The East Carolinian, August 23, 1984






(Bht iEaat (Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.59 No.l
Thursday August 23,1984
Greenville, N.C.
34 Pages
Circulation 12,000
ECU 'Dynamic
Kinsey Tells Faculty
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NwHhi
"A vigorous institution com-
mitted to scholarship were the
words used by C. Ralph Kinsey,
chairman of the ECU Board of
Trustees, in describing ECU dur-
ing the 75th annual faculty con-
vocation Monday.
"ECU is one of the most
dynamic institutions in the
nation Kinsey said, adding that
"our people make things happen,
not buildings, budgets and pro-
grams Kinsey told the faculty
they have the "fullest support and
appreciation of the trustees He
also cited some of their ac-
complishments during the past
school year.
In discussing funding for
ECU's new classroom building,
Kinsey noted there has been a 40
percent increase in enrollment
since Brewster Building was con-
structed and that ECU ranks se-
cond from the bottom in the UNC
system in terms of academic space
per student. "Hopefully the new
building will alleviate academic
space problems he said.
ECU Chancellor John Howell
also spoke, welcoming new facul-
ty members. Howell praised facul-
ty members' accomplishments
during the past year while stress-
ing the need for increased funding
to provide more opportunities for
faculty excell nee. "This will
allow a good taculty member to
become a leader in his or her field
and the university will be iden-
tified with them Howell said.
Another of Howell's goals is
developing a "critical mass" of
prestige scholarships to attract
more of the best students in the
region. These students, he said,
"will provide leavening and com-
petition for all students
Vice Chancellor for Academic
Affairs Angelo Volpe reported on
the progress made in the develop-
ment of on-line registration. The
university has received $200,000
in order to buy computer hard-
ware and software and eventually,
Volpe said, every department on
campus will have a microcom-
puter.
In addition, Volpe said there
has been a 65 percent increase in
grants and an 81 percent increase
in non-state funding for faculty
research. Currently ECU is rank-
ed 239th in the nation in terms of
funds received for science
research and development. This is
an increase of 12 places over the
last set of rankings.
SGA President John Rainey
cited the student body's close
association with the faculty and
pledged that the student leader-
ship would do its best to make the
year a success,
Teaching excellence awards
were presented to two faculty
members and the Alumni Associa-
tion presented Howell with
$15,000 to use at his discretion for
the enrichment of academic pro-
grams.
A Helping Hand
This Attic staff member was one of several who volunteered to help students move into ECL 's residence
halls last weekend.
Researchers Planning Monitor Expedition Next August
(UPI) � While the cleaning of
the anchor of the Civil War
ironclad USS Monitor continues
slowly at ECU, researchers are
working on plans for another ex-
pedition next summer to the site
of the wreck.
The anchor was recovered from
more than 200 feet of water about
16 miles off Cape Hatteras during
an August, 1983 expedition spon-
sored by the National Oceanic and
Atmospheric Administration and
ECU. Since shortlv after they
weie recovered, the 1,500-pound
anchor and chain have been in a
tank undergoing a process called
electrolytic reduction to combat
corrosion and incrustation.
Gordon Watts, an ECU under-
water archaeologist, said resear-
chers were turning their attention
to a "comprehensive research
design" for further work on the
Monitor.
The Monitor sank Dec. 31,
1862, while being towed to
Beaufort to participate in a Union
blockade of Confederate ports.
That year, the vessel had made
naval history when it fought the
Confederate ironclad Virginia,
also known as f.he Merrimac, to a
standoff at Hampton Roads, Va.
the 173-foot vessel, which has
been described as a "cheesebox on
a raft now rests upside down on
its gun turret. Some scientists are
hoping to recover the 9-foot-high
21-foot diameter turret, and its
two guns may be removed.
Watts said researchers were
working with NOAA to obtain
use of a research vessel next sum-
mer.
Watts said possible goals of the
1985 expedition would be a
photographic survey of the wreck
and placement of an environmen-
tal station that would measure
such things as water temperature,
current and turbidity. A
photographic survey was taken
last year, but Watts said three-
dimensional mapping of the site
was needed.
"I think the chances are pretty
good that we will be able to do
one or the other and possibly
both Watts said.
Any expedition probably will be
in August, when weather and
water conditions are best for div-
ing, although the specific time will
depend on the availability of a
research craft. Cleaning of the an-
chor and chain is expected to be
completed about the time of the
next expedition.
In the electrolytic reduction
process on the anchor and chain,
a small electrical current is sent
through the anchor, creating a
process that removes the salt and
incrustations from the anchor in
an extremely slow process.
"There is absolutely no v. ay to
speed things up Watts said.
"Any attempt to speed up the
process would probably result in
some damage to the anchor
itself
After it is cleaned, the anchor
will be turned over to NOAA.
Speier Named Associate Dean,
Plans To Meet With Greeks
By GREG HIDEOUT
Muiflit Ulln
Dr. Ronald Speier began duties
as associate dean and director of
student services August 15,
replacing Dean James Mallory
who retired after 31 years as dean
of orientation and Judiciary.
Speier will have first crack at the
newly-created position in the Divi-
sion of Student Life. He comes to
ECU from La Roche College in
Pittsburgh, Pa where he was
dean of student affairs.
Speier will coordinate the sum-
mer orientation program, advise
campus fraternities and oversee
student withdrawals and campus
solicitation policy. He will also be
in charge of the judiciary system
and supervise the offices of off-
campus housing, international
students, non-traditional students
(those over 25 years of age) and
handicapped students.
Speier plans on evaluating the
programs in place before setting
any goals or changing any set
policy. One major concern, he
says, will be the fraternity system
and its declining membership.
Speier plans to meet with fraterni-
ty system leaders to discuss the
issue.
The new dean's policy on
judicial matters will be to look at
each case as it comes rather than
deciding them by set guidelines.
He will oversee the honor board
and advise the student attorney
general and student public
defender.
Speier feels his experience with
special students, such as the han-
dicapped and older ones, will give
him a sensitivity to their problems
and concerns. The average age of
students at La Roche is 32, he
said.
Speier acknowledges he has a
hard act to follow. Dean Mallory,
he says, has been very helpful by
showing him the ropes and
smoothing his adjustment to
ECU. Both Mallory and Vice
Chancellor for Student Life Elmer
Meyer have nothing but high
praise for Speier. Vice Chancellor
Meyer said Speier was selected
from more than 150 applicants.
Speier received his doctorate in
education from Virginia
Polytechnic Institute and State
University. He also holds a cer-
tificate of advanced studies from
VPI, a masters in college student
Board Of Education
Restores A ccreditation
Speier
personnel from Bowling Green
University, masters in education
from State University of New
York at Genesco and a bachelors
degree in history from SUNY at
Genesco.
Speier is a member of several
professional organizations in-
cluding Omicron Delta Kappa,
Phi Delta Kappa and Kappa Delta
Pi.
From Staff And
Wire Report!
The State Board of Education
restored full accreditation to
ECU's teacher education pro-
grams, school officials announced
Tuesday. The state board's deci-
sion came after reviewing changes
ECU made to strengthen its ad-
ministrative control of the pro-
grams.
Dr. Charles R. Coble, dean of
the School of Education, said the
N.C. Department of Public In-
struction notified the university
Monday by letter that its ac-
creditation status had been upped
from a two-year provisional term
to full accreditation until 1987-88.
Dr. Angelo Volpe, vice
chancellor for academic affairs,
said he was happy with the deci-
sion. The state board's approval
follows the reaccreditation of the
National Council on Accredita-
tion of Teacher Education.
NCATE had denied accreditation
last year, but restored it this year
and made it effective for six years
because of the changes made.
The university addressed the
concerns of both groups by
creating a Council on Teacher
Education on campus and giving
Dean Coble direct responsibility
for the teacher education pro-
grams. They also adjusted class
loads that had been cited as too
large.
ECU's teacher education pro-
gram is the largest in the state with
more than 1,300 students in 40
programs.
r
he inside
nnouneements2
Editorials4
reatures13
laasifleda23
sports27
�Two local banks offer free
checking to students and all
banks offer numerous services.
For a list of area banks and
some of the services they offer,
see page 3.
�The Rotterdam Philharmonic
Orchestra and the Tokyo String
Quartet are among the artists
sceduled by the Unions Artists
Series Committee this year. For
details, see FEATURES, page
13.
�A complete synopsis of all
summer athletic events appears
� In the sports section today.
Also appearing is an analysis of
this year's football team. See
SPORTS, page 27.
Summer's News
Pirates Win Tournament, Martin Visits ECU
By GREG RIDEOUT
A visit by Republican can-
didate for governor Jim Mar-
tin, the re-accreditation of
teacher education programs
and the retirement of Associate
Dean of Orientation and
Judiciary James B. Mallory
topped this summer's news.
The following is a summary of
ECU news for May, June and
July.
Martin's visit to the Student
Supply Store on July 17 gave
students an opportunity to
meet him and discuss the
issues. The National Council
for Accreditation of Teacher
Education restored approval of
ECU's teaching programs
retroactively to cover last year.
The stamp is good for six years.
Dean Mallory's resignation
took effect June 30, ending 30
years of service to ECU. His
career included stints as a
baseball coach, football coach
and professor.
In May the Faculty Senate
elected officers, naming James
Leroy Smith to a second term
as chair of the body. Smith is
chairman of the Philosophy
Department.
In Baseball, the Pirates slug-
ged out a win in the conference
tournament, gaining an
automatic bid to the NCAA
playoffs. It was their fourth
post-season appearance in five
years. The Pirates won two
games in the NCAA South
Region tournament before los-
ing to the University of Miami
6-4.
News came at the end of May
that student IDs and activity
and library cards would be
revised for the Fall. Beginning
this year the three would be
combined into one.
The month of June brought
the resignation of head baseball
coach Hal Baird. The former
Pirate star was lured to Auburn
by a better salary and a bigger
budget. Baird's five-year
record at ECU was 145-66-1.
The North Carolina General
Assembly approved a budget
that contained money to build
ECU's proposed general
classroom building. Construc-
tion will start this fall.
Dr. Maurice D. Simon,
associate professor and direc-
tor of Master of Public Affairs
program at UNC-Greensboro
was appointed chairman of the
Political Science Department in
early June. He began his duties
on July 20. Simon replaces Dr.
Tinsley E. Yarbrough, who
stepped down to devote more
time to research and writing.
SGA Transit manager Bill
Hilliard stepped down from his
post to take a job with Thomas
Built Buses. Hilliard had held
the job for three years. Mar-
shall Tucker was named to fill
the student run job.
ECU pitcher and designated
hitter Winfred Johnson was
named ECAC South co-player
of the year. The Buc star
posted a 10-3 record on the
mound with a 3.30 ERA and
batted .321 with 18 home runs
and 46 RBIs.
Pirate softball player Stacy
Boyette was named the school's
first ever Academic All-
America. The ace pitcher had a
record of 12-2 while maintain-
ing a 4.0 gpa in chemistry.
The Board of Trustees
traveled to Beaufort, N.C, to
tour the research vessel Cape
Hatteras. ECU Geology pro-
fessor Stanley Riggs uses the
ship as a base for
oceanographic studies. While
in Beaufort, the Trustees re-
elected C. Ralph Kinsey chair-
man.
Dr. J. William Byrd, chair-
man of the Physics Depart-
ment, resigned in July to accept
the position of dean of Arts
and Sciences at Appalachian
State University. Byrd had
been at ECU for 22 years.
Hal Baird, former ECU head
baseball coach now coaching at
Auburn, was named East
Region Coach of the Year bv
the NCAA. Baird led the '84
Pirates to a school record 34
wins.
The first open heart pro-
cedure ever performed at Pitt
County Memorial Hospital oc-
cured during July. The triple
coronary bypass surgery, which
lasted almost four hours, was
performed by Dr. W. Ran-
dolph Chitwood Jr chief car-
diac surgeon at the School of
Medicine.
Former East Carolinian staff
member and peace activist
Patrick O'Neill was found guil-
ty of breaking into a Martin
Marietta defese plant and
damaging Pershing II missile
components. O'Neill was a
member of a group calling
themselves the Pershing
Plowshares; he was sentenced
to three years in prison.

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 23, 1984
Announcements
ALPHA PHI BIG BROTHERS
The Big Brothers ot Alpha Phi Sorority would
like to welcome back all of the sisters, we hope
you an had a oreat summer The first Big Brother
meeting will be Monday. Aug 27th at the house
starting at 4 00 Attendance Is mandatory Be on
time
NAVIGATORS
Check It out! The Navigators Bible study
fellowship Brewster D Wing room 202, every
Tuesday. 7 30 PM, beginning August 2tth
ICE CREAM SOCIAL
You "are invited to an ice cream social on Thurs
day. Aug 23 from 7 00 8 30p m Campus Ministry
building 501 E 5th St Sponsored by Presbyterian
Campus Ministrv and Presbyterian Churches.
LACROSSE CLUB
Come lo the bottom of college hill on Tuesdays
and Thursdays at 3 30 to play some Lax We're
looking tor a few good men Any questions call
Dave Lockett
BALL ROOM DANCE
Ball Room Dance tor faculty and staff will
begin on Ocf 2 at no� I in Memorial Gym, rm tot.
Classes are scheduled for Tuesday and Thursday
There is no charge Bring a partner or come alone
and learn basic dance steps in the Fox Trot, Cha
Cha. Waiti Rumba and Bop! Contact Jo
Saunders at 757 6000 or iust arrive to dance
BASEBALLTRYOUTS
Anyone interested in trying out for the baseball
team should report to Harrington Field Friday,
ugust 24, at 4 00 p m All participants should
wear appropriate workout attire
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
a student Episcopal serv ce of Holy communion
will be celebrated on Tues evening, Aug Mth in
the chapel of St Paul's Episcopal Church, 406 4th
St (one block from Garrett Dorm) The service
will be at 5 X p m with the Episcopal Chaplain,
me Rev Bill Hadoen. celebrating
JUDICIAL OPENINGS
There will be several openings to serve on The
university Honor Board and Public Defender
Staff There will be an organizational meeting on
Tuesday, Aug. 2tfh at 4:00 In Mendenheil Student
Center, room Ht. This Is your chance to oet In
volved In student government, if you art unable
to attend and ere still Interested call Scott at
753 595
PRE MED
Attention: All Pre-Med. Pre-Vet, PrrDental
Pre Pharmacy, mere will be an Important
meeting held In Mendenhaii room 221 Tuesday,
Aug 2tm at 700. Refreshments will be served.
CHEERLEADER TRYOUTS
Anyone Interested in trying out for the 1M4 195
Gold Cheerleader Squad, must attend an
organliatlonal meeting on Tues Aug. 2ithet5:00
pm, Minges Coliseum Practice Clinics to be an
nounced Guys and Girls welcomed)
SIGMA THETATAU
Sigma Theta Tau, the National Honor Society of
Nursing, will hold Its Fall Business Meeting on
Monday, August 27 at 7 p.m. In the School of Nurs
irtg upstairs conference room Committees for the
academic year will be formed. All members are
urged to attend
FACULTY
A faculty investment club Is presently being
formed In our area This should be an exciting,
fun, educational, and financially rewarding op
portunlty for all For more Information and
details on an organizational meeting to be held
soon, call or write today: 355 2025 days and nights,
FACULTY INVESTMENT CLUB. P.O. oox �372,
Greenville. N C. 2714
AMBASSADORS
Welcome back! we really missed you this sum
mer but an exciting semester Is already under
way Our first general meeting will be Wed , Aug
29th in the Mendenhaii Mulltpurpose room We
have many prolects to discuss and we will also
discuss the retreat We're looking forward to see
ing all of you there
ECU TRANSIT
PURPLE SCHEDULE
(7:30am-5:30pm)
PLACE DEPARTS
Speight On the Hour
Univ. Cond. 5 after hour
Cannon Court 6 after hour
Eastbrook 7 after hour
River Bluff 10 after hour
Kings Row 15 after hour
Village Greene 18 after hour
Memorial Gym 20 after hour
Mendenhaii 23 after hour
Speight on till hour
Univ. Cond. 25 till hour
Cannon Court 24 till hour
Eastbrook
River Bluff
kings Row
Milage Greene
Memorial Gym
Mendenhaii
23 till hour
20 till hour
15 till hour
12 till hour
10 till hour
7 till hour
GOLD SCHEDULE
(7:30am-9:30pm)
PLACE DEPARTS
Minges on the hour
Allied Health 3 after hour
�Greenville Square 5 after hour
�Pitt Plaza 6 after hour
�Hargett Drug 10 after hour
Mendenhaii 20 after hour
10th ACollege HUI 25 after hour
College Hill 26 after hour
Minges on half hour
Allied Health 27 till hour
�Greenville Square 25 till hour
�Pitt Plaza 24 till hour
�Hargett Drug 20 till hour
Mendenhaii 10 till hour
10th & College Hill 5 till hour
College Hill 4 till hour
BROWN SCHEDULE
(7:30am-5:30pm)
PLACE DEPARTS
Speight on the hour
Oak and 1st St. 3 after hour
Elm Street 5 after hour
Willow & VYoodlawn8 after hour
Avery & Holly 10 after hour
5th & Elizabeth 15 after hour
Mendenhaii 20 after hour
Speight on the hour
Oak and 1st St. 27 till hour
Elm Street 25 till hour
Willow & Woodlawn22 till hour
Avery & Holly 20 till hour
5th S, Elizabeth 15 till hour
Mendenhaii 10 till hour
�Bus schedule includes sru ppmg centers
only between the of 5:30pm-9:30pm, M-Th
��Pus -cher le includes Hargett Drugs only
between the hours of 7:30am-5:30pm, M-F.
NIGHT TRANSIT
Fri.&Sat. Nites
10:00pm-2:00am
SCHEDULE HOURLY
Home Federal On the Hour
CoUege Hill 6 after hour
Cannon Court 12 after hour
Eastbrook 14 after hour
River Bluff 19 after hour
Kings Row 26 after hour
Village Greene 30 after hour
�Departure for last round will be a'
15 mm. after the hour
�No beverages or food ma be
consumed on the bus.
REOPENING MONDAY,
AUGUST 27TH
soup
sclad
wiehes
mendenMU . student center
east carolzTha. Bining services
Now Offering: Stuffed Baked Potatoes
or Quiche Lorraine
AEROBICS
The Physical Education Department will offer
free Aerobics for Faculty and Staff at noon on
Mon Wed Pit starting Sept 10 Classes will be
held in Memorial Gym. rm 106 No experience Is
necesaary. Wear comfortable work out clothes
�-�f� get back in shape together
FOREIGN STUDENTS
If you art interested In taking an English Se
cond Language Course (non credit) then sign up
In the Writing Center, Austin 309 Students will be
contacted about class schedules
GOD INFORMATION
Stop by our table In front jf the Student Supply
Store. We will be glad to answer any questions you
have about reading the Bible Understanding the
Bible is the key to being happy In life.
BIBLE FELLOWSHIPS
For Information about Bible Fellowships on
campus, stop by Mendenhaii Student Center Rm
21? between 7,309:00. We will have a short
fellowship from 700 to 730 at room 212 Thurs ,
and at 7,30 on Mon
ZBT
A welcome back parry will be held Sunday, Aug
26 at 9:00 p.m. Call Don or Scott at 752 5895 for
details on location, important announcements
will be made at this party so please attend
SKIING
Let's spend New Years In wild wonderful West
Virginia at Snowshoe. You can register for PHYE
1150. 1151, 1152 and receive 1 hour's creditor you
may go non credit � the ski lodge where we stay
is located right on the slope equipment is provid
ed and ski lessons by the Ski Academy are
available in beginner. Intermediate, and advanc
ed levels Contact Jo Saunders at 757 M00 for fur
ther Information or drop by her office In
Memorial Gym 205 to talk skiing
PEACE COMMITTEE
The Greenville Peace Committee Is concerned
with the Issues that affect us dally, fhe nuclear
arms build up, Central America, further escala
tlon of American Troops on foreign soli, draft
registration too It you think you want to help. If
you are concerned about your future and the
future of our planet, please loin us Fridays at 6 00
p m at 610 S. Elm St or call 75T490A
SCHOLARS PROGRAMS
Guidelines and application forms for the
Younger Scholars Program of the National En
dowment for the Humanities art now available
for photocopying in the Placement Office The
program will award up to 100 grants nationally to
students under 21 to conduct their own research
and writing projects in such fields as history,
philosophy, and the study of literature
MEN'S GLEE CLUB
The ECU Men's Glee Club Invites all men In
forested In singing In the U IS Men's Glee club to
meet Thurs Aug. 23rd at 1200 In Room 101. fief
cher Music Center, or to call Mr Glenn at 757 4331
tor further Information The Glee club is open to
all men campus wide, and will be performing
locally as well as in Fayefteviile and Raleigh, dur
Ing the fall semester A tour of N C � VA is pienn
ed for the spring The Men's Glee club meets
Mon Thur at 12 00 for 1 hr credit
PI KAPPA PHI LITTLE SISTERS
Welcome back to all the little sisters of Pi Kap
pa Phi, to start this year off right, there will be a
brother tittle sister party this Friday night at me
house starting at 9 00 There will eiso be e little
sister meeting Sunday, Aug 26th at the house
starting at 5 30
HANDICAPPED SERVICES
Employment Is available to qualified persons
who art interested in becoming Personal Care
Attendants to students in wheelchairs. Readers,
Proofreaders. Tutors For further details, con
tact OFFICE OF HANDICAPPED STUDENT
SERVICES, 212 Whlchard Building, 757 47V9
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Due to limited space, The Easi
Caroliruan requests that orgranizations
submit only important announcements
about up coming events that students
need to know about in advance Please
submit such messages as "thank you"
and "congratulation" notes to the Per
sonals section of the classifieds in The
East C arohnian
The deadline for announcements is 3
pm Monday for the Tuesday paper
and 3pm Wednesday for the Thursda
Paper
They must be typed on an announce-
ment form to be accepted These forms
can be picked up at our office
Classifieds
work for you
. � ��. �
SANDWICH SHOP
Featuring Our
HAPPY HOUR
3pm to 6pm
$1.50 pitchers Bud & Nat. Lite
Ample FREE Parking
752 - 2183
Comer of Reade & 4th Sts.
ATTIC
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CU Adm Policy
Except For Cone
I. feaa� QM� Dm, ;�.��
2 $1.90 ICl; 6- aW
1�1$0 lrrt
THUR
SIDEWINDER
FRI&SAT
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ECU $1.00 ECU$1.00ECU
ECU$1.00 ECU$1,QQ
Mon
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SUM 4SST
After much d ate o
convenience ' ident
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The New
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TelU r UP locations
convenient to East Carolina
Mendenhaii Student Center Campus
Pitt Plaza Highway 261 Bvpass
University 802 E. 10th Street
Bank around campus
get cash around
the country.
With the new Wachovia Banking Card, you can
bank anytime at Teller II� machines around campus
and at more than 125 locations statewide. And now
you can use it to get cash and check your balances
at thousands of other automated teller machines all
across the country. Just look for the Relay symbol
at participating financial institutions in North Carolina,
South Carolina and Virginia or the CIRRUS- svmbol
at banks nationwide.
The new Wachovia Banking Card comes with
every Wachovia checking or Statement Savings
account at no extra charge. One more reason to make
Wachovia your bank. A Personal Banker can tell
you more - and why you shouldn't settle for less.
'Included among North Carolina financial institutions
participating in the Relay network are:
Wachovia Bank & Trust
First Union National Bank
Northwestern Bank
First Citizens Bank & Trust
Member F.D.I.C.
Southei n National Bank
United Carolina Bank
Planters National Bank
Peoples Bank & Trust
Wachovia
Bank&Trust
su
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mi
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BUFFI
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23. 1984
ANNOUNCEMENTS
to limited space, The E
r.ian -fguesis thai organization
oniv important announcement
up coming events that studertir
know about in advance Pleajt
nessages as "thank yojM
ngratulation" notes to the Pet
the classifieds in TrW
f rot announcements is
i tor the Tuesdas paper
m Wednesdav tor the Thursday
be ped on an announce-
be accepted These forms
t our office.
lassifieds
ork for you
ic
IUR
DEWINDER
iSAT
PANIC
N
GRAPHIC
& 3 HITS
1.00 ECU
US1.00
ampus
h street
r machines all
Relay symbol
n North Carolina,
CIRRI'Ssymbol
'arc! comes with .
itement Savings
lore reason to make
Banker can tell
it settle for less.
henna
tank & Trust
Area Banks Offer Many Types Of Accounts
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
r"�w� Editor
Establishing a checking account
nnff lUe �� be dmost as
aln.M h LhC Variety 0f acc
available there are many choices.
I wo banks in Greenville offer free
checking for ECU students but
many services are offered by all.
Following is a list of the banks in
Oreenville and some of the ser-
vices they offer. For more com-
plete information, contact the in-
dividual banks.
ECU Student Bank The ECU
Student Bank is located on the 1st
floor of Mendenhall Student
Center. It is open only to ECU
students and staff. The bank will
cash up to $125 of checks during a
seven-day working period. No
two-party checks are cashed
(unless from the university
payroll) and a valid student ID
and drivers' license are necessary.
The student bank also offers
savings accounts. No interest is
earned on these accounts � the
bank simply holds the money.
Telephone bills may also be paid
at the bank.
Branch Banking and Trust Co
BB&T has three locations in the
Greenville area. It also has an
automated teller machine located
at Mendenhall.
Checking with no service
charges is offered provided a
minimum balance of $400 is main-
tained in the checking account or
$500 in a savings account. If the
balance drops below the
minimum, the service charge is
$7.50 per month.
BB&T also offers a NOW ac-
count which pays 5 14 percent in-
terest on a checking account if it
has a minimum balance of $500.
Savings accounts are available.
They require $50 to open and pay
5 12 percent interest.
First American Federal Savings
and Loan Association First
American is one of the two banks
offering free student checking.
Students will be charged for the
cost of printing the checks and
also for insufficient funds charges
but there is no minimum balance
and no monthly service charge. A
valid ECU ID is required to open
an account.
To open a savings account at
First American, $25 is required.
Interest is not earned unless there
is $50 in the account. Their
Almost Free Checking account
pays 5 14 percent interest with a
minimum balance of $100. If the
balance is maintained above $100,
no service charges are accrued.
First American does not have
automated teller machines but a
spokesman for the bank said they
plan to work on getting them later
this year.
First Federal Savings and Loan
There are two First Federal loca-
tions in Greenville and one
automated teller machine.
Customers can avoid service
charges by maintaining a balance
of $300 in their checking account.
If the balance drops below this
amount, the service charge is $6
per month plus $. 15 per item. This
account will pay 5 14 percent in-
terest with a $300 balance. Sav-
ings accounts are also available.
First State Bank First State is
the other Greenville bank offering
free student checking. It has two
branches and two automated
teller machines.
With student checking, students
pay the printing costs for their
checks and are charged only if
they have insufficient funds. The
First State Club plan is also
available. Included in club
membership are discounts for
local merchants, discount movie
tickets, travel discounts and in-
surance. The charge for the club is
$4.75 per month.
A minimum deposit of $25 is re-
quired to open a savings account.
Home Federal Savings and
Loan There are two Home
Federal locations in Greenville.
Home Federal is offering a
special checking account through
the end of August. With a
minimum balance of $500, there is
no service charge, interest is earn-
ed and the first 200 checks are
free. If the balance drops below
$500, the service charge is $2 per
month and $.15 per check.
A deposit of $100 is required to
open a savings account. If the ac-
count balance drops below $50,
no interest is earned.
North Carolina National Bank
NCNB has four locations in
Greenville and automated teller
machines are available.
Service charges for checking ac-
counts are $2 per month, $.25 per
check and $.15 per electronic
debit. These charges can be avoid-
ed if a $600 balance is maintained
in the. checking account or a $500
balance is maintained in a savings
account. Bonus Checking pays 5
14 percent interest, but requires a
minimum balance of $1,000.
In order to avoid a service
charge of $1.50 per month, a $100
balance must be maintained in
savings accounts. The accounts
earn 5 12 percent interest. Two
withdrawals are allowed each
Are You Taking Freshman
English?
The books on the right
represent just a small por-
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The UBE has over 1300
used copies of Writing: A
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come check out our huge
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U.B.Ei
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month after which there is a $1 Automated teller machines are
charge for each withdrawal. not available.
North State Savings and Loan Free checking if offered with
North State has two locations in $500 in the checking account or
Greenville and one automated $600 in a savings account. When
teller machine
A $300 minimum balance is re-
quired in Basic Checking. If the
balance drops below that amount,
there is a $3 monthly service
charge and a charge of $.20 per
the balance in checking drops
below $500, there is a series of
graded services charges, ranging
from $1 to $5 per month. There is
also a charge of $.20 per item.
Savings accounts accrue service
item. Interest-earning checking charges if the balance is below
accounts require a $2,000
minimum balance.
A $100 deposit is necessary to
open a savings account. Savings
accounts earn 6 percent interest.
People's Bank There is one
People's Bank location in Green-
ville. at Carolina Fast Mall
are
$300. Six free withdrawals
permitted each quarter.
Planter's National Bank and
Trust Co. Planter's Bank has four
locations in the area. Automated
teller machines are available.
No-service-charge checking is
available with a minimum balance
�ySSSSSSS SSSSSSS
of $500 in checking or $400 in sav-
ings. Planter's Bank also has
graded service charges ranging
from $1 to $5 if the balance drops
below $500. There is an additional
charge of $.20 per item.
Wachovia Bank and Trust
There are five Wachovia locations
in Greenville. There is also an
automated teller machine located
at Mendenhall.
There is no service charge for
Wachovia checking with a
minimum balance of $500 in
checking or $400 in savings.
Below this amount, the service
charge is $3 per month and $.20
per item. With a $600 balance, a
checking account will earn 5 1 4
percent interest.
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(�19) 751-3114
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Wtt East (ttarnttnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. mammmm
GREO RlDEOUT. ��4 Editor
Jennifer Jendrasiak.
Randy Mews, spoke,
Tina Maroschak.
Bill Austin, ommm
J.T. PlETRZAK, Dirwctor of MMH
Anthony Martin, mm ���,
KATHY FUERST, Production M�i��r
Linda Vizena. Adrtuint r��Mw
August 23. 194
Opinion
Page 4
Welcome Back
Change Is Only Constant
Nothing is constant except
change. Something so stable must
come to Greenville. It does. Last
May, students drove off from their
dorms, apartments, houses and
condos. Some graduates, of
course, did not come back; others
did return, a little older and a little
different. There are new faces,
most grinning ear-to-ear and hap-
py to be away from home. Things
have changed. You, our readers,
are different. Together it is time to
begin and build a new year. It's
time for the traditional East
Carolinian, urge-you-to-be-super-
student editorial.
When something is new, such as
this school year, there are broad
and numerous chances to mold the
young year into something good
for yourself and the campus. The
student must remember the
primary reason for being here,
which, for those who don't know
or who have forgotten, is learning.
Now, you don't always become
educated from just books alone. In
fact, rare is the person who has
grown to his full potential after
hibernating in a library for four
years of his life. So, remember that
school is number one, but it isn't
everything.
A close second is involvement �
ah, involvement, a classic word.
Everyone says, "get involved
But what does it mean? Well,
basically everyone who encourages
you to get interested in extracur-
ricular activities is telling you to
expand yourself. They are asking
you to grow. Join a club, pledge a
fraternity or sorority, run for the
student government association
legislature, work for a campus
organization or be an aide in your
department. ECU has everything
imaginable. Upperclassmen should
know that it's never too late and
underclassmen should jump right
in.
Involvement not only enriches
you and helps you change and
grow, it helps your school. ECU
benefits from you being involved
while here. What you've done will
serve you well in life after
academia, making a name for you
and your alma mater. A school
grows on the reputations of its
students. Being involved, as they
say, is certainly worth it for both
of us.
Another reason for being here is
to meet people � all kinds of peo-
ple, from different counties, cities,
states and countries. At ECU
students come from coast-to-coast
and from many foreign countries.
Mark Twain once said that travel
cured bigotry. Well, with as many
kinds of people that come to ECU,
our world is continually shrinking
and our minds and thinking always
broadening. From your friends
and acquaintances, you must
learn. They have as much to teach
you as your professors do.
And if an education teaches you
one thing, it is that you are never
finished learning. If college does
its job and you get your money's
worth, a desire to explore and
discover will stay with you the rest
of your life. We at The East
Carolinian hope you will take our
sermon to heart. As another year
stands in front of you like a can-
vass ready to be painted on,
remember to reach out for the
paint brush. Enjoy ECU by pain-
ting a complete picture of yourself.
You will change yourself and,
subsequently, ECU will be altered
just a little bit. Welcome and good
luck.
Drop-Add Blues
The computer age has arrived.
Unfortunately, it hasn't arrived at
ECU, as evidenced by the condi-
tions at drop-add yesterday.
Standing in line for four hours is
frustrating � standing in line for
four hours and then discovering
the courses you need are closed is
ridiculous.
Obviously, with 14,000 students,
lines are unavoidable. However,
there are a few things which could
make the process less time-
consuming and anger-provoking.
First of all, on-line computeriz-
ed registration needs to be initiated
as soon as possible. It's hard to
understand why a school as large
and advanced as ECU is using ob-
solete and technically inefficient
keypunch cards.
Secondly, the system of letting
students into drop-add in two
groups is not working well and is
only making things more com-
plicated. The line of students
allowed to drop-add at 8 a.m. did
not end until 1:30 p.m while the
line of students permitted to drop
at noon began forming at 8:30
a.m. and did not begin to enter
Wright Auditorium until 1:30 p.m.
In the meantime, some students
got in the wrong lines uninten-
tionally because of the lack of in-
structions and had to start all over
again, while others disappeared
from the back of the line and
magically appeared at the front.
Having all the students in one
line is, if not more efficient, at
least more conducive to mental
health. Spending four hours in the
same spot is difficult, especially
when another line is moving for-
ward
Additionally, it would help to
have a list of closed courses posted
outside the drop-add location. It
would be worthwhile if it saved at
least a few students the lengthy
wait.
On the positive side, most
students accepted the wait calmly
and cooperatively. There are
always those who try to
"outsmart" the others, but for-
tunately there aren't many. The
faculty and staff working drop-
add are, for the most part, plea-
sant and courteous � a difficult
chore after the 100th irritated re-
quest for a closed course.
There is no need for registration
and drop-add to be so prolonged
and painful. Installing a com-
puterized registration system by
next semester snould be top priori-
ty.
aMJ00�fttai
METfl
ChKK
m mi
GOINGS
Nixon Fighting Back
History Judging Ol' Dick
By GREG RlDEOUT
Richard Nixon is a very methodical
man. Each day is the same for him. Up
in the morning, some toast and juice,
take a walk and go into New York from
his New Jersey home to begin a full day
of work. Most of the time he talks on the
phone with old friends, keeping abreast
of world and national events. Yet, a day
this month most certainly caused him
pause. Ten years from August 9 he gave
up the most powerful position in the free
world. August 9 most certainly was not
Just another day.
History is not constant. People inter-
pret and re-interpret. The facts are the
same, but new light is shed on them to
explain why things happened and what
they mean. Watergate is now part of our
history; it is no longer the property of
those who study current events.
Watergate belongs to historians. In fact,
Nixon is becoming somewhat
fashionable today as people forget the
damage he did to our Constitution and
our nation. People are beginning to say
Nixon got a "bum rap" and only com-
mitted "indiscretions A revision of
the events is occurring.
The main reason for this is Nixon
himself. He devotes most of his day to
clearing his name. Nixon wants to shed
the infamy that will most certainly sur-
ViewPoint
Shines On
Richard
Nixon
round his name in history. The inter-
views, the speeches and the books have
only one goal � to mold opinion and in-
fluence historians as they write his
chapter of the book. Nixon seems to be
accomplishing his goal, and for that very
reason we must try harder not to forget
what he did. Nixon damaged the
presidency through his paranoical quest
for security and his never-ending thirst
for power.
One can only wonder what goes on in
the mind of the 71-year-old former
president. Does he regret what he did
All indications point to the contran. In
fact, he still admits to feeling "nothing
but contempt" for the two Washington
Post reporters, Bob Woodward and Carl
Bernstein, that brought about his
downfall.
Nixon's presidency had many high
points, foremost among them was his
breakthrough in relations with mainland
China. His knowledge of foreign affairs
and his understanding of complex issues
was and is as keen as ever. But all this is
overshadowed by the scandal of
Watergate. When a president misuses
the trust the people have placed in him,
as Richard Nixon did, then that abuse
must be paramount to historians. Nix-
on, as he walks around and eats his
breakfast each morning, knows this.
When he goes to work, he knows this.
That is why August 9 is different to him.
It should stay that way.
Subsidized Steel Drain On U.S. Economy;
Reagan Should Let Free Enterprise Reign
TRB COLUMN
TkcNwl
UBh� "rM Syndic
�OX�U
A ton of American-made steel from a
big unionized company such as U.S.
Steel costs about $500 F.O.B. Pitt-
sburgh, more or less, depending on how
shrewdly you bargain.
This covers something like $140 or
labor costs (according to the most op-
timistic industry estimates) at $22 an
hour, plus raw materials, energy,
overhead, a piece of the chairman's
$600,000 salary, and maybe this year for
the first time recently a tiny sliver of pro-
fit.
A ton of imported steel costs, on
average, about $360, even after shipping
and import duties. American steel pro-
ducers say this reflects hidden subsidies
by foreign governments and an inflated
dollar. Perhaps so. But it also reflects
more efficient plants and lower wages
abroad.
In Brazil, for example, labor costs
$2.13 an hour, and the head of the
government steel holding company
makes less than $20,000 a year.
President Reagan must decide by
Sept. 24 whether to restrict foreign steel,
based on the findings of the Interna-
tional Trade Commission that imports
� currently taking a quarter of the
market � are causing severe harm to the
domestic steel industry.
Uncertain about Reagan's intentions,
the steel industry is pursuing legislation
in Congress for a flat 15 percent import
quota on foreign steel.
When you stop a $360 ton of steel at
the border and roll your own ton of steel
for $500 instead, someone is out $140.
That someone might be a car buyer, for
instance, since a car contains about a ton
of steel.
It's like a $140 tax on cars for the
benefit of the employees, executives,
and stockholders of the steel industry.
Yet if that car buyer makes the average
industrial wage, his income is only three-
fifths of a steelworker's. This means
that every three employed steelworkers
could hire two laid-off steelworkers out
of their own wages to do nothing but
stand around and watch them work, and
all five would still make as much as the
fellow they propose to charge an extra
$140 in order to "save jobs" in the sted
industry.
Not only would this absurd arrange-
ment create more jobs in this country
than a quota, it also would save the jobs
of those poor Brazilians whose
livelihoods depend on exports to the
United States. That's why a quota is
even more absurd.
The Congressional Budget Office
estimates that a 15 percent steel quota
would raise the average price of all steel
by about 9 percent, costing consumers
of steel products an extra $7.7 billion a
year by 1989.
It would create 34,000 additional jobs
in the domestic steel industry, thus
costing the economy a mere (where's my
calculator?) $226,000 a year per job.
Meanwhile, the higher price of steel
would divert $7.7 billion from other in-
dustries, thereby destroying jobs as well.
Since over $2 billion of that $7.7 billion
would go abroad in the form of higher
prices for the foreign steel that still
comes in, a quota almost surely would
end up destroying more jobs than it
creates. And even this morose calculus is
based on the unlikely assumption that
other countries won't retaliate with
quotas on our exports. Why shouldn't
they? We've got no monopoly on
stupidity.
These are the unbending economics of
protectionism. Unfortunately, the
politics of protectionism are equally
unbending. The group seeking protec-
tion from foreign competition is self-
aware, cohesive, politically organized.
The much larger group of people who
lose from any particular exercise of pro-
tectionism is diverse, unorganized and
mostly unidentifiable.
Protectionism is the very model of
"special interest" politics. What seems
good for each of us in our particular cor-
ners of the economy is ruinous for all of
us as participants in the economy as a
whole. Higher-priced steel makes our
automobile industry less competitive,
which leads to automobile protec-
tionism, which is a tax on steelworkers
along with everybody else.
Imports are only a small part of the
problems facing the steel industry, and
unfair imports are barely a problem at
all. That's why protectionism is no
answer even for steel itself.
Coming out of a deep recession, the
industry faces an economy that needs
less and less of its product. Cars are get-
ting smaller, aluminum and (yes, Ben-
jamin) plastics are replacing steel in all
sorts of manufacturing, and manufac-
turing itself is losing ground to services
The large domestic steel makers have
behaved stupidly for two decades; their
biggest competition today comes no:
from abroad but from so-called "mini-
mills" here in the United States, which
have built advanced plants and held
down labor costs.
Foreign companies sometime?
"dump" their steel in the American
market. But if "dumping" means seffinj
at below production cost, the American
steel makers have been "dumping
themselves for the past few years, since
they've been losing money on every ton
they sell (and not making it up in
volume).
What else are you supposed to do dur-
ing a recession?
A nation such as Brazil doesn't need
unfair trade practices to undersell L S
Steel. Almost all of its plants are the
most modern, efficient type. It has plen-
tiful iron ore and an eager � indeed
desperate � work force.
This desperation deserves sympathy
Among other reasons, Brazil is one of
the countries that's in hock to the inter
national banks, which means that
Brazil's economic problems are our pro-
blems, too.
The best favor we can do for Brazil
and other countries in similar straits is to
offer them a market labor, it's the best
favor we can do ourselves as well.
�. 14, Umi-dFmtmiSimdkmi. Imc
r� Campus Forum
Solving Those Lines
As a victim of one line or another
here at ECU, I would like to present
this modest proposal to help alleviate
some of the boredom they present.
l)Oet WZMB and the Attic to
sponsor a concert behind Brewster
building during dropadd. Put a
giant screen TV over by Spilman for
those who are paying their fees late.
2)Oet Patrick O'Neill (care of the
Florida Federal Penitentiary), Jay
Stone and the College Republicans
out for a "Roving Soap Box
Forum
3)Have a vote by the students as to
which bureaucrat they hate the most
and then burn him in effigy at least
three times a day during the
dropadd procedure, as well as drop
cards and assorted forms. This
should help alleviate some frustra-
tion associated with the wait for that
one last class.
Kirk Shelley
Junior, Political Science
Duar
�yGUYGUGd
Throughout his poliiu
Napoleon Duane. like ai.
El Salvador, has
' that a great manv of
A uld welcome his c-
Hetklers have shoutec
him. A 1,5 nac
stad" u on
ponents have thre
murder The left ha
fav Dloodv - .t
na : ed him
Is have I
arrogant t i i and a)
of this dampened his
On June I Duane to
first civiiia ,n 50
reasonabl) straight presi
in El Salvador. Consic
the electoral confj
ions and the gene?
pervade- this badly.
was an easy vict
His opf Robertl
the kinetic :ha f
commune
wing death squads, re
of the vote to Dua'
aftermath, some am
foreigners) sugge�
showing entitled I j
the governme-
: unity' to
in El Salvador, a
point victors
D'Aubuisson
for crumbs.
What is new and
that Duane. as El I
president, now has
legitimacy unn
on the - .
anyuhere else He ha
power and should g
cements control of
V :e significantly, ru
authority � a new i
weapor. in El Salva. I
gle
Before this year, th
always claim e
to exist in E! Saha
dominated govemmenj
has won an election �
tion to be sure,
theless. The gucrri
ground, a trifling matt
scheme of things, but
portant for a movemi
propaganda argurr
its cause
To recoup, the hav
They must "re-ieg
Marin
B GREG R
Tw :ksag
bat troops left Be
little fanfare. It �
in most news
staved behind a
Some Thh
Thinking
it. I thought bee
- e Things 1 Tfc
What the hell is
anywayNo � "
tagg ng ha � th a
Whs I
wfc stil nsisl ea
I'll take m D
Le- s fac ' no M
better than he does
that s vhj e now
wee Olymi
here we g
Olvnid - s� ' i
the farm Jim.
How come a ma I
type of pants; J
an -tore. Are th.
alwav- in God-an
Who the hell the ci
a urinars tract infect�.
because ol this � art.
� ugh. You won
The first person to
Hyro G. Grypmcs. Hj
The word was "Emu
So what if AT&T i
I could care less if 1
something. And rnusl
should rx plugged ind
What kind of peon!
thev short people witr
Chevy Luv atop thosj
Pretty soon doctor
room for M Allen Nerj
facer " Now. little ki
such stuff. Geez. wh
Why do proctologi
want to be one anyw;
guess just like a meci
kicks from the rectai
Do roaches know
think they are sensitij
should mind their ma
I know, you're tin
last Thing i Though I
What kind of pcoi
in the water? .Are th
two? Who knows?

