The East Carolinian, June 13, 1984






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darolmiatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.S8Nor
Wednesday June 13,1984
Greenville, N.C.
10 pages
Circulation 5,000
UNC Board Of Governors
Changes Consulting Policy;
Guidelines To Be Tightened
By JENNIFER JENDRAS1AK
NmHto
The UNC Board of Governors
recently changed its policy on con-
sulting done by faculty members,
but the effects on ECU should be
minimal, according to ECU
Chancellor John Howell.
The changes, to be put into ef-
fect by September, are aimed at
preventing possible conflicts of in-
terest in consulting work which
faculty members perform. Howell
said the ECU has always asked
faculty members to identify the
companies for which they do con-
sulting work. They will now also
be required to disclose whether
the company is funding research
they are performing at the univer-
sity and whether they are
stockholders in the company.
"At ECU, for the most part,
our faculty members are con-
sulting for government agencies
or educational institutions
Howell said. "They do less con-
sulting in industry
"One loophole is that a faculty
member might do consulting work
for an outside agency which is
funding work in his department,
or for an agency in which he is a
stockholder or official Howell
said. He added that "as the
primary employer" the university
is drawn into a conflict such as
this.
Questions concerning these
areas will now be asked and if a
problem is discovered, the school
will be able to determine whether
a conflict of interest exists, prior
to the initiation of the consulting
work.
The new policy will have the
greatest effect on UNC-Chapel
Hill and N.C. State University,
since these are the schools with the
most faculty members doing con-
sulting work, Howell said. "A lot
of their work is done through the
Research Triangle he said,
See CONSULTING, Page 2
�RYAN HUMIERT � ECU rteto Lab
So, you came to college to get an education. And what exactly are you learning? At least it promotes
physical fitness.
Freshmen Exposed To College Life Through S.O.S. Program
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Editor
Think back to the beginning of
your freshman year in college.
Chances are the first week was
more than slightly confusing. Ad-
justing to a new campus, new liv-
ing arrangements and a different
academic atmosphere is difficult,
to say the least. Freshmen orienta-
tion is geared towards making the
transition easier.
Freshman orientation begins to-
day and lasts until July 12. It con-
sists of five three-day sessions for
regular freshman and two shorter
sessions for special studies and
transfer students.
Between 2,200 and 2,300 in-
coming freshman arc scheduled to
attend the sessions this yearQAp-
proximately 95 percent of new
freshmen go through orientation,
said James Mallory, dean of
orientation and judiciary.
Mallory coordinates the pro-
gram, aided by Residence Hall
Directors Vanessa Higdon and
Don Joyner.
"The program is basically and
primarily an academic orienta-
tion Mallory said. Placement
testing and preregistration are
among the program's scheduled
activities.
The student orientation staff,
known as the S.O.S is responsi-
ble for coordinating activities and
answering questions. The staff
consists of 14 upperclass and
graduate students, chosen because
"they are familiar with residence
�RYAN HUMBERT � ECU Photo Lob
It's summer and the bees and the sun are out in full force.
Friday Hosts Show;
Howell Featured Guest
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
ECU, its progress and
achievements, was the subject
of the television show North
Carolina People, a program
hosted by UNC President
William Friday and sponsored
by the UNC Center for Public
Television network. ECU
Chancellor John Howell was
the featured guest.
The show aired Monday
night on Channel 25 and will be
shown again Sunday, June 17
at 7:30 p.m.
An overview of ECU was
provided, with subjects discuss-
ed ranging from enrollment
growth to the medical school to
the athletic program.
Friday praised Howell for
serving "with distinction and
total dedication" during his 27
years at ECU.
"I've seen a lot of it (ECU's
development), because a lot of
it happened in the last third of
its history Howell said.
ECU's enrollment growth in
the last 20 years has been
"phenomenal Friday said.
See FUTURE, Page 2
hall living, have a high scholastic
average and are well-rounded
according to Mallory. "They
work, eat and live with the
students he added.
Staff members are chosen from
all majors, Mallory said, in order
to provide more variety. "It's an
enjoyable job he said "and the
student staff has done an outstan-
ding job for a number of years
An important aspect of orienta-
tion is the opportunity to take
placement tests. Mallory said all
students are required to take tests
in math and chemistry, while
language and English tests are op-
tional. "One selling point of the
program he said, "is the idea
that you can come and earn col-
lege credit, free, putting you
ahead of the game
Students can earn up to 12
hours of credit in a language, six
hours in mathematics and three
hours in English. The English
placement test is also given for
placement into an honors section
of English.
Between 65 and 70 percent of
the incoming freshmen will also
preregister in the general college
while they are here. Others will be
able to preregister in the technical
schools, such as nursing.
Having the new freshman
preregister while they are here is a
necessity, Mallory said, since it
takes from mid-July until classes
begin in August to process the
schedules.
Several information
sessions
are also scheduled. One session
will deal with residence hall living
and another will deal with campus
activities. During the activities
session, groups such as the Mar-
ching Pirates, Career Planning
and Placement and the SGA will
be allotted five minutes to present
the students with information
about the services they offer. In
addition, Greenville Mayor Janice
Buck will welcome them.
There will also be academic in-
formation sessions. These sessions
are designed to familiarize
students with the offerings and re-
quirements of specific depart-
ments. "It gives them (the
freshmen) a chance to get their
feet wet Mallory said. "It is
especially good for those in
general college � it might help
them make up their minds
Parents are not neglected in this
process. A special parents' orien-
tation is held the first day of each
of the first five sessions, t lasts
between two and three hours,
Mallory said, depending on the
number of parents attending, and
the number of questions aked.
They are shown a 15-minute
slide presentation about life at
ECU and given an opportunity to
talk to different people from the
Division of Student Life. They are
also given a packet which includes
maps information about fees and
information about eastern North
Carolina. "The parents enjoy
this Mallory said.
Infractions Are Result
Students Unaware Of Regulations
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
N�w� Editor
One major problem en-
countered by the ECU Honor
Board, according to 1984-85
Honor Board Chairman Tom
Buonocore, is that "people don't
realize that we are there until they
come before us
The Honor Board consists of
ten students: a chairman, seven
voting members and two alter-
nates. "The board has original
jurisdiction in all cases where the
student is in direct violation of
university policy Buonocore
said. He added that it is "respon-
sible for ensuring that students
adhere to the university's code of
conduct
Unfortunately, Buonocore
said, many students are un-
familiar with the rules governing
conduct on the ECU campus. "It
is the student's responsibility to be
aware of these rules he said.
"The best way to prevent an in-
fraction is to know what is right
and what is not
According to Buonocore, a list
of offenses and possible
punishments is published in the
Student Handbook. He said
students, especially incoming
freshman, should read the hand-
book so they are aware of the
types of behavior considered
violations of the code.
The Honor Board handles bet-
ween four and six cases a week
during the year, although it is not
active during the summer,
Buonocore said. Before a case is
brought before the board,
preliminary hearings are held to
determine whether the infraction
is serious enough to merit a board
hearing. If it is, the board hears
the case and determines a punish-
ment. In cases such as cheating, it
has the power to suspend a stu-
dent from school.
One student was recently
suspended for cheating on a final
examination. The one-year
suspension, Buonocore said,
means that not only is the student
unable to attend ECU, but he is
also unable to attend most other
colleges or universities.
In general, the number of
cheating and plagiarism cases is
small. Buonocore said alcohol-
related offenses are the most com-
mon. Vandalism or residence hall
destruction is usually involved.
"Cases of vandalism are usually
alcohol-related he said.
Book thefts also account for a
large number of cases apj:earing
before the board. "Peopk don't
realize that if you see a book lying
around, you can't just take it and
sell it because there is no on e there
to claim it Buonocore sa;d.
Both the University Book Ex-
change and the Student Supply
Store have systems to track down
students who sell stolen books.
This is how the Honor Board gets
most of the cases. "Book stealing
is dealt with very strictly
Buonocore said, "as is vandalism
against the university
"One person got a $250 fine foi
maliciously setting off a fire
alarm he added.
Rental Program Not Feasible
Book Exchange System To Expand
ByMARYCASHIO
Staff Writer
When the SGA Student Welfare
Committee conducted student
surveys last year, one concern fre-
quently cited by students was the
high cost of textbooks. As a
response to this concern, a tex-
tbook exchange program was
developed on a trial basis and
book rental programs were
discussed.
At present a book exchange
program is still in operation on a
small scale at the Student Supply
Store, according to SGA Presi-
dent John Rainey.
Rainey said attempts are now
being made to establish com-
munication between ECU
students and administration con-
cerning the problem of book
costs. A meeting between SGA of-
ficers and the Faculty Senate was
held recently to propose longer
use of textbooks. One problem
students experience is that,
whenever a new edition of a book
is received by the bookstore, the
store is unable to repurchase older
editions.
Rainey has suggested that, in-
stead of this method, editions of
textbooks should be used for a
longer period of time, at least two
years.
Rainey added that a book rental
system is not feasible at this time.
He said he does not feel it could
be managed the way it is at other
schools. Making students pay a
set fee for differing numbers of
books would not be fair, he said.
The SGA, particularly the Stu-
dent Welfare Committee, will
continue to work on the problem
over the summer and, according
to Student Welfare Committee
Chairman David Brown, hopes to
expand the book exchange pro-
gram in the fall.
Crimes Include Indecent Exposure
By ERNEST ROBERTS
r Writer
An indecent exposure incident,
three summonses for worthless
checks and two assaults were
among the crimes reported to the
ECU Department of Public Safety
during the past week.
Reported crimes for June 5 �
10 included:
June 5, 6:35 p.m. � Sandra L.
Hall of Wilmington was served a
summons for a worthless check by
Ptl. Dail.
June 7, 12:10 a.m. �
Christopher C. Wood of 122 Jar-
vis Residence Hall reported pro-
perty stolen from dorm room.
11:55 a.m. � James Arthur Cran-
dol of Ayden was issued a state
citation for a stop sign violation at
Brody Building by Ptl. Brew-
ington. 2:35 p.m. � Joan Elaine
Tomer of 343 Rawl Building
reported an indecent exposure in-
cident in her office. 2:38 p.m. �
Harriette Griffin of the payroll
office reported an assault on a
female at the east end of Rawl An-
nex.
June
8, 12:22 a.m. � Lisa
Gatlin of 114 Slay Residence Hall
reported a suspicious person out-
side her room knocking on the
door and window. 4:20 a.m. �
Jennifer Layne Dunn of 27
Langston Pak Apartments was
taken into protective custody by
Cpl. Watson. 6:00 a.m. � Ken-
dall Diane Carrigan of Raleigh
was served two summonses for
worthless checks. 8:40 p.m. �
Sgt. Lawler reported the hydraulic
door stop on the level C stairwell
?;l?CnuStadium was �roken
and the door could not be
secured.
June 9, 12:40 a.m. -A female
student reported being assaulted
by a black male south of the am-
phitheatre. The suspect was not
found.
June 10, 12:36 a.m. � Monica
Loh of 804 Greene Residence Hafl
was transported to Pitt County
Memorial Hospital by Sgt. I awler
for a medical emergency. 10:32
a.m. � Frank Rabey report the
telephones and airconditionmg
were malfunctioninf in the Allied
Health Building.





2THgEAST CAROLlNlANjjjNjEl 3, 1984
Simon Appointed Political Science Chair
ECU News Bureau
Dr. Maurice D. Simon,
associate professor of political
science and former director of the
Master of Public Affairs program
at the University of North
Carolina at Greensboro, will
become professor and chair of the
Department of Political Science at
East Carolina University effective
July 20.
Dr. Marie Farr, assistant dean
of the College of Arts and
Sciences, made the announcement
following confirmation of the ap-
pointment by the UNC Board of
Governors Friday in Wilmington.
"I am pleased to announce the
appointment of Dr. Maurice D.
Simon as professor and chair of
the Department of Political
Science Dr. Farr said. "Dr.
Simon, formerly graduate direc-
tor of the MPA program, UNC-
Greensboro, has published widely
on international topics and receiv-
ed many fellowships and grants in
support of international research.
"He has been invited to attend
an international conference this
summer in Poland
"Dr. Eugene Ryan, dean of the
College of Arts and Sciences, ex-
pects Dr. Simon's international
expertise and administrative
abilities to be valuable additions
to international programs, the
department and the College. Dr.
Ryan and I both look forward to
working closely with Dr. Simon
when his appointment begins July
20 she said.
Dr. Simon holds the PhD in
political science from Stanford
University and is internationally
known as an authority on Poland.
He received the BA degree with
highest honors in political science
from the University of California
at Berkely in 1962 and the MA in
public law and government from
Columbia University in 1964.
He has been a member of the
political science faculty at UNC-G
since 1973 and was granted
research leave in 1976-77 and in
the fall of 1980. He became
graduate director of the MPA
program in 1981 and served until
June, 1983.
In 1972 and 1973, he par-
ticipated in the research exchange
program of the International
Research and Exchanges Board
and also held a fellowship from
the American Council of Learned
Societies-Social Science Research
Council. In 1969 through 1972, he
was a lecturer and assistant pro-
fessor of political science at
Williams College.
Dr. Simon was the recipient of
the Stanford University Wilson
Fellowship in 1967-68. In addi-
tion, he has received several
grants and fellowships, primarily
in the area of in 1976-77 , he par-
ticipated in the exchange program
of the National Academy of
Sciences Commission on Interna-
tional Relations, section on the
USSR and Eastern Europe, dur-
ing which he studied at the Polish
Academy of Sciences in Warsaw.
A search for a new chair for the
political science department at
ECU began last September when
Dr. Tinsley E. Yarbrough an-
nounced he would resign the
chairmanship in order to devote
more time to research and writing.
Yarbrough, a member of the ECU
faculty since 1967 and political
science chairman for the past four
years, served on the search com-
mittee which recommended Dr.
Simon for the position.
In announcing that he would
resign as chair when a successor
was named, Yarbrough said, "It's
time to do other things
Graduates Entering Improved Job Market
ECU News Bureau
This year's college graduate is
entering a job market which "is
10 times better than it has been in
recent years" but still very com-
petitive, according to ECU's
director of Career Planning and
Placement.
Getting a good job is highly
compet'tive because of the sheer
numbers of new college graduates
entering the market, says Furney
James. He estimates that North
Carolina colleges and universities
awarded approximately 30.000
baccalaureate degrees this spring.
"Jobs are out there � lots of
them � and a lot of 1984 college
graduates already have found
jobs James says. "Quality col-
lege graduates will find jobs
Based on past experience,
James estimates that 70 to 75 per-
cent of ECU's placement ap-
plicants will have jobs by
September following their gradua-
tion.
"There are good people out
there who won't have jobs by
then, but as they keep searching
most of them eventually will find
suitable work James said. Fac-
tors such as geographic considera-
tions, relocation, family ties and
the like enter the job search pro-
cess and often make it more dif-
ficult.
For the first time, James said he
is seeing concern among ECU
nursing school graduates this year
� not about Retting jobs, but
about getting jobs where they
want to live and work.
James says he believes "the
days are gone when the big pro-
blem facing a graduate was simply
deciding which job offer to ac-
cept
Now, James said "the job
market is 10 times better than it
has been in recent years when jobs
were scarce. But it is still com-
petitive The Bureau of Labor
Statistics forecasts that the job
market will be competitive for
many years to come, he said.
There is strong demand for
graduates in certain areas or pro-
fessions. This is heightened by
shortages of people trained in cer-
tain fields, such as secondary
mathematics teachers and in some
Future Looks Good
Continued From Page 1
Howell said that when he came to
ECU in 1957, the enrollment was
between 3,000 and 4,000. It now
stands at approximately 13,500.
"We have moved qualitatively
as we've done this rapid
growing Howell said.
Howell said that, although
ECU was started as a teachers'
college, "in a very short time, it
was taking a very strong role in
the development of teacher educa-
tion in this state and soon
became a full-blown comprehen-
sive university.
Consulting
Regulations
Revamped
Continued From Page 1
while the amount of consulting
done by ECU faculty is "not quite
as high
ECU faculty members do con-
sulting work through campus
facilities such as the Regional
Development Institute and the
Center for Applied Technology,
but many also do consulting on
their own.
"I've urged it (consulting) very
much Howell said. He said the
school's major concern is that the
professor fulfill his contractual
obligations to them. However, he
added, he feels it is possible for a
faculty member to spend as much
as one day a week consulting and
still fulfill his obligations.
The new policy was proposed in
order to assure that problems
didn't develop, Howell said.
"We've really not had any pro-
blem with our consulting
It is now "the largest industry
around" in eastern North
Carolina. In fact, Howell said, the
Pitt-Greenville Chamber of Com-
merce was originally organized
for the purpose of having ECU set
in Greenville.
Howell said ECU's community
involvement is shown through
several programs such as the
disaster as evidence of the need
for the ECU School of Medicine.
"I'm proud of the quick way our
hospital people responded to
that he said.
The medical school, Howell
said "is not just an institution that
graduates a certain number of
MD's � it does a great deal more
than that
Concerning ECU's future, "the
� j -� � "� "��"Ciimig eau s iuture, th
Rural Education Institute and a future looks very good in educa
program with Elizabeth City State tion Howell said. "I think we're
designed to aid economic develop- going into another boom in
ment m northeastern North education. The public sees that
Carolina. we're needed to solve some of the
Friday cited the recent tornado technical problems of society
Every Thursday Night
Ladies Night
Ladv Members Free
With Don Vickers Playing Th�
Be�t Of Top 40 & B�ach
Pitchers Of Margaritas
& 2 Shots Of Tequila $10.00
$2.00 Pitchers Of Beer
Free Wine 9 To 11














