began to protest the site of the lot.
The association, which represents
close to 180 families, charged that
the lot would violate zoning or-
dinances and have adverse effects
on the neighborhood.
Zoning regulations on Fifth
Street allow residential dwellings,
churches and schools. In order to
permit the lot, the zoning or-
dinances will have to be amended
or the lot will have to be approved
by the city's Board of Adjust-
ment.
According to University At-
torney David Stevens, nothing has
been decided yet, but the school is
currently working with the city to
devise a parking plan. Included
are proposals to move the Depart-
ment of Public Safety to another
location. "We haven't gotten
there yet, though Stevens said.
"The neighborhood association
is concerned with the aesthetic
beauty and value of the
neighborhood Stevens said,
"but the university is just as con-
cerned as anyone else
Honor Board
Seeking 10
New Members
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nf�� K-dltor
Applicants are currently being
ought for positions on the
?84-85 ECU Honor Board, ac-
ng to Scott Sutker, student
rney general.
Sutker said there are between 10
and 12 positions available on the
t ard, which has original jurisdic-
n all cases of lying, stealing,
ring and other violations of
the university's code of conduct
: disciplinary offenses.
meeting for all those in-
'erested in applying will be held at
4 p.m. today in room 221 of
Mendenhall Student Center. Ap-
; ints will be informed about
he campus judicial system and
he functions of each board.
Those applying will be interview-
by the SGA Executive Commit-
tee later this week.
Sutker stressed that this is an in-
terim board and will not receive
final approval until the SGA
legislature is in session in Oc-
tober. The interim board should
be chosen by the end of the week
and will begin functioning shortly
thereafter.
Members must maintain a 2.0
g.p.a. and be in good standing
with the university. Honor Board
meetings are on Thursdays at 6
p.m. and "are not very time-
involving Sutker said.
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recognition, too
Ms. Rochelle, who is divorced,
said she had difficulty making the
transition to a single income and
called for "assurances of support
systems" for women in such situa-
tions.
Louise Wilson of Raleigh, a
widow, said she lost Social Securi-
ty survivors' benefits because
eligibility rules were changed,
restricting payments to those who
are over 50 and totally disabled.
Debby Reed, a nurse at
Dorothea Dix Hospital, praised
Hunt for obtaining funds from
the General Assembly for a study
on comparable worth of salaries
paid to men and women employed
by the state.
"I think it has been long over-
due she said. "We feel Gov.
Hunt has addressed our priorities
much better than Sen. Helms.
Comparing the records of Hunt
and Helms, Ms. Law cited Hunt's
push for improvements in public
education and said Helms has
repeatedly voted in favor of fun-
ding cuts for education.
Day care is an important issue
in North Carolina, where 54 of
every 100 women work, she said,
and Hunt has sought affordable
programs for middle and low-
income families while Helms has
opposed day-care income tax
credits for working mothers.
The news conference was held
at Learning Together Inc a day-
dare center on the Dorothea Dix
Hospital campus.
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6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 28, 1984
Tuition Cost Increases Are Lower This Year
(CPS) � The total cost of at-
tending college this school year
has increased only six percent over
last year, a new report by the Col-
lege Board concludes.
Over the last few years, says
College Board President George
Hanford, college costs have in-
creased 10-to-ll percent a year as
colleges boosted tuition to keep
pace with high interest rates and
in ilation.
The comparatively small in-
crease in this year's college costs
marks what many experts hope is
an end to the double-digit cost in-
creases of the last several years.
At public schools, moreover,
the increase amounts to only a
five percent rise over last year,
making the total cost $4,881 for
four-year resident students, and
$3,998 for students at two-year
schools.
Private school students aren't
faring quite as well. Costs of at-
tending private colleges are up
seven percent over last year, for a
total cost of $9,022 at four-year
schools and $7,064 at two-year in-
stitutions, the study of over 3,000
schools nationwide reveals.
Total college costs in the survey
include tuition and fees, books
and supplies, room and board,
personal expenses, and transpor-
tation.
While total costs will rise only
six percent this year, however, the
study also shows that tuition and
fees will increase eight-to-nine
percent at both public and private
schools.
Students at four-year public
schools, for example, will pay
average tuition and fees of1,126,
while their counterparts at private
colleges will pay an average of
$5,016.
The Massachusetts Institute of
Technology will be the most ex-
pensive school to attend this year,
the survey shows, where total
costs will average $16,130.
Bennington College in Vermont
comes in second for a total cost of
Program Aids Migrant Children
B TOM FORTNER
Kl Maflol � rite
During the long summer days in
the Pitt County community of
Fountain, the St. James Child
Care Center comes to life with the
energetic rumblings of pre-school
toddlers. The center is home to a
Head Start program for children
of some of the 40,000 migrant
farmworkers who each year pass
through the state of North
Carolina.
Through the efforts of a
pediatrician at the East Carolina
University School of Medicine,
administrators of the program are
now finding it easier to obtain
quality health care for the migrant
children.
In the past, Center Director
Yvonne Barnes explains, the
center had to bus as many as 70
youngsters to local health depart-
ments for required physical
screenings. And since the program
involves migrant children from
Pitt, Nash and Greene counties,
separate visits had to be made to
each health department.
Besides representing a schedul-
ing nightmare. Barnes says, the
multifarious trips kept the
children away from daily educa-
tional activities designed to
enhance their development.
Enter, the Department of
Pediatrics at the School of
medicine. Dr. James R. Markello,
professor of pediatrics, had
become familiar with the center's
dilemma when migrant children
were occasionally brought to the
medical school's Outpatient
Center for pediatric care.
'Working with migrant
children is a strong interest of Dr.
Markello's Barnes explains.
"He made suggestions to us as to
the best and most effective way
that we can carry out health care
within our budgetary resources
Markello offered to make
periodic visits to the center to pro-
vide the screenings for the migrant
youths. So now on many days
during the five-month program,
he and one or two pediatric
residents from the School of
Medicine make the 20-mile trip to
Fountain.
From the standpoint of conve-
nience, the site visits have been an
obvious benefit to the center. "It
helps us in not having to transport
the kids so frequently for health
care says Barnes. "It's less tax-
ing on the kids too
Markello, who serves the
American Academy of Pediatrics
as a consultant on migrant
children's health care, says the
youngsters' medical needs tend to
be neglected as the parents strug-
gle merely to survive.
The children he sees � mostly
Hispanic, Haitian and black �
encounter health problems typical
of rural migrant populations:
diarrhea caused by parasites, in-
fectious diseases of the skin and
respiratory tract, and problems
associated with poor sanitation
and an unclean waier supply.
Poor nutrition is also a constant
worry, Markello said, "simply
because they're on the move, they
have low incomes, and cultural
practices prohibit adequate nutri-
tion " He added, however, that
the migrant center provides a
good diet for the children enrolled
there.
One of the major advances of
the past few years in the care of
migrant children has been the
development of a computer-based
tracking system by the East Coast
Migrant Head Start Project.
When a migrant child is seen at a
local health department or at one
of 17 delegate agencies between
Massachusetts and Florida, the
updated medical record is filed in
a central data bank in Arlington,
VA.
Markello said the tracking
systems makes current accurate
data available to each new loca-
tion of the child. Before the
system was implemented, it was
hard to be sure of a child's
medical history.
"That was one of the great bar-
riers to continuity of care said
Markello. "I think that's a real
success story
Despite the advances, Markello
said, health care for migrant
populations, both young and old,
still has a long way to go. Medical
care is still largely "crisis-
oriented" rather than routine.
Health agencies � open only in
the daytime when workers are in
the field � are inaccessible,
though Markello said more night
clinics are becoming availiable.
And although physicians are now
able to see some youngsters
routinely, many others are miss-
ed; the St. James Center currently
has a waiting list of 30 children.
"We really don't have a good
handle on health care of the
migrants said Markello.
$16,040, followed by Harvard at
$15,750, Princeton at $15,625,
and Barnard at $15,558.
Yale, Brandeis, Tufts, Brown,
and Sarah Lawrence College, in
that order, round out the list of
the ten most expensive schools to
attend.
But the College Board figures
may be a bit deceiving, points out
Meredith Ludwig with the
American Association of State
Colleges and Universities, which
is conducting a similar survey for
release later this fall.
"Many schools are still involv-
ed in the legislative process (for
state funding) and tuition and fees
haven't been set yet she points
out.
"We expect (this year's cost in-
crease) to be a little less than last
year's she speculates, probably
around "six-to-eight peicent"
when all the figures are in.
The cost increases of the last
few years came because colleges
had put off things like building
maintenance and salary increases
during the '70s in an effort to hold
down tuition and fees, savs
Kathleen Brouder, associate direc
tor of College Board's Scholar
ship Services.
This year's curtailment of cost
increases, she adds, may mear
colleges have finally caught up
with such deferred expenses.
Now that inflation has subsided
and interest rates are down, agrees
AASCU'S Ludwig, college costs
could level off for a few yearv
But Ludwig and College Board
officials are quick to note they
really aren't sure why costs in-
creased so little this year.
"Everybody's been saying it's
because colleges have finalh
caught up vvith expenses ana
because the economy is better.
she says.
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Reagan
(CPS) � As the campaign
begins in earnest, President
Reagan is not getting any higher
marks from the nation's educa
tion community than he has dur
ing the last four years, various
higher education experts sa
To assess the president's impaL-
on colleges, College Press Service
asked a cross section of officials
and experts a variation of the
same question President Reagan
posed to voters in 1980: Are you
and your campus better off now
than you were four years ago?
Pointing to Reagan's attem
to gut federal financial aid p.
grams, soft enforcement of .air.
pus civil rights laws, and a generaj
"lack of interest" in higher
education, some concluded
Reagan has one of the
higher education track reccr
any president in recent hist
"We are certainly not better
than we were four years ago.
says Shawne Murphy, presiden-
of the National Coalition of In
dependent College and Univt
Students and a student at Si
College in Minnesota.
"We've been fighting a con
tinuaJ uphill battle against
Reagan budget cu:
laments "He's tried to take a I
chunk out of education for the
last four years, but fortur
Congress has come ur
promises that didn't ma
as bad as they could have beer.
Indeed, during his fir
years in office Reagan pr r.
cutting financial aid fundin.
30-to-50 percent, sending
waves through the higher .
tion community.
Among other things. Reag
proposed eliminating some f
cial aid programs �
Social Security bene-
plemental Education Opr
Grants and State Student Ince'
tive Grants among them � u
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'