mm
mm
45





i
Dick
never-ending thirst
der what goes on in
71 year-old former
egret what he did?
to the contrary. In
eehng "nothing
he two Washington
3 Woodward and Carl
light about his
ienc had many high
among them was his
relations with mainland
e of foreign affairs I
tiding of complex issues I
?n as ever. But all this is 1
he scandal of I
a president misuses I
have placed in him, I
hen that abuse
uians. Nix-1
ind and eats his
ning, knows this.
� he knows this.
is different to him.
a a
.
conomy;
e Reign
are barely a problem at
hy protectionism is no
� steel itself,
of a deep recession, the
an economy that needs
its product. Cars are get-
ummum and (yes, Ben-
are replacing steel in all
itacturing, and manufac-
losing ground to services,
lestic steel makers have
dly for two decades; their
jtition today comes not
it from so-called "mini-
the United States, which
Ivanced plants and held
sts.
:ompanies sometimes
Ir steel in the American
"dumping" means selling
Ruction cost, the American
have been "dumping"
Ir the past few years, since
losing money on every ton
lid not making it up in
re you supposed to do dur-
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ich as Brazil doesn't need
ractices to undersell U.S.
all of its plants are the
efficient type. It has plen-
and an eager � indeed
ork force,
ration deserves sympathy,
reasons Brazil is one of
Ithat's in hock to the inter-
iks, which , means that
mic problems are our pro-
ivor we can do for Brazil
kntries in similar straits is to
market labor, it's the best
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United Feature Syndicate Inc
'ties
ote by the students as to
icrat they hate the most
n him in effigy at least
a day during the
;edure, as well as drop
I assorted forms. This
I alleviate some frustra-
with the wait for that
leal Science
THIrtAST CAROLINIAN
Other Opinion
AUGUST 23, 19H4
Page 5
Duarte Effecting Changes
ByGUYGUGLIOTTA
������ RcpaMir
N7�.�U8h�Ut his political carr. se
Napoleon Duarte, like all public figures
in h Salvador, has come to accept the
tact hat a great many of his countrymen
would welcome his death.
Hecklers have shouted obscenities at
nun, ill-wishers have shoved him,
students'have spat on him and op-
ponents have threatened him with
murder. The left has damned him as a
fascist and a bloody butcher; the right
has damned him as a communist;
erstwhile friends have damned him as an
arrogant blowhard and a hack. Yet none
of this dampened his ambitions.
On June 1, Duarte took office as the
tirst civilian in 50 years to win a
reasonably straight presidential election
in El Salvador. Considering the civil
war, the electoral confusion, guerrilla
disruptions and the general loathing that
pervades this badly divided nation, it
was an easy victory.
His opponent, Roberto d'Aubuisson,
the kinetic, chain-smoking anti-
communist with suspected links to right-
wing death squads, received 46 percent
of the vote to Duarte's 54 percent. In the
aftermath, some analysts (mostly
foreigners) suggested that d'Aubuisson's
showing entitled his people to a share of
the goven ment "in the interest of na-
tional unity" to "heal the wounds But
in El Salvador, as elsewhere, an eight-
point victory is a stomping.
D'Aubuisson's people will have to look
for crumbs.
What is new and important is the fact
that Duarte, as El Salvador's elected
president, now has credentials for
legitimacy unmatched by anyone on the
left, on the right, in the armed forces or
anywhere else. He has some political
power and should get more as he
cements control of the government.
More significantly, he also has moral
authority � a new and perhaps vital
weapon in El Salvador's bloody strug-
gle.
Before this year, the guerrillas could
always claim that they had as much right
to exist in El Salvador as any military-
dominated government. Now Duarte
has won an election � an imperfect elec-
tion to be sure, but an election never-
theless. The guerrillas have lost moral
ground, a trifling matter in the military
scheme of things, but tremendously im-
portant for a movement whose biggest
propaganda argument is the rightness of
its cause.
To recoup, they have two alternatives.
They must "re-legitimize" themselves,
either through important battlefield vic-
tories or by waiting for Duarte's govern-
ment to disgrace itself, or they must play
by Duarte's rules. Thus far the guerrillas
have failed to understand that El
Salvador today is Duarte's game, despite
the constraints imposed by the United
States, and the touchy, and as yet
unresolved, relationship with the armed
forces.
In his first three months, he has done
well. His predecessor, the army-
appointed interim president, Alvaro
Magana, set him up nicely by transferr-
ing Treasury Police Chief Nicolas Car-
ranza and former National Guard In-
telligence boss Lt. Col. Mario Denis
Moran to diplomatic posts abroad. Both
men had enduring reputations as
military hard-liners and had been dodg-
ing charges of human rights abuse for
years. The transfer of two officers may
seem like a negligible move, but such
changes are not to be lightly dismissed.
In Latin American military governments
like El Salvador's, where the armed
forces see themselves as engaged in a
crusade against communism, civilians
are regarded as untrustworthy meddlers.
By shifting Carranza and Moran,
Magana was smoothing the way for
Duarte to serve as commander in chief in
fact as well as in name.
Once in office, Duarte quickly moved
to put his own stamp on military affairs.
On June 4, former Treasury Police
Chief Col. Francisco Antonio Moran,
another hard-liner once branded by
Duarte as "an enemy of the Christian
Democratic Party resigned as director
of the state power commission. He was
replaced by retired Gen. Jaime Abdul
Gutierrez, a former army chief, a close
Duarte associate and a leading exponent
of agrarian reform within the military
establishment. A week later, the
Treasury Police's S-2 intelligence unit,
regarded by many moderates as little
more than a tarted-up death squad, was
disbanded.
Both the departure of Moran and the
abolition of S-2 were portrayed as inter-
nal administrative matters of the armed
forces, but Gutierrez is Duarte's man,
and the treasury police have never been
Duarte's favorites. Still, it is too early to
tell how successful the new commander
in chief will ultimately be in asserting his
authority.
Another event eased Duarte's transi-
tion to power: On May 24, five
Saivadoran National Guardsmen were
convicted in the 1980 murders of four
U.S. churchwomen. For three-and-a-
half years, this notorious affair, known
generally as "the nuns case turned
civil rights abuses in El Salvador into a
cause celebre in Congress. Although the
convictions did not address the question
of whether military higher-ups, par-
ticularly Defense Minister Gen. Eugenio
Vides Casanova, were involved in con-
cealing evidence, the partial resolution
of the case was enough to temporarily
ease the pressure in Congress.
Nevertheless, the churchwomen were
only four among tens of thousands of
non-combatants who have been
murdered in El Salvador in the past five
years. A verdict in the nuns case may
have had a handsome public relations
impact in the United States, but its
general effect on violence in El Salvador
is so modest as to be irrelevant.
The only area in which Duarte's sup-
porters abroad may have been disap-
pointed is in the matter of a negotiated
settlement with El Salvador's Marxist
guerrillas. As the moderate candidate,
Duarte was touted during the campaign
as more dialogue-minded than the in-
transigent d'Aubuisson. But whatever
his private views, in his inaugural
speech, Duarte took the tough stance of
advocating no dialoque that "implies
discussing the sharing of power with
weapons plunked on the table
There is nothing inconsistent here
with either military or Christian
Democratic Party doctrine. For years,
the guerrillas have offered cease-fires
and powersharing as preliminary steps
to end the war. The Saivadoran govern-
ment, with Duarte or without him, has
consistently refused to negotiate. Power-
sharing with Marxist guerrillas has had
scant success in the region (many non-
Marxists left Nicaragua's military
government when the leadership moved
sharply to the left).
The government's stance � and
Duarte's � has been that the guerrillas
must lay down their guns and join an
electoral process set up by the govern-
ment. For the guerrilla movement, the
problem with this stance is that it may
mean both literal and figurative suicide.
Literal becuase leftists could not cam-
paign in El Salvador without getting
murdered, and figurative because no one
thinks they could win an election
anyway.
The left cannot afford to lose an elec-
tion, and the U.S. government would
never allow it to win. The Saivadoran
government can thus offer it as an op-
tion knowing that the left will never pick
up the challenge.
(Guy Gugliottta is a Latin America
correspondent for The Miami Herald.)
Marines Leave Beirut Unchanged
By GREG RIDEOUT
Two weeks ago the final 80 U.S. com-
bat troops left Beirut � quietly and with
little fanfare. It was back-page material
in most new capers. Fifteen Marines
stayed behind as embassy guards in a ci-
ty where 265 of their buddies lost their
lives for a reason nobody could seem to
explain. Why did the peacekeeping mis-
sion of the Marines fail? Why was it
necessary that President Reagan order
back the 1,800-man force?
Beirut today is lost to the United
Some Things I Thought Of
By GREG RIDEOUT
Thinking occupies a lot of most people's time. In fact, most actions require
it. I thought beaucoup amounts this summer, so once again, it's time for
Some Things I Thought Of
What the hell is Opie's full name, and who shortened whatever it is to Opie
anyway? No wonder he has no mother. She probably committed suicide for
tagging her son with a name like that, anyway. Geez!
What kind of people eat Pac Man cereal? Could it be the same creatures
who still insist on wearing Leisure suits to weddings and Kiwanis Club picnics?
I'll take my Donkey Kong flakes any day.
Let's face it, Jim McKay sucks. I've heard WZMB newscasters who speak
better than he does. For example: "Now the Olympics are Olympic-like and
that's why we now will, uh, er, uh, go to, uh � wait a second � uh, er, now
we're ready for Olympic-type action from an Olympic venue � yes, er, uh,
here we go off to Olympic boxing, er, uh � heck, er, we're heading off to
Olympic swimming. Isn't it, uh, er, Olympically heartwarming Go back to
the farm Jim.
How come a majority of old and fat people wear those stretchy, double-knit
type of pants; and where on earth do they buy them? I've never seen them in
any store. Are they passed on from generation to generation? And they're
always in God-awful colors like purple and turqoise.
Who the hell thought of this Pee Dee the Pirate stuff? Pee Dee? Sounds like
a urinary tract infection. Geez, I'm tempted not to admit I'm a Pirate fan
because of this � and they even stuck the damn thing on our parking stickers
� ugh. You would think college-educated minds could do better.
The first person to write on a bathroom stall door in the United States was
Hyro G. Glyphics. He did it inadvertently while enjoying a crossword puzzle.
The word was "Emu
So what if AT&T is in mushrooms or cereal. I don't give a flying fandango.
I could care less if I open up my Capt'n Crunch and find a switchboard or
something. And mushrooms? Oooh, whoever thought of putting them there
should be plugged into a phone jack and have his or her bell rung.
What kind of people drive those trucks with the 18-foot high wheels? Are
they short people with a complex or what? And why is it always a Toyota or
Chevy Luv atop those dump truck rollers?
Pretty soon doctor shows will fall by the wayside like lawyer shows to make
room for "Allen Nerdbrain, Computer Scientist at Large or "General Inter-
facer Now, little kids will grow up wanting to be systems analysts or some
such stuff. Geez, where'd you go Joe DiMaggio?
Why do proctologists always have sharp fingernails? And why does someone
want to be one anyway? Freud would have a nice time with that question. I
guess just like a mechanic is fascinated with cars, a procto-kind-of-guy gets his
kicks from the rectal system.
Do roaches know we hate them? If they did would their feelings be hurt? I
think they are sensitive and would change their ways if we let them know they
should mind their manners. It's true.
I know, you're tired of reading this garbage. So, I hold in my hand the very
last Thing I Thought Of. (Audience appluase)
What kind of people think up weird stuff like this? Do they have both oars
in the water? Are they playing with a full deck? Are they missing a marble or
two? Who knows?
M, 1964. Greg J Syndicated Features, Inc
States. And by extension, it is a minor
Russian puppet in a major geographic
area. Our original goal � that of keep-
ing the peace until Special Envoy Phil
Habib could work out a negotiated set-
tlement among the myriad of factions in
the ancient city � seemed noble when
begun. Unfortunately, as we became
more involved and government and
media more clearly defined the situation
in the city, we realized there was no
peace to keep. In fact, the side we ended
up backing after we were not supposed
to support anyone, Gemayel and the
Christians, was a minority that refused
to share power fairly with the Moslem
majority. It was a problem we found
had no easy solutions.
But Congress stuck with its decision to
back the president at first, along with
numerous members of the media � in-
cluding this columnist. A Russian in-
fluence in the area, we reasoned, would
mean disaster sooner or later. What we
didn't realize was the price we would
have to pay to keep Lebanon out of
Syrian hands. To adequately keep the
peace, our Navy and Air Force � as well
as Marines � would have had to have
been there � fighting a real war. It
would be no pot-shot-here or retaliation-
strike-there thing. The people of
America, Congress and the president (in
an election year) were not ready for that,
not so soon after Viet Nam. It took a
dose of reality to make us all wise.
A car bomb underlined how volatile
the situation was and how vulnerable we
were. Suddenly many of our young men
were dead and everyone was asking
"Why?" Was the peacekeeping we were
doing helping the situation at all? The
answer then and now is no. The men
who died did so because a president, a
congress and a nation knew not what it
wanted to do. Our over-arching reason
was sound, but only specifics can make a
good foreign policy.
The Democrats may try to make an
issue of the ill-defined foreign policy of
the Reagan administration. Beirut will
be their example to show the voters, but
the political rhetoric will seek to hide the
truth. All parties are responsible.
Foreign policy is now shaped by all
branches of government, and the one we
used in Lebanon was not just the ad-
ministration's. It was everyone's, either
implicitly or explicitly.
So, today we must all share a little
blame. A chapter of failure is over.
Maybe student-America will listen to
teacher-history next time.
Cartoon Gallery
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 23. 1984
Carson Elected Chair
In Contested Election
SGA Transit
By JENNIFER JENDRAS1AK
System Helps Solve Parking Woes
In the first openly contested
election in the UNC Board of
Governors history, Asheville at-
torney Phillip G. Carson was
elected chairman of the board by
a 16-15 vote on July 27.
Carson, a graduate of UNC-
CH and the UNC-CH School of
Law, succeeds John R. Jordan,
who has served the legal limit of
two two-year terms. Jacob H.
Froelich of High Point was
elected vice chairman and Geneva
J. Bowe of Murfreesboro was
chosen as secretary.
Two other candidates contend-
ed for the position of chairman:
Winston-Salem Mayor Wayne A.
Corpening and David J.
Whichard II of Greenville, who is
the publisher of the Daily Reflec-
tor. Whichard withdrew from the
race prior to the elections.
Some board members said they
felt the outcome of the election
would affect the future of UNC
system President William Friday,
64, who will either retire next year
or serve as president until he is 70.
Friday has been president for 26
vears.
Carson was backed by a group
of board members who apparent-
ly felt the board was a rubber
stamp for Friday. These members
uant the board to play a more ac-
tive role in the determination of
university policy.
Corpening was backed by a fac-
tion that was said to be close to
Friday and to consist mainly of
older board members.
There was also a debate over
the balloting procedure. One
board member proposed a secret
ballot but the state Attorney
General's office decided this
would be in violation of the state's
open meetings law. The vote was
taken by written, signed ballots
which were available for public in-
spection following the election.
Froelich's election was also
contested. He was chosen 17-14
over former Gov. James E.
Holshouser, Jr and Durham
businessman Asa T. Spaulding
Jr after three ballots were taken.
Bowe's election was unoppos-
ed.
By BILL DAWSON
M�ff Writer
For those students who don't
have a car or dislike dealing with
the problems involved in parking
on campus, the SGA transit
system may be a viable alter-
native.
During the year, the system
covers close to 300 miles a day and
carries betveen 2,500 and 2,600
passengers per day.
In order to best serve students,
three routes are utilized. The
Brown route covers the area north
of campus and west of the
downtown area. The Gold route
serves College Hill, Minges Col-
iseum, the Allied Health Building,
Greenville Square, the Plaza and
Oakmont Square apartments. The
Purple route covers Kings' Row,
Riverbluff, Cannon Court and
Eastbrook apartments as well as
University Condos, Village Green
Apartments, Memorial Gym and
Speight Building.
According to Marshall Tucker,
SGA transit manager, the routes
will be expanded to accomadate
more apartment complexes in the
fall of 1985.
In addition, the Night Transit
Service, which was started last
fall, and which serves the
downtown area on weekend
nights, will be continued, Tucker
said.
The expansion of routes in one
of the changes Tucker plans,
building on the foundation built
by former Transit Manager Bill
Hilliard. "I want to continue
Bill's progress and start expansion
in the fall of 1985 Tucker said.
The purchase of a bus will con-
stitute part of the expansion. This
will "take the load off the bkgei
buses when they aren't needea
This will also reduce costs inc
red from the poor mileage of the
large buses, which get about �
miles to the gallon, "Tucker M
adding that cost reduction
another of his goals.
Bus service for handicapped
students is also managed -
transit service.
Student interests are a toe
priority, Tucker said, "It (S
transit) is for the students an,
that's what we have to keep
mind
Get the
word out
in the
Announcements
in The East Carolinian
� Aerobics
417 Evans-Downtown
757 - 1608
"We Specialize
In It"
Walking Distance From Campus
Bring Coupon For 1 FREE Class
(Anytime But 5:30 Class)
Class Times: Mon, Wed, Fri-9:30am
Mon thru Thurs: 3:15,4:20, 5:30,6:45
Fri: 3:15 Sat: 11:00,1:00
3:15 Class Mon Thru Thurs Starts Labor Day
Limit 1 Coupon Per Person
WHAT'S COOKING AT FOSDICK?
FABULOUS WEEKNIGHT
SPECIALS
Monday: Shrimp (All You Can Eat) 5.95
Small Shrimp Dinner 3.95
Tuesday: Flounder (All You Can Eat) 6.95
Small Flounder Dinner 3.95
Wednesday: Shrimp (All You Can Eat) 6.95
Small Shrimp Dinner 3.95
Thursday: Trout (All You Can Eat) 3.95
Small Trout Dinner 2.95
Specials Good Through September 6th
Hours: Monday - Thrusday 4:30 - 9:00pm
FOSDICKS 1890 FAMILY SEAFOOD
2903 S. Evans St. 756-2011
FREE
TRIP TO OUR SALAD BAR
With Purchase Of Any Meal
FREE
CUP OF CLAM CHOWDER
With Purchase Of Any Meal
NEWS WRITERS AND
ASSISTANT
EDITORS NEEDED
Apply In
Person At The
ID Can
Da
Thurs
Mon
rh.
trie.
f ridfa
W ed
V ed
1983 1
B JKNMKKRJr SDK
If
soph
want lo take
baci
has beer, d.
do U st
andp
Buccaneer
A'
bool
not las'
WZMB
B Kl IZABr H Bl
ECl
WZMB
wide: yariet
than it has
According
program
WZMB si
gressive alb
mat but inc
Wave. C
grams.
Hararj i
gressive AOR
which a
East Carolinian Office
,rf
Intersection drel
PRtM
ATTHEPIRAT1
��,
A T '





