The East Carolinian, April 19, 1984






1

She
(Earoliittan
Serving the East Carolina campus communit
'y since 1925
Vol.58 No.S 5"f
Greenville, N.C.
Thursday, April 19, 1984
Residents' Protests
Considered Before
Changes Are Made
B ELIZABETH BIRO
Staff Wt1tr
A final vote on Centra Campus
dormitory changes was put off
until next week following an open
meeting between Slav and
I'mstead dormitory residents and
the Student Residence Associa-
tion.
About 40 residents from the
two coed dorms turned out to
voice their protests to changes
planned for fall. 1985.
Present at the meeting were
Associate Dean of Student Life
Carolyn Fulghum, Director of
Housing Dan Wooten. Chairman
of the Committee on Residence
Life Dr. Brett Watson, and
former SRA president Mark
Niewald.
Several students spoke out at
the meeting against Slay being
.hanged to a quiet dorm and
Umstead to a female dorm. Only-
one resident supported the quiet
dorm idea at the meeting.
A number of residents thought
if resident advisors were more
strict with noise regulations there
would be no need for a quiet
dorm.
Fulghum responded by saying
students must work with the RA's
in controlling noise. One RA was
recently injuried by a student
while trying to enforce noise rules
on the hall. Fulghum said. "To
enforce noise rules in the dorms
we would need an officer on every
hall and we're not going to go to
that sne !�aid.
Residents also claimed the
changes would ban handicapped
students from living in a coed
dorm. However, Fulghum said
making Slay the quiet dorm was
the only way to make it available
to everyone who wished to take
advantage of it.
Brian Rangeley, president of
Slay, said he had spoken to all but
one dorm resident on campus who
were confined to a wheelchair and
none of them planned to live in
the quiet dorm.
Residents posed other
arguments saying Umstead was an
unsafe location for females and
there would be no coed dorms on
central campus after the changes
were made. They also cited the
very unique area the coed dorms
have become and the stong friend-
ships which would be broken up.
"Niewald overlooked many
factors when he proposed the
quiet dorm said Slay resident
Todd Barrow.
As for the location, that was
left up to Fulghum and Wooten,
said Fulghum. According to
Fulghum and Wooten a number
of factors must be taken into con-
sideration when a change is pro-
posed. The dorms must match the
ration of males and females living
on campus, she said. Wooten said
because Cotten was going to be air
conditioned there would be need
for a male air conditioned dorm
which would be Fleming.
Therefore, it would be necessary
to relocate girls from Fleming,
s a! �" Wooten.
'The dorms are alwavs going to
be in a state of fluxsaid Wat-
son. Watson said 390 students ex-
pressed interest in the quiet dorm
and their opinion should matter.
Residents presently living in
Slay and Umstead ask that the
dorms remain as thev are until
1987, said Jamie Brittresident of
Umstead. "We the students want
to be left alone. Let us graduate
and then change it said Britt
The Committee on Residence
Life will meet again April 24, to
take residents' protests into con-
sideration before a final decision
is made.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Faculty Senate Ok's
Smoking Restriction
BRYAN HUMBERT - ECU Photo Lab
st0udnentSLind ZT St�re a Wea,th of information for
students and scholars that are not available in the regular stacks.
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Staff WrtUf
The ECU Faculty Senate
recently voted 19-15 to recom-
mend to Chancellor John Howell
that smoking be prohibited in all
ECU classrooms.
The resolution was proposed by
Dr. David Chenoweth, associate
professor of Health Education.
Chenoweth's original resolution
banned smoking from all universi-
ty classrooms, hallways adjacent
to classrooms and restrooms in
buildings containing classrooms.
"This is something which is
good for the mass public
Chenoweth said. Chenoweth said
in the five years he has been a
faculty member he has heard so
much concensus against smoking
in classrooms he decided to take a
stand.
Chenoweth said he was first
moved to act on the issue because
of opinions expressed by students
in his classes. When asked by
Chenoweth what they most dislik-
ed about anything, Chenoweth
said he was amazed at the large
number of students who disliked
tobacco. He said this seemed
unusual because this is the tobac-
co belt.
People have the right to smoke,
but not anywhere they chose to,
Chenoweth said. Smoking in the
classrooms is an occupational
hazard for professors and a learn-
ing disability to students, he add-
ed, and when students pay the
money they do they shouldn't
have to deal with an environment
not conducive to learning.
"1 feel the decision I have made
reflects that of a number of peo-
ple who don't want to go out on a
limb in the tobacco belt said
Chenoweth. Most students do not
want to expose their thoughts on
the no smoking issue because of
political ramifications involved,
said Chenoweth. Therefore, he
said he thought he must represent
these people. Chenoweth said he
even considered a student referen-
dum on the issue if he received
much opposition from the facul-
ty.
On the contrary, Chenoweth
said he was happy ivith the
number of supporters he had,
especially the large number of
smoking faculty who were in
favor of the resolution.
"I really felt I as taking a risk
here, but 1 thought if I reallj hae
academic freedom, I'm going to
say something now said
Chenoweth. "If you value vour
life and health as I value it where I
teach then you'll speak out he
said.
Chenoweth said he thought the
resolution was fair because it still
left smokers with their privilege
only not in the classroom.
ECU Transit Researches Route Usage
By STEPHEN HARDING
SUff Wrtt�r
The SGA Transit is currently in
the process of conducting a
passenger count on each of its
routes to obtain information to be
used to plan more effective use of
the system, according to Bill
Hillard, director of SGA Transit.
When the last count was taken
in February it was found an
average of 4,400 students use the
system each day. The gold route
was used most often, due in part
to us stops at Minges Coliseum
and Allied Health.
Some changes are being plann-
ed for the fall semester, Hilliard
said. Tentative plans are being
made to change the purple route
since presently there are too many
students riding it for one bus to
handle.
Bv JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Vwi Mil or
Thirty-two cadets from the
ECU Army ROTC unit were given
a preview of military life when
they attended a pre-camp
weekend at Fort Bragg Friday-
through Sunday in Fayetteville.
According to Cadet Major Kris
Cuello, the purpose of the pre-
Of Military
Changes are also being con-
sidered in order to include new
apartment complexes currently
being built, especiallv those south
of 10th Street.
Hilliard said the transit svstem
may also extend night service to
the Eastbrook Apartment area.
"Students living there have com-
plained about not being able to
get to the librarv and other
places he said.
Minor changes will be made in
routes during the summer. The
purple route will stay the same but
the goid route will stop at 7:30
p.m. The brown and ueekend
night routes will not be run.
It is hoped that the weekend
night route will be continued next
fall. "If the fee increase goes
through and e can get funding
we will continue Hillarc said.
SGA President John Rainev
Elections chairperson Mike
McPartland, the new SGA
vice president, has designated
six areas on campus as polling
places for next week's student
referendum on an ECU Public
Interest Research Group.
The election, caJled because
ten percent of the student
body signed a petition caJling
for the vote, will be held April
24. Polls will be open at the
following locations between 9
a.m. and 4 p.m
Bottom of College Hill
The Croatan
Mendenhall Student Center
Student Supply Store
Lobby of Umstead Hall (cen-
tral campus)
Lobby of Greene Hall (west
campus)
camp week I is to give students
an idea of the kind of activities
they will be participating in during
a six-week advanced training
camp this summer. Twenty-eight
cadets who are ECU juniors will
be going to Fort Bragg for camp
this summer.
"Completion of advanced
camp is the most important thing,
other than completion of college,
for commissioning as an army of-
ficer Cuello said. The pre-camp
weekend is designed to give the
cadets a preview of what to expect
in camp.
Representatives of ECU Army
ROTC who attend the six-week
camp will be competing with
members of ROTC units from all
over the East Coast, from Maine
to Puerto Rico. The schools will
be ranked by the scores of par-
ticipating cadets.
"We do everything possible to
help ECU said Capt. Heldur
Liivak, a military science instruc-
tor who works with Army ROTC.
By attending pre-camp, it is hoped
that students will gain enough
Installation Of SGA Computer
System To Be Decided On Today
familiarity with the area and ac-
tivities to give them an advantage
during the longer camp session.
The three areas emphasized are
land navigation, tactics and
leadership. Land navigation in-
volves finding predetermined
points using a magnetic compass
Tactics involve simulated combat
situations where the cadet is re-
quired to applv knowledge
previously acquired. Leadership is
tested in all areas.
The tactics situations test
decisiveness and technical com-
petence, both of which are "two
important dimensions of leader-
ship values Cuello said.
On The
Announcements2
Editorials4
Style7
Sports 10
Classifieds 12
� For a review of the 'sur-
realistic comedy Angel City
playing this week at McGinnis
Theatre, see Features, page 7.
ECU Pirates win 24th
baseball game, for the full
�tory, see Sports, page 10.
"1
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
New, Editor
The final decision on the in-
stallation of a computer system in
the student government offices in
Mendenhall will be made at a
meeting today.
According to computer task
force member Scott Epting, plans
were initially made to utilize the
existing computer system in
Mendenhall Student Center so
that additional expenditures
would not have to be made.
However, it is not possible to
work out a time-sharing schedule,
so new equipment will have to be
purchased.
The computer system, if install-
Eptlng
ed, will have two functions. One
Epting said, will be to serve as a
hotline for students with ques-
tions about student organizations.
When they call, they will be given
the name of the organization's of-
ficers, their office hours and a
statement of the organization's
purpose. The computer system
will also be used for ad-
ministrative purposes. The transit
system and the refrigerator rental
program will be computerized to
provide for more efficient opera-
tion.
Officials will decide Friday
whether the benefits to be gained
by the use of the system will
outweigh the additional costs
necessary for the purchase of
equipment, Epting said.
Greene Named Outstanding Dorm
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
MMtHto
Greene Hall received the
Outstanding Residence Hall
award at the annual Student
Residence Association banquet
Tuesday night, due to its
"outstanding projects benefitting
the campus and community
said 1983-84 SRA President Mark
Niewald.
In addition to the presentation
of awards, new officers were
sworn in at the banquet designed
to honor this year's SRA officers.
New officers are Deborah Gem-
bicki, president, Juan Velasquez,
vice president, Lycia Ross,
secretary, Carolyn Gary, treasurer
and Karen Griffin, publicity
chairperson.
In addition to the award given
to Greene Hall, Juan Velasquez,
the 1983-84 treasurer, was given
the Outstanding SRA Member
award. James Mallory, dean of
orientation and judiciary, who
will be retiring this year, was
honored for his contributions to
campus residence life.
"I feel that SRA has done an
excellent job this year Niewald
said. "We've gotten more
notoriety and have worked on
projects that we feel have been ex-
cellent for the campus, including
the quiet dorm proposal
Niewald added that he has
often felt "frustrated" and stress-
ed that in order to improve
residence hall life, students must
get involved, both on good and
bad points. "I hope the students
will stand behind next year's
president he said.
"Spring is the time when a young man's thoughts tan to tore u th
Mvtat toes. One look at these two should prove the validity of thl
statement beyond the shadow of a doubt
gMMffrV'�
V





2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 19f 1984
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
since 1925
Publlahad avary Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
vaar and avary Wednesday dur
Ing fne summer.
The East Carolinian is the of
tlclal newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University.
Subscription Rate: tX yearly
The East Carolinian offices
�re located In the Old South
Building en the campus of ECU,
Oreenvllle, N.C.
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
Old South Building, ECU Green
vllle, NC 27834
Talipham: 717-434. 4U7, UM
C.A.D.P.
There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol & Drug Pro-
gram Thursday, April 19 at 5:00
In 210 Erwln Hall. The meeting
will concern elections
DELTAZETAS
Remember that Thursday
night Is the senior dinner to honor
our graduating seniors It will be
�t the house at J:30 Hope
everyone Is psyched for the
beachl WE ARE I Good luck to
everyone on exams and have a
great summer
NAACPCHAPTER
The NAACP Chapter will meet
on Thursday. April 19, at a oc
p.m In room 248 of Mendenhall
Plans for the coming event will
be discussed
GAMMA BETA PHI
The final meeting of Gamma
Beta Phi for this semester will be
held at 7:00 p.m on Thursday
April 19, 1984 In Jenkins Art
Auditorium. Please Attend!
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
The CR's will meet tonight at
S X Alan Williams from Senator
Jesse Helm's office will speak
All CR's are urged to attend.
ROCK CONCERT
All Campus Rock Concert: The
KAs and the Miller Brewing Co.
are working together to bring the
campus of ECU the second con
cert of the "College Rock
Series" The concert will take
place at the KA House on April
28th from 100 until 6:00. The
bands are "The Usuals" which
play 60s craie music and "Lefty"
which plays high powered ROCK
N ROLL. The main attraction
will be "Oh Boy" an all girl band
from Va. Beach. These girls are
wlldl I There will be thousands of
collectors cups given away along
with T shirts, caps, hats, and
posters Remember this Is a ma
lor concert so be ready to party
Don't forget BYOB.
PI KAPPA PHI
The newly appointed exec
-RUSH� Mark Holland, In
tramurals William Mann, PUSH
Chip Hachmeister, IFC Carl
Krati. Little sis Bob Schulti,
Social Haywood Parrlsh
Scholarship Matt Nease, Sororl
ty Jim Rackley, PR. Barry
Oeans. House J P. lyons, Assls
tant vice Revenue � Ely Forrest,
Jamie Brlley, Assistant Treasury
Rusty Carty, and Assistant
Warden Hank Core will meet
next Monday at Mendenhall at
500 Brotherhood will meet at
7:00 at the house. It will be for
mal
CAMPUS VOTE
On April 24, from 9 a.m. to 4
p.m there will be a campus wide
referendum In the form of a vote
on the question of establishing a
Public interest Research Group
(PIRG) at ECU. To vote: bring
your student ID. and current ac
tlvlty card to any of 6 SGA polling
precincts located at the Croltan,
Mendenhall Student Center, the
Student Supply Store, College
Hill, and Central and West Cam
pus Dormitories.
