The East Carolinian, April 17, 1984







She SaHt (Earoltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Greenville, N.C.
Tuesday, April 17,1984
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Freshman Applications Rise;
Howell Attributes Escalation
To Football, Medical School
By JENNIFER JENDRAS1AK
NmwBMm
Freshman applications for ad-
mission at ECU are up approx-
imately 23 percent over the
number of applications received
at this time last year, ECU
Chancellor John Howell told the
Alumni Association Saturday.
According to Eugene Owens,
associate director of admissions,
6,500 applications had been
received as of last week. Of these,
1.840 applicants had already in-
dicated acceptance through pay-
ment of fees. Owens called the in-
crease "fairly significant ad-
ding that actual enrollment is
limited to a certain extent by a
projected enrollment figure sent
to the UNC Board of Governors.
Schools are allowed to go over
this figure by 2 percent, Owens
said, but beyond that percentage
they will receive no additional
state funding.
Applications to the graduate
school program have shown no
change, according to Charles
Cullop, associate dean of the
graduate school. The school
usually receives between 1,000
and 1,200 applications.
Howell grants part of the credit
for the increase in applicants to
:l.e success of the ECU football
program. "The national publicity
had an effect on the number of
applications he said. "Anything
of a positive nature will cause
students to become interested in
the institution
The medical school was also
cited by Howell as an aid in draw-
"The medical school is becoming
more and more good news in
eastern North Carolina he said.
"There are a great many good
things about the university �
public relations is a very impor-
tant thing for us
Howell said he does not see the
current increase in applications as
leading to a significant increase in
enrollment. A one-half to one per-
cent increase in enrollment is pro-
jected for each year and Howell
said he assumes this will continue.
"What we are dealing with now is
a possible increase in the
freshman class, which is only one-
fourth of the enrollment he
said. He added that "we won't get
all of those 23 percent
Applications are up everywhere
this year, Howell said. He at-
tributes this to the upswing in the
economy as well as the fact that
many students apply to three or
four schools. "Our increase was
higher than the national
increase he said, but, "some in-
stitutions will have more applica-
tions, but fewer students
The reason for both the in-
crease in applicants and the
relatively stable number of
students is the decline in the
number of high school graduates.
"All institutions have known
about the decline in the number of
students, so they have been
recruiting more aggresively
Howell said. "I don't think
enrollment will increase like it did
in the sixties and seventies because
the students just aren't there he
added.
"We have a situation at ECU
where enrollment will remain the
same or increase slightly while
others are possible declining,
Howell said.
One thing Howell feels needs
particular emphasis is the creation
of merit scholarships to attract
more high quality students. "I
would like to attract more
students with high averages and
class ranks without losing the
other students Howell said.
"We can improve the quality of
students by admitting more top
students without losing those we
have
Providing more money to the
faculty already here is another
priority mentioned by Howell.
"We want to make available to
professors the dollars the state
doesn't fund he said. "If a pro-
lessor is involved in a research
project that is showing a lot of
promise, we'd like to be able to
help with it
Concerning a possible increase
in admission equirements, "I
don't think there will be any
significant increase in re-
quirements Howell said. He
said the only change is a change
that has been made statewide in-
creasing the number of units re-
quired for high school gradua-
tion. "We aren't apt to change re-
quired SAT scores of grade
averages he said. "Universities
will put themselves out of business
by raising SAT scores and
averages" because of the declin-
ing number of students.
�y�o EZTtt "f St S Strma ,h�" MM F.otbX!Ye.m'A�g.L"
was one or the events at this weekend's Purple-Gold game.
At Annual Banquet
1984-85 SGA Execs Sworn In
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NemEMtor
John Rainey was officially
sworn in as the 1984-85 SGA
President at the annual SGA Ban-
named best legislator and the Best
Piece of Legislation award went
to the bill initiating the guber-
natorial forum, which was co-
sponsored by Speaker of the
quet last Thursday. Also sworn in Legislature Kirk Shelley
mp J'�f cPresidenTt Mike "I think it was the happiest day
McPartland, Secretary Lee Lane of my life Rainey said "I felt
and Treasurer Georgia Mooring.
Several awards were presented
at the banquet honoring this
year's SGA executives and
legislators. Senior Class President
Lisa Roberts was named the best
committee chairperson, Junior
Class President David Brown was
good about taking office and I'm
fortunate to have the good
organization that Paul (Naso) has
left me
Rainey added that he is looking
forward to "serving all students
next year and said he invites
anyone with input to contact the
SGA office.
"It was a good year said
former President Paul Naso "We
turned the image of SGA aound
this year, but we still have n long
way to go The organisation
needs to be built up more, Naso
said.
The year was a "forerunner
Naso said, "because the ad-
ministration listened to us. ' He
added that the debate ir the
legislature this year was plentiful
and constructive.
'For me it was a very gratifving
year Naso said.
CATfc. A � , m m �aVld Br�Wn WaS with inPut to c�ntact the year Naso said
SGA Passes Appropriations Bill, Discusses PIRG Funding
B DARRVL BROWN n,v. ��r �
B DARRVL BROWN
M�n�giu Editor
Two debates related to Public
Interest Research Groups
dominated the SGA Legislature's
final meeting of the year Monday
night, as a Duke University stu-
dent spoke about PIRG on her
Durham campus and the
legislature passed a resolution op-
posing PIRG's funding svstem at
ECU.
The legislature also passed by-
consent the 1984-85 annual ap-
propriations bill submitted by the
Appropriations Committee. The
bill appropriated $81,776.68 to
more than 30 student groups and
the SGA Executive Council for
next year.
During the questions and
privileges period, Juliette Sadd, a
member of the College
Republicans and Associated
Students of Duke University, cau-
tioned ECU students on the
establishment of a PIRG.
Sadd said the PIRG at Duke
collected $24,000 in student fees
annually but was not active on
campus. "After PIRG established
that funding (a refundable fee on
tuition bills), they kind of disap-
peared. We didn't see them on
campus she said.
Sadd called PIRG a "political
group" and said the Duke
organization had an off-campus
office, registered lobbyists with
the N.C. General Assembly and
spent $20,000 per year to pay staff
members.
Challenging PIRG's funding
system of collecting fees through
the university tuition bill, Sadd
asked, "Why should an organiza-
tion like PIRG be able to use the
university's name and
automatically send out a little
form that says, 'check this'? Why
are they different from any other
student organization?"
Duke PIRG made refunds for
students who did not want to sup-
port the organization difficult to
obtain, Sadd said.
Sadd. who is on the Editorial
Another Film To Premiere
Thursday At Mendenhall:
'All Of Me' Previewing
Board of the Duke Chronicle
newspaper, added that "PIRG
does do some good things. Don't
think I'm anti-PIRG
She said the group worked on
consumer, housing and en-
vironmental issues "now that we
have them under student govern-
ment control Duke students in a
referendum last year voted down
the PIRG funding system by a 68
percent majority. Thirty-four per-
cent of the students voted, accor-
ding to Sadd.
In an internal attempt to thwart
a PIRG at ECU, legislator Dennis
Kilcoyne offered a resolution
stating "the student government
legislature opposes the use of the
university's Cashier's Office as a
fund collecting agent for any one
student group
The bill, when reported out of
the Student Welfare Committee,
opposed only a mandatory fee on
tuition bills, but Kilcoyne had the
bill ammended "to cover all three
different types of funding systems
they (PIRG) could use
"The reason I wrote this resolu-
tion was because of the funding
system that PIRG is asking for
Kiicoyne said.
After much debate, the resolu-
tion passed by a voice vote. The
resolution is only the opinion of
the legislature, since the SGA has
no authority on policy of the
Cashier's Office or tuition bills.
The legslature earlier ap-
propriated $150 so the SGA could
sponsor a campus-wide referen-
dum on PIRG April 24. The
money must be re-paid to the
SGA if a PIRG is established at
ECU, according to the bill.