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:a - came because colleges
mgs like building
enance and salary increases
. c ' 70s in an effort to hold
n dnd fees, says
B oudcr, associate direc-
ge Board's Scholar-
u :ailment of cost
adds, may mean
l caught up
d expenses.
' has subsided
- are doun, agrees
� v college costs
i 'cw vears.
md v ollege Board
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115 is better
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T
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28, 1984
Reagan's Impact On Education Assessed
(C PS) � As the campaign
ygins in earnest. President
Reagan is not getting any higher
marks from the nation's educa-
tion community than he has dur-
ing the last four years, various
higher education experts say.
To assess the president's impact
on colleges, College Press Service
isked a cross section of officials
and experts a variation of the
ame question President Reagan
vsed to voters in 1980: Are you
md your campus better off now
v an you were four years ago?
Pointing to Reagan's attemf .
to gut federal Financial aid p
. ams, soft enforcement of cam-
pus civil rights laws, and a general
lack of interest" in higher
Jucation, some concluded
Reagan has one of the worst
higher education track records of
any president in recent history.
"We are certainly not better off
:han we were four years ago
ays Shawne Murphy, president
of the National Coalition of In-
Jependent College and University
Students and a student at St. Olaf
College in Minnesota.
"We've been fighting a con-
uiual uphill battle against the
Reagan budget cuts she
aments. "He's tried to take a big
�hunk out of education for the
dst four years, but fortunately
Congress has come up with com-
promises that didn't make the cuts
as bad as they could have been
Indeed, during his first three
ears in office Reagan proposed
cutting financial aid funding from
M)-to-50 percent, sending shock
-vaves through the higher educa-
lon community.
Among other things, Reagan
proposed eliminating some finan-
cial aid programs � student
Social Security benefits, Sup-
plemental Education Opportunity
Grants and State Student Incen-
tive Grants among them � and
restricting other programs.
"It's been clear since the
1980-81 school year that overall
student aid has decreased by 20
percent, even with the rejection of
Reagan's drastic proposed cuts
observes Kathy Ozer, legislative
liaison for the United States Stu-
dent Association in Washington,
D.C.
"The administration's policies
regarding regulations, court deci-
sions, and funding have clearly
not been in the best interest of
most students she asserts.
For example, she says, the
Reagan administration backed off
a strict enforcement of Title IX of
the 1972 Higher Education
Amendments.
Title IX prohibits federally-
funded colleges from
discriminating on the basis of
gender.
Reagan changed the policy,
supporting court cases that made
only those campus programs
which directly got federal money
swear they didn't discriminate.
The administration also pro-
posed to begin granting tax ex-
emptions to schools that
discriminate on the basis of race.
The U.S. Supreme Court
ultimately approved Reagan's Ti-
tle IX position, but upheld the In-
ternal Revenue Service's right to
deny tax exemptions to
discriminatory schools.
At the same time, the ad-
ministration supported efforts to
take away faculty tax exemptions
on job benefits like tuition breaks
for their families and campus
housing, notes Iris Molotsky of
the American Association of
University Professors.
Students, USSA's Ozer adds,
have had "very little input" in
federal policies since Reagan took
office.
"Reagan's approach to educa-
tion has been more on issues of
For just 75 cents a line S
The East Carolinian Classifieds �
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Come To Western Sizziin For
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JUST ASK FOR THE NO. 3
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7
If Killian's Irish Red
is a ten,
German beer is a nein.
Now don't get us
wrong. The Germans
make some pretty fine
beers. But none of
them slow-roast their
malt like we do.
So no German beer
(n boast the color,
the character, the rich,
incredibly smooth taste
of Killian's Red Ale.
So the next time
you're about to order
your favorite German
beer, try a Killian's
Red, instead.
And go from a nein
to a ten.
KALIANS RET)
MNMCw�p�Mhi Colorado MMOl laMrd Fin Qad ken fence IITJ
prayer in school or discipline than
on substantive issues like access,
quality, and funding Molotsky
says.
Administrators, too, complain
the president has done little good
for higher education in the last
four years.
"We had hopes that the ad-
ministration, given its rhetoric,
would have been more responsive
in making regulations less burden-
some says Larry Zaglaniczny
with the American Council on
Education.
"Instead there's a lot more
he says, because of new re-
quirements for students to prove
they've registered for the draft,
income statements, and needs
tests that must now be filed with
financial aid forms.
Other higher ed officials are
more neutral in their assessment
of Reagan's performance.
"We've simply been too over-
whelmed with state funding cuts
and impositions that we really
haven't noticed many of the ef-
fects from Reagan says Art
Martinez, president of Orange
Coast Community College in
California.
Federal aid cuts, for instance,
"haven't really affected us
because up until this year fees and
tuition were free for state
residents he explains.
The president, however, is not
without fans on campus.
"Boston University and its
students are far better off now
than they were four years ago
proclaims BU president John
Silber.
An improved economy and
lower inflation and interest rates
"have been of enormous benefit
to students" and allowed schools
to moderate the drastic tution in-
creases of several years ago, he
points out.
As far as student aid is concern-
ed, "it's a false claim that there's
been a reduction in the aid
available he argues. Aid has in-
creased every year, Silber says,
"although not as much as some
people wanted
And the administration's sup-
port of the Solomon Amendment
� which requires male students to
prove they've registered for the
draft in order to receive federal
aid � "demonstrates that
students are still citizens of the
U.S. and can be expected to serve
their country he says, adding
the new law is a "valuable lesson
in civics" for students.
But Silber is wrong, the ACE's
Zaglaniczny argues.
"To say that student aid wasn't
gutted in Reagan's proposals is
not true he contends. "Many
students have been denied a col-
lege education, and many more
would have been in Congress
hadn't managed to hold off the
worst effects of Reagan's pro-
posals
Many colleges, of course, have
benefitted from the improved
economy, increased corporate
contributions, and from the more
streamlined management techni-
ques they developed in adversity.
Asked to consider such indirect
benefits before listing ways the
Reagan administration has helped
American colleges, the AAUP's
Molotsky replies, "I'm
thinking

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V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
orian
AUGUST 28, 1984 Page 8
Upcoming Movies
Filled With Talent
"The Rogues" are the subject of Bernstein's "Windy Cit
Old Inn Re-emerges
This fall Warner Bros, brings to
the screen a rich harvest of new
motion pictures that ranges from
comedic battles between Heaven
and Helland right here on
Earth, to dramatic conflicts set in
Cambodia and the Middle East.
Major talent in the fall line-up in-
cludes George Burns, Diane
Keaton, Ryan O'Neal, Shelley
Long, Jobeth Williams, Tom
Conti and Kate Capshaw.
Academy-Award winning pro-
duction designer Stuart Craig
(Gandi) co-produces with David
Puttnam Cal, the story of a young
man who is caught up in the tur-
moil that exists in Northern
Ireland over which he has little or
no control. Cal, protrayed by
screen newcomer John Lynch,
comes to understand what it
means to be young and Catholic
in Protestant-ruled Ulster. Can
his love for an older woman
flourish among the ruins of a city
torn by secular violence? Is there
any hope for his sad and bitter
land � or its people?
Critically-acclaimed novelist
Bernard Mac Laverty adapts his
novel Cal to the screen, with
Helen Mirren starring as the
beautiful, enigmatic widow
Marcella, in a performance that
won her the Best Actress Award at
the 1984 Cannes Film Festival.
Cal is produced by David Putt-
nam. An Enigma Production for
Goldcrest Films, it is directed by
Pat O'Connor.
Windy City is writer-director
Armyan Bernstein's affectionate,
empathetic and comedic look at a
group of friends who have grown
up together in Chicago and who
are now facing life's buffetings as
together as adulthood allows. But
their dreams are fading; reality is
taking on a relentless quality. It is
time for a stand: to revive some of
the old dreams and make them
happen � or write off romance,
adventure, friendship and hope as
mere illusions.
CBS Theatrical Films presents
Windy City, starring John Shea,
who came to prominence when he
starred with Jack Lemmon and
Sissy Spacek in Missing; Kate
Capshaw, recently seen in Indiana
Jones and the Temple of Doom,
and Josh Mostel, son of the late
Zero Mostel. Produced by Alan
Greisman, the film was
photographed by Reynaldo
Villalobos.
First-time filmmaker Kevin
Reynolds also takes a look at
friendship in a free-wheeling
odyssey across Texas and
Oklahoma in Fandango. Written
and directed by Reynolds and pro-
duced by Tim Zinnemann, the
picture focuses on five fraternity
brothers who take a final emo-
tional fandango before taking on
the reality of their individual lives.
Kevin Costner, Judd Nelson, Sam
Robards, Charles Bush and Brian
Cesak star as the "Groovers
with Marvin J. Mclntyre,
Elizabeth Daily, Robin Rose and
Suzy Amis in co-starring roles.
Irreconcilable Differences is a
contemporary comedy written by
Nancy Meyers and Charles Shyer,
who together wrote and produced
Private Benjamin. The film opens
in a California courtroom where a
landmark trial is taking place:
Brodsky vs. Brodsky and Brod-
See RICH, Page 11.
Bush, Robards, Nelson, and Costner star in the nild "Fandango.
gooooooooooooooooooooo��oaoooooooo�QooooooopBo�ooomotiooooooooooooooooqa w g.
rn.rc, � i lCC 08111
!
Bv BRIAN RANGELEY
Suff Wrlltr
Recessions come and go, leav-
ing their blessings and curses on
the heads of many downtown
Greenville merchants. But among
the "Inns" and outs of flash-in-
the-pan restaurants, The Olde
Towne Inn Restaurant and
Tavern re-emerges a. a quality,
medium-priced establishment.
I say "re-emerges" because
before Plain Jane's, before Fred-
die's, the building used to be the
location of The Olde Towne Cafe.
The Cafe had a long and pro-
sperous life in the downtown
district.
Originally, the building was
Greenville's town hall. The fire
department is now a restaurant
and the town jail is a tavern. The
bars still remain in the windows.
Owners Herbert Cory, Jimmy
Flake, and Jerry Whitehurst want
to emphasize good service in their
establishment. Their unique grand
opening seems to emphasize this
philosophy � for the first two
days, they gave food away.
Apparently the promotion
worked. With very little advertis-
ing, The Olde Towne Inn is grow-
ing in popularity. The owners are
trying to make the restaurant a
nice place for business people to
eat lunch, without pricing
students back to fast-food
restaurants.
"We wanted to have food for
the people downtown to get nice
meals in the three to six dollar
range commented Flake. He
went on to say that they try to
serve basic food dishes � roast
beef, chicken salad, baked ham �
and embellish it in some original,
attractive way to enhance the
flavor and appearance. For exam-
ple, the chicken salad is seasoned
with crushed walnuts, which gives
the salad a nutty flavor and, of
course, a crunchier consistency.
I tried the fish � "Fairfield
Flounder Filet Although my
filet had two bones in it and no
lemon with it, the subtly flavored
mushroom-cheese sauce com-
plimented the flounder very well.
The fish was served with two
watermellon slivers on a piece of
lettuce. The entrees come with
your choice of two vegetables
from a selection of about six.
The night I went, beef ribs were
featured at two dollars off the
regular S6.95 tag. Flake said that
the ribs are comparable to
Darryl's; both establishments buy
from the same supplier and both
serve the same number of ribs.
"We think that students can't
afford $11 to SI2 meals said
Flake. "We feel like we can sell at
a higher volume and still make as
much money he added.
The menu offers appetizers,
salads, hot and cold sandwiches,
entrees, desserts, and cocktails all
at attractives prices. A wine list is
also available.
After dinner, you can hit the
bar in the back. The bar, made of
massive hardwood, has comfor-
table seating for about 50 people
(tables included), and a private
entrance that opens onto Cotan-
che Street.
My impressions about dinner?
The food was tasty, attractively
served, and the waitress was more
than eager to serve. The damage
to my wallet wasn't too bad �
about ten dollars for my friend
and I, plus tip, appetizers, salad,
and extras.
The owners say they want their
place to become a permanent part
of Greenville. They hope that
customers and alumni alike will
want to return. So at least once
before you graduate, go make a
memory at the Olde Towne Inn.
DATE
Fall ECU School of Music Schedule
ACTIVITY
�RYAN HUMBERT, ICU Ptwt L�b
Olde Towne Inn Restaurant and Tavern offers a unique experience.
Clyde Hiss, voice
Faculty Recital
Brad Foley, saxophone
Donna Coleman, piano
Faculty Recital
Contemporary Ensemble Concert
Opera Scenes
Percussion Ensemble Concert
Friends of the School of Music
Pop's Concert
Symphonic Wind Ensemble Concert
Paul Tardif, piano
Faculty Recital
Faculty Chamber Music Concert
Donna Coleman, piano
Faculty Recital
George Broussard, trombone
Faculty Recital
Percussion Ensemble Concert
Charles Bath, piano
Faculty Recital
Small Ensemble Concert
Small Ensemble Concert
Symphonic Band Concert
Faculty Chamber Music Concert
Jazz Ensemble II Concert
Saxophone Quartet Concert
High School Choral Festival
ECU Symphony Orchestra Concert
Paul Topper, violin
Faculty Recital
Instead Concert
Jazz Ensemble I Concert
Symphonic Wind Ensemble
Christmas Concert
Men's Glee Club Concert
New Musk Ensemble Concert
ooooooooooooooo
TIME
8:15
8:15
8:15
8:00
8:15
5:30
8:15
8:15
A Fresh Treat
(PRN) � Kids are used to hear-
ing that they have to eat certain
foods because these foods are
"good for them But many times
these foods don't look, smell, or
taste appealing. It is no wonder
that often children don't realize
that enjoyable foods can also be
nutritious!
If you really want to see a con-
fused look on a child's face, give
them a big bowl of ice cream and
tell them that they have to eat it
because it is good for them. They
are likely to think you have been
eating too many brussels sprouts
and have lost your mind. But you
know, it is important for children
to learn at an early age that good
tasting foods can be nutritious,
too!
With all of the emphasis these
days on eating healthful foods, ice
cream is an important option to
keep in mind. Since the major
component of ice cream is milk,
that naturally makes ice cream a
good source of calcium,
riboflavin, protein and vitamin A.
Certainly children aren't con-
Pfcitrltlon
Shorts
cerned about caloriesthat seems
to develop with age! But for all
the adults who think that ice
cream 1S too big a sacrifice on the
dieter s scale, they are in for a sur-
prise. An average scoop of ice
cream contains onlv 135
caloriesabout the same number
found in a medium-sized banana
tio�n in " l�� kecp 8��d �-
rh " ?�??Uve' we n to
�ur children the benefits of
eating a wide variety of
foodsincluding the ones that
w?tha800dLJhcy -i� grow up
habits in balancehfeS
to appreciate all foods for their
'he ECU School of Music and
partment of University Unions
present the Dorian Wind
lintet as the first attraction of
tir new, jointly sponsored
jmber Festival. The perfor-
lce is scheduled for Hendrix
itre on the East Carolina
liversity campus in Greenville
Wednesday, September 18 at
p.m.
Currently in its twenty-third
son, the Dorian Wind Quintet
distinquished itself as one of
v
7
c
The Dorian Wind Qui
Critic Tackles
Football Story
(UPI) � If you want to read a
really good football book with
plenty of action, lots of exciting
game sequences and a srx
of football nostalgia, read
anything but In Search of Billy
Cole.
Billy was a high school quarter-
back in rural New England. He
had a strong arm, and could
"throw it on a rope at 50 yards
threading a needle with that :
He won a football scholar-
to the University of Mich
After a promising freshrr.
season. Billy left Michigan I
Middlebury College, a -
school iln Vermont.
No one seems to know why he
left Michigan, so a profesona.
football scout deems it his respon-
sibility to discover the reasons.
Jack Newcombe has tried
write a book about the first pi
football scout in history
more interested in a rrP"
quarterback's mind than whe
or not he can throw, the long one
So, you figure. �'Well, maybe h
would be interesting to see just e
actlv why Billy Cole did le
Michigan' for tiny Middlebury
College Sorry. The cout never
finds out, or if he doe. he dc
let the reader in on - s
In Search of BUI Cole
just one of those Nv-o -
hard to get into, it is one of th.
books that is hard to get throug
You keep waiting for something
to happen but it never does.
ufypfl
if AST5tts
ecofcds
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Albums & Cassettes
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t
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28, 1984
reat
�, ice
n to
la or
Itlon
ts
.JU
�ems
r all