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to
declare physical education as a
maor should report to Mlnges
coliseum at looo a.m. Wednes
day, April 23, for a motor and
Physical fitness test. Satisfactory
performance on this test is re-
quired as a prerequisite for of
tlclal admittance to the physical
education maor program. More
detailed Information is available
by calling 757-6441 or 6442.
Any student with a medical
condition that wrvid contraln
dlcate participation In the testing
program should contact Dr
Urael at 757-6497. Examples
would Include heart murmurs,
congenital heart disease,
respiratory disorders or signlfl
cant musculoskelefal problems.
If you have any significant
medical conditions, please notify
Dr. Israel If you plan to be tested.
FLATBALL
Attention all Plastic Fiafbail
Pnanatlcks: Today, the FrlsbL
Club will be lamming on the mail
with a membership drive pro-
gram Including chances to win a
rH yr 'avorlfe ���wage and
cool Irate shirts for sale (85) m.
Portant: All .rates are urgod to
be in Wilmington Beach this
��� (42, a, 22, for �
mt , Eo�str�vaganza Tourna
ment I rates. Beat Gale Force I
DIETETIC ASSOC
The Student Dietetic Assocla
tlon will have their last annual
meeting on April 24 at 5:30 p m
The meeting will be held In the
Dining room In the Home
Economics Building. There will
be a covered dish dinner during
the meeting so all old and new
members should bring their
favorite dish. The dessert will be
furnished. Also, aU of the final
business for this year will be
discussed Come get Involved In
the SDA and have a good meal
tool Everyone is Invltedl
WIN ABUNNYII!
That's right - win A Bunny.
Tickets may be purchased all
week In the Student Supply Store
Lobby or from any PPHA
member. The drawing will be
held Friday, April 20th at noon
and you don't have to be present
to win. So come on by and try to
win a Bunny for Eastern I
POETRY FORUM
The last meeting of the ECU
Poetry Forum will take place on
Thursday, April, 19th in
Mendenhall Rm. 248 at 8:00 p.m.
Anyone wanting feedback on
hisher poem(s) should bring t 10
copies of each. Open to all In-
terested In poetry.
JOBS-OUTER BANKS
Summer Jobs on Outer Banks!
Most mln. wage and no living
quarters furnished. Most obs
beoln Apr� 2 Ned. Cookj
Waitresses, Cashiers, Maids, etc
Over 300 openings now listed
Contact Job Service (261 2885)
Won- - Frl. for more info.
STUDENTS WITH
HART
Now is the time for a new
generation of leadership, if y00
are fed up with the politics of
nostalgia and looking for new
solution to the nation's problems
loin. Students with Hart, we are
�he vanguard of a new
democracy, we will be meeting
at the headquarters on 5th Street
next to the Blue Moon Cafe every
Thursday at 8 p.m. For more In
formation call 752 4935 or
'5 "35oo.
BAHAMA MAMA
Bahama Mam� Party coming
oon!ll April 19th at the Kappa
Sigma House. The party starts at
4:30 so get your tickets early. See
any brother or little ,jSfer for
tickets.
Stye iEast (Earnliman
SUBCRIPTION FORM
� Name:
Address:�
Date to Begin:
Complimentary
Business
Date to End:
Individual
Amount Paid $.
Date Paid
Students wanting to have their parents receive
The East Carolinian can fill out the form
above and drop it by The East Carolinian of-
fices on the second floor of the Publications
building, across from the entrance of Joyner
Library. Rates are $30 for one year and $20 for
six months.
:��:������
THERE ARE TWO SIDES TO
BECOMING A NURSE IN THE ARMY.
V.vXv
And they're both repre-
sented by the insignia you wear
as a member of the Army Nurse
Corps. The caduceus on the left
means you're part of a health care
system in which educational and
career advancement are the rule,
not the exception. The gold bar mvMHm
on the right means you command respect as an Army officer. If you're
earning a BSN, write: Army Nurse Opportunities, P.O. Box 7713
Clifton, NJ 07015.
ARMY NURSE CORPS. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
P
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is now taking applications for two Day Student Represen-
tatives for the 1984-1985 Term. The responsibilities of the
members of the Board of Directors include:
� Selecting the Student Union President
� Approving committee chairpersons
� Approving the Student Union Budget
� Setting policy for the Student Union
Other members of the board are as follows: IFC President, Panhellenic President,
S.O.U.L.S. President, Student Union President, Faculty Representative, Vice-Chancellor
for Student Life, Director of University Unions and Associate Dean of Student Activities,
SRA President, and SGA President. Pick up applications at the information desk in
Mendenhall Student Center.
Deadline to apply: Tuesday. April 24, 1984
CLASSIFIED ADS
Vow may uh the form at right or
��� � aaparat alwot of p�por If
you nMd roora Horn. Thoro art n
onltt par ilrw. Each latHr. r
tuatlan mark and wont spaca
counts as ono unit. Capitaltza and
hyphen t� words property. Laava
�P�c� at and of Una if word
�tn't ftt. no ads will be ac
captad ovar ma phone We
ratarva tha rfotrt to rajact any ad.
AH ads must be prepaid. laaTaii
75� per Itae or fraction of � hnt
I1 oral legibly! Use capiul tad
lowercase letters
f"� THE EAST CAIOUNUN
�"tee or 1:W Taeaae, k,f.�
Name
Addrca
CityState.
Np, lines
.z�.
.af?5� par bmS.
.No
-L
fflj
n
FREE FOR SENIORS
Now Is your chance to keep up
with events at ECU. after you
graduate. The Pirate Club Is of
'�ring free "Crew Club"
memberships for graduating
seniors. This consists of purple
�nd gold report, decals. priority
on season football and basketball
tickets and much more and this Is
completely free. Contact the
Pirate Club office at 757 41768, or
Mark Nlewald at 757 6009 or stop
by our booth at the Student Supp
ly April 12 & 13, or Barefoot on the
Mall April l�.
LACROSSE PLAYERS
All lacrosse players please
return all equipment to Bob Fox's
office by Friday Grades will be
withheld If not returned
ANGEL CITY
Usher tor the play April 18. 19,
20, or 21 and see the play free
Signup sheets are located In
Messlck Theatre Arts Building.
SCUBA DIVING
DIVE the GRAND CAYMAN
ISLANDS August 14th 21st 1984.
Spend eight days and seven
nights at South Cove on Grand
Cayman, Fly Eastern Airlines
from Raleigh, three meals, lodg
Ing and diving. Cost 8970.00 for a
diver and 8784 for a non diver In
eludes a 8100.00 non refundable
deposit. For registration and In
formation call Ray Scharf, Direc
tor of Aquatics at 7576441 or
evenings at 756 9339
SIGMA THETA TAU
The Beta Nu Chapter of Sigma
Theta Tau, me National Honor
Society of Nursing, will hold Its
Spring Banquet and Educational
Meeting on Thursday, April 19 at
6:00 p.m. at the Greenville Coun
try Club. This event will mark the
Beta Nu Chapters tenth annlver
sary. Dr. Ann Rosenow. RN,
PhD, will speak on "Going Public
Through Nursing Research
Everyone is Invited For further
Information contact Martha
Engelke at the School of Nursing
(757 6061).
PHI BETA SIGMA
The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity inc. will be sponsoring
� Jr. Miss Phi Beta Sigma
Pegeant on April 27, 1984 at the
Remade Inn Anyone who would
like to shere in this event with a
talent that you would like to per
form on this date art asked fo
contact Richard Dawkins at
7589405 or any brother of the
?reternlfy as soon as possible
TWIRLER TRY OUTS
When April 15th, ?9th and "ay
5th Where Meet in the Lobby of
the Music Building at 200 Try
outs start at 3 00. For more infor
matlon contact Tom GoolsOy
757 6982 or Beth Weoster 752 569C
HEALTH ALLIANCE
This is the last meeting of rtv�
semester so all members art
strongly urged to attend The
meeting will be held a'
Mendenhall in Room 247 at 5 30
on Thursdey. April ltth it you
have not tu'ned In an tlcke?
money or paid dues, contact m�
Vice President before the
meeting! 11
EDMISTENI4
Ail students interested bi eta
'ng me campus organization to
elect Rufus Edmisten as Gover
nor m 1984 Please contact Ben
Casey or Mecon Moye (ECU
Coordinator) at 752-0312
HAPPY HOUR
PRICES
ANYTIME
Pitcher $1.50
Subs & Burger $.99
Pita Sandwiches
Homemade Biscuits
Blue Moon Cafe
205 E. 5th St.
Located Across from Apple Records
STUDENT SUMMER TRAVEL
Orlando including air rare and hotel$239
Eurail Youthpass$290
New York to Luxemburg589 round trip
with FREE bus connection to Germany
Hawaii-7 nights in Waikiki$568
including air rare and transfers
Free passport pictures with purchase or oundtnp
European air ticket.
Book earlv tor best tares and date
A
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, :
breenvi lie, w.
Phone
34
?��,��,�� . ��� � �
As boys, they made a pact to share their fortunes, their loves, their lives
As men, they shared a dream to rise from poverty to power
Forging an empire built on greed, violence and betrayal, their dream
would end as a mystery that refused to die.


1
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QKE OPOH A HIE
AWKOW MtLCHAN fve��ts A SERGIO LEONE fh.
x� ROBERT De WRO "ONCE UPON A TIME IK AHMCA'
-��wore aizUEiiittgttn joepbci
BWTYME lUESMTHLD MUI mm m-n.
PrtinibrARNONNLCHAN ow � SERGIO LEONE
OPFNSJL H 1st AT THI ATRIS EVERYW HIkIi

� ' !�
CIA I
(CPS) - The Centra In
telligencc Agency is mak-
ing a new push to recnut
college students this spr-
ing, according to reports
from a number of cam-
pus and CIA sou-
not without some stu
protests and de-
tions against the ager
policies and ope-
In recent inter
CIA officials have
their campus visits
been happ affa
differed drai
from the
demonstrations the)
countered a :
Things got so ba
that many campuses
ed the CIA n 11
on college grou
few carr.pusc
banned agenc) re
for a while.
This is the 1
the agenc ha
of its way to pub
recruit- .
The results ha i
always beer a pea.
fas the CIA p
At the L'r.
linois rece-
stance, ab
attended a presentai
by four CIA
of them former
students - toui .
benefits fClA
The
to three full-r .
the Da
combination
job applicants, cui
seekers and al
sooooocccccocoocoi
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5
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THE fAST (. ROl IMAN
PRU 19. 1WU
CIA Begins Major College Recruitment
(CPS) - The Central In-
telligence Agency is mak-
ing a new push to recruit
college students this spr-
ing, according to reports
from a number of cam-
pus and CIA sources, but
not without some student
protests and demonstra-
tions against the agency's
policies and operations.
In recent interviews,
CIA officials have said
their campus visits have
been happy affairs that
differed dramatically
from the huge
demonstrations they en-
countered a decade ago.
Things got so bad then
that many campuses ask-
ed the CIA not to recruit
on college grounds. A
few campuses actually
banned agency recruiting
for a while.
This is the first spring
the agency has gone out
of its way to publicize its
recruiting efforts.
The results haven't
always been a peaceful
fas the CIA portrays.
At the University of Il-
linois recently, for in-
stance, about 500 people
attended a presentation
by four CIA agents - two
of them former Illinois
students touting the
benefits of CIA life.
The crowd, responding
to three full-page ads in
the Daily Illini, was a
combination of serious
job applicants, curiosity
seekers and about 70 pro-
testors, university of-
ficials report.
Likewise, recent CIA
recruitment seminars at
Stanford, once a center
of student movement,
drew over 120 career-
oriented students along
with 20 protesters from
the Stanford Central
American Action Net-
work.
And several weeks ago
about a dozen students
seized the career planning
center at Wesleyan
University to oppose on-
campus CIA interviews
being conducted there.
Although dozens of
students showed up to ap-
ply for the 16 interview
slots the CIA had
scheduled, the protestors
succeeded in turning
away several student in-
terviewees before school
officials issued warnings
against physically block-
ing students from atten-
ding the interviews.
The CIA campus
recruitment drive is part
of a new effort to replace
the last generation of
CIA workers, many of
whom are approaching
retirement age, says CIA
publicist Dale Peterson.
The sizable student in-
terest in CIA openings
stems from a newfound
sense of patriotism
following American
military exploits in Beirut
and Grenada, coupled
with a tight job market
this spring, Peterson con-
tends.
And despite some well-
organized protests, the
CIA is labeling its cam-
pus talent search a suc-
cess.
"The recruiting effort
has been highly successful
so far adds CIA
spokeswoman Pat Volz,
with the agency's head-
quarters in MacLean, Va.
"We've had a fairly ac-
tive early spring she
says, and agency
recruiters are continuing
to visir campuses nation-
wide in search of students
"interested in staying
on" with a career in the
intelligence-gathering in-
dustry.
"People's perception
of the agency has chang-
ed in the last 10 years
Volz thinks, as "the en-
tire world situation" calls
people's attention to the
need for a strong in-
telligence network.
But many campus pro-
testors don't see it that
way.
"The vast majority of
(the CIA's) resources are
going to support other
things (besides
intelligence-gathering)
which I don't see as
legitimate at all says
Stanford graduate stu-
dent Steve Babb, one of
the 20 SCAAN members
who demonstrated
against the CIA's recent
recruitment drive there.
Babb and the other
protestors wanted their
arguements against the
CIA heard so students
would know about
"some of the very un-
savory things that they
have done and are cur-
rently doing" in places
like Nicaragua, he says.
Wesleyan protestors, in
addition to blockading
CIA interviews there,
handed out over 200
flyers arguing the agency
should not be given
university office space to
to hold the interviews.
And in one of the
largest and best-
organized anti-CIA
demonstrations, Univer-
sity of Illinois students
took a similar complaint
to Chancellor John Crib-
bet, who said he could
not bar the recruiters
from campus unless the
CIA was proven to be an
illegal organization.