SGA Vice President-Elect Mike
McPartland is elections chairper-
son of the referendum
In other SGA business, new
SGA President John Rainey r am-
ed computer science and bus.ness
major Scott Sutker as the 1984-85
Student Attorney General.
Sutker, who will be a senior next
year, served as public defender
this year.
By DALE SWANSON
Staff Witter
The precedent the ECU Student
Union Films Committee set with
the incredibly successful sneak
preview of Police Academy last
month seems to have caught the
eye of Hollywood.
For the second time in ECU
entertainment history a major
film will preview in Hendrix
Theatre when Universal Pictures
in conjunction with Eastman
Kodak presents All of Me, a com-
edy starring Steve Martin and Lily
Tomlin, this Thursday, April 19
at 7:30. According to Dave Cobb,
President of the Student Union
Films Committee, a Universal
representative from Hollywood,
Ca. contacted him Tuesday, April
10, to offer the film, free of
charge, as a one showing sneak
preview.
Although there are no official
connections between the preview
last month, and the one this
Thursday, Cobb believes the suc-
cess of Police Academy had
something to do with it. Police
Academy is a Warner Bros. Pro-
duction a. id was brought here
through a connection with Jenny
Nichols of Films Inc a film
distributor out of Atlanta,
Georgia, Cobb said.
Nichols said a California adver-
tising agency contacted her for
recommendations of college cam-
puses that would be good for a
preview of Police Academy.
"There's an amazing amount of
free programing coming out right
now for college audiences said
Nichols, who attributed much of
this to the healthy economy and
the financial freedom many com-
panies are now experiencing. She
also commented that college cam-
pus premieres must be working
well since the profits of Police
Academy are funding a new com-
edy western by the same director.
The company responsible for br-
inging this Thursday's screening is
American Passages, a college
marketing and media firm.
Greg Haversfield, a represen-
tative for the California based
company, was responsible for br-
inging together Universal and
Eastman Kodak to sponsor the
screening of All of Me, said,
"many companies are becoming
more interested in goodwill adver-
tising "Kodak is hoping that
you will remember that they
brought you a free screening the
next time you're in a store and see
their product Haversfield com-
mented. He also noted that Duke
and UNC-G will also be screening
All of Me. Another factor he con-
sidered in selecting ECU was the
success films have here and the
See ALL, Page 6
Knox Brings Rural Roots
To Much Urban Experience
This article is the second in a
series of short features on guber-
natorial candidates.
By DARRYL BROWN
MYAN HUMIIRT - ICU
A Bicycle Built For Two
Sometimes letting to class Is easier when you have a ttttie help
friend. It's not a Mercedes, bat It sure beats walking.
E4Koc
Former Charlotte Mayor Eddie
Knox, who followed Jim Hunt as
the student government president
at N.C. State University, want to
succeed him now as North
Carolina's next governor. But
Knox hasn't been waiting in the
wings; he has, in addition to ex-
perience in the General Assembly,
probably more local government
experience than any other guber-
natorial candidate this year.
Knox is known for being a com-
bination of country boy and ur-
ban leader. He was born on a
farm in Mecklenburg County,
took a B.A. in agriculture educa-
tion at N.C. State, then graduated
in the top 10 percent of his law
school class at Wake Forest
University.
His economic development plan
for the state, REAP (Rural
Economic Action Program)
reflects the Knox combination of
rural roots and experienced fiscal
planning. REAP is a highly touted
program not only to recruit in-
dustry in 60 targeted
underdeveloped counties in North
Carolina, but also to improve
water, sewer, utilities and
highways in the areas with a com-
bination of state and local invest-
ment.
Knox comes to such a plan
from a history of budgetary
management posts. He served as
chairman of the N.C. Advisory
Budget Commission from
1977-81, during which time .state
teachers got their largest pay in-
crease in history, Knox proudly
notes. He also oversaw great
economic growth in the state's
largest city, Charlotte, while
mayor of that city from 1979-83.
Economics were also the motive
behind Knox's stance on the ECU
medical school. While in the N.C.
Senate from 1971-74, Knox irst
voted against a proposal for the
medical school when the bill nad
no funding provision. Knox Inter
voted for the school funding,
however, and as chairman of the
Budget Commission recommend-
ed $138 million for ECU, though
the Legislature gave $134 million.
One of Knox's major education
proposals in a steady 8 percent
salary hike for teachers over each
of the next four years ;ind
developing incentive pay plans for
teachers working toward higher
degrees.
Knox talks more than most can-
didates about the state's second
largest industry, tourism, and he
boasts a detailed plan to upgrade
the industry with private seci:or
and citizen involvement.
Knox is proud of a long list of
appointments of women and
minorities while mayor of
Charlotte, and his record on
minorities and the poor includes
weatherization programs in low
income housing and urban
development programs in depress-
ed areas.
Lr-r Mf � �- ' . - .
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1, :
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 17, 1984
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
since 1925
Published every Tuesday anti
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
Irtg me summer
The East Carolinian is the ot
flclal newspaper ot East
Carolina University, owned
operated, and published tor and
by the students ot East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate. US yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Ore South
Building on the campus o ECU,
Oreenvthe N C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian
Old South Building. ECU Green
ville, NC 27834
Telephone: W-eJe. J47, ��
POETRY FORUM
The last meeting of the ECU
Poetry Forum will take place on
Thursday. April, 19th in
Mendenhall Rm 24 at 8 00 p m
Anyone wanting feedback on
hisher poems) should bring 8 10
copies of each Open to all in
terested in poetry.
DELTAZETA
BIG BROTHERS
There will be a meeting on
uesday, April l7fh at 9 00 at the
house. This will be our last
meeting so please try to make it
We hope everyone is ready to par
ty at Myrtle Beach! The DZ's
sure are ready! Krlsty, we all
hope you get well soon
RUGBY CLUB
We are sorry to say that the
UNC CH Rugby Club forfeited
the match last Saturday Their
team reluctantly tailed to show
up at the field We apologize if
anyone was inconvienced There
will be a team meeting next week
for anyone interested in playing
next fall New players welcome
HEALTH ALLIANCE
This Is the last meeting of the
semester so all members are
strongly urged to attend The
meeting will be held at
Mendenhall In Room 247 at 5 30
on Thursday. April 19th if you
have not turned In all ticket
money or paid dues, contact the
Vice President before the
meetlngl 11
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be a meeting for all
old and newly inducted members
on Wed . April 18 at 5 30 In room
221 Mendenhall All members
who participated in the Move A
Thon should bring their money to
the meeting Hope to see all of
you there!
BIOLOGY CLUB
Attention Biology Club
members! I! If you are Interested
in coming to the Biology Lun
cheon on Thurs April 19th,
please sign up on the club office
door by Wednesday or call Rox
anne at 758 4466 or Jim at 355 6854
by Wednesday night tor details.
Good Luck on Exams
KA LIL SISTERS
Thanks for all the support you
gave at the Purple and Gold
game The Pirate Club really ap
predates It Don't forget � we
have an A Team Handball game
on April 17 at 915 and a B Team
Handball game on the 18th at
8:30. Come on out and show your
KA spirit Don't forget the party
we're going to have on the 28th
Prepare yourselves in advance
tor an all day blind.