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Every Saturday Night
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sM BEACH PARTY m
FREE BEER FROM 8 9:30 PM
SHOW STARTS AT 9:30 PM
DOORS OPEN AT 5:00 PM
Every Tuesday Night
All Night
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Tuesday Thru Saturday
Specials Every Night
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Night
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& 2 Shot Of Tequila $10 00
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Memberships available at the door,
guests welcome
756-6401
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51 75 Margarita
52 OO Pin. Colada
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at door with coupon
Offer good June 1216. 1984
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a Coupon EX-
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guests only. All ABC Permits.
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752-2183
SANOWICH SMOf
Monday - Friday
Hto2or4to7
Join us for Lunch or Dinner!
The choice is yours
no. 1 Ham & Cheese
no.5 Ham & Cheese & Turkey
no. 10 Turkey & Cheese
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For
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$2.39
All sandwiches include lettuce, tomatoes, onions, salt, pepper, oregano, oil, and vinegar.
Also choice of: Potatoe, Macaroni Salad or Cole Slaw and your choice of 12 oz. soft
drink
Bring this ad and receive chips of your choice in store promotion only
other teaching disciplines. And
there is a brisk demand for
employees in three basic
categories � production of goods
and services, sales and finance,
James said.
"I suggest to students that they
use unique, imaginative ways of
looking for jobs James says. "I
tell them to take the initiative �
don't just respond to an ad � to
know something about the firm,
or the field, about its products
and services and to go after the
particular job in a knowledgeable
way
Also, James says, "I have the
impression that we're going to
have fewer levels of
management or training
periods, being offered by
employers. "Employers are going
to hire a person to do a specific
job
Within a short time after ECU's
annual commencement last
month, some typical ECU job
placements included a manage-
ment trainee for Burlington In-
dustries; a manufacturing cost ac-
countant for Ray-O-Vac in
Kinston; a sales and manufactur-
ing manager for Millikin & Co
Spartanburg; a speech pathologist
at O'Berry Center, Goldsboro; a
shopping mall manager in
Raleigh; accountants with some
leading accounting firms; a
management trainee at Duke
University; management trainees,
loan officers, credit analysts and
operations officers for banks and
other financial institutions, posi-
tions with department stores in
Richmond, Va positions in inter-
national marketing for tobacco
companies; position; with major
utilities firms, retailers, fast food
firms and processors and in-
dustrial equipment firms.
A large percentage of ECU
graduates find jobs with relatively
small industries or companies
with fewer than 100 employees.
But some others go with giants
such as Ford Motor Co which
hired an ECU grad as an owner
relations analyst, or Pitney Bowes
which hired an ECU graduate as a
salesman.
SGA
Transit Manager Needed
Apply in SGA office, Room 228,
Mendenholl, before June 21.
Wty&w
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Pirates Landing & Pizza Transit Authority
Invite you to open house at Pirates Landing.
Thursday, June 14 from 11:30 til 2:00
Drop by and see one of our units and have delicious pizza
from P.T.A. for lunch
P.O. Box 6026
GreenviUe, NC 27834
9197586061
�tofsttronoily Monogakd v
remco
east,
inc.
�� at tkiail MSMOIMINI
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�� Tjesday ard Thursdav dLnrJ
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lor and by the students of East Carolina I ner
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EXHIBITIONS
Four new exhibitions will open June
works gallery in Salisbury. NC Featured will be
Allen W Erdmann. Joyce Biunk Herb Pan
Wayne Wrights The new er.hibr.ions will run fr
3-July 23. 1984
PERSONAL CARE ATTENDAV
Applications are requested fro-n ttoat pc
interested in becoming PERSON CARE
DANTS :o wheelchair students Fat Fii. �
We are particularly interested la a - .
background of assisting T,dn
daily living.
For further details contact Office o' Hindicapp
dent Services, 212 W'hicharj -
University, Phone "5-r'99
IRS
The Department of ln;rimu-L Recreational So
offering physical fitnes masses for second
Registration for aerobics. Ua�lIlllii I ani
defense beganj Wednesia
22 Come by Room 20 Memorial
57-638-
ADMINTSTRATTVF PI ANNIM
Exam:r.e and analyze planning Bad
seaside community Full tirrr � maj
nominal cost Contact Co-op office
WOODWORKING DESIGNE!
Opportunity to design and COcntniCt � -
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.�iiiabie at nominal cost Contact Co op
Blcg
BEACH JOBn
Retail, grocery and fast food positions �
Head. Kill Devil Hills and Myrtle Bea
-omodation assistance Contact C
Bldg
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A special administration of the N
3 (Professional Knowledge) an i
Saturday, July 14, 1984, in Spe .
sional Knowledge Test begins a! 9:
p.m. Closing date for reg ;rra
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752-0326
CallU
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crystal, typewriters,





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
AFWLJ2J
r
rch for a new chair for the
science department at
fsan last September when
isley E. Yarbrough an-
he would resign the
nship in order to devote
: to research and writing,
jugh, a member of the ECU
since 1967 and political
J chairman for the past four
served on the search com-
which recommended Dr.
tor the position.
inouncing that he would
cts chair when a successor
ned, Yarbrough said, "It's
do other things
ket
fleers, credit analysts and
t ons officers for banks and
financial institutions, posi-
-vith department stores in
ond. Va positions in inter -
i marketing for tobacco
tarries; positions with major
i. firms, retailers, fast food
and processors and in-
Jial equipment firms.
arge percentage of ECU
ites find jobs with relatively
I industries or companies
fewer than 100 employees.
isome others go with giants
as Ford Motor Co which
an ECU grad as an owner
ions analyst, or Pitney Bowes
h hired an ECU graduate as a
man.
eeded
228,
21.
wmmrnitiitiiiitiiMi
LTT
mmtowy

sit Authority
es Landing.
til 2:00
tve delicious pizza
Studnts!
mnwr Rates
OFF
ugnst Rental Rates
only
N�rtFall.
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
since 192)
Published every Tuesday and Thursday during the
academic year and every Wednesday during the sum-
mer
T" East Carolinian is the official newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned, operated, and published
for and by the students of East Carolina University.
Unsigned opinions on the editorial page, unless other-
wise noted, are the opinion of the newspaper, usually
written by the managing editor.
Sebecrlpdoa Rale: SM yearly
The Eail CaroHatea offices are located o� the secoad
floor of tke PaMcattoa Balidlag oa Ike ECU campus,
GreeavUe. N.C.
POSTMASTER: Send address changes to The East
Carolinian. Publications Building. ECU. Greenville.
N.C. 27834.
TsJaaljaat: 7S7-4M. 6367, 639
EXHIBITIONS
Four new exhibitions will open June 3 at the Water-
works gallery in Salisbury, NC Featured will be works by
Allen W Erdmann. Joyce Blunk, Herb Parker, and
Wayne Wrights. The new exhibitions will run from June
3-July 23, 1984
PERSONAL CARE ATTENDANTS
Applications are requested from those persons who are
interested in becoming PERSONAL CARE ATTEN-
DANTS to wheelchair students for Fall Semester. 1984.
We are particularly interested in anyone who has a
background of assisting individuals with their activities of
daily living
For further details contact: Office of Handicapped Stu-
dent Services. 212 Whichard Building, East Carolina
University Pnone 757-6799.
IRS
The Department of Intramural Recreational Services is
offering physical fitness classes for second session.
Registration for aerobics, aquarobics and personal
defense begins Wednesday, June 20 and ends Friday. June
22. Come by Room 204 Memorial Gym to register or call
757-6387
ADMINISTRATIVE PLANNING
Examine and analyze planning and zoning ordinances in
seaside community. Full time, housing available at
nominal cost Contact Co-op office.
WOODWORKING DESIGNER
Opportunity to design and construct a wood shop for
construction firm located at Emerald Isle. Housing
available at nominal cost Contact Co-op office, 313 Rawl
Bldg
BEACH JOBS
Retail, grocery and fast food positions available at Nags
Head. Kill Devi! Hills and Myrtle Beach. Some with ac-
comodation assistance Contact Co-op office, 313 Rawl
Bldg.
t LASSIFIED ADS
r k i.v um tne form at right or
usi a separate SIMS of paper If
r x, nead mor. Haas. Thar ara 33
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hyphenate woros properly. Leave
space at and w Una It word
doesn-f tit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the rloht to rate -1 any ad.
AH ads must he �repaid. Enclose
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Please print legibly! Use capital sad
lower case letters
Reran la THE CAST CAJHHJNIAN
attic � ):W Tecsda? before
�safest)
Name.
Address.
CityState.
NjpuJincs.
.Zip.
. at 730 I
life i.
.No.
PLANTERGROWER
Positions available in Emerald Isle to assist in growing
and planting flowers and shrubs for landscaping. Full
time, housing available at nominal cost. Contact Co-op
office. 313 Rawl Bldg.
Classifieds.
SALE
WANTED
AUDITOR INTERN
Audit under supervision of senior accountant; auditing
courses required. Position available in accounting firm
located in Morehead City. Contact Co-op Office 313 Raw!
Bldg.
FOR SALE: Black and White TV 12 inches 120 00 Call
Kim at 732-9957.
FOR SALE: 1972 VEOA. excellent condition! $300. Call
758-0893. After 3:30.
FOR SALE: Bed, full size. Call Jim 752-1419.
1 OB 3 ROOMMATES wanted to share 3 bdna apt. I
block from campus. E. 11th Street. CaH WMgf.
FEMALE ROOMMATES I or 3
East 5th St. CaU 758-4799.
SECRETARY
Needed for position in Washington, DC. Good shor-
thand, transcription and typing skills required. Contact
Co-op office, 313 Rawl Bldg.
BSU
The Baptist Student Union has dutch dinners every
Tuesday Evening at 5:30. Join us at the BSU Center on
511 East Tenth Street every week. Programs follow.
SAILING CLUB
ECU Sailing Club Organizational meeting, Wednesday,
June 13th, 7:00 p.m. at rm. 142 Minges. All interested per-
sons welcomed. The planning of our summer sailing ac-
tivity will be discussed. For more information call Don at
7521-6424.
OUTDOOR REC
The Outdoor Recreation Center located in 113
Memorial Gym is offering a white water canoeing 'Adven-
ture Trip' June 16. The registration deadline is June 12.
On July 11 a local canoeing trip will be offered with ad-
vanced registration ending July 9. For more information
call 757-6911 or come by room 113 Memorial Gym.
FINE ART
Greenville Jaycees cordially invites you to attend an Ex-
hibit and Auction of Fine Art Saturday Evening, June 16,
1984 to be held at the Sheraton Greenville Inn. Admission
is free.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED to snare 3 bdrooai
apt. Eastbrook. H uttttJes, for 2nd isaalori and faU. Cal
Cindy 435-3S74 Jacksonville.
PERSONAL
(Hire East (Earolmtan
SUBCRIPTION FORM
Name:
Address
Date to Begin:
Complimentary
Business
Date to End:
Individual
Amount Paid $
Date Paid
Students wanting to have their parents receive
The East Carolinian can fill out the form
above and drop it by The East Carolinian of-
fices on the second floor of the Publications
building, across from the entrance of Joyner
Library. Rates are $30 for one year and $20 for
six months.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Ruben Ingram, general manager
of the Ebony Herald. You have just made it through
another year. Best of luck with your inovations for the
"new" Ebony Herald. C.H.F.
M3: "Irregardlen" of what the test results are, you score
well above "87 percent" in all subjects with mel Here's
to wishing you an early Happy Birthday and a "good"
time hiking � enjoy them both! Love yal M3
mmn
MISC
NTE � CORE BATTERY 3
A special administration of the National Teacher Examinations � Core Battery no.
3 (Professional Knowledge) and the Specialty Area Examinations � will be held on
Saturday, July 14, 1984, in Speight Building, at East Carolina University. The Profes-
sional Knowledge Test begins at 9:00 a.m. and the Specialty Area Tests begin at 1:30
p.m. Closing date for registration is MONDAY, JUNE 25, 1984.
PROFESSIONAL TYPIST IBM typewriter, full time
typing at home. CaU 736-3660.
COLOR CO-ORDINATE yourself for the summer! Free
make-up and color analysis by Professional consultant.
Classic Reflections. 756-264 after 4 PM.
BABYSITTERS NEEDED: occasional nights A
weekends. Must be good with children and have car.
756-2684.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Worn leather key case with LAM written on
front. Please call Martha at 738-1193.
For just 75 cents a line,
The East Carolinian Classifieds
are the best way in town to
sell, advertise, send messages
Keep up
to date with
Announcements
in The East Carolinian
iiiiiiHiiniiiiHiiiicniii
ATTENTION INCOMING FRESHMEN
The Student Union will be presenting:
BRICE STREET

Admission is Free!