"Our chancellor is a
law professor, and we'd
hoped be more attentive
to our arguments says
Belden Fields, a political
science instructor one of
about 70 People's
Alliance on Central
America members in-
volved in the CIA protest
there.
"The CIA presents two
different faces" when ir
terviewing on campuses
and in thetr real-life ac-
tivities, Fields asserts. In
fact, he charges, "they
have broken both U.S.
and international law.
(and) have spied on U.S.
campuses and on
academicians abroad
Protests and
demonstrations aside,
though, the CIA is happy
with its new campus
recruitment drive, Volz
says.
When compared to the
total number of students
interviewed,she points
out, "they (the protests)
have been very, very
small in scope
The agency will gather
about 150,000 student ap-
plications this year, most-
ly from college grads, for
an undisclosed number of
job openings, she says.
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?
�te Eaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, o�a,M,wvrr
Darryl Brown. ������ h�
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK. n-�. J.T. PlETRZAK. � f ,j JIU
Ed Nicklas. m �� mike McPartland. s�� ���,�
Tina Maroschak. h. .� Tom Norton, o� m
Allen Guy. cmm Kathy Fuerst. �, s,anagtr
Mark Barker, (mm n��r Mike Mayo. �� r��n�
April 19, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Referendum
Rare Opportunity For A Direct Voice
You have before you much infor- vocal and adament, at least from
mation about Public Interest some groups.
Research Groups at ECU. Almost Students will have a chance to
every topic is covered from every directly voice their feelings about a
view point. The important thing is PIRG Tuesday. The SGA
for students to make the time to Legislature should have waited to
vote next Tuesday. There hasn't find out that choice, for they will
been a student-initiated referendum look bad if the resolution they pass-
at ECU in many years; Rarely does ed opposing PIRG is in opposition
an issue that students feel so strong- to the will of those they represent. If
ly about that a petition with 10 per- the people vote for PIRG, will the
cent of the student body's signature people's representatives oppose it?
is accomplished. Likewise, opposi- Make an informed decision and
tion to the student movement is vote Tuesday.
pwmm,mmM am mm
Students Opinion Splits Over PIRG Debate
As a Republican since the age of 18, I
am personally embarrassed by the
organization and members in the ECU
College Republicans. This clique of
students is an embarrassment to the
Republican Party and it's time the
honest Republicans at ECU united
against this radical bunch.
The radicalism this group
demonstrates is apparent even in their
constitution. The CR Executive Com-
mittee dictates the "policy" and tone of
ideology that each member is expected
to conform to. Nonconformity to these
directives results in expulsion from the
group.
Are the members honest? Ask a CR
member how the chairman of the Ex-
ecutive Committee last semester manag-
ed to defraud its members by embezzl-
ing the organization's funds. There's
something wrong here. How can one
member manipulate and control the en-
tire organization's funds?
I suppose this is why this group of
College Republicans is left dependent
on the expensive "NO" flyers prepared
by a national organization that has
never heard of ECU. A careful reading
of these flyers will clearly point out that
its organizers supposed that PIRG fun-
ding at ECU would be mandatory.
There is something wrong here. Why
have over 1,400 ECU students re-
quested a referendum on PIRG know-
ing it would be funded by a waivable
fee? Why have these College
Republicans spread posters about the
campus dealing with an issue not ger-
mane to our referendum next Tuesday?
I encourage the honest Republicans
of ECU to join with me next fall in for-
ming a more respectable Republican
organization that will campaign on the
truth about the issues. No member will
be subject to expulsion but will be en-
couraged to speak his mind and argue
his beliefs. A new constitution will not
contain a power-hungry Executive
Committee that fasions rules and
policies after its own private beliefs.
Embezzlement and corruption will not
be permitted. Next fall, Republicans at
ECU will present their arguments based
on the truth and honesty will prevail.
Mike Dixon
SGA Legislator
� � �
I am writing to you today concerning
a matter that is both important and im-
mediate on your univeristy campus.
That is the formation and funding of a
Public Interest Research Group, or
PIRG. I am a student at Duke Universi-
ty and I heard that a PIRG is organizing
at ECU.
First, I would like to say that these
groups are good and have a right to ex-
ist on university campuses. We have
had an NC-PIRG at Duke for more
than ten years. During this time they
have pursued many projects of value to
the university and the community in-
cluding consumer guides, tenant hand-
books and rape awareness. NC-PIRG
has also been a source of controversy
on campus as a political group.
Although PIRG maintains a "non-
partisan" stance, these groups are
definitely political, involving
themselves in such activities as
boycotts, demonstrations, lobbying in
the state legislature and picketing fac-
tories and nuclear installations. The
biggest problem with PIRG, however,
has been their funding.
PIRGs prefer to be funded by a
"negative check-off" system devised by
Ralph Nader. These funding systems
allow PIRG to take money automatical-
ly from students through the university
term bill. The problem is that once such
a system is implemented most students
don't realize tht the fee has been col-
lected. Under these circumstances
students are being compelled to fund a
group which they do not necessarily
support.
The PIRG organizing at ECU is ask-
ing students to support a positive check-
off funding system. This system is more
equitable in that students voluntarily
contribute to PIRG.
PIRG, as a student organization has
the right to exist on campus and carry
out its activities just as does every other
student club � that is not the issue.
They do not, however have more of a
right to use your cashier's office than
any other student organization. Make
them go through the SGA as Duke
students did.
Juliette Sadd
Senior
Duke University
� � �
I wasn't at ECU when Juliette Sadd
of the Duke College Republicans told a
"real" story about Duke PIRG, but I
heard a report of what she said. Juliette
has for some time been a mouth piece
for the National College Republican
campaign to eliminate PIRG. A faithful
foot soldier, Juliette repeats what the
national office tells her, regardless of its
truth.
The party line is that PIRG has paid
lobbyists, so Juliette goes around talk-
ing about two paid lobbysits PIRG had
at the Legislature last summer. Juliette
knows this is not true; she knows I was
the only person working for PIRG last
summer and that I didn't once lobby
the Legislature. I have told her this
myself, but she says it anyway.
The party line is that PIRG is involv-
ed at a campus only long enough to get
funding, and often that is rarely seen.
Juliette knows this is not true. Since she
has been a student at Duke, PIRG has
organized numerous educational sym-
posia on nuclear weapons, the environ-
ment, sexual assault and so on. PIRG
has published a guide to Durham for
students and a tenant's handbook.
PIRG sponsored a "little 500" bike
race, worked for bike paths and involv-
ed students on planting gardens for
senior citizens. Students who have
worked with PIRG have gained
valuable experience, and gone on to be
lawyers, environmentalists and even a
newspaper publisher.
I don't know how Juliette can con-
tinue to repeat things she knows to be
untrue, but a comment she made not
long ago to the Duke Chronicle is sug-
gestive. After working long and hard
against funding for any student
political group, Juliette's College
Republicans turned around and ac-
cepted $100 from student fees. "We
needed the money Juliette told the
Chronicle. "I guess I sold my soul for
$100
Ruffin Slater
Director of Duke PIRG
� � �
On April 16, the legislature of the
Student Government Association of
East Carolina University heard from
Vtiss Juliet Sadd, a member of the
Associated Students of Duke University
their SGA). She came to speak to
legislators about Public Interest
Research Groups, or PIRGs. Specifical-
ly, she came to address the funding
mechanism known as the mandatory
refundable, wherein the student has to
automatically pay a fee to the PIRG
and has the option to collect a refund.
I was not suprised to hear her speak
(as she proved to be eloquent and in-
telligent), but I was suprised at what she
had to say: her talk basically addressed
the mandatory refundable funding
mechanism as she perceived it to affect
the ECU campus. The proposed PIRG
at ECU would not use such a funding
mechanism. I fear that many more peo-
ple share Miss Sadd's misinformation; I
fear that many of those people may be
students at East Carolina University.
By now, most people are aware that
PIRG is a non-profit, non-partisan,
student-run research and advocacy
organization, already researching and
promoting student ideas and interests
on 160 campuses in 25 states, Canada
and Australia. Still, many people are
unaware that the proposed PIRG at
ECU is to be funded by a waivable fee.
This means that, at the time students
pay their bills, they have the option of
funding the PIRG or not.
This is not a shot in the dark: inside
the university term bill would be a
pamphlet explaining what a PIRG is to
each student. Too, it is the most
democratic method of funding a PIRG
on the ECU campus, and if it seems
foreign, it is: this is the first time that
students themselves have been given
the right to directly decide whether a
student group receives funding or not
� a freedom previously not found on
campus at ECU. Students should know
there is nothing underhanded about
PIRG: all actions of any PIRG are up
to the members of that particular
PIRG and its own elected student
Board of Directors. The same is true at
ECU � having a PIRG is up to the
students, just as it's up the the
members of the PIRG to elect a student
Board of Directors and select its topics
of research. But first it's up to the
students of East Carolina University to
go out on Tuesday, April 24, vote
to establish a PIRG on the ECU cam-
pus.
Greg Shelnutt
Senior
Art
� � �
Dear Students,
On Tuesday, April 24th, a referen-
dum will be held on the PIRG (Puolic
Interest Research Group) issue at six
polling places on campus from 9 a.m.
to 4 p.m. Since this is the last day of
classes, it is very important that your
voice be heard on this issue. Under the
Student Government Association Con-
stitution, a majority of the votes cast on
a referendum shall be sufficient to pass
it. I encourage you to take a moment to
find out about the issue and vote next
Tuesday.
Johnny Rainey,
SGA President
� � �
When still in my tenure as SGA presi-
dent, I refrained from taking any sides
on the PIRG issue because I felt that I
needed to remain neutral. However,
now that my tenure is over I feel it is im-
portant for you to know where I stand.
Since the issue first crossed my desk I
had the opportunity to research and
delve into the concept itself. I support
the PIRG concept because I feel it will
enhance student input into the
democratic process and increase the
power of the student voice in the com-
munity.
The concept of the PIRG, in simple
terms, channels apathy into action and
enables students to pursue goals where
the SGA or other organizations cannot.
The separate fee is needed in order for
the PIRG to function effectively. They
can't be funded underneath the SGA
because serious research requires a
stable funding mechanism. Projects
that encompass a two-year span need
consistant funding in order to ensure
completion. I also believe the waivable
fee policy is more than fair. It enables
each of us to make our own decision.
It is unfortunate that with issues such
as these facts often times become
twisted. It is important for each of us to
make an educated decision. I implore
you all to talk and ask questions about
the PIRG.
I feel this is an opportunity for us as
students and as a university to enhance
our education and work within the
system to effect change for the better-
ment of us all. Thank you for your con-
sideration.
Paul Naso
SGA President, 1983-84
� � �
In talking with people about the issue
of establishing a PIRG (Public Interest
Research Group) on campus there ap-
pears to be some confusion concerning
the "wavable fee" or "just how the
funding system is supposed to work
It seems to me to be very simple. The
PIRG fee will be a separate line item on
the university term bill just like other
fees. This fee will be clearly denoted as
a "PIRG FEE It will say "PIRG
FEE" and then beside that it will say
"optional" in parentheses. In this man-
ner it will be made clear to students
that: 1) students are paying the fee
specifically to fund PIRG, and 2) that
the fee is optional and they don't have
to pay it unless they want to. So that, all
a student who does not want to pay the
fee has to do is tell the university cashier
when they pay their regular fees in
Spillman Building at the beginning of
each semester, to subtract the PIRG fee
from their total, and they will not have
to pay it. They never need to go back
for a refund � they simply never have
to pay, period.
Jeff Whisnant
Senior,
9 m Philosophy
The April 24th referendum is now
receiving a lot of attention. I hope
students will debate PIRG's unique
funding proposal vigorously. Every stu-
dent group should be treated equally,
should be required to file a constitution
with the SGA, and should get funds
through normal channels � the SGA.
I feel that most of the trouble with
posters being torn down has been with
the outsiders who evidently do not
know the election rules. PIRG has in-
dicated they will tell their people, as I
already have done with C.A.S.E to
respect the rights of the opposition.
Tim Whisenant
Committee Against Student
Exploitation
� � �
Since when do the College
Republicans speak for East Carolina
students? And where did they get that
cnnUl ball they use to see into the
tomI've had it up to my keester with
"�MJPPOtated spokespersons who
Mtt 10 Amort the truth and avoid the
real issue that ECU students will be ask-
ed to vote for.
The question is simple: Do ECU
students wish to allow themselves the
opportunity to pay $3 per semester in
order to create a student run, student
funded Public Interest Research Group.
An organization such as PIRG would
give students the opportunity to pro-
pose topics of interest for research, con-
duct research with the help of faculty
members, publish their findings, make
these findings available to the proper
officials and, if needed, lobby on behalf
of their research. That, in essence, is
what a student-run research and ad-
vocacy group is all about! If resear-
ching topics such as environmental pro-
tection, consumer advocacy and social
justice is controversial, then so be it.
The fact is that College Republicans
have no earthly idea what students are
interested in because they have not
bothered to ask. All that interests Col-
lege Republicans, as far as I am ab e to
tell, is an innate fear that the majority
of students at ECU do not share their
reactionary views.
So what to do, College Republicans.
what to do? Bingo: Skirt the issue! A
tack the funding. Harrass PIRG
organizers. Destroy posted fivers
Misrepresent the funding by using the
term automatic, thereby implying hat
every student will be required to peg the
fee. Obviously, the College Republicans
are aware of the fact that deception,
distortion and flat untruths will pro-
duce favorable short-term results.
I believe that the students of ECU are
intelligent enough to discern truth from
fiction. Unlike every other campus
organization, an ECU Public Interest
Research Group would be respons:bie
only to the students that fund it. Unfet-
tered by administrative guidelines. ECU
students would have an open foium
through which they may research their
grievances and work for change. I must
admit, at first it might be difficult: to
comprehend the benefits of an
organization that actively solicits the
opinion and help of every ECU student
since students have never had his
privilege. Given the opportunitv to
work and grow, an ECU chapter of the
North Carolina Public Interest
Research Group could become the best
thing to ever happen to this campus
I strongly urge you to vote YES 'or
PIRG on Tuesday, April 24.