PI KAPPA PHI
Everyone come out and sup
port the handball and softball
teams this week in playoff play
Thanks goes out to everyone for
making our Rose Ball a great
success Everyone get ready to
party this Wednesday night with
the Alpha Xi Delta sorority at the
Pi Kapp house These girls know
how to party! I
MANAGEMENT
There will be a banquet Toe
day, April 17 at 8 00 P M for all
members of SAM There will also
be a tour to Grady white April n
at l 00 information sheets reoar
ding both of these events will be
posted In front of Dr Eckstein's
office
NTE
Or John S Chlloers, Director,
ECU Testing Center, announces a
special administration of the Na
tlonai Teacher Examinations �
Core Battery No 3 (Professional
Knowledge) and me Specialty
Area Examinations to be held at
East Carolina University, on
Saturday, May 5, 194. Persons
Interested in registering for this
special admlnstration are urged
to contact the ECU Testing
Center, Speight Building,
Room 105, Greenville, NC ,
Telephone: (919) 7576811, no
later than April 15, 1984
FREE FOR SENIORS
Now Is your chance to keep up
with events at ECU. after you
graduate. The Pirate Club Is of
ferlng free "Crew Club"
memberships for graduating
seniors. This consists of purple
and gold report, decais, priority
on season football and basketball
tickets and much more and this Is
completely free. Contact the
Pirate Club office at 757 6)768, or
Mark Nlewald at 757 6009 or stop
by our booth at the Student Supp
ly April 12 & 13, or Barefoot on the
Mall April 19.
EDMISTENI4
All students Interested in oln-
ing the campus organization to
elect Rufus Edmlsten as Gover
nor in 1984. Please contact Betty
Casey or Macon Moye (ECU
Coordinator) at 752-0312.
AIR BAND CONTEST
At the Elbo, April 17th, 1984
8 00 p m. Sponsored by PRC
Sign up at the Elbo
SCUBA DIVING
DIVE the GRAND CAYMAN
ISLANDS August 14th 21st 184
Spend eight days and seven
nights at South Cove on Grand
Cayman, Fly Eastern Airlines
from Raleigh, three meals, lodg
Ing and diving Coat IV70 00 for a
diver and 8714 for a non diver in
eludes a 1100 00 non refundable
deposit. For registration and in
formation call Ray Scherf, Direc
?or of Aquatics at 757 6441 or
�venlngs at 756 9339
WINABUNNYIII
That's right � Win A Bunny
Tickets may be purchased all
week in the Student Supply Store
Lobby or from any PPHA
member The drawing will be
held Friday, April JOth at noon
and you don't have to be present
to win. So come on by and try to
win a Bunny for Easter 111
BAHAMA MAMA
Coming Soon! I April 19th at the
Kappa Sigma House. The party
starts at 4:X so get your tickets
�arly. See any brother or little
sister for tickets.
TWIRLER TRY OUTS
When: April 15th, 29th and May
5th Where- Meet In the Lobby of
the Music Building at 2:00. Try
outs start at 3:00. For more infor
mation contact Tom Goolsby
757-6�W or Beth Webster 752 5690
PRCCLUB
There will be a meeting Tues
April 17 at 7:00 p.m. The meeting
will be held In the Coffeehouse In
Mendenhall.
ICE HOCKEY
WANTED: Faculty or Staff
member who enjoys watching
people suffer to be the advisor of
a new Ice hockey team. We also
need more players who would
like to put the hurt on the ACC.
Teeth are not a requirement for
either position Contact George
Sunderland at 752-8525
AMBASSADORS!
We will have our last general
meeting this Wednesday. April
II. at 5 00 In the Mendenhall
Multipurpose Room Election of
officers will take place and there
is a special end of me year sur
prise planned Also, plans tor the
end of the year party will be
finalized and graduation ac
tlvlties will be discussed See you
mere!
PHI BETA SIGMA
The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity inc will be sponsoring
a Jr Miss Phi Beta Sigma
Pageant on April 27, 194 at the
Ramada inn. Anyone who would
like to share in mis event with a
talent mat you would like to per
form on this date are asked to
contact Richard Dawklns at
758 9405 or any brother of the
fraternity as soon as possible
MARKETING ASSOC
American Marketing Aaeocia
lion will be sailing a NEW type Of
painter's hat, starting April itttv
Wed featuring 1 Love ECU' in
Pur pie 4 Gold 1 Great accessor ,
?or moae Summer days on me
beach An item you cant pees up
- show your P:r�te Pride 4 get
your 1 Love ECU" hat for only
83 901 Purchase them at me AMA
pig plckln on the lefh a, Barefoot
on me Mall" on the Itthi
STUDENTS WITH
HART
Now is the time for a new
generation of leadership if you
�ra fed up with me politics of
nostalgia and looking for new
solutions to the nation's problems
loin Students with Hart we are
the vanguard of a new
democracy We will be meeting
at Mendenhall, (Ask receptionist
for room nember) every Thurs
day at 8 00 p.m. For more infor
mation call 752 4935 or 757 3564
LACROSSE PLAYERS
All 1 mm pe re � pieeve
return en equipment t0 Bat Mart
office by " sa Grades win tM
wimftem if not returned
MANAGER NEEDED
SGA is looking tor a
Refrigerator Rental Manager'
it interested tin Jut an apptica
lion in the SGA office before 2 00
Tue April 17
FACULTY
The faculty Children Egg
Hunt is today at 4 00 for ages 1
Rain date is Wed April la at 4 00
Children should bring their own
baskets meet on me west lawn
beside Spiiman
ANGEL CITY
Usher for the play April 18. 9
20 or 21 and see me play free
Sign up sheets ere located m
Messick Theatre Arts Building
Htf� �aat (Earolinian
SUBCRIPTION FORM
Name:
Address:
Name
Vou may in ttv. fnrm t rtahf Or AddrCSS .
ue � separata sheet of paper if j you need more Hoes. There art 33 CityMate.?ho
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Date to Begin:
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SrGMA THE TATAU
he Bete �� I 1.1 pr -
Theta raSJ � Ni' one none,
Vor et, w Mur�, �, r)ig (1
Spr.ne Banquet mr f�v, ntlL
Vee'iijor. 'Iwvn, Ap.
� 00 p rr at me ttreawvlWa Cou-
trrCiue Tn. ever-t � mark axj
Bete hw C-epter t�nt aanrvet
sar, r Ann Rosenov. eN
PhD w-ii speak on ' Gcwr
Through Nur�.r.g Reiea' .
Everyone s aM ted For �
rilormjl or ontec Mar ft) a
Engeike e' the School of N.
(75701)
PHI ETA SIGMA
Those mernber �no Signer
to bake sometn.ng or -or. �� ��
oeke Bata piease Oorvr tcw$�-
mat it k) Ms Pr.oey e iv
nave the picnic Hi Set
at Greenspr nS Mr� for tfiot
members who signec yp to 90 a
member shou e attend �.
meeting fVea Ap. .g B
THERE!1
ALPHA PHI
BROTHERS
The Big Brothers ana S.ste-5
Alpha Ph. Soror.t, owc
congratulate the new B
Brothers that were ncuctec ia5-
Tuesday night Tonight there
be a meeting at tr,e house s'a"
at 9 30 pm election wfli be hew
for new officers so arenas
mandatory
JOBS �OUTER BANKS
Summer jobs on Outer Banns
Most mm wage arid i
quarters furnished Mov
begin April 2 Neea Cooks
Waitresses. Cashiers Va.os e-
Over 300 openings to llSfec
Contact job Servic? 21 2885
Mon Fri for more info
BIBLE DISCUSSIONS
Coeo Group Bible MSCWSS 1
Tuesday 7 so p v wan
212. Everyone Welcome
RESEARCH PAPERS
' 89 to cfoose ' � � �
Rus" S2 lot vie
.stom resaai - s rhe�
11 e afaa J-a aoie
����� 11k 11322 Idaho rtve
los Angeies. CA90025 213)43
Students wanting to have their parents receive
The East Carolinian can fill out the form
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f
Custom crafting
&
Jewlery Repair
fair pries
guaranteed work
Bring This Ad for
25 OFF
j 14K Chain Repairs
I by Les Jewlery
I 120 E. 5th Street
759-2127 19-5 Tues. Sal
SPRING CONCERT GREETINGS
The Staff and Manage-
ment of WZMB would like
to extend our deepest sym-
pathies to the Major At-
tractions Committee for
the Spring Concert Situa-
tion. Because of Time and
Money Considerations, the
Major Attractions Com-
mittee has not been able to
provide you with a Spring
Concert.