:e on the
I sur-
' ice
I 13 5
I "umber
td banana.
bod nut ri-
le need to
)enefits of
r i e t v of
dcs that
grou up
standing
leir eating
e learning
tor their
nutrient
ht
lenewed decade-
the conservative
I controversy
kg Mews of the
Irty as the leader
nment and the
?d between Wall
d therefore
f only a minority
iruth in both of
ommation and
nplete the con-
nservatives that
ders alo have a
re-election, but
1 control of Con-
: likely to do so
t conservatism
Street as well as
e difficulty cap-
pericans in the
In temporarily
it cannot hold
jon.
JFe Republicans
L Now Right.
�in the end, not
Btrvatism of the
w : market
u ude in the
A as increas-
�r at her than
� Right, put it
f "Conservative
ing ideological
sues, it is a lot
it is populist,
accordingly
or editor of In
writing a
Bucklev Jr
t
i ning m-
f drugs and
('onship of a
at does not
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nows what
Drts that.)
3up should
le way for
ng that sin
that death
pting Jesus
omans 10:9
with your
3rd and
God raised
will be sav-
Rangeley,
roups (do)
esus Christ
tanding of
is the best
les
welcomes let-
is of view.
ur office in
Hng, across
of Joyner
fication, all
jame, major
ress, phone
re of the
ntted to two
le-spaced or
Dorian Wind Quintet Scheduled For Sept.
I'he ECU School of Music and
Department of University Unions
will present the Dorian Wind
Quintet as the first attraction of
iheir new, jointly sponsored
Chamber Festival. The perfor-
mance is scheduled for Hendrix
Theatre on the East Carolina
University campus in Greenville
on Wednesday, September 18 at
S:00 p.m.
Currently in its twenty-third
season, the Dorian Wind Quintet
has distinquished itself as one of
America's formost chamber
ensembles. In addition to acclaim-
ed performances of the baroque,
classical and romantic repertoire,
the Dorian Wind Quintet has in-
spired many contemporary com-
posers to write for wind.
Internationally known, the
Quintet has frequently toured the
United States, Europe, and
Canada, and has also delighted
audiences in the Middle East, In-
dia, Africa, and the Far East.
They have collaborated with such
renowned artists as Lorin
Hollander, Ruth Laredo,
Beveridge Webster, Jean
Casadesus, Lukas Foss, Jean-
Pierre Rampal, Claude Frank,
Hilde Somer, Minoru Nojima,
Phyllis Bryn-Julson, James Toc-
co, Lee Hoiby, and Phyllis Cur-
tin.
The ensemble was organized at
Tanglewood in 1961 during a
summer season at the Berkshire
Music Center under a Fromm
Foundation Grant, and made its
The Dorian Wind Quintet is the first attraction in this year's Chamber Festival.
Critic Tackles
football Story
(UPI) � If you want to read a
eally good football book with
plenty of action, lots of exciting
game sequences and a smattering
�r football nostalgia, read
v rut In Search of Billy
� as a high school quarter-
rural New England. He
a strong arm, and could
it on a rope at 50 yards
iireading a needle with that rope.
He won a football scholarship
'he University of Michigan.
After a promising freshman
eason, Billy left Michigan for
I'ddlebury College, a small
;ol iln Vermont.
No one seems to know why he
Michigan, so a professional
uball scout deems it his respon-
bility to discover the reasons.
Jack Newcombe has tried to
rite a book about the first pro
rail scout in history who is
more interested in a prospective
I ;urterback's mind than whether
' not he can throw the long one.
So, you figure, "Well, maybe it
w iiild be interesting to see just ex-
actly why Billy Cole did leave
Michigan for tiny Middlebury
' ollege Sorry. The scout never
finds out, or if he does, he doesn't
'he reader in on his secret.
In Search of Bill Cole is not
ust one of those books that is
hard to get into, it is one of those
books that is hard to get through.
You keep waiting for something
o happen but it never does.
uAppfe
cPocoJids
�4f AST5tf�ST
PHONE 7SS-1427
GREENVILLE, MX. 27134
Albums & Cassettes
t8 98 Ust - SoU $5.99
Newest releases by:
John Waite "SO BRAKES"
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f'eter Wolfe "LIGHTS OUT"
Jacksons "VICTORY"
Missing Persons "RHYME A REASON'
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Twisted Sister "STA Y HUNGRY"
The Cars "HEARTBEA T CITY"
Mck Lowe "COWBOY OUTFIT"
Rush "GRACE UNDER PRESSURE"
The Bangles "ALL OVER THE PLACE'
Y and T "L ROCK WE TRUST1'
Depeche Mode "PEOPLE ARE PEO
PLE"
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I The bqgmzza to Bm.ji01
widely acclaimed New York debut
in October, 1961. Twenty years
later the Quintet celebrated its
gala anniversary by becoming the
first wind quintet to appear in
Carnegie Hall. During its debut
tour of Europe in 1962-63, the
Quintet presented a concert in
London, inaugurating a new
series of concerts sponsored by
the American Embassy.
In addition to performances,
the Quintet's original format in
lecture-demonstrations and
master classes has been en-
thusiastically received by a wide
variety of audiences. Presently in
residence at the Mannes College
of Music, the Quintet has also
been resident ensemble at
Brooklyn and Hunter Colleges.
For a decade they also held the
position of University-Wide
Artists-in-Residence of the State
Universities of New York, where
they performed in lecture-
demonstration and concert
residences ranging from one to
four days. For the U.S. State
Department, the Dorian Quintet
toured Africa for three months
and also participated in a U.S.
Department of the Interior pro-
gram, "The Center of Arts of In-
dian America Derforming and
giving workshops for Indian
children of the Navajo reserva-
tion.
In the fall of 1982 the Quintet
was presented in Pakistan, India,
Jordan, Egypt, Morocco, and
Tunisia under the auspices of the
USICA. The International Music
Festival in Warsaw, Stravinsky
Festival at New York's Lincoln
Center, the Caramoor Festival,
and Music Festival of Stratford,
Ontario have all featured perfor-
mances by the Dorian Wind
Quintet.
The Quintet's recordings in-
cluded "The Avant Garde Wood-
wind Quintet in the U.S.A
which contains ten 20th century
compositions for wind ensemble;
Elliott Carter's Woodwind
Quintet, hailed by Stereo Review
as a performance of "such
musical and technical skill that it
amounts to a virtuoso experience
in every dimension and with
pianist Jean-Casadesus, an album
of French chamber music contain-
ing works by Poulenc, Bozza,
Ibert, and Francaix, which High
Fidelity called "superbly balanced
performances of incredible
elandazzlingly executed by the
Dorian Quintet
Tickets for this premiere per-
formance will be available beginn-
ing September 4 from the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, telephone 757-6611,
ext. 266. The Ticket Office is open
Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Ticket prices are $2 for ECU
Students and a guest and $4 for
ECU faculty, staff, and the
public. All tickets will be $4 at the
door. Group rates are also
available. For more information,
please call the Central Ticket Of-
fice at the number above.
A master class will be given by
the Quintet on October 11 from
10 a.m. to 12 noon in the ECU
School of Music A.J. Fletcher
Recital Hall. Classes are open to
all with no admission charge.
wprr
TOKiNS
ADDING LIFE .
TO CAMPUS LIVING.
� MYLAR BALLOONS
iPOSTERS
'MUGS
WINDOW SHADES
CANDLES
'UNUSUAL GIFTS
CALENDARS
STATIONERY POUND
CARDS
WICKER
WIND CHIMES
GAG GIFTS
FIFTH & READE STREETS
DOWNTOWN GREENVILLE
Creating A Place
Of Your Own ?
We designed Cargo furniture for living.
It's strong and sturdy with clean simple
!ines. Handcrafted of wood, Cargo is
guaranteed to last.
4
"We want to be your night spot
every nite
WELCOMES
THE CLASS OF 1988
TO ECU
Doors Open: DST 9:00-2:00 a.m. Est. 8:30-1:00 a.m.
MONDAY
TUESDAY
�WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY -
FRIDAY �
SATURDAY -
SUNDAY -
CLOSED � Open for private dorm socials and special Mondays, 1 e
first week of each semester.
CRAZY TUESDAY � Different events each week from Bikini Contest to
Air Band Contest to Draft Nite. Each Tuesday is always different
& always fun.
HUMP NITE � Free admission to ECU students $1.OQ 18 vr. adm. .
All cans 55C till 11:00 p.m 80� till closing.
COLLEGE NITE � $1.00 admission for ECU students VS2.00
18 yr. adm. All cans 55� till 11:00 p.m 80C till closing.
End of the Week Party � Friday Afternoon-3:30 till 7:30 - Free
admission ($1.00 18 vr. adm.). All cans 55� till 5:15 p.m 80C cans
till 7:30. FRIDAY NITE � $1.00 admission ;$2.00 18 yr adm). All
cans 80C till 11:00 p.m.
Best in Dance Music �1.00 admission ECU students
($2.00 18yr. adm.).
LADIES NITE � For 15 years our favorite way to wrap up the weekend.
Free admission for ladies $1.00 18 yr. adm.), & Nickel Draft while it
lasts.
'BRING YOUR FRIENDS & COME EARLY
You must be 18 to enter the club.
N.C Sute law prohibits person under 1M .o purchase alcoholic beverages.
Persons under 19 required to wear a wristband while on the premises.
Alternative Beverages xn provided.
'Excludes 1st Wednesday ot each semester.
BUI I
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m





10
HE EAST CAROLINIAN
IRS Records
Enters The
Video Market
B DAVID WITHERJNGTON
wasn't for the Foresight of
:KS Records (the International
-v indicate), we may never
I of such fine bands as
R.I M the Fleshtones, and the
v sh Beat IRS has been in-
Mgning the best acts
he new music scene since
v ad � America's
I v e record label is
e video market and
n may never be the same.
company's first release is a
: ion of the best of
ippi tpriately entitled
IRS Video
pe opens with the Beat's
lip 1 -ven wiih the
nal clowning
� deo captures the
g The painful
elling facial epres-
iger Dave Wakel-
iptured beautifully on
to the skillful direc-
M :k Hagger;v and CD.
into Wall of
tny Mexican
literal scene to
wish 1 wa-
becued ig-
x � h their
"The Stand
k( the clash,
i legiance I
md audience While
r m perform, you
n there with
s the staj
. ause
e Fleshtones'
od I hii .
.h good

the banc- they,
n bining
I
lei s, and just
m 1966, this
ased two incredible
p partv rock.
�! (ds and Hexbreaker
m the latter album

i
and'
. the
a good thing
eai to the sur-
R L Ms "Radio
Like most of
s I rr - stical visions,
j into its deep
angled dreams. There
my mind that
m ��' important
V if you've never
this clip is a fine in-
� a band you should
. ig m r.ey on!
' n also features
H ward Devoto and the
the New Church, featur-
er Dead Boy Stiv Bators.
� bone1 of much of the
the crisp production
-Salem own Mitch
ster, a fine musician in his own
rr's band. Let's Active,
ed in "Every Word
This is the best song
Monkees ever recorded, with
� - that grab and don't let
� ad the video is so bland
es a -umple lipsync by
i while being surrounded
ip e �! Kor -d puppies.
"and is the Cramps'
ige Man" � I would hate
this group in a dark
The band's "Munsters"
ona fits perfectly with the
graveyard setting.
The Beast of IRS winds up with
i '�d-pleaser, the Go-Go's
id Over Heals These ladies
lament that IRS is a label
ambition, and I'm sure you'll
ad �ver heels for these other
at groups
The Beast of IRS Video is
able in both VHS-Stereo and
i Hi Fi formats.
string Quartet
To Perform
he Tokyo String Quartet, ac-
med as one of the world's
st ensembles, will open the
1985 Artists Series at ECU's
ght Auditorium on Wednes-
September 26. The concert
egm at 8 p.m.
rickets for this performance,
Quartet's only in eastern
( , will be available beginning
September 12 from the Central
Ticket Office, Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center, telephone 757-6611,
ext. 266. The Ticket Office is open
Monday-Friday, 11 a.m. - 6 p.m.
rc
A&PCOUPON
A&P
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Charcoal Briquets
LIMIT ONE WITH COUPON AND 7 50 ORDER
GOOD THRU SAT SEPT 1 AT A&P
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66r
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU SAT . SEPT 1 AT A&P IN
GREENVILLE NORTH CAROLINA
fTEMS OFFERED FOR SA. E NOT AVAILABLE TO
OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
GOING ON VACATION
A4P HAS MORE STORES
CONVENIENTLY
LOCATED TO ANY AREA
Of THE GRAND STRAND'
WELCOME BACK,
ECU STUDENTS
MARKET STYLE
DOU
COUPONS
SEE YOUR A&P STORE IN GREENVILLE FOR DETAILS
ith supermarket prices r
V Beef Specials ,
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Ground Beef I Chuck Steak
3 lbs. or
more
FRESm
Ground Chuckl