Rick Brown
Assistant Student Attorney General
Grow up, Mick
To Mick LaSalle, a.k.a. Al Agate:
Sorry I did not go out with you an,
of the four times you asked me after th?
interview, but don't you think your
comment in last Thursday's Eat
Carolinian was a bit childish?
Lisa Distefano
MarketingHistory
(Dear Lorina Brooks, a.k.a Lisa
Distefano,
As I tried to tell you over the phone
the line was intended to have read "If
Andrea Faulkner were really beautiful,
she d look just like Lisa Distefano "
You were the victim of a misprint.
�Mick,
Beat A Dead Horse
I hate to beat a dead horse, but in
response to the April 10 criticism by Jav
B. Shavitz of the English lecturer turn'
ed overnight expert in anthropology '
I ask him to ponder:
How does a mere sawed-off Piratt
pub go-fer become an overnight expen
in declaring who is without worth? Was
ne speaking from personal experience?
Bill Evans
Junior
Political Science

'gyfrdHHt

�� � -�.�-�. m .��-��� � ���� ���! n�i ��� p
iHf vi 4,K(i in
No On PI
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
"Ah! NC-PIRG the say as if or
are special. We sponsor good things h
freeze, gun control, homosexual affiri
etc. We're the onJy student group it
university-sponsored fund-collecting i
ed by the Cashier's Office. After all
public interest
That's PIRG talking (Public In
Group). On Tuesday, April 24. the.
"yes for PIRG as their posters'
referendum. They don't want vou t.
their funding system, which is what .
voting on. Their on organizing mam
"avoid discussion" of the funding y.
What they want is a "waivabk
known as the positive check-off Wi
would check 'yes" or "no" on contn
NC-PIRG. Here are eight reaso
the PIRG funding question.
1) This past Monday, the Stude
Legislature, your elected representat.
ly debated a resolution which conden
funding proposals. Out of the 60-odd
but three voted for the condemning
poses the PIRG funding.
2) At the same egislame mee
proved its annual appropriations
organizations. These groups ha
Yet they took the cecent and honest
ing funds. Why is PIRG more specie
3)Those student groups have pro1
over the years. PIRG has done ab
here � they haven't proven the -
enough they want a priviledged fundu
they get it first, before they are pro
4) The University's Cashier's Of.
against the PIRG runding because d
explosion of pape- work il would
system has been proposed before �
fees and health insurance. These a
proposals, but even they were s
they would be burdensome on the o
MILLER
SOFTBALL MEN
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2. GAMBLERS
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FREE
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from the ECU
ONE $30 CRE
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wl
f
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m
mmm
bate
Ahb on behalf
n essence, is
.h and ad-
i ail about! If resear-
r.mental pro-
imc acj and social
I nen so be it.
Republicans
i
students are
; have not
wests Col-
1 am able to
c majority
l are their
Republicans,
issue! At-
Harrass PIRG
ted flyers.
using the
erebj implying that
red to pay the
College Republicans
at deception,
mtruths will pro-
shon-erm results.
the students of ECU are
ern truth from
nher campus
Public Interest
I be responsible
at fund it. Unfet-
I ie guidelines. ECU
have an open forum
1 :� may research their
'k for change. I must
I might be difficult to
benefits of an
that actively solicits the
help of every ECU student
Its have never had this
�ven the opportunity to
Jw, an ECU chapter of the
lolina Public Interest
)up could become the best
"appen to this campus.
I you to vote YES for
April 24.
Rick Brown
Student Attorney General
up, Mick
kSalle, a.k.a. Al Agate:
not go out with you any
lies you asked me after the
I: don't you tnink your
last Thursday's East
a bit childish?
Lisa Distefano
MaketingHistory
Brooks, a.k.a. Lisa
tell you over the phone,
vended to have read, "If
ner were really beautiful,
st like Lisa Distefano
victim of a misprint.
�Mick)
Dead Horse
beat a dead horse, but in
M April 10 criticism by Jay
1 the English lecturer turn-
t expert in anthropology
ponder:
mere sawed-off Pirate
come an overnight expert
ho is without worth? Was
Tom personal experience?
Bill Evans
Junior
Political Science
'
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Other Opinion
AI��IL l�. I
No On PIRG
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
'Ah! NC-PIRG they say as if on a high. "We
are special. We sponsor good things like the nuclear
freeze gun control, homosexual affirmative action,
etc. we re the only student group that deserves a
university-sponsored fund-collecting system manag-
ed by the Cashier's Office. After all, we're in the
public interest
That's PIRG talking (Public Interest Research
Group). On Tuesday, April 24, they want you to vote
yes for PIRG as their posters say, in a campus
referendum. They don't want you to even consider
their funding system, which is what you'll really be
yotmg on. Their own organizing manual tells them to
avoid discussion" of the funding system.
What they want is a "waivable fee correctly
known as the positive check-off. With it, a student
md.o1!? "yes" or "no" on contributing his $3 to
NC-PIRG. Here are eight reasons to vote "no" on
the PIRG funding question.
1) This past Monday, the Student Government
Legislature, your elected representatives, exhaustive-
ly debated a resolution which condemned the PIRG
funding proposals. Out of the 60-odd legislators, all
but three voted for the condemning. The SGA op-
poses the PIRG funding.
2) At the same legislative meeting, the SGA ap-
proved its annual appropriations to 27 student
organizations. These groups had their budgets cut.
Yet they took the decent and honest path to obtain-
ing funds. Why is PIRG more special than they?
3)Those student groups have proven their worth
over the years. PIRG has done absolutely nothing
here � they haven't proven their value. It's bad
enough they want a priviledged funding system. Must
they get it first, before they are proven worthy?
4) The University's Cashier's Office is dead set
against the PIRG funding because of the imminent
explosion of paper work it would cause. Such a
system has been proposed before � for dorm social
fees and health insurance. These are more worthy
proposals, but even they were struck down because
they would be burdensome on the office.
5) PIRG is asking for a waivable tee. Yet approx-
imately 80 percent of the PIRG chapters across the
country which have a mandatory fee started with the
waivable fee. As soon as they get a foothold on cam-
pus, they'll start working for a mandatory fee, I
assure you.They cannot operate in the style they are
accustomed to � hiring a professional staff, giving
themselves salaries, filing lawsuits, etc � on a
2?2M? fcc' which would �ve thcm only about
$2,500 by their own estimation.
6) According to your own political convictions,
you can decide whether the following is favorable or
unfavorable about PIRG: It is a left-wing political,
ideological group. In the U.S. Third Circuit Court of
Appeals, where the PIRG funding system at Rutgers
University was ruled unconstitutional (Galda vs
Rutgers), the court record reads, "all the parties to
this litigation agree that PIRG functions as a
political, ideological organization NC-PIRG, mas-
querading as a "public interest" group, sent $100 to
New Jersey PIRG in legal fee assistance.
7) PIRG is, in fact, a front group for left-wing ac-
tivist Ralph Nader. Nader organized it in 1970, and
whenever it is in legal trouble, he sends teams of
lawyers to help. When PIRG faces a campus referen-
dum, its headquarters in Washington mobilizes
shock troops and dispatches them to the target cam-
pus. Such hitmen have already descended on ECU
8) By NC-PIRG's own rules, 98 percent of the
money collected at a local chapter must be sent to the
state headquarters. There, an elite board of eight
people decides how much money should be sent back
to ECU and for what purposes. They are obliged to
send some of the money to Washington where it is us-
ed to push radical causes many students at ECU
would never dream of contributing to. FIKG claims
to epitomize democracy. This is democratic?
No I'm not asking for you to vote against PIRG
You cannot. PIRG can organize itself here at
anytime. It can sponsor some good things, such as
picking up garbage and cleaning our streams. But
other student groups do good things. They don't
have the kind of funding system PIRG is asking for
so why should PIRG have the special privilege of
automoatic access to student money?
A "no" vote is not a vote against PIRG, but
against its funding system. Don't let PIRG become a
privileged elite among student organizations Vote
No!
Yes On PIRG
By JAY STONE
MILLER PICKS
SOFTBALL MEN
1. BOMBERS
2. GAMBLERS
3. KAPPA SIGMA
4. PI KAPPA PHI
5. YA MO MEN
TEAM HANDBALL
SOFTBALL WOMEN
There is some misinformation concerning the
establishment of a Public Interest Research Group
(or PIRG) at ECU which I would like to address.
First, there is a misperception in regard to the form
of funding which a PIRG established at ECU would
employ. To begin with, PIRG's funding is neither
mandatory or automatic. It is optional. That is why it
is called a "waivable fee In other words the PIRG
fee will be listed on each student's regular term bill as
a separate line item. It will be listed as an optional
fee, meaning no student has to pay the fee.
Therefore, when each student pays his or her fees at
the beginning of the semester, if they don not wish to
pay the PIRG fee all they need do is tell the university
cashier when they pay their regular tuition to subtract
the PIRG fee from their total bill. They do not need
to go get a refund or wait in any lines other than the
normal line for paying fees. The process is simple.
Obviously, then, there is really nothing objec-
tionable about the method of funding which PIRG
would employ. Funding is really a non-issue which a
few who oppose PIRG use because they object to
students having a voice on issues which concern them
such as voter registration, hazardous waste clean-up,
and consumer protection.
Also, because PIRGs are student-run, student-
controlled, and student-funded, every aspect of their
operation is a matter of public record, open to the en-
tire student body. That is one reason why they are the
most democratic and accountable groups on any
campus. The issue is clearly nothing other than the
issues which PIRGs work on. PIRGs are student-run,
non-partisan, non-profit research and advocacy
organizations which give students an opportunity to
earn academic credit while working on issues which
they have chosen. Since the students, themselves
choose the issues it is impossible to say what any
given PIRG will work on until students have voted to
create it. Nevertheless, a survey of what PIRGs have
done at other schools shows that they generally work
on environmental and consumer issues. For example,
many PIRG's are currently conducting on-going
streamwalker projects in which student moniter in
dustnal discharges into streams, nvers. and lakes to
make sure that they do not exceed levels established
by the Environmental Protection Agency.Other
PIRGs have done reports on acid rain and mercurs
pollution. PIRGs have also exposed fraudulent beef
grading and price fixing, in addition to fighting un
fair utility price hikes for residential consumers.
These are the kinds of things that a PIRG can do
In many states, such as New York, Massachusetts
and Oregon, PIRGs serve as the major voice in the
state on environmental and consumer issues. The
point is that Public Interest Research Groups provide
students with an opportunity to have an impact on
issues other than deciding where the commencement
ceremony will be held, whether or not the snack bar
will get a new brand of candy bar, or how many quiet
dorms will be established on campus. Certainly these
are issues that must be addressed. But PIRG provides
a vehicle for addressing other issues in addition to
these isucs. PIRG seeks to give students a voice and
an opportunity to put their energy and idealism to
work on real issues that affect all of us. That is why 1
believe that students at ECU should vote for PIRG
on Tuesday, April 24.
1. TYLER ENFORCERS
2. ELIMINATORS
3. ALPHA PHI
4. SIGMA PHI EPSILON
GOLDEN HEARTS
5. SLAY STALLIONS
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��HUNTERS 4. SPIKE YOU
5. HANSONS 5. WESLEY WOMBATS
Would You:
like to travel out west
this summer? Be able
to use $2500 in the
fall? Benefit from
some good experience
on your resume?
If the aaswer to any of these
questions ia yes, you need to
hear more. Interviews will
be held today at 1:00 aad
4:00 la Brewster D-202.
Reproductive Health Care
Unileryanding non ludqmental :ar that
includes abortion f� omer. of all ages
Counseling �or both partners 'S aailaWr
Special Servees and rales for students.
Cai. 781 5553 davs. wninn, ��u4
Jay Stone is a junior political science major who
serves as the president of the Student PIRG Organiz-
ing Committee.
Dennis Kilcoyne is a junior political science major
who serves as chairman of the ECU College
Republicans.
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Tri-State 1
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24 hour towing. �
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What
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Graduating Seniors
Don V leave Pirate Athletics
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to you
from the ECU
(M
ONE $30 CREW MEMBERSHIP
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When rich, eccentric Edwina Cutwater died,
a crazy guru tried to transport her
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But the guru goofed.
And Edwina 's soul has
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the entire right side
of her lawyer,
Roger Cobb.
He still controls
what's left.
Now, Edwina and Roger
are Irving together-
in the same body.
He's losing his job.
He's losing his girlfriend.
And he just can't seem to get
her out of his system.
No matter how hard
he tries.
body
Date of graduation
State
Zip
TIN LILY TOMUN
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Qaaartfc.NC 2734
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APRIL 19TH
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�� � -� i �� ���






!
3 THE EAS T CAROLINIAN APRIL 19, 1984
U-
4
Universities Threaten To Cut Off Research
(CPS) � Three univer-
sities that make millions
of dollars by performing
research for the Pentagon
say they'll drop all their
Pentagon research con-
tracts if the Reagan ad-
ministration goes ahead
with its plans to censor
professors' publication of
certain research results.
In a letter to ad-
ministration officials, the
presidents of Cal Tech,
the Massachusetts In-
stitute of Technology and
Stanford � which
together do about $400
million a year in Dept. of
Defense research � last
week said they'd have to
stop doing all military
research if the rules are
implemented.
"Major universities
says David Wilson, a
University of California
official and co-chairman
of the committee that is
trying to hammer out the
research publication
rules, "do not sign con-
tracts that give someone
else the ultimate authori-
ty to decide whether the
material is published
The new rules would
give the Pentagon the
right to approve and cen-
sor the scientific reports
of certain kinds of
research on campuses,
says Dr. Leo Young,
director of the Defense
Depts Research and
Laboratory Management
Office.