BUT WE HAVE.
IN FACT WE HAVE TWO.
WZMB would like to ex-
tend a cordial invitation to
the members of the Major
A ttr actions Committee
and students in general to
attend our Spring Con-
certs.
WZMB invites you to
the Third Annual Back
Doors Concert at the Attic
Wednesday. April 18.
Thursday Night, don't
miss Stevie Ray Vaugham
& Double Trouble with
special guest Steve Bassett
at the Greenleaf, brought
to you by Mid-Eastern
Brokers and WZMB.
RSVP WZMB 757-6656
- - - . -
-
Vandal
B STEPHEN
HARDING
Malt �nirr
Harrassing telephone
calls and vandalism to
window contributed to
the fifty crimes reported
to the ECU Department
of Public Safetv dunng
the past week There were
also reports of vandalism
to vehicles and fire alarm
equipment.
There were oni two in-
cidents reported in con-
nection with the Stree:
Dance held on Thursday
night.
Reports of assault were
up slightly this ueex One
report was of assault to a
pizza delivery man
Crimes reported to the
ECU Public Safetv
Department for ,
thru 15 were:
April 9, 6 p.m. �
Rhonda Carole Sn
was banned "om campus
for living in a dorm while
not a student 11 p.m. �
A
repc
ing
p.m
Erne
med
A
A re
roor
Mm
p.m
dali
of A
A
Dan
Gree
brea
and
Ber
mg

ing
NCSL D
Resolutl
JENDRAS
tf
YMFER
Nee tdlior
A resolution calling
the repeal of the �-�
speed limit was an
the resolutions discus
at the Interim Cou
meeting of the N
Carolina Student
Legislature which
place in Wilmington
weekend.
The speed limii resolu-
tion, cesigned to
states authority to set
their own speed lie
failed bv a vote of 4C
Over 75 NCSL mc
from approximate;
EC
0
legi
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pas
A ��
NEMv
7a-ir
as
� 8 98 I j�t - Sale Price 5 9-
Albvmt & Tape
Veu- release by:
( yndi L auper
April H ine
Joe Jackson
Judas Priest
Thomas Dolby
Dan Fogelbere
"Hierd Al" YamKovk
Alan Parsons Project
Bullet
Real Life
11 98 Litt-On Sot. 8 99
Albums & Tape
Dire Straits
STYX
In Stock
Rb�� ' dur I � PneMirr
P��k �� Sr� LP
K r M � Rrckaalitf Bn lXiK
P
Yol
Preser
G
reen
8:1
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Papa KatJ
We Hav,





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taHj oap,er S(grna
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viav April 19 at
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OUTER BANKS
Banks:
living
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Sf-e Cooks
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261 28851
USSIONS
discussions
" vendenhali
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PAPERS
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Custom croftina
lewlery Repair
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A ttic
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with
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lism
By STEPHEN
HARDING
Start WiMe,
Harassing telephone
calls and vandalism to
windows contributed to
the fifty crimes reported
to the ECU Department
of Public Safety during
the past week. There were
also reports of vandalism
to vehicles and fire alarm
equipment.
There were only two in-
cidents reported in con-
nection with the Street
Dance held on Thursday
night.
Reports of assault were
up slightly this week. One
report was of assault to a
pizza delivery man.
Crimes reported to the
ECU Public Safety
Department for April 9
thru 15 were:
April 9, 6 p.m. �
Rhonda Carole Smith
was banned from campus
for living in a dorm while
not a student; 11 p.m. �
A female student
reported receiving harass-
ing telephone calls; 11 15
P-m- � Kimberly Cox
was transported to Pitt
Memorial Hospital
emergency Room for a
medical emergency
April 10, 4:25 p.m. �
A report of the larceny of
a watch from the locker
room by the pool in
Minges Coliseum; 8:10
p.m. � a report of van-
dalism to a vehicle west
of Aycock Hall.
April 11, 9 a.m. �
Daniel Robert Maier of
Greenville was given a
state citation for safety
equipment violation; 2:10
p.m. � a report of
breaking and entering
and larceny from a vehi-
cle in the 14th and
Berkeley freshman park-
ing lot; 12:45 p.m. -
Three female students
reported receiving harass-
ing telephone calls. 5:10
p.m. � Rhonda Carole
Smith of Pompton
Slllts Among Campus Crimes
Lakes, NC was arrested
for trespassing; 8:30 p.m.
� A report person(s)
unknown fired a pellet
gun at room window in
Belk Hall; 10:45 p.m. A
report a window in room
417-A Belk Hall was
broken and occupant in-
jured; 11:50 p.m. �Paul
Michael Hill of 409
Biltmore St. was arrested
for defacing a mural in
the Art Building.
April 12, 12:20 a.m.�
Christopher Scott Miek
of 482 Jones was given a
State citation for passing
on a solid yellow line; 3
P m. Ellen Clarke
Daubenmire of Rueil-
Malmais, France was
served a summons for a
worthless check; 6: 51
p.m. � Linda Grassawas
was injured at Memorial
Gym while playing
basketball and was
transported to Pitt Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital by
Greenville Rescue; 7:20
p.m. � A report of
malicious mischief done
to room 325 Umstead
Hall as a practical joke;
7:30 pm. � Frank J.
Corey of 701 Skinner St.
was found in possession
of a weapon at the street
dance on College Hill
Drive;10:15 p.m. � A
report of an affray at
Spring Concert on Col-
lege Hill Drive; 10:45
p.m. � A report that a
window on the north first
floor west wing of
Aycock Hall was broken
by person(s) unknown;
11:10 p.m. � Two
female students reported
receiving threatening
telephone calls.
April 13, 12:05 a.m. �
A male student reported
being assaulted by
Dwight Richardson of
Belk Hall 12:15 a.m.� A
report of a window of
room 108 Jones Hall
broken; 12:37 a.m. � A
delivery man for Alano's
Pizza reported being
assaulted in the lobby of
Belk Hall; 2:30 a.mA
Jire extinguisher was
found in the grass area
northeast of Belk Hall; 3
a.m. � James Dennis
Spirek of 510 E. Fifth
was placed in protective
custody; 2:06 p.m. � A
report of vandalism to a
vehicle parked in the 9th
St. parking lot; 2:45 p.m
� A report of the larceny
of a coat and key ring
from an unsecured locker
m Memorial Gym; 4 p.m
- Dwight Edgar
Kjchardson was served a
warrant of arrest for sim-
ple assault; 6:45 p.m. �
A report the north central
stairwell window on third
floor of Aycock Hall was
broken; 11:50 p.m �
Cpl. Watson observed
two subjects pull a speed
limit sign out of the
ground on East 14th St
the subjects were iden-
tified as Roy Staggers and
Christopher Dean Jones
both of 402 Scott Hall;
both were turned over to
the Greenville Police
Department for further
action.
April 14, 1:40 a.m. �
Christopher K. Biggers of
Lot 29 Shady Knoll was
found with a lacerated
hand after a fire alarm
box glass had been
broken on the first floor
northwest wing of Gar-
rett Hall; 1:45 a.m. �
Jeffrey Neal Umphlet of
Fayetteville, NC was ar-
rested for DWI north of
Aycock Hall; 1:30 p.m.