Bone-In
1
48
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
BUDGET PACK � BONELESS
Beef Shoulder
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
FAMILY PACK
Cubed Steak
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
BONELESS
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B 12 !b
avg
lb.
168
198
398
HONEYMOON BONELESS
Buffet Ham
SWIFT HOSTESS
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WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
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JANE PARKER HAMBURGER OR
Hot Dog Buns
III
Oct.
pkgs.
FRENCH STYLE OR CUT GREEN BEANS � CREAM OR
WHOLE KERNEL CORN�TOMATOES
215'?oz
cans
ALL VARIETIES"
8 oz
btl
A&P Vegetables
ALL VARIETIES
A&P Dressings
DEL MONTE
Tomato Catsup 32�r
SLICED � CRUSHED � CHUNK IN JUICE � IN SYRUP
Dole Pineapple
79�
59c
99�
89c
REGULAR-THIN
MelloYello
GOOD ONLY IN GREENVILLE
ctn. of

16 oz.
btls.
A&P Spaghetti x 39c
EXTRA ABSORBENT fQO
A&P Diapers X 5
DESIGNER W0
Brawny Towels i 59�
GOLDEN RIPE
Bananas
ALL VAHIET1ES
A&P Pizza
AAPFROZEN
Orange Juice
KRAFT
American Singles
FLAV-O-RICH
REGULAR & LIGHT
Cottage Cheese
10 oz
24 oz
ctn
ALL VARIETIES
Ruffles� $$
S5Sto ni
plus
deposit
lbs.
only

ALL FLAVORS Carlo Rossi3 Llr. Btl. GOOD ONLY4.99 IN GREENVILI

REGULAR
BUDWEISER �
BEER
ot.
co�
712 oz.
pkg-
SAVE 25c,
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� Country Fresh Chicken tarts;
� Breast, Thiiihv IViiniH, I �, 1r .nwwtcd Ifc
CRISP GREEN
Leaf Lettuce
JUMBO SIZE
Broccoli
US 1 RED BLISS
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bunch
bunch
tWta.
handsel' � JJS 3��W? P c
COUNTRv pqiDE FOODS
I PO BOX 1594
� CLINTON IOWA 52734
-Coupons arc not to be assigned or transfer hv
Ilpltcalion const.tutes traud lnvo.ee T'Ovng pu,ch
last 3 months to cover coupons accepted ��i n�
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SEPT. fi, 1,1
Sunday 8:00am � 10:00pm
Monday thru Saturday 7:00am -12:00 Midnite
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Dreu
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jffrmgr Amy, Amoime Fall Flick
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 28. 1984 1
' A Rich Harvest' Of Movies
Continued From Page 8.
sky. Ten-year-old Casey has sued
her parents for divorce. Though
he loves them both, she suggests
to a sympathetic judge, if I'm
not going to be totally nuts when I
grow up, I'd better get out of this
family while I still have a
chance
Ryan O'Neal, Shelley Long and
Drew Barrymore star as the Brod-
sky family. Sam Wanamaker,
Allen Garfield and Sharon Stone
also star in the film which is
directed by Shyer, produced by
Arlene Sellers and Alex Winitsky
with Ms. Meyers serving as ex-
ecutive producer. William A.
Fraker was director of
photography.
The household in American
Dreamer, however, is disrupted in
a different way. In the madcap
comedy, Cathy Palmer enters a
writing contest and wins a trip to
Paris. In that romantic city,
Cathy begins to feel the force of
her own personality; the daring,
shimsical and impetuous aspects
of her nature take command. Not
only does she change her own life
hut she revolutionizes the lives of
those around her, instigating in-
ternational escapades beyond her
wildest fantasies.
A CBS Theatrical Films Presen-
tation of a KrostChapin Produc-
tion of a Rick Rosenthal Film,
American Dreamer, stars Jobeth
Williams as Cathy Palmer, Tom
Conti as Alan McMann, an
English playboy, and Giancarlo
Giannini as a French politician
caught up in the adventure.
Directed by Rick Rosenthal (Bad
Boys) and produced by Doug
Chapin with Barry Krost serving
as executive producer, the film's
screenplay is by Jim Kouf &
David Greenwalt with a story by
Ann Biderman. Original music is
by Lewis Furey.
Diane Keaton stars in the screen
adaption of The Little Drummer
Girl, based on John Le Carre's
critically-acclaimed bestseller.
Caught up in a world of intrigue
and international politics, Keaton
protrays an aspiring actress who
unwittingly becomes a pawn in a
game of international espionage.
Brought vividly to the screen by
distinguished filmmaker George
Roy Hill, with a screenplay
adapted by Loring Mandel, the
picture stars Diane Keaton, Klaus
Kinski and Yorgo Voyagis. Film-
ed on location is West Germany,
England, Greece and Israel, The
Little Drummer Girl was produc-
ed by Hill, with Patrick Kelley
and Robert Crawford serving as
executive producers.
An intensely personal story of
friendship and survival amidst the
torment of war, The Killing Fields
is Academy-Award-winning pro-
ducer David Puttnam's (Chariots
of Fire) film based on Pulitzer
Prize-winning correspondent
Sydney Schanberg's 1980 article
for The New York Times
Magazine, "The Death and Life
of Dith Pran Sam Waterston
stars as Schanberg with Haing
Ngor as Dith Pran, a young man
with an incredible instinct for sur-
vival. Directed by Roland Joffe
from a screenplay by Bruce
Robinson, the film is an Enigma
Production for Goldcrest Films.
On the subject of survival,
George Burns returns to star as a
down-to-earth Supreme Being in
sneakers in Oh, God! You Devil.
And now, in his first dual screen
role, Burns also stars as the flip
side of the celestial coin � a
suave, charming Devil.
Ted Wass stars in the comedy as
Bobby Shelton, a struggling
young songwriter whose thirst for
success leads him to unwittingly
make a deal with the Devil, thus
activating a cosmic battle of wills.
Tony Award-nominee Roxanne
Hart stars as Wendy Shelton, the
songwriter's supportive wife, who
can't imagine what � or who �
has gotten into her husband.
Paul Bogart directs Oh, God!
You Devil from the screenplay by
Andrew Bergman. Robert M.
Sherman is producer with Irving
Fein as executive producer.
Warner Bros, brings to au-
diences a rare and varied feast for
the fall of 1984 � enough for all
to partake.
Shelly Long, Ryan O'Neal and Drew
Barrymore star in the comedy "Irreconcilable Differences
Classifieds
work for you
YOUTH SOCCER COACHES
Youth Soccer Coaches work part-time, 10-20 hours
weekly, beginning Monday September 10th. Hours are
normally 3:30-7.30pm Monday thru Friday with occa-
s.onal Saturdays. Salary rate $3.45hr. Knowledge of soc-
cer skills and the ability to coach young people, ages 9-15
needed. Contact: Greenville Recreation and Parks Dept
at 752-4137 (ext.d 248, 220, 259) Deadline for applica-
tions is Friday August 31st.















WASH AND DRY
2804 E. 10th St.
Greenville, NC 27834



HARBIN HIGHLANDER CENTER INC.












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SALVAGE STORE
112 North Greene Street, Greenville, NC
(Located beside Harris Supermarket)
t�

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a$
&
F
&
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Open 8:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Every Thursday, Friday and Saturday