es
hake the load off the biRBer
' when they aren't needed
I Mil also reduce costs incur
rom the poor mileage of the
buses, which get about fiVe
to the gallon Tucker said
fg that cost reduction i
per of his goals.
service for handicapped
Ir.ts is also managed by the
It service.
pent interests are a top
�ty, Tucker said, "It (SGA
t) is tor the students and
a hat we have to keep in
?
�at)
at)
5.95
395
6.95
3.95
6.95
3.95
3.95
2.95
)er 6th
- 9:00pm
FOOD
1
It
CHOWDER
Of Any Meal
ID Card Schedule Fall Semester, 1984
Day
Date
Thursday
Friday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Wednesday
Friday
Wednesda
Wednesday
Friday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Friday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Friday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
August 23, 1984
August 24, 1984
August 27, 1984
August 28, 1984
August 29, 1984
August 30, 1984
August 31, 1984
September 5, 1984
September 7, 1984
September 12, 1984
September 19, 1984
September 21, 1984
September 26, 1984
October 3, 1984
October 10, 1984
October 17, 1984
October 19, 1984
October 24, 1984
October 31, 1984
November 7, 1984
November 9, 1984
November 14, 1984
November 28, 1984
December 5, 1984
Time
12pm�5pm
12pm�5pm
12pm�5pm
12pm�5pm
12pm�5pm
12pm�5pm
12pm�5pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�4:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�4:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�4:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm� 4:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
2:30pm�3:30pm
1983 Buccaneers Are Here
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nws 1 dilor
If you were a freshman or
sophomore in 1982-83 and you
want to take a nostalgic journey
back in time, the perfect solution
has been devised. All you need to
do is stop by the Buccaneer office
and pick up your copy of the 1983
Buccaneer.
After many delays, the 1983
book has finally arrived. This is
not last year's book, but the an-
nual from the year before last.
However, according to 1984 Buc-
caneer Editor Anthony Martin,
the 1984 book should be back
from the printer's by the end of
this semester.
In order for students to pick up
their copy of the 1983 Buccaneer,
they must have an ID with a
number beginning with 82 or
lower. The books are available at
the Buccaneer office, located on
the 2nd floor of the Old South
Building, during the afternoon.
Yearbooks from previous years
are also available, as are last
year's Freshman Registers.
Gary Patterson, editor of the
1985 Buccaneer, said he hopes to
get the 1985 book done as early as
possible. His book, he said, will
have more photos and less copy in
order to speed up production.
Portraits for the 1985 Buccaneer
will be taken in February and
March.
WZMB Offers More Variety
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Staff Writer
ECU's campus radio station,
WZMB, will offer listeners a
wider variety of music this year
than it has in the past.
According to Spike Harward,
program and music director,
WZMB still maintains its pro-
gressive album-oriented rock for-
mat but includes Jazz, Soul, New
Wave, Classical, and Gospel pro-
grams.
Harward explained the pro-
gressive AOR format as one
which airs music before it enters
the charts. "You get the chance to
hear music first on WZMB said
Harward, 'but then we don't
overplay chart songs as other sta-
tions do Harward said chart
songs receive no airplay.
"This year we're playing more
oldies than in the past said Har-
ward. Along with back-to-back
oldies, WZMB will play back-to-
back request music on the "Heavy
Segment" daily from 2 p.m. to 3
p.m.
WZMB's tentative program
schedule, up for approval by the
elude; jazz weeknights from 6-8,
the "Permanent Wave" new wave
show Wednesday nights from 11
p.m. to 2 a.m "Inner Rythyms"
soul music Sat. and Sun. nights
from 6-10, Classical music Sat. 6
a.m. to 10 a.m. and Sun. 10 a.m.
to 12 a.m and Contemporary
Gospel Sunday 6 a.m. to 10 a.m.
WZMB will also continue to air
the heavy metal "Electric Rain-
bow Radio Show" with Keith
Mitchell Fri. and Sat. 12 a.m. to 4
a.m.
Besides music, WZMB will air
Media Board Sept. 10 will in- nine newcasts daily
ftrafesi
Chest
CONVENIENCE STORE
OPEN 24 HOURS
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� UNION 76 GAS
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LUNCH SPECIALS
Served 11:00-2:00pm
CHOICE OF
1 Meat
&2Veg.
ONLY
Meats and Seafood
Shrimp
Trout
Oysters
Deviled Crabs
Crab Cakes
Clam Strips
Flounder
Fried Chicken
BBQ Chicken
Country Style Steak
Veal Cutlets
Hamburger Steak
Barbeque Dinner
$3.25
includes tax
and beverage
8 Steamed Shrimps
2 Veg.
i! $3.50 �
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u Steamed Seafood Feast
Crab Legs (6oz.)
Sauteed Crab Meat (2 oz.)
& Steamed Shrimp (2 oz.)
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Vegetables
Beets
Slaw
Boiled Potatoes
Potato Salad
French Fries
Yams
Black-eyed Peas
Collards
Rice
Mashed Potatoes
String Beans
Apple Sauce
Brunswick Stew
Cabbage
includes tax & beverage
Vegetable Plate: Choice
of four vegetables
Alaskan Crab Leg!
2 Veg.
$3.25
rh SEAFOOD DELIGHT
Choose from: Choice of three seafoods. Shrimp, Oysters, Clam Strips,
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DINNER
Hard Shell
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Steamed in Spice
4.50
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2 Large Crabs
Choice of 2 Vegetables
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Channel Cat Fish
Choice of 2 Vegetables
p 1
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One Pound
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6.99
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Ki X va
V.O.YT
-
Greenville Apartment Business 'Booming'
Bv JENNIFER JENDRAUk
�- � Oil. 1.
rscent boom in Greetiville's
� � am � "i ?� hasi- '� en
- i .� rr. r r s d f i r . rce c
places' z t han ai an �C" i"
� aThe o p t i o i ar ' no
m�1 f -A- -
m�nt :omptotes ae full, asire the
ECUresidence balls
A�ii to the coun: :a.x
3ls ses o: i office, assessmetre for
� � a ne e � a p art rr. e a t an:1 ?on-
i o m i� -� - -�- n a aS �
aptain's Quarters, Kings Arms,
Rjnggold Towers, Kingston Place
and 5 y c am o r e Hill � are
inavailable A spokesman a: the
ffice said he thought Ringgold
-e ould nave the highest
i �alue � S6 million, bas-
a es Final figures will be
: i able in October
"Business is booming said
Sk p Browder i the Greenville
Department of Cit Planning. A
- ng marketplace and reaction
ated demand were cited
bv Browder as reasons for the
m "The (developers) build
ai ic pation of demand he
said "S metimes the overbuild
hen a a and let the market catch
ap Greenville has been under-
partialh because oi high in
r a t es
der a d since the first of
. �� planning staff
rev ewed proposals for 480
� family units and as of June,
.v permits for 312.
ising boom has not af-
e demand for ECL's
ce halls, said ECU Director
� H ising, Dan Wooten. As of
� k the residence halls were
. u There were 50 women and
57 men assigned as the third per-
son in a room designed for two
people. There were also 25 men on
waiting lists
Tor those students who opt to
live off-campus, and who are
searching for apartments and or
roommates, the first stop should
be the Office of Off-Campus
Housing, located in Whichard
Building.
The office has a complete list of
all apartments in the area and
their specifications. It also has a
frequently-revised list of students
needing roommates and apart-
ments. In addition, rooms for rent
in the area, apartments available
for subletting and mobile homes
and houses for rent are listed.
A stud.nt can be included in the
bulletin by stopping at the office
and filling out a form detailing,
for example, the type of apart-
ment they would like to rent.
Brochures listing things to be
onsidered before renting are also
available in the office. The
brochures list items that should be
checked in sn apartment before
signing a lease.
Following is a list of some of
the apartments and con-
dominiums in the Greenville area.
This list is not exhaustive. More
the Office of Off-Campus
Housing rr from the individual
apartment complexes
There are s e e r a I con -
dominium complexes in the
Greenville area Two of these are
designed specifically for students
� Kingston Place and Ringgold
Towers Information about Ring-
gold Towers in unavailable
Kingston Plic is located on
Greenville Boulevard, approx-
imately wo miles from campus.
The complex, which :s totally stu-
dent orientated, has two-
bed room units, all of which sell
for 159,900. Students have a
choice of garden apartments or
townhouses. .All the condos are
furnished for four inhabitants and
come complete with all furniture
and accessories, including linens.
A swimming pool and clubhouse
are located on the premises.
Phase I, consisting of 4$ units,
has been completed and is sold
out. Phase II will be ready for spr-
ing semester. Ninety percent
financing is available. A
spokesman for Kingston Place
said he anticipates a waiting list in
the near future. He added that 75
percent of the condos are oc-
cupied ?v the owners
There is a vast a�iv of apart-
ment complexes in the xcs
Apartments are available in many
different sizes and price ranges
list of a variety of apartment com-
plexes follows This list includes
onl those complexes which
than .4 units and in
rtav
1.11V. ?.
ren ig tor $2 W pe i and
o bedi �� " ' � : '
$'� ?' " ' - i ��
prov ied �� � �. :
ments ���: -� bage d �
basic cable v - � - � - s � ��N -
stoves and ret jera rs N
;�. re a �� ed and a one �
yZv

r
Apart
c' j� cut ikv FVwai 't
.V id � � �
MMT
���
So .v. a c ;
I �g�'i sa ft
cases a res:cer manager
Captain's Quarters is one of the
newest apartment complexes It is
located or. 12th and Cotanche
Streets about four blocks from
ECU. There are 2' one-bedroom
or $V pe:
five have been
fall The apart-
units wh:ch rent
month
rented
All bu
ments come with a stove.
refrigerator, dishwasher and are
carpeted. Water is furnished and
all apartments are wired for cable
A one-year lease is required and
no pets are allowed.
Carriage House Apartments are
located on New Bern Highwav, 1
1 2 miles from campus. There are
SS two-bedroom units, renting for
$250 and $270 per month. No pets
are allowed. The complex has bus
service available
Cherry Court is located on 10th
Street, two miles from campus.
There are 52 one-bedroom units
ava able Fit ee pe ' "
occ pa " n -�� ; tudent
Courtney iNiaart -v ed
Arlington Bou ev i J
rent to ande jradua - � c �
but will ent to � aduate st aden s
One, .vwvN id ' ee reu ov
apai men - a t �'��� b :
rents range from S2 435
morth Vll appl -� es a t
basic cable, a sw i .w -�� �'
a clubhouse a t pi � ded No pe
are allow ed
Cypress Gardens, ocated one
ha ' �' e " om - a np is on I
Street, is aboui 55 p cer
student occ p ed I he t a c 24
one bedi n apa ner s . ig
I astbrv(k. p.tmciu
Kni
-
v
pus � ' T J.
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w
s S2
s i
� i :�.
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� . M � ti Mi l n
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CAPTAIN'S QUARTERS APARTMENTS
300 EAST I211 STREET
(FACING CHARLES STREfcT)
Captain Quarters are con-
veniently located within
walking distance of the
university, seven restau-
rants, two cleaners, one
grocery store, and the
downtown shopping area.
No need to fight the
parking hassle because
more than adequate park-
ing is furnished on site
for our residents.
r
���?l
1gH
-r em6




All twenty-seven units
are one bedroom with
a spacious living-
kitchen area that is
fully carpeted and
furnished with Sears
refrigerators, ranges,
and dishwashers. Cen-
tral heating and air
conditioning is by
efficient electrical
heat pumps and all
units are prewired for
telephones and cable TV
FLOOR PLAN
RENTAL AGENT
MILLER a DAVIS ASSOCIATES g
402 N GREENE ST. GREENVILLE , N.C.
758-7474
app o � .
anipus
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M M'lKlMIMs
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The COH is a private club for member guests All ABC permits.
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Urn





THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUOUST13. 1984
ng'
tpartments rent foi
mth A six month
. lired. No pets are
e apartments,
gerator, stove
ditioning, are rented
- . 90 percent of
occupied b
;v mu is another ne
.1 tour blocks
s Boulevard
rhere are 120
enting for
Refrigera
provided
I le foi ttie
is equired
Half of
. nts
s' Row � 10th
IU,
� ed with
ors,
x ipart-
fall, 85
RIU N Is rav-t s�

ARTY
m
ABC permits.
Apartments Available In All Sizes, Shapes
Continued From Page 8
percent by students. A one-year
lease is required. One-bedroom
apartments rent for $230 per
month; two-bedrooms for $265
No pets are allowed. The complex
is on an SGA transit route.
Langston Park is located off
First Street, five blocks from cam-
pus. There are 48 two-bedroom
apartments, renting for $275 per
month. Water is provided. Cable
TV, refrigerators, stoves,
dishwashers and washerdryer
hookups are also supplied. All of
the apartments, which have one-
year leases, are rented for the fall.
Approximately 50 percent of the
renters are students. No pets are
allowed.
Oakmont Square has both one
and two-bedroom apartments,
with rents ranging from $275-325.
The complex, located 1 12 miles
from campus, is on an SGA tran-
sit route. A one-year lease is re-
quired. Np pets are allowed.
Apartments are furnished with
stoves, refrigerators, dishwashers,
garbage disposals and basic cable.
Water is also provided. All apart-
ments are occupied for fall
semester, with students compris-
ing about 60 percent of oc-
cupants.
Pirates' Landing was first open-
ed last winter. The complex is
located near campus on Reade
Circle and is essentially a dor-
Get Football Tickets Early
By RANDY MEWS
1984 is expected to be an ex-
citing year for the Pirate football
team, so all students interested in
attending any of ECU's home
order to get a ticket, student early in the week will have the op-
status must be demonstrated by portunity to purchase these
showing a current ECU tickets.
identification-activity card. Another alternative to assure
To avoid long lines and poor good seating is the purchase of
, . - seating, ECU's ticket manager group tickets. A minimum of 25
SJS,sed to Plcuk up their Brenda Edwards suggests that all tickets (student or guest) is re-
h IT yaS?�SSlbedur,n8 studcnts get their tickets on Tues- quired to constitute a group.
T�.P"?irw0 .rf?1, . day �nce the student-section These tickets will be distributed
e.s will He avaiiable a: the tickets are distributed, assigned Monday, but a group represen-
seating beyond the endzone will tative must make an appointment
be the only alternative. with the ticket office the
The student section extends ap- preceding Friday,
proximately 70 yards along the Away tickets for ECU's contest
North side of Ficklen Stadium with intra-state rival N.C. State
(35,000), and seating will be deter- go on sale Aug. 29 at 8 a.m and
mined on a first-come, first-serve may be purchased at the ticket of-
basis. fice for $12. There is an extremely
ECU students also have the op- limited supply,
tion to purchase guest tickets at ECU's season-opener against
The price of student tickets was half price ($5.50), but Edwards Temple is expected to be a sell-
,ded m tuition costs, but in warns that only those who come out.
Athletic Ticket Office in Minges
Coliseum between 8 a.m9 p.m
and from 11 a.m6 p.m. in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Tickets may only be obtained on
Tuesday, Wednesday and Thurs-
day the week of the game, while
tickets for games against future
opponents will not be released
under any circumstances
For just 75 cents a line
The East Carolinian Classifieds
are the best way in town to
sell advertise, send messages
t�-lf')lM�lM�M)�U)�,���MMg�gw���mi
Introducing
to
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TRACY A. PITTS
Formally at Heads Up
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Open 8 a.m. to Midnicht, 7 Davs A Week
Located Next To The Pizza Hut
2510 E. 10th Street Greenville, N.C. 752-5222
Remember to Join the Wash Pub Wash Club
mitory. It is air-conditioned and
carpeted. All residents live in
suites. A suite consists of four
bedrooms, two baths and a kit-
chenette. Each room, which is oc-
cupied by one person, is furnished
with a bed, desk and refrigerator.
The rooms rent for $170 per
semester. Three units are available
for fall semester. Semester,
school-year and full-year leases
are available. Ninety-five percent
of the residents are ECU students.
River Bluff Apartments are 75
percent student occupied. They
are located 1 12 miles from cam-
pus, off 10th Street. One-
bedroom garden apartments rent
for $240 and two-bedroom
townhouses rent for $290 per
month. Apartments are furnished
with all appliances and basic cable
service and water are paid for. A
pool and laundry room are
located on the premises and
24-hour maintenance service is
available. A six-month lease is re-
quired. Pets are allowed and the
complex is on an SGA transit
route. Most of the apartments are
rented for the fall.
Stratford Arms is located on
Charles Boulevard, one mile from
campus. The rent range is from
$250-290 per month. The 144
units are furnished with ap-
pliances, water and basic cable.
All of the apartments are rented
for the fall, 35 percent by
students. A one-year lease is re-
quired. No pets are allowed.
Transit service is available.
Sycamore Hill is another new
apartment complex. It has 21
units located on Fifth and Holly
Streets, across from campus. The
apartments rent for $235 per
month and include water and ap-
pliances. There are still apart-
ments available for the fall; a one-
year lease is required. Pets are
allowed provided they are under
40 lbs.
Tar River Estates are on Willow
Street, six blocks from campus.
There are 409 units with rents
ranging from $265-500 per
month. Transit service is
available. Pets are not allowed
and a one-year lease is required.
Apartments are furnished with
water, appliances, blinds and
patio drapes, and basic cable. All
are rented for the fall, 50 percent
by students.
Village Green is located bet-
ween Fifth and 10th Streets, 34
mile from campus. One and two-
bedroom apartments are
available, with rents ranging from
$250-280 per month. Pets are not
allowed. Transit service is
available. Apartments are fur-
nished with kitchen appliances,
but no dishwashers. All are oc-
cupied for the fall, approximately
75 percent by students. A one-
year lease is required.
Wedgewood Arnu is located i
12 miles from campus on Arl-
ington Boulevard. Very few
students rent here because the
complex requires a minimum
monthly income of $1,300
Students can rent if their parents
sign the lease. There are 80 two
bedroom apartments renting for
$325 per month. No pets are
allowed and a one-year lease is re-
quired. Transit service is
available.
Wilson Acres is about 95 pei
cent student-occupied. One, two
and three bedroom apartments
are available, with rents ranging
from $250-370 per month. Apart
ments are furnished with ap
pliances and water. All are oc
cupied for the fall. A one-year
lease is required and no pets are
allowed. Transit service w
available.
tt WELCOME BACK STUDENTS!
Hurry In For The Best Deal In Town
Rent a 19 in. Color TV
for as low as
$19.95 permonthl
TVVCRStereo Rentals
Short Term Rentals Availabi
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2905 E. 10th St.
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1
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10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 23, 1984
Collard Lovers, Haters Answer Poetry's Call
By CAXLYN EBERT
Poetic inspiration is a
mysterious thing, so they say. But
this summer two ECU English in-
structors found when the subject
was coHards, poets from all over
the country answered the call to
verse.
Loved or loathed, glorified or
denounced, co Hards inspired over
500 entries from 32 states and
three European countries in the
nation's first collard poetry con-
test. Judges Alex Albright and
Luke Whisnant hive edited an an-
thology � Leaves of Greens: The
CoUard Poems � being published
in conjunction with the Ayden
Collard Festival, September 3-9.
Albright and Whisnant an-
nounced the winning entries Mon-
day at Bum's Restaurant in
Ayden. Mrs. Anne Creech,
Festival Chairman, presented the
winning poets with checks and
collard corsages.
United Methodist minister
Harvey Estes of Magnolia, N.C
took the $100 top honors with his
villanelle, "Spring Collards in
Washington "I'm pretty infor-
mal, and I have to admit that this
is the first time I've worn a clerical
collard cracked Estes as the
judges draped a sash of collard
leaves tied with a red velvet ribbon
over his shoulder.
A $50 second prize went to
Rose C. White of Titusville, Fl
for " 'Twas the Season for Col-
lards a send-up of " 'Twas the
-Night Before Christmas And
ML. Parks summoned memories
of forced childhood collard-eating
in her third-place entry, "Col-
lards
Collards take me back a bit.
Age ten, I had the gall to sit
Rock-jawed before a plate of tin
Lumped dense as cow dung, full
of them.
Raymond W. Dew, Jr. and
Virginia Love Long-Glasscock
were both on hand to receive $10
honorable mentions. Dew, a
Social Security judge from
Raleigh, vented his life-long
hatred of collards in "O'Collard"
("O'Collard, thou foul
weedThinkst thou could fool me;
indeed?"), while Long-Glasscock,
a poet from Hurdle Mills,
N.Cissued her "Challenge
" am just like a collard
patch
The wild Man told the Saturday
night drunk
Looking for a fight after hours at
the Black Eye Bar
"Any time you want a mess,
you're welcomed
To come and get it
Winners of $25, $15 and $10 in
the student competition were
Chad Everett, 15 of Tarboro,
N.C. for "The Collards War
Erin J. Rice, 15, of Baton Rouge,
La for "The Bird and Jill
Rogers, 15 of Tarboro for "My
Friend Lester
The judges, who've been at this
task since May and admit to being
a tad sick of versified greens, were
pleased with both the quantity
and quality of submissions. Still,
choosing the winners out of this
mess o' songs, ballads, limericks,
narratives and couplets was no
easy task.
First they "crapped" the
poems, sorting them into
categories. ("Crapping" is proper
Ayden dialect for picking collard
leaves.)
"We got to the point where we
had as many as 20 or 30 poems
about the same thing, poems
about remembering Grandma
cooking collards, or poems about
how to pick collards, or poems
about how to cook collards said
Whisnant. Then they determined
the prizewinners from the best of
each group.
Winning poet Estes said he
would donate his award money to
Opus, the literary and art
magazine at Washington High
School where he has substitute
taught and run poetry workshops.
He and the other winners will read
their works at the CoUard Festival
on Saturday, September 8, at
about 1:30, between the collard
cookin' and the collard eatin' con-
test. Winners will receive plates of
collards in addition to their cash
prizes.
"I can't believe how big this
whole thing has gotten said
Debbie Adkins, the Ayden native
daughter who will illustrate
Leaves of Greens. "I mean, this
year everybody's coming in for
the Collard Festival. My aunt
from Marion. Everyone Events
include a parade, Festival Queen
contest, tennis tournament, car-
nival rides and a Michael Jackson
look-alike contest.
The rash of publicity spread by
the collard poetry contest has in-
deed focused much media atten-
tion on Ayden's collards.
Newspapers across the state ran
features, as did papers in Florida,
California, Texas and New Mex-
ico. USA Today picked up on the
fun and even European readers
were invited to send poems via the
International Herald Tribune.
Whisnant and Albright appeared
Tuesday on "Carolina Today
Although Albright and Whis-
nant aren't quite sure why they
got such a tremendous response,
they did find that collards serve as
a badge of regional pride,
especially among Southerners.
"It's such a Southern
vegetable speculated Whisnant.
I think the only other thing in the
world to eat that would inspire as
many poems would be possibly
okra
"I think it's absurd that people
even consider 'em food added
Albright. Poet Dew agreed,
holding a bowl of collards in his
hands and a sour expression on
his face as the TV cameras rolled.
"I'm working on a herbicide
that'll kill 'em. I tried plain spit,
but that didn't work he said.
"It's hard to be indifferent
about coliaids noted Long-
Glasscock, cheerfully eating
forkfuls of the greens for
photographers. But Estes, who
eats his collards "vegetariano
declined.
"I lean toward the little known
'collard liberation movement' "
he said.
I
oto express
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After much debate o
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an ID card, an activi! j
library card, a solution
devised. There is now
multi-purpose photo ID
"The thought aj
more practical to have all
Stickers Req
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more pleasant thanl
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Pat Gertz, the numi
stickers issued does
the total spaces a. ailabli
because student! are;
going all da, unlike
come at 8 a.m. a. .
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUOUST 23. 19B4
Call
More Efficient Multi- Purpose ID's Issued
unk it's absurd that people
cnsider 'em food added
tht. Poet Dew agreed,
a bowl of collards in his
nd a sour expression on
e as the TV cameras rolled.
orking on a herbicide
ill em. 1 tried plain spit,
didn't work he said.
hard to be indifferent
roilards noted Long-
ck, cheerfully eating
ol the greens for
ipherv But Estes, who
collards "egetariano
-ard the little known
.ition movement' "
I � � 0 � � I
By DALENE SIPPEL
SUff Witter
After much debate over the in-
convenience of students carrying
an ID card, an activity card, and a
library card, a solution has been
devised. There is now a new,
multi-purpose photo ID card.
"The thought was to make it
more practical to have all three in
Stickers Required
one, and hopefully the students
will appreciate it said Rudolph
Alexander, director of University
Unions and associate dean of Stu-
dent Affairs.
The freshman's ID's were made
during Orientation, "Theirs were
all done, arc we're approximately
3,000 aheto with faculty and staff
taken last spring Alexander
said.
For those students (approx-
imately 10,000) who have not yet
acquired new ID's, the procedure
is as follows:
Go to Room 244 in Mendenhall
Student Center, and show a
receipt for payment of tuition
fees. A new ID card will then be
made. There is a $2.50 charge for
the new card.
The activity sticker is then af-
fixed to the back of the ID card.
On the students' first visit to the
library, a staff member will affix a
coded bar to the lower portion on
the front of the ID card.
Since such a large number of
students are getting IDs, lines will
be lengthy.
"We considered various ideas
to keep the lines down, none
seemed practical. One student
might find it extremely important
to have it the first day, others
might not Alexander stated.
The result was to provide two
weeks for students to have their
photo ID cards made. Two ID
card cameras will be used, each
with the capacity to make at least
100 photo ID cards per hour.
"We hope they all won't come
at once or at the last minute
Alexander said. In case this does
happen, Alexander said, students
will be informed of the expected
waiting time.
"We feel we made all possible
plans without a lot of red tape
That's what we're trying to get
away from. We hope students will
look at it as an opportunity rather
than a burden.
Parking: Problems, Procedures Same
� � � � �
Developing
By TINA MAROSCHAK
ttatara Editor
Freshmen are likely to find
parking a little easier and a lot
more pleasant thanks to a new
drainage ditch that was installed
in the freshmen lot on the corner
of Berkley and 14th Streets.
What about the rest of the stu-
dent body? According to Assis-
tant Director for Traffic Services
Pat Gertz, the number of parking
stickers issued does outnumber
the total spaces available, but only
because students are coming and
going all day, unlike the staff who
come at 8 a.m. and leave at 5 p.m.
"We have a constant turnover in
spaces, so it's not like we're
overselling stickers Gertz said.
Parking is a definite problem
on this campus at times, but
nevertheless, students who plan to
keep a car at school are required
to register it and purchase the pro-
per sticker. Vehicle registration
for the 1984-1985 school year is
being conducted at the
Mendenhall Student Organization
Booth from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and
will continue until August 29.
Stickers for "Staff "Day" and
"Dorm" students are $25, and
stickers for "Freshmen" anr
film fC 41 Prranl
30,311984
UsSJlli
41
"Night" students are $12.
Newcomers, be warned: Don't
park in any other area except that
designated on your sticker.
Penalties for parking in
unauthorized areas range from $2
fines to towing. Gertz said that
vehicles with three uncleared cita-
tions can be towed. Those with
four are automatically put on the
lowing list. Normally a letter is
sent to the owner warning him or
her of the possible actions that
can be taken. Possible conse-
quences include the withholding
of transcripts and schedules to the
more drastic measure of towing
the vehicle.
Gertz said campus policemen
are a little more lenient during the
first few days of school; however,
violations such as overtime park-
ing and parking in no-parking
zones are strictly prohibited.
Those who disregard the rules and
regulations will be ticketed and
possibly towed.
Freshmen with parking stickers
are prohibited from parking on
campus at all times except from 5
p.m. on Friday to 10 p.m. on Sun-
day.
Keep your parents up
on life at East Carolina
with a subscription to
The East Carolinian
Call
LATE NIGHT MUNCH!
P.T.A.
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12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 23, 1984
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fT