� A report the Soda
Shop in Wright
Auditorium was
unsecured; 1:45 p.m. �
A report of vandalism to
a vehicle in the West
Parking lot at
Mendenhall Student
Center; 3:15 p.m � a
report of the larceny of a
wallet from a locker
room of Memorial Gym;
517 p.m. � A report the
northwest gate lock at the
Brewster Building was
broken and malfunction-
ing; 9:30 p.m. �
Christopher G. Santacruz
of 211-A Belk Hall was
given a campus citation
for careless and reckless
driving west of Belk Hall
April 15, 12:33 a.m. �
A report of vandalism to
a pull alarm box by per-
sons) unknown; 12:40
a.m. � Kelly Franklin
Joyce of 347 Umstead
was found in possession
of a sign belonging to the
City of Greenville Public
Works Department; 12:45
a.m. � James S. Straine
of 176 Jones was found
with an unauthorized keg
of beer in his room; I
a.m. � Jimmy Walden
of 211-A Bdk Hall was
advised to turn his music
down afte receiving
complaints; 1:11 a.m. �
Paul Vinson III of
Goldsboro, NC was ar-
rested for DWI north of
Jones Hall: 1:20 am �
Lita Karin Souers of
Apex, NC was arrested
for DWI at the Green
Barn; 3:01 a.m. �
Thomas Stanton Hill of
436 Aycock Hall was
placed in protective
custody after being in-
volved in an affray in the
lobby of Jones Hall, 9:06
p.m. � A report larcenv,
assault and damage to
property at the basketball
court by Belk Hall; 9:58
p.m. � a report of a
problem with several
black males in the lobbv
of Fleming Hall.
lyoL ueiegates Attend Meeting
Resolution On Registrars Passed
�� �1H ���� CUl-
JENDRAS?AiE1VNIFER
Newi Editor
A resolution calling for
the repeal of the 55-mph
speed limit was among
schools attended the
meeting, according to
ECU Delegation
Chairperson Braxton
O'Neal. The monthly
meetings are a chance for
gram. P gram when hev caJ,eJ for for student leadership "
the resolutions discussed legislature members
Interim Council "debate pertinent issues
in North Carolina and
some things on a federal
level O'Neal said.
Another resolution
supporting the continua-
tion of the ECU-N.C.
State football rivalry was
passed by a voice vote. In
addition, the students
decided to pass a resolu-
tion calling for the
redefinition of the word
meeting of the North
Carolina Student
Legislature which took
place in Wilmington last
weekend.
The speed limit resolu-
tion, designed to give
states authority to set
their own speed limits
failed by a vote of 40-36
Over 75 NCSL members
approximately 18
��MMHiiBB
� E. Stt Si.
7M-1427
gram.
Thp �i- , an appointed, not
regLuars to ��� utili,i� c�"�-
registrars in university sioner
rLftr sriekua aarJr -
Hei0Qt;rt� -j y mandate them to. Ad-
3ES�a SSSSSk
candle and .nsuranc, g, g .ffft; �
MAYS, 1984
One even planned by
the NCSL for this week's
Barefoot on the Mall is a
Rent-an-Argument
booth.
TUESDAY NIGHT
COLLEGE NITE
6:30-10:00 All ladies with
College I.D. Skate Free
with MTV
i 6ft SCREEN
I
8.98 I j�t. Sale Price 5.99
Albums & Tap�s
New reieaset by:
Cyndi Lauper
April Wine
Joe Jackson
Judas Priest
Thomas Dolby
Dan Fogelberg
MH ierd Ar YanKovic
Alan Parsons Project
Bullet
Real Life
� 11 98 List-On Sole 8.99
Albums & Tapes
Dire Straits
STYX
In Stock
Ruth's "Cu, 1Mb Prw,�r"
Panic's N� LP
R.E.M. s'RfckoalBg" (April mrh,
DUN HICKS has twice the experiences
In Law: As a practicing attorney in Greenville;
4 years as Assistant District Attorney;
3 years as Public Defender
Academics: Graduate of UNC Chaple Hill
A.B.Economics,1970 (Phi Beta Kappa)
Juris Doctor, 1970
Adjunct Ass't Professor
ECU School of Social Work and Corrections
With young people:Advisor to Teen Democrats
�T ViCevPresiden ��� Treasurer
of Pitt County Young Democrats
VOTE For Experience
VOTE For DON HICKS
Pdd for by friends of Don Hicks
PAPA IKATZ"
Your Adult Entertainment Center
Presents
Weds Nite
Greenville's First & Still No. 1
Ladies Lock-out
8:30 - 10:00
Free Draft & Wine
At 10:00 For Men One Free Keg
East Carolina University's
Student Union Board of Directors
is now taking applications for two Dav StiU.i R0�
tatives for the 1984-1985 Term TV r itudeKeprn'
l r i �U,70J ierm. I he responsibihties of thp
members of the Board of Directors include:
� Selecting the Student Union President
� Approving committee chairpersons
� Approving the Student Union Budget
� Setting policy for the Student Union
Other members of ,he board are as follows: IFC President. Panhellemc President.
b.OUL.S. Prestdent. Student Union President. Facultv Representative. Vice-chancellor
tor Student L,fe. Dtrecto of Universi.v Un.ons and Associate Dean of Student Activities.
SRA President and SCA President. Pick up applications a. the information desk
Ivlendenhall btudent Center.
Deadline to apply; Tuesday, April 24, 1984
intb;
��&�
U �
o

O
II
n
. NIGHTCLUB
��nvill�
Th,
Draft Nite
Doors Open At 8:30
Members1.00
Guests $2.00
:
X 111
Penny
Berlesque
Lingerie Review
(10 women & 4 guys)
Wednesday, April 18
Show starts at 9:30
(For men & women)
Advance Tickets: $3 and $4
(available at the door)
Night of Performance: $4 and $5
Photographs by
Chns Teiesca
Every Wadnaaday Nljh.
Mexican Happy Hoar wtth
pitchers of Mexican Delight
end other
Happy How Special.
Papa Katz Is A Private Qub For Members & Guests
We Have All ABC Permits
10th St. Ext. At
Riverbluff Rd. �
Every Saturday Night
Original Beach Party with
Steve Hardy
Show Start At 9:30
Every Taaraaay Night
�� Ladles Night
Free ariae 9 to 11
Draft Bear SO 45'
'�taWre of Beer $2.00
No cover for lady i
Every Friday Night
Mexican Delight Happy Hour
wrth pitchers of Mexican Delight
�ad other Happy How Specials
also
Pitchers of Beer $2 00
Special Prices Oa Mixed
��
J A play If
2 to 5
Baaa ft K.Happy Hoar
From 8 to 9 10' Draft froea S to 9 Bottl
9 until 20 Draft j3 QO
� �� �washers ft
Hembenhip mvmUmbim at tbm door. ,
11 nimtTifiTTft�ft
75'
ff
�?- ��,�.
f � -f -��
i '





9
(Silt iEaflt (ttarnlfman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. HUNTHR FiSHER, m. �rrr.n�li
Darryl Brown, innjnu raw
Jennifer Jendrasiak. w��,�� J.T. Pietrzak. umm rnnnL
Ed Nicklas. ewmt Mike McPartland, ��� ��,�
Tina Marosc hak, mm bow Tom Norton, o�y� �,���,
Allen Guy. CdMmiM Kathy Fuerst, product,� Manage
Mark Barker, ohmm .����� Mike Mayo, mi�iu� Techmaan
April
1983
Opinion
Page 4
Simon Says
College Aid Plan Needs Scrutiny
Students across the country are
concerned, and should be, over a
bill currently being considered by a
House subcommittee to combine
federal aid programs into block
grants for universities after 1985.
The bill, being considered by the
House Post-Secondary Education
Subcommittee, is part of the exten-
sion of the Higher Education Act
which expires next year.
The proposal is to combine the
National Direct Student Loans,
Supplemental Equal Opportunity
Grants and State Student Incentive
Grants into one block of funds
given to schools to allocate at their
discretion. Rep. Paul Simon,
D-Ill who is chair of the commit-
tee and sponsor of the bill, design-
ed the block grant idea, he says, in
response to school administrators'
requests for flexibility in ad-
ministering their own aid pro-
grams. The bill is also designed to
stream-line federal programs and
make more money available to
lower-income students.
The problem is that the block
grants awarded to schools each
year will be based on the number of
students with Pell Grants and
Guaranteed Student Loans at the
institution. Thus, leading student
groups say, colleges and univer-
sities will be encouraged to give
money only to those who take out
loans. A student may have to bor-
row federal money before he could
be awarded funds by the university.