&
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SAVINGS! BARGAINS!
DISCOUNTS OF 50 TO 60
COME NOW AND SAVE!
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IHJLEASTCAROUNIANAUGUST 28,
1984
i
d.
w
tl
S
7
d
e:
N
The Graphic Debuts
By BRIAN RANGELEY
Suff Writer
Last Sunday night a new wave
washed through the Attic, but on-
ly a few were swept off their feet.
After that last statement, manv
of you probably assumed that a
new wave group played at the At-
tic and that people jumped up and
down. Your assumption isn't en-
tirely wrong. But Dolphin
Records' recording group, The
Graphic, is far from your average
new wave fare. What 1 heard was
fresh, fun music with tight ar-
rangements. Once The Graphic
started playing, they hardly even
paused between songs. Most of
the time, the group moved
smoothly from one song to the
next.
The transitions remained easy
and natural-sounding, even when
the songs were musically dif-
ferent. Music styles ranged from
new wave to your basic
rock'n'roll to R & B, with jazz
overtones weaving throughout.
It's impossible to categorize this
group by their sound.
"We would like to keep our
sound as liberal as possible said
drummer Jim Hoyle, "until some
record company forces us to con-
fine it
Hoyle, hidden behind his
arsenal of drums and symbols, is
the most visually exciting member
of the group. He moves through
complex rhythms with ease, punc-
tuating every note with pinpoint
accuracy. Hoyle received musical
training here at ECU's own
School of Music.
Lead guitarist Brad Newell
played with incredible ease as
well. Before joining The Graphic,
Newell attended the Berkeley
School of Music and played in
San Francisco. He had his own
ideas about industry tendencies to
label them as "new wave "I
think the term 'new wave' is too
ambiguous said Newell. "It's a
marketing term, not a musical
one
Newell also doubles as a part-
time keyboard player. He decided
to return to N.C. in 1981, when
The Graphic's first lead decided
to leave and when bass player
Classifieds
Dwight Mabe persuaded him to.
The two had played jazz together
previously.
Mabe, a graduate of UNC-
Greensboro, played bass for the
Greensboro and Winston-Salem
symphonies. He was instrumental
in originating The Graphic some
four to five years ago.
Dwight and a few others heard
Treva Spontaine playing acoustic
guitar and singing 60s folk songs
in Greensboro clubs. She needed a
band, and he needed a singer.
Thus, The Graphic.
Although the band plays a few
oldies, the music is mostly
original. I did discover, however,
that if The Graphic's music was to
be labeled, it would be termed
"New Music In fact, the show
was billed as Greenville's first
New Music Show.
"It's what they don't hear on the
radio said Newell. "Most of the
bands that come here play music
that they wrote themselves
"I may be getting myself into
trouble here said Hoyle, "but
I'm not sure that Greenville is
aware of New Music � you look
around town and everyone is driv-
ing around in their cars with the
This "New Music" band entertained Attic fans Sunday night.
heavy metal cranked up Jim felt
that the unawareness may be part-
ly to blame for the poor atten-
dance Sunday night.
In spite of the sparce crowd,
Spontaine marched to center stage
and filled the room with the
richness of her voice. And just
when you thought they couldn't
jam any harder, the intensity
drove higher. People were com-
pelled onto the dance floor. For
me, "Way of the World" was the
most exciting song of the night. It
begins slowly, and by the time the
song is finished, you ears are
bursting and yet screaming for
more.
Before you get too upset about
missing The Graphic, remember
this � The Graphic has an EP,
entitled "S'il Vous Plait coming
out in about a week. Mabe said
that the group is looking forward
to promoting the EP as it becomes
more popular. "We're gonna do a
hop, skip, and jump tour said
Mabe.
Major record labels are keeping
a close eye on The Graphic and so
should you. A Southern
Renaissance is on the rise As
Spontaine said, "North Carolina
bands are happening
SALE
78 VOLARE, FULLY LOADED; EX-
CELLENT CONDITION. 754-835.
OR $ALK B�ach Crui��r tlSO Call 731-171?
08 SALt '75 Pord Grand Torino Runs oooo
rldas oood sfereo, C B AC Call Georae 758 7240
a'er 4pm
ONB DORM SUED RCFR IOER ATOH 150 T�o
tXKfi trundle UC Electric guitar amplifier IX
Can 7� 7�3
FOR SALE It77 DATSUN B210 Hatchback
! �oaJ Runs weh Call 75 8253 after � Needs
Bodywork Best offer
PHOTOGRAPHERS AND PHOTOGRAPHER'S
REPRESENTATIVE needed to work with local
fraternity and sorority parties Earn $15 20hr
Send resume to Picture Perfect, 101 Woodland
St Morganton, NC 28655
WANTEDrFEMLEo6ATEloshire two
bedroom apartment Walking distance to cam
pus 10 00 plus j utll For more info call
752 4771
NEEOEOrPARTriME SOCCER COACHES for
various Pitt County Schools Contact Alice or
Barry at 752 610a if interested
FEMALE RddMM"ATE WANTED to share
2 bedroom townhouse apartment, $140 month plus
' j utilities Carpeted air, furnished dishwasher
laundry facilities and pool Deposit required Call
758 1263 after 5pm
FOR SALE: l 6 cu ft refrigerator excellent condi
flon Perfect tor dorm room $70 Can Ron after 5
P V '58 485C
MISC
East Carolina Coins & Pawn
Corner 10th & Dickenson Ave.
We Buy Gold & Silver
INSTANT CASH LOANS.
Buy - Sell - Trade
752 - 0322
Hours: 9:00am - 6:00pm Mon Sal
LOANS ON � buying TV's, Stereos, cameras
fyoewr teri O0ia � silver anything else of value
So. 'hem Paviv Shop T52 2464
APT FOR RENT j roos ttl kitchen anc Be
I 0 ocatec ntar rnK jchoo! ca, vole' a'
- 6042 v 'S� 053v
GOwOENHEARTS see announcements
DON T MISS ANOTHER CONCERT! RoadT7los
Unltd s tskng a busload Sept U to ves in
Greensboro Pick up your tickets at Appie
Betc-as soon
ECD A PLACE TO PARK your c7r7Free cose
'0 s'admm. 7S6-Q800 at'e- 5 3C Ask for Mack
FREE KITTEN, 4 months old, very friendly,
'ortoise colored Free cat, 1 year old gray and
'� '� Bo female 'en 752 5483
WANTED
V.AB ROOMMATE NEEDED 1 m. from cam
pus "a utilities 8? 5C for rent Cai' Doug a' '52 1983
CK '52 4804
PIANO PLAYERS WANTED 'epertoire should
mclude jazi. Bmes Rags. Dixieland Can 752 1361
o -ome Dy Piquant Alley
REGIONAL ANDLOCaIREPS "WANTED 'o
d strintt posters on college campuses Part time
ork or more Requires no sales Commnsor
P'us piecework Average earnings $6 00 per hour
Con'ac' American Passage 500 Third Ave Wes'
Seattle WA 9ril9. 1J�0 4262836Network
Ft MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED? NonTmoker
ivatber-drye provided new mobile home, ren'
$165, vs utilities, private room and private bath
Call '56151
HELPWANTEO For a tun part time iob deliver
ng balloon bouquets, must have car Fo. inter
view ca'l Balloons Over Greenville, 752 3815 or
7524931 between 10 a m 4 p m
PART- TIME SECRETARIAL POSITIO N
available immediately In Sports Medicine
Depart-nent Must be an ECU student and possess
good typing skins 15hrs week Call 757 6426 bei
ween 10 am 12 p.m and ask for Greg
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED Vi reniVj
' ' es.Cail3S5 6933after4 00 pm on weekdays
FEMALE STUDENT NEEDED to Share fur
nished conoo Central airheat.
washer-dryer $150 00 plus 'a utilities Apt
1 1 Cannon Colt- Cail 758 7090 after S pm
BURGER BREATH
GIVES Y0V
FALLENARCHES
TrA Fresh Sandwich
Or Salad
Get uk' SiL�-l()tmu7tui
208E. 5thSt. 758-7979
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rHE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
AUGUST 28, 1984
Page 13
QB In Doubt
By RANDY MEWS
ECU's first year offensive coor-
dinator Don Murry is in a
precarious situation � only four
days remain until the Pirates
season-opener at Florida State,
and he has yet to name a starting
quarterback.
Last year's starter, Kevin In-
gram, was signed by the Canadian
Football League, while backup
John Williams was lost to gradua-
tion. Of the three candidates vy-
ing for this year's starting posi-
tion, none has ever taken a snap in
varsity action.
Ron Jones, Robbie Bartlett and
Darrell Speed are fighting for the
job, and according to Murry, they
all play the same type of game. "I
would consider all three option
quarterbacks he said. "All have
good speed, and they're consistent
at deciding whether to pitch or
keep the football while on the
run
Jones, who was listed as the
No. 1 quarterback following spr-
ing drills, is the most adept runner
of the three. "When he gets in the
open field, Ron is a little quicker
and more evasive than his com-
petition Murry said.
Transfer Robbie Bartlett has
had the most game experience
after playing a year with Citrus
Junior College in California, and
Murry said he has a better overall
understanding of how the offense
should operate.
The final candidate, Darrell
Speed, saw action as a reserve
tailback last year. He runs a 4.5
second 40-yard dash, benches 315
pounds and has the strongest
throwing arm. "Sometimes he
doesn't make the right decisions
as to when to throw the ball
Murry said, "so he hasn't emerg-
ed as the best passer
Murry said regardless of who's
named the starting quarterback,
ECU's passing game will not be
up to par with the veteran
backfield. Starting and alter-
nating tailbacks Tony Baker and
Jimmy Walden return from a year
ago, as well as experienced
fullback Reggie Branch.
"We have the ability to be pro-
ductive on offense, but we're go-
ing to lean towards the run
Murry said. "All our quarter-
backs are excellent runners, and I
feel our offense will be built
around what we accomplish on
the ground
Murry also believesg successful
ground attack will enable the
Pirates to gain more yards
through the air. "We'll try to use
the play-fake by drawing the
secondary up to cover the run
he explained, "and then we'll get
behind them with our speed
The speed Murry refers to, will
come from flankers Henry
Williams and Ricky Nichols and
split end Stefon Adams. Williams
led the nation in kickoff returns
last year, was a 100-meter NCAA
National track qualifier and
posesses 4.2 speed; while Nichols
and Adams return as the two
leading receivers from last year's
team and can both run under a 4.4
forty.
If one of the young quarter-
backs can develop into an effi-
cient passer, his success will still
depend on the effectiveness of the
offensive line. Gone are first-team
All-America Terry Long and
starters John Robertson and John
Floyd. There are six players still
battling for the vacant positions,
and Murry expects each person to
see a considerable amount of
playing time before the final posi-
tions are determined.
"Our line is in the process of
maturing Murry said. "They're
capable of playing well, and 1 ex-
pect them to develop as the season
goes along
Overall, Murry seems confident
when acessing the offensive situa-
tion. He realizes the pressure of
playing a team such as Florida
State might get to one of his
young quarterbacks, but Murry is
more than looking forward to
making the trip to Tallahassee.
"We're going to give them
credit for being sound at all eleven
positions Murry said. "But
we're not really concerned with
their defense, we're concerned
with how we run our offense �
and that's going to be right at
em.
HH I � .
MICHAEL SMITH
ECU Photo Lab
ECU-FSU
Contest
Televised
WITN-TV will present ECU's
season-opener at Florida State �
a rematch of last year's one point
thriller � Saturday, Sept. 1 at
8:00 p.m. Kenny Hoff will an-
nounce play-by-play action with
commentary by Dick Jones.
The game, broadcast direct
from Tallahassee, is the 49th foot-
ball game produced by WITN-TV
with ECU. WITN Chairman,
W.R. Roberson said his station is
"committed to support athletic
events involving local teams which
generate veiwing interest
Last year's contest also marked
the first game for both teams. It
was called one of the most ex-
citing collegiate games ever by
sports personality Jimmy the
Greek. There were over 1,300
total yards in the game.
The ECU Pirates, under the
direction of Coach Ed Emory,
completed the 1983 season with
eight wins and three losses. The
Pirates ranked 20th in the final
Associated Press Poll and 17th in
the final Sports Illustrated Poll.
The Florida State Seminoles
finished 1983 with a 28-3 trounc-
ing of the University of North
Carolina in the Peach Bowl. The
Seminoles are ranked in most pre-
season polls as one of the top 20
college teams in the country.
According to ECU offensive coordinator Don Murrv, Ron Jones is the
most adept runner of the three candidates battling for the starting
quarterback job.
Skeffington Anticipating Fall
Bv SCOTT POUFR l.?u- ? . . �

C5
Juinor David Skeffington (white shirt) is expected to be one of the leaders on this vearTsoVceMeamand
hopes he can help the Pirates break the school record for number of victories in one season.
White Attempting Sta
By SCOTT POW ERS
Stiff Wrilfr
Junior David Skeffington has
yet to complete a season for the
ECU soccer team because of in-
juries, but hopes to put all of that
behind him as he prepares for the
1984 season.
'Those injuries shouldn't
bother me this year Skeffington
said of the .racked rib. torn
tments and broken collarbone
which cut both his freshman and
sophomore seasons short.
"David is very quick, has very
good speed and good skills head
coach 'ev� Brody aid. "He's a
real hustler
Skeffington. who was an All-
State player as well as Player of
the Year in Somerset County,
New Jersey, his senior year of
high school, will serve as a team
captain this year along with
seniors Mark Hardy and Brian
Colgan.
� a team captain, Skeffington
feeU thai it is his responsibility to
keep the team's spirit up, to keep
the communication on the field
going and to help pull the team
together.
"He's doing a real good job
pulling the upperclassmen and the
freshmen together Brody said.
This in itself is a difficult task
since about half o the team are
freshmen.
"David is going to be the key to
our success this year with his scor-
ing, leadership and ball move-
ment Brody said. "He is our on
the field leader without a doubt.
He can do it all on the soccer
field
"He's got an exceptional at-
titude. He wants to win so bad
and that helps to make him a
leader on the field. He's a really
good game player
Concerning this year's team.
Skeffington said, "We have a lot
better attitude now. We are
developing as a team and I think
that this sport is becoming more
of a program here at the school
He feels that a lot of that has to
do with Coach Brody. "He has a
positive attitude and is really
working hard. This is just the
beginning of a serious program
that should continue to build
from now on
Skeffington will play either the
midfield or the center forward,
commonly known as the striker,
position this year, where he will be
looked to for scoring. "He hasn't
really proven it yet, but I believe
that David's got a knack for put-
ting the ball in the back of the
net Brody said.
One of the goals for this year's
team is to break the school reco-j
of seven wins (1982), something
Skeffington feels that is within
reach.
"We have a difficult schedule
this year, but if the team will ex-
ecute and get the job done then we
will do it he said.
To break the win record would
be quite an accomplishment for
the team, but if you talk to David
Skeffington, you've got to believe
that thev'll do it.
By PETER FERNALD
Assistant Sports tAiXot
ECU's own Craig White, who
qualified for the Olympic and
NCAA National track trials this
summer, is now looking forward
to playing wide receiver for the
Pirate football team this fall.
Although White hasn't played
collegiate football, with top
veterans like Ricky Nichols and
Stephon Adams to learn from, he
certainly has the chance to excel.
At East Duplin High School,
White led his team in yards per
carry with 7.8 yards his senior
year and won nine letters in three
sports. He was an all-conference
running oack and voted the most
valuable back on his team.
ECU wide receiver coach Ken
Matous thinks White has the abili-
ty to be a good football player,
but says he will have to work
hard. "If he wants to make the
committment, he has a chance at
being good.
"He's going to have to start
over because he's been out of
football for two years Matous
said. "Craig is building it back
up, he has great speed and is a
step faster than his defenders.
"Craig is a big target Matous
continued. "He has pretty good
hands and has the ability to take a
hit. If he becomes a good football
player it also might make him bet-
ter on the track
White agrees with Matous that
football will be good for the spr-
ing track season. "The dicipline
and mental toughness I gain from
football will be somewhat
beneficial to me when I run
track he said.
On the track, White has ex-
hibited his running ability by win-
ning 110 high hurdle events and
setting the school record in that
event with a time of 13.82
seconds. Last spring he par-
ticipated in the NCAA Outdoor
Championships in Eugene,
Dual
"Coach Emory said that it
takes a lot of repititions to be
good at any one thing � even if
that means it takes a million reps.
I feel with enough repititions that
I will come on strong and be just
as good as the other players
participated in the '84 Olympic
trials.
But during the fall track season
White will be mainly concerned
with football. "I'll go to a couple
of track meets, but I'm only going
to be concentrating on one thing
at a time White said.
In the spring, White hopes to
qualify for the NCAA Nationals
and become an All-America.
"Hopefully, eveything will be
ticking at the right time so I can
win it this year he said.
"In preparation for the Florida
State game the Pirates have been
practicing four times daily and
White feels that the team will be
ready. "I think we'll be ready.
Coach Emory said if the team
didn't look readv for Florida
State that we would practice
more
In his first season at ECU foot-
ball, White has set a few goals.
"I've been getting better every
day and from the evaluations
from the coaches I'm improving.
One of my goals is to get some
playing time so I can gain ex-
perience. The other players have
more experience than I do, so this
will be a learning year for me.
Next year, my expectations will be
a lot higher
With a time of 4.2 seconds in
the 40-yard dash, White and
Henry Williams along with the
rest of the team, which averago
4.8 seconds, ECU will be a very
quick team.
"I feel that I'll be faster than
my opponents, but I will have to
adjust my speed according to the
particular play White said. "I'li
have to know when to slow up or
get a quick start and that comes
with practice.
Coaches Poll Picks Auburn
Although ECU finished last
year ranked in the Top 20, the
graduation of 12 starters (11 of
whom are now playing profes-
sional football) has caused most
people to overlook the Pirates this
season.
Below is the United Press Inter-
national Board of Coaches pre-
season Top 20 1984 college foot-
ball ratings, with first-place votes
and last year's records in paren-
theses (total points based on 15
points for first place, 14 for se-
cond, etc.).
1. Auburn (32) (11-1) 604
2. Nebraska (1)( 12-1) 429
3. Texas (4) (11-1) 417
4. Miami (Fla.)(l) (11-1) 336
5. UCLA (1) (7-4-1) 309
6. Penn State (8-4-1) 282
7. Pittsburgh (1) (8-3-1) 280
8.Clemson(9-l-l) 276
9. Ohio State (9-3) 255
10. Michigan (9-3) 217
11. Oklahoma (8-4) 194
12. Alabama (8-4) 194
13. Arizona State (6-4-2) 170
14. Iowa (9-3) 162
15. Notre Dame (1) (7-5) 149
16. Southern Methodist (10-2) 103
17. Washington (8-4) 100
18. Florida (9-2-1) 86
19. Geoigia (10-1-1) 68
20. Boston College (9-3) 56
Note: By agreement with the
American Football Coaches
Association, teams on probation
by the NCAA are ineligible for the
Top 20 and national champion-
ship consideration by the UPI
Board of Coaches. The teams cur-
rently on probation are Arizona,
Illinois and Kansas.
NCAA National and Olympic trials qualifier Craig White has already
�6t, established himself as a track star � now he's trying to learn the
Oregon and during the summer he system of the Pirate football team as a wide receiver.
ACC Move Over, The Pirates Are Here
As one can see by MUSING
over the above pre-season Top 20
rankings, not a single team from
the state of North Carolina is
represented in the poll.
Although that may not seem so
unusual to some, it's the First
time in many years such has been
the case. North Carolina was
powerful in the days of Kelvin
Bryant, N.C. State man-handled
opponents under the guidance of
Lou Holtz and even Wake Forest
got noticed in the late 70's � but
now the time has come for a new
leader to take charge, and ECU is
in a perfect position to do so.
Fact: No team in the state can
even attempt to match ECU's
schedule over the next few years
(Penn State, Miami, Pittsburgh,
Auburn, LSU, Florida State, Il-
linois, West Virginia, etc.).
Fact: With the exception of
men's track and baseball, ECU
doesn't have an athletic program
worth mentioning � therefore all
$750,000 raised by the Pirate
Club, plus a cut out of the stu-
dent's tuition will almost ex-
clusively go for football scholar-
ships.
Fact: Head Coach Ed Emory is
known as one of the best
recruiters in the region, � hich is
evidenced by the continual rise in
his record since he took over as
head coach ('80, 4-7; '81, 5-6;
'82, 7-4; '83, 8-3).
Many people are writing the
Pirates off this year because they
lost 11 seniors to professional
football, but there's no doubt
capable replacements are waiting
to get their chance, and there's
doubt the Pirates will be the top
team in North Carolina, and pro-
bably the only, when that same
poll is released on Jan. 3.
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14
THE EAST CAROLONIAN
AUGUST 28, 1984
Jones Shines For Olympic Handball Team
By TOM HAMILTON
Los Aafcics Ttaa
While a majority of Olympic
athletes have dedicated more than
half their lives to excelling at their
sport, Leora Sam Jones, the U.S.
star of women's team handball,
didn't even know what team
handball was until two years ago.
But she's a very fast learner.
Jones was an athlete, all right,
but she had spent most of her time
playing basketball. Despite the
fact that she loved to play, Jones
felt that her chances of ever mak-
ing an Olympic basketball team
with the likes of a Cheryl Miller
were slim.
So she was somewhat startled
two years ago when East Carolina
I niversity intramural director
Wayne Edwards one day asked
her, "How would you like to
compete in the Olympics?
"1 immediately thought of
basketball and told Wayne to stop
loking she said. "Then, he ex-
plained to me that he was talking
about team handball. I had never
heard of the sport, but Wayne
kept telling me I had all the
natural qualities to become a good
player in the sport
What Edwards saw was a
strong-armed, 5-8 left-hander
with a quick, first step and the
stamina to survive in a sport that
has two, 30-minute halves with no
time-outs. Edwards thought Jones
was a natural, and he was right.
Jones, 23, played in two in-
ttamural games at East Carolina
before earning a berth in the 1982
National Sports Festival in Col-
orado Springs. Three weeks later,
she was jetting off to France for
an exhibition tour as a member of
the national team.
Of course, Jones had im-
pressive prerequisites before
enrolling in a crash course of team
handball. She was a junior college
basketball All-America for two
seasons at Louisburg College in
Louisburg, N.C where her team
finished fifth in the national
tounament in 1980.
As a teenager in Mount Olive,
N.C Jones was the talk-of-the-
town during her prep career at
Southern Wayne High School.
She was a three sport standout in
basketball, volleyball and soft-
ball, in fact, it was in high school
that Jones gained the nickname,
"Sam after Boston Celtics great
Sam Jones.
Because team handball features
many of the same skills from
more-established American
sports, Jones found the initial
transition to be simple. In fact,
she found she could score with the
best of them. But she soon
discovered that there's more to
the game than throwing the
cantaloupe-sized leather ball into
a mesh net.
"The game came naturally to
me she said. "The little
technical skills were simple. But
once 1 started playing against the
best players in Europe, I found
out I had a lot to learn.
"The biggest problem for me
was � and still is � defense. All
my life, I played basketball where
you sit and wait on defense so that
you can use all of your energy to
score. But defense is the biggest
part of the game in team hand-
ball. If you don't play defense,
you don't win many games
Jones, who was the only black
competing among the 18 teams in
either the women's or men's com-
petition at the Olympic games,
said she is now working to in-
troduce the sport to other U.S.
black athletes.
"I think the United States will
start making a name in the sport
throughout the world when they
pick up more black players
Sports Line
To Return
By BILL MITCHELL
S�ff Wrtltr
Dial-a-Pirate, which was First
used in the mid-70's, is a taped
message concerning Pirate sports
which anyone can call. The tape
consists of interviews of coaches
andor players, scouting reports,
upcoming schedules, what the
team is doing in practice, injuries
and anything concerning the foot-
ball program.
Rob Wilson, Assistant Sports
Information Director, states that
his ofFice is promoting the service
as, "a way for the media, students
and all other supporters to get a
daily 'progress' report on the
teams
The report is changed daily
(travel schedules sometimes pro-
hibit daily changes on weekends).
The length of the reports will
range from three to Five minutes.
Dial-a-Pirate may be reached by
calling (919) 757-6666.
While the majority of the
members on the American team
will retire from the sport follow-
ing the 1984 Olympics, Jones said
she will continue to participate
and train in preparation for the
1988 Games in Seoul, South
Korea.
Jones says she has no plans to
return to East Carolina, where she
was studying special education.
She has received offers to play in
clubs in West Germany, Austria
and Japan where she can earn a
living and retain her amateur
status.
The U.S. team coach, Klement
Capliar, is one of her biggest fans.
After all, she is the U.S. team's
second-leading scorer.
"She's going to make it big in
the sport Capliar said. "The
fans in the Orient and Europe lov-
ed her. She has a presence and lots
of personality on the court. She
seems to feed on the fans' ap-
Former ECU standout basketball player Leora "Sam" Jones led the
U.S. Olympic Handball Team to a fourth place finish in L.A.
plause
copyright, L.A. Times, 1984.
reprinted by permission
A former ECU women's
basketball star who adopted the
sport of team handball two years
ago and then led the U.S.
Women's Olympic Handball
squad to a fourth place Finish last
week in Los Angeles got more ac-
claim from the games than she ex-
pected.
Leora "Sam" Jones of Mt.
Olive, N.C who scored a total of
32 points against the Teams of
China, Yugoslavia, Korea, West
Germany and Austria, got several
job offers from some of the coun-
tries where handball is an impor-
tant sport.
"She was sought after very
highly by club teams in Austria,
Japan and Germany said Dr.
Wayne Edwards, former ECU
Director of Intramurals, a team
handball official who served as a
scorekeeper during the Olympic
competition.
"The Austrians wanted her the
most in terms of what they were
offering her to come Edwards
said. "But I think she has pretty
much decided to turn them down
and come back to school and
graduate Jones has about
another year of course work re-
maining and expects to graduate
from ECU next spring.
In the Olympic games Jones led
the U.S. team in upsetting China
in the First game 25 - 22. She
scored six goals in that game.
In losing to Korea, she scored
nine points and then went on to
score three more against
Yugoslavia, the team that went on
to win the gold medal, and eight
against West Germany. In the
final match, the women's team
beat Austria, with Jones scoring
six goals.
"She was just fantastic Ed-
wards said. "It's hard to describe
to someone who hasn't seen her
play just what she has accomplish-
ed in just two years. That's what
the Europeans were so impressed
with because the top scorer was a
woman from Yugoslavia who is
29 years old and has been playing
since she was four or Five years
old. Sam is close to her in terms of
overall ability he said.
Edwards said the offers by the
countries involve hiring players to
work in various types of jobs with
the understanding that they also
play handball. "It satisFies the
amateur requirement because the
really do work in the capacity that
they are hired Edwards said.
The Austrians made her a good
offer but what they wanted her to
do was to come here and go to
school at the University of Vien
na. They were going to pay for her
schooling and give her a house
and transportation
"I think she will come back to
school and graduate next spring
and maybe play in Europe next
year said Edwards.
iVMIMTHON
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WHAT EVERY STUDENT
SHOULD KNOW ABOUT THE DIFFERENCES
BETWEEN LEASING A TELEPHONE AND
LEASING A CHICKEN.
Yes, there are differences.
And we think you should
know what they are. Ask
yourself these questions.
WHEN YOU LEASE A
CHICKEN, DO YOU
GET THREE MONTHS
FREE DURING
THE SUMMER?
Probably not. But when
you lease your telephone
from AT&T this fall, you
won't pay any lease charges
next summer. You can use
your phone at home, and bring
it back to school in the fall.
DO LEASED CHICKENS COME IN A
SELECTION OF COLORS AND STYLES?
No. Chickens don't come in many colors.
But the AT&T telephone you lease this
fall comes in a variety of colors and
three popular styles.
ARE LEASED CHICKENS
Don't kid yourself. Repairing a
chicken is a delicate process that requires the work
of expensive professionals. However, in the off chance your
telephone will be shipped
directly to you after one
call to 1-800-555-8111,
or you can pick up your
phone at any of our AT&T
Phone Centers.
ONE FINAL QUESTION:
DOES IT COST THE SAME
TO LEASE A CHICKEN AS
TO LEASE A TELEPHONE
THIS FALL?
Hardly. While we have no
hard data on the exact cost of
leasing a chicken, we can tell you
with some certainty7 that the cost
of leasing a telephone this fall is
far less than you might think.
The decision to lease a chicken
or a telephone, of course, rests with
you. But should you opt for the tele-
phone, remember: you get three months
free next summer, and you can take the
phone home with you. There's a choice of
colors and styles, free repair, and we'll
ship you the phone
or you can pick
AT&T leased telephone needs repairs, we'll fix it absolutely
free when you visit any of our AT&T Phone Centers.
ARE LEASED CHICKENS SHIPPED DIRECTLY TO YOU?
Ship a chicken? Don't be silly. However, your AT&T leased
it up at any
of our AT&T Phone Centers.
It doesn't cost much either. And
that's something to crow about.
AT&T Consumer Sales and
Service. To order your telephone,
call 1-800-555-8111 for delivery
right to your door or for information
concerning AT&T Phone Center
locations.
AT&T
Call The Toll Free Number Listed Above
Vaiid with the following restrictions: 1. You must be registered for 12 accredited hours for the 19&4 fall term. 2. Valid only to students billed by AT&T Consumer Sales and Service 3. Delinquent accounts are void from offer 4 Limn two telephones per account 5 Offer expires
72 months from lease initiation date. 6. This offer is not vahd for permanent year-round resident students. 7. The three free months will not begin until you have paid for the first tune months of your lease. 8. All telephones are FCC registered We provide repair service for all
telephones soW at AT&T Phone Centers Only telephones equipped with Touchtone dialing can access certain long distance services and networks. O Copyright AT&T Consumer Sales and Service 1984
f
Dye, Jo
East Rutherford, N J ti p
It took Fat Dye three tuil vears ts
Auburn coach to get where hmmv
Johnson will be in his ?r .
at Miami on the hot seat
Dye needed just three yean
turn a mediocre Auburn team-
to the 1984 pre season No 1 br
inging a load of pressure
himself in the pro ess
accepted as much pressure
leaving Oklahoma Stac to sue
ceed Howard SchneUenbergei at
Miami atter -he Hurricanes
their first national champj
Dye rr-rid.r D B field
after the rigers went 5 6 in
Auburn hadn't been in the I
.1
ECU And
Go Back
I he pi rale a
( ai olina I nivci -
athletic teams, was ad
the legend and lore
North C arolina and m .
choice foi a tli
collegiate athletics beg .
school in the 1930
Pirates, fierce a
were promii
Carolina's colon,
state's Outer B . �
out into the Atlai
hideouts foi these
gangsters ol the I
had homes at
small il!age- aloi .
Idward reach, I
" Black bea d
i astern North t ar .
house at I
Banks Md an in
on the Pamlicc F
1 ast t arolina I .
tcrest in pirates and �ea
in 1934 rhat yea
the yearbook
East c arolina I eac h�
carried pirates as its thei
pages were tilled with
and sketches ol
figures, tall
treasure I he bool rel
tales ol the infamous " 1 ea
Pirate" often told I
the historic town ol B
The men's varsitv team at the
time was know n a ' he
Teachers a lacklustei band ol
Manwaring
Honored
At Banquet
B 1 lhR MK1)
Maft t�
The Athletic Depai tm
banquet honoring I
ing, the new womc
coach, on Aug. 21 u
hosted bs the Ramada ,an
She comes to the team ft
Francisco State 1 niversil
she was head
Ms. Manwaring sp kc al
plans for the team and
looking forward :
high caliber placers
Carolina. Pam H
Athletic Director ol Stud-
states that "the Athletic Dq
ment is ver pleased
Coach Manwaring come
Carolina, and is exp
gOOd 1984 -83 sea In Ma
wanng's thirteen
coaching at the junioi col .
university level, sh
a losing season And i
cisco State, she built a
program using m
Attending this I
basketball dignatanes
over the countrv. in
Yow, the head �
ball coach at N t
tant to the CHympi v
the coaches from EC! were t
as well as other impt rta
from the Umve
Pam Holt stati
over 300 people there
turn out to welcome (
Manwaring to East i
ATTIC
Thur
Aug 30
13Hi Anmvntor
13 cont Admission
13 cant Happy Hour
wMt-
SPLIT DECISION
Woy�g songs from all 1 3 yrs
ECU ADMISSION POLK Y
txctrr Fot cohorts
1. SSSnSS Dor. Stwdwin
2. St 00-fCU G Admiuw
S. $$� tlyv oM �?���
f
Till