"We want the right to
approve what you
publish he explains.
The reason is "that
we've got to slow the flow
of all this good
technology stuff going to
the Soviet Union he
says. "The Russians
come here and buy all the
stuff they can in Radio
Shack, and most of the
leakage comes from
businesses. But some of it
comes from universities.
and we have to slow it
down
In essence, the ad-
ministration proposes to
create a new category of
research, points out
Rosemary Chalk,
spokeswoman for the
American Association for
the Advancement of
Science in Washington,
D.C.
"For the 40 years that
the government has been
funding military research
on campuses, ther's been
dassifiec research and
unclassified research
she says.
"There were strict rules
about publishing the
results of classified
research and many
schools, particularly in
the late sixties, adopted
policies not to do it
Chalk explains.
"Now, they want to
call some of the
unclassified research they
fund 'sensitive and app-
ly the same censorship
rules to it that they used
for classified research
she says.
An official at the Na-
tional Academy of
Sciences who asked not to
be named because he's
not an official NAS
spokesman, calls the pn.
posed censorship "an ex
ercise in paranoia. It's a
way
for the Pentagon to make
more projects secret
without having to justify
it. You can understand
their fears the Russians
will steal our weapons,
but we're talking about
science, not weapons
The official says "we
profit from publication
of their science as much
as they profit from
ours
Young contends that
"less than one percent"
it Uic Pentagon research
contracts, would be af-
fected bv the rulf
Asked if it was possible
that the Pentagon could
one day decide to classify
a majority of its research
contracts as sensitive,
Young concedes that
"nothing can stop that in
principle. But these are
reasonable people. It's a
danger, but a very small
danger, I believe
oung adds the censor-
ship proposal is "an
pening negotiating
position" in a "construc-
tive" effort to limit the
flow of technological
research to the So
Union while doing "as
little as possible to
abridge the rights of
universities
Wilson is also cont;
dent a mle palatable
both the Pentagon ana
the universities can be
formed. "It's not in
possible that we can finu
a resolution to it This j - .
very big issue, but there is
no sense of real par.K
The committee ot I
university and Penta
officials will meet to tr
to work out the dif-
ferences sometirr e late
1984, Young saw
Presidents' Jobs Stress- Filled
(CPS) Despite what
students, faculty, and ad-
ministrators might think,
college presidents don't
have it made it made in
their life at the top, at
least according to a still-
to-be-released study by
the Association of Gover-
ning Boards of Univer-
sitites and Colleges.
On the contrary, col-
lege presidents' jobs are
filled with stress, long
hours, few payoffs, and a
feeling of isolation - fac-
tors which cause one out
of four to teeter on the
edge of resigning, said
Marian Gade, one of the
researchers working on
the report, "Strengthen-
ing Presidential Leader-
ship
Gade and her fellow
researchers have inter-
viewed more than 800
college presidents, their
spouses, and other top
university officails for the
study.
While three of four of
the presidents say they
like their jobs, one out of
four would like to resign
at the first opportunity,
the study has found.
Only 25 percent of the
presidents say they
thoroughly enjoy their
jobs, the researchers
report.
Half say they like their
jobs more than they
dislike them.
The rest are more or
less disillusioned and
burned out, ready to
leave office for another
position, the study
shows.
The stress, loneliness
of the job, and long
hours required of college
presidents are the main
reasons for the
widespread dissatisfac-
tion, Gade says.
"Few people really
know what a complex job
the presidency is, even at
a small institution she
points out. "The causes
of stress are those of
financial pressures, work-
ing full-time, seven days a
week, 24 hours a day, of
dealing with collective
bargaining, and more and
more state and federal
controls
Presidents are also a
lonely lot, she says, who
don't identify with facul-
ty, are politically
separated from ad-
ministrators, and typical-
ly not appreciated by
their boards of trustees.
Indeed, turnover
among college presidents
in the last year seems to
confirm the study's early
findings.

t

1 1
mi iH ?. i
Smith College Presi-
dent Jill Conway, for in-
stance, announced her
resignation last month,
saying she needed more
time with her family and
had had enough of the
pressures and strains of
her 10-year tenure.
In February, Walter
Leonard, president of
embattled Fisk University
- a predominantly-black
college on the financial
skids � said he was so
drained by the constant
pressures that he wanted
to quit before his planned
retirement this coming
December.
And Cecil Mackey,
five-year president of
once-beleaguered
Michigan State, recently-
announced he will leave
his office in June 1985,
under pressure from the
board of trustees.
Among other things
the board was upset with
Mackey's hiring of head
football coach George
Perles in 1982
Don't Forget
To Vote
Tuesday
April 24
jjiiifiiiiiiWHiiMiiiiiiiimiiiiiiHiiiiiiimHiimmmiHiiiiiifniiniiitii mmim
s y.

ABC's Of
Job Search
In Booklet
"ABC's of Career
Preparation described
as a workbook for
anyone looking for a job,
has been published by its
author, James R.
Westmoreland, assistant
director of Career Plann-
ing and Placement at
ECU.
The 32-page booklet
contains career ideas, in-
terviewing tips, education
and study hints, resume
samples and worksheets
and sections on preparing
for work and keeping a
job.
Westmoreland said he
has woked more than 10
years preparing the
booklet which features 26
steps � by letters of the
alphabet � on the job
search process. It was
designed for high school
or college graduates, he
said, adding that it "will
benefit any reader
The author holds
master's degrees in
counselor education and
adult education and
works daily with college
students about career
matters.
The booklet is
available through college
bookstores and by mail to
ABCs, Box 3411, Green-
ville, NC 27834. The cost
is $3.75 for individual
copies.

:r 1
ueicc!
re irtit "a
4
M.00
ECU
Sat.
BUSTER
BROWN
$1.00 ECU
THURSDAY
6th A nnual Spring Zing I
Wing Ding Fling Thing I
50CHappy Hour Cans 1
99CAdmission
iiiiiiiiiiiiiMiiiniiiniiiiiiiiiiiimiiiiiiimiiiiiiiMimiiiffiiniiiiiiiiiHiiiii i:
Student
Groups
Get A
50 Percent
Discount
When They
Advertise
With The
Carolinian
� 8 golden fried Shrimp breaded daily!
� French Fries or Rice Pilaf
� Toasted Grecian Bread
� Cocktail Sauce
� AND ALLYOU-CAN-EAT
40ITEM SOUP AND
GARDEN-FRESH SALAD BAR!
All You Can Eat Fisherman Buffet Every Friday. 5-9pm
I C)fop&dtfaMeto everything nice
Coca-Cola and Coke are registered trade-marks which
identify the same product of The Coca-Cola Company
cSHONEYS
1 '�'
OMtf expires D�c�mb�r
Wtn-tviCH nut . �jT lOutm
��,�;��.��
mmmm
���
Actors Perfor
Surre
BTINAMROSCHAK
If there was one word to -
the acting in ECU's production a
Sam Shcpards Angel C
would have to be admi i
Through surrealistic cor j
five major characters manage
not onl to glide the auc
through tin � which v.as
iculf to follow), I
them as eil.
The plav describes tfe
and i turmoil that a prod
lion v.ompa d g
through aK
from fina In or.
sahage in c � -lllion i
picture, a tuntmar irw
come up with a miraculous ci
Anxel Cit de i uglinev
Hoy re.
Several a. ould b
menced for surerb pa
L a r. x
Mel
neu-
brown leather su i
60-ish looking
aid won the audie-
- I
Hindley.
a n
of r
sta'
Campus
B MATTHEW Gil I 1
- � �ntr.
It an ea:
ing as we find several
students
Jenk.ns Art Building. Once n
the auditorium , frier
several a :re
meeting begins � a I
meeting, yes, until the student
one point reach for their Bit
Re)a folks iks is no: a "J
Falwe Fan C
students, many like
dedicated to reaching
Female Trio
'O 'Boy
B TINA MARUXHil
trititrn felloe
"Technicolor Bag I j
perhaps the best des;
new wave female
scheduled to head ur
Miller High Life Rod
cert. Dubbed bv
"trendy "colorful and
"spacey the three men
Julie Jumper, Fiona and ZoJ
corporate three synthesizes
programmable electric druj
produce what they call
danceable, modern music
O Boy formed a little les
a year ago in Richmond, Virj
Actually, Julie and Zoe hav�
together since August ol
thanks to a mutual acquainj
Zoe, who was collabor
fashion shows in Richi
Virginia, met Julie and hal
compose modern music fqj
shows, which they now call
for Fashion Skew. The dt
creased to four, and for a
months the quartet played
and the Jumpers. Eventuali
of the members return
schocn. so the three have
called O'Bov ever since.
What is is that makes a
major from Virginia
monwealth University, a
major from Georgetown Ur
ty and a pre-med stucent
VCU turn to new wave ent
ment for a living? The
would probably say it is b
of their enthusiasm. 'We'r
colorful on stage Zoe sak
can float around Whatevj
these girls have toured fror
York to Texas, and have pej
ed two videos on USA
"Male Rites" and "VI
Voom
Although O Boy has notI
album yet, the group, at onl
produced and engineered a j
tape that received air pj
heavy rotation at 50 statioi
Wednesday interview, th
were at a studio in Char.
N.C. making a demo tapel
, � � s





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IHh EAST (AROI INIAN
the Soviet
doing "as
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ghts of
confi-
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agon and
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101 inv
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ater in
't Forget
'o Vote
uesday
prll 24
s TER
BROWN
El
UKt av
Thing
ins
HlfFF
Features
APRIL 19, 1984 Page 7
Actors Perform Supprhlv Opening Night
Surrealistic Comedy
By TINA MAROSCHAK
tcatam Editor
If there was one word to sum up
the acting in ECU's production of
Sam Shepard's Angel City it
would hae to be admirable.
Through surrealistic comedy the
five major characters managed
not only to glide the audience
through the plot (which was often
difficult to follow), but entertain
them as well.
The play describes the financial
and artistic turmoil that a produc-
tion company in Hollywood goes
ig -hen trying to save itself
from financial ruin. In order to
salvage an eigln- million dollar
picture, a stuntman is hired to
come up with a miraculous cure.
Angel dry depicts the ugliness of
Hollywood through satire.
Several actors should be com-
nded for superb performances.
1 anx, portrayed by Larry-
McDonald, played the role of the
roi film producer. Clad in a
brown leather suit and white
60-ish looking "stack" shoes,
McDonald won the audience's ad-
the opening act. Also
. spect was Lanx's pan-
by. Jim
Hii story line described
Wheeler; destruction as a result
- : film and current
status.
Perhaps the most lovable
character in the production was
Tympani (Eric Sox). Throughout
the evening Sax entertained the
audience with exagerated
caricatures and amusing an-
tidotes.
The most down-to-earth
character was Rabbit (John
Kuhn). Kuhn played the part of
the hippie stuntman hired by the
directors to construe a chemical
that would create an eight-million
dollar smash movie. Tympani was
hired earlier to do the same thing,
however, his duty was to come up
with a new rhythm that no one in
the world had ever heard of.
The role of Miss Scoons, plaved
by Connie Yoder, is also' a
believable one. Miss Scoons, the
director's secretary, is a young
woman who would do almost
anything to get a part in a film.
Voder does an excellent job winn-
ing the audience's svmpathy
through dialogue.
The least seen but most heard
character was the saxaphone
player, Sax (Jim Hindley). Sax
sets the mood for the entire play.
Costumes were simple yet
perfect for the context of the play.
Colorful lighting and special af-
fects also contributed to the visual
appeal of the stage.
Angel City was directed by
RabbTLohn �M OOM iC:onni Voder). Vmp.nHErtc' Sox), 2
Rabbit (John Kuhn) put their heads together with the hopes of
AmAinCMl- UECL Thetre that audiences identify with
to h,nT e XemntC�rdin8 Thr�Ugh�Ut the cot
number' of � i emphas,zes a mercials were satirically acted out
number of popular stereotypes The purpose of this was to per
Mrlrp,av H,nh� -w ��
suade us to quit listening to "com-
mercial images" and come back
to earth.
Tickets for remaining shows
may be purchased at the McGin-
nis Theatre Box Office Thursdav
and Friday from 10 a.m. until 4
p.m.
' a � l" ' �r remaining shows p.m
C!f Christian Groups Enjoying Large Membership
sJrwrC uaus fellow classmates and sharing the Athletes, the Navigators, the the "nowr" �r n. �
By MATTHEW GILLIS
It's an early Wednesday even-
ing as we find several ECU
students heading towards the
Jenkins Art Building. Once inside
the auditorium , friends chat for
several minutes before the
meeting begins � a typical group
meeting, yes, until the students at
one point reach for their Bibles?
Rela folks, this is not a "Jerry
Falwell Fan Club but a group of
tudents, many like you and I,
dedicated to reaching out to
fellow classmates and sharing the
knowledge one can gain from the
principles God dictates in the Bi-
ble. The scene just described is
common of what goes on during
campus Christian group meetings;
groups equally dedicated to help-
ing others, finding answers to pro-
blems, and easing troubled
"souls" on campus through faith,
training and action. No, these are
not cults, but they are serious.
In fact, the Christian campus
groups � the Fountain of Life,
the Fellowship of Christian
Female Trio Make Their Mark
Athletes, the Navigators, the
Campus Crusade for Christ, and
the Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowship � have more "bless-
ings" to count these days. About
250 students are in one or more of
the groups - a significant in-
crease over past years.
In short, it has become an inter-
denominational "movement as
one student put it. These groups,
involving students, adult advisors
and other adult workers, give
students needed counseling with
problems and introduce them to
'O 'Boy' To Appear A t ECU
By TINA MAROSCHAK
trttare KdJtor
"Technicolor Bag Ladies" is
perhaps the best description of the
new wave female trio O'Boy
scheduled to head up the '84
Miller High Life Rock Series con-
cert. Dubbed by manv as
"trendy "colorful and'even
spacey the three members,
Julie Jumper, Fiona and Zoe, in-
corporate three synthesizers and a
programmable electric drum to
produce what they call "fun,
danceable, modern music
O'Boy formed a little less than
a year ago in Richmond, Virginia.