Simon is a long-time friend of
higher education, and students who
know his record must feel uneasy at
opposing his plan. But the new pro-
gram could result not only in mak-
ing money less accessible to those in
lower income brackets, since they
would have to be able to borrow
money before they could be
granted it, but it also could
discourage students from higher
priced, private institutions with a
provision allowing Pell Grants to
cover only half of tuition,
regardless of the total.
Students' fears may be un-
justified, but the Simon and the
subcommittee should re-examine
the criteria for allocating the block
giants. The institutional control of
funds is good, for they can best
knew the needs of their students,
but the needs of students who can-
not afford even loans must not be
ignored in allocating resources. It is
them that Simon's bill is designed
to help; he should make sure that
while the government spreads
funds more evenly, institutions are
not encouraged or forced to
overlook their needs. If federal
grants, and not just loans, are still
available to students and are used
to calculate institutional need for
the block grants, the program
should work; if loans are virtually a
pre-re,quisite, though, to local
mone, the plan could do more
harm than good.
Not Bad, Guys
Congratulations to Lisa Roberts,
voted best committee member of
the SGA Legislature this year, and
to David Brown, voted best
legislator.
MANAGUA NICARAGUA
IS AWONPERFUL
YOU CAM MINE A LITHE
hi
Court Restricts President's Policy
By GREG RIDEOUT
With the United States exempting
itself last week from International Court
of Justice decisions concerning Central
America for two years, the Reagan ad-
ministration has removed legal barriers
from achieving its goals in Nicaragua.
The cost of such a move may be high,
but it is a plus for the president in his ef-
fort to assert his foreign policy powers.
The World Court is the judicial organ
of the United Nations. It has no
machinery to enforce decisions, but
the United States is one of several states
that has accepted its compulsory
jurisdiction. The U.S. has never revoked
the court's jurisdiction before, but the
decision to do so now was a realistic
move by the White House, for it most
assuredly would have lost and would
have to cease its activities in Central
America.
The United States would have been on
trial for mining Nicaragua's harbors.
CIA involvement in providing and set-
ting the mines has been revealed in re-
cent weeks, and the Central American
country has gone to The Hague with
claims � valid claims � that its
sovereignty has been violated. Congres-
sional critics say the acts are shocking
and editorialists have likened White
House morality to that of Iran. With so
many and so much against him, the
president finds himself in a curious posi-
tion.
Our allies are not with us, as evidenc-
ed by a 13-1 vote in the U.N. Security
Council. The negative vote was a veto by
us that killed a condemnation of foreign
military intervention in Nicaragua. Even
Britian abstained. This is worrisome
and, of course, is important. But we
must not let world opinion dictate
foreign policy, whether it is liberal,
human-rights inspired, like that of Presi-
dent Carter, or hard-line, anti-
communism, like Ronald Reagan's.
Likewise, Congress should play the role
of the partner in debate, but even that
body must not form policy; that in the
president's job.
View Point
It is not often that presidents are as
alone as Reagan is right now in his goals
for Central America, but these should be
the times of leading opinion, not follow-
ing it. Election year realities cloud this
decision, but Reagan must stick to his
guns � not because they are the right
guns, but because he alone wears them.
The president is being less than strong
but more than smart when he intones
that he just wants to stop arms from
flowing through Nicaragua to El
Salvador. He knows damn well he wants
the Nicaraguan government over-
thrown. It is a reality Americans, who
elected Ronald Reagan, must face. He is
our leader in international affairs. He
can be tempered by opinion, but h;s
decisions are our policy. New policy re-
quires a new president.
Oversimplification is a p tfall of such
a cursory glance at foreign policy and
the president. The president must follow
his own course in the face of many con-
flicting events, and should only change
policies when the new direction is ge-
nuine, not politically expedient. He mu:
even duck legalities, as evidenced bj
retraction of World Court jurisdiction
over the United States. Reagan must
lead, not be led.
A nation's right to protect itself and
its interests must not be subject to court
rulings. It may be condemned or action
can be taken against it, but the right to
do something in the name of seir-
preservation is a right not to be yielded
Of course, the consequences of what -
done under this principle and the morali-
ty of the outcome are debateable Our
interests now are defined by Reagan
Soon, they may be defined by someone
who opposes what the presideif j$ cur-
rently doing. This, too. okay
Americans have the right to change
poicy by changing presidents.
We, and the president, are moving in-
to a new phase of involvement in Centra.
America. The question is not legal or
moral, it is who's responsible. That's the
president. If we don't like i let's get a
new one.
Alumni Director Defends Awards, Givers
Lest the editorial in the April 5 issue
of The East Carolinian leave a false im-
pression with its readers, an attempt to
set the record straight should be made.
The article has become a source of con-
cern to me for several reasons, mainly
because of comments based on misin-
formation andor lack of information.
It has also created concern because of
the unjustified references to certain
alumni who are giving so much of
themselves to make ECU an even
greater university for both current and
future students.
As director of the alumni program
for the past 14 years, I have had the
privilege of working closely with many
loyal alumni who have given freely of
their time and resources without any
desire for recognition. The services of
the Alumni Association grow with each
new year, and its current leaders are
some of the most dedicated and
unselfish people with whom I have ever
been associated. The majority of the
services they provide actually costs
them from their own personal finances.
Most of the time, they pay for travel,
lodging and certain other expenses from
their own pockets. This is in addition to
their annual monetary gifts to the
university. Many of these alumni are
not wealthy people and their giving
represents a degree of sacrifice to
themselves and their families.
It might be interesting for the readers
to know that Gerald Arnold, judge of
the N.C. Court of Appeals who was
mentioned in the recent editorial, has
traveled at his own expense during the
past few months to give "ECU Pride"
speeches to more than seven chapter
meetings, Alumni Leadership Con-
ferences, and other ECU gatherings. He
will be on campus again April 14 for
Alumni Day activities, April 17 for a
senior class assembly, and May 5 for
graduation ceremonies. Judge Arnold
has also been nominated to serve as
president of the Alumni Association for
1984-85, which will greatly expand his
sphere of alumni involvement. His
record speaks for itself.
Regarding the accusation in the
editorial that the basis for receiving an
Outstanding Alumni Award is making a
large financial gift to the university, the
giving records of the award recipients
including Judge Arnold, Rick Atkin-
son, or any alum for that matter, are
not for public discussion. This policy is
out of respect for their privacy. I would
suggest, however, that one consult the
April Honor Roll edition of the alumni
newspaper, Report, if there is interest in
a current list of contributors.
In looking back at the list of reci-
pients of the alumni awards, one would
notice a large variety of majors and oc-
cupations represented. During
ceremonies last October, a retired
pubjic school administrator, a musi-
cian, and a Pulitzer Prize journalist
were honored. I might add that these
award recipients were selected by a
committee of other alumni and approv-
ed by the Alumni Association's Board
of Directors. A maximum of three
Outstanding Alumni Awards are given
each year; therefore, the selection com-
mittee will occasionally elect to
recognize a deserving alum the follow-
ing year.
I am proud and pleased that the pro-
fessional successes of some of those
honored as Outstanding Alumni have
yielded them an amount of financial af-
fluency. Because of their faith in higher
education in general, their appreciation
for the mission of East Carolina
University in particular, and their love
for their alma mater, they choose to
give a portion their assets back to the
same insititution that helped prepare
them to achieve these successes. I
hasten to add that I am equally proud
of those who chose careers in profes-
sions which, by the nature of these pro-
fessions, yielded less monetary reward
and who give other resources such as
time, energy, and talents. Many give
combinations of all of these resources.
Representatives of all these categories
have been recipients of Outstanding
Alumni Awards. It should be inspiring
to all ECU students and alumni to note
the successes that our graduates attain.