Thursday Night
8:30-11:00 p.m.
i
i
The concert will be held in front of
Mendenhall Student Center.
OOODKMCmXMjL
K
nmnmn!
����-�
Keep your parents up
on life at East Carolina
with a subscription to
The East Carolinian
MARATHON
Restuarants
Greek
Dishes and Pastries
Sandwiches
Subs.
Pizza
We Serve Daily Specials
752-0326 560 Evans St
ail UsFast Delivery
Looking for a place to live this fall?
RINGCOLD TOWERS
Campus �East Carolina University
Student Condos
SALE AND RENTAL UNITS AVAILABLE
ECU students will have a special place to live this fall � nexc to
campus in their own private, secure, fully-furnished sad
carpeted, air-conditioned condominium units. Surrounded on
three sides by ECU property, Ringgold Towers is closet to
classrooms than some on-campus dormitories. Downtown
Greenville is one block away.
Completely furnished, each unit will be individually owned
either by students and their parents or by investors renting to
students. There will be on-site management with security
personnel on duty at night. These brand new units will be
occupied for the first time fall semester.
Recent changes in tax laws make ownership of this r pe
property advantageous for both investors and parents of
students. Prices begin at S27.900 with up to 959F financing
available. We'd like to show you how Ringgold Towers can
provide a special place for ECU students to live. For purchase
or rental information, contact us for free 17-page booklet on
Ringgold Towers. 1-800-672-8229 (NC), 1-800-334-1135 (GA,
SC. VA, MD, WV, DL, TN), (919) 355-2698 (collect) frm
other states.
RINGGOLD DEVELOPMENT CO INC.
105 Commerce Street
P.O. Drawer 568
Greenville. NC 27834
(919) 355-2698
m
WE PAY
CASH
FOR
Class Rings Diamond Rings
Gold A Silver Jewerly
SilverCoins
j
WE BUY & SELL
T.V's. stereo's, cameras, video, microwave ovens,
bicycles, watches, binoculars, walkmans portable
AM-FM, cassette, heaters, good furniture, china 4
crystal, typewriters, etc.
INDEX TO BUILDINGS
1. Afro American Cultural Center
2. Amphitheater
V Auxin Building
4 Arnica Residence Hill
V Bel Residence Hall
6 Belle Building- School of Allied Heskh and Sucial Profession.
7 Bluicon House
1 Brcwstcr Building
9 Cafeteria Building
10. Chancellor i House
11. Qiriitanbury Memorial Ofm
12 Clemem Residence Hill
IV Cotten Residence Hall
14 Cruaian Building
IV Drams Building
16 ErvinHslI
17 Ficklen Stadium
15 Flanagan Building�School of Technology
19. Fleming Residence Hall
20 Fletcher Residence Hill
21 Fletcher Musk Center�School of 1
22 Garage
2 V Garten Residence Hall
24. Green Residence Hall
2V Graham Building
EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY
RISCGOLDTOVVERS
26 Harrington Field
2?
2S
29
W
II
2
R
M
1
He-inna Plant
Home Economics Suildina�Sctv.J if Home Economics
Infirmary i Student Health Service)
International House
Irons Building
. arvis Residence Hall
enkins Alumni Building
enkins Fine Arts Center�School of Art
ones Residence Hall
McGmnis Auditorium
Minges Coliseum
Nursing Building�School of Nursn
Parks. Recreation andConservation
PaVaHJitnsi lrUpsftfueMv
EVANS,
Downtown Greenville
7524K6
17. MaintenanceBuilding. Central Wanhnie. Central Supply
IS Mendenhall Student Center

m
41.
42.
ft
44.
4V
46.
47
4R
49
V0.
VI.
VI
H
u
�.
V6
V7.
a
i
6ft
61.
62
61
64.
6V
Folia. Traffic sad Information Center
Ragsdale Hall�School of Medacins
Rail Building Srnool of Business
Rawl Annas
Regional Development Institute
Scata Field House
Scott Residence Hall
SUy Residence Hall
Speech � Hearing Building
Speight Buikiing-Sthi.J d Educai.m
Sports swdictne Building
Steam Daiishasiusi Cetner
Tyler Residence Hall
iVlssiJ ttuidsnti Hall
Whichard sfctildina.
White Residence Hall
Wright Annas
Wright Building





Stye Caat QTarnlfntan
Servmg the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, g
Darryl Brown. Managint Edilor
JENNIFER JENI�AS1AK. v� , T PmjRZAK
RANDY MEWS. ANTHONY Martjn a
TINA MAROSCHAK. �, ��� ToM NoRTON
Greg R.deout. mm, ,m � KATHy FUERST fnMm Mgnager
BILL AUSTIN, omm Mmt LlNDA VlZENA. MK I.
June 13, 1984
Opinion
Page 4
Drunk Driving
online �r A
a5 ex�A IM UiSTbRV.
IkWBotTtoi ANY"
�fesTs GtAiNQ UP ?
Congress' Solution Bad
The House of Representatives
vote last week to deny federal
highway funds to states that allow
people under 21 years of age to
drink was an unimaginative,
bullyish answer to a legimate ques-
tion. Yes, preventing wrecks and
deaths by people driving while
drunk is a proper concern of the
nation's lawmakers, but this is not
the way to do it. Besides the
wrongness inherent in raising the
age, the tactics planned by the
Congress are plainly unfair.
The bill has virtually no op-
ponents. Seems the politicians do
not want to offend vocal groups
like Mothers Against Drunk Driv-
ing (MADD) during an election
year. Everyone is for it without
even pausing to think of the
arguments against why raising the
age is unfair and denying the
monies is mean.
The argument against making 21
years of age the nationwide drink-
ing age is an old but valid one; it is
a simple extension of the old-
enough-to-die old-enough-to-vote
logic. If a man or woman of 18 can
be killed in the name of his country
and choose his nation's leaders,
then why can't he have a drink?
Why deny this privilege to those
between 18 and 21 by making them
the scapegoat for a crusade on
drunk driving?
Last year our state made con-
sumption of beer illegal to those
under 19. The East Carolinian and
ECU students fought against it,
but alas our power was not
enough. The same is happening
now in the Senate and House. Very
few will voice the concerns of those
under 21. We do not have enough
pull; we are not a big enough
voting bloc.
Once again we are about to be
walked on, but this time with a
twist. Our state and a number of
others would be forced to raise
their drinking age to 21 or face a
cut-off of federal highway funds.
The first year five percent goes and
the second ten percent. States
would be foolish not to hike legal
drinking ages in the face of such a
large loss of money. A little
bullyish, eh?
The worst part about the legisla-
tion is the hastiness involved in
passing it. The politicians want to
appear to be doing something
about the national "drunk driving
epidemic They have grasped on
to a quick fix at the expense of
states' rights and people under the
age of 21. This is not the answer.
The problem is too complex, it
must be studied carefully before
such drastic steps are taken.
So, once again our represen-
tatives are acting more like politi-
cians than leaders. Maybe when
November rolls around we ought
to get some new ones.
A in t Easy
Thank You
The East Carolinian wishes to
congratulate those members of the
administration who restructured
the ID-card process. Although at
first there may be some confusion
getting accustomed to the new pro-
cedure, the benefits definitely
outweigh any minor incon-
vienences.
Having a library card, activity
card and identification all in one
will make using all three a lot
easier. No longer will students be
frustrated when they forget one
part of the ensemble at football
games or the checkout desk. We
and the students appreciate the ef-
fort.
Campus Forum
ID Procedures Change
The May 30 issue of The East Caroli-
nian had an article on the front page
concerning the new ID cards. There
were some errors in the article, and I
think it would be a good idea to correct
them for the record. I shall appreciate it
if you will use following information to
correct the mistakes. Thank you very
much.
For many years, ECU students have
found it necessary to carry a photo ID
card, an activity card and a library
card. A new multi-purpose ID card
which will combine all of these cards in-
to one will replace the present system
beginning Fall Semester 1984.
Combining the photo ID card, activi-
ty card, and library card will involve the
following process: The photo ID card
will be made in Mendenhall Student
Center, the activity card will be received
with the receipt for payment of fees and
the library card will be obtained from
the library when the student uses the
library card for the first time during
Fall Semester. The following steps
should be followed by the student: take
either the class schedule or receipt for
payment of fees to Mendenhall Student
Center and have the photo ID card
made. Next, peel the gum label back of
the photo ID card and the activity card
tab to the front of the card beneath the
individual's picture. The final step is to
get the library card. This is to be done
the first time the student goes to the
library. A library staff member will af-
fix a coded bar to the lower portion of
the front of the photo ID card. After all
of these steps have been taken, the
multi-purpose ID card will be complete.
Thereafter, each semester the ID card
will be updated by the student removing
the new activity card and tab from the
receipt for payment of fees and affixing
the activity card and tab to the ID card
on top of the old activity card and tab.
With more thant 13,000 students ex-
pected Fall Semester, considerable time
will be required to make that many
photo ID cards. Freshmen and transfer
students who attend the summer orien-
tation sessions will have their photo ID
cards made during the summer. Return-
ing students will have the first two
weeks of Fall Semester in which to have
their photo ID cards made. ID cards
will be made in Room 244 in
Mendenhall Student Center according
to the schedule listed below:
Mon. Aug. 20, 9am-5pm
Tues.Aug. 21, 9am-5pm
Wed. Aug. 22, 9am-5pm
Thur. Aug. 23,12pm-5pm
Fri. Aug. 24,12pm-5pm
Mon. Aug. 27,12pm-5pm
Tues. Aug. 28, 12pm-5pm
Wed. Aug. 29,12pm-5pm
Thur. Aug. 30,12pm-5pm
Fri. Aug. 31,12pm-5pm
The cost will be $2.50 for each ID
card.
The making of photo ID cards will
involve the use of two ID card cameras.
Each camera has the capacity to make
at least 100 photo ID cards per hour.
With two weeks set aside for ID cards
to be made, there is no need for
students to wait in long lines to get then-
ID cards made.
Rudolph Alexander
Director of University Unions and
Associate Dean � Student Activities
By GREG RIDEOUT
The Democrats staggered across the
finish line last week, all three exhausted
and dazed. And, as political writers like
to say, Mondale "limped" by the
checkered flag first. Now phase II is
upon us. We pundits now get to see how
wrong we were about the primary fights
and begin our next series of predictions
during the lull before the convention.
We are dazed from our earlier mistakes
but not down for the count. So, with the
valiant courage and conviction of a
handful of wet spaghetti, the following
words of wisdom are set to print.
First, my credentials. I have a lifetime
membership to Pundit Weekly, a card
and decoder ring and I once touched Bill
Moyers' lips at a press conference. (It's
okay, I only lost one tooth.)
First, I predict Walter Mondale will
not wear Jim Palmer underwear just to
get the Gary Han vote. Instead, he will
choose Hart as his VP specifically for
donning bikini briefs and other assorted
non-Norwegian apparel. Hart will ac-
cept the vice presidential, stripped low-
risers despite his calling Mondale a
"strictly white boxer kind of guy
Mondale will, though, court the
"tough guy" vote. He and the Secret
Service agents assigned to him will run
three marathons and a triathalon, arm
ViewPoint
wrestle an alligator and Mr. T and go to
a bar mitzvah dressed as Arabs. After
being released from the hospital, sym-
pathy will shoot him up in the polls.
Jesse Jackson will demand and receive
from the party leadership an all-expense
paid vacation for two to wonderful Tel
Aviv, Israel. That's right, Jesse, you and
a lucky someone who is somebody will
be flown first class to rescue the hostage
of your choice. Jesse will deliver the vote
in exchange for this favor.
Mondale, Hart and Jacksor will unify
and make their first appearance together
on 'Family Feud They will bi: introduc-
ed by Richard Dawson as the "Mohack
family" and will match wits ;igainst the
Regbushes, a rich and powerful family
from somewhere near Virginia. The
Mohacks will disagree and not yell,
"good answer, good answer" and be
thrown off the show.
Ronald Reagan will agree to debate
Mondale in the fall, but will lose when
he says how he discussed nuclear
weapons with the White Hoi.ise kitchen
help. He will also suffer a memory lapse
during a news conference and say Jane
Wyman is the president of E! Salvador.
And, my last prediction. Whar you've
all been waiting for � my pick for the
next head honcho of the fee world.
Well, urn � eeny, meeny, mim, moe -
er, I pick Reagan by a nose ;n Illinois.
Of course, he'll decline the offer to write
his memoirs and star in a TV movie
about his life. C'est la vie.
TRB
Tht Ntw KtpubUe
They aren't lining up outside Studio
54 anymore, and down here in
Policyland they aren't talking much
about the "window of vulnerability
Those were fads of the 1970s. Geez,
where have you been? But let's take a
trip down memory lane. It's instructive.
In the mid-to-late 1970s, conservative
defense intellectuals began promoting
the idea that the United States would
face a period in the early-to mid-1980s
� a "window of vulnerability" � when
our nuclear defenses would be inade-
quate, unless drastic and immediate
steps were taken. Specifically, the
Soviets' nuclear buildup would have
reached the point where they could wipe
out our land-based nuclear missies and
bombers in a surprise attack, with nukes
to spare. After such an attack, we would
still have our submarine-launched
missiles. But, pending improvements
due in the 1990s, these are only accurate
enough to be useful against the general
population � unlike land-based
missiles, which can hit specific military
targets. The United States would thus
face the choice of escalating to certain
mutual holocaust, or surrender. Logic
would dictate surrender.
Reasoning backward, in the manner
of nuclear strategy, "window" theorists
argued that � despite the uncertainties
about whether the Soviets would or
could do such a thing and what our ac-
tual response might be � the mere
awareness of such a possibility would
weigh heavily on the world's actors,
leading to increased Soviet boldness and
new depths of appeasement by our
allies. The 1980 Republican platform
predicted "geopolitical paralysis" for
America unless the window was closed.
The "window" theory is a fine exam-
ple of the neoconservative dictum that
"ideas have consequences It played a
real role in stimulating a general appetite
for defense spending among politicians
and "opinion leaders What gave this
idea power, however, was its specificity.
Chicken Little had a detailed scenario of
why the sky v, as falling, when, and what
to do about it. "Our nuclear deterrent
forces must be made survivable as rapid-
ly as possible to close the window of
vulnerability said candidate Ronald
Reagan in 1980, for our own security
and for the political perceptions of our
adversaries, our allies and Third World
Countries
It is now 1984, the early-to-mid 1980s.
Do you know where your "window of
vulnerability" is? Last Dec. 14, Presi-
dent Reagan said, "I think we have clos-
ed largely that window of
vulnerability Then on Feb. 15 he said
"we've gone a long way toward" closing
it, "but we still haven't done" it. On
Feb. 22 he referred to "the window of
vulnerability that we're trying to close
But then on March 29 he said that the
United States is now more secure than
"earlier when our defenses were so lax
that there was a window of vulnerabili-
ty Come on, man, it's your metaphor.
Get it straight!
The truth is that absolutely nothing
has been done to close the alleged win-
dow of vulnerability. There are only two
possibilities: either it never existed, or it
is wide open. Both are inadmissible for
Reagan.
President Carter proposed to close the
window by shuttling MX missiles
around vast areas of the American West.
The idea was that the Soviets wouldn't
be able to find and hit all of these targets
with the number of missiles they were
allowed to have under SALT II. His first
solution was "defense pack" � planting
MX missiles so close together that in-
coming Soviet missiles would knock one
another off target. After this and other
schemes (MXs strapped to airplanes,
MXs hidden in Good Humor trucks
and so on) met with skepticism, Reagan
appointed the Scowcroft Commission to
think it all through again.
To the naked eye, the Scowcroft
Report of April 1983 seems to say that
there is no window of vulnerability. "In
the judgment of the Commission, the
vulnerability of (missile) silos in the near
term, viewed in isolation, is not a suffi-
ciently dominant part of the overall pro-
blem to do anything about it. Did
Reagan denounce General Scowcroft
and his commission for trying to hand us
over to the Russians on the platter? Not
at all. That's because the report recom-
mends building the MX anyway. What
for? A a bargaining ch.p. as a
demonstration of national will, and as a
potential first-strike weapon :n defense
of Europe. But if Congress approves
(the long twilight struggle continues),
the new missile will go in the same old
vulnerable silos, so its arrival aon't ad-
dress the need Reagan said was so
urgent. And the other strategic weapons
Reagan has asked for won't be available
before the end of the decade.
The Scowcroft Report was the official
signal that the "window of vulnerabili-
ty" was out of fashion. Paul Nitze, for
example, said last week that he has never
used the term. (I cannot prove him
wrong.) Nevertheless, Nitze was a
founder of the Committee on the Pre-
sent Danger and probably is more
responsible than any other person for
promoting the idea that our hind-based
missiles were becoming vulnerable, with
perilous strategic and geopolitical conse-
quences ("an increase in the orospects
for general Soviet hegemony was his
warning in 1974). Have adequate steps
been taken to avert the danger he
predicted? No, he acknowledges. Does
he see signs of the Soviet Union taking
advantage of our strategic vulnerability?
Eugene Rostow was another early
'window" buff and later Reajian's first
arms control director. Rostow does not
bend with fashion. He reads the
Scowcroft Report as triumphantly affir-
ming the "window" theory, which is his
privilege. He forthrightly believes we
nave now entered a period where his
prediction of 1979 - that we would "be
vulnerable to nuclear war or nuclear
r?1?11" and would "face a condition
ot diplomatic impotence and be totally
unable to use our conventional forces"
� nas come true.
f HI
ASimpjyVlJ
Drei
By BRIAN RANCH
If you had happenend to b
Ohio ten years ago, you may h
heard a whisper emerging h
the industrial rhythms, a tan
familiar melody straining to
neard above the popular song
the billion radios, tape decks,
record players.
These melodic wisps wen
first chords of The Marvells, i
the familiar notes were the soj
of the 50s and the 60s. Bat
new group wasn't just ano:
group cashing in on the nostai
craze of the mid-Os: 1
Robert Green, Mark Rosenbei
Earl Peaks, and Ken Posey o
Marvells had added a Marvels
new twist to their music.
"We put visual presentation!
it says Ed Zap, one of
9-member group's three rem
ing original members "us
choreography, custumes. pn
and we tried to make
theatrical as possible
'Vulnerability' Vulnerable I The F,�
5 D VIUULDi v rg-x
By KIMBERU COX
M�ff � rlu-r
The Flower Basket, Iocs I
3002 East 10th Street in Gref
ville, is quite a florist. The s:
shop opened three years ago
has done surprisingh well,
business is owned by Greg
Tina Lee. Each of their fami
help with the business during h
day seasons. Greg and Tina
most of the work as
manage the establishment.
The Art
By MAR1 CASHIO
M�f f � mer
While leafing throuv:
March. 1984 issue of USAl
magazine given to me by a friej
I came upon an article ab
m i
i
$i
til
.
.HeaMeUPTV)BUCKS5H0BTCMH�Sllu Mm
Grawfba, or the "poor man'
Louisiana lifestyle.
i