c
am
Sam is c lose to her in terms of
all ability he said.
ds said the offers by the
'ines involve hiring players to
i -v in various tvpes of jobs with
nderstanding that they also
handball "It satisfies the
tteur requirement because they
tv m the capacity that
hired Fdwards said.
v s ians made her a good
what the wanted her to
ome here and go to
ric I niversity of Vien-
going to pav for her
- e her a house
"ill come back to
ate next spring
turope next
NCES
hone will be shipped
Sly to vou after one
to 1-800-555-8111,
i can pick up your
at any of our AT&T
Phone Centers.
FINAL QUESTION:
IT COST THE SAME
ISE A CHICKEN AS
1SE A TELEPHONE
THIS FALL?
While we have no
n the exact cost of
en, we can tell you
that the cost
i telephone this fall is
in you might think.
101 e a chicken
rests with
i you opt forthetele-
ou get three months
; and you can take the
u. There's a choice of
free repair, and we'll
AT&T
two telephones per account 5 Offer expires
eistered We provide repair service for all
'�
IHfc EAST CAROl INIAN
AUGUST 28, 1984
15
Dye, Johnson Both Feel Coaching Pressure
East Rutherford, N.J. (UPI) �
It took Pat Dye three full years as
Auburn coach to get where Jimmy
Johnson will be in his first .game
at Miami � on the hot seat.
Dye needed just three years to
turn a mediocre Auburn teams in-
to the 1984 preseason No. 1. br-
inging a load of pressure on
himself in the process. Johnson
accepted as much pressure by
leaving Oklahoma State to sue
ceed Howard Schnellenberger at
Miami after 'he Hurricanes won
their first national championship.
Dye replaced Doug Barfield
after the Tigers went 5-6 in 1980.
Auburn hadn't been in the final
ratings since 1974 but finished
14th in 1982 and third in 1983.
Dye is 25-10 in three seasons with
a Southeastern Conference crown
and � more importantly to
Auburn fans � two straight vic-
tories over state-rival Alabama to
his credit.
"I've been here as long as
Coach Dye. What's unique about
this program is it didn't inherit a
winning tradition Tigers
lineback Gregg Carr said. "The
people who are here now put this
program up where it is now.
"I guess throughout the coun-
try we have an identity crises. But
in the South, Auburn has been
establishing itself as one of the
best teams. Alabama has great
tradition and we can't build tradi-
tion in one or two years. Hopeful-
ly under Pat Dye, Auburn will
develop tradition
Another triumph over Alabama
would help the Tigers finally
climb out from under the long
shadow of the Crimson Tide. And
a national championship would
finish the task.
Dye feels Monday night's game
can help his team gain exposure.
"We're in the position where
Alabama's always been the domi-
nant football team and we need
the exposure Dye said. "The
ECU And The Pirate Logo
Go Back A Long, Long Way
The pirate, a symbol of East
Carolina University and its
athletic teams, wa adopted from
the legend and lore of coastal
North Carolina and was a natural
choice for a nickname when inter-
collegiate athletics began at the
school in the 1930's.
Pirates, fierce and colorful,
were prominent in North
Carolina's colonial period. The
state's Outer Banks which jut far
out into the Atlantic were ideal
hideouts for these legendary
gangsters of the high seas. Many
had homes and families in the
small villages along the coast.
Edward Teach, best known as
"Blackbeard was a resident of
Eastern North Carolina. He had a
house at Ocracoke on the Outei
Banks and an inland home at Bath
on the Pamlicp River.
East Carolina University's in-
terest in pirates and sea lore began
in 1934. That year, the Tecoan,
the yearbook for what was then
East Carolina Teachers College,
carried pirates as its theme. The
pages were filled with paintings
and sketches of patched eye
figures, tall ships and buried
treasure. The book referred to the
tales of the infamous "Teach the
Pirate" often told by natives in
the historic town of Bath.
The men's varsity team at the
rime was known as "The
Teachers a lackluster band of
Manwaring
Honored
At Banquet
B TATER HEAD
M�rr wm�r
The Athletic Department held a
banquet honoring EmiK Manwar-
ing, the new women's basketball
coach, on Aug. 21 which was
hosted by the Ramada Inn.
She comes to the team from San
Francisco State University, where
she was head coach for five years.
Ms. Manwaring spoke about her
plans for the team and how she is
looking forward to coaching the
high caliber players at East
Carolina. Pam Holt, Assistant
Athletic Director of Student Life
states that "the Athletic Depart-
ment is very pleased to have
Coach Manwaring come to East
Carolina, and is expecting a very
good 1984-85 season In Man-
waring's thirteen years of
coaching at the junior college and
university level, she has never had
a losing season. And at San Fran-
cisco State, she built a very good
program using no scholarships.
Attending this banquet were
basketball dignataries from all
over the country, including Kay
Yow, the head women's basket-
ball coach at N.C. State and assis-
tant to the Olympic team. All of
the coaches from ECU were there
as well as other important people
from the University.
Pam Holt stated that there were
over 300 people there, a very good
turn out to welcome Coach Emily
Manwaring to East Carolina
ATTIC
6
Thur.
Aug. 30
lith Anniversary
13 c�nt Admission
13 c�nt Happy Hour!
wM SPLIT DECISION
Playing tongs from all 13 yrs.
ECU ADMISSION POLICY
EXCEPT FOR CONCERTS
1. FREE-FamaU Dorm StuaWt
2. $1 00-ICU G�n. Admission
3. SI 50 18 Y, old ttwWi
athletes who had won only two
fooiball games in three seasons of
existence. But the student body's
interest in pirates quickly resulted
in changing the name of the team
to capture the romantic appeal of
the early sea adventures. The
change brought so much en-
thusiasm that in the following
year, 1935. the Piiate football
team had a much better season,
winning three of its six games.
Prior to the introduction of
atnletics for men, the ECTC
Athletic Association, comprising
women athletes in basketball, ten-
nis, baseball and archerv were
content with the more classical
nicknames. A 1930-31 Handbook
for ECTC listed the two teams
that made up the Athletic
Association as the Olympians and
the Athenians. Their colors were
purple and gold (the same as to-
day's colors) and the mascot a
wildcat.
Other uses of the pirate theme
began in the 1940's, with a literary
magazine named "Pieces of
Eight The name, however, was
later changed to "Rebel
The college yearbook became
the "Buccaneer" in the 1950's
and the pirate symbol, the face of
a bearded, patched-eye character
with a crossed bone emblem on
his hat was added to the school
seal in the mid 1960's.
i he Pirate as it is seen today �
Powerful Pee Dee � was official-
1 adopted as the new logo in
1983.
' TTI3XGN MAXELL OR PD MAGNETICS
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Free T Shirt or
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I
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i
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NOW TAKING
APPLICATIONS
General Managers
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Interested persons
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soup
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Now Offering: Stuffed Baked Potatoes
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I
i
- fm
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can't play
Schnellenberger did at Miami
what Dye accomplished at
Auburn. Now it is Johnson's job
to maintain the Hurricanes' lofty
standing. That promises to be
tough at the start. Although
Miami is ranked fourth in pre-
season, Johnson has had just 29
practice sessions with his new
team and is about to face three
ranked teams within 12 days
"My wife Linda Kay and I talk
ed about it and said it's going to
be a trying year Johnson said
"But the bottom line was we
wanted to live in South Florida. A
lot of people thought I was a little
crazy. Quite a few of my col-
leagues called and said thev never
thought I'd do it
Johnson knew what he was get
ting into, though. He even left
behind an Oklahoma State team
that many thought was finally
ready to challenge for the Big
light crown.
"The easy thing would've been
to stay in Stillwater he said. "I
wmild've played a lot of golf this
summer. This gives us a chance to
go to a place we've always wanted
to go
So far, the Miami players are
impressed with Jorjnson.
"Obviously,when you lose a
man of Coach Schnellenberger's
capabilities, you lose a lot star-
ting quarterback Berme Kosar
said "But the transition's gone
smoothly and we're right on
schedule
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28, 1984
17
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Of
GAINESVILLE. Fla. (UPI)
Florida Coach Charley Pell, who
led his Gators to a 24-17 come-
from-behind victory over ECU
last year, will resign at the end of
this year following a lengthy
NCAA investigation into the foot-
ball program at the Southeastern
Conference school.
Pell, 43, told his plavers of the
decision Sunday night, but declin-
ed to discuss it at a Rotary club
meeting in Jacksonville Monday
except to deny he was forced out
of the job.
University officials scheduled a
news conference for later in the
day and Pell said he did not think
it would be proper to discuss the
matter before then. Pell was not
expected to appeal at the news
conference.
"1 regret not being able to
discuss it he told those atten-
ding the luncheon meeting. "I
want you to forgive me for that.
But the situation doesn't permit
it
But Sunday night he confirmed
his resignation to reporters.
"1 called the team together and
told them I was resigning at the
end of the season. 1 hope to coach
this year pell said.
The resignation will become ef-
fective Dec. 2 the day after the
Gators' final regular season game
at Florida State.
"God loves this place and that's
the way I want it to be. I am hur-
ting Pell said. "I take full
responsiblitiy for what has hap-
pened
Sources at the university said
Pell gave his resignation as "a
sacrificial lamb, possibly to lessen
the NCAA charges
But Pell denied the accusations,
saying the resignation was "total-
ly my decision
The NCAA began an investiga-
tion of Gator recruiting practices
Clayton Honored For '59-61 Season
1 awrence Howard "Cotton"
Clayton, former basketball and
baseball player at East Carolina
I Diversity, will be honored with
induction into the school's Sports
Hall of Fame during halftime
ceremonies of the Sept. 8 home
opening football game vs Temple
Universit.
Clayton becomes the 43rd
member of the 11 year old Sports
Hall of Fame, established in 1974
to honor those individuals who
have, b) their direct participation
in Fast Carolina University inter-
collegiate athletics, brought
IRS Fall A ctivities
Bv JEANNFTTFROTH
Staff � rlicf
Well, it's a brand new year and
once again you've been bombard-
ed with deals you can't refuse.
Everything from pizza
coupons, dolphin dollars, free
checking accounts with your per-
sonal banker to nickel draft dur-
ing ladies lockout. Well, there is
one program at ECU where those
"free checks" will never be writ-
ten and you can have just as much
fun (well, almost) as you would
during ladies night at your
favorite tavern. That program is
the Department of Intramural
Recreational Services.
What is the 1RS� It can be
Aerobic Exercise, Flag Football,
Umost Anything Goes. Putt-Putt
Golf, Backpacking Trips, Free
Swim. Hang Gliding. Rugby,
W eight Room� . and the list goes
or. and on. It covers every activity
aginable so students, faculty,
and staff can recreate.
There are programs in Outdoor
Recreation. Sport Medicine. In-
formal Recreation, Instructional
Classes and Intramural Sports.
Here is vour chance for full-time
fun and pan-time employment (if
you need it). Just ask around �
everyone participates and enjoys
intramurals. If you need to get out
from behind those books and
blow your steam, sign up for the
activity of your choice and par-
ticipate!
Registration deadlines for the
following activities are ap-
proaching:
outstanding recognition to
themselves and to the University.
During two years of athletic
participation from 1959-61,
Clayton was named all-America
in both baseball and basketball, as
well as, all-North State Con-
ference and all-District.
Perhaps baseball was his top
sport. Playing for coach Jim
Mallory, Clayton led the 1961
Pirate team to the national cham-
pionship in the NAIA as the
team's leading hitter. He played
both outfield and thir base.
Following graduation, Clayton
played in the Baltimore organiza-
tion for seven years, including
triple-A ball.
According to a newspaper arti-
cle in the Raleigh Times, Clayton
is credited with being the state's
most prolific high school scorer
ever in basketball, with 2750-plus
points in four years.
After his pro career ended,
Clayton returned to his home in
Henderson, opening Downtown
Tire, which he still owns and
operates.
Son Lawrence, Jr, graduated in
1983 from East Carolina, while
Clayton's youngest son, Randy, is
a sophomore this year at ECU.
20 months ago. The probe began
with a preliminary inquiry and
Florida officials have said it has
not advanced to the next stage,
which would include the listing of
allegations by the NCAA.
Players and assistant coaches
said they were shocked by pell's
disclosure. Some wept and others
were silent.
"None of us had any idea
one player said.
"Coach just told us and the
players that he was doing what he
thought best for the team said
defensive coordinator Joe Kines.
"I had no idea it was coming.
He told us the best thing for our
careers would be to try to win and
hold the team together and
somebody would notice Kines
said.
In the UPI pre-seaon poll
Florida, 9-2-1 last year, is ranked
18th. The Gators' nine wins tied
the school record of most wins in
a season.
Florida defeated Iowa 14-6 in
the Gator Bowl and ended the
year ranked sixth. It was the first
time in the school's history that a
team finished the season ranked in
the nation's top 10.
The Gators won their first seven
games last year, including a M-3
win over eventual national cham-
pion University of Miami.
Pell's personal record is
83-42-4. He has directed the
Gators to 32 total wins over the
last four years, tying a school
record.
He came to Florida from Ckm-
son and less than two years later,
the Tigers were placed on proba-
tion by the NCAA. The Clcmson
probation stemmed from
numerous infractions, many of
which occurred during pell's
tenure.
Pell has consistently denied any
rule violations at any time in his
career.
The Gators open their 1984
season Saturday at Tampa against
Miami.
NA UTIL US, INC.
7St 95i4
Activity
Bicycle Race
Flag Football
Team Putt-Putt
Co-Rec Softball
Fntrv Dates
9-4 9-5
9-4 9-5
9-10 9-11
9-10 9-11
Welcome Back ECU
Students
$&
If you don't have a team but
you still want to play � come to
room 204 Memorial Gym (IRS
Office) or call 757-6387, anu we'll
put you on a team. You may even
become the IRS Player of the
Month, win the infamous IRS
T-shirt, or help your team win the
coveted Chancellors Trophy.
Check us out � we're free and
we're fun and we want you to
participate rather than
soectate
Combination Special:
Shrimp, Trout & Deviled Crab
FF or Baked Potato,
Cole Slaw & Hush Puppies - $3.99
Weight Training Center WAerobic Classes Daily
Within walking distance from ECU caaspus
Gym Hours:
Mon-Thurs 10:00-9:00
Friday 10:00-8:00
Saturday 10:00-5:00
Sunday 1:00-5:00
Rates.
100.00 Semester-1 ndiv.
85.00Semester-Group of 3 or More
Add 20.00 for Aerobic daaaca
Just Aerobics - 66.00 Semester
(Unlimited Ctaatca)
105 Airport Rood 758-0327
Our Gym Has:
- 6,000 lbs. of Olympic Weights
- Complete Nautilus Circuit
� Tanning Booth
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- Good Supervision on Nutrition
� and YES we have air conditioning
THE
Trial In Both Aerobics
And Weight Training
fear men end women
tool kvm� rracrr
OIUNVIULI M C. TM
WELCOME BACK ECU STUDENTS
Proud Sponsor
Of The Great Pirate Purple & Gold
Pigskin Pigout Party
$&&j;
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i