Actually, Julie and Zoe have been
together since August of '82
thanks to a mutual acquaintance.
Zoe. who was collaborating
fashion shows in Richmond,
Virginia, met Julie and had her
compose modern music for the
shows, which they now call Music
for Fashion Show. The duo in-
creased to four, and for a couple
months the quartet played as Julie
and the Jumpers. Eventually one
of the members returned to
school, so the three have been
called O'Boy ever since.
What is is that makes a music
major from Virginia Com-
monwealth University, a Russian
major from Georgetown Universi-
ty and a pre-med student from
VCU turn to new wave entertain-
ment for a living? The group
would probably say it is because
of their enthusiasm. "We're really
colorful on stage Zoe said. "We
can float around Whatever it is,
these girls have toured from New
York to Texas, and have perform-
ed two videos on USA Cable,
"Male Rites" and "Va Va
Voom
Although O'Boy has not cut an
album yet, the group, at one time,
produced and engineered a casette
tape that received air play on
heavy rotation at 50 stations. In a
Wednesday interview, the three
were at a studio in Chapel Hill,
N.C. making a demo tape of the
'O'Boy' band members Zoe, Julie and Fiona will be on campus Anril
2 at the Miller High Life Roek Series concert. P P
5Xaa-2�2?� bCCfUSC Whcn � wh
theEnofTumrse " " thC futUre wcrc'
Perhaps "Space Age Trio" was ttsT" bdTn X
the best description the group shuttle " SPaCC
the "power" of Christianity.
Also, they provide opportunities
to study the Bible, to come
together for fun, fellowship and
guidance, and to sponsor projects
and events for both campus and
abroad to inform people of
"God's work holding anything
from cookouts to missionarv
training programs. The groups are
open to all students who come to
the weekly meetings.
These groups emphasize one
fact, however. They do not con-
sider rhemselves "churches" nor
an alternative to church. In fact,
one goal in helping new and even
"tned-and-true" Christians is to
help them find a local church ser-
vice which they enjoy and can at-
tend regularly.
Still, there are things to con-
sider. What kind of person would
be willing to take a chance and
help students do work like this? Is
there any kind of training that one
has to go through to prepare
themselves for such work? Most
of all, why would anyone work
with students in a position like
this for the good of God and
Christ, anyway?
For one individual, it was the
need to be involved in a special
way with people and to enrich his
lileby doing God's work � a task
which he began when he accepted
Christ into his life in 1971. After
several years of training and
research, Mark Stebbans spent
time working with a University of
South Carolina Christian group
but later changed course and
headed to Africa and a missionary
program there. He came back
again to work with college
students, however, and since last
May he has been a full-time adiv-
sor to the ECU Navigators.
"The greatest thing for me right
now is to be in a ministry situation
like this with college students
Stebbans said. "I believe that col-
lege students can be most effective
in helping out their friends on
campus with their problems and
leading them to Jesus Christ and a
better understanding of
themselves. The college students
will become the leaders of tomor-
row in whatever they choose to
do, and maybe that's why they
can have such an impact now on
other lives
Others, like Joe Schrader
would probably agree with Steb-
bans. But then again, Schrader
himself should know � for the
past few years, he has fully en-
joyed his work helping students
through the ECU Campus
Crusade. "I find the work mean-
ingful by instructing students how
to have the power of God in their
lives, and the students show
satisfaction in learning and apply-
ing thatknowledge as well "
Schrader said. "The work we do,
in fact, does give us direction for
our lives, which we feel is very im-
portant. I feel that the Lord has
given me direction in my own life,
and through my trust in Him, any
problem can be looked at and
solved if we let him take care of
our worries. Students todav are
looking to solve problems rind
direction, ana just fill needs in
their lives; a lot more are now see-
ing that there is a way to solve
them through trust in Jesus
Christ
Are there more students willing
to find answers in God now, or at
least help give others a guiding
hand? Just ask Paul Lear, a staff
worker with the ECU and N.C.
State Inter-Varsity Christian
Fellowships. Like his colleagues,
Leary expresses much the same
concern for helping students
fulfill needs through Jesus Christ.
"What I think we are trying to do
is this � we try to bring in
students and help them discover
that they can have answers to their
problems through a relationship
with Jesus Christ. We provide an
atmosphere for these students to
come together and share the cood
things that the Lord has done for
them Leary said. "We een try-
to help students develop their
God-given talents to help reach
out to others through wiitmg,
singing or just sitting down to talk
with people, and give them a
chance to find understanding
through the Lord and his son
Jesus Christ. We give them an op-
portunity to find answers to pro-
blems through praver and by-
reading the Bible, and then, if
they choose to do so, to involve
themselves with other people
through one-on-one contact or
through projects on and off cam-
pus Leary concluded by saying,
"It is a challenge, but I am
priviledged to be doing this
Students, as well as the adults,
are finding satisfaction doing such
work. Clem Edwards , a junior
from Rocky Mount, did not know
that such groups existed on cam-
pus until last summer. After being
introduced to the Inter-Varsity-
Christian Fellowship group by a
friend, Edwards attended a
meeting and has been quite active
ever since. "The people I met
there � other students like me �
made me feel welcome and gave
me a lot of support, and I've
learned how to get along with
them in return. At the same time,
I've become more aware of my
need to let the Lord take careof
my troubles, and also to find
some form of fellowship that I
can feel comfortable with, both of
which I think are very important
to Christian growth. I've grown
more faithful in my walk with
God through the help I got in
I.V and I've noticed changes for
the better in my life along with
it
Finding guidance and
understanding with oneself and
others is important, as Clem Ed-
wards found out in his relation-
ship with God. Rob Shive, a
senior, was also trying to find that
out in his own life when a friend
introduced him to the ECU Cam-
pus Crusade during his freshman
year. As an involved member of
the group. Rob emphasizes the
need to reach out to fellow
students "1 kno that as a stu-
dent, the people involved with
Campus Crusade have a good
chance to bring students to an
understanding . n their lives
through Christ. We aren't
fellowship, but we are a move-
ment, like the oiher groups, to
give students the opportunity to
give iheir Ijvc new meaning ana
to give them an alternative to go-
ing downtown every night and
partying their heads off Shive
said.
"We all do different work for
the Lord and the vampus Shive
said when referring the the
various Christian organizations
across campus, "but any and all
of these groups have to find time
to work with each other. We
know that we at Crusades can't do
it alone, and we've been doing
projects with the Navigators.
Inter-Varsity, the Fountain of
1 ife Christian group and others.
We'd like for students to see that
Christian hfe can be as exciting as
anything they bevome involved
with
But does that son of persuasion
actually work for students? For
most people, they'd consider jum-
ping off a bridge before hearing
all that "baloney" about becom-
ing involved with the "Christian
life much less even setting foot
into a group mee.ing to "sing
praises to the Lore True, vou
say? Maybe, but for one student,
it turned out that coming in con-
tact with people like that did give
him direction that he needed.
Blake Eudailey was your tvpicai
college student. Yet, he said he
was still searching for something
more in his life. Last spring,
Eudailey, a junior, met some
friends who invited him to Inter-
Varsity, and as he put it, "These
were very sincere people � there
was just something about them
that I liked, and I knew that I
wanted to have that same sort of
belonging and direction in my life.
Although I went to Inter-Varsity,
it was a little extreme "or me at the
time, but Paul Leaiy, the staff
worker, gave me what help he
could. Also, my roommate pro-
vided an example of how my life
could be in Christ because of his
work with the Navigators After
discussing his involvement with
the Navs' prayer group and his
later acceptance ;f Christ
Eudailey said, "It was as if part of
my long search was o er, and now
I find myself trying to bring
myself closer to the Lord every
day. It was difficult and it still is
trying to make it on my own � i
needed a common bond
But whatever the cir-
cumstances are that tiring people
into these groups, the people are
becoming involved. A new move-
ment? Who knows! Even so, the
movement is growing - - and Clem
Edwards may have said it best: "I
pray that more people will get �,
volved
- - - -�
I Wonmi'i nmm0immrtmmtl�m
m m Mm m �'
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������� i �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 19, 1984
?
tm i
��SU�-��� � �o-a .w
Tributes To Omar,
Sampson And Omid
By SHARON LEWIS
SlT Writer
The construction
workers thought it was
the funniest thing they'd
ever seen. There I was
running along - puffing
and blowing and on the
verge of a cardiac and on-
ly a block away from m
starting point when
suddenly a curb jumped
out in front ot me and I
was flat on my face.
Stunned, I stayed there
for a second with my eyes
closed. This, by the way,
is not my usual procedure
after I make a fool of
myself. 1 usually jump up
and pretend nothing hap-
pened, then check behind
me to see who was wat-
ching. At any rate, this
time was different - it
was the perfect oppor-
tunity for me to stop run-
ning and rest for a while.
I layed there until my
breathing returned to
normal and my nose got a
whiff of the most awful
smell in the world.
Without moving my
body, I opened my eyes
and discovered the
grossest dead, decaying,
fly-covered cat I'd ever
seen in my life, only two
inches away from my
head-
Needless to say, I hur- never really noticed the
nedly got up and walked
back to the house because
1 was "hurt Actually, I
think it was more like un-
conscious laziness, but
that's beside the point.
As I was limping back to
the house, I couldn't help
but think of that poor
corroded cat - he must
have been there for two
weeks! Yuk! And I
almost had him for
lunch!
That's not the half of it
though - a week later a
friend and I drove by the
spot and that same cat
was still there! He was a
pretty sad sight, but sure
enough he was still hang-
ing out on the side of the
road. At the time, my
friend and I thought it
was pretty funny. We
named the dead cat
"Sampson" and rode by
periodically to witness his
progress in the decaying
department. For days,
the big joke was
dedicating everything to
Sampson. We even went
to Papa Katz (a fitting
place!) and wore tags one
night saying, "We
dedicate this evening to
Sampson the cat
Before that, we had
smashed bodies that sit
on the road for months
after they're flattened
Isn't the sanitation
department suppose to
clean that stuff up? We
pay taxes - we don't
ant that stuff on our
tires! Somebody needs to
see to it that these car-
casses receive a decent
burial.
At this very moment on
the road in front of
Wistful Vista apartments
there lies a dead squirrel
and a dead bird that have
been there so long that
they're barely
recognizable as once liv-
ing beings.(We've named
these, too - "Omar" is
the squirrel, "Omid" is
the bird). Something
needs to be done!
We've decided (mj
friends and I, that is) that
we'd like to start a group
to put an end to this kind
of disgrace. We've all
heard of M.A.D.D.
Mothers Against Drunk
Drivers, right? We'd like
to call ours A.N.G.R.I.
Animals Need Guts
Removed Immediately!
Maybe this story will
stir some action!
summer school
MEAL PLAN
flexible, Convenient, Savings
-use the meal card at any meal
-get 10 discount off our cash prices
-dorm students are within walking
distance of MSC Snack Bar
For more information call 757-6382
East Carolina University Dining Services
O
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1-3-5-7-
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UP THE
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BUCCANEER MOVIES
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HARD TO
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A UNIVERSAL PICTURE
MORE TERRIFYING "
THAN EXAMS!
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WHERE WASHING IS FUN
BEER-VIDEOS-PQPCORN
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!Expires May 5,1984
Choral Society
To Entertain
The Greenville Choral
Society and members of
the East Carolina Univer-
sity Men's and Women's
Glee Clubs will perform
Brahms' Requiem on
Sunday, April 29, at 3:00
p.m. in Wright
Auditorium. It will be
performed with an or-
chestra of community
and East Carolina
University musicians. Dr.
Rhoda Fleming, Musical
Director of the ChoraJ
Society and a faculty
member of the ECU
School of Music, will
conduct the performance.
The Choral Society is a
community musical
resource group whose
membership includes
people of all ages and oc-
cupations. The group's
goal is to bring the finest
choral literature to the
singers and listeners of
the Greenville area.
The Women's Glee
Club, also directed by Dr.
Fleming, is an auditioned
chorus, open to qualified
women throughout the
University. This group
was featured in perfor-
mance at the Southern
Division Convention of
the American Choral
Directors' Convention in
Atlanta on February 23
as one of ten choirs from
eleven southern states.
The Men's Glee Club,
directed by Mr. Edward
Glenn, is a choral
organization drawing
voices from more than a
dozen schools or depart-
ments on the University.
This group has an equally
varied repertoire, from
traditional and classical
to popular and contem-
porary.
The concert will be the
largest presentation of a
major choral-orchestral
work since the perfor-
mance last year of
Beethoven's Ninth Sym-
phony with the combined
forces of the School of
Music choruses and or-
chestra and the Greenville
Choral Society.
Admission is $3.50 for
adults and $2.00 for
students; ticket, can be
purchased at the door.
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
I 05 A RPOB- R;
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Combination Special
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Spending the summer in the
CHARLOTTE area?
Move closer to your degree by
taking courses for college credit
at the
CHARLOTrE
CAMPUS
of �
1st SESSION
Management Science
COBOL Programming I
continues through 2nd
Session)
Principles of Economics I
Public Speaking
Criminology
Social Research
Statistics for Psychology
Prose Fiction
Music Appreciation
Registration: May 8
Classes Begin: May 9
2nd SESSION
ManagenK M Information
Systems
COBOL PrognunmiBti I
continued from 1st Session)
Principles of Economic II
Managerial Accounting
Computer Application, to
Social Research
Calculus
Court Systems
Americas Governmeat
Registration: June ,18
Classes Begin: July 2
Most classes are taught at night for the couvesueuo of
working students. Pfeiffer College is accrei.eToT ti
Southern Association of Colleges and Schoob and JL X?
credlrted coUeges .nd uersittes. Ple�e conwHZr
school s Resur for trmufer appro orio, ESsiT
For more information, contact FRanitik r?l ?.8
INGTON, PFIIFFER COtAlS 14H I JuS.St'
ST. CHARLOTTf urssMiV. i mOIHIad
�� inAKLOTTE, NC 28204. Or call: (704) 333.1422
STARTS TOMORROW!