CPS
asy
rice. Jesse will deliver the vote
ige for this favor.
laie. Hart and Jackson will unify
e their first appearance together
li Feud. The will be introduc-
chard Daw son as the "Mohack
: will match wits against the
es, a rich and powerful family
newhere near Virginia. The
will disagree and not yell,
swer, good answer" and be
ff the show.
. Reagan will agree to debate
in the fall, but will lose when
how he discussed nuclear
with the White House kitchen
will also suffer a memory lapse
ws conference and say Jane
is the president of El Salvador.
my last prediction. What you've
waiting for � my pick for the
id honcho of the free world.
� eeny, meeny, miny, moe �
k Reagan by a nose in Illinois.
he'll decline the offer to write
and star in a TV movie
is life. C'est la vie.
a bargaining chip, as a
-anon of national will, and as a
first-strike weapon in defense
oe. But if Congress approves
ig twilight struggle continues),
missile will go in the same old
Ible silos, so its arrival won't ad-
he need Reagan said was so
And the other strategic weapons
has asked for won't be available
the end of the decade.
rowcrofl Report was the official
;hat the "window of vulnerabili-
out oi fashion. Paul Nitze, for
le, said last week that he has never
(he term. (I cannot prove him
) Nevertheless, Nitze was a
pr of the Committee on the Pre-
anger and probably is more
Isibie than any other person for
ting the idea that our land-based
p were becoming vulnerable, with
strategic and geopolitical conse-
ts ("an increase in the prospects
neral Soviet hegemony was his
ig in 1974). Have adequate steps
j taken to avert the danger he
ted? No, he acknowledges. Does
signs of the Soviet Union taking
Itage of our strategic vulnerability?
ene Rostow was another early
ow" buff and later Reagan's first
control director. Rostow does not
with fashion. He reads the
croft Report as triumphantly affir-
the "window" theory, which is his
ege. He forthrightly believes we
now entered a period where his
ion of 1979 � that we would "be
rable to nuclear war or nuclear
mail" and would "face a condition
plomatic impotence and be totally
to use our conventional forces"
s come true.
let
le
ill
1
THE EAST CARCH INI AN
Features
JUNE 13, 1S84
Page 5
A Simply Marvell-ous Group
Dressing Up To The Music
By BRIAN RANGELEY
"l�ff Writer
If you had happenend to be in
Ohio ten years ago, you may have
heard a whisper emerging from
the industrial rhythms, a faintly
familiar melody straining to be
heard above the popular songs of
the billion radios, tape decks, and
record players.
These melodic wisps were the
first chords of The Marvells, and
the familiar notes were the sounds
of the 50s and the 60s. But this
new group wasn't just another
group cashing in on the nostalgia
craze of the mid-70s; The
The Marvells, now hailing from
Nashville, premiered at the
Carolina Opry House last week.
Last Wednesday night the band
played three one-hour sets. That
night the first set was the most
theatrical and featured much of
the oldest material.
Each member dressed like a 50s
character. A street hood, a motor-
cycle gang member (leather jacket
and spiked collar included), a
preppie guy, and even a real-life
nerd, adorned the stage.
Drummer Freeman Brown was
pounding out that 50s beat, when
who should appear on stage, but
her around the stage.
Hours of preparation go into
each minute of presentation.
Usually, one of the members
selects a song that he or she would
like to do. The whole group
discusses who will sing the song,
who plays the various in-
struments, and who stands up
front. Most of the members can
play at least two instruments.
The group then arranges the
music, the vocals, and the
choreography. Choreography
takes the most time.
All of that time is well-invested.
The Marvells have played the
1
?rSe?pSreen,HM;rk 5osenber8er.up�d Lord, Ed Zap, Freeman Brown, Myron Stillman, Tony Ko
Earl Peaks, and Ken Posey compris. ihe original Marvells. ' y '
Marvells had added a Marvell-ous
new twist to their music.
"We put visual presentations to
it says Ed Zap, one of the
9-member group's three remain-
ing original members, "using
choreography, custumes, props,
and we tried to make it as
theatrical as possible
� Buddy Holly! � or at least a
close copy, the customed Mark
Rosenberger. Rosenberger danced
around the stage in the true Buddy
Holly tradition.
The crowd enjoyed visual com-
edy to the music of "Lion Sleeps
Tonight Wendy Lord played a
damsel in distress as a lion chased
Grand Old Opry, warmed up for
Lerry Lee Lewis, and toured the
South from Chattanooga to
Hylton Head. Currently, The
Marvells has two shows on the
Nashville Cable Network.
Ed Zap says that the group is
breaking into the large country
music clubs; apparently, the au-
uiences also have a taste for the
oldies.
And the oldies are what The
Marvells does best. The second set
began rockin' to the beat of
"Locomotion" and the people
began to jump. The dance floor
filled with flashdancers,
breakdancers, bumping beer
bellies, and even one mother-son
combination.
After a quick costume change,
Wendy Lord entered the
stagefront in a black evening
gown. The pace slowed as she
began singing Streisand's "People
Who Need People but the
crowd was as earnest in slow dan-
cing as they were in boppin
The band beautifully recreated
the hamonies of the Beach Boys in
a medley of Beach Boy tunes.
Then Wendy re-emerged as Con-
nie Francis, and Ken Posey
followed up as the "Killer a
convincing Jerry Lee Lewis.
The excitement skyrocketed as
the band belted out hits by Bill
Hailey and the Comets, James
Brown, Sam & Dave, and
Rosenberger again as Chuck
Berry. Wendy broke the pace once
again, this time to satisfy the
country music fans' appetite with
Pasty cline's "I Fall to Pieces
The shows seemed to move
smoothly; the crowd readily ac-
cepted the costume changes and
different music styles.
Occasionally, however, confu-
sion sets in. Mark Rosenberger,
who does Chuck Berry in the se-
cond set, also does Buddy Holly
in the first set.
"There was this one time said
Tony Kaz, "when we were doing
both in the same set. At this point
in time, when he went off to
change, we were playing his Bud-
dy Holly intro. Well, he comes
out and he's half white and half
black, waving his arms saying,
'no,no He was wearing half of
his Chuck Berry suit. We were
BRYAN HUMBERT - ECU Photo Lat
The Marvells
Last week The Marvells mesmerized fans with their tulent and unique
choreography at The Carolina Opry House.
totally lost. Someone else in the
band had to do the Buddy Holly
song at the last minute
During the band's last break,
the crowd thinned and the noise
decreased. But anticipation
permeated the air as people sensed
the last hurrah coming.
Bartenders passed out fresh cans
of beer.
The Marvells came onto the
stage and Boom-shak a-lak-a-la-
ed right into a medley of Sly and
the Family Stone hits. For a few-
minutes, the crowd sat back and
sipped their beverages, but they
couldn't resist those inviting
rhythms. Little time passed before
they again put on their boogie
shoes and hit the floor.
Sly Stone perfectly led into the
Motown Medley, featuring the
best of Smokey Robinson and the
Miracles, The Temptations, The
Four Tops, and the Supremes.
The Supremes act was the most in-
teresting; Wendy Lord sang the
Diana Ross par.s while three of
the guys � Tony Kaz, Robert
Green, and Ed Zap � backed her.
Quite effective.
Robert Green and Earl Peaks
later teamed up for a remarkable
rendition of the Righteous
Brothers' "Levin Feeling
However, the bind didn't do as
well with the Jackson Five's A-B
C. The song seemed to lack some
of the characteristic tightness,
that Jackson punch. The Marvells
ended the night v.ith Bob Seeger's
"Old Time Rock 'N' Roll" while
the crowd danced its last Tango.
By the time th�
the musicians ha
Said Kaz, "We'r
pie educated as tc
probably quite ;
from what peoj
here. The peopl
you know, whei
clap
And clap the
night was over,
won the crowd
: getting the peo-
: what we do. It's
different twit
)le are used to
: have to learn.
e they're gonna
people did.
erable I The F,�wer Basket: An Exquisite Shop For All Seasons
By KIMBERLY COX
Sttff Writer
The Flower Basket, located at
3002 East 10th Street in Green-
ville, is quite a florist. The small
shop opened three years ago and
has done surprisingly well. The
business is owned by Greg and
Tina Lee. Each of their families
help with the business during holi-
day seasons. Greg and Tina do
most of the work as well as
manage the establishment.
The works of the Flower Basket
are what makes it the most
outstanding florist in the Green-
ville area. The Flower Basket uses
the freshest flowers, creative
talents, and over all, puts more
time and effort into each piece.
Their aim is to listen attentively to
what each customer desires and to
suggest helpful ideas based on
their knowledge so they create a
perfect arrangement that will
satisfy their customer and the oc-
casion.
The true beauty of this business
is the arranging and creating of
the flowers. Greg and Tina truly
enjoy their work, and it shows.
Each boutonniere, corsage, bou-
quet, and centerpiece is special
and is looked at as an individual
art piece. More time and creative
thought are put into their works
of art. Their prices are also lower
than area competitors. Greg and
Tina are sincerely proud of each
article they complete.
Because of their dedication to
make their work art, one can
definitely tell the flowers which
come from the Flower Basket.
Their flowers are set apart from
other florists due to their secure
arranging and fresh creativeness.
The Lee's strive to let the flowers
they arrange represent the Flower
Basket. One of the keys to their
success is their friendliness to their
patrons. Greg and Tina have not
lost touch with their customers as other countries. If the order is
ot Th,Ssts hpv e, a � made prior lo 12 noon- delivery�
The Flower Basket does offer a usually made he same dav
delivery service which extends 3 Holidays, of course, are an excep-
miles past the city limits. If you tion.
The Art Of Eating Crawfish Louisiana Style
By MARY CASHIO
Miff Writer
'mudbugs Usually, the name
conjures up an image of crawly
While leafing through the yucky creatures. Nothing could be
MarQh, 1984 issue of USA, a further from the truth Crawly
magazine given to me by a friend, they may be, but definitely not
I came upon an article about yucky.
Crawfish, or the "poor man's lobster is an important part of the
Louisiana lifestyle.
Indeed the little critters, a
delicacy in Louisiana, are a sym-
bol of the laid-back, easygoing
lifestyle of southern Louisiana.
Like clambakes, crawfish boils
are festive occasions of revelry.
There is a certain mystique to sit-
ting in front of a pan of crawfish,
with other devotees, pealing the
tails and taking an occational sip
of Dixie beer. Even a stranger can
get caught up in this ritual, the
origin of which lies in the customs
of the French-speaking Cajuns of
Southern Lousiana, descendants
of the Acadians who were expell-
ed from Nova Scotia by the
British in 1763.
Crawfish(by the way, Louisia-
nians never, under any cir-
cumstances, say "crawfish") are
often called the poor man's
lobster, a label which is
misleading, because while the two
creatures resemble each other,
they come under two entirely dif-
ferent catagories. Both are crusta-
ceans, though.
According to the article men-
tioned above, mudbug eating has
just become a craze. On the
average, in 1982, people in Loui-
siana consumed over 34 million
pounds of them. This puzzles
Hubert Melencon, a retired
crawfisherman, who said that
people just didn't eat that many in
the old days. The only edible part
of the critters is the meat inside
the tail.
They usually are served in three
ways: boiled; in an etouffee,
whereby the crawfish meat is
cooked in a thick sauce and served
over rice; or as a bisque, whereby
empty crawfish shells are stuffed
with crawfish stuffing.
Here is a recipe for boiling
crawfish, which is an art. It is not
enough merely to have a pile of
live crawfish and a pot of water.
One has to blend ingredients
skillfully. Twenty-five pounds of
crawfish will serve five people.
4 gallons water
1 one-lb. box salt
1 pint cayenne pepper
3 lemons, sectioned
15 whole, peeled onions
20 small, unpeeled Irish
potatoes
1 box crab boil
25 lbs. live crawfish
According to the article, "put
four gallons of water, salt,
cayenne, lemons, onions,
potatoes, and crab boil in a
10-gallon pot. Cover and bring to
a boil. Add crawfish, cover and
bring back to a boil. Simmer for
10 minutes, then leave in water for
another ten minutes. Drain and
serve with condiments on the
side
Right now, they may still be in
season, which usually lasts from
about mid-March through mid-
May. However, since
crawfishermen started cultivating
crawfish ponds, the season has ex-
tended. It now may begin as early
as January and end as late as
August.
Part of this extended season
comes at the same time as the
Louisiana World's Fair, which is
attracting people from all over the
world with its exhibit of priceless
treasures from Versailles and the
Vatican.
Now is as good a time as any to
visit the World's Fair and get a
taste of crawfish in Cajun County
of South Louisiana. As they say in
the Pelican state, let the good
times roll.
mm. w BRYAN HUMBEHT � ECU Photo ik
The Lees proudly display their shop. The Flower Basket.
purchase something that is $15 or
more, there is no delivery charge;
$10 or more, there is a delivery fee
of $1.50; and for purchases under
$10, there is a delivery fee of $2.
The Flower Basket will deliver
anywhere in Pitt County for a
higher fee based on mileage. Ac-
cording to Tina, "A large percent
of their sales are done cash and
carry, where the customer pays
for the article and takes it with
him
Teleflora services are also of-
fered. For only $2.50 one may
select and choose flowers to be
sent anywhere in the United
States, Canada, Mexico, and
In addition to" fresh flowers,
they also carrybrass and gold
items, silk and dried flower ar-
rangements, Japanese pottery,
household plants, and attractive
stuffed animals, all of which may-
be incorporated with ar-
rangements.
The Flower Basket is everyones
florist. They have a wide selection
of flowers, and offer everyone
something for their price range
whether it is 50 cents or 50 dollars.
When you need flowers for that
special someone or occasion, the
Flower Basket and Greg and Tina
are where you neec to be. They
are open MonSat.
?f? Br�e?�M,i PBS �� �"��� � �" WVSP Benefit
Concert tonight at 9:30 at the Attfc. �"�ni