ECU has a great group of alumni �
some of the most loyal and unselfish
that can be found anywhere. Regardless
of whether they receive public recogni-
tion, they will continue to give of their
resources to advance the cause of their
alma mater. They know that each dollar
and every hour of time they give in-
creases the value of each diploma
received or to be received from East
Carolina.
Donald Y. Leggett
Director of Alumni Relations
PIRG Privilege?
Through all the publicity on PIRG I
have yet to see where PIRG has explain-
ed to the students what they mean by
"waivable fees As a matter of fact, I
have heard several students asking each
other if they knew what it meant. Well,
let me see if I can help explain these
"waivable fees" to my fellow concern-
ed students.
To begin with, using this method
PIRG has three funding possibilities.
The first, which was created by Mr.
Ralph Nader himself, is a negative
check off system that demands a man-
datory fee of three dollars to all
students. In other words, when students
get their bill for tuition and other fees
they will have to pay three dollars to
PIRG at the same time. Then, if you
would like a refund you will have to go
stand in line, at PIRG's convenience,
and wait for your three dollars. Mean-
while, you'll hopefully start thinking
it's only three dollars, why bother?
Well, multiply three times 13,500
students.
Secondly, PIRG can change its fun-
ding so that instead of waiting in line
for a refund, you can wait in line for a
receipt saying you have chosen not to
pay the three dollars. Here again, PIRG
hopes you'll come to the conclusion
that it's only three dollars, why bother?
Once again, you're out three bucks
andor three beers or lunch at
McDonalds.
The final way PIRG can choose is to
put a box on your tuition bill where you
can check either yes or no on paying
three dollars to PIRG. At last they have
thought of your convenience instead of
their own. However, even this method
costs you money. You see, the problem
is that no matter which way they choose
PIRG's funding goes through the
cashier's office instead of the SGA like
other clubs and organizations are re-
quired to do. Thus, we end up paying
the salaries at the Cashier's Office for
the extra funding system will cause
them.
Why should PIRG be any more
special than any of the other clubs and
organizations? Every other organiza-
tion has to go to the SGA to ask for
funds. Then, they are not always
assured of getting them. Meanwhile,
PIRG sits there and rakes in your
money. Is that fair? Why should PIRG
ask you for extra money when you've
already paid the university money for
that sole purpose? Sure going to the
SGA for funds can be a little inconve-
nient for the club, but think of the in-
convience the cashier's office would
suffer if all organizations chose the
system PIRG has chosen. If PIRG can
bypass the SGA by using "waivable
fees" then every other group has the
same right to do so. Now, do you really
believe PIRG is that special? I don't!
Ronda Sutton
Sophomore
Theater Arts
Censorship Unfair
An unfortunate incident of censor-
ship occurred last week at The East
Carolinian.
In the pre-dawn hours of April 12,
after the staff had left, The East Caroli-
nian's Managing Editor Darryl Brown
appreared in the newspaper's office. He
examined the style page then zeroed in
on Gordon Ipock's article about ECU's
College Republicans. Brown cut out
substantial chunks of the article, in-
cluding sections critical of Gov. Jim
Hunt and the Public Interest Research
Group (PIRG), two causes Brown
strongly supports. When he reached the
halfway point in the article, he segan to
rearrange sentences, causing Ipock's
line of discussion to become less
coherent. With his transfigurations of
the material, Brown changed the ap-
pearance of the ECU College
Republicans. Our reaction to his
devious censoring was, at first, in-
credulity and then resentment Ipock,
an experienced writer now working as a
professional editor, was pained and
deeply hurt.
The censorship is being made public
m this letter. Yet, more is needed. If
Managing Editor Brown wishes to
regain some of his lost respect, he must
apologize to the members of the College
Republicans and the students.
Executive Committee of the
ECU College Republicans
Greenville
Ipock All Right
Just recently several articles in The
East Carolinian by features editor Gor-
don Ipock have greatly impressed us. It
is most encouraging to us of 'out of
college age" to know we have a young
man of this caliber of thinking within
the ranks of our so-called intellectual
university students. We fine manv
university students to be molded in their
thinking by the liberal media exposure
rather than by a deep and thorough
study and investigation of the real
issue with the ability to then bring
forth an intelligent understanding and
expression. We commend Mr. Ipock
for his intelligent reporting without be-
ing affected by bias as put forth by the
majority of media reporting. We extend
our wholehearted thanks and con-
gratulations to you, Mr. Ipock, and
especially your articles on "Why Does
AeMedia Ignore Sobering Facts of
Soviett Nuclear Strategy?" and "Don't
Attack Senator Jesse Helms - Until
You Know a Few Things.
Mr. A Mrs. T.R. Jones, Jr.
Greenville

Quiet B
B ELIZABETH BOO
The Student h
Association will vote �
Wednesday. April 18 on a si
proposal to change Slav Pi
dormitor into a quiet R
dorm and L'mstead to ar. R
ail female dorm .
1985.
Dorm residents have f
recently beer, voicing r
tests to the SRA
posals
Stockh
(CPS) - r. V ,
State L'nrerv nuti
professor who has
publically
safety of the new ai
sweetene' "NutraSw
is fighting off an
on his or.
after it wasdisx
purchased stock
drug ,
manufactun
sweetener
ASL Pi .
Woodrow v
mitted he r
"put" option-
Phannacc itka
-
price going down
to the airing
CBS television
the safety hazai d
ne a food additive
drug company rr.ar.�a
tures
Mone, w
research indicating
sweeter.e- ma) ck
pose into ha
chemicals under
circumstances, was
of the mair N
new dru� � g E"
Wed . April 18
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IFAUTHeII Quiet Dorm
IHh fcAM AKOi IN1AJK
AHHJ1 )
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Policy
i, must face. He is
al affairs. He
-non, but his
New policy re-
a pitfall of such
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nt must follow
of many con-
uld only change
I rection is ge-
expedient. He must
s evidenced by the
Court jurisdiction
Reagan must
� itself anu
ibject to court
ed or action
"he right to
name of self-
to be yielded.
nccs of what is
'hemorali-
bateable. Our
- by Reagan.
by someone
- psesident is cur-
o is okay;
to change
its.
are moving in-
'rnent in Central
; nof legal or
e That's the
it, let's get a
ers
e began to
g 1 pock's
me less
- ations of
-ed the ap-
College
to his
first, in-
nt. Ipock,
working as a
named and
ade public
- needed. If
wishes to
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f the College
mmitteeof the
College Republicans
Greenville
All Right
several articles in The
by features editor Gor-
greatly impressed us It
ing to us of "out of
know we have a voung
fber of thinking within
p so-called intellectual
lents. We find many
�ts to be molded in their
liberal media exposure
" deep and thorough
fstigation of the real
ability to then bring
lent understanding and
commend Mr. Ipock
M reporting without be-
Pas as put forth by the
jia reporting. We extend
led thanks and con-
gou, Mr. Ipock, and
Nicies on "Why Does
re Sobering Facts of
pategy?" and "Don't
Jesse Helms - Until
Things
&Mrs. T.R.Jones, Jr.
Greenville
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Staff Wrttec
The Student Residence
Association will vote
Wednesday, April 18 on a
proposal to change Slay-
dormitory into a quiet
dorm and Umstead to an
all female dorm in fall
1985.
Dorm residents have
recently been voicing pro-
tests to the SRA's pro-
posals
"I don't feel it's
something most of the
residents want now or
will want in the future
said Slay House Council
President Brian
Rangeley.
Residents have been in-
vited by the SRA to an
open meeting at 4
p.mWednesday, one
half hour before the SRA
plans to make its deci-
sion.
Rangeley said SRA's
idea was sprung on
residents quickly, but 40
or 50 of them planned to
voice their complaints at
the meeting.
Slay House Council
member Susan Barker
said the proposed plan
was not fair to handicap-
ped students planning to
live in Slay in 1986.
'They're handing
students an ultimatium of
either moving to a single
sex dorm or paying extra
to live in Jarvis Barker
said.