v
Z0i
Great Taste Less Filling
�1983 Miller Brewing Co. Milwaukee
Flip For
The Pirates!
Compliments of C.O.Tankard Co.
UNCC
Chapel Hill, N.C (UPI) �The
construction of one of the coun-
try's biggest sports arenas has
prompted both praise and
criticism about the roles of
athletics and a sports booster club I
at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill
Private contributions entirelv
funded the S33 8 million, 22,000
seat Student Activities enter,
which is set for completion by
next spring When the final
pledges were added up and releas-
ed last eek, the total was S38
million � nearly S5 million more
than the arena's cost. In July
alone, the final month of the four
year campaign, $h million pour-
into the coffers of the universit
Educational Foundation In.
ter known as the Rams Club
Some sav the financially
club is a boost to overall s.
at the university. Others
may be ume to tighten the -
on the dub bel
over academia.
Their aim
sies that ha
universities with big
booster clubs accused
promising
politic
"I thii f
dation's) empl a
best interc
univer
an alumni disting .
of English and
univer
"It's the pi
per se,
sports she told the '
Observer of R .
'Education' is a n
though it provides
Globetrot
TULSA, OK
piece of
former Harlem Gl
ques Haynes' new
plant -
It- Haynes' way,
shot at - vithou
touc m - the world
for more than 4i
basketball.
"Thai
up said plan: ma is
Wright
Haynes
P
si
.IXT.
doe&n ;
erf JRT
d tie,
talent -hat promp
to dub him "the �
dribbler
Whi c
dribbles, nearby wor.�
sew the fihrati
at his plant. Ha nes -aid he v
to acj � - more r
ma
"We're ahead of
said, refei
ed.
Ha .
tion about three n
out air
d u s t r i a
Haynes
and
12,900-squr �
An order
bag 4 1 2
take the work
Wrig M
larger.
The bag fron
polye-tr- � a
sell � r $6
Havr.e- sa i
which
Hay re-
man
dustnes includ
plants
"They ca
before gel -
atmosphere he -
Haynes d s
he has Invested
how much pi
make But Wr -
tion is tor H
million in met
year and S million al (
one-hal: vears
-tec
r
Vv
ENJOY
$S
e
ON ICE
Shor 65
Corner 10th & Ev
I





I
17
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 28. 1984
on
wl and ended the
sixth. It was the first
.hool's history that a
the season ranked in
top 10.
i won their first seven
rear, including a 28-3
ttual national chanv
sty of Miami,
trsonal record is
has directed the
totaJ wins over the
rs, tying a school
Florida from dem-
it han two years later,
ere placed on proba-
JCAA. The Clemson
stemmed from
�tractions, many of
rred during pell's
fnsistently denied any
U at any time in his
I open their 1984
lay at Tampa against
C.
Classes Dally
campus
rlndiv.
oup of 3 or More
r obk dasaes
� Semester
emcj women
lAMsrracsr
.CC. M C. XTA
TS
d
e
o
h
o
e
y
it
d
o
o
l-
jr
�e
to
�8
xt
id
le
1,
ur
a
s.
t
I
S
no
tof
you
X)St
Ulis
ink.
ten
with
tele-
nths
i the
ceof
we'll
Co.
UNC Complex In '85
Chapel Hill, N.C. (UPI) � The
construction of one of the coun-
try's biggest sports arenas has
prompted both praise and
criticism about the roles of
athletics and a sports booster club
at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Private contributions entirely
funded the $33.8 million, 22,000
seat Student Activities Center,
which is set for completion by
next spring. When the final
pledges were added up and releas-
ed last week, the total was $38.57
million � nearly $5 million more
than the arena's cost. In July
alone, the final month of the four
year campaign, $8 million poured
into the coffers of the university's
Educational Foundation Inc bet-
ter known as the Rams Club.
Some say the financially fat
club is a boost to overall support
at the university. Others say it
may be time to tighten the leash
on the club before it runs rampant
over academia.
Their aim is to avoid controver-
sies that have dogged other
universities with big money sports
booster clubs accused of com-
promising academic and athletic
policies.
"1 think (the Education Foun-
dation's) emphasis is not in the
best interest in the long run of the
university said Doris W. Betts,
an alumni distinguished professor
of English and chairman of the
university's faculty council.
�'It's the promotion of sports
per se, leading to professional
sports she told the News and
Observer of Raleigh. "I think
Education' is a misnomer � even
though it provides education to
those who might not otherwise get
it, and I'm in favor of that
The Rams Club, an indepen-
dent athletic booster foundation,
funds the university's entire
athletic scholarship program con-
tributing about $1.5 million an-
nually for 365 full and partial
scholarships.
For their contributions, club
members receive special privileges
such as reserved parking and
ticket priority for basketball and
football games. They do not
receive free tickets but the right to
buy tickets, an opportunity rarely
available to the public.
The first basketball under the
arena's giant dome is set for Nov.
30, 1985, against UCLA. That
game and all those to follow in the
state's largest arena are sold out
from the public's point of view.
About 12,500 seats will be set
aside for the university's students
and faculty members. The rest
will go to the Rams Club.
Joseph S. Ferrell, a professor at
the Institute of Government in
Chapel Hill, said he is concerned
that the public will not have access
to games at the arena, a state
facility.
"People who have the where-
withal to contribute thousands of
dollars obtain privileges at a state
institution which the average man
cannot afford he said.
"That's simply not right. The
very idea that you will be able to
will your seat in the Student Ac-
tivities Center to your children is
absolutely repugnant. There's ap-
parently no limit to it. It just of-
fends my sense of what this place
is all about
Rams Club members who gave
$10,000 or more will be allocated
four to eight seats apiece, depen-
ding upon the amount pledge, in
the arena forever and can will
their seats upon their death.
Those who pledge $5,000 to
$10,000 receive two seats for life
or 25 years, whichever is longer.
The seats can be willed if the con-
tributor dies within 25 years.
Ernest W. Williamson, ex-
ecutive vice president of the Rams
Club, said he is attuned to
criticism of the club and its fund
raising.
"One department chairman ac-
cused me of taking half of the
money given to the university
he said. "You're always going to
have animosity there. I'm sorry
there's animosity there. I make an
all-out effort not to run down any
phase of their program
Ms. Betts, in her third year as
chairman of the faculty council,
said the role of athletics at the
university had been a primary
concern of faculty during her
tenure.
"I think there is a great deal of
rumbling. I think faculty
members see this as athletics tak-
ing more concern than
academics
But Chancellor Christopher C.
Fordham III said the foundation
has not abused its power.
"I think the Rams Club has
managed to keep their interest in a
high-quality university and high-
quality athletics. My feeling is
that we've had good, mature
leadership he said. "I think if
you calculate the number of
scholarships they've given, you
have to be grateful to them
Globetrotter Haynes Invests
TULSA, OK (UPI) � The first
piece of equipment delivered to
former Harlem Globetrotter Mar-
ques Haynes' new manufacturing
plant was a basketball goal.
It's Haynes' way of taking a
shot at business without losing
touch with the world he has loved
for more than 40 years � comedy
basketball.
"That's the first thing that went
up said plant manager Chuck
Wright.
Haynes doesa't mind an im-
�' � ?!S�gr'QrmlTnjjg jjg3�ir!
CeTrnd tie, of TTOrTTneti
talents that prompted the public
to dub him "the world's greatest
dribbler
While he passes, dunks and
dribbles, nearby workers cut and
sew the filtration bags produced
at his plant. Haynes said he plans
to add two more rows of sewing
machines within weeks.
"We're ahead of ourselves he
aid, referring to orders to be fill-
ed.
Hayneco has been in produc-
tion about three months, turning
out air filtration bags for in-
dustrial pollution control.
Haynes' 11 employees cut, sew
and package the bags in a
12,900-square-foot factory.
An order of 150 eight-foot
nags, 4 12 " in diameter, will
ake the workers five hours to fill,
Wright said. Most orders are
larger.
The bags, made from cotton or
polyester in all sizes and shapes,
sell for $6 each.
Haynes said his company, for
which his wife, model Joan
Haynes, is a vice president,
manufactures the bags for in-
dustries including steel and coal
planis.
"They catch the pollution
before it gets into the
atmosphere he said.
Haynes doesn't say how much
he has invested in the company or
how much profit he hopes to
make. But Wright says the projec-
tion is for Hayneco to ship $1
million in merchandise the first
year and $7 million after three and
one-half years.
We're ahead of that schedule
right now Wright said. "We're
making a dent
He said one success key is
Haynes' involvement, including
his personalized sales technique.
Haynes accompanies Wright in
calling on clients across the na-
tion, mixing the business visits
with charity and basketball com-
mitments in the same cities.
Haynes is a basketball star from
Sand Springs, a Tulsa suburb, and
Oklahoma's Langston University.
IeiH�ye)fe�vitft!threeprofetttional
is TTefdYe JtfminT the"
Globetrotters in the mid-1940s.
He said his basketball contacts
have boosted business.
"I've traveled all over the
world he said. "In each city
there is someone I know
Basketball remains an impor-
tant part of Haynes' life, despite
his age. The slender, agile athlete
with graying hair and mustache
refuses to tell his age, but sports
writers calculate he is well past 60.
The sports comedian-turned-
businessman said he will continue
to play basketball but will be in
the Tulsa area as much as his
manufacturing business requires.
Mr "As far as my heart is concern-
ed he said, "I'm in Sand Spr-
ings all the time
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 28, 1984
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YOUR ONE-STOP SHOPPING
HEADQUARTERS
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2 BLOCKS
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 28, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 28, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.354
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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