.6 THE EAST CAROLINIAN JUNE 13, 1984
Patrick O'Neill Relying On Faith, Support
u. A41 k- r u a urn j i . . . .
By MIKE HAMER
Sttff Writer
Below is a continuation of last
week's telephone interview with
former East Carolinian news
editor and writer, Patrick O'Neill.
Patrick, a member of the Per-
shing Plowshares, was arrested
Easter Sunday for breaking into
the Martin Marietta plant in
Orlando, Florida and damaging
Pershing missile components.
EC:Have you received support
from people around the country?
PO: Yeah. Well, most of the sup-
port, of course, has been from
New York and North Carolina
and Florida, except for people in
the peace movement up in New
England. I think that the real
value of these actions is the im-
pact that they have on the real
local community. I think what
we've done is sufficiently brought
the reality of Martin Marietta to
these people. Hey, in the land of
Disneyland we've got a stark reali-
ty called Pershing II; it might be
the thing that ends the world, and
1 feel that's been well com-
municated.
From the visits I get from local
eucharistic ministers, they've said
we really accomplished a lot. I got
a letter from Dirk Sprite and this
is a real beautiful quote that he
said. "In the hands of the
Blacksmith, we hope that your
basic metal is of sufficient quality,
and when he's through with this
conditioning you'll be stronger,
wiser, more effective discipline,
better prepared for your next
assignment. Your witness is to so
many of who are more timid, less
honest, unprepared Dirk is a
medical doctor in Chapel Hill who
was fired from the clinic he work-
ed at because he was involved in a
tax day protest against the arms
race. After he was firedhe decided
that this was a sign to him as a
Quaker that he should work full-
time for peace. He's working full-
time on disarmament. My jour-
nalism professor at North
Carolina Central gave me an A �
you know I missed the last half of
the semester � and sent me a let-
ter saying, "I admire you for your
passion and compassion; for your
concern and love of humanity; for
your conviction and courage
Melinda Newell wrote, "I can't
get you out of my mind, you and
the gallant peacemakers who are
confined with you. The profundi-
ty of your course of action is
monumental. I have held back for
so long. That's been a theme
throughout the letters. They're
almost like personal admissions of
a need to do more.
Some of the local people in
Florida said, "Your actions give
me strength. At a time when I
need an example of courage, I
thank you for providing it. Your
witness is an inspiration to us
all From another Florida resi-
dent, "Dear Patrick, Lift high
your banner of love
A friend of mine in New York
wrote to me, "Although you are
paying mightely for your so-called
crime, what is legal is not always
just. You did what you believed
was right, which very few men
would do. You are a man of iron
and I am proud to call you a
friend of mine Sister Happy
quoted from Thomas Merton:
"The duty of the Christian is to
do the one task which God has im
posed on us today. That task is to
work for the total abolition of
war Happy writes, "You and
the others have taken the one step,
a big one Later she writes, "I'll
be praying for you and I'm sure
you'll be praying that I and many
others will have courage to work
for peace. I know that my pro-
blem is that I have too much to
lose. I guess the main thing I want
you to know is that I'm very
grateful that you have taken the
faith. It is just too hard to explain
to people what it's like. Most peo-
ple I know wouldn't want to deal
with this for thirty minutes, what
I've been locked into for 40
daysthirty minutes at max.
There's no segregation of in-
mates at all. A guy who just got
put in here for blowing
somebody's head away is right
near my cell. The guy's a Vietnam
veteran. The guy's permanently
disabled; he's obviously mentally
ill. He just killed somebody �
prophetic stand you have taken, he's right here in the next cell with
and I do think you are right to do people in here for bullshit crimes
it. I pray that you'U be led by the like driving under the influence,
spint in
way
all the steps along the
Almost every day I get one of
those kinds of letters that makes
me want to cry. Quite honestly, I
just cry every day. I cry for a lot
of different reasons. I cry because
I'm overwhelmed by the enormity
of the support from every single
person in my life who means
anything to me. They all support
what I've done, and yet, I'm sit-
ting in a prison cell facing the
possibility of years in prison. I
just cry because the actions of the
peacemakers are so badly do something to help youper-
understood. It's so essential that sonally or contribute to the ending
we respond to this filthy rotten of the arms race, what would you
driving with suspended sentence;
these people are in the same cell.
What can I say? The guy could
have a flashback in the middle of
the night and start choking people
to death. I don't know. I'm on my
toes all the time. You've got to
assert yourself, and you've got to
have faith. That's the whole
point. I've got to believe that God
is taking care of me. If I don't
believe that, Mike, I might as well
just hang myself.
EC: For students and faculty who
are sympathetic and would like to
war. They have to be as dedicated
to the achievement of non-violent
cause as they are to the attainment
of a world with violence � the
status quo.
People have to be willing to
make the commitment, as Merton
said, to totally abolish war. It's
quite clear that war is obsolete,
but we've got to abolish it. I hate
to offend people. People who
want to write off the Pershing
Plowshares as just a radical
groupI just want to say to them:
what stage are we at with this
arms race? We've seen The Day
After and we've heard people teU
us that nuclear was is inevitable �
we've got to stop it.
I see all my friends taking col-
lege courses and preparing for
graduate school, making all these
grandiose plans, and they treat the
issue of nuclear war and justice
for the oppressed like a hobby.
"Well, PI try to make the
meeting if I can, I'm really busy,
I'm working on this, I'm working
on that It's just absolutely in-
comprehensible to me that the
building can be burning all
around us and we're going to keep
fiddling. I don't understand it. I
can't see anybody not working to
prevent this thing. It's just so
clear and so obvious that nuclear
war is inevitable if there isn't
some incredible changes in the
way the world is working now.
I guess I'm in a state of shock.
It's not just the 18 and 20-year-old
students who attend the wealth of
universities in this country � it's
the professorsit's the people
who are in a position where they
have a responsibility to train peo-
ple � and they're sending a bunch
of ill-prepared people out into the
world who think they have the
same opportunities that their
mothers and fathers did. The
signs of the times are there �
we're in the last stages of a
nuclear age. Our sisters and
brothers are dropping like flies,
and we're worried about nailing
down our nice little niche � our
nice little job where we make
$20,000 a year and give our five
bucks in the collection plate on
Sunday � and we feel that we've
done our duty. I just refuse to ac-
cept thestatus quo that people dy-
ing of starvation is acceptable.
World hunger is a preventable
problem.
I gave a couple of Jxtures at
ECU and at Georgetov n Univer-
sity in Washington, and I said to
the people, "Compassion isn't
something I can give you. I can't
take compassion or passion and
jam it down your throat. Either
the fact that 50,000 people dying
each day causes you a lump in
your throat or it doesn't. Either
these are real people or they're
just statistics. Or you really feel
that in you gut. That's the pro-
blem � that we're just a nation
without compassion. We really
just view the suffering of the poor
as a fact of life, and it's just
abominable.
I mentioned to you when I went
to Haiti and I saw little babies
starving in the streets � you
know, laying in mud ind their
own defacation. Here's a country
that's only 45 minutes by air from
Miami. It's just a gross, gross
thing.
system, from a position of love
and trust, and I guess people just
don't understand it. I, for one,
don't understand it.
EC: Can you get books to read?
PO.Yeah, I can get books. I don't
want any books. I don't know
whether they'd let me have them
or not.
EC: Are you still giving Bible
classes?
PO: They're not really Bible
classes. We get some guys
together and do some scripture
study. We had a memorial service
when the first black in over 20
years was executed in Florida. At
the exact moment he was being ex-
ecuted, we had a service and talk-
ed about capital punishment and
that whole issue
suggest?
PO: Well, I don't think that atten-
tion should be placed on the Per-
shing Plowshares. What I'm hop-
ing is that our action as a witness
will enpower others to take action
of a similar nature. That is, work-
ing for peace. As Helen Caldicott
says, "We've got six months to
save the earth. We hold it in the
palm of our hands. We are the
curators of God's creation I
think we have to be willing to be
heard; we have to be willing to
take a risk for peace; we've got to
be willing to stick our necks out.
The fact is, we've got a limited
amount of time to deal with this
problem and if we don't, we're
going to have a nuclear war and
the whole third world con-
Theresa new fashion place in
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������ iojuv ��.��� nunu ,KJU-
It's hard, Mike. I can't tell you sc,�usness. If people are going to
how screwed upit isit's just do something, they have to treat
amazing. Stuck in this roomI non-violence and the prevention
swear, the only thing I've got is o war witn a moral equivalent of




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THE EAST CAROLINIAN j.
History Of T
Me
By TONY BROWN
SufTWrlle
The first version of The Va
birds, formed m London durf
1963, included Keith R.
(vocals), Chris Dreja (guitar), Ji
McCarty (drums), Paul Sam
Smith (bass), and Ei
"Slowhand" Clapton (he pUy,
so fast he looked slow . They wt
called the most blueswailing mc
Yarmirizing Yardbirds, and wh
they rocked songs like "T
Much Monkey Business"
knew why.
The first hint of success car
from replacing rhe Rolling Ston
as house band at the Crawdad
Club in Richmond. England
1965 the title song from For o,
Love by Graham Gouldman, latj
of lOcc. became their first U.S.
at number six. After playing
four cuts for the Having 4 Rax
Up Ip, Clapton left to play bla
Another guitar wiz, Jef Bee
replaced him. Number n:n
"Heart Full of Soul" follow
and the English hit "Evil-Hear
You" preceeded their final I
top 20 U S. singles "Shape
Things" and "Over Un
Sideways Down" in 1966.
Samwell-Smith left to becci
producer, and session-man Jim
Page entered after working w
The Who ("I Can't Explain.
Generation). He then worked wi
Van Morrison ("G-L-O-R-l-A
Baby Please Don't Go), T
Kinks, Tom Jones ("It's N
Unusual"), and others. The grc
then appeared in the mov
Blowup. With Beck's long illne.
the band fell apart in 196.5 aft
one last number 50 "Happenir
10 Years Ago Dreja became
photographer, and Rel: ar.d N
Cany formed a series oi iins
cessful bands before Rel el
tricuted himself with his euitar
May 14. 196.While the oth
faded away. Jimmy Page w
ready to break loose.
Jimmy, being the only Yardb:
left to fulfill contracts, formed t
New Yardbirds with Robert Pla
(vocals), John Bonham (drum
and John Paul Jones (bass). Jo.
wa�anoth�-veteran session pla
fo acts like The RoIIi
Stones,Herman's Hermits, etc
Soon becoming Led Zepp
(Keith Moon of The Who s
they'd go over "like a le
balloon"), the toured the U.
opening for Vanilla Fudge
1969, while their initial Ip L
Zeppelin went to ten and "Gc
Times Bad Times "Communi
tions Breakdown" became
double-sided hit.
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hunger is a preventable
a couple of lectures at
at Georgetown Univer-
ashington, and I said to
le, "Compassion isn't
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pn your throat. Either
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Ml or it doesn't. Either
real people or they're
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thai we're just a nation
t ompassion. We really
trie suffering of the poor
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Ible.
ioned to you when I went
and 1 saw little babies
n the streets � you
ng in mud and their
ication. Here's a country
lv 45 minutes by air from
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" SUPER
SAVING
CENTER
IREENV1LLEBLVD.
IHEEASTAROUNlAN 7
History Of The Yardbirds
Members Move
By TONY BROWN
Sun Writer
The first version of The Yard-
birds, formed in London during
1963, included Keith Relf
(vocals), Chris Dreja (guitar), Jim
McCarty (drums), Paul Sam well-
Smith (bass), and Eric
"Slowhand" Clapton (he played
so fast he looked slow). They were
called the most blueswailing, most
Yarmirizing Yardbirds, and when
they rocked songs like "Too
Much Monkey Business you
knew why.
The first hint of success came
from replacing the Rolling Stones
as house band at the Crawdaddy
Club in Richmond, England. In
1965 the title song from For Your
Love by Graham Gouldman, later
of lOcc, became their first U.S. hit
at number six. After playing on
four cuts for the Having A Rave-
Up lp, Clapton left to play blues.
Another guitar wiz, Jeff Beck,
replaced him. Number nine,
"Heart Full of Soul" followed,
and the English hit "Evil-Hearted
You" preceeded their final two
top 20 U.S. singles "Shape of
Things" and "Over Under
Sideways Down" in 1966.
Samwell-Smith left to become
producer, and session-man Jimmy
Page entered after working with
The Who ("I Can't Explain My
Generation). He then worked with
Van Morrison ("G-L-O-R-I-A
Baby Please Don't Go), The
Kinks, Tom Jones ("It's Not
Unusual"), and others. The group
then appeared in the movie
Blowup. With Beck's long illness,
the band fell apart in 1968 after
one last number 30 "Happenings
10 Years Ago Dreja became a
photographer, and Relf and Mc-
Carty formed a series of unsuc-
cessful bands before Relf elec-
tricuted himself with his guitar on
May 14, 1976.While the others
faded away, Jimmy Page was
ready to break loose.
Jimmy, being the only Yardbird
left to fulfill contracts, formed the
New Yardbirds with Robert Plant
(vocals), John Bonham (drums),
and John Paul Jones (bass). Jones
ua$anotlJC�-veteran session player
fot6 acts like The "Rolling
Stones,Herman's Hermits, etc
Soon becoming Led Zepplin
(Keith Moon of The Who said
they'd go over "like a lead
balloon"), they toured the U.S.
ooening for Vanilla Fudge in
1969, while their initial lp Led
Zeppelin went to ten and "Good
Times Bad Times"Communica-
tions Breakdown" became a
double-sided hit.