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
AUGUST 23, 1984 Page 13
ECU Unions Artists Series Begins Season
Five Renowned Acts Scheduled To Perform
The well-known and enchanting Vienna Choir Boys will perform Jan. 15 at Wright Auditorium.
Parking: Race For A Space
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nrw, Fdltor
If you stop and think about it,
$25 is a lot of money. It will
finance at least one weekend in
Greenville, several meals, or
almost all of a textbook. And last
week, $23 is what 1 shelled out at
the Department of Public Safety
for one small piece of paper � an
ECU parking sticker.
This seemingly insignificant
item will enable me to park on
campus for twelve months, or so
they told me. On the surface, it
looks like a good deal � 12 mon-
ths of parking for about $2 a
month. Unfortunately, the park-
ing on this campus works on the
same principle as time-sharing in
condos. I share my oarking place
with about 50 other students. In a
condo, each one of us would get a
week. At ECU, each one of us has
a 10 o'clock class. I can tell what's
going to happen.
Even if I don't have an 8
o'clock class, I still have to leave
home at 7:30. If I get here at 7:30,
I might be able to get a space
An Editor's Note
halfway between here and my
house. If I can't, I'll need the time
to walk.
Once, when I was a naive
freshman, I arrived on campus 10
minutes before a class. I missed all
three of my morning classes look-
ing for a parking space. I also us-
ed half a tank of gas and most of a
rather extensive vocabulary of
obscenities.
One of the side effects of the
parking situation is it clearly
demonstrates there are some peo-
ple who are completely in-
tolerable. They tend to fall into
two mutually exclusive categories.
The first consists of those peo-
ple who always have a parking
space right next to the building
where their class is. These are
usually the people who arrive ear-
ly for their classes (then spend the
time studying), who always have
perfectly coordinated wardrobes
and who never chew on the wrong
end of a pen. I usually console
myself by thinking that they leave
home at 5 a.m. It's probably not
true. I think some people are just
genetically destined to have good
parking spaces.
The second category of people
is infinitely more loathsome. Pic-
ture this: You've been cruising the
parking lot for so long you could
have a personal relationship with
most of the cars in it. Suddenly,
you see a car pulling out of a
space. (So what if it's a motorcy-
cle space.) You wait patiently for
them to pull out and as you
prepare to pull into the space, this
big, pre-oil crisis car with Jesse
Helms bumper stickers and a
"The South's gonna rise again"
license plate lumbers in. You can
yell and scream all you want to
but the 500 lbs. of snarling,
leather-clad flesh driving the car
are impervious to anything.
The bottom line is this: i you
have $25 to spend, an ECU park-
ing sticker is not the best invest-
ment. Investigate walking � it's
great exercise and you'll be doing
it even if you have a parking
sticker. Besides, there will be less
competition for my parking
space.
By TINA MAROSCHAK
fftur �
So you think you've got it made
now � no more evening curfew,
no more cleaning up your room,
no more making your bed, no
more washing the dishes. Wallah
� a life full of partying,
Domino's Pizzas and socializing.
Think again. Responsibility does
not end after high school. Too
much partying leads to red eyes
and hangovers; too many pizzas
lead to the classic "freshmen
ten and too much socializing
leads to bad grades and nagging
parents.
No, this is not a lecture. This is
merely one college veteran's at-
tempt to say that ECU has much
more to offer than just a blazing
night-life. I'll admit, the social life
here is pretty good; however, in
order to avoid starting off on the
wrong foot, get your priorities
straight in the very beginning.
If partying is your number one
priority, disregard the remainder
of this article. If you're looking
for a little bit more, however,
heed well the tips that follow.
1). A college education is a
privilege � someone is footing
the bill for your tuition and so-
meone has faith that you will
spend that money and your time
wisely � don't let them and
yourself down.
2). Besides competition among
students, ECU departments and
schools are really cracking down
on admission requirements and
standards. If you don't make the
grades, you don't reap the
rewards.
3). College lectures are a lot dif-
ferent than those of your high
school days. Skipping class and
relying on a friend's notes is not
"the next best thing to being
there
4). Don't miss tests because you
stayed out too late the night
before. Those "sick" excuses
usually don't work anymore.
5). Procrastination is probably
the easiest thing to do and the
hardest thing to avoid. Beware �
those term papers may take longer
than you think.
Whether you appreciate my
suggestions or not, you'll even-
tually learn from experience and
mistakes, as I have, that a college
education is something for you
and you alone. You do get out of
it what you put into it.
The ECU Unions Artists Series
Committee has announced its
1984-1985 season which promises
to continue the greatness of past
seasons. Highlighting the upcom-
ing season are the Rotterdam
Philharmonic Orchestra and the
Vienna Choir Boys. The season
also includes such stellar attrac-
tions as the Tokyo String Quartet,
Marvis Martin, and Janina
Fialkowska. All performances are
scheduled for 8 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium.
The Tokyo String Quartet
opens the season with its perfor-
mance Wednesday, September 26.
Music lovers and critics alike have
proclaimed this quartet as unques-
tionably the finest chamber
ensemble performing today. Since
their 1982 performance at ECU,
they have grown in stature and
style and are returning by popular
demand.
On Thursday, October 25, a
new but highly talented young
soprano will make her debut in
the eastern North Carolina area.
Marvis Martin, hailed by critics as
the new Leontyne Price, has
everyone singing her praises as the
best rising star of voice.
The following performance will
be that of a pianist who was
discovered by Arthur Rubenstein
and immediately became his pro-
tege. Janina Fialkowska, appear-
ing Monday, November 19, has
developed a reputation for perfor-
mances which reflect a clarity and
James Conlon will direct the Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra.
depth in style.
The last attraction, while cer-
tainly not the least, is the Rotter-
dam Philharmonic Orchestra on
Wednesday, February 27. Under
the musical direction of James
Conlon, this full symphony or-
chestra is renowned world-wide.
Yet another attraction returning
by popular demand, this promises
to be an evening of musical glory.
Season tickets for the 1984-1885
Artists Series may be obtained
from the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center,
telephone 757-6611, ext. 266. The
ticket office is open Monday
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
There are many advantages to
season tickets, but most impor-
tant is that the Series is expected
to sell out by subscription. Only a
limited number of single tickets
may be available. Ticket prices are
$12.50 for ECU students (who
may purchase one additional
ticket at that price for a a guest),
$15 for youth (age 14 and under),
and $30 for ECU faculty, staff
and the public.
Kjiiiiiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiitiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiittiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiifittiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiafiiiiiiiitiiitiittiittiiiiiitiiiiiitiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiitititiiiiifiiiiiiitiaiiiittiiiitiimtiiiiiiitiiiit:
FALL MOVIE SCHEDULE
DATE
� Aug. 23-25
I Aug. 29
Aug. 30-Sept. 2
Sept. 5
Sept. 6-8
Sept. 7-8
j Sept. 13-15
Sept. 19
Sept. 20-22
Sept. 23
1 Sept. 26
Five Smart Suggestions For Freshmen I
Sept. 27-29
Oct. 3
Oct. 4-6
I Oct. 5-6
Oct. 17
Oct. 18-20
1 Oct. 25
Oct. 26
j Oct. 27
Oct. 31
Nov. 1-3
Nov. 7
Nov. 8-10
Nov. 14
1 Nov. 15
Nov. 16-17
! Nov. 18
i
� Nov. 29-Dec. 1
I Dec. 5
DAY
ThursSat.
Wed.
ThursSat
Wed.
ThursSat.
FriSat.
ThursSat.
Wed.
ThursSat.
Sun.
Wed.
ThursSat.
Wed.
ThursSat.
FriSat.
Wed.
ThursSat.
Thurs.
Fri.
Sat.
Wed.
ThursSat.
Wed.
ThursSat.
Wed.
Thurs.
FriSat.
sun.
ThursSat.
Wed.
� Dec. 7-8
FriSat.
MOVIE
Sudden Impact
Montenegro
The Empire Strikes Back
The General
Safety Last
The Great Dictator
Silkwood
Spinal Tap
Gorky Park
Fanny and Alexander
Terms of Endearment
The Chase
Jeremiah Johnson
Three Days of the Condor
One Eyed Jacks
The Wild Bunch
Scarface
Blow-Up
Footloose
Last Tango In Paris
Rules of the Game
Educating Rita
Rosemary's Baby
The Exorcist
The Dead Zone
Ghost Story
Halloween
Greystroke, The Legend of Tarzan
Extrenous
Splash
The Deer Hunter
Apocalypse Now
Uncommon Valor
Liquid Sky
Peter Pan
Something Wicked This Way Coi
Never Cry Wolf
The Right Staff
Das Boot
A Christmas Story
TIME
7:00, 9:30
8:00
7:00. 9:30
6:30
8:00
9:30
7:00, 9:30
12:00 midnight;
7:00, 9:30
8:00
7:00. 9:30
3:00
5:30
8:00
7:00
9:30 e
7:00
8:00
7:00. 9:00
11:00
8:00
7:00. 9:30
7:00. 9:30
7:00, 9:30
7:00, 9:00
7:00
9:00
7:00, 9:30
8:00
7:00, 9:30
8:00
im
7:00,9:
11:0
i
I
6:30
8:30
7:00
�Not:
'Spinal Tap is one of many
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THE EAST CAROLONIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
Goodbye Cruel World Tour Superb
?M$
By DAVID W1THERINGTON
Matt Writer
Since his legendary debut in
1977, Flvis Costello has kept us
guessing. This extraordinary
linger songwriter has played every
musical role imaginable, from
new wave pioneer to country
crooner, from soul music to love
ballads. In 1982 he even played a
historic concert with the Royal
Philharmonic Orchestra. Through
all these bold excursions, the
quality of Costello's live perfor-
mances has been simply incom-
parable, liach time I attend one of
his concerts. 1 never know quite
vhat to expect. But, in the end, I
am never left disappointed.
So, as J set off for a three-day
end with Elvis Costello and
;he Attractions' Goodbye Cruel
Id tour, the anticipation
rtted The first show of my
rip wa he. August 9th perfor-
man al the Hampton-Rhodes
inn in Virginia.
As the enthusiastic crowd settl-
ed, Elvis and the band launched
nt m unrelenting "Let Them
Ml Talk the brassy raveup from
Pun;H The Clock album. The
ions' infamous rhythm
i was augmented by the
saxaphone of guest Gary
t the time, I didn't
� it but this was to set the
the entire tour. Elvis
� -ady to rock again.
: the audience on their
with a searing version of
c. ' This led into
'�Girls Talk
:iAvd-pleaser. The song
and closes with the lines
re some things you can't
with lipstick and
i thought 1 heard you
!� name7 Can't you talk
' As the number fad-
vit, Flvis posed the closing line
hallenge to the audience,
Can't you talk any
til the overwhelming
li wned out his voice,
nd then segued into the
Shabby Doll from
imperial Bedroom album,
red r; many to be his
pie c.
re was a definite trend to
lection, as Elvis seemed
Iravv the high-energy rock
from each phase of his il-
istrious career. These choices
on led into an attack'on the
ack in general and MTV
- with "Worthless
one of the more bitter
m s from Goodbye Cruel
. .J: "Bored out of your tiny
lind while life is twice as large
'11 cut her down to size on
vision She's available and
, but v�ith more time to
1 hey're going to take this
able no and stick it down your
nroat This state-of-the-art
bservation went hand in hand
with a surprising cover of the
Byrds "So You Wanna Be A
Rock'n'Roll Star?" As the crowd
screamed, Elvis commented, "I'm
glad that's not the life for me
The evening continued with
stunning performances of old
favorites and future classics, from
"Watching the Detectives" to
"Everyday I Write the Book As
the show's exhilirating pace raced
on, I must admit I longed to hear
one of the man's heartfelt love
songs. Elvis proved he hasn't lost
his touch with a revamped version
of the classic "Alison He added
new lyrics to this tale of
tormented' love: "Laugh,
everyone, at the clown He's the
best one in town But somewhere
deep in his shell There's an
ember of pride One day I will be
smiling again I love you
Costello's unique phrasing almost
moved me to tears.
On August 10, I attended the
Merriweather Post Pavilion date
in Maryland. There were a few
notable differences from the night
before, namely a rare appearance
of "Waiting for the End of the
World" from My Aim Is True.
This concert also saw the live
premiere of the Van McCoy soul
cover, "Getting Mighty
Crowded In the middle of the
tune, Elvis urged the crowd to
dance stating, "This song's called
'Getting Mighty Crowded not
'A Whole Lotta Sittin' Going
On
For the First encore, Elvis
returned to the stage by himself to
perform his latest social commen-
tary, "Peace in Our Time His
emotional vocals added to the ten-
sion of the song, repeating the
line, "Meanwhile there's a light
over the ocean burning brighter
than the sun and then
substituting "desert" for
"ocean" to suggest widespread
nuclear holocaust. He also slipped
in other revisions such as "The
Heavyweight Champion fights in
the International Olympic Pro-
paganda Star Wars There's
already one spaceman in the
White House What do you want
another one for?" These lines
drew a roar from the crowd and
the feeling of unity spreaded as
Elvis sang "We can thank God
that we've finally got peace in our
time
My weekend closed with
Costello's performance at the
Spectrum in Philadelphia. This
was by far the best of the three
shows, as we were treated to all
the previous material plus a solo
rendering of "Riot Act
The most memorable moment
of the evening came as the crowd
tapped a yellow balloon over the
stadium. As Elvis watched the ac-
tivity, he referred to the balloon
as a "life-size model of Ronald
Reagan's brain then sang his
anti-war ballad, "Shipbuilding
While Elvis Costello may well
be the reluctant rock'n'roll star,
he hasn't lost his social cons-
cience. This is one of many ap-
pealing aspects of this man of a
thousand moods and one reason I
can't wait to see what "next year's
model" will be like.
M
A
Elvis Costello's 'Goodbye Cruel World' tour proved enjoyable to one reviewer.
DAY STUDENTS
DO YOU WANT TO
MAKE A DIFFERENCE?
Apply now for position of
Day Student Representative on the ECU Media Board.
Help set policies for
operation of WZMB,
THE REBEL, THE EAST CAROLINIAN,
BUCCANEER, THE EBONY HERALD &
THE PHOTO LAB.
Apply in Media Board Office 757 - 6009
Filing Dates 82384 thru 9784
Episcopal Students
First Weekly Holy Eucharist
Tuesday, Aug 28th
5:30 pm
St. Paul's Episcopal Church
4th & Holly Sts.
(One block up Holly from Garrett Dorm)
Supper & Organizational Meeting will follow
Episcopal Student Fellowship
Th� R�y. WJ. tiuttoddw, Jr. Chat.
758-1593
Oftic-St. Poul't Church
W"��
wmmmm
:��:�:��:�
Su4&to4
Fantastic
Summer Sale!
Select Group of Spring
and Summer Merchandise
50 .o75
One Rack of Belts 7 5
Group of Handbags 50
Group of Blouses 60
Welcome Back I
With Your ECU I.D. You
Are Able To Receive
20Off Any Fall Merchandise.
Expires September 8,1984
Come by and let
Syble Taylor or Cindy
Vickers help you with
your New Fall Wardrobe.
We exclusively
carry Paula Blumenfeld's
exquisite jewelry
Oft 4 coeicro hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
752-0688
Your One Stop Store
For Everything Creative
wmmmmmmm,
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X:Xv-V-V-V-X�Vv�
:�ftS
(Save
I y�u
jWeh
I of
v
I Sho
si
We
m
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w
331 Arlington Blvd.
756-5844
We Offer a Complete Line of
Camera Supplies and Equipment.
Photofinishing by Eastman Kodak
48 Hour Kodak Slide Service
24 Hour Kodacolor Service
by Colorcraft
Nikon and Canon Cameras
Lenses, and Accessories
A Complete Line of Koda
Film, Equipment and Supplies
Kodak, Agfa, and llford, Photo Papers
We Offer the Best Selection of
Art Supplies in the East
Supplies for the Student
Amateur, and Professional
Graphic Supplies by Letraset,
Zipatone, Tactype, Alvin,
Decadry, E-Z Letter, and many more.
Custom Framing
Drafting Supplies
Largest Selection of Mat Board
Artist Boards and Artist Papers In the East
Ready Made Frames and Framing Supplies
Framed and Unframed Posters and Prints
Wewi
.v.
i
ST

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
15
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One Stop Shopping For:
�:�;�;�.
'&$.
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�Xv
� � �
���:�:�
�Xv
v.v
v.v
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gave 25 of book costs when
you buy used books!
(We have the largest inventory
of used books in this area
I Shop early and save!
art suplies
bulletin board ideas
calculators
gift items
greek items
greeting cards
jerseys
leisure reading paperbacks;
official ECU class rings
rainwear
room accessories
school supplies
shorts
sundries
sweatshirts and pants
t-shirts
textbooks
I
and.� �
much more
m
We accept Visa and Master C
Bank Cards
Fall "Rush" Hours
Aug. 23, 24,27, 28 & 29
8:30am - 6:00pm
We
00pm
Three (3) drawings will
be held Monday, August 27th
and winners will be announced
in the East Carolinian ad
on September 4th.
Prizes are:
$50.00
$30.00
$15.00

sra
:x
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
Owned and Operated by
i
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i
1
East Carolina Universit
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16
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
Campus Christian Groups Offer Support
Bv BRIAN RANCELEY
Staff U run
"1 was sitting in my room all
alone. It was a little tough to do
sometimes
A lonely heart is ruthless. There
shouldn't be any reason for
lonhness in a community of
15,000 people. Too often,
however, a student new to campus
life spends the first few weekends
alone because everyone he's met
goes downtown or sits around and
gets high or drunk. And he's just
not interested.
"When 1 first came to ECU I
knew no one. 1 soon learned that
weekends often began on Thurs-
day afternoons and ended early
on Monday mornings. Three-and-
a-half days can seemingly stretch
into weeks when vou're spending
much of that time to yourself
Of course, it's easv enough to
make friends with others on your
hall, but on a crowded campus
. an get so busy looking for a
nest friend that you might look
over him. Besides, you may prefer
leisure activities that don't require
a compromise oi your standards.
If you're not part of the
downtown crowd, you can find a
friend in one of the campus
ministries.
Some 18 student-oriented
ministries, mostly protestant and
iny interdenominational, con-
gregate around ECU. You may
tve run into one organization
ad Inter-Varsity helped
,i freshmen move into the
ms It's ihen way of letting
u know they exist. Allen Lark-
ings oi Inter-Varsity stresses the
portance of getting into a group
right away: "It's really important
ei aside the time to begin with.
It's a prem sure thing, if you
n't set the time aMde.during the
first two weeks when you're fall-
. into routines, it's gonna be
hard to set time aside later
rime is of the essence if you
want to become involved with a
group quickly. A good place to
King, especially if you
a member of a denomination,
Methodist Student Center
t ifth Street. It you're
Baptist, Episcopalian,
Presbyterian, or even Catholic,
. an find information on who
act and where and when to
Reverand Dan Earnhardt says
tl regular Bible studies and wor-
p services are held at times con-
venient to students. Topics of
study include personal and
spiritual growth and the role of
cults in our society. Episcopalian
and Presbyterian services are also
held at the Center.
The Center sponsors occasional
weekend retreats to provide a
break of routine in a semester.
Hot dog lunches, dinners, and
movies also fill the calendar. In
addition, says Rev. Earnhardt,
the Methodist Student Center of-
fers housing for 16 students and
Methodist student loans.
Although the Baptist ministry
communicates through the
Methodist Student Center, it
operates out of a separate facility
on Tenth Street. The Baptist Stu-
dent Union runs a lot of programs
not too dissimilar from the
Methodists.
If protestantism isn't your
game, maybe the Catholic
Newman Center is. Ten percent of
ECU students are Catholic � an
impressive figure when you find
that only one percent of North
Carolina's population is Catholic.
Father Collins said of the
Newman Center's place on cam-
pus, "The entire thrust is, first of
all, to provide for the spiritual
welfare of students, faculty, and
staff who are Catholic, and also
to open ourselves to those who are
not Catholic but are interested in
our particular forms of worship
He went on to say that the
Newman Center meets needs on
spiritual, social, and service
levels. The Eucharist, or Mass,
shared meals, and fellowships
meet the spiritual needs; beach
and ski trips meet social needs;
and charity fund raisers and in-
dividual talents meet service
needs.
If your concerns lie in the
Jewish faith, then the ECU Hillel
may be your answer. The purpose
of this educational institution is to
broaden students' understanding
of the life, faith, culture, history,
and concerns of the Jewish peo
pie.
No matter what your faith, the
campus ministries encourage you
to become involved in a local
church or synogogue. Mark Steb-
bins of the Navigators put it this
way, "We feel that attending a
local church is a critical part oi
growth. Students are only in a
university setting for four to six
years, maybe eight. They spend
the rest of their lives out in the
community, like Winston or
Raleigh. So it's vital that they
learn how to relate in a church en-
vironment
The various ministries meet at
different times of the day and
night, many of which are schedul-
ed around the students' schedules.
The important thing is to find
people who share common
characteristics and beliefs.
Thousands of people have.
The following is a list of cam
pus ministries:
Baptist Student Union
752-4646
( ampus Crusade for Christ
758-1195
758-1593
Catholic Newman Community
752-4216
ECU Gospel Choir
752-0709
ECU Hillel
757-6045
Fellowship of Christian Athletes
757-6330
Fountain of Life Fellowship
758-0950
Inter-Varsity Christian Fellowship
757-6316
757-6043
Latter-Day
Association
756-1473
Saints Studen
Canterbury Episcopal Fellowship King Youth Fellowship
Muslim Student Association of
ECU
355-2880
Presbvterian Student Ministry
752-7240
The Navigators
756-2467
The Way Campus Outreach
752-0424
Wesley Foundation
758-2030
iv
v. Vs
WHAT DO THESE BOXES MEAN?
THEATRES
WELCOME STUDENTS!
PUTT
CAROLINA EAST CENTER
756-1449
DISCOUNT MOVIE TICKETS
You can purchase Plitt Theatre tickets at a 40
discount that are good for any movie seven days a
week. These tickets may be purchased at
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
SHOWING THIS WEEK:
The easiest way for a college
bokstore to order all of their
textbooks is to order them new
from the publisher. The UBE way
is not the easy way. Liz Veytia,
UBE textbook manager searches the
entire nation for used textbooks.
That's what is in these boxes,
used textbooks that Liz has found
in bookstores from Kentucky to
Nebraska. So these boxes mean
extra savings for your! It's all
part of the UBE difference!
The Atlanta Ballet m
"TIGHTROPE"
7:05 9:20 R
"REVENGE OF THE NERDS
7:30 9:20 R
U.B.E
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"DREAMSCAPE"
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The U.RE. difference means. . .big savings for you.
HAD A PIECE LATELY?
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We Invite you to compare
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students parents and investors Recent changes in tax laws makes owning
rather than renting not only possible but more advantageous We'd like to
show you how CANNON COURT is the best, providing you with your own
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PHASE COMPARE Why. pay more for less square feet?
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919-758-6050
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Get down to business faster.
With the BA-35.
It there's nc thing business
students have always needed,
this is it: an affordable, busi-
ness-oriented calculator.
The Texas instruments
RA-5, the Student Business
Analyst.
Its built-in business
formulas let you perform
complicated finance,
accounting and statistical
functions - the one that
usually require a lot of time
and a stack of reference books,
like present and future value
calculations, amortizations
and balloon payments.
The BA-35 means you
spend less time calculating,
and more time learning. One
keystroke takes the place
of many.
The calculator is just part
o the package. You also get
a book that follows most
business courses: the Business
AruiKst Guidebook. Business
professors helped us write it,
to help you get the most out
of calculator and classroom.
A powerful combination
Think business With
the BA-S Student
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Texas
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Creating useful pnducts
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f Nk' Tcx.i lnirumfi,t.





rt
)a Saints Student
ition
dent Association of
Student Ministry
V
us Outreach
I
mndation
Theatre Arts Series Announced
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
17
Atlanta Ballet To Highlight Season
t The nation's oldest ballet com-
pany, the Atlanta Ballet, is one of
five attractions slated for the
1984-1985 Theatre Arts Series.
Other presentations, sponsored by
the ECU Unions Theatre Arts
Committee, include the North
Carolina Shakespeare Festival
with "The Merry Wives of Wind-
sor The Negro Ensemble with
"A Soldier's Play John Max-
well in "Oh, Mr. Faulkner, Do
You Write? and the Ballet Gran
Folklorico de Mexico. "A
Soldier's Play" will be presented
in Wright Auditorium at 8:15
p.m. All other performances are
scheduled for 8:15 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre. It is a great
opportunity to join your family
and friends for a 400th Anniver-
sary celebration, a romantic
delicacy, a Pulitzer-prize winner,
a literary portrait, and a Mexican
fiesta.
The season opens September 20
with the North Carolina
Shakespeare Festival, a group
which has earned the reputation
of being one of the state's
premiere theatre companies. They
will perform William
Shakespeare's delightful comedy,
'The Merry Wives of Windsor
with the endorsement of North
Carolina's 400th Anniversary
Committee.
The Atlanta Ballet will perform
October 8. This fine ensemble,
steeped in the traditions of
classical and romantic ballet, has
been hailed by The New York
Times as "one of the chief
pleasures of the season
On October 26, the winner of
the 1982 Pulitzer Prize for Drama
and the 1982 New York Drama
Critic's Circle Award, 4A
Soldier's Play will be presented
in Wright Auditorium. Performed
by the award-winning Negro
Ensemble, this is a penetrating
play about the investigation into
the murder of a black Army man.
John Maxwell, appearing
January 17, has been acclaimed as
a superb one-man tour-de-force
for his portrayal of William
Faulkner. In "Oh, Mr. Faulkner,
Do You Write? Maxwell begins
contemplating his unwanted fame
with his early days as a postal
worker, and culminates with his
acceptance speech for the Nobel
Prize for Literature.
Finally, on March 26, the Ballet
Gran Folklorico de Mexico will
present an evening of Mexican
dance. Each piece is an example
of the diversification and in-
terweaving of old and new tradi-
tions of the various regions of
Mexico.
Last year, season tickets yielded
four shows for the price of three.
This year, season tickets will yield
five shows for the price of three.
Season tickets for the 1984-1985
Theatre Arts Scries may be ob-
tained from the Central Ticket
Office, Mendenhall Student
Center, telephone 757-6611, ext.
255. The ticket office is open
Monday through Friday, 10 a.m.
to 4 p.m.
Season tickets, more than ever,
offer substantial savings over pur-
chasing individual tickets. Ticket
prices are $15 for ECU students
(who may purchase one additional
ticket at that price for a guest),
$21 for youth (age 14 and under),
and $30 for ECU faculty and staff
and the public. Season brochures
may be obtained by contacting the
Central Ticket Office above. Plan
now to join your family and
friends for these five excellent per-
formances.
The Atlanta Ballet will perform at ECU on October 8.
H
HAPPY HOUR DAILY
4:00 P.M. to 7:00 P.M.
Live Entertainment
Fri and Sat
Aug 24th & 25th
Featuring:
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ECU STUDENTS ONLY
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irpn
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Vi
t





H THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 23, 1984
Member of Brice Street are Jack tehison. Mike Rowe. Doug Dennis, and Steve Coble,
Belvoir
Factory Outlet
Term � Toga
looufS logs
Factorv Outlet
� r;i. sland Sth.jol House
I � 13 H�un fd .fri 930.5
it � 30-3 00
U -Msm Wholesale
Shop Our Outlet Stor� Nearest You lot Back-To-Scriool Specials
Giris Jea
$9.99
Boys
niouflage Pants
j
9.99
Hooded Name
Brand T-Shirts
13
Assorted I OOS AH SummeT Merchandise
12 oh
2
! d i
Off Keq Price
M.un More Items Arriving For Girls Boys 1 adii s X.ul Men ; 01 I .11 :
Discounl Prices
Infant Sleepers
lilies JL
Gift Sets
S2.99 To $4.99
'
BB&T Offers ECU Convenience PLUS.
BB&T
EE 1.4 HOUR BANKING
using our BB&T 24 �
PlUS
System
e vou- 2 cur cord when you open yocr checkmq c savings account
Your Bank At ECU Mendenhall
Member FDlC
EE PIRATE CHECKS
ir RST PIRATE CHECKS ARE PRFF with your new BB&T check.ng account.
R GREENVILLE LOCATIONS
Arlington B l& Greene Streets.Stantonsburg Re
752 6889
1
WHY IS JEFF FERRELL SMILING?
ft
PHYSIC
mm
t 1
f
1A �
If you look closely at the
shelf behind
Jeff, you'll see that all
of the textbooks
have used stickers on
them. That means
that ail these books will
save you 25
over the price of new
ones. So that's why
Jeff Ferrell is smiling
He's getting ready
to save money by buying
used books for
the UBE.
hi- I BK difference
means big saving to you!
U.B.Ei
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Brice Street Returns
By TINA MAROSCHAK
? r�iurr� hdlloi
Brice Street said it best when
they commented "We've opened
and closed the school year
manytimes Why break such a
winning tradition? The four-
member band from Greensboro,
N.C. made their mark on ECU
students once again Monday night
when they performed for a
psyched-up crowd on the patio at
Mendenhall Student Center.
What makes them keep coming
back? "The people � they're just
great said drummer Jack Af-
chison. During their fifth per-
formance at ECU, Brice Street
captivated the audience with such
popular big-band hits as "Every
Little Thing She Does Is Magic
"Talking In Your Sleep "I
Want A New Drug and catchy
original tunes like "When Push
Comes to Shove "Mind Over
Matter and "Brand New love
Affair
In an interview with Atchison,
he explained that Brice Street got
its name from a street in
Greensboro. "We used to
rehearse at a guy's house on that
street Although the band has
been together for many years, the
four-member combination they
have now has only played together
for about one year. Members
Doug Dennis, bass, Steve Coble,
guitar, and Jack Atchison, drums
have been playing together for ten
years. Last year they were joined
by keyboard player Mike Rowe.
What makes Brice Street so uni-
que? Two things � First, their
energy and enthusiasm. Judging
by their facial expressions and
body movements, Brice Street
could have a good time playing
anywhere. Their hopping spirits
can't help but rub off on you, as
was evident during the entire se-
cond set when the audience
gathered at the front of the stage
for dancing and singing.
Second, the copy material they
play is different from that
other bands; they play a lor �
Police and Rolling Stones hits
"When we chose copy music, we
don't do tunes that many otl
bands do Atchison said. "We
select material that we enjoy and
others enjoy. It's not like hear
another band
So far, Brice Street has rele
two albums � Rise Ip In The
y-ight and imagination The
now doing demo tapes in hope-
receiving another record dea:
tor the immediate future, the
be heading to New London
Charlotte N.C. and Danville.
It you missed them this
around, don't worry, they'i
to be bak
CALL
P.T.A.
757-1955
FOR LUNCH
OPEN llarr
rv Cooking
512 E. 14th Street
Greenville, North Carolina
down from men dorm on Nth
Daily Specials For Only includes 1 meat, 2 vegetables and
$2.25 plus tax 1 bread
We Serve Home Cooked Vegetables and Bread.
10 Free Meals V ith Semester Meal Plan
$250.00 Gets You 110 Plates
Monthh Meal Plan 22 Plates S50.IH)
ASK ABOUT OUR CATERING SERVICE
?????????????????? ?????????????????�??????�
ECU SPECIAL PRICES
YOU DON'T AT
FACTORY MATTRESS �r WATERBED OUTLET
fffly fear A
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OVER 12 OFF
POSTURE
PEDICS
LOWEST PRICES IN EASTERN N.C.
ON SLEEP PRODUCTS
POSTUREPEDIC ROYALE
T -mN � J A� " tSAlE
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FIRM
252 CO1-5 YR WARRANTY
TWIN�59"
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SLEEPWELL
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TWIN 2V. '69
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PRICES
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MONTERY
349
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489
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499"
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789.95
FACTORY MATTRESS & WATERBED OUTLET
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Payments 355-2626 10t�6
Delivery
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4 CENTRA! BOd
4l Greenville Sq. Sj
'





rns
terent from that of
s; the) play a lot of
Rolling Stones hits.
5� copy music, we
a hat many other
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tture, they will
New l ondon, N.C
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t
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
19
'Red Dawn' Brilliantly Portrays
Action And Drama Of WW III.
By GREG RIDKOUT
The war movies of the '40s and
�50s were patriotic productions
equipped complete with hero and
girl-back-home. Thev were John
K ayne and Glenn Ford saving us
from Japs and Gerrys. Today's
wai movies are more intense
more guttural and more mean-
ing tul. One such movie is Red
Dawn, an imaginative fighting
Hick that blends friendship and
growing up within the confines of
World War III.
The setting is Calumet, Col-
orado, a quintessential small town
where the high school quarterback
is forever a hero and the mayor's
son is student body president. The
action starts surprisingly but
refreshing fast. Five minutes in-
to Red Dawn, during a history lec-
ture at the local high school,
transport planes begin to drop
paratroopers and heavv artillery
from the clear, blue Rocky Moun-
tain skies. It's the beginning of
W 111; the Russians are in-
vading the I nited States, with the
help ol Nicaraguans and Cubans.
During the assault, we meet the
eight students who are soon to be
guerrilla uarnorsas they scramble
to safety.
The eight young actors who
escape the raid at their school and
form the guerrilla group turn in
good performances for the most
part, with C. Thomas Howell
leading the way with an expep-
tional performance as Robert, a
shy boy whose anger over the in-
vaders for killing his parents turns
him into a revenge-seeking killer.
Howell turns an apple-pie boy in-
to a gun-notching guerrilla by
superb acting and uncanny facial
expressions that turn a
bewildered, lost-in-the-woods
presence into a hard killer look
complete with glassy eyes.
Howell's performance helps out
the others, but the real star carry-
ing the film is the story itself and
the direction and production of it.
John .Milius, the director, was
able to bring together relatively
inexperienced actors and shape
them into a cohesive acting unit.
Even though the firefights and
commando raids dominate the
movie and are in fact its best
parts, Milius does not let us forget
the eight teenagers who live and
grow up together as a crack guer-
rilla unit in the mountains of Col-
orado.
The excellent sets are the work
of Jackson De Govia. Under
Mi'ius' guidance and with the help
of Kevin Reynolds pen, De Govia
designed perfect props and
scenery to underscore the taking
over of middle America by Rus-
sian troops. A Russian tank and
f
! Hawian Fountain
I
Restaurants
Chinese Food
Excellent Atmosphere -
Completely Remodeled
Welcome Back Students
Everyday Luncheon Special Only $2.85
Take Out $2.85
$ Dinner Buffet Friday & Saturday 5pm-9:30pm
Only $7.95 per person
� AH You Can Eat!
2 355 - 2169
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.ft CENTRAL BOOK AND NEWS
4i Greenville Sq. Shopping Center


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soldiers in front of a McDonald's
restaurant says it all.
Other fine points include
Powers Boothe's portrayal of a
downed Air Force pilot who
becomes a reluctant member of
the guerrilla gang and Judd Omen
as the Nicaraguan Captain who
spent his life as a rebel and iden-
tifies with the high school com-
mandos.
It's almost awesome. Go and
see it at the Plitt Theatre at
Carolina East Centre next to
Carolina East Mall. Definitely
three out of four stars.
e I
Russia. officers occupy Calumet, Colorado in the new drama-filled movie 'Red Dawn.
Grand Opening
of
ohirtPrinter
2725 E. 10th St. (down from King Sandwich)
SPECIALIZING IN ALL OF YOUR
SILKSCREEN PRINTING NEEDS. SEE
OR CALL US IF YOU NEED T-SHIRTS
FOR A CLUB, ORGANIZATION,
DORM, FRATERNITY AND SORORI-
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WE ALSO HAVE A SELECTION OF
ECU T-SHIRT DESIGNS-ALL AT LOW
PRICES!
LISTEN TO WOOW RADIO & WIN A
FREE T-SHIRT FROM THE SHIRT
PRINTER!
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CONTACTS
$7900
Price includes
lenses & care kit
tut uur
SENIOR CITIZEN
DISCOUNTS
LARGE SELECTION OF
FRAMES
NOW
REDUCED
12
PRICE
COUPON
$1 coo
A D OFF ANY
COMPLETE PAIR OF
EYE GLASSES
Must present coupon with order for discount. Not
good with other advertised specials.
COUPON
We Can Arr.i
An Eve E�ai
Foe Yon On
The Same Day
OPTICAL
Phone
756-4204
PALACE
703 Greenville BUd Arrs r mm Pm PUa "Wxt I i RA H�alK
Gar M H�rns 1 i ensed Optician Opvn 9 lOi m lu p m Mon Fr
ii
We want to be your night spot
every nite
'&
WELCOMES
THE CLASS OF 1988
TO ECU
Doors Open: DST 9:00-2:00 a.m. Est. 8:30-1:00 a.m.
MONDAY �
TUESDAY �
?WEDNESDAY �
THURSDAY �
FRIDAY �
SATURDAY �
SUNDAY �
(4
CLOSED � Open for private dorm socials and special Mondays, i.e.
first week of each semester.
CRAZY TUESDAY � Different events each week from Bikini Contest to
Air Band Contest to Draft Nite. Each Tuesday is always different
& always fun.
HUMP NITE � Free admission to ECU students ($1.00 18 yr. adm.).
All cans 55$ till 11:00 p.m 80$ till closing.
COLLEGE NITE � $1.00 admission for ECU students ($2.00
18 yr. adm.). All cans 55$ till 11:00 p.m 80$ till closing.
End of the Week Party � Friday Afternoon-3:30 till 7:30 - Free
admission ($1.00 18 yr. adm.). All cans 55$ till 5:15 p.m 80C cans
till 7:30. FRIDAY NITE � $1.00 admission ($2.00 18 yr. adm.). All
cans 80$ till 11:00 p.m.
Best in Dance Music � $1.00 admission ECU students
($2.00 18 yr. adm.).
LADIES NITE � For 15 years our favorite way to wrap up the weekend.
Free admission for ladies ($1.00 18 yr. adm.), & Nickel Draft while it
lasts.
BRING YOUR FRIENDS & COME EARLY
�You must be 18 to enter the club.
N.C. State law prohibits persons under 19 to purchase alcoholic beverages.
Persons under 19 required to wear a wristband while on the premises.
Alternative Beverages are provided.
?Excludes 1st Wednesday of each semester.
f
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- �s 9 ?� �-





f
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The Saving Place
SM
STORE HOURS
9:30-9:00
Mon-Sat
Prices Effective Thursday-Monday
WELCOME BACK
ECU STUDENTS!
nJoo outdoor
V
6.97
our reg.
9.97
Wood Clothes Line
H I 1 I
7.44 �
our reg.
Student Lamp
15 Watt Fluorescent Lamp
I Model 20-21 11.44
6.97
our reg. 8.97
Door Mirror
Great for dorm or
apartment use
97
20 in. 3 Speed Box Fan
Stav cool & save monev too
��J
16.97
W.v'our reg 19.97
Oscillating Fan
9 in. 2 Speed Oscillating Fan
12 in. 3 Speed 22.97 our reg. 27.97
r
2.77 our reg 3.78
Woolite
foi coM �a!cr wash
5.99
our reg 7.77
Wisk
1 gallon jug
10.96 our reg. 14.96
1 f
i
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64.00
Stuaeni Desk Lamp
Fluorescent light model 20-23
& model 20-24
14.96 our reg. 19.
12 in. B&W TV
KMC B&W TV
Solid State, Fine Tuning
condition II rA,
CLAIROl
After-Shampoo B
Treatment
Enriched
with Collagen-
One ot
Nature's
Richest Proteins. l
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final net
PUMP
A Littte Final Net
Goes a Long Long Way
i
8 Ounce
1.47
1.87 our reg. 2.17
our reg. 1.96
Available in regular, unscer.ted, ultra hold,
ultra hold nonaerosol
.99 our reg. 1.27-1.37
Sani-Flush & Vanish
�W oi container o(
toilet bowl deaiKT, cleans.
dumfevtN A deodorizes
'V'OHCIO
L.
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31.00
14 oz.
leanser, bleaches out the toughest stains
1 imit 4
4.97
oui reg 6.77
16 oz. Arm &. Hammer Baking Soda
-r.
Bicycle 1 o�.k
Secuntv cnainlock. be sate!
1.97
12.97
our reg 16.97

Bf-drest Pillows
watel
44.97 our reg. 48.87
Modd no 32n Toastmaster Oven
Bake, broil or mow heat, toast oven, ven irav and
31.88 our reg 49 58
Corelle Expressions
20 p. Dinners are Set
Assorted patterns o
Forget Me Not, WUdflower, India.
Glad Kitchen Bags
30 ct. large white bags
2 1.00 our reg .97
Super Clue
Does the job in seconds, super holding power
n
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Refrigerator
177.00 our reg 197.00
5.1 cj ft dorm 01 apt nze
ffi
t-Qj Size
Foam
Cups
.99 our reg 131
Foam Cups
l. TK- ,
yS6
1.49 Dr. Pepper
6 pk. of cool, refreshing Dr. Peppei
Buy some today
10.9"
our 14.48
Ironing Board
Sturdy 4-legged. tuiiy adjustable stcei top,
Har esi Gold nor
F'ackae ol 36 d cups
12.77 our reg. 17.88
Hand Truck
4 Wheel Hand truck & Dolly
w trash bag holder
1.48 our reg 1-77
m
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n.
Freezer Containers
Sizes available in �: pt
1 pt 1 qt Yi gal. &. 1 gal.
Casio HR7 Calculator

24.97 V "
our reg. 34.97 �A
� Printing Hand Calculator
Handheld with I C
digit with memorv fu
Sale
Price
�SI�J
2.97
?��
Durable Corn Broom
Long-lasting broom with
painted wooden handle.
Size May Vary
10.97 our reg 17.88
Clothers Hamper
Wicker clothes hamper. bu no and save
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Shop our large selection or wicker items
m
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ffiffiL
199.00 our reg 219.00
Commodore 64K u Computer
New, advanced home com-
puter system by Commcdoit
with powerful 64K memory
1.97 our reg. 13.97
24" Portable Grill For
Your Backyard Cookouts
IT does the job1 Spiral
grid with stick-shift ad-
juster and tripod-type
legs for sturdy support
7.97 our reg. 9.97
Banana Lounger
36-position lounge chair
Win $100 worth of merchandise at
K-Mart; Greenville Store ONLY
NAME
ADDRESS
TELEPHONE
ECU ID
Offer good at K-Mart, Greenville
Store Only. ECU Students only
One drawing per student
Fill in registration form & bring to
K-Mart Aug.23-25
Drawing for winner Aug.27
This is your official registration form
8.97
10 in. Show Plants
Beautiful plants to decorate
your home or office
3.99
Hanging Basket
Beautify your surround
with a lovely hangmg baske;s I
omp
The Department of Uimersl
Unions and the ECU School
Music have announced the y.
undertaking of a new chaml
ieries for the 1984-1985 seas
Appearing at this seasoi
Chamber Festival are the DorJ
Wind Quintet, the Anna;
Brass Quintet, The Los Ange
Piano Quartet, The West
Wind, and The Composers StrJ
Quartet. All performances
iCheduled for 8 p.rn in Hend
Theatre. This series is made po
ble in part by a grant from the
our Types
B� PATFEITOS
Mart Vfcrtiw
Four types of employn
generally available to studen'i
ECU: 1). part-time empi
through the federally fund
Irge Work-Study(CWS) Pr .
2). full-time
employment(40 Hr Worl
3). part-time employment on i
pus through the Univei
4). part-time off-campus em
ment.
1). Students who show -
ffef financial need may q
nhe Work-S;udy Prog-
qualifying, the student
placement survey to ind
preference, by which the 1 :
Aid Office makes eve efi
assign the student to an area
'erest.
After being hired, the i
makes out a schedule with hi
respective departmer
I count, seven percent
I student population -
with Work-Study, and


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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23,1984
21
1EBACK
DENTS!
X
(
r'
omposers Scheduled For Chamber Festival
The Department of University
Jnions and the ECU School of
riusic have announced the joint
Indertaking of a new chamber
rncs for the 1984-1985 season
spearing at this season's
rhamber Festival are the Dorian
Vind Quintet, the Annapolis
irass Quintet, The Los Angeles
sano Quartet, The Western
find, and The Composers String
)uartet. All performances are
Lheduled for 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre. This series is made possi-
e m part by a grant from the Na-
tional Endowment for the Arts in
Washington, D.C a federal
agency.
The Dorian Wind Quintet, per-
forming October 10, is interna-
tionally renowned for their per-
formances of commissioned
scores, numerous recordings,
residency activities, and sold-out
concert tours. This program is
supported in part by a grant from
the National Endowment for the
Arts through the Southern Arts
Federation.
On November 5, the Annapolis
Brass Quintet will showcase music
for brasses spanning 400 years.
They are celebrating 12 years of
excellence as America's only full-
time performing brass ensemble.
About the Los Angeles Piano
Quartet, scheduled for January
28, the Los Angeles Times said,
"The group enlists highly ac-
complished players who have
forged an ensemble based on like-
mindedness, on equality of
technical skills, on disciplined
reaction to interpretive stylethe
playing was on a grand scale
Performing February 11 is a
vocal sextet, The Western Wind.
This unique musical phenomenon
has rekindled a love for the art
and literature of acapella singing,
and has enchanted audiences
throughout the world.
The final program of the
Festival, on April 10, is The Com-
posers String Quartet. Of this
highly acclaimed ensemble The
New York Times has written, "Its
players combined precision,
musical understanding, and ex-
pressive warmth in their winning
interpretations
Master classes will be given by
each group the morning following
their concert from 10 to 12 noon
in the ECU School of Music A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall. Classes are
open to the public with no admis-
sion charge.
Season tickets for the 1984-1985
Chamber Festival may be obtain-
ed at the Central Ticket Office,
Mendenhall Student Center,
telephone 757-6611, ext. 266. The
ticket office is open Monday
through Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
IFour Types Of Student Employment To Be Offered
By PAT FELTON
Staff Wrtlv
Four types of employment are
generally available to students at
ECl 1). part-time employment
igh the federally funded Col-
egc Work-Study(CWS) Program,
full-time summer
ment(40 Hr. Work-Study),
) part-time employment on cam-
v through the University, and
art time off-campus employ-
Sl dents who show evidence
rvial need may qualify for
he v ork-Study Frogram. After
ying, the student fills out a
placement survey to indicate job
-ererence, by which the Financial
Office makes every effort to
. he student to an area of in-
ere-
V e: being hired, the student
make out a schedule with hisher
respective department. At last
even percent of ECU's
ident population were involved
��: Work-Study, and CWC
makes up 18 percent of all Finan-
cial Aid.
The majority of Work-Study
jobs are in the departmental of-
fices, with a great number of jobs
also available in the library and
intramural areas. According to
the Director of Financial Aid, Mr.
Robert Boudreaux, "both the
students and the academic depart-
ments are happy with Work-
Study
Ms. Pam Spell, Assistant Direc-
tor of Financial Aid and employ-
ment head said, "First off, it gives
the students valuable work ex-
perience. Second, it's a good
lesson in time managementand
third, the University gains
valuable services from Work-
Study
2). A second type of employ-
ment, the 40 Hr. Work-Study
Program, has the same eligibility
criteria as specified for the basic
CWS. This program permits
students to work 40 hours a week
during the summer to earn money
for the upcoming school year's
educational expenses. As with
basic CWS, participation in this
program is restricted to those
students who demonstrate suffi-
cient financial need.
3). The third type of employ-
ment is University Part-Time
Employment, more commonly
known as Self Help. With institu-
tional funds, the University
employs a limited number of
students to work on a part-time
basis in various parts of the cam-
pus. Generally, students are
selected by employment qualifica-
tions without a consideration for
financial need.
4). Finally, there is Off-Campus
Part-Time Employment. Under
this program, students andor
their spouses are assisted in
locating part-time work in the
vicinity of Greenville. Inquiries
about any of the types of student
employment or other financial
assistance can be directed to the
Financial Aid Office.
Ticket prices are $7.50 for ECU
students and guests, $10 for ECU
facultystaff and guests, and $15
for the public. Those who pur-
chase season tickets for the Series
get a discount on the Chamber
Festival tickets � tickets will be
only $4 for ECU students and
guests, $7.50 for ECU
facultystaff and guests, and $10
for the public. At this price,
tickets will sell quickly. Order
yours today! Season brochures
may be obtained by contacting the
Central Ticket Office.
Assistant Features
Editor Needed
Apply at The East Carolinian office on the second floor
of the Publications building across from the entrance of
Joyner Library.




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WASH .50 :
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STOP BY AND SEE HOW
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626 W Greenville Blvd. 756 � 5434
WELCOME ECU STUDENTS
Immanuel Baptist Church
Chruch Phone: 758-1240
1101 S. Elm St.
SUNDAY SCHEDULE
9:30-9:45 Snock Brkfast
945 Bible Study
11:00 Worship
SUNDAY MORN VAN SCHEDULE
9 30 Front of Gorrett
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9 35 ParV.ng lot of White
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9 40 Arrive at Immanuel
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Your Two Best Choices For Printing
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The
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� Resumes
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Located Downtown in
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758-2400
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If
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22
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
A Bar For Every Night Of The Week
By PAT FELTON
Staff Writer
From the rock sounds of
Sidewinder to the new wave spunk
of O'Boy, the Attic offers ECU
students a wide assortment of
bands to enjoy. And don't worry
if you're 18 � you won't be left
out of the fun. As of August 17,
the Attic began a policy to allow
ECU and Pitt Community College
freshmen the privilege of admit-
tance. Admission will be $1 for
ECU students in general and
$1.50 for freshmen. Tom Hanes,
manager of the Attic, said the
policy will be in effect until it's
abused.
Hopefully, that won't happen.
The Elbo Room, which offers
dancing to a mix of funk and pop
music, has had a similar policy
since last year. According to Elbo
manager Kirby Bryson, "When
we started allowing people under
19 in last year, we thought we'd
have a lot more trouble. But I ap-
proximate it's less than one per-
cent that try to bend the rules
By the way, the Elbo and the At-
tic, which are situated downtown
less than a block from each other,
will work together by using one
wristband for both clubs, with
different stamps, for the conve-
nience of the student. The Elbo
admits any college student under
19 with a student ID.
If you're in a heavy metal
mood, try the downtown head-
bang spot Rafters. It's a great
place to hang out, put down a
few, and listen to good hard rock.
And if you feel fidgety, you can
play some foosball or shoot a
game of pool.
If you're looking for a serious
night of dancing, check out the
Wiz on 264 E. Bypass. Manager
Charlie Mills, who runs the club
with his four brothers, says the
Wiz is "a total entertainment
complex They regularly stage
live bands such as Ray, Good-
man, and Brown, and have pro-
spects such as R.Js Latest Ar-
rival for the future. The club has a
spacious dance floor for disco
Thursday-Sunday, with three
house jocks and an occasional
road jock spinning the tunes. In
addition, WQDW and WSEC do
live remotes from the Wiz every
weekend.
Another disco in Greenville is
Unlimited Touch on W. 5th St.
For a cross of college and older
age groups, some of Greenville's
bars cater to both 19 and 21 year
olds, by serving both beer and li-
qour. Pantana Bobs a
downtown private club for
members and invited guests, of-
fers a rustic atmosphere set to
medium rock music. To become a
member, one must be attending
college or have a college degree,
and express an interest in sports.
On 10th St. ext. you can find
Papa Katz, a dance club for
members and guests, that is tagg-
ed as the place to go when you
want to dress up a little bit. The
music is mostly Top 40 mixed with
some funk. They have plenty of
room, with three bars offering
beer, wine, or mixed drinks.
Although Papa Katz has various
specials throughout the week,
"Ladie's Night" on Wednesdays
is perhaps the most popular event.
If country rock is your thing,
the Carolina Opry House offers
plenty of it with live bands, as well
as Top 40 and special 50's and
60's music nights. The club is
located on the 264 bypass, has lots
of space, and serves both 19 and
21 year old age groups.
Some of the more laid-back
bars you might want to try in
Greenville include the
Rathskeller, Grog's, Corrigan's,
New Deli, and The Treehouse, all
located downtown. These are
good places to go with friends
during happy hours or on band
nights (depending on the club).
For a night of beach and Top 40,
they tell me King and Queen
North on Greene St 200 West on
10th St and Beaus at Carolina
East Center are the places to go.
1984-1985 Playhouse Season
DATE
Sept. 5-6
Sept. 26-27
Oct. 24-27, 29
Oct. 25-27
Oct. 31, Nov. 1
Nov. 12-15
EVENT
Auditions for 'Anything Goes'
Auditions for 'Ozma of Oz'
'Anything Goes' run
Auditions for 'Stage Door'
Auditions for 'Dance Theatre'
'Ozma of Oz' run
(Matinee � 9:15 all except 13th � 7:15 p.m.)
Nov. 27-30,Dec. 1'Stage Door' run
Nov. 29-30Auditions for 'The Diviners'
Feb. 6-9'The Diviners' run
Feb. 20-23'Dance Theatre' run
Feb. 26-27Auditions for 'Hamlet'
April 16-20Hamlet' run
'Purple
By DAVID WITHERING
Staff Writer
I'm sure many of you real
review of Prince's Purple
soundtrack album a month
panning the record for beinj
similar to his previous v�orf
quote myself, I stated
whereas these songs were
extended for the soundtrack!
would tell if they worked o
film.
Since that time, the PurpU
movie opened nationwide
viewing the film several tirj
feel a need to wrestle wi
previous review The
justifies and complemen j
music, providing a clear me
for many of Prince's at
lyrics. More than that,
why we got another typi
album. Purple Ram.
the Beatles A Hard Day
film, is a vehicle to sh
of the music scene's hot:e
pcrties.
Prince
is an extre
O'Boy, Theatrix Kick Off School Year At The Attic
By TINA MAROSCHAK
and PAT FELTON
Theatrix and O'Boy kicked off
ECU's registration week with per-
formances Monday night at the
Attic. Theatrix, the opening band,
started off their set with a cover of
"The Boys Are Back in Town
and went on to do a pretty good
job with songs by groups such as
Van Halen, Rush, and Journey.
They also performed their original
tune "Never More which had a
good hard rock beat.
In an earlier interview with
band leader John Custer, he said
that the band, originally from
Cary, N.C, has only been playing
since May. "In 1981 there were
originally four different
members Custer said. After
Custer joined the group, he took
over its leadership and got new
members. "Since then we've gone
through eight changes
Members of the band are Kevin
Richmond on bass, John Custer
on guitar, Bob Sanne on syn-
thesizers, and Burton Cummings
on drums. Thus far they have
released a 45 with the songs
"Deceived Children and
"Never More and they are
presently cutting a demo.
At about 11:30 p.m O'Boy
made their second Greenville ap-
pearance and continued the
musical show with the tunes "I
Don't Speak the Language and
"Goo Goo Ga Ga Appropriate,
huh?
As usual, their sound was clean,
fun, and bouncy. O'Boy members
Julie Jumper, Fiona and Zoe use
three synthesizers and their voices
to produce harmony and funky
rhythms. Playing a straight
90-minute set, they performed
such favorites as "Dance to the
End of the Universe" and "Beat
the Rap Crowd reaction was
good all night as they danced or
swayed to the likes of "Beauty
Shop Robot" and "Vacuum
Chamber
O'Boy, appearing again at the
Attic on Sept. 13, is presently
working on a record deal. "There
is a lot of serious major label in-
terest now Jumper said. 'This
is an important time � we're
checking out record companies
and they're checking out us
Perhaps one thing that may ap-
pear to make O'Boy so unique,
besides the fact that they rely
totally on synthesizers, is the way
they dress. Julie said that their
clothes are part of their personali-
ty, not a gimmick. "They're not
important to the act � we've
always dressed in unique styles
Julie said.
Trendy or not, I'm sure we'll be
hearing a lot more about this uni-
que three-woman band in the
future. Greenville is in the middle
of O'Boy's "Penetrate Inertia"
tour across N.C. From here they
go on to Raleigh, Chapel Hill, and
Charlotte, among other landing
sites.
HAPPY HOUR AT
BLUE MOON
CAFE
$1.50 pitchers
Reg. price $1.95
Subs.99 onytime
Va Fresh Burger.99 anytime
MEAL PLAN $40 00
15 meals a week
All You Can Eat
Open 7om-2am
� Appte cofids
Open: 10am 9pm Mon - Sat
Apple Records Offers The
Many New Albums And Cassettes On Sale Every Week
Check Our Prices And You'll See
Lowest Prices In Greenville!
We Mean Business!
THIS WEEKS SPECIAL SALE VALUES INCLUDE:
Bruce Springsteen's "Born In The USA "
The Jackson's "Victory
Quiet Riot's "Condition Critical"
Rush s "Grace L nder Pressure
Elvis CosteUo 's "Goodbye Cruel World
Billy Squier 's ' 'Signs of Life
Romeo Void's "Instincts"
Twisted Sister's ' 'Stay Hungry
Steve Perry's "Street Talk"
"Bachelor Party" Soundtrack (R.E.M Fleshtones, The Album j
These Albums & Cassettes (and many more)
Are Sale Priced at $5 99 Each!
We have a complete line of record & tape care accessories, posters,
banners, blank tapes, replacement, needles & stylil and
many other items.
WE BUY AND SELL USED ALBUMS.
Apple Record's Setni-Annua) Poster Auction-Moo, September 3rd at 5pm
Classih
SAI r
� voku i-ashSIS
410 Evans St. Mall
758-2211
No. 1 In Quality Fashions
For Men
10 �o Discount With Coupon
aojBQ�OOBOOC8OO8OOOOCWOMOOOOtt0OOOOOOQOOOOOOOOOO�OO�rrrrrrcrcc - - n L ,u