According to
Rangeley.Jarvis would be
the only coed dorm
available to handicapped
students.
"Everyone has to give
up something for the bet-
terment of the entire cam-
pus said SRA President
Mark Niewald.
Slay is the best choice
for a quiet dorm because
it is fair to the handicap-
ped students who will
want to live in a quiet
dorm, Niewald said
However,Barker and
Rangeley think Jarvis or
Jones would be a better
choice for the quiet
dorm.
Barker said Jarvis is
alredy close to the library
for people who want to
study. A quiet dorm
should be available to
People on the hill who are
further away from the
library, she said.
Barker went on to say
that the Slay-Umstead
area has a special per-
sonality and a unique
relationship would be
ended if the changes were
made.
(CPS) � An Arizona
State University nutrition
professor who has
publically criticized the
safety of the new artifical
sweetener "NutraSweet"
is fighting off an attack
on his own credibility-
after it was discovered he
purchased stock in the
drug company that
manufactures the
sweetener.
ASU Professor
Woodrow Monte has ad-
mitted he purchased
"put" options in Searle
Pharmaceuticals in an-
ticipation of the stock
price going down, prior
to the airing of several
CBS television reports on
the safety hazards of the
new food additive the
drug company manufac-
tures.
Monte, who has done
research indicating the
sweetener may decom-
pose into harmful
chemicals under certain
circumstances, was one
of the main critics of the
known as aspartame �
on the CBS programs.
"Put" options are
orders to put a block of
stock up for sale at a cer-
tain price within a set
period of time.
Monte told the ASU
student newspaper, the
State Press, that he
bought options on Searle
stock several weeks
before the program was
broadcast in January,
1984, anticipating the
stock would lose value
after the broadcast.
As it turns out,
however, the Searle stock
never plummeted the way
Monte had speculated
when he bought the op-
tions. Had the stock price
dropped drastically,
Monte would have made
a handsome return on his
$1,994 investment.
Instead, according to
reports in the Wall Street
Journal, Monte lost
$1,224 in the stock op-
tions venture.
Now the Securities and
Criticizes Nut
��
the federal agency that ing the summer
regulates stock trading - But "I knew Searle
is investigating Monte would get dirty and it
and several CBS would become a hot
employees for possibly political issue he says
trying to profit from But such potential con-
changes in Searle stock flicts between professors'
prices brought on by the academic research and
broadcast of their own in-
formation.
The controversy, of
course, raises questions
about the objectivity of
Monte's academic
research as well as about
what would be illegal
stock manipulation.
ASU administrators,
other outside activities
are causing increasing
problems and concerns at
schools nationwide,
sources say. In the
1980-81 school year, for
instance, 81 percent of
4000 faculty members
surveyed by the Chronicle
of Higher Education
� 6�ti cuucauon
however, say they aren't reported they earned an
ing any similar average $5700 a year
new drug - generically Exchange Commission �
ATfnc1
investigation on their
own.
"I think the research
he was discussing was
probably legitimately a
part of his research
here says ASU Vice
President Maureen Frye.
"I've tried to keep the
issue separate from the
university Monte
laments. "(The
NutraSweet research) was
my own work I did dur-
from outside consulting
and research activity.
"I think, certainly,
there are situations that
exist where individual
faculty members are con-
ducting research on cam-
pus and their research is
involved with corpora-
tions in which they have
interests, "observes
Robert Kreiser, an
associate with the
American Association of
University Professors.
While it's not new for
faculty members to mix
their academic activities
with outside business, he
says the potential for
abuse is greater now as
more professors turn to
outside jobs to supple-
ment their income.
Moreover, schools
themselves are teaming
up with high tech
businesses to help sup-
port research efforts and
help attract companies to
"research parks" adjoin-
ing campuses, opening
the door for more
academic and business
conflicts of interest.
What's needed, Kreiser
says, is a set of guidelines
that limits what faculty
members do with their
outside time, and outlines
when it may conflict with
their academic work.
"Faculty bear a
responsibility for policing
themselves and determin-
ing when it's appropriate
and inappropriate for a
faculty member who has
interest in a company to
do research in the same
field he says.
But "I knew Searle
would get dirty " he
says.
News, Features
And Sports Writers
Needed This Summer
At The
East Carolinian
Apply In Person Al
The East Carolinian Offk t
Second Floor, Publications Building
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 17, 1984
?
Mid-Year Tuition Hike Reimbursements
(CPS) - In a settle
ment that could help slow
down colleges' new prac-
tice of imposing mid-year
tuition hikes and sur-
charges, the University of
South Carolina has
agreed to repay the extra
tuition it charged 16 of its
med students in 1981.
Each of the students
will get back their $215
surcharges.
The students had
claimed the surcharge
had amounted to a
retroactive tuition in-
crease that breached their
enrollment contracts.
A state court had
agreed with the students
last October, but South
Carolina had appealed
the decision.
In late March, lawyers
for all parties agreed to
drop the appeal. Under
the settlement, South
Carolina repaid the
students and promised
not to make any more
retroactive increases,
reports Paul Ward, the
university's chief lawyer.
He recalls the state
legislature belatedly had
limited the med school's
1981 budget after the
catalog, which listed tui-
tion for the term as $790,
had been printed.
To get enough money
to operate, the med
school had to charge each
student an extra $215.
"It was a very unusual
set of circumstances
Ward says, "and I'm not
sure they would occur in
any other state
Others disagree.
Colleges' legal right to
impose midyear hikes
and surcharges "depends
really on how the enroll-
ment contract is
worded says Estelle
Fishbein, lawyer at Johns
Hopkins University and
past president of the Na-
tional Association of Col-
lege and University At-
torneys.
"I imagine that (settle-
ment) will cause a few
people to think" before
raising tuition in mid
year, says Darel Semler
of the National Organiza-
tion of I egal Problems in
Education in opeka,
Kansas
"Students and msiitu
tions exist m a contrac-
tual relationship adds
Don Gehring, a NOI PI
officer who is also a pi of
fessor of higher educa-
tion at the University of
I ouisville. "Terms art-
set up in the catalog The
courts say both sides have
to play by the rules. Once
(students) register and
pay tuition the college
can't alter the contract.
Bob Ross, attorney for
the University of
Missouri system, says
"most of the catalogs say
tuition is 'subject to
change' or something to
'Hat cfU ' j 0 ,ld
therefore allow schools to
impose surcharges
Missouri, caught in a
budget squeeze. reentK
imposed a tuition sur
charge on its students,
but then rescinded it after
Go Kit Bon. icleased
additional funds foi state
colleges
"I think you'd have to
sav more than that (tui-
tion is 'subjeel to
change') Fishbein
opines.
But none of the lawyers
contacted foi this article
was reads to sav the
South Carolina settle-
ment will profoundly af-
fect the abilities of cam-
puses to impose unnlann-
Various Entertainment
Presented At Annual
Barefoot On The Mall
rd tuition increase .n
their students
"I .lust don'i know I
anothei institiution (
besides South arouna)
that's applied a sur
charge Gehring e
plains
There have been man)
although the pae has
slowed this academic
ear
Starting in 1981 82,
colleges caught in
budget crunches caused
h the "tax revolts" of
earlier ears, federal fun-
ding cuts and the reces-
sion began imposing
mid-year surcharges and
hikes in increasing
numbers
Since then, Arizona,
Jaban i California W�
State I nivf
Ore
New Hampshire. 1
a n d M a n k a I St a
among others, have I l 'I sup
ed their s:
more than the a
listed in their cataio "ix �
C alifornia last
barred public c
from raising tuition and term ! !
tees in mid ear be moi . i
And Gannon College these
in Pennsylvania has
adopted a guaranteed tui-
tion plan that promises
freshmen their charges
will stav the same foi
four vears
But "the court did no!
rule surcharges are il-
legal South Carolina's
B ELLEN MOORE
NUff V�rl!�
Barefoot on the Mali,
the