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Balloons for all Occa-
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In 1970, included the number
two classic, "Whole Lotta Love"
bw "Livin Lovin' Maid the lp
went to the top. got to first the
same year. The single, "Im-
migrant Song" hit 16th.
In 1971, Runes included the
classic "Stairway to Heaven
which was never released as a
single. A 1973 tour broke atten-
dance records everywhere, in-
cluding the Beatles' Tampa record
(56,000), and three shows of
25,000 each at Madison Square
Gardens. Houses of the Holy
became their third lp in a row to
go to the top, with "D'Yer
Mak'Er" and "Dancing Days
By 1975's Physical Graffiti,
they were the most popular band
in the world. Top cuts were
"Wanton Song "Trampled
Underfoot "Kashmir and
"Houses of the Holy In August
of 1975 Plant was hurt in a car
wreck and the touring slowed.
Presence was the next smash, even
though it's considered to be weak
overall. It includes "Royal
Orleans" and "Nobody's Fault
But Mine Also in 1976, a con-
cert movie, The Song Remains the
Same, along with the soundtrack,
were successful.
The last "new" album came
along in 1979 � In Through The
Out Door � with "All My Love"
and "Fool in the Rain John
Bonham was asphyxiated in his
own vomit while drunk in 1980,
and the band dissolved.
In 1982 Page did the Sound-
track for Deathwish II, and an lp
of old, unreleased songs came out
(Coda).
Robert Plant had immediate
solo success with Pictures at
Eleven, going top five, as did The
Principle of Moments in 1983.
Page played in a series of Ronnie
Lane benefit concerts in the same
year with numerous sixties
rockers.
After the Yardbird's Eric Clap-
ton joined John Mayall's
Bluebreakers, then recorded one
lp with Mayall, Steve Winwood
and Jack Bruce as Powerhouse.
After playing on The Beatles'
"While My Guitar Gently
Weeps Clapton formed Cream
with Bruce (ex-Manfred Mann)
and Ginger Baker. Their first U.S.
success came in 1967 with the
number four lp, Fresh Cream.
The double-album Wheels of Fire
Live hit thetop in 1968. The same
year, rare singles hits were "Sun-
shine of Your Love" at fifth, and
"White Room at sixth. In 1969,
Goodbye rose to second, and
"Crossroads" was their last top
thirty single. Best was third in
1969, and the final U.S. top twen-
ty lp was Live in 1970. The double
lp. Heavv Cream, is most
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Monthly Memberships
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representative.
The group disbanded in 1969.
Baker and Clapton, known as
Blind Faith, recorded one million-
selling, self-titled lp with Steve
Winwood. Bruce went solo, then
joined West, Bruce, and Laing.
After Blind Faith, Baker formed
Airforce, then the Baker-Guervitz
Army.
Clapton then played on John
Lennon's Live Peace In Toronto
and joined Delaney & Bonnie
("Never Ending Song of Love"
and "Only You Know and I
know"). His first self-titled solo
lp, with Leon Russell and Steve
Stills, included the hit, "After
Midnight
From there, Clapton formed
Derek & the Dominoes with
Delaney and Bonnie and recorded
Layla with Duane Allman. The
single "Layla" failed initially, but
when re-released in 1972, it went
to top ten. Py then the band had
broken up because of the lack of
success and Duane Allman's
death on October 29, 1971 in a
motorcycle accident. A live lp was
the only other release.
Clapton played for George
Harrison's All Things Must Pass,
"Concert for Bangladesh and
others. In the midst of heroin ad-
diction in 1973, he recorded Rain-
bow Concert with Pete
Townshend of The Who. By
1974's Ocean Boulevard, he was
cured and began his most suc-
cessful stage with the major
number one hit, "I Shot the
Sheriff and massive album sales
with platinum Slowhand,
Backless and others. The top
singles "Lay Down Sally "Pro-
mises and "I Can't Stand It
followed. Other hits were: "Willie
& the Hand Jive "Hello Old
Friend Wonderft. 1 Tonight
"Watch Out For mcy and
"Tulsa TimeCocaine In 1983
he played in several benefit con-
certs for Ronnie Lane.
The other guitar wiz from The
Yardbirds, Jeff Beck, also went
on to fame on his own. After two
solo English hits, he formed the
Jeff Beck Group with Rod
Stewart and Ron Wood. Beck was
hurt in a wreck, and after Truth
and Beck-Ola, Wood and Stewart
left to formFaces. In 1971, a se-
cond Jeff Beck Group recorded
two lp's. Beck's solo, Blow By
Blow was successful in 1975, and
followed by a string of unsuc-
cessful lp's, some with the Jan
Hammer Group. The Jeff Beck
Group backed Donovan on a top
forty hit "Love is Hot" in 1969.
Jeff also played in the Lane con-
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i i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
JUNE 13, 1984
Williams Takes Third In 200 Heat
�����.spomf-h,� " the later heats when rh ri.nnrc � � .� . " �� �� K WW m
By PETE FERN ALD
WM Sport fJJlOf
Competing at the Nationals
held in Eugene, Oregon, ECU
trackster Henry Williams con-
tinued the Pirate's surge to be one
of the best track programs in the
country.
Running in a 200-meter qualify-
ing heat, Williams beat out rivals
Stanley Blaylock and Tony Dees
of the Southeastern conference
placing third with a time of 20.89
seconds.
'Henry placed sixteenth
overall, he beat some really fine
people said head coach Bill Car-
son.
With the combined men's and
women's sports this year at the
Nationals, the competition was
reduced to the qualifying heat
winners.
In the 200 meters, only the six
heat winners and the top two
times were taken. Unfortunately,
Williams' time was not one of the
fastest so he was unable to com-
pete.
Coach Carson voted against the
qualifying procedures used at the
meet, but the rules were unchang-
ed. "Henry had to win because he
was running in one of the middle
heats. The fastest times came in
MaxweUShines
the later heats when the runners
knew what times they had to
beat Carson said.
Teammate Craig White who
had qualified for the 110 high
hurdles did not participate in the
Nationals due to a death in his
family, but still has the Olympic
trials in L.A. to think about later
this summer.
The men's track team has gain-
ed great respect and considerable
recognition this past season as
they have shown what ECU is all
about � excellence.
In preparation for next year,
coach Carson has recruited
several top athletes for the Pirate
program.
The recruits are:
Julian Anderson, a high school
All-America out of Louisa Coun-
ty HS in Virginia. Has performed
well running a 40.66 in the
quarter, a 20.2 in the 200 meters
and a 10.4 in the 100 meters.
Lee Vernon McNeil, a high
school All-America out of St.
Pauls, NC. Participated in the 100
and 200-meter dashes at the state
meet and is ranked in the
country's top ten.
Ken Daughtry, of Mt. Saint
Josephs HS in Baltimore. Ran a
40.72 in the quarter mile and a
20.12 in the 200 meters.
John Lee of Marshall HS in
Fairfax, Virginia.
David Parker, of Patrick Henry
HS in Roanoke, Virginia. Jumped
40.88" in the triple jump and ran
a 14.2 in the 110 high hurdles.
Andre Fields, of Norcom HS in
Portsmoth. Ran a 13.8 in the 110
high hurdles, a 30.72 in the in-
termediate hurdles, a 40.68 in the
quarter mile and jumped 49.9 " in
the triple jump. "Fields is a com-
bination footballtrack recruit for
ECU. He plays wide receiver and
is a good piece of recruiting said
Carson.
In addition, sprinter Terry
Brown who did not run on the
track team last year will return for
next year's team running in the
100, 200 and 60 meters.
"We'll have more depth for
next season and we're going for
it said Carson. "I boxed myself
in, we'll only have one or two
recruits at most next year.
"The key is quality more than
quantity. I could have limited it to
three or four, but the athletes
from last year and the recruiting
this year will give us more top
athletes for the individual events
and relays
MICHAEL SMr H - ECt Phcxc Ufc
program for his team except he
wants to score in two other events
for next year � the intermedite
Carson plans to run the same hurdles and quarter mile. "We'll
rtar, Williams pl.c�. sixteenth over.ll i� ,h, 200 me.ers ,he Xrtoml, held in Eugene. Oregon
attempt to score in the quarter at
the IC4A's said Carson.
Carson expects the ECU track
program to grow over the next
couple of years arid hopes the
team will have nev facilities in
order to advance th: program to
national excellence.
The Boston Celtics, behind
Cedric Maxwell's 24 points, add-
ed to their storied basketball
tradition Tuesday night by
defeating the Los Angeles Lakers
111-102 in the seventh game of the
finals to win the NBA champion-
ship.
It was the 15th title for the
Celtics. Their last championship
came in 1981 when they defeated
Moses Malone and Calvin Mur-
phy of the Houston Rosckets.
Boston also received 22 points
from Dennis Johnson and 20
from Larry Bird. Bird was named
Most Valuable Player in the series
although he was held below his
average in the game and had just 4
points in the fourth quarter.
Police restrained fans
underneath the Celtic basket in
the waning seconds, as many in
the crowd of 14,890 tried to storm
the court. Hundreds of fans
managed to rush the players at the
buzzer, holding aloft green towels
and Celtic banners in the heat of
Boston Garden.
The game remained even
through the first period as the
Lakers were unable to get their
fast break into high gear, and the
Celts shot poorly from the out-
side.
After a James Worthy slam
made it 32-30 in the opening
moments of the second period,
Boston reeled off eight
unanswered points and began to
control the tempo of the game as
they went to the lockerroom with
a six point lead.
The Lakers were never able to
get into the flow of the game, and
ultimately found themselves down
A
by ten points with less than five
minutes remaing in the game.
Los Angeles did cut it to three,
but Dennis Johnson hit two free
throws with 45 seconds left to give
Boston a 107102 lead, putting the
Celtics out of Danger.
Boston scored just three field
goals in the fourth quarter but
had 14 points on free throws. Bird
scored the Celtic's last 2 points on
free throws with 10 seconds re-
maining.
The Lakers were unable to
recover from Boston's 8-0 spurt at
the end of the third quarter, which
gave the Celtics a 13-point lead,
their biggest of the game. Dennis
Johnson scored 10 of Boston's 20
fourth-quarter points � 6 on free
throws.
Overtoil Appointed
Football Goes
Coach Gary Overton
After working under five dif-
ferent coaches and serving as an
assistant for the last eight years,
Gary Overton has been named as
the new ECU baseball coach.
Director of Athletics Dr. Ken
Karr made the announcement last
Wednesday, less than a week after
former head coach Hal Baird
resigned in order to become head
coach at Auburn University.
"I'm happy for the opportunity
and am looking forward to the
challenge Overton said. "Very-
few changes will be made with the
program in order to continue the
strong tradition we have had here
over the years
Although the Pirates concluded
thier 1984 season with a 34-13
record, an ECAC South Cham-
pionship and a third place finish
in the NCAA South I regionals,
Overton is optimisric that the
Pirates can have continued suc-
cess in the future.
"We lost five great seniors be
said, "but with the plavers we
have returning next -ear we have
the nucleus for a good club and a
possibility of winning the ECAC
South championship "
Overton came to ECU in 1969
as an undergraduate, and served
as the team's manager until 19"?
In 1974 he served one vear as "a
graduate assistant, before becom-
ing a full-time assistant and facul-
ty member in 1977.
A native of Ahoshe, Overton
played basketball, baseball, foot-
ball and golf at Aiioskie High
School. He recieved all-
conference and ail-East honors ir.
baseball and was named all-state
in golf.
Time
Carolina head football Coach Ed Had the Bucs won more than a nf'SL ' mCnt,�n But Emory adds' "We're n
Emory polished off a slab of goodly measure of raoectir,TL! �3"T'i , goin� t0 sliP UP on n�ody no
Shoney's hot fudge cake the other games tihV fooSif SS� It Everybody always thought I more, neither
day pondering the Pirates' EfttSTW STTTT1" This season's schedule also will
schedule for this fall and for falls ahead of schedule.here woSS Su mv'life nl'aT? e top-heavy with road games-
I�me- u be bowl money to spend nadomd nLSi. d 0nJy four in Gr�"e and seven
And even as he put away the exposure galore But it ?s moVe ?n 25 2? Y�U Take up away- "But l thin � will be the
last bite, Emory knew he couldn't is needed to delive The BucTto hJ11??? anloutlook on l�t year we'll have to do that
have his cake and eat it, too. that loftv rani Zt cil ?e orld� you better havc a Pr�- Emory said "I think next vekr
"They schedule 'em, , play XZStZ trXlt'ZT k WC'U � JhSSJZ
"a KhC Sat o c there is scheduling heavweghfs ?�"�?� wc ve ot � � and some years in the
- Emory says he doesnH crinae tio�?� h 5? Kna' future we'U s" at home and
when Dr. Ken k eSu's -tom!ZZ�n thcKschcd.ul5- flveon the road The Pirates will
athletic director, walks into h� of! gct ryleT butnf SS T T date t0 flU in 1985'
get .arTy-cyed, but he (Karr) Another factor in the recent
Penn State.
Auburn. Miami.
Pittsburgh. LSU.
Money. Recognition. National
exposure. Prestige. Membership
in the College Football Associa-
tion.
Big-name opposition and big-
time football programs often go
hand in hand, and when you're
fice � perhaps with yet another
proposal to play a
"big-time team � because that's
the way to the top.
hasn't Boh-Hii -H "T' turner iacior in tne recent
rTe backeofrfT 5" scheduIin8 splurge, Emory said,
said HevJit � ' ?at oVe was to enhance East Carolina's
fie weC alhlyd�ing?2 P�sition with the CFA, which
"I haven't hadmuch input into we've am tnlav th-tm k �pe0�e voted last weekend to accept ECU
scheduling for the last four and-a- money and SteJSSi "u? an � football -
not there yet, when you're still on half years Emory said. "Dr SSaMnK' ?? �d tw� other universities into its
the road an aspirant you have to Karr has done it, but on a couple 87? thfnkTLS VZSS?- ranks"
dig the trenches before you can of occasions he has asked me pete withtW rJSnle C�m" Each scho�l necded �� Prcent
about it. He did ask me about the "That's what� �,��? v� �f the membership votes to be ac-
LSU game in 1985 because that'll want the bat the �c, �U c?Wed� and one of the conditions
be in December, and I said, 'Well, thusiastic Whv rn� aroilnSLit �f membership is for the school to
that'll be good because we'll be 'E�Z5 2& ctTS Jf
going to a bowl game in 1985 can play in the maioT ll�,�i X �.�,SFA members-
anyhow. So go ahead and BrnwlLdTSSkhS 'We're not protected by a con-
schedule it SfcSldC; JL2SJ S ference Emory said. "We have
In addition to LSU in 1985, JSTteffllS l� ?lay 5 f" of ��r games
East Carolina's other noted op- SStaKcSSui 2?S t ! SCh��ls- That
ponents, including recent addi- ing. And that" ZloaMo com ��' negative thing for
tions are Pitt, N.C. State and pete with the bat.
South Carolina this season, "Penn State? They don't make
JST'Slf ate.and Aubu?in me nervous, or LSU or Auburn.
1985; Wat Virginia in 1986, We're not going to Auburn just to
jump in, go to war, hold your
own, overcome.
So it is at East Carolina, home
of the near-miracle workers of
1983, a football team that came
ever so close to perhaps the most
extraordinary Cinderella story
ever in collegiate football.
The Pirates � or Bucs as
they're fondly called � lost three
games last season, all in Florida,
all in dramatic fashion. They
could have � and according to
Emory, should have � won each
SSS- B"1 �V to Florid. EStoSS. 19 7. TSSSSSfSSSlSl
State. Florid and eventual linois in 1987. . JguwjWW. We re ton down