0 c
ST
"
jS
cf
jy
y
IMPORTED
CAR PARTS
105 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, NC
WE CARRY A COMPLETE LINE OF OEM PARTS & ACCESS.
756-7114

"c
U
� uo,
$
"�L�
St
UNIVERSAL KOKO MATS
KONI & BILSTEIN SHOCKS
SUNROOF WIND DEFLECTORS
SHEEPSKIN SEAT COVERS
Quality Parts at a Reasonable Pr
ice
IWASH
HOUS
LARGEST LAUNDRAMAT IN
GREENVILLE
Fluff & Fold
� Video Games
Fully Attended �Draft Beer
Air Condition
� Lounge
"Welcome Back ECU"
$, , SPECIAL
j& M the body shoppe
&& "j Q95
W 1 MONTH I Z

1 MONTH
3 MONTHS
(Reg. $24)
49
95
(Reg. $60)
(Additional 10 DISCOUNT with
3 OR MORE JOINING TOGETHER
CALL OR COME BY TODAY
FOR A FREE WORKOUT
It
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Ham - 2am
1530 E. UthSt.
Greenville
7587564
� Bring in this ad for an extra week
with your membership.
Color Cable TV �Snacks
COUPON
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WHEN WASHING AT
SWASH
HOUSE
"More Than A Laundromat"
11 E.lOrhSt.
514 E. 14th St.
W� MINUTES TO CAMPUS I
nom�, 2 AC Ml ?� '��"�
down payments 5s -�- S
?S� 5414 AW 'or Rooe'
� CO FRAMES 'TrSJOM"
Lifc now UC a e v I �
STRING ART S I 6 - -
$25 753 0�1
STEREO CONSOLE -
GOOd cood ' or J f
DEACONS BENCH joc
753-OBH
PLAN ON COOING IN vOUR
Ml 1 CO (I 'r�' J�'J'or ��
OOuDI not pi�t�-S2 Cm
7SHES0
WAHIRDRYE� . aooc
S17S. 753 no RWgr '
1�7S SUEARU 4 OR S ���: 3�o-
7Sa-im. �Nr ipir
FOR SALE: 'T7 Dat�v' EM -a
5 tpooa Rum' C� s R$3 a�
OOoywor E�t or�
TYPEWRITER FOR SAlEE -
7S7-4BB PAY- 753 51 Qttwr
BEAUTIFUL KITTENS I ��l
wMN 1 Brow and Bi�c� It c
homt c�n nk-rm x 's�w
MISC
E.J. THOMAS IN CONCER"
�Gr�efMe�t DRRP
Logos' fn�n B
MRP Boom Store Aoc I - -
Radio
CONGRATULATIONS M
RIG BROTHER OFF CESS OF At
'TV-Eiotteo .�: wruitf
Scret�ry R C-a'C Coo TrRM 'r1
Ait rb. TMa .a' prom s�
ever
TOO ARE INVITEC
Tfiuno, - ,
Campers MUNMRn
Sponsored e� PfRRRrN -
�nd Pr�oter.�ri CNurcftW
WARNING INCOMING PEESI
PJ m� Bets' - ta- ��
LOANS ON � BUYING � s
�ypowriters j - � s
SOUtftOT PlW Scc
HAVE HEART tip I
PERSON
PACE IT At e oev -e-c �
Favette. e �: '�
want to v . ���
2f.2f.fyQZ
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mw� �iwii�'i� - �
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kwr
i





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 23, 1984 23
Season
1 it:T
for 'Anything Goes'
i for Ozma of Of
lit does' run
for 'Stage Door'
for Dance Theatre'
it (' run
� 9:15 all except
15 p.m.)
?or run
ps for 'The Diviners'
mriV run
leatre' run
for Hamlet'
run
tais
On Sale Every Week
lenville!
ES INCLUDE:
e USA"
ucal"
sure
tel H orld
"t"
fchiones. The Album
id many more)
'�t $5.99 Each!
are accessories, posters,
& stylii and
spiembr 3rd at 5pm
��
AT IN
Games
Beer
ge
ks
'Purple Rain' Elevates Album
By DAVID WITHERINGTON
Sttrtf Writer
I'm sure many of you read my
review of Prince's Purple Rain
soundtrack album a month ago,
panning the record for being too
similar to his previous work. To
quote myself, I stated that
whereas these songs were over-
extended for the soundtrack, time
would tell if they worked out on
film.
Since that time, the Purple Rain
movie opened nationwide. After
viewing the film several times, I
feel a need to wrestle with my
previous review. The movie
justifies and complements the
music, providing a clear meaning
for many of Prince's abstract
lyrics. More than that, it explains
why we got another typical Prince
album. Purple Rain, much like
the Beatles' A Hard Day's Night
film, is a vehicle to showcase one
of the music scene's hottest pro-
perties.
Prince is an extremely visual
performer as the film's erotic con-
cert clips prove. 1 mean, watching
a man make love to an amplifier is
one of the wildest stage shows I've
ever seen.
Now, can the man act? Let me
just say that Prince's magnetism
and charismatic screen presence
will charm even the most skeptical
viewer, myself included. The
chemistry between Prince and
Apollonia, the new girl singer in
town, is electrifying as the
couple's relationship develops
beautifully throughout the film.
Morris Day of the Time is ab-
solutely wonderful, providing
comic relief at all the right times.
This man is a born comedian.
With the assistance of his right-
hand man, Jerome, Day adopts a
hilarious update of Abbott and
Costello's classic routine, "Who's
On First?"
The storyline is pretty simple.
The movie centers on the activities
of several struggling bands in a
local nightclub, highlighting the
petty jealousies that would
naturally occur in such a setting.
While Purple Rain may lack in
plot, it overflows in pure enter-
tainment. The movie succeeds in
its initial goal to expose Prince to
the world. Prince, in turn, uses
the movie to expose his hidden
talent for drama, turning in an
impressive screen debut.
So, for those of you who are
wondering exactly where I stand
after two contradictory opinions,
let me put it this way � I still con-
sider the album standard fare for
Prince, but the movie gave me an
appreciation of why the music
stayed in familiar territory. When
an artist reaches a certain level,
his work tends to be over-
analyzed, and I'm not beyond
making that mistake myself.
My advice is to judge the movie
on its own merits. If nothing else,
it is a major breakthrough in the
effectiveness of rock video. Pur-
ple Rain is playing at the Bucaneer
Theatre in Greenville.
Classifieds
SALE
WANTED
M MINUTES TO CAMPUS. 2 bedroom mobile
riome, 2 AC unit, ready to move in! $300 00
down, payment less than $125 00 a month! Call
TSA 5434 Ask for Roger
� ED FRAMES ' TWIN BOXSPRINGS 2 MtS.
Like new $40 a set or $100 both 752 0681
WANTED HOUSEMATES: male spirit filled
Christians Call 752 3597 or 752 3094 after 9 pm.
NEEDED: PART TIME EXERCISE INSTRUC
TOR 12 15 hrs per week Enthusiastic and
motivated The Body Shoppe 758 7564 Ask for
Theresa to schedule interview
STRING ART SAILBOAT. 45X58 IN Attractive.
$25 752-0611
STEREO CONSOLE. RCA with Fisher turntable.
Good condition $100 752 0681
DEACON'S BENCH. Good condition $20
,52 0611
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED for Fall
Good location Cheap rent. Leave name and
phone numberjor Karen at 758 2381
MALE RCK)MMATEEEDEDTrnT frenTcam
pus Vj utilities 87.50 for rent. Call Doug at
752 1983 or 752 4804.
PIANO PLAYERS WANTED repertoire should
Include Jazz, Blues, Rags, Dixieland. Call
752 1361 or come by Piquant Alley.
REGIONAL AND LOCAL REPS WANTED to
distribute posters on college campuses Part
time work or more. Requires no sales. Commit
sion plus piecework. Average earnings $6.00 per
hour. Contact: American Passage, 500 Third
Ave West, Seattle, WA 98119, 1 800 426 2836, Net
work.
PLAN ON COOKING IN YOUR ROOM? For
sale 1 6 cu ft refrigerator ex cond $70 Also 1
double hot plate-$12 Call Ron after 5pm
758 4850
WASHERDRYER. Apt size good condition.
$175, 752 1160 after 5 p m
1978 SUBARU, 4 DR, 5-speed. dependable, $1808,
752 1160, after 5 p.m.
FOR SALB: 1977 Datsun B210 Hatchback
5 speed Runs well Call 756-8253 After 6 Needs
bodywork. Best offer
TYPEWRITER FOR SALEElectric Royal 550
757-6686 day. 753-5919 other, see Linda
BEAUTIFUL KITTENS.S weeks old 2 black and
white 1 brown and black tiger Free to good
home Call 756 7771 or 756 9005
MISC
B.J. THOMAS IN CONCERT, Sept 14 at the
"Greenleaf" Opening Doors 7 00 pm �
"Logo's" then "B J Thomas" Ticketjt Chris
tian Boo Store Apple Record Bar A' B Z Q
Radio
CONORATULATIONS GO OUT TO THE NEW
� JG BROTHER OFFICERS OF ALPHA PHI
6aMa1WTTElected last semester were.
President Bob Schultz, Vice Pres Steve Kucera,
Secretary Richard Cook Treasurer Bruce
Watkins This year promises to be better than
ever
YOU ARE INVITED to an ice cream social
Thursday. August 23, from 7 00 to 8 30 p.m.
Campus Ministry Building, 501 East 5th Street.
Sponsored by Presbyterian Campus Ministry
and Presbyterian Churches.
WARNING INCOMING FRESHMEN Beware of
PJ the Beast In the East More details later
LOANS ON ' BUYING TV's, Stereos, cameras,
typewriters, gold ' silver, anything else of value
Southern Pawn Shop, 752 2464
HAVE HEART tip a Pizza delivery person
PERSONAL
PACE IT, We're destined to be together! From
Fayetteville to Greenville � Linda ana Dan
want to wish Vesta luck at ECU! Study smart!
DONTBEA
STYROMAMACl
he Sesiylitmatwe
204 East Fifth St. Phone:758-1427
�n
�a
�it
�it
t
�a
�it
�it

�it
�it
�it
�H
It
�it
�it
�it
w
IS THIS ANY TIME TO THINK t
ABOUT ARMY ROTC?
IQt
it
It s the perfect time.
You re a freshman, right' And you want
make college a real learning experience?
Well.ROTC can add a valuable
dimension to your college education. A
dimension of leadership and manage-
ment training. And that'll make your
degree worth more.
ROTC offers scholarship and
financial opportunities, too.
Plus, the opportunity to graduate
with a commission and
begin your future as an
officer.
For more informa-
tion, contact Captain Holdur
Liirak at 324 Erwin Hall
or call 757 - 6967.
ARMY ROTC.
BEALLYOUCAMBE.
Sign up for MSLC 1001 this fall.
ij�J�l
Prince's 'Purple Rain' both complements and explains his new album of the
same name.
What's Important About This Stack Of
Books?
iM-
I he vii
lESUi
USED
USED
Health
JUI. COTAMCHC
oamrvaxE. n.c
dm
nmiCM Acnvmis ton ftthus and fun UScD
THE
First of all, they are all used.
Secondly, they represent the wide
selection of used books available at
the UBE. This Fall, the UBE has
more important of all, these books
will save you money. That's because
they are priced 25 less then a stack
of new ones.
The UBE difference .means big savings for you!
Just Moved To Greenville?
Feeling out of touch
Well, you can call home again!
RECONDITIONED & NEW TELEPHONES
Phones by ITT & Stromberg
STANDARD DESK
ROTARY
Reconditioned $25.89
New $46.89
TRENDLINE DESK
Reconditioned $43.97
New $62.50
zr3
fS.
TRENDLINE WALL
Reconditioned $43.97
New $61.49
Uf,
'444XU

MINIWALL U-TOUCH
Reconditioned $36.93
New $53.25
Beige
White
Cocoa Brown
Harvest Gold
PAIR'S
STANDARD DESK
U-TOUCH
Reconditioned $39.97
New $46.89
107 Trade Street
Phone 756-2291
MonFri. 8:30-5:30
, ML Saturday 8:30-12:30
I �
��BjnH�� n'wmiigm
I� II �M�il
� m pm, �iim000i
"�"�i'�
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1
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v
24 THE EAST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 23,1984
F
YOUR ONE-STOP SHOPPING
HEADQUARTERS
2 BLOCKS
FROM ECU
211 JARVISST.
CORNER
3rd AND
JARVIS ST
OVERTON'S SUPERMARKET, Inc.
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�� �'�S�,� ECU �"� ����,
sUWP�0 v trom home.
you ���� � .on,s ur home �� ,irst
u UU. o� � �" �0,ou I diSCu�0Ue� - 'he cashier
�HU�� of P�'� SUPPU �e � oer�ons even
. mor10
Comesee"10
d�y-
Sincere.? ��
t-M .tonkins
Art Ctnttr

OvertousS
coupon to receive
our 10. Oiscount
Jvct
Summit
Jarvis

r
Don
I
PEPSI COLA
2 LITER BOTTLE
Limit 4 w$ 10.00
or more food order
Pricas �Hactiva thru Sat. Aug. 25
I f
STROH'S BEER
6pk-12oz. cans $1.69
Case price $6.59
i affecriv thru Sat. Aug. 25th
FERARRI
SUNGLASSES
WITH THB COUPON AND A $20.00
FOOD OtOiR AT OVERTON SUPERMARKET INC.
SORRY, KEG PURCHASES EXCLUDED FROM THIS
OFFER. LIMIT ONE FAjR SUNGLASSES PER LD.
NUMtER. THIS COUPON NOT VALID IN CONJUCTION
WITH ANY OTHER OFFER OR DISCOUNT
OFFER LIMITED TO STUDENTS ONLY!
OVERTON'S FINEST
HEAVY WESTERN
SIRLOIN STEAKS
Sirloin Steaks
lb. $1.99
T-Bone lb. $2.19
Price �H�ctiva thru Sat Aug. 25th
WE CARRY A FULL UNE OF
PARTY SUPPLIES AND KEGS
Budweiser Beer
6pk12oz. cans $2.29
Limit one case please.
reis
thru Sot
Aug 25th
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RUFFLES
80Z.
BAG
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CHIPS
Pricas ettiiiv thru Sot Aug 25th
FREE CUP!
btm
NAME
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ID NO
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PRESENT THIS COUPON FOR ONE FREE 30 OZ.
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THIS COUPON NOT VALID IN CONJUCTION WITH
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OVER $10.00 Expires
PRESENT COUPON 9184
TO CASHIER FOR 10
DISCOUNT ON GROCERIES
Name.
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I.D. Number.
I.D Number
The
School s
By BRIAN RANGELE
MTMi
Maybe you're one of the
ds on the block at ECU m
u're a third-year student
g back to try out your fifth
jor. Or maybe you're k(
a senior, staring graduatu
e face and knowing I havi
uch left to do before entt
e real world.
College life creates so
estions! Fortunately for
udents, the Counseling C
supply a lot of the ansvK
Several times during a semi
e Center holds group sessicf
lp students in planning
es. Featured topics aid stu(
career decision-making
lf-direction. So If you're a
udent, these seminars wi
ming to you. "We'll be of :
lot of other programs
idence halls in assert, .i
aining, personal developr
lationships, and social skJ
d Dr. Wilbcrl R. Ball. D:rJ
f the Counseling Center.
Beginning a new year of c
uses a great deal of a:
et's say you're here for the I
me � you're 200 miles
ome, you Fed like everyi
ally hates you. and you ha
ea how to begin relatmj
5,000 people. According to
any students feel that r J
d that much of the Center!
vidual counseling is
:owards adjustment to I
'This is a pretty big place
ou compare it with back ho
aid Ball. "People get k
et intimidated, the ge: in
nd they get frightened. So
oes that mean? It means
et along with a lot of
on't know. I gotta meet t
for the place that I live in. I
meet the requirements :o si
college. I gotta manage
money. I gotta learn that I
go downtown every nighl
�we're doing some prograi
Sstress management and
'management
These programs can h
Scope with the mounds of i
?work that must be donel
volumes that must be reac
shopping that must be ltd
to, and the bills that must be
The programs can also helj
map out your time so you cai
form everyday tasks efficij
That way, you can do
classwork, run errands, m
job, and even have time
social life.
Such scheduling beg
careful evaluation. Accordu
Ball, the first item that mu
examined is motivation. It
words, why are you here D
parents want you here1 Do
want a diploma? Are yom fi
here? Do you want to be
vour girl or bovfriend. Of
"the thing to do?"
Ball said that good
management begins after a
plete, honest self-evalui
Then he helps you sort thi
everything and arrive at a
tion.
Okay, now suppose you"
tually been here two years an
know how to order your lif
just don't know what you wi
do. Should you spend the
year bouncing from ma o
joj? The Counseling Center
help in choosing a major or
tion. Through various -
testing, counselors can i
your attitudes and interest:
you can select an apprcpnatl
or. You may even fid
necessary to be tested more
nee. Career-making decisioi
"fficult and important
ounselors don't mind you
ng back.
But you say you camel
owing exactly what you wj
o major in. and a cro
5,000 doesn't bother
verything would be perfl
ou just didn't have that o
us, inconsiderate roommat
umbles in at 2 a.m. m
ise and turning on lights.
again at 6 a.m. blow-dryij
He sleeps all afternc
u can't study in your
he eats pizza in you
ving you nothing but
d tomato-stained sheets t
The Center can help re
ur living situation
unselors help you and
te work through
tens and show you wi
with each other. OccasH
unselor will act as mc
roommates.
'One thing that surpr
t people who are got
room Ball noted,
I't matter if it's a fresi
junior, or sophomc
surprised that the two
't sk down early and sa
J�les are for
4





G
ER
MD
ST
mit
TON'S

(HIPS
UNT
DERS
Expires jj
'ON 9184
10
IR0C5RES "
i
I
ll
The Counseling Center
School Service Gives Direction, Advice
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
25







Features Writers Needed
Apply tt The East Carolinian offices on the second floor of the Publications building across from
me entrance of Joyner Library.







By BRIAN RANGELEY
SttfTWrtter
Maybe you're one of the new
kids on the block at ECU. Maybe
you're a third-year student com-
ing back to try out your fifth new
major. Or maybe you're like me
- a senior, staring graduation in
the face and knowing I have too
much left to do before entering
the real world.
College life creates so many
juestions! Fortunately for us
students, the Counseling Center
can supply a lot of the answers.
Several times during a semester
the Center holds group sessions to
help students in planning their
ev Featured topics aid students
career decision-making and
self-direction. So If you're a dorm
sudent, these seminars will be
.vming to you. "We'll be offering
a lot of other programs in the
residence halls in assertiveness
aining, personal development,
relationships, and social skills
Mid Dr. Wilbert R. Ball, Director
� the Counseling Center.
Beginning a new year of college
causes a great deal of anxiety.
I et's say you're here for the first
:ime � you're 200 miles from
home, you feel like everybody
.illy hates you, and you have no
idea how to begin relating to
XX) people. According to Ball,
ianj students feel that way. He
Aid that much of the Center's in-
dividual counseling is geared
towards adjustment to college.
This is a pretty big place when
you compare it with back home
i Ball. "People get lost, they
get intimidated, they get anxious,
and they get frightened. So what
es that mean? It means, 'I gotta
get along with a lot of people I
lon't know. I gotta meet the rules
'or the place that I live in. I gotta
meet the requirements to stay in
college. I gotta manage my
money. I gotta learn that 1 can't
go downtown every night So
we're doing some programs in
stress management and time
management
These programs can help you
ccpe with the mounds of paper-
work that must be done, the
volumes that must be read, the
shopping that must be attended
o, and the bills that must be paid.
The programs can also help you
map out your time so you can per-
rm everyday tasks efficiently.
1 "at way, you can do your
c.asswork, run errands, work a
b, and even have time for a
:iaJ life.
Such scheduling begins with
careful evaluation. According to
Ball, the first item that must be
examined is motivation. In other
� ords, why are you here? Do your
parents want you here? Do you
w ant a diploma? Are your friends
Here? Do you want to be close to
your girl or boyfriend, or is it just
"the thing to do?"
Ball said that good time
management begins after a com-
plete, honest self-evaluation.
rhen he helps you sort through
tf erything and arrive at a solu-
tion.
Okay, now suppose you've ac-
tually been here two years and you
�mow how to order your life, you
just don't know what you want to
do. Should you spend the next
vear bouncing from major to ma-
jor? The Counseling Center offers
help in choosing a major or voca-
:on. Through various kinds of
testing, counselors can discern
ur attitudes and interests. Then
ou can select an appropriate ma-
jor. You may even find it
necessary to be tested more than
once. Career-making decisions are
difficult and important � the
counselors don't mind you com-
ing back.
But you say you came here
knowing exactly what you wanted
to major in, and a crowd of
15,000 doesn't bother you.
Everything would be perfect if
you just didn't have that obnox-
ious, inconsiderate roommate. He
stumbles in at 2 a.m. making
noise and turning on lights. He's
up again at 6 a.m. blow-drying his
hair. He sleeps all afternoon so
you can't study in your room.
And he eats pizza in your bed,
leaving you nothing but crumbs
and tomato-stained sheets to sleep
on. The Center can help remedy
your living situation too.
Counselors help you and your
roommate work through your
problems and show you ways to
live with each other. Occasionally
a counselor will act as mediator
between roommates.
"One thing that surprises me
about people who are going to
share room Ball noted, "and it
doesn't matter if it's a freshman,
wnior, junior, or sophomore �
I'm surprised that the two people
don't sjt down early and say what
the rules are for sharing the
room Ball said that roommates
should set guidelines for sharing
food, clothing, allowing others to
sit on beds, and study times.
The Counseling Center offers
guidance through all sorts of con-
flicts. Inner conflicts, such as a
lack of confidence and self-
esteem, rank high on the Center's
list of frequently occuring pro-
blems. Counselors also deal with
family troubles. A problem that
nearly everyone faces is a clouding
of values. Possibly, you met head-
on with values that are radically
different from yours when you
first got away from home. Some
previously unexplored experience
or "forbidden fruit" � alcohol,
sex, drugs � presented itself.
Suddenly the forbidden looked at-
tractive. You partook and no
longer feel good. With skillful
guidance from the Counseling
Center, you can sort through your
values and decide which ones you
really believe.
The more severe problems that
counselors meet include violence,
severe depression, and eating
disorders like anorexia nervosa
and bulimia. Of course, these pro-
blems are serious and must be met
by qualified personnel.
The Counseling Center has five
full-time counselors, each with a
doctorate in psychology, counsel-
ing, or both. Various counselors
have specialized in different areas
of counseling.
Every four years the Center
surveys past clients to determine
how effective the counseling ac-
tually is. The results indicate a 90
percent success rate. To say the
least, it would be hard to find a
more qualified staff.
In spite of the Center's high
success rate, many students
hesitate going for help when they
need it. Ball feels that the hesita-
tion may in part be due to the
societal norm of handling your
own problems. People feel that
they should be completely self-
sufficient. But, as the old saying
goes, no man is an island. People
sometimes need outside help.
Another reason for hesitation is
the fear that what goes on will
become part of the academic
record. "It is not pan of the
record Ball asserts. "Our
counseling notes stay in our files
and every five to seven years they
are destroyed. There is no perma-
nent record
Located above the Student Sup-
ply Store's Snack Bar, the
Counseling Center is open Mon-
day through Friday, 8 a.m. to 5
p.m. All services are free for
regularly enrolled students. If any
problem arises, large or small,
qualified and confidential
counselors are ready to serve.
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B&B&XB0 AB0UT THE DIFFERENCES
BETWEEN LEASING A TELEPHONE AND
LEASING A CHICKEN
Yes, there are differences
And we think you should
know what they are. Ask
yourself these questions.
WHEN YOU LEASE A
CHICKEN, DO YOU
GET THREE MONTHS
THE SUMMER?
Probably not. But when
you lease your telephone
from AT&T this fall, you
won't pay any lease charges
next summer. You can use
your phone at home, and bring
it back to school in the fall.
DO LEASED CHICKENS COME IN A
SELECTION OF COLORS AND STYLES?
No. Chickens don't come in many colors.
But the AT&T telephone you lease this
fall comes in a variety of colors and
three popular styles.
ARE LEASED CHICKENS
REPAIRED FREE?
Don't kid yourself. Repairing a
chicken is a delicate process that requires the work
of expensive professionals. However, in the off chance your
telephone will be shipped
directly to you after one
call to 1-800-555-8111,
or you can pick up your
phone at any of our AT&T
Phone Centers.
ONE FINAL QUESTION:
DOES IT COST THE SAME
TO LEASE A CHICKEN AS
TO LEAS A TELEPHONE
THIS FALL?
Hardly. While we have no
hard data on the exact cost of
leasing a chicken, we can tell you
with some certainty that the cost
of leasing a telephone this fall is
far less than you might think.
The decision to lease a chicken
or a telephone, of course, rests with
you. But should you opt for the tele-
phone, remember: you get three months
free next summer, and you can take the
phone home with you. There's a choice of
colors and styles, free repair, and we'll
ship you the phone
or you can pick
AT&T leased telephone needs repairs, we'll fix it absolutely
free when you visit any of our AT&T Phone Centers.
ARE LEASED CHICKENS SMPPED DIRECTLY TO YOU?
Ship a chicken? Don't be silly. However, your AT&T leased
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i





i t VST CAROLINIAN AUGUST 23. 19�4
The Fall Of
The House
Of Beta
U BRUN RANGELEY
SUM rttcr
number it � that white
it the end of 9th Street, on
of Joyner Library's
' ai kiii lot The Beta house,
: at had those Thursday
parties I could always
� nusic streaming through
ds fiom my perch on Slay
� side porch.
music died, the Betas
teimites rejoiced.
use was then com-
5 for the feasting.
. late lul I was going
ct on my way to an
1 heard heavy
running and the
:rackle of breaking
ihe vacated Beta
ise Running around
the noise was all
veied a bulldozer
) lifted high, poking
i econd floor back
hat a bulldozer's
. so high. While I
p raised over the
. ' and nudged the
� v About three
troke off; the
to 'he ground
house the six
- reened-in porch
vecond-floor wing.
pped out long
f the famed Beta
. t Bill Har-
ion Company
bulldozer and
e wing would be
ill lowering his
Harrelson
straight out,
towards the
� ed out the two
und to the side,
wo trees. Ap-
w anted the
he scoop pok-
v lumns. Only
ed under the
d 'ne scoop
columns.
ed and the col-
I he half-eaten
'� out of the in-
, lown onto the
ei A bathtub
pen end.
' t destruction, I
. the aftermath
light parties �
mi everywhere,
ront yard, liv-
aitanged out-
. a friend came in-
said that there
tig in the woods.
1 went out to the
ng on a blanket. I
� was okay; when he
; ecognized him. He
Betas.
tatter, can't a guy
und here without
;ring him?"
wasted. "You
i told him, "it's
i see people stret-
middle of the
kay?"
muttered, "just �
hering me
re in the middle of a
Maybe you should move
i pointed out a nice
some bushes. He
een there, so he
in peace.
the guy didn't like
in it turned out that
into an argument
camp out. I told
d idea; he went
I
A&P CHILLED
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GOOD THRU SAT. AUG 25 AT A&P
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GREENVILLE. NORTH CAROUNA
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO
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WELCOME BACK
ECU STUDENTS
MARKET STYLE
GROUND
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� ith uupfftiarkpt mires
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i dered, the dump
� Harrelson stepped
the bulldozer; another
d started loading the
story wing into the
scoop at a time.
� Harrelson and asked
: e was a specific strategy
down a house. He said
l't. "The main thi. g is
� be particular said Harrelson.
1 get hurt. Get the high
DIET COKE SPRITE TAB
Coca Cola
1.09
2 Liter Bottle
GOOD ONLY IN GREENVILLE
FLAV-O-RICH DIP
American Cheese
10 oz.
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12 37 02
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.88
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.49
449
CALIFORNIA WHITE
Seedless Grapes
Ice Cream
FlAV-0-RICH
Scooter
Crunch
FLAV-O-RICH
Scooter Crunch
1.59
Harrelson also told me that the
i Auer. Ben Harrison, intended to
rennovate the old house until in-
spections revealed that the ter-
mites had caused too much
damage. Tearing the house down
costed around $2,000 and saved
the owner many more thousands.
The trucks hauled about 50
loads of house away and replaced
it with 15 loads of fill dirt. The
whole job took about two days.
The Betas? I don't know where
they went. All I know is, when I
want to hear some good, loud
rock V roll, 1 gotta go sit on the
back porch and listen to the Kap-
pa Sigs.
ALL FLAVORS
Carlo 3Lt,ei 4.99
tlUSSI CjOOD ONLY IN GREENVILLE

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Yellow
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LARGE SIZE
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a
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Suave
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MtCoffeeFilters
703 Greenville Blvd.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
100 ct
Pkg-
A
f"