JODIE FOSTER BEAU BRIDGES
ROB LOWE NASTASSJA KINSKI
rteco-
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OPENING SOON
TOO TUFF TUGS SPORTSWEAR
New Factory Outlet in Grimesland, N.C.
Highway 33 located in old school house
JUST WHAT YOU'VE BEEN WAITING FORf
Mens, Ladies, childrens and infants wear
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hmmuai i"?help you stretch y�ur do��
Merchandise that we manufactor are at unbelievable prices
New Store Opens May 2,1984
Hours: WedFri. 9:30-5:00
Sat. 9:30-3:00
Thank You for your patronage.
331 OOQp 1
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- - - iin�Itn �
�wawwusi m �����;
Bands I
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
'MnUhi
The annual "Barefoot H
on the MaJJ" will begin
today and will feature R
entertainment from the
Big Zuchini Washboard
Bandits, Sallv Fingerett. B
Barefoo
12:00 12:30
12:30 1:00
1:00-1:30
1:30 2:00
2:00 -2:30
2:30 -3:00
3:00-3:30
3:30-4:00
4:00-4:30
4:30 -6:00
7:30
Kappa
Ptesent 3rd Amu
BAHA
BEAQ
Date: Aj
Place: Kj
Time: 4:1
Tickets
Featuring the Afiss,
Raffle Grand Prize:
To Nassau in The B�
Miss Hawaiian Tropic






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Sneak Preview
M
The Big Zuchlnl Washbdoard Band
Bands Entertain At Event
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Ftatam ESHar
The annual "Barefoot
on the Mall" will begin
today and will feature
entertainment from the
Big Zuchini Washboard
Bandits. Sallv Fingerett,
the ECU Karate Club.
Ron Darian, and The
Amateurs.
Stand-up comedian
Ron Darian will emcee
the event. His credits in-
clude appearances in the
Broadway production of
Grease, the Regional
Theatre Productions of
Play It Again Sam,
Godspell and Two
Gentlemen of Verona.
Darian also appeared in
the soap operas Ryan's
Hope and One Life To
Barefoot On The Mall
12:00
12:30
1:00
1:30
12:30
1:00
1:30
2:00
Big Zuchini Washboard Bandits
Sally Finge"tt
2:00 � 2:30
2:30 � 3:00
3:00 � 3:30
3:30 � 4:00
4:00 � 4:30
4:30 � 6:00
7:30
ECU Karate Club
Ron Darian
Big Zuchini Washboard Bandits
The Amateurs
Sally Fingerett
Fantasy (ECU Sign-LangUage Club)
Door Prize Giveaways
Downtown
Sneak Preview
All Of Me
Live, along with feature
spots on Showtime and
HBO.
Sally Fingerett, known
as the Jimmy Durante of
contemporary singer-
songwriters, shares her
outlooks on life while
performing.
Blues, Rags, Country,
Swing, and Appalachian
Fiddle Tunes will be
played by the folk band,
The Big Zucchini
Washboard Bandits.
Band members include:
Rachel Maloney, fiddle,
washboard; Chris
Turner, harmonicas,
bagpipes, vocals; and
Richard Badu, guitar,
autoharp, mandolin.
Martin
If
Tomlin
Steve Martin and Lily Tomlin co-star in the new release All Of Me In the movie Tnmi.n .i
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THE EASTCAROl INI AN
Sports
APRIL 19. 1984
Pa�e 10
Pirates Win 24th Ballgame
Johnson Hits Three HRs, Pitches To Sixth Win
By ED NICKLAS
Sporti Editor
Do I hear an All-America
nomination for a Mr. Winfred
Johnson?
Who's that in the back? ECU
coach Hal Baird? What do you
say on the matter?
"If he is not an All-America
candidate, I don't know who is. I
know I haven't ever coached a
player that has done so much for a
team
Let's look at his latest creden-
tials from last night's game
against UNC-Wilmington: Three
home runs, four RBIs, a complete
pitching game. Yessir, that young
man would be a fine candidate.
Correction
Due to a printing error, not
an editorial error, in last Tues-
day's edition of The East
Carolinian, the photographs of
the two ECU quarterbacks
were reversed. Robbie Bartlett
was the Gold quarterback, not
the Purple quarterback.
Similarly, Brian Watts was the
Purple quarterback, not the
Gold quarterback as shown.
First the nomination.
What does Winfred say about
his performance?
"I don't feel like I had good
stuff he said. Ah, modesty, a
good quality in a ballplayer. Se-
cond the nomination.
Nomination confirmed.
Although Johnson did just
about everthing last night, he
had help from the stinging
batsmen. The Pirate bats con-
tinued to blister the ball in route
to a 8-6 victory over the Seahawks
at Harrington Field.
The team was hitting all the way
down the batting order � David
Wells, Greg Hardison, Todd
Evans and Mark Shank all con-
tributed to Johnson's miraculous
performance.
With the victory, Johnson's
record stands at 6-2 on the year.
He has won four in a row.
"My breaking pitch was doing
well Johnson said. "But my
fastball wasn't as good
When asked if he was thinking
about tieing the ECU record for
homers (the record is four, and
the concensus among baseball ex-
perts is that there are a number of
players holding the mark),
Johnson said, "Not really
Johnson provided support for
his pitching, as his three homers
early in the game increased the
Pirates' lead to 6-0 after five inn-
of play.
In the sixth inning, however,
the Seahawks began to touch
Johnson, narrowing the gap to
6-1. In the seventh, they added
two more runs, both unearned,
and the Pirates were beginning to
breath hard.
Mitch Wells led off that inning
with a ground ball to Hardison at
shortstop, but the sophomore
committed an error, and when
Cary Hall legged out a double,
Johnson faced Bobby Reynolds
with one out and runners on se-
cond and third.
After striking out Reynolds,
Ken Jones hit a chopper to Har-
dison and a bad throw to first
enabled Wells and Hall to score.
Johnson struck out Johnny
Slaughter to end the inning.
ECU scored two more runs in
its half of the seventh. Wells and
Evans each ripped singles to lead
off the inning, and Johnson walk-
ed (do you blame the UNC-W pit-
cher) to load the bases. Mike
Williams then routinely flied to
right field, but the ball was drop-
ped and Wells scooted home.
Then the fun began for the
crowd, as Chris Bradberry hit a
pop up just behind second base,
but the Seahawk second baseman
and shortstop tripped over each
other, and the ball thumped the
ground. Evans came home with
the Pirates' eighth run of the
game.
Johnson ran into some trouble
in the eighth, but it was not much
of his doing. Another unearned
run was given up, as Bobby
Bryant reached first on an error
by Steve Sides, and came home on
a Buddy Walters single. The lead
was narrowed to 8-4.
The Pirates held off yet another
Seahawk rally in the ninth.
Reynolds and Ken Jones reached
on singles, and Slaughter brought
home Reynolds to close the gap at
8-5. After a groundout, Chuck
Jones lined a double that ap-
peared to clear the right field
fence but fell just short, to bring
home the Seahawks sixth run.
Johnson, however got the final
out on a ground ball to short.
"It (the game) wasn't very pret-
ty said Baird, noting all of the
Pirate errors. "They're (UNC-W)
dangerous when they get behind.
But we won.
"Winfred really pitched a bet-
ter game than the score indicates.
Winfred's got to hit the corners
and the umpire was calling the
game a little tight
With the win, the Pirates, now
24-8, continue to increase their
chances at an at-large bid to the
NCAA playoffs. Their next game
is tonight against Virginia Com-
monwealth, 7 p.m at Harrington.
BRYAN HUMBERT - ECU ��f�oto Lab
Winfred Johnson did everything for the Pirates last night. He fc.lt three
homers and pitched the full nine innings, picking up his sixth win.
Larranaga Tells What America Missed Out On In Moscow
ByDALESWANSON
Stttt Writer
Chema was born on July 7,
1963 to Javier and Mayte Lar-
ranaga in Lima, Peru. Presently,
he is attending ECU on a swimm-
ing scholarship. He has competed
in both the 1980 Moscow Olym-
pics and the 1982 World Games
under the flag of his native Peru.
In 1981 he enrolled at Daytona
Beach Community College where,
in 1982, he became the NJCCA
(National Junior College Athletic
Association) champion in the 500
and 1650 yard free-style events.
He came to ECU in 1983 as a
junior in computer science.
Chances are good that this sum-
mer he will again be representing
Peru in international competition
� the 1984 Los Angeles Olym-
pics.
Q: What got you started in
swimming rather than something
more traditional in Peru, like soc-
cer?
Chema: Well, I started swimm-
ing competitively when I was
seven, but I really started getting
around in the water when I was
two. You know, like pool parties
when my dad used to say, "Hey,
get in the water and swim from
here to there and just kind of
show me off. He always liked to
get me and my brothers in the
water. We belonged to a beach
club. They had all kinds of sports,
but mainly water sports � skiing,
sailing, swimming, diving and all
that stuff. I was smaller than the
other kids my age when I started
competing, but I really liked it so I
didn't care if I won or lost. I was
right in the middle of the group,
nothing special. You know, I was
just there for the fun.
Q: Was there a big turning
point when you realized you were
destined to become a great swim-
mer?
Chema: Sort of�. When I was 11
I got second place in the butterfly
in the 11 to 12-year-old age group.
It was at a big national age group
meet. I was the only 11-year-old in
the finals, so my dad was real hap-
py. It's funny too, I don't even
swim butterfly competitively any
more.
Q: How did you qualify for the
1980 Olympics?
Chema: The way you qualify in
Peru is pretty much like here.
First, there are the open trials.
Anyone who is even dreaming of
going to the Olympics, and made
the standard time, can swim in
that meet. Then, whoever makes
the cuts at that meet � usually
about 100 out of about 500 swim-
mers � is put on the trial team.
That meet is usually about one
year before the Olympics. Those
people who make the trial team
then start training really hard for
the real trials that are about two
months before the Olympics.
They just had that meet a little
while ago for the Olympics in Los
Angeles. At that meet, those who
make the Olympic qualifying cuts
and place either first or second get
to go. But for the Moscow games
it was very expensive � all the
way to the other side of the world.
They cut the swim team down to
just four � two guys and two
girls. Gymanstics and rowing and
some others didn't even go at all.
Peru was only going to send
volleyball, because they're inter-
national champions, track, weight
lifting and the rifle team. Those
are the sports that have the best
chance for placing for Peru. They
weren't going to send the swim
team at all, but our cuts were pret-
ty good and the Russians were giv-
ing smaller countries financial aid
to go. You know, there was the
boycott and the Russians wanted
as many people there as possible,
so they helped out the little coun-
tries. It was good propaganda for
them too.
Q: How did they treat you when
you got there?
Chema: Really pretty good.
They had 19 dorms, kind of like
the high rise dorms here, for all of
the athletes and their coaches and
everything. We were in dorm 17
with Africa and Sweden and some
other countries. The rest of the
Village was like a real little city.
There was a drugstore, a sporting
goods, souvenir places, two
discotheques, even a barber � but
we didn't go in there. And in the
corner of that little plaza was a big
building � that was the cafeteria.
It was killer � practically every
other day we had to eat crabs.
They had everyting � even
caviar; just like it was butter. And
all kinds of juices � pineapple,
grape, banana, papaya. We
thought, 'no way would they have
papaya juice' because you don't
see it anywhere but South
America. There was no reason to
ever go out to eat because the
food was so good. Nothing like
the cafeteria here � everything
wrapped in plastic. Everything
there was fresh. They spent a lot
of money.
Q: What about security? I'll bet
the Soviets were pretty tight with
all of those foreigners in the coun-
try.
Chema: If you think about it, I
guess, there was a lot of military
security. But all of the time they
were worrying about 1972 � you
know, Munich. We had to wear
these big, square ID cards, that
hung around our necks, wherever
we went. We had to show it to get
into our building, to get out of it,
to go down the street to the plaza,
to go in the shops and discos.
Practically to go in the bathroom,
too. They even had X-ray
machines for bags just like at the
airport, only we got checked 100
times every day. You really get
tired of that for a whole month.
The last day w were upset with all
of it and just walked right through
one of the check points � me and
my coach and another guy. The
guard starts going, "nyengt!
nyengt that's what they say for
"no" or "stop" or whatever, and
tried to stop us. We just pushed
him out of our way and walked
on. Everyday with that is too
much.
Q: Sounds like everything was
pretty extravagant. Did they do as
good a job with the athletic
facilities?
Chema: The pools, the whole
athletic complex was a killer!
There was a big coliseum with a
giant window down the middle.
On one side was the 50 meter pool
for swimming, and on the other
side was the diving well with all
the boards and towers. And then,
also, there was a little door that
went to another pool divided in
the same way for warming up.
Also, to get to the pool from the
dorms they had buses that they
assigned us to. There were only
swimmers on our bus, all from
South America and Australia.
Those Australians are crazy! I
remember once they brought a
whole bag full of yogurt con-
tainers from the cafeteria. One
guy made a stack of them about
six high. Then, while that guy held
it steady another guy did a little
drum roll on the seats and then-
smashed all the containers straight
down so they squirted yogurt all
over the inside of the bus.
Everyone was surprised at first,
and then we all started cheering
and did it again. You should have
seen it. The bus smelled awful and
everyone was all covered with
yogurt.
The Russian athletes had their
own buses for their equipment
and coaches and trainers and
everything. They were real for-
mal, all dressed up in the same
suits; and they walked in straight
lines when they got off their bus.