� - t i
Tbe Plrata wiH have to ptffor-i Ufa they �d i. test fall MkwMri t orer "mat two yaJTtf HfJH
hag to do weU �gainst such teams at Plttebarah. Pcaa state, Aubara, Mlaad, Florida State aad LSU.
East Carolina about the CFA. A
team like Wake Forest or Duke
can play six, five conference
teams, and then play six double-A
teams and their conference pro-
tects them
Ya, Emory said, by scheduling
such teams as Auburn, LSU, and
Penn State, East Carolina also
could count on a number of votes.
"That was part of it Emory
said. "The only thing we had
negative was we weren't playing
80 percent CFA members. So this
was one of those things. We had
no alternative, and to get the
1 votes, we had to play them.
Florida State and Miami are in-
dependent CFA members, and to
get the Southeastern Conference
voting for you, you get LSU and
Auburn. And Penn State doesn't
want to play a Division AA team.
"I'm not saying that East
Carolina campaigned for votes,
but I think, in a way, you have to
be
"We want to play a national
schedule. We want to win a na-
tional championship Emory ad-
ECU head football coach Ed Emorv aM (�tw �- �
�em retae.ee ,� fc ���, SSSSSl &
ded. "And the only way to win is
to play them guys. Maybe we're
gambling like heck, and that's
why it's so tough to be a graduate
of East Carolina and be the
coach, because what's bat for the
university sometimes isn't bat for
the coach
But, as Emory said, CFA
membership wasn't the lone ob-
jective in scheduling tougher op-
ponents.
"We wanted CFA membership,
we wanted to play a national
schedule, and we wanted an op-
portunity for national exposure
he said.
Emory is relentless in pursuit of
excellence for the ECU program,
and he said he believes the 1984
season will be crucial to its goals.
The team will be inexperienced
at many positions, and the squad
he hopes to field in 198! and 1986
will be built on the record of 1984.
"It's the year that's so impor-
tant Emory said, "bxause we
have to hang in. And I guarantee
you, when we line up n 1985, I
don't think there'll be a magazine
m the country that won't say
we've got the toughest schedule in
college football
That schedule includes Penn
5f Auburn, N.C. State, and
LSU on the road, and South
Carolina, Tulsa and Miami at
Ficklen Stadium
"We're trying to build an army
of fans Emory said "We're
�?�?� to get everybady, 2.5
million, 3 million peop e east of
Interstate 95 to stay in the East
� see football on Saturday
afternoon "
THE EAST CARPUS av
Athlet
GREENSBORO LPI
Atlantic Coast Confer
schools spent $7 miinc
their athletic program,
ago. Today, that figure wouk
about cover the cost to
Intramu
Comes
ByJEANNETTEROri
The first session I
program is coming to ar enc
exciting finals ahead in so:
three-on-three basketba.
nis singles
In softball action.
between the two league
played June 18. The I
Powers, Bombed Ski -
favored to win the leagje"
pionship. Preliminarv
wind up Wednesca Junt
determining the semi-fir
f 5AM 5LZ
In three-on-three basKe
tion. the Midnight Express
by captain Kevin Banks
favored to win the char
tournament. Out to dera; :
press are the No Names. V.1
ing Crew, Sig Ep Raide-s. i
Village Green TM's. 7
pionship game is set for Tui
June 14 at 7.00 p.m. in Mei
Gym. Play promises I
paced and exciting.
Further Intramura. acne
I
I
I
I
I
I
WELCOME Ol
Bring this, ad & an wl
OPEN 7 Days
A Week
8:30A.M. until
2:30A.M.
Pli.7S2.1294
ALL-Y
I
EVERY FRIDAY
5 PM � 9 PI
INCUDES:
A variety of Fillets,
including Lousiana-
Style Fish Fillets. Hush
Puppies. French Fries,
a choice of Hot V
and our own Famous 5
BE ORANI
ENJOY FLI
SHDNEti






THE EAST CARtHlNIAN
Sports
Jl Nf 13. 1V84
Williams Takes Third In 200 Heat
������ soon,MdA, the later heats whtn fh� rnnn�r -�n � � " �� � � w
B PETE FERN AI D
�tolMi Sport, Milor
mpcting at the Nationals
held in Eugene, Oregon, ECU
ester Henry Williams con-
tnued the Pirate's surge to be one
rhe best track programs in the
untry.
Running in a 200-meter qualify-
ing heat, Williams beat out rivals
Stanley Biaylock and Tony Dees
the Southeastern conference
?lacing third with a time of 20.89
onds.
'Henry placed sixteenth
averall, he beat some reallv fine
Pie said head coach Bill Car-
�n.
With the combined men's and
men's sports this year at the
Nationals, the competition was
luced to the qualifying heat
nners.
In the 200 meters, only the six
heat winners and the top two
limes were taken. Unfortunately,
iiams' time was not one of the
est so he was unable to com-
Coach Carson voted against the
tlifying procedures used at the
meet, but the rules were unchang-
ed. "Henry had to win because he
was running in one of the middle
heats. The fastest times came in
Maxwell Shines
the later heats when the runners
knew what times they had to
beat Carson said.
Teammate Craig White who
had qualified for the 110 high
hurdles did not participate in the
Nationals due to a death in his
family, but still has the Olympic
trials in L.A. to think about later
this summer.
The men's track team has gain-
ed great respect and considerable
recognition this past season as
they have shown what ECU is all
about � excellence.
In preparation for next year,
coach Carson has recruited
several top athletes for the Pirate
program.
The recruits are:
Julian Anderson, a high school
All-America out of Louisa Coun-
ty HS in Virginia. Has performed
well running a 40.66 in the
quarter, a 20.2 in the 200 meters
and a 10.4 in the 100 meters.
Lee Vernon McNeil, a high
school All-America out of St.
Pauls, NC. Participated in the 100
and 200-meter dashes at the state
meet and is ranked in the
country's top ten.
Ken Daughtry, of Mt. Saint
Josephs HS in Baltimore. Ran a
40.72 in the quarter mile and a
20.12 in the 200 meters.
John Lee of Marshall HS in
Fairfax, Virginia.
David Parker, of Patrick Henry
HS in Roanoke, Virginia. Jumped
40.88" in the triple jump and ran
a 14.2 in the 110 high hurdles.
Andre Fields, of Norcom HS in
Portsmoth. Ran a 13.8 in the 110
high hurdles, a 30.72 in the in-
termediate hurdles, a 40.68 in the
quarter mile and jumped 49.9 " in
the triple jump. "Fields is a com-
bination footballtrack recruit for
ECU. He plays wide receiver and
is a good piece of recruiting said
Carson.
In addition, sprinter Terry
Brown who did not run on the
track team last year will return for
next year's team running in the
100, 200 and 60 meters.
"We'll have more depth for
next season and we're going for
it said Carson. "I boxed myself
in, we'll only have one or two
recruits at most next year.
"The key is quality more than
quantity. I could have limited it to
three or four, but the athletes
from last year and the recruiting
this year will give us more top
athletes for the individual events
and relays
Carson plans to run the same
MICHAEL SMFTH - BC1 P
Henry Williams placed sixteenth overall in the 200 meters at the Nationals held in Eugene. Oregon.
program for his team except he attempt to score in the Quarter �i ��u �
wants to score in two other events the IC4A's "said Carson P �?, uearS and hopc"
for next year - the intermedite Carson expel s the FCT rrL T WlB � ne facUitie
hurdles and quarter mile. "We'll program" toTow 'he IM nal ���
The Boston Celtics, behind
Cedric Maxwell's 24 points, add-
to their storied basketball
tradition Tuesday night by
defeating the Los Angeles Lakers
111-102 in the seventh game of the
finals to win the NBA champion-
ship.
It was the 15th title for the
Celtics. Their last championship
came in 1981 when they defeated
Moses Malone and Calvin Mur-
phy of the Houston Rosckets.
Boston also received 22 points
from Dennis Johnson and 20
from Larry Bird. Bird was named
Most Valuable Player in the series
although he was held below his
average in the game and had just 4
points in the fourth quarter.
Police restrained fans
jnderneath the Celtic basket in
the waning seconds, as many in
the crowd of 14,890 tried to storm
the court. Hundreds of fans
managed to rush the players at the
buzzer, holding aloft green towels
and Celtic banners in the heat of
Boston Garden.
The game remained even
through the first period as the
Lakers were unable to get their
fast break into high gear, and the
Celts shot poorly from the out-
side.
After a James Worthy slam
made it 32-30 in the opening
moments of the second period,
Boston reeled off eight
unanswered points and began to
control the tempo of the game as
they went to the lockerroom with
a six point lead.
The Lakers were never able to
get into the flow of the game, and
ultimately found themselves down
A
by ten points with less than five
minutes remaing in the game.
Los Angeles did cut it to three,
but Dennis Johnson hit two free
throws with 45 seconds left to give
Boston a 107-102 lead, putting the
Celtics out of Danger.
Boston scored just three field
goals in the fourth quarter but
had 14 points on free throws Bird
scored the Celtic's last 2 points on
free throws with 10 seconds re-
maining.
The Lakers were unable to
recover from Boston's 8-0 spurt at
the end of the third quarter, which
gave the Celtics a 13-point lead,
their biggest of the game. Dennis
Johnson scored 10 of Boston's 20
fourth-quarter points � 6 on free
throws.
Overtoil Appointed
Coach Gary Overtoil
Football Goes
After working under five dif-
ferent coaches and serving as an
assistant for the last eight years,
Gary Overton has been named as
the new ECU baseball coach.
Director of Athletics Dr. Ken
Karr made the announcement last
Wednesday, less than a week after
former head coach Hal Baird
resigned in order to become head
coach at Auburn University.
"I'm happy for the opportunitv
and am looking forward to the
challenge Overton said. "Very
few changes will be made with the
program in order to continue the
strong tradition we have had here
over the years
Although the Pirates concluded
thier 1984 season with a 34-13
record, an ECAC South Cham-
pionship and a third place finish
in the NCAA South 1 regionals,
Overton is optimistic that
Pirates can have continued - .
cess in the future.
"We lost five great senior!
said, "but with the players
have returning next yeai w.
the nucleus for a gocd club a
possibility of winning the ECAC
South championship
Overton came to ECU
as an undergraduate, and
as the team's manager ,73
In 1974 he served one year a
graduate assistant, before be
:ng a full-time a
' member in 19
A native of Ahoskie, Overt n
played basketball, baebaii. f
ball and golf at Ahoskie Hig
School. He recieved all-
conference and all-East her i
baseball and wa- named a
in golf.
Durham. N.C. (UPI) � East
Carolina head football Coach Ed
Emory polished off a slab of
Shoney's hot fudge cake the other
day pondering the Pirates'
(schedule for this fall and for falls
fto come.
And even as he put away the
(last bite, Emory knew he couldn't
have his cake and eat it, too.
'They schedule 'em, I play
'em he said.
Auburn. Miami. Penn State.
Pittsburgh. LSU.
Money. Recognition. National
exposure. Prestige. Membership
in the College Football Associa-
tion.
Big-name opposition and big-
time football programs often go
hand in hand, and when you're
not there yet, when you're still on
the road, an aspirant, you have to
dig the trenches before you can
jump in, go to war, hold your
own, overcome.
So it is at East Carolina, home
the near-miracle workers of
1983, a football team that came
ever so close to perhaps the most
extraordinary Cinderella story
ever in collegiate football.
The Pirates � or Bucs as
they're fondly called � lost three
games last season, all in Florida,
ail in dramatic fashion. They
could have � and according to
Emory, should have � won each
game. But they lost, to Florida
State, Florida, and eventual
champion Miami.
Had the Bucs won more than a
goodly measure of respect in those
games, the football program at
East Carolina would have been
ahead of schedule. There would
Time
Emory chuckles at the mention
of "murder
"Everybody always thought I
was commiting suicide, anyhow
he said. "I've taken the challenges
all my life. God knows. And I
be bowl money to spend, national guarantee you, when you wake ud
fsXPnTeUded8to0rdHBUt T 2 m0re in the �r� with 5 on
hatloftv ra�i, S ,e BT t0 the WOrId' you "�� have a Pr�"
f l?hv-y SCek' and �ne ductive day- You better �� it
oi me tools they re using to get
,hEmorvChsa�'t8 'l'aveits- � ��. "en with four pasi nl
� du�o, waits &�ES �, yZ fff SS
Fice � perhaps with yet another
proposal to play a
"big-time team � because that's
the way to the top.
"I haven't had much input into
scheduling for the last four-and-a-
half years Emory said. "Dr
Karr has done it, but on a couple but iI 53 wVbe ab To com-
of occasions he has asked me pete with those people
about it. He did ask me about the
LSU game in 1985 because that'll
be in December, and I said, 'Well,
that'll be good because we'll be
going to a bowl game in 1985
anyhow. So go ahead and
schedule it
In addition to LSU in 1985,
East Carolina's other noted op-
ponents, including recent addi-
tions, are Pitt, N.C. State and
South Carolina this season,
Miami, Penn State and Auburn in
1985; West Virginia in 1986,
Florida State again in 1987 and Il-
linois in 1987.
But Emory adds, "We're not
going to slip up on nobody no
more, neither
This season's schedule also will
be top-heavy with road games �
only four in Greenville and seven
away. "But I think this will be the
last year we'll have to do that
Emory said. "I think next year
we'll be five at home and six on
KSSiJfS WC VC 80t the road � s�� years in the
future we'll be six at home and
five on the road The Pirates will
have one date to fill in 1985.
Another factor in the recent
scheduling splurge, Emory said,
was to enhance East Carolina's
position with the CFA, which
voted last weekend to accept ECU
� an independent in football �
and two other universities into its
ranks.
Each school needed 60 percent
of the membership votes to be ac-
cepted, and one of the conditions
of membership is for the school to
hasn't scheduled anything that
I've backed off from, that I've
said, 'Hey, what are you doing?' I
think we've scheduled people
we've got to play, that'll bring the
money and the recruits. We're
gambling that we'll be successful
"That's what you want. You
want the best, the most en-
thusiastic. Why mess around play- nlav 80 Zl PS V SCh�0110
ing in the minor leagues whenu MfTSI&s"
jWSLftS; . "We'renotTrotectedbyacon-
wTcoUve coed'S ttmSZ 7t " "
any football team America a�gam D vfs 7 SSLT
defensively, offensively, and kick
ing. And that's our goal, to com-
pete with the best.
"Penn State? They don't make
me nervous, or LSU or Auburn.
We're not going to Auburn just to
get the payroll. We're going down
there to win
The Pirate will have to perform like they dW i. Mt fall Missouri favorer the mat two yearTlf 5��.
pect to do well against such teams � Plttabnirh. Penn SUte, Auburn, Miami, Florida State and LSU.
was the only negative thing for
East Carolina about the CFA. A
team like Wake Forest or Duke
can play six, five conference
teams, and then play six double-A
teams and their conference pro-
tects them
Yes, Emory said, by scheduling
such teams as Auburn, LSU, and
Penn State, East Carolina also
could count on a number of votes.
"That was part of it Emory
said. "The only thing we had
negative was we weren't playing
80 percent CFA members. So this
( was one of those things. We had
no alternative, and to get the
votes, we had to play them.
Florida State and Miami are in-
dependent CFA members, and to
get the Southeastern Conference
voting for you, you get LSU and
Auburn. And Penn State doesn't
want to play a Division AA team.
"I'm not saying that East
Carolina campaigned for votes,
but I think, in a way, you have to
be
"We want to play a national
schedule. We want to win a na-
tional championship Emory ad-
em, in reference to the Pirates extremely difficult schedule in 19W
ded. "And the only way to win is
to play them guys. Maybe we're
gambling like heck, and that's
why it's so tough to be a graduate
of East Carolina and be the
coach, because what's best for the
university sometimes isn't best for
the coach
But, as Emory said, CFA
membership wasn't the lone ob-
jective in scheduling tougher op-
ponents.
"We wanted CFA membership,
we wanted to play a national
schedule, and we wanted an op-
portunity for national exposure
he said.
Emory is relentless in pursuit of
excellence for the ECU program,
and he said he believes the 1984
season will be crucial to its goals.
The team will be inexperienced
at many positions, and. the squad
he hopes to field in 1985 and 1986
will be built on the recorc of 1984.
"Its the year that's so impor-
tant Emory said, "because we
have to hang in. And I guarantee
you, when we line up in 1985, I
don't think there'll be a nagazine
in the country that won't sav
we've got the toughest schedule in
college football
That schedule includes Penn
State, Auburn, N.C. State, and
LSU on the road, and South
Carolina, Tulsa and Miami at
Ficklen Stadium.
"We're trying to build an armv
ot fans Emory said. "We're
trying to get everybody, 2 5
million, 3 million people east of
Interstate 95 to stay in ihe East
and see football on Saturday
afternoon
THEEAJ
Athlel
GREENSBf- ,(
Atlantic Coas:
schools spent S7 mill
their athletic program:
ago. Today, rj
about cover the co:
Intramu
Comes
b jeans rn
The firsl
program is con g
exciting finals
three-on-r
nis single-
In softr.
between the I
played June
Powers. B a
favored I a
pionship Pre
wind up �'
determine
In three-on
tion, the M .
by captain Kevin Ba
favored to win the
tournament. Oul
press are the No Name
ing Crew, Sig Ep Raid
Village Green TM's
pionship game
June 14 at 7:00 p m
Gym. Play prorr.isc
paced and exciting
Further Intra:
SP0I
WELCOME ()1
Bring this ad &amil
Ml
j L
OPEN 7 Days
A Week
8:30A.M. until
2:30A.M.
Mi. 732-1294
ALL-Yi
I
I
EVERY FRIDA1
5 PM � 9 PI
INCUDES:
A vanetv of Fillets,
including Lousiana-
Stvle Fish Fillets. Hush
Puppies. French Fries,
a choice of Hoi Yeget
and our own Famous
BE "ORAN4
ENJOY FLOR1DJ
MONEY,