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
AUGUST 23, 1984
Page 27
Quarterback Candidates Untested
By RANDY MEWS
Spom Etor
Anticipation and excitement are
at an all-time high about this
year's football team after 1983
saw the Pirates produce an 8-3
record, come within 13 points of
an unbeaten season and finish the
year ranked in the top 20.
According to head coach Ed
Emory the Pirates should have
gone 11-0 last year. ECU's losses
came at the hands of Florida
State, Florida and national cham-
pion Miami. All were ranked in
the top ten at the time they played
ECU and all had to come from
behind to achieve victory.
Although 11 members from last
year's squad were lost to the pro-
fessional ranks (NFL-8, CFL-2,
USFL-1). there's no doubt 1984
can be a successful year.
"We have more talent on this
club than we had in 1983 or 1982
(7-4) Emory said. "But right
now we're very inexperienced and
it will probably take until mid-
season to find out what type of
team we have
ECU's inexperience will be
most evident at the quarterback
position because of the loss of last
year's starter Kevin Ingram and
reserve QB John Williams.
Ron Jones, Robbie Bartlett and
Darrell Speed are battling for the
starting position, but none of
them has ever taken a snap in var-
sity action.
"If we are to be successful, one
of our young quarterbacks has got
to come forward and produce
Emory said. "I really believe we
have the talent on hand, but they
have to step up and get the job
done
The defensive line is another
area in which inexperience is
prevelant. "We got cleaned out
across the front line Emory
said, "and up front on defense is
the area you get hurt first.
"Our defensive abilities this
season hinges strictly on the
development of the interior
lineman and ends the fifth ypar
head coach said. "1 think we have
a chance to be pretty good defen-
sively if they develop
Chris Santa Cruz is the only
defensive lineman with any real
playing time and is expected to
start at noseguard. But he also has
limited experience at his position,
having only played at noseguard
for the last seven games of 1983.
The linebacker position is a dif-
ferent story as P.J. Jordan and
Tyrone Johnson return as the two
leading tacklers from a year ago.
"Linebackers are strong for us,
and I feel we have good depth
behind them Emory said.
Although the secondary lost
Clint Harris, who was probably
the most talented athlete on last
year's team, this should be
another strong position for the
Pirates.
"The secondary has a chance to
be as good as it was last year
Emory said optimistically. "Their
success depends on whether the
defensive line can put some
pressure on the opposing quarter-
back
Kevin Walker and Calvin
Adams return at the corners to
provide experience and leader-
ship, while the safety postions
have been filled nicely by Keith
Ford and Gary London.
Overall, the Pirate defensive
unit should be a strong one if the
defensive line can mature and
develop the way Coach Emory
hopes they will.
Offensively, ECU can be more
productive then last year if the
starting quarterback can come in
and do a respectable job.
"We have the best group of
receivers in the country Emory
proclaimed. "We'll just have to
the ball a lot regardless of who's
named quarterback, so with 4.4
speed in the 40-yard dash coming
from Stefon, 4.3 speed coming
from Nichols and 4.23 speed com-
ing from NCAA national
100-meter qualifier Williams,
there's no doubt the Pirate receiv-
ing corps will be something to
watch.
The backfield also looks strong
as starting and alternating
tailbacks Tony Baker and Jimmy
Walden both return. Fullback
Reggie Branch should also prove
to be an asset as he fills the shoes
of the graduated Earnest Byner.
ECU lost three starters off their
wait and see if our quarterback offensive line, including first team
can get them the ball.
Stefon Adams and Ricky
Nichols return as the two leading
receivers from last year's team.
Stefon will be backed up by
brother Amos at split end, and
Nichols' replacement will be All-
America candidate Henry
Williams.
Offensive coordinator Don
Murry said the Pirates will throw
Sept1
Sept8
Sept15
Sept22
Sept29
Oct.6
Oct.13
Oct.20
Oct27
Nov.3
Nov.10
Sept3
Sept10
Sept17
Oct.1
Oct.8
Oct.15
Oct.22
Oct.29
Nov.5
Nov.12
Nov.19
1984 SCHEDULE
Florida State University
TEMPLE UNIVERSITY
Central Michigan University
GEORGIA SOUTHERN
N.C. State University
University of Pittsburgh
University of Tulsa
EAST TENNESSEE STATE
University of South Carolina
Southwestern Louisiana
SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
1983 RESULTS
Tallahassee, FL
GREENVILLE, NC
Mt. Pleasant, MI
GREENVILLE, NC
Raleigh, NC
Pittsburgh, PA
Tulsa, OK
GREENVILLE, NC
Columbia, SC
Lafayette, LA
GREENVILLE, NC
Florida State 47 - East Carolina 46
EAST CAROLINA 22 - N.C. State 16
EAST CAROLINA 50 - Murray State 25
EAST CAROLINA 13 - Missouri 6
EAST CAROLINA 21 - SW Louisiana 18
EAST CAROLINA 24 - Temple 11
Florida 24 - East Carolina 17
EAST CAROLINA 21 - East Tennessee 9
Miami 12 - East Carolina 7
EAST CAROLINA 40 - William & Mary 6
EAST CAROLINA 10 - Southern Miss. 6
0-1-0
1-0
1-0
1-0
1-0
1-0
2-0
6-2-0
6-3-0
7-3-0
8-3-0
All-America Terry Long, but
Emory feels all the replacements
have had adequate playing time
and doesn't expect this to be a
weak position.
Emory is optimistic when
assessing the offensive situation,
"we could be truly outstanding on
offense if a quarterback comes
through and we stay healthy he
said.
Although the offense and
defense look to be in good shape
for the upcoming season, ECU
will probably make its presence
felt most when it comes to the
specialty teams.
Williams led the nation in
kickoff returns a year ago with
31.1 yard average per return, and
will once again return punts and
kickoffs.
Two-year starter Jeff Heath is a
steady performer at kicker, as is
returning starter Jeff Bolch at
Punter and deep snapper Stuart
Ward.
Overall, Emory is confident
about the upcoming season, but
warns the key to the Pirates' suc-
cess is how fast the inexperienced
players develop.
"There is just as much talent
here as there was a year ago, but
the kids we had last year knew
what it was like to play the best �
these kids still have to learn that
Linebacker, Corners Strong
Bv RANDY MEWS
Sports Mltor
Position Analysis
Offense
Quarterback: Robbie Bartlett,
Ron Jones and Darrell Speed are
all battling for the starting posi-
tion. Bartlett, who played junior
Jimmy Walden, who alternated at
the spot in 1983, make this an ex-
tremely solid position. Baker end-
ed the season as ECU's second
leading rusher (534 yards) while
Walden wasn't far behind with
453 yards.
Flanker: Back are 1983 starters
Ricky Nichols and Henry
Williams. Nichols caught 15
Ron Jones (8) is one of three candidates battling for the starting
quarterback position on ECU's football team.
college ball in California, has the
most game experience and is also
considered the best passer of the
three. He played well in the
Purple-Gold game, completing
nine of 14 passes, while his com-
petition sat and watched. Both
Speed (broken hand) and Jones
(knee) were injured during the
course of spring workouts. Jones
underwent orthoscopic surgery
after injuring his knee on the final
day of the spring, but has now ful-
ly recovered. Jones was listed as
the number one QB following spr-
ing practice and is considered the
quickest of the three. Speed, who
Guard: First-team All-America
Terry Long is a big loss, but
senior Mack Powers saw enough
action last year to serve as a
capable replacement. Norman
Quick, who started with Long a
year ago, will be the other starting
tackle. Redshirt freshman Petey
Davis and sophomore Paul Hog-
gard should see playing time as
reserves.
Center: Senior Tim Mitchell is
back after starting the majority of
the 1983 season after John Floyd
was sidelined. Deep snapper
Stuart Ward and Greg Thomas
will serve as back-ups.
Tight End: The Los A geles Rams
got last year's starter Norwood
Vann, but Damon Pope is ex-
pected to perform just as well.
Pope caught seven passes for 83
yards (11.9 average) in 1983.
Behind him will be a fight between
sophomore Bryant Porter, junior
Jeff Patton and Barry Wright,
who played forward for the
Pirates during the 1983-84 basket-
ball season.
Defense
End: Both of last year's starters
are gone, and there's still a battle
going on for the vacant positions.
Emory is looking to either redshirt
freshman Ron Gillard or junior
Willie Mack on the right side,
while the left side could see any
one of three people � redshirt
freshman Vinson Smith, senior
Dave Thomas or redshirt
freshman Essray Taliaferro.
Tackle: Tackle was probably the
Pirates' strongest defensive posi-
tion a year ago, but this year inex-
perience abounds. David Plum is
passes for 222 yards with a 14.8
yards per catch average. Williams,
who led the nation in kickoff
returns last year, only grabbed
four tosses for 62 yards (15.5
average), but is expected to figure
more into the passing attack this
fall. Depth is also there with
sophomore Chris McLawhorn
and redshirt freshman Tony
Smith.
Split End: Stefon Adams was the
Pirates leading receiver last year, expected to start on the left side,
If �� P
Tyrone Johnson, who registered
56 tackles in 1983, return as the
two leading tacklers on the team.
There is good depth behind these
two, but Jordan and Johnson
aren't expected to spend much
time on the sidelines.
Cornerback: Both 1983 starters
Returning. Juinor Kevin Walker
the left side and senior Calvin
Adams on the right side. Walker
led the Pirates with five intercep-
tions last year, while Adams will
provide senior leadership. Junior
Tim Pittman and redshirt
freshman Ellis Dillahunt will serve
as reserves.
Safety: Second-team All-America
Clint Harris is gone, but Emory
has lots of talent to choose from.
Juinor college transfer Keith Ford
impressed Emory with three in-
terceptions in the Purple-Gold
game and is expected to start at
free safety, while Gary London is
expected to start at strong safety.
Junior Vernard Wynn, senior
Randy Bost and James Martin
will all add needed depth to this
postion.
Specialties
Returns: Henry Williams was the
nation's leading kickoff return
man last year, and is expected to
defend that title in this, his senior
year. Williams had four returns
for touchdowns last year
(2-kickoffs, 2-punts), and is con-
sidered one of the most dangerous
scoring threats in collegiate foot-
ball.
Placekicker: Junior Jeff Heath
will handle all the kicking duties
for ECU this season. Although he
only converted nine of 21 field
j-
� V
ECU head football coach Ed Emory said the Pirates have more talent
than last year's nationally ranked team did.
Pitt, Florida State
Scheduled For '84
By SCOTT POWERS
StafT Writer
The Pirates enter the 1984 foot-
ball season hoping to improve on
last year's 8-3 record, and with
this year's schedule, that would be
quite an achievement for Ed
Emory's team.
ECU will drop teams responsi-
ble for two of its defeats last year,
the University of Florida and the
University of Miami, as well as
Missouri, Murray State and
William and Mary, all teams that
the Pirate scored victories against.
Additions to the Pirates'
schedule include three first time
opponents, national powers Tulsa
and Pittsburgh, in addition to
Georgia Southern. Pittsburgh is in
many preseason top 20 polls and
Tulsa has an overall record of
18-4 over the last two seasons.
The Pirates have faced Central
Michigan University and the
University of South Carolina in
the past, and both should prove to team may prove to be too much
be worthy adversaries.
All of these teams are a part of
the football program's ongoing
process of building one of the
toughest scheduled and best pro-
grams in college football.
The following is a game by
game look at the Pirates op-
ponents for the 1984 season.
With a schedule that includes
powerful teams like Rutgers, Pitt-
sburg, Florida State, Boston Col-
lege, and West Virginia, head
coach Bruce Anans will be hard
pressed to improve much on last
years 47 record, but the Owls will
definitely be a better team.
Temple reiurns nine starters on
offense, including four offensive
linemen, led by John Rienstra.
The receiving corps are expected
to be especially strong, with
Russell Carter, Willie Marshall,
and Ellis Primus leading the way.
The defense should also be im-
proved, with All-America can-
didate Anthony Young leading a
strong secondary. Paul Darragh
will lead an experienced lineback-
ing corps, with tackle Chuck
Cohen anchoring the line.
The Owls will bring a better
team into Greenville to face the
Pirates than they had last year,
but the opening day home crowd
combined with a strong Pirate
FLORIDA STATE
Sept. 1,7:00p.m.
DOAK CAMPBELL STADIUM
Once again the Pirates will open
their season in Tallahassee against
the Seminoles, whom they have
never beaten.
Last year the Pirates lost a
47-46 heartbreaker to the
Seminoles after leading for most
of the game. The Seminoles ended
their season with a lackluster 7-5
record, but went on to a convinc-
ing 28-3 thrashing of UNC in the
Peach Bowl.
FSU will once again be led on
offense by Ail-American Greg
Allen, who last year ripped the
Pirate defense for 154 yards.
hauling in 29 passes for 277 yards
(13.9 average). Backing him up is
brother Amos Adams, while
bench presses 315, is the strongest junior Brent Holbrook also adds
of the three. depth.
Fullback: Although the Pirates Tackle: All-America candidate
lost their leading rusher Earnest Tim Dumas returns to the left side
Byner to graduation, this will still of the line. The 6-6, 280-pound
be a strong position. Senior Reg- sophomore was called the best
gie Branch, who played a backup freshman offensive lineman in the
role to Byner last season, rushed
for 166 yards on just 40 carries for
a 4.2 yard average per carry.
Emory also feels confident with
reserves Pat Bowens and redshirt
freshman George Franklin.
Tailback: Tony Baker and senior
country by Emory. Right tackle
John Robertson was lost to the
NFL, but senior Brad Henson
should be a capable replacement.
Others who should see playing
time include Greg Sokolohorsky,
Theo Livingston, Rick Hilburn
and Greg Quick.
and Joe Grinage on the right.
Redshirt freshmen Leon Hall and
Glenn Geist are in reserve.
Noseguard: Although last year's
starter Gerry Rogers signed with
the Canadian Football league, this
is an extremely strong position for
the Pirates. Chris Santa Cruz,
who moved from linebacker last
year, will start; while talented
freshman Medrick Rainbow
should also see a considerable
amount of playing time.
for them to overcome.
CENTRAL MICHIGAN
Sept. 15, 1:00 p.m.
KELLY SHORTS STADIUM
It promises to be a fired up
Central Michigan team that will
be waiting for the Pirates to come
into town on September 15,
because it will be the first time
that the Chippewas have ever fac-
ed a top 20 team.
"It will be a tremendous
challenge for us to play a team
like ECU said head coach Herb
Deromedi. "It really has some
people. It will be the fastest team
we've seen
CMU returns all of its starters
at the skill positions on offense,
ld by two-time all conference
tailback Curtis Adams. Adams
has rushed for over 2,500 yards
over the past two seasons. After
an impressive freshman season,
quarterback Ron Fillmore will be
back to direct the attack.
The defense should be strong,
especially the linebacking, where
three seniors return: Mike Bevier,
Kevin Egnatuk, and Steve
Sklenar. Overall, the defense
returns seven starters from a team
Quarterback Eric Thomas, who
goal attempts last season, Emory led FSU to their Peach Bowl vic-
has confidence that Heath will tory, figures to play a major role
come through in '84. Heath had a in his teams' success,
spectacular freshman year, setting The key to Florida State's sue- that gave up more than 15 points
school records for most field goals cess this year, however, looks to in only one game last year.
(16) and longest field goal (58 lie in it's defense. The defense
yards). If Heath can regroup this allowed the opposition 26 or more
points in seven games last year,
and coach Bobby Bowden has
hired a new defensive coordinator
to help shore up the defense.
season, he'll prove to be a tremen-
dous asset this fall.
GEORGIA SOUTHERN
Sept. 22, 1:30 p.m.
FICKLEN STADIUM
Punter: Jeff Bolch returns after
averaging 40.3 yards a punt dur-
ing 1983. Bolch's longest punt was
When Georgia Southern comes
to Greenville for their September
As was the case last year, this
for 66 yards, and he hasn't had an game promises to be a wild affair, 22 meeting with the Pirates, it will
attempt blocked in 50 tries. and it could be an excellent start probally be one of the biggest
for the Pirates. games that the Eagles have ever
Linebacker: This is possibly the Snapper: Junior Stuart Ward is a played.
strongest position on the team, returning starter at this position, TEMPLE UNIVERSITY Playing almost exclusively a
P.J. Jordan, who was in on 90 and another player that Emory Sept. 8,7:00 p.m.
tackles last year, and senior has full confidence in.
FTCKT EN STADIUM
Sec NEW, Page 34
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28
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984

ECU & Summertime
By RANDY MEWS
Sporto Editor
Although track and baseball
were the only teams in competi-
tion during the summer months,
many other interesting
developments concerning ECU
athletics took place.
Pirate football coach Ed Emory
hos offered the job as head coach
of national champion Miami,
EC I had the third highest
number of players drafted by the
NFL, while three other players
skipped the draft in order to sign
with the Canadian and United
States football leagues, track
member Craig White ran in the
Olympic trials, Stacy Boyette was
named ECU's first-ever Academic
All-America and much, much
more.
4 far as the teams that were in
action. ECU finished third in the
CAA regional baseball playoffs,
while the track team turned in
their ' 'greatest performance ever
by dominating the sprint field at
the IC4A Championships in
Philadelphia.
BANF.BALL: After capturing the
ECAC South tournament cham-
pionship for the second time in
three years ECU traveled to
Tallahassee, Fla seeded last in
the NCAA South region playoffs,
but came home with a third place
finish � the highest in school
historj.
The Pirates escaped with a 5-4
victory over top seeded South
bama in the opening round as
Winfred Johnson drove in Greg
Hardison to score the winning run
in the top of the ninth.
In second round action.
nson smashed a grand slam
nd pitched his second straight
:te game victory in post
son pla to lead the Pirates to a
4 victory over Florida State.
Bob Davidson got his first start
the mound in more than a
�nth in ECU's third game, but
the Pirates couldn't rally to the
cause as Miami edged out a 6-4
decision.
"1 was disappointed we made
many mistakes defensively
former head coach Hal Baird
said. "We also had our chances to
score, but we just couldn't
capitalize with runners in scoring
:tion
Going into the fourth round of
the double elimination tourna-
ment, the Pirates were two vic-
tors away from a trip to the Col-
lege World Series, but they were
tuled 18-2 by their first round
victim South Alabama.
.son was the only Pirate to
be named to the all-tournament
team. In four days he knotched
me victory on the mound, batted
444 and hit three homeruns.
Immediately following his
team's return from Tallahassee,
FCC coach Hal Baird announced
lis resignation in order to accept
the head coaching position at
Auburn.
The primary reason Baird left
was that the baseball budget only
provided him with a quarter of the
allowable NCAA allowance for
scholarship money, while Auburn
provided a full number of scholar-
ships.
'They offered me a generous
salary, but there were no budget
adjustments that I could see
anytime in the near future Baird
said in a farewell press conference
to the media.
"Perhaps East Carolina feels it
has turned the corner financially
because of the recent success of
the football program, but not to
the point of adding to the baseball
budget
Another thing Baird found ap-
pealing about the Auburn job is
that he wouldn't be required to
teach any classes. "They (ECU)
made an attempt to reduce my
course load Baird said, "but it
wasn't reduced to the point where
I was happy with it
Baird played for the Pirate
baseball team in the early 70's and
then went on to play with the Kan-
sas City Royals for seven years.
He returned to Greenville in 1978,
and in 1979 was named ECU's
head coach.
During his five years at the
Pirate helm Baird posted an im-
pressive 145-66-1 record, made
three appearances in the NCAA
playoffs and won two out of a
possible three ECAC South cham-
pionships.
few changes will be made with the
program in order to continue the
strong tradition that we've had at
ECU over the years
Overton said he was also op-
timistic that the Pirates could
have continued success in the
future. "We lost five great
seniors, but with the players we
have returning we have the
nucleus for a good club and the
possibility of winning another
ECAC South Championship
Overton graduated from ECU
in 1973 before becoming a full-
time assistant and faculty member
in 1977.
Less than a week following
Baird's resignation, assistant
coach Gary Overton was ap-
pointed the new baseball coach by
Director of Athletics Dr. Ken
Karr.
"I'm happy for the opportunity
and am looking forward to the
challenge Overton said. "Very
�������
Following his stunning perfor-
mance in the NCAA regionals,
Winfred Johnson was honored as
the ECAC South co-player of the
year.
Johnson was also named to all-
conference team as both a pitcher
and the designated hitter, while
teammate Greg Hardison was
honored at the shortstop position.
On the mound Johnson posted
a 10-3 record, had nine complete
games and recorded a 3.30 earned
run average.
He was just as impressive at the
plate as he set single-season school
records with 46 runs batted in, 18
homeruns and 115 total bases. He
finished the season with a .321
batting average picking up 52 hits
and 33 runs.
Hardison finished the season as
one of the best hitting shortstops
in ECU history. He led the team
with 41 runs, 61 hits, 12 doubles
and 4 triples. He was right behind
Johnson with a .319 batting
average, while also picking up 33
rbi's and 96 total bases.
Both players are sophomores
and are expected back for the the
next two seasons.
ECU track member Steve Rash
qualified for the Deaf Olympics
by capturing first place in the
110-meter high hurdles and se-
cond in the 400-meter in-
termediate hurdles in Austin,
Texas.
"I wanted to represent East
Carolina in what I can do � and I
did Rash said.
To qualify an athlete must have
at least a 55 percent hearing loss.
Rash says his loss has been
measured at about 70 percent.
Rash's victories make him a
member of the U.S. Track Team
that will compete in the Deaf
Olympics in Los Angeles next
summer.
� � � � �
MEN'S TRACK: ECU finished
their season in impressive fashion
by placing fourth among a field of
76 teams at the 1C4A Champion-
ships in Philadelphia.
"It was simply the greatest per-
formance we've ever had head
coach Bill Carson said. "There
were over 1000 athletes and we
FOOTBALL: ECU lost eight of
its graduating seniors, the third
highest total in the nation, to the
National Football League's draft,
while three other seniors skipped
the draft to sign with other
leagues.
Of the players drafted, Steve
Hamilton, a 6-4, 253-pound
defensive end, was the first Pirate
to go. Hamilton was picked up by
the Washington Redskins in the
second round. "I'm very happy
about the whole situation
Hamilton said. "I talked with
Coach Gibbs and they said they
plan to use me at a down defen-
sive end
First team All-America Terry
Long, a 6-0, 280-pound offensive
guard, was next to go as he was
drafted by the Pittsburgh Steelers
in the fourth round. Although
Long is one of the quickest
players in the nation for his size,
he was thought too short by many
teams to be given higher con-
sideration.
Defensive back Clint Harris,
linebacker Jeff Pegues and defen-
sive end Hal Stephens all went in
the fifth round. The New York
Giants got Harris, the Redskins
selected Pegues and Stephens was
nabbed by the Los Angeles Rams.
The Rams also picked up Nor-
wood Yann, a 6-2, 225-pound
tight end, in the tenth round.
Fullback Earnest Byner was
drafted later in the same round bv
Henry Williams placed first in the 100 meters at the IC4A Champion-
ships in Philadelphia.
dominated the sprint field racking
up 37 of our total 41 points
Villanova placed first with 73
points followed by Maryland in
second with 56. Boston University
edged out the Pirates for third
position with 42 points.
First place finishers for ECU in-
cluded Henry Williams in the 100
meters and the 4 x 100 relay team
of Chris Brooks, Erskine Evans,
Nathan McCorkle and Williams.
Brooks is one of the east coast's
top long jumpers, but was unable
to participate in that event
because of an injury he sustained
in the relay. If not for Brooks' in-
jury, Carson said the Pirates
would have been assured a third
place finish.
trie Cleveland Browns.
The final Pirate selected was
6-6, 257-pound offensive tackle
John Robertson, who went to the
Philadelphia Eagles in the
eleventh round.
Kevin Ingram and Gerry Rogers
signed early with the Canadian
Football League, while Mike
Grant joined with the Memphis
Showboats of the United States
Football League.
If Ingram, Rogers and Grant
had elected to wait for the NFL
draft, ECU would have had the
second hightest total of NFL
draftees, surpassing Illinois who
had nine.
Craig White broke one of the
cardinal rules for a hurdler when
he was trying to make team USA
in the 110-meter high hurdles at
the Olympic trials in Los Angeles.
"I was in third place coming in-
to the last three hurdles White
explained, "but I lost my concen-
tration by looking over to see
what position I was m. I hit a hur-
dle and fell back to seventh
As a result, White finished the
race in 14.2 seconds. "I feel I
could have had a 13.7 which
would have advanced me in the
competition he said. "I was
running well prior to the race.
Some of the people even ap-
proached me and said I was doing
good, but I lost my concentration
right at the end
The top four runners in White's
heat advanced to the semi-finals,
including Greg Foster, who won a
silver medal in the Olympiad.
Although White failed to
qualify, he plans on training for
the 1988 Olympics in Seoul, South
Korea. "I'm glad I put forth the
effort. I gained experience and in
the next Olympic games I should
be very competitive
"It is Ed Emory's desire to stay
at ECU and meet the great
challenges of the '80's the
Pirate head coach said at a press
conference to put an end to
rumors that he was going to ac-
cept the head coaching job at na-
tional champion Miami.
Emory had been mentioned as
one of several candidates for the
post vacated by Howard
Schnellenberger who resigned in
May to become head coach of the
USFL's Washington Federals � a
team that is expected to move to
Miami next year.
The ECU baseball team won their second ECAC South tournament championship in three ear ana we;
to capture third place in the NCAA South region playoffs.
ECU was accepted into the Col-
lege Football Association in early
June, and hopes to be part of their
televison package this fall now
that the NCAA no longer has ex-
clusive rights to college football
games which appear on television.
"This is an important step for
East Carolina in our attempt to
become one of the nation's top
football programs Director of
Athletics Dr. Ken Karr said
The CFA is comprised of the
top conferences and independent
schools in the nation, with the ex-
ception of schools in the Pacific
10 and Big 10 conferences.
The vote was held at the CFA's
annual meeting in Dallas. A two-
thirds vote was required for ac-
ceptance, and ECU passed
without opposition.
�������
SOFTBALL: Stacy Boyette was
named ECU's first-ever Academic
All-America.
She was the Pirates pitching ace
this season posting a 12-2 record,
while also serving as the team's
designated hitter when not on the
mound.
"Stacy is a very intense com-
petitor and is a person who gets
the most out of her ability head
coach Sue Manahan said. "She's
our top pitcher and we're excited
about having her back next year
In the classroom Boyette sports
a 4.0 grade point average and was
named ECU's top chemistry stu-
dent for the 1983-84 school vear.
������
WOMEN'S BASKETBALL:
Emily Manwaring, head basket-
ball coach at San Francisco State
the nast six years, was named to
the same positon at ECU.
Manwaring, 35, succeedsath
Andruzzi who resigned after
years at the Pirate helm in order
to persue business interests
"I'm really looking forward to
coaching the elite athletes tl
East Carolina attracts Man a
ing said. "I'm sure rnv coaching
philosophy will differ somewhat
from my predecessors, but this is
an established program and I
think it's at a good tage right
now
Manwaring led Division II Sai
Francisco State to a 19-12 i
a Northern California Athlc
Conference Championship and a
berth in the NCAA Wesl Region
plalyoffs last year.
She coached three Ail-
Americans at San Francisco State
while compiling a 97-56 record �
her team never suffered a losing
season.
Manwaring becomes only the
third coach of the Lady P -
since the program's ince
1969. Joining Manwaring as assis
tant cocach is Jo Anne Blv wh
served in the same capacity undei
Manwaring at San Francisco state
the past three years.
SOCCER: Stepl
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
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Harrison Reflects On Knight, Olympic Team
By RICcCORMAC
Staff Writer
rif? Carolina basketball coach
v-narhe Harrison spent part of his
summer working with Bobby
knight and the United States
Olympic basketball team.
Knight, not always cast in a
tavorable light by the media, led
nis team to the gold medal bv
literally crushing the opposition
w�h tight man-to-man defense.
The team won each of their games
by an average margin of thirtv-
two points.
Coach Harrison knows first-
hand about Bobby Knight since he
was a graduate assistant under the
Indiana coach for two years. In
those years, Harrison helped the
Hoosiers to a third place finish in
the N.C.A.A. tournament and a
berth in the NIT.
Harrison feels that Knight is
often misunderstood by the
general public. "His handling of
the media and general public is
very terse only for the reason that
he has no free time for himself
that when things don't go the way
he has worked and planned for,
he becomes offensive
When asked about the selection
process for the Olympic team,
Harrison said "Knight tried to
pick players that would fit into his
system.
"The general public sometimes
sees things one-dimensionally.
They see what a Mark Price does
for Georgia Tech or what Lorenzo
Charles does for N.C. State, but
they need to realize this is a team
of great players and Knight picked
his team on how they would play
collectively
Harrison also said the team was
not picked just by Knight, but
also by the selection committee. It
was also hinted by some that
Knight was prejudiced in picking
Steve Alford who plays for Knight
at Indiana over Johnny Dawkins
of Duke, who was chosen along
with Auburn's Chuck Person as
alternates.
Harrison defended Knight by
saying "the week I was at the
right now that Coach Knight is
too intelligent to be prejudiced.
He would not make a decision for
one of his favorites if it would not
help win the medal
Many have tried to speculate
whether or not the American team
would have won the gold medal if
the Russians had not boycotted
the Los Angeles Olympics. Har-
rison felt the Russians would have
been medal contenders but that he
thought that Italy and Spain had
better teams. "People don't
realize Russia has finished third
the past two years in Europe and
third in the Olympics we boycot-
ted" stated Harrison.
When questioned as to whether
he thought this was the greatest
Olympic team ever Harrison
would not comment. "This team
is better prepared than any Olym-
pic team in history. Who am I to
judge whether or not one team is
better than the other. I will say the
trials and games against the tour-
ing pros and how they were pro-
moted were better than ever
before
Harrison said that "Knight has
done an unbelievable job pro-
moting the team. But it's not just
Coach Knight, it is the selection
committee the USA-ABA and
everyone
"We realize we must be better
prepared than ever before. The
level of play has risen con-
siderably
The main reason for the im-
provement of the opposition is the
fact that they play together for
years while our team is put
together over a two month period.
Another reason for the foreign
improvement is better coaching.
American coaches like Dan Peter-
son and Jack Donahue who coach
Italy and Canada respectively.
Spains coach Antonio Diaz-
Miguel has learned a lot about the
game from Bobby Knight and
UNC Coach Dean Smith.
Coach Harrison also pointed
out that we are the only country in
the world with professional
basketball. All of the other na-
tions best players play on their
country's Olympic team.
"The Russians and Yugosla-
vians are all in the military, play-
ing basketball is part of their
military duty. Many of the French
and Italian players are earning six
figure incomes playing in leagues
comparable to the old AAU
They are still considered amateurs
even though they are paid to play.
No real parity exists in all sports
in all areas" Harrison lamented.
Harrison was at the trials and
traveled with the team some dur-
ing the pre-olympic tour and had
an interesting response when ask-
ed which player suprised him the
most. No, it was not Michael Jor-
dan, but his UNC teammate Sam
Perkins. Harrison said "it was not
his ability, everybody knew he
had ability. It was his work habits
that impressed me. I should have
known better than to believe
things that have come out of the
media knowing and respecting
Dean Smith as I do
ECU basketball coach Charlie Harrison spent part of his summer with
the United States Olympic basketball team.
Harrison told of dining out
with Knight on two occasions in
Greensboro during the team's pre-
Olympic exhibition tour. "I ate
dinner with him on two nights and
he couldn't even eat because of all
the people coming over to the
table
Harrison explained the tribula-
tions of being a public figure.
"You can't be alone or enjoy your
time. Either you become a hermit
or offend some people
While Knight may seem obnox-
ious to some, there is a side to him
that is seen by a very few. Har-
rison said Knight has helped him
out on several occasions, as well
as helping raise money Tor the
athletic and academic programs at
Indiana.
Harrison says the reason people
don't hear of all of the good Bob-
by Knight does, is "he doesn't
boast about it. He does things
because he wants to, not because
he's going to gain something from
it
Coach Knight is better known
for his well publicized incident
with a policeman at the Pan
American games in 1982. Har-
rison feels that Knight loses his
temper because "he is so in-
telligent and such a perfectionist,
trials, Alford shot over seventy
percent from the field and com-
mitted fewer turnovers than any
guard at the trials
Harrison went on to say
"Johnny Dawkins is a great
basketball player, but I can say
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Women's Volleyball Program
Receives Much eeded Boost
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THE EA8T CAHOUMAN AUOW. 13. HM
Women's Volleyball Program 5
Receives Much Needed Boost
ByTONYBROWN
Rising morale on the ECU
women's volleyball team is spurr-
ing hopes for an improvement
over last year's poor showing.
Internal problems over the
departure of the coach and the
loss of some top players brought
on a host of problems which
quickly became evident during the
'83 season, and resulted in the
lackluster performance of the
team.
lmogene Turner became the
new coach only days before the
August 1 recruiting deadline last
year, so she had no opportunity to
hunt recruits and had to carry on
with the remaining team
When people saw the excitement
of modern volleyball, they wanted
to see more and become par-
ticipants also.
"The sport is spreading fast
since it has evolved from a lazy
beach sport to a fast-paced and
explosive game. It began in the
middle sixties when international
rules changed to reflect the new
nature of the game.
"A Japanese team toured the
U.S. in the mid-sixties, beginning
at Cal-State Long Beach and hit-
ting key cities across the country.
Those places became the hub of
the new style of volleyball as it is
played today
Some points to watch for at the
games will be:
side, an opponent or interfere
with hitting the ball.
After an opponent has had
three hits or is absolutely unable
to make a third hit, a Mocker's
hands may extend over the plane
of the net but at no time can
anyone touch the net.
� Points to watch for as far as in-
dividual and team statistics go
are: Points made on serve; "kills"
through unreturnable hits
(formerly called "spikes"); blocks
and unforced errors.
Coach Turner wants any walk-
ons with volleyball experience to
call 757-6441 or 757-6161 for
more information.
ECU VOLLEYBALL
1984 SCHEDULE
Sept. 19(Tri-Match)
ECU woaaea's volleyball team has
schedule and higher morale for the 1984
Sept. 21
Sept. 22
Sept
Sept
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
Oct.
25
27
2
4
S
12 (Tournament)
UNC-WILMINOTON
N.C. WESLEYAN
WAKE FOREST
UNC CHARLOTTE
af Virginia ffl wn
METHODIST COLLEGE
DUKE UNIVERSITY
�t UNOChapd HH1
at Atlantic Clirirtian CoBefc
at Wake Forest
Stetson University
Furman University
James Madison University
UNC-Chnriotte
North Carolina A A T University
Appalachian State University
at N.C. Weskyan Collate
Radford University
UNC-CHAPEL HILL
at Methodist CoUeae
Pembroke State University
at UNC-Wilmington
Coastal Carolina CoBete
Oct. 27 at St. Andrews College
Oct. 30 ATLANTIC CHRISTIAN COLLEGE
Nov. 3 (Tournament) at William 4 Mary
Loyola University
James Madison University
Nov .9-11 at EC AC -South Tournament
Oct. 13
Oct. 16 (Tri-Match)
Oct. 17
Oct.23(Tri-Match)
Oct. 25 (Tri-Match)
"The teams's attitude has improved a lot since last
year. We 9ve got a better schedule that will allow us
to gain experience before we play some of the
toughest teams.
�!
�lmogene Turner
members.
The schedule compounded the
problem, since it began with mat-
ches against top-rated opposition,
ill-suited for gaining confidence
for a young, inexperienced team.
By the time the team was through
playing scholarship teams such as
N.C.State, North Carolina and
Duke, morale was so low that the
team had little chance to rebound.
Turner feels this season pro-
mises a better outcome. "The
team's attitude has improved a lot
since last year she said. "I feel
we're in a much better position
also. We've got a better schedule
that will allow us to gain ex-
perience before we play some of
the toughest teams
She now has had a year to
recruit and the team is beginning
to look more impressive. "Last
year we averaged around 5'5" and
our tallest player was 5'9 This
year we have several at 5'10" and
taller. We've got some others with
good potential for great improve-
ment with some experience.
Here's a brief look at some of
the early leaders on the team:
Sharon Shank, a 5' 10" transfer
from Chowan and Traci Smith, a
.6-foot freshman from
Thomasville, should be the two
top hitters. Smith could become
ECU's best ever if she continues
to improve.
Donna Zekonis, 6'1" from
Delaware, figures to be the
primary blocker and defensive
player. Her quick learning ability
can be a real plus for the team.
Ann Guida, a setter-hitter at
5'5 is the backbone of the star-
ting offense. She's the best setter
and a team leader.
Martha McQuillen, a returnee
at 5'7 is a hitter that works hard
and has a lot of grit. The team will
use plays designed to allow her to
attack one-on-one and keep
blockers honest.
Tammy Riggan, a 5'5" setter, is
the youngest player on the team
even though she's a sophomore.
She skipped her senior year of
high school and won't turn 17 till
October. She's still in a learning
process, but already has shown
great improvement. During the
summer she won the Governor's
Award for saving a man's life
through CPR.
Mary Barnum, another
Chowan transfer, is a good defen-
sive specialist and server.
Turner plans on using mostly a
6-2 or 5-1 offense. In the 6-2,
there are two setters situated so
that one is always on the front line
and one the back; the one on the
back line sets and the other is a
hitter until the rotation reverses
their roles. In the 5-1, there is only
one setter.
The team hasn't been together
long, so Turner is still sorting the
players out and looking for walk-
ons with high school experience.
Since there is no line item for
recruiting money in the budget,
she must rely on whatever means
available to find talented players.
According to Turner, only
4,200 dollars is available for
scholarships and the whole budget
is less than is spent on some in-
dividual football players. "I sup-
port the football team whole-
heartedly and I know the expense
involved is greater she said.
"Our budget did increase slightly
this year and we hope to get some
money for recruiting at more
funds become available
Coach Turner has teen a great
increase in interest in volleyball
since the recent Olympics and ex-
pacts the sport to continue to
grow. "Everyone I talk to hat
been receiving requests for infor-
andrve
� Points are scored only while
each team has the serve.
� When the team serving fails to
return the ball, it's termed a side-
out and the other team gets the
serve.
� A player's foot may cross the
plane of the net underneath pro-
vided it doesn't touch the other
Charles R. Hardee
and
G. Wayne Hardee
are pleased to announce the
formation of a partnership
for the practice of law.
HARDEE & HARDEE
319 South Cotanche Street
Greenville, North Carolina
(919) 752-5565
General Practice of Law
JERRY'S SWEET SHOP
Come see us at our new location in THE PLAZA,
across from Radio Shack on Arlington Blvd. Call us
for your birthday cakes, pastries, cookies,
nd doughnuts.
355 - 2832
Brod
�ySCOTTPpWERS
New head soccer coach
Brody, at age 23, becomes
the youngest coaches to I
coach at the college level
sport.
A four year player for
Brad Smith and Robbie
three of which he served as
captain, he has been aroun
soccer for a long time.
Brody has two natl
EC
1984
I
Sept. 1
7
13
15
18
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept.
Sept. 22
Sept. 25
Sept. 29
Oct. 1
Oct. 3
Oct. 6
Oct. 10
Oct. 16
Oct. 18
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Oct. 24
Oct. 27
Oct. 31
Nov. 3
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Nov. 5
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at
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I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23. m$
LEYBALL
HEDULE
UNC WILMINGTON
N.C. WESLEYAN
WAKE FOREST
UNC CHARLOTTE
at Virginia Commonwealth
METHODIST COLLEGE
DUKE UNIVERSITY
at UNC Chapel Hill
antic Christian College
at Wake Forest
Stetson University
Furman University
James Madison University
UNC-Charlotte
I � Una A & T University
ppalachian State University
at S . Wesley an College
Radford University
I SC CHAPEL HILL
at Methodist College
Pembroke State University
a I V Wilmington
iaiolina College
S -Vidrews College
IRIS! IAN COLLEGE
at Wilham&Mary
1 oyola University
es Madison University
M "south Tournament
1 SHOP
iIHr PLAZA,
� jon Blvd. Call us
ies lookies,