Not really military, just real for-
mal. So we just tried to look as
bad as we could and walk around
with our shirts off and make fun
of them and stuff like that. Then
our coaches would yell at us and
say, "These are examples of good
athletes about the Russans.
Q: Were the Russian athletes
always so'serious?
Chema: Yeah, but they were
teated pretty good. I remember
Salnikov, (Russian world record
holder). I swam against him and
he beat me badly but in warm-ups
there were always five trainers and
coaches around him. As soon as
he was out of the water one guy
would give him a pill and another
would do this and anothe- would
tell him that. It was like he was
some sort of king. Actually, the
medical set-up was pretty good
for everyone.
Q: With only four swimmers on
your team, you must have felt
pretty overwhelmed by the bigger
teams?
Chema: Yeah, in that big
stadium there was the German
team with all these peopk cheer-
ing, and some other teams had a
lot of people, too. Then here we
are with just four swimmers �
three when one of us was swimm-
ing � so we got together with the
other South American teams.
There was Brazil, Venezuela, Col-
umbia and Equador, and we kind
of formed one big South
American team. They'd an-
See SWIMMER, Page 111
Football Fever Struck Early Last Saturday A t Ficklen
ITANLSV LIAKY - CCU
There was a display of speed
Swimmeil
Olympic
Continued From Page 10
nounce, "Lane eight,
Columbia and we'd all
cheer, "Yeah! Go South
America It was prettv
cool, all of South
America together
Q: How did you did in
your events?
Chema: I only swam
two events � the 400 and
the 1500 meter freestvle
events. I got 17th in the
400 and 15th in the 1500.
I broke the Peruvian
record in the 1500. so we
were pretty happy. I
dropped my best time by
twenty seconds in the
finals. I remember
Vladimir Salnikov was in
my heat ir. the a
finals; and the next day.
in the finals, he uer
under 15 minutes. That
was the first time anyone
had ever gone under 15
minutes in the 1500.
Q: What did you do to
deal with all of the ten-
sion you mentioned?
Chema: It was hard. It
got so quiet just before
you got on the blocks �
you wanted to scream. I
knew 1 didn't have a
chance tc win or
anything, bu: still, youre
representing your country
and you want to do as
good as you can. The on-
ly thing you can do about
the tension is put it out of
your head. While the
events were going on. the
whole place was real quiet
� total concentration.
But after it was all over
you just let go. People
went wild. I remember
the disco. At 12 they tried
to close the place, bu:
after the events were over
no one was ready to stop
partying at midnight.
They finally got us out
around two o'clock.
Then everybody went to
the cafeteria since it was
open 24 hours a day.
After everybody was in-
side � about 200 or 300
� a giant food fight
started.
It was so wild! The
whole night was wild!
Then all of these Russian
police came to break i: up
and we all threw food at
them. They had clubs,
but no guns, and they
weren't even allowed to
use the clubs on us. All
they could do was throw
us out, and we would just
run back in through
another door. It was a big
riot.
That was during the
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I
M
iPRIL 19. 1984
Lady Pirates Drop Doubleheader
By RANrtV Mfuc Choice on the rnsuino wn mi.kii .
By RANDY MEWS
�' Saor Eaton,
After defeating
Virginia last weekend in
the Liberty Baptist Soft-
ball Tournament, ECU
came up short yesterday
afternoon as it dropped
��th games of a
doubleheader to the
Cavaliers 2-0 and 3-2 in
Charlottesville.
Despite being shut out
in the first contest, Pirate
head coach Sue Manahan
didn't think unproductive
hitting was the reason for
her team's downfall.
"We got a few hits, we
just didn't put them
together Manahan
said. "We left a lot of
runners stranded on
base
ECU's most serious
threat came in the open-
ing inning of play. After
Stacy Boyette flied out to
left, Carla Alphin nailed
a ball into right field for
the Pirates' first hit. Bon-
nie Smith, the only ECU
player to make it as far as
third base the entire
game, hit into a fielder's
choice on the ensuing
Play, enabling the
Cavaliers to get Alphin at
second.
Lisa Zmuda was next
up, and responded with a
single to advance Smith
to second. Suzanne Mar-
tin took a pitch with the
count full on the next at
bat to get a free trip to
first loading the bases for
the Pirates. ECU was
unable to captitalize,
however, as Pam Young
flied to center to end the
inning.
Virginia picked up
both of its runs in the
bottom of third, one
coming as a result of an
error. Doucher led off the
inning as she smashed a
triple to deep center field.
Turner followed with a
bunt, which enabled
Doucher to come home
on the squeeze play, while
Turner also made it to
first safely.
O'Neal advanced
Turner to third on the
next at bat as she drove a
single up the middle.
Beard followed with a
sharply hit grounder that
was mishandled by
Zmuda, allowing Turner
to score and advancing
O'Neal to second. O'Neal
and Beard each advanced
on a Lluy grounder, but
were stranaded by
Stevenson as she popped
up in the infield to end
the inning.
Virginia only gathered
two more hits than ECU
during the game, but as
Manahan stated, "We
just couldn't seem to get
any of our hits in the
same inning
By the start of the se-
cond game, the effects of
a long ride and several
rain delays started to take
their toll on the Pirates.
ECU was able to get on
the board first as Zmuda
sacrificed to left field to
score Sandy Kee, but th
Pirates quickly lost their
lead as they gave up two
runs in the bottom of the
inning.
Losing pitcher Robin
Graves started things off
by throwing four con-
secutive balls to send
Marks to first. Daucher
followed by making it to
first on an infield error,
and then both runners ad-
vanced on a Turner
grounder. With runners
on second and third,
O'Neal hit a shot deep to
left which enabled both
Marks and Daucher to
score.
The Pirates had an op-
portunity to knot the
game up in the top of the
second. Angie Humphrey
led off the inning with a
single, then moved to se-
cond on a Dawn Langley
grounder. Leslie Bunn
followed with a fly deep
to right, but Humphrey
was thrown out at the
plate.
After several other
frustrating innings, ECU
finally tied it up in the
sixth. Tamara Franks was
walked, and then came
home on a Langley triple.
The Pirates'lead didn't
last long as Virginia came
right back in the bottom
of the inning. Daucher
almost assured victory
when she led off with a
triple. Turner followed
with a routine hit-and-
run to score Daucher,
and all the Cavaliers had
to do was hold off ECU
in the seventh to ensure
victory. Final score:
Virginia 3, ECU 2.
The Pirates drop to
20-14 on the year, and
will be in action again to-
day to take on Virginia
Commonwealth at 2 p.m.
on the varsity softball
field.
C�;Rec Tug-Of-War Cancelled
Classifieds
SALE
OOMJXOSjtoECUH0Q 752 3644
LOOKING TO SUBLEASE furnished
apt $270 a montn plus util 5 blocks
from campus HBO. Showtime. Pool
&Jotsrnore Call 758 697)
FOR SALE: 750 HQMa. Cantfer
frame, trick paint job, hooker
headers lots of chrome, $1,400 or best
offer Call 757 2461 or 75a-3917
FOR SALE:
Call 752 8967
ROOM FOR �NTlo7ispoibTe
female Reduced rent in exhange for
samejJuties. 756 0600 after 5�.
FOR SALE: Almost new twin mat
'ress for only $50 Call 752 1974 after
WANTED
SUMMER JOBS - Work out West
with twenty other ECU students.
Average student earned $3800 last
summer interviews Today
Brewster D 202, 100. 4:00. Please be
prompt.
IRS Picnic
Come socialize, laugh
and enjoy your fellow in-
tramural participants
during the annual awards
picnic. This event will be
held at the bottom of
College Hill. Join us as
Chancellor Trophy win-
ners will be recognized as
well as other intramural
standouts.
ECU Intramufuls
Tug-of-War Cancelled
The Co-Rec Tug-of-
War activity has been
cancelled for this year. Be
watching after the sum-
mer months for the
return of this activity.
Twin bed, 2 dressers.
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted for
summer Fully furnished apt
WasherDryer $100 a mo. plus 13
utilities. Cannon Court 752 3434.
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM
MATE to share furnished 2 bedroom
apt. In nice apt. complex. $153.50 plus
a deposit plus "1 utilities. Available
May 1.
COFFEE TABLE, with three end
fables $50 iff Bar $50 a Dresser $25
752 5879
1974 pinto $495, Table a, Chairs 30
752)001
SOFA AND LUVSEAT, exc coffee
and end table, new $300 758 9122 PM.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: 3
beoroom at Wilson Acres, 3 blocks
from campus, next to pool, tennis
courts, laundry Rent 124 76 Call
752S886
ROOMMATE NEEDED for summer
Furn. room in 4 bedrm. house
$125mth plus Ui utilities Come by
406 Rotary Dr near Campus Security
5th St
r.
HERO.
fefel
C
.��
,&
s l
tSr-
i
MISC
WHEN A FRIEND has stereo system
problems, tell them that the audio
technicians at the TECH SHOP don't
charge for repair estimates Call us
at757 '�Nineteen Eighty"
AUTO ACClbeNTTspIaJWTn
personal injury litigation j David
Duffus, Jr , Attorney, NCNB
Building Greenville. North Carolina
758 6200
QUALITY TYPING - IBM
Typewriter, 15 years experience Full
time typing for faculty 4 students
756 3660
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: For J Bedroom house, ful-
ly carpeted, AC.flreplece and par-
tially furnished Rent lis.ee � month
Call 7SS-S252
FEMALE ROOMMATES WANTED
to share 2 bedroom condimlnlum tor
tummer Fully furnished �
washerdryer � AC - tennis court
� bus service � Mi rent 756 9374, ask
tor Cynci or Snevon
ROOMMATE WANTED: 4 summer
$85 plus Ui util, 1 mi to campus bus
Can 752 6265
ROOMMATE$ NEEDED for sum
merfall River Bluff Apts Call
758 8822
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PROFESSIONAL TYPING Service
all typing needs 758 5488 or 7S8J241
COLLEGE STUDENTS will find th7s
offer attractive $200 wk .sales and
service car helpful Call 756 3861
ATTEN UNC-CH SUMMER School
Students need a place to live wo
"assets of subletting Granvill
Towers is the place for you! � Air
conditioning, 15 meals per week,
swimming pool, great parties plann-
ed, and weekly maid service All for
only $365 per 5 wk session. Sessions
run May 20 June 26 and July 1 Aug
7 For more details call our Business
office at (909) 929 7143 Unlv Square
Chapel Hill. The Place To Be At
UNC!
ROOMMATES NEEDED for Sum
mer 98 00mo. Call 7571487.
ROOMMATE WANTED for summer
must be neat and responsible $125 a
month plus to utilities and phone.
Contact Bob Schulti 758-0045 at B 9
Cannon Court Condomlnioms
ROOMMATE NEEDED for summer
Furn. room in 4 bedrm. house.
$125mth plus Mi utilities. Come by
406 Rotary Dr near Campus Security
5th St.
1 to 2 ROOMMATES to share 2 BD
Apt AC, furnished, has large yd,
pets, 5 mlns from campus $250Call
7564515
Fim'SARE ttiUJbl
henrden fresh lettuce, cheese, rolls. So come in to Subway whirl
tomatoes, mms ��� picftfa and heroesgdecoratealeX
PARTY? D.J. available on request
'or frats, sororities, dorm socials,
mixers, etc References available
contact w
FREt TO GOOD Home small white
puppy with Gold markings �
Female Very Intelligent � house
trained 752 5377
RESEARCH PAPERS
'4.789 to choose from � an �uopecty
, Rush $2 tor thecurrent. 306-page cm
I �g Custom research s thesis aaan
I lance also available
i Rewirrh. i 1322 Idaho Ave. �206W
I los Angeies. CA 90025 (213) 477-8226
208
E. 5th St.
758-7979
Sandwiches & Salads
208
E. 5th St.
75S-77f
TWO CUTE MALES need a home 8
eeks old Toilet trained. Purr on
command Call 756 5888 after 9 00 and
say Meow
SUMMER JOBS Tremendous oppor
tunity. income up to $300 or more a
week PART TIME National com
oany selling a needed product where
fne drinking water is bad tasting, sal
ty. or unsafe Responsible students
needed throughout eastern N.C. and
southeast va To apply, send letter of
interest with phone number to Sales,
P O Box 44, Greenville, NC, 27835
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED to and from New
Bern for one or both summer ses
sions Call 752 8759 If Interested
TersonaiT
CONGRATULATIONS to Michael P
Monahan who is now an officer In me
united States Marine Corps, but was
always a Gentlemanl Your support
system will continue to back you
'oreverl
SHERRY O Call me after n p.m.
within tn next week URGENT DRR
758 3915
DELTA ZETA Big Brothers � Con
Brats on a great softball season You
ail are the best I We love ya and can't
ait to get back In the fall to party
'th yal Love the Sisters i. Pledges of
Delta Zeta
SISTERS OF DELTA ZCTA: ITS
BEEN A GREAT YEAR FOR YOU �.
we hope next year Is even better I
We'll miss ya all this summer I Love
the Big Brothers of Delta Zeta
HEY NEW YORKERI En loved Frl's
marathon. Let's gat together real
soon I VIRGINIAN
JOHN Congrats on finding the
library. Howelrd It only fakes tlma.
Goon Squad Revenge Is mine Third
floor Unsteed WATCH OUTII
'ESI I JOHN DEVINCEN:WAS IN
THE LIBRARY. Believe It or not.
RAT
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: A 7
�.rten wit green eyes and partially
white itemec Aanwan to name ef
Mickey. Loaf arewnd Ijth It. (near
Domino i Plixa) If NMMdJ, call
7SA-6SJI.
PAPA KATZ
Your Adult Entertainment Center
Presents
Thurs. Nite
Penny Draft Nite
Members1.00
Guests $2.00
Fri.
4:00pm Super Happy Hour
lOCDraft 1st Hour
oftt. Something New
Rock & Top 40 Music
25CDraft All Nite Long
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 19, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 19, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.338
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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