THE EAST CAROL1N1 AM
JUNEJ3, 1984
Heat
MICHAEL SMITH - ECV Pfxxo Ub
nonals held in Eugene. Oregon.
.pie or years and hopes the
team will have new facilities in
order to advance the program to
national excellence.
ppointed
Overton is optimistic that the
Pirates can have continued suc-
cess in the future.
"We lost five great seniors he
said, "but with the players we
have returning next year we have
the nucleus for a good club and a
possibility of winning the ECAC
South championship
Overton came to ECU in 1969
as an undergraduate, and served
as the team's manager until 1973.
In 9"4 he served one year as a
graduate assistant, before becom-
ing a full-time assistant and facul-
ty member in 1977.
A native of Ahoskie, Overton
played basketball, baseball, foot-
ball and golf at Ahoskie High
School. He recieved all-
conference and all-East honors in
baseball and was named all-state
in golf.
Emory �ald "they schedule em, I play
tes extremely difficult schedule in 1984
is
re
Mtt's
late
the
the
for
:fa
ob-
op-
ship,
lonal
op-
re
he hopes to field in 1985 and 1986
will be built on the record of 1984.
"It's the year that's so impor-
tant Emory said, "because we
have to hang in. And I guarantee
you, when we line up in 1985, I
don't think there'll be a magazine
in the country that won't say
we've got the toughest schedule in
college football
That schedule includes Penn
State, Auburn, N.C. State, and
LSU on the road, and South
Carolina, Tulsa and Miami at
Ficklen Stadium.
"We're trying to build an army
of fans Emory said. "We're
trying to get everybody, 2.5
nullion, 3 million people east of
Interstate 95 to stay in the East
and see football on Saturday
afternoon
Athletic Expenditures Skyrocket In ACC
GREENSBORO (UPI) � Four
Atlantic Coast Conference
schools spent $7 million to run
their athletic programs a decade
ago. Today, that figure would just
about cover the cost to run the
program at the University of
North Carolina.
Due to inflation, rising tuition
fees and the addition of women's
and other non-revenue sports,
athletic department costs have
Intramural Action
Comes To A Close
soared in the past 10 years. In
1974, UNC invested $24,000 in its
women's athletic program, a
figure that has now reached $1
million.
North Carolina's athetic pro-
gram finished fiscal 1982-83 with
a net profit of more than $1
million. In the period of
1974-1976, the athletic depart-
ment to post revenues of more
than $4 million in fiscal 1982-83 as
well as a net profit of more than
$360,000.
"We're in the black and we will
stay in the black Athletic Direc-
tor Willis Casey said.
When Gene Hooks took over as
athletic director at Wake Forest,
the total athletic budget was
ment experienced serious financial $600,000 and the department was
difficulties, operating at a deficit more than $200,000 in debt
Also, Hooks has agreed to
switch this season's football game
with Clemson to Death Valley for
an estimated payoff of $250,000.
Officials at Duke University
declined to release specific infor-
mation about specific areas of
operation. According to Athletic
Director Tom Butters and Univer-
sity Comptroller Jack Adcock,
the department's expenses for
$6.5 million.
The revenues for that same
period, however, were $5 million.
The $1.5 shor fall is covered by a
subsidy from the university's
general fund.
Butter's said he would like to
see the day when the athletic
department could opetate without
the subsidy, but he questions
whether it should ever become ful-
By JEANNETTE ROTH
The first session Intramural
program is coming to an end with
exciting finals ahead in softball,
three-on-three basketball and ten-
nis singles.
In softball action, the finals
between the two leagues will be
played June 18. The Pirate
Powers, Bombed Skaggs are
favored to win the league cham-
pionship. Preliminary play will
wind up Wednesday June 13
determining the semi-finalists.
eludes the Tennis Singles finale.
Semi-finalists include Randy
Meetre, Hank Outclaw, Tom
Kiehl, and Don Joyner. The top
netter will be crowned by Friday
June 15. Good luck netters
The time has arrived to register
for second session activities.
Physical fitness classes are being
offered again to all facultystaff
and students. Aerobics,
aquarobics, and personal defense
classes begin June 20 and finish
up July 24. An $8.00 fee for
students and $10.00 fee for facul-
ty is required. Registration begins
June 20 and ends June 22. For
more information come by room
204 Memorial Gym. Shape-Up
with Intramurals
The Outdoor Recreation
Department invites everyone to
of a half-million dollars
"The cash reserves were totally
depleted, which is a very scary
siuation Athletic Director John
Swofford said.
During the last fiscal year, the
Wake Forest athletic budget
reached about $5 million.
Although Hooks would not reveal
exact figures, he said the program
fiscal 1982-83 were approximately ly independent of the university.
In 1977, Norht Carolina began finighed the year in the black. He
'Tornlino C 4.1 � - �- JJI .1a 1
its "Carolina Fever" promotion
and sellouts became com-
monplace at football games.
Larger football revenues, an
already succesful basketball pro-
gram and an intense fund-raising
effort, have resulted in a solid
financial base on which UNC can
field 26 sports, 13 each for men
and women.
North Carolina State operates a
27-sport program, but on a
budget half the size of UNC's.
Until 1978, when the debt incur-
added that the program has
finished in the black the last 10
years.
Wake Forest fields 14 sports,
eight for men. But under NCAA
guidelines, the school must field
at least eight women's sports to
retain Division I status beginning
in 1988.
To keep the Demon Deacon
athletic program out of debt,
Hooks has made unpopular deci-
sions. In 1982, he agreed to move
Wake Forest's home football
participate in exciting 'Adventure tmic�tne budget has grown steadi
Trips' left during first session. If ty-
red to build Carter-Finley game with Clemson to Tokyo for
Stadium was retired, N.C. State
operated without the benefit of
football gate receipts. Since that
RAM5U
In three-on-three basketball ac-
tion, the Midnight Express, lead
by captain Kevin Banks, are
favored to win the championship
tournament. Out to derail the ex-
press are the No Names, Wreck-
ing Crew, Sig Ep Raiders, and the
Village Green TM's. The cham-
pionship game is set for Tuesday
June 14 at 7:00 p.m. in Memorial
Gym. Play promises to be fast
paced and exciting.
Further Intramural action in-
you love the great outdoors,
register for the next white water
canoeing trip set for June 16. The
registration deadline is Tues. June
12. A local canoe trip is planned
for July 11 with registration
deadline July 9. Don't forget
horseback riding at Jarmans
Stables every Thursday at 4:00
p.m. For more information con-
cerning all outdoor recreation ac-
tivities, come by the Outdoor
Recreation Center in room 113
Memorial Gym or call 757-6911.
Intramurals � Participate,
don't just spectate! Join in the
fun, shape up and get physical
through summer recreation.
The Wolfpack's 1983 national
basketball championship netted
a guarantee of almost a half-
million dollars. That same year,
he moved the majority of the
basketball team's home games
from 8,200-seat Memorial Coli-
seun in Winston-Salem to the
more spacious Greensboro Col-
the school $300,000 after expenses iseum in order to generate more
and allowed the athletic depart- revenue.
Sports Writers
Needed
Apply at the East Carolinian offices on the second floor of the
Publications building across from the entrance of Joyner Library.
AEROBICS
It Should Be So Much More ThaB 'Do �f this, Do 8 of
that" At The Aerobic Workshop it it!
We Specialize In Aerobics
THE
Uf�
k&
'WOMKSHOP
"The Fun Way
To Fitness"
Phone 757-160S
417 Evans St Mall
Downtown (,i
Little
of Mexico
Restaurante & Cantina
I
I
WELCOME ORIENTATION STUDENTS
Bring this ad & anything showing that you are at ECU
for Orientation and
SKATE FREE Tonight
June 13th.
Open Sun. thru Thur.
11 AM to 10 PM
Frl. a Sat.
11 AM to 11 PM
Good Food Ftom South of the Border
Introducing Our New
"All You Can Eat"
Taco Buffet For Only
$2.99
264 By-pass near Memorial Dr
Greenville, N.C.
We have all ABC permits
ECU students skate every Tuesday for IV.00
IHSIC TELEVISION
&
BLUE MOON
CAFE
O P E N 7 Days Pitchers $1.50 anytime
A Week
8 30A M untiI 8 insubs lbfresh burcrs " anvtinse
2:30A.M.
lfc.7S2.1294 2051.3 St.
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT!
FISHERMAN'S
BUFFET
EVERY FRIDAY
5 PM � 9 PM
ONLY
INCLUDES:
A variety of Fillets,
including Lousiana-
Style Fish Fillets, Hush
Puppies, French Fries,
a choice of Hot Vegetables
and our own Famous Seafood Chowder.
BE "OBANGE YOU 9NABT" TODAY
ENJOY FLORIDA OBANGE JUKE ANYTIME
i a� $.���
SHONEYS
Welcomes the Class of 1988 to ECU
Bringing you the best in dance music & rock n' roll for 15 years.
Doors open 9:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m. each night
East Carolina's Party Center
417 Cotanche SU
Downtown Greenville
758-4591
Wed: Orientation Party - $1.00 Adm. (18 yrs. Adm. $2.00)
All cans.55 til 11:00 p.m. &.80 til close
Thur: College Nite - $1.00 Adm. (18 yrs. Adm. $2.00)
All cans.55 til 11:00 p.m. &.80 til close
Sun: Ladies Nite - Free Adm. for ladies (18 yrs. Adm. $1.00)
$ .05 draft while it lasts!
Mon: Orientation Party - $1.00 Adm. (18 yrs. Adm. $2.0!))
All cans.55 til 11:00 p.m. &.80 cans til close
COME EARL Ytl
You mutt kt It to enter the dub. N.C. State Law prohibits persons under 19 to
PMrchMsakholkb��ersaes. Atorn�tivebcvcnessjepit)�id�donthei
Persons under 19 required to wear a wrist band while on the premises.





10
JHEEASTCAROLINIAN
Ij
Fishel Takes Out Revenge
1MAHA, Neb. (UPI) Maior n - V r V' fJST f
p baseball held its annual 22? IfEflS�J� �� most outstanding oerfor� �f V
OMAHA, Neb. (UPI) - Major
league baseball held its annual
free-agent draft one week too ear-
ly for Cal State-Fullerton out-
fielder John Fishel and one week
too late for the defending NCAA
champion Texas Longhorns
Inspired by his lowly selection
in the 19th round by the Oakland
As earlier in the week, Fishel
SPS lSe I984 ornament field
with his bat to carry Fullerton to
its second NCAA title in six years
under coach Augie Garrido.
Fishel batted .520 with a tour
nament record-tying 13 hits in 25
at-bats as the Titans rebounded
from a second-round 6-4 loss to
Texas to eliminate traditional
powers Miami, Arizona State and
Oklahoma State in order before
downing the Longhorns 3-1 in the
title game Sunday night.
Fishel knocked in four runs in
the 10-2 victory over Oklahoma
Mate and also collected two
homers in Fullerton's six games in
Omaha. He shared the tourna-
ment lead in both runs (six) and
RBFs (10) to earn acclaim as the
mx"� a w) iu earn acclaim as t
Nominations Accepted
SpSS hSS Sr�2 �tS2 mi is �P�ially interred in
quaiified �kMV.SSE VST �f yCarS Pri�r '� the
Ssesterf " "d �� � � �- a
To aualifv fnr sh f nomination should do so by June
must CfUiteSSLS i5- CrPlete info"�ationyregar-
recognition to thfL��Sd to fnrn' "SE?
the University by the?r dTrecToar IhS I �� should be in-
ticipation in Fa. r!�.Rf ud alon wth tne current
mailing address for the nominee.
University intercollegiate
athletics. A nominee must not
have been connected with the
University in the capacity to
which the nominee is being elected
for a minimum of five academic
years.
The Sports Hall of Fame Corn-
All nominations should be
mailed to:
ECU Sports Hall of Fame
co Ken Smith
Scales Field House
East Carolina University
Greenville, N.C. 27834
�m�th,�g to prove her. and we They w?re Joined by firs,
FishdI hi, , eading .378 ZZX��Sft� t
for the Titans this season with 16 cond baseman RanHv wtf
1982 after turning down a bonus Barry Bonds and Sf
. Fishe! though, he had substan- KSSwto'S SfcE
natty unproved his market value the vol atAiano.ftton "
SnSe'on'Ihe"81 25? "�Cft
Fishe. was i to the au- K nelr bl"
Support Alfred E. Neuman
for President you could
do a lot worse and you
always have!
Mail this official write-in ballot
and Alfred will send you a
free bumper sticker.
? YESNO
? WHO CARES
VOTE MAD
Mail to: Alfred For President, 2080 A Calumet St
Clearwater, FL 33575
NAME (PLEASE PRINT)
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
ZIP
Sports Writers Needed
for 2nd Summer Session
Apply at East Carolinian
offices on the second floor
of the Publications building
between 2-5 p.m. Tuesdays
BuffetLovers, take your
Pick of The Pi2zasa77aTGagY
ATTIC
Wasn PilEi
WVSP
BENEFIT
3 bands
presents
WZMB
LADIES LIGHT
NIGHT
THE
PEDESTRIANS
Ladies Free til 11.00
Fri. & Sat. PEGASUS Itocks"
E.C.U. Students $1.00 ALL SUMMER
WZMB
Live RemoteHappy Hour
$.35 Draft &$.65 cans
3 p.m. to 6 p.m.
Every Wednesday Afternoon
Giveaways: T - shirts or Free Washes
i�nCFeKXct0 thtEast 10th St- Pizza Hut
&W fc. 10th Street Greenville, NC 752 - 5222
If you have to do your own laundry, do it in style at
the WASH PUB!
x-NN-ri
Lunch Buffet - llam-2pm Daily
(AU You Can Eat) $2.99
farn �. ADVERTISE0 ITEM POllCV
Dinner Buffet - 5-8pm
Mon. & Wed. $3.09
Spaghetti - 5-8pm Thurs.
(All You Can Eat) $2.65
items anc Prices Copyngnt 1994
Effective Thru sat "��� Vav on
June 16 198a Ouantirv Bignts Bese'veo
cne soio to Dealers
Happy HoursDaily - 2 til 5pm
& 9pm til closing
Video Games Big Screen TV
The Best Pizza in Town. Corner of Cotanche 8, loth st
Hon1 J'hone 758-6121
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The
c 2 HOURS EVERYDAY
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KROGER CHOCOLATE MILK. BUTTERMILK OR
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Title
The East Carolinian, June 13, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
June 13, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.345
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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