4
�A IT
M
�:

� X
BY -�
NN-
Wl
Brody Signed As New Head Soccer Coach
By SCOTT POWERS
New head soccer coach Steve
Brody, at age 23, becomes one of
the youngest coaches to ever
coach at the college level in any
sport.
A four year player for coaches
Brad Smith and Robbie Church,
three of which he served as a team
captain, he has been around ECU
soccer for a long time.
Brody har two national
coaching licenses as well as
operating camps in North
Carolina and New York. He is
also a licensed referee and a
member of numerous camp staffs
up and down the east coast.
The Edison, New Jersey, native
received his bachelor of arts
degree from ECU and is currently
finishing his masters work, also at
ECU.
Brody's love for soccer is evi-
dent. He views his job as more
Sept. 1
Sept. 7
Sept. 13
Sept. 15
Sept. 18
Sept. 22
Sept. 25
Sept. 29
Oct. 1
Oct. 3
Oct. 6
Oct. 10
Oct. 16
Oct. 18
Oct. 21
Oct. 24
Oct. 27
Oct. 31
Nov. 3
Nov. 4
Nov. 5
ECU SOCCER
1984 SCHEDULE
UNC CHARLOTTE
GEORGE MASON
at ACC
CHRISTOPHER NEWPORT
at N. C. State
at Virginia Commonwealth
atODU
at Methodist
AMERICAN UNIVERSITY
CAMPBELL UNIVERSITY
at Pfeiffer College
VIRGINIA WESLEYAN
N.C. WESLEYAN
at Elon
at Navy
at James Madison
RICHMOND
WILLIAM AND MARY
at N. C. Wesley an Classic
at N. C. Wesleyan Classic
UNC-WILMINGTON
1:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00p.m.
2:00 p.m.
7:30 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:00p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00 p.m.
2:00 p.m.
3:00p.m.
TBA
TBA
3:00p.m.
than just coaching the ECU soccer
team. He feels that helping in the
development of his players and in
the growth of the sport as a whole
in eastern North Carolina are very
important aspects of his job.
As far as a coaching
philosophy, Brody says, "Soccer
is basically a simple game. It
takes a lot of determination and
hard work, but if the players are
willing to put forth the effort, I
feel that we can have a successful
program
Concerning this year's team,
Brody seems optimistic. "We
have super upperclassmen leaders
for the first time ever he said.
"These guys want to turn the pro-
gram around, and that means a
lot He also feels that experience
will help the team this year as well
JiLarsWs
as the added support that he per-
sonally is receiving from within
the athletic department.
The captains for this year's
team will be seniors Mark Hardy
and Brian Colgan, and junior
Dave Skeffington.
Top prospects in the forward
position look to be David Pere,
Colgan, and Rick Spenski. "We
don't really have any standout
forwards, but they are all ex-
cellent players Brody said.
Skeffington will be the standout
midfielder, while other top pro-
spects include Scott Gibbs, Todd
Engles and Jamie Riebel.
Hardy, who Brody feels can
play any position well, will most
likely move from the forward
position where he has been a
leading scorer for the last three
years, to the back line. There he
will combine his talents with
Palmer Grossi and Jeff Langrehr
in what looks to be a strong posi-
tion for the Pirates.
Goalie Grant Pearson, who is
out because of knee problems,
will be missed greatly by the team,
but Brody feels North Carolina
products Jesse Daughtery and
Greg Brandle will be able to fill
the position well.
"We will have a solid team this
year Brody said, "but we will
also have a tough schedule. Our
conference will be especially
tough
Brody doesn't feel that there
are any pushovers on the
schedule. "Nobody is going to
give us a game, we'll have to earn
every victory that we gt
In the conference, Brody ex-
pects George Mason and Old
Dominion, who are both peren-
nial powerhouses, to once again
be tough. Other strong con-
ference teams will be American
University, Navy and James
Madison.
The Pirates will also play a
tough non-conference schedule,
facing stiff challenges from in-
trastate rivals N.C. State, UNC-
Wilmington and UNC Charlotte,
with whom ECU opens their
season on September 1.
Trying to rebound from last
year's dismal season is not ex-
pected to be an easy task for
Brody's team, but if his players
are willing to put forth the effort,
it is a goal that the new coach feels
is well within reach.
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32
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
Baker and Walden Prepare
For Seminoles, New Season
By PETER FERNALD
Autstaat Sports Editor
In nine days the ECU Pirate
football team will try to win its
first game of the season by
defeating rival Florida State in
Tallahassee.
The Pirates have already clash-
ed with the Seminoles three times,
coming up short each time. FSU
leads the series 3-0.
Last year in a game that pro-
duced over 1,300 yards in total
yardage, the Seminoles edged out
the Pirates with a last minute
touchdown.
But according to junior tailback
Tony Baker, this year the Pirates
are due to win. "We've been play-
ing Florida State for about three
or four years now. Each time we
got closer and closer to winning.
You can't get any closer than last
year. We want more in '84
Teammate Jimmy Walden who
shares the first string tailback
position with Baker is also en-
thusiastic about the upcoming
game against FSU. "I'm ready to
line up on the field and play
said Walden. "I'm very confident
about the Florida State game and
the rest of the season
Ed's Show
The Ed Emory (ECU football
coach) television show will be
aired in three markets during the
1984 football season and will
again highlight the Pirates in ac-
tion along with special features.
The show will be produced bv
WCT1-TV, New Bern, and aired
on Sundays at 6:30 p.m. beginn-
ing Aug. 26. The show will also be
aired in Wilmington, N.C.r on
WWAY-TV at 1:00 p.m. and
WKFT-TV in Fayetteville, NC, at
5:30 p.m.
Lee Moore, sports director of
WCTI-TV Channel 12 in New
Bern, will host the show.
Highlights of the previous
game, scouting reports on the up-
coming game, player interviews,
special features and Coach
Emory's thoughts will comprise
the Ed Emory Show. This year's
version will also have the added
touch of being shot at the site of
the game.
The 12-week series begins Sun-
da, Aug. 26 and will run through
the Sunday (Nov. 11) following
ECU's last game of the season
with Southern Mississippi.
Emory will again have his radio
call-in show on WRQR in Farm-
ville, N.C. The show, with host
John Moore, will air Tuesdays
from 7:30 to 8:30 p.m.
Although Baker and Walden
share the tailback duties, there is
no pressure between the two.
"Tony and I are pretty tight
Walden said. "He tells me his
problems and I tell him mine. We
look after each other. It's a good
situation. Combining our dif-
ferent talents together makes a big
plus for the team
Both players have a different
style of running giving the
coaching staff a selection to
choose from. "Both of us get the
yardage said Walden. "We'll
have equal playing time unless one
of us is injured, but if one of us is
performing well, then why should
he come out
Baker's style is characterized by
fast, straight ahead running, while
Walden's style is flashier with
more cuts and jukes.
Both players have goals for the
fall season. Walden wants to be
the leading rusher, gain over a
thousand yards and contribute to
the team as much as possible.
Baker on the other hand, only has
one goal. "To be honest, I always
have set one goal � and that's to
stay healthy
Walden was plagued with in-
juries in his sophomore year, and
as a result, missed most of the
season. Last year Walden and
Baker finished behind Earnest
Byner in rushing yardage.
Coming off an 8-3 season, the
Pirates again have a tough
schedule in '84 facing
powerhouses Pittsburgh and
Tulsa, as well as Florida State.
"It's every football team's
dream to go undefeated and get a
bowl bid said Baker. "We have
a tradition of good running backs
at ECU added Walden. "As
long as we be ourselves the cream
will come to the top
ECU tailback Tony Baker and the rest of the Pirates will try to end their team's drought against Florida State
when they visit the Seminoles on September 1.
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I
I
I HE fc AST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
33
11 H f
Olympians Parade In Dallas

ta Mate
Wording to senior fullback Reggie Branch the Pirates wilM readv
hsl on Sept. 1.
Branch Is Ready!
H PKIFRKFRNA1D
tg tailback Reggie
' top physical and men-
tor the Pirate's
ei against Florida
September 1.
e got to be in top condi-
m to defeat Florida
Branch said. "We're go-
ady
irates have been practic-
times dail working on
reparation for the game.
iccording to head
I moi) is drill repiti-
enough repititions the
hould be able to play as a
the Seminoles.
; ming together
said. "Our
p I he coaches are
I he players are
and everyone is
;
to Branch, the
ing support for
ng the team
ere combin-
in order to
he said.
rs if they're do-
ing good or bad and I expect them
to do likewise
The only problem the Pirate
football team has faced is the hot
weather during practices. "We've
got to overcome the heat. That is
the number one factor Branch
said. "I went home to Florida
recently and the heat was
unbearable. We're going to be
playing in Florida so if we want to
win we're going to need a lot of
energy.
"Everybody coming back for
the fall season looks good
Branch saidCoach Emory said
that this is the best group of
freshmen he's had. The varsity
also looks good with top results in
the sprint and strength tests
Last Saturday, the Pirates put
on their pads and played a scrim-
mage game. Prior to the game.
Branch said "the men will be
separated from the boys
The Florida State game is about
a week away and Branch said the
team will be ready. "We have no
negative attitudes so far and can't
afford to have any. We lose as one
and we win as one. The way we're
going now, I see victory on
September 1
DAI LAS (UPI) America's
newest heroes wound down a
whirlwind of post -olv mpics
euphoria, creating a ground-swell
of patriotic fervor in a city already
geared to host the Republican Na-
tional Convention.
The 95-degree noontime heat
failed to tarnish the 150 I .S
Olympic medal winners or a
crowd of about KM),(XX) that lined
the downtown streets for the
ticker-tape parade Fridav
The hour long parade featured
1,800 participants, 0 floats, 11
marching bands and four
equestrian units.
Dallas attorneys Jim and Susan
Jennings brought their 7-week-old
daughter, Olivia, to the parade
"We figure we can tell her tl
her first parade was for the Olym-
pic athletes Jennings said.
"I'm a competitive swimmer so
we have a personal interest said
Mrs. Jennings. "This may never
happen again
Donna I ancastei i A suburban
Duncanville arrived at the parade
route two hours before the pro
sum began to maneuver
wheelchair-bound son Mo
curbside
"We came to see the olym
athletes and 1 figui i
a-lifetime opportunity said
Mrs. l ancaster, who also ushei
six oilier children to the parade
"Plus it's good tin m 10-v
old daughter Nikki because si
got a new hero. Miti h (iaylord
stead oi Michael ackson 1
suits me a lot better she add-
Many in the a
craned their neck I
hometown he
a member oi th So
Methodisi I ni ei
"YOU :
it 1 undquist s li
tv tour that ended
sure I'll realize v
soon .
skvscrapers have windows that do
not open, but workers leaning
from the windows of older struc-
tures managed to douse the
athletes and crowds with shredded
paper and confetti
The cascade oi paper marked
the first ticker-tape parade in
downtown Dallas in almost 40
years. In 1946, the city turned out
to welcome Gen. Douglas MacAr-
ir.
li H the newest generation of
American heros created a new
sense oi patriotism in the citv
already charged up for the
Republican National Convention
� gar M �� d �
Gymna gold medalist Marv
Lou Reti timed her share :
hero worship, gleefully
acknowledging several signs along
the route that read "Marv Lou we
love U
"She's adorable said one
woman when Retton passed by
"She's cuter in person than she
is on TV
Gymnasts Peter Vidmar and
Gaylord drew several ovations
from the crowd when they leaped
from their car in the motorcade
and did backflips down the street
Vendors along the route had a
gold medal day as well, selling
thousands of American and
Olympic flags for up to $5 each. A
white sheet draped from the third
floor of the historic Adolphus
Hotel proclaimed "You're all N
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34
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AUGUST 23, 1984
New Opponents Dot Pirates' 1984 Schedule
Continued From Page 27
small school schedule, the Eagles
compiled a 6-5 record last year,
and East Carolina is the only ma-
jor college that coach Erk
Russell's team will face this
season.
Quarterback Tracy Ham will
return to lead an explosive offense
that averaged nearly 25 points per
game last year. He will be joined
in the backfield by tailbacks Ricky
and Gerald Harris and will have
newcomers Kenny Butler and
Mark Lambert at wide receiver.
The defense will be strong up
front, with linemen Jesse Jenkins
and Theoriea Ward joining defen-
sive end John Richardson as
leaders.
NC STATE
Sept. 29, 7:00 p.m.
CARTER-FINLEY STADIUM
When ECU and N.C. State
square off, it's anything goes. In
hat many people feel is the big-
gest game of the year for the
Pirates, it promises again to be a
barnburner.
Coach Tom Reed's squad is
once again led on offense by all-
everything back Joe Mclntosh.
Going into his senior year, Mcln-
tosh has over 3000 career rushing
vards.
Returning to run the offense for
the Woltpack is quarterback Tim
Esposito, who threw for 2,096
yards last year as the Pack stumbl-
ed to a dismal 3-8 record.
State returns seven starters on
defense but star linebackers
Vaughan Johnson and Andy
Hendel have been lost to the pros.
The secondary will be keyed by
Nelson Jones, John McRorie, and
Dwayne Greene, and the line will
be anchored by noseguard Dillard
-ndrews.
Emotions will be high as always
on the field and in the stands
when these in state rivalries square
off on September 29.
PITTSBURGH
Oct. 6, 1:30p.m.
PITT STADIUM
When the Pirates travel to Pitt-
sburgh in October, they could be
facing a Panther team among the
top 10 in the polls.
Pittsburgh is led by Ail-
American Bill Fralic, who many
think may be the best offensive
lineman in the nation. The
backfield will be somewhat unset-
tled at the beginning of the
season, with none of the positions
set
The defense will be solid and
experienced, with end Chris
Doleman possessing Ail-
American potential. Last years
leading tacklers Troy Benson and
Caesar Aldisert will be back at
linebacker.
The two teams have never met
on the gridiron before, and this
meeting would be an excellent
chance for the Pirates to make a
memorable mark in the minds of
coach Foge Fazio's team.
TULSA
Oct. 13, 7:30p.m. CDT
SKELLY STADIUM
Tulsa coach John Cooper turn-
ed down the head coaching job at
N.C. State in 1983 to stay at
Tulsa. He has led the Golden
Hurricanes to four consecutive
Missouri Valley Conference titles
and Tulsa is picked to make it five
straight.
The team has lost seven all-
conference players from last
year's 8-3 team, but looks to have
many very capable replacements
back to take over.
Sophomore quarterback sensa-
tion Steve Gage, who was
Newcomer of the Year in the
MVC last season, will have to
carry an inexperienced offensive
backfield that will sorely miss
Michael Gunter. a 1200 yard
rusher for the Golden Hurricane
last year, who was lost to gradua-
tion.
The key to the Tulsa game,
however, is defense. The defense
gave up twenty or more points in
only three games last year, and is
led by tackles Kevin Lilly and Joe
Dixon. The secondary is also solid
with Albert Myres anchoring that
aspect of the defense.
If the Golden Hurricanes han-
dle their early schedule, which in-
cludes Brigham Young, Arkansas
and Oklahoma on consecutive
Saturdays in September, they
could possibly be a ranked team
when they entertain the Pirates.
Needless to say, this first ever
meeting between the two schools
promises to be exciting.
EAST TENNESSEE STATE
Oct. 20, 2:00 p.m.
FICKLEN STADIUM
ETSU will be the Pirates
homecoming game for the second
consecutive year, and it will be
pretty much the same team that
the Pirates beat 21-9 in a lack
luster outing last year.
Coach Buddy Sasser returns 19
starters from last year's 3-8 team.
The record is misleading as five of
the losses were by less than a
touchdown, including three by a
field goal or less.
On offense, the team will shift
from the wishbone to the
1-formation. Robbie White is the
leading candidate at quarterback
with Henry Latham and Vince
Redd the top returning ball car-
riers along with Herman Jacobs,
who rushed for a school record
237 yards last year against The
Citadel.
The defense returns in tact with
the exception of the free safety
position. It is led by junior tackle
Calvin Thompson, who many
consider an All-America can-
didate. Senior linebackers Gary
Ingram and David Vestal who
were the two leading tacklers last
year, will look to make things
tough on opposing offenses.
Although the series is tied at
4-4-1 the Pirates have won the last
four meetings convincingly and
the last Buccaneer victory was in
1970.
SOUTH CAROLINA
Oct. 27, 1:30p.m.
WILLIAMS-BRICE STADIUM
When the Pirates travel to Col-
umbia in late October, they will be
playing in front of one of the
wildest crowds in the nation, as
the Gamecock fans are known to
support their teams like no other
school in the country.
Coming off of a 5-6 campaign,
coach Joe Morrison's Gamecocks
look for consistency on both sides
of the ball, and with 16 starters
returning, they should be able to
achieve that.
Nine of those starters return on
offense, with quarterback Allen
Mitchell being the key. Mitchell
passed for 1128 yards last year but
has to cut down on his intercep-
tions if the Gamecocks hope for
much improvement.
The top running backs return-
ing are junior Thomas Dendy,
who had 725 yards, and Kent
Hagood, who had 653 yards. Ira
Hillary, who had 30 catches for
442 yards, gives them some speed
and experience at wide receiver.
The defense will be led by
James Seawright and James
Sumpton, two senior linebackers
who keyed the defense that held
opponents to 169 yards rushing
per game last year. The secondary
will also be strong, with all four
starters returning.
SOUTHWESTERN
LOUISIANA
Nov. 3, 2:00 p.m. CDT
CAJUN FIELD
The Ragin Cajuns came to ECU
last season lightly regarded, but
took the Pirates to the wire before
a Tony Baker touchdown in the
fourth quarter put ihe Pirates on
top 21-18.
USL rallied after that defeat,
which gave them a 0-5 record, to
win four of their last five games,
losing only to Southern Mississip-
pi, and they return a large portion
of the 4-6 team.
The leading returner will be
quarterback Donnie Schnexnider,
who led the Cajuns against the
Pirates last year. A lot of USL's
success will depend on how well
Schnexnider is able to guide the
offense.
Other key returners on offense
will be fullback Thomas Jackson,
who ripped the Pirate defense for
135 yards on the ground last year.
Opening holes for him will be the
Cajun's outstanding guards Chris
Boudreaux and Keith Guidry.
The defense will have a few
holes to fill, and will rely heavily
on Fred DeJean and Chris Jacobs
to slow the ground attack of op-
ponents.
ECU has won the last two
meetings between the schools, but
Coach Sam Robertson's Ragin
Cajuns will be prepared for the
Pirates when they roll into town.
SOUTHERN MISSISSIPPI
Nov. 10, 1:30 p.m.
FICKLEN STADIUM
The biggest factor in last
season's 10-6 win over USM by
the Pirates was the weather. The
game was played in a rainstorm
with tornado-watch winds and
was a classic defensive struggle.
The Golden Eagles lost 11
starters from last years 7-4 team
whose other losses came at the
hands of Alabama, Auburn and
Tulane, but have a strong nucleus
of players returning for Coach
Jim Carmody's third season at the
school.
Back to lead the Golden Eagles
is quarterback Robert
Ducksworth, whose quick arm
and feet make him a double
threat. Handling the rushing will
be Sam Dejarnette, a 185 pounder
who was slowed by injuries last
year after a 1,545 yard rushing
performance as a sophomore.
The defense will be led by "Lit-
tle Richard" Byrd, who is believ-
ed to be one of the best defensive
tackles in the nation. Other key
players will be defensive end
Willie B. Moore and linebacker
Greg Hauesler.
The Golden Eagles play a
schedule comparable to ECU's,
with games against Georgia,
Auburn, Mississippi, Mississippi
State and Tulane all on the road in
addition to the Pirates.
WELCOME
to the new Presbyterian Congregation
Peace Presbyterian Church
Sunday
Church School At 9:45 A.M.
Morning Worship At 11:00 A.M.
For More Information Please Contact Either
Bill Goodnight-Organizing Minister (758-0384)
Or P.O. Box 1783
Morty, Mike & James
Fosh.on Cut For Both Man & Women (919) 752 � 1M6
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Title
The East Carolinian, August 23, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
August 23, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.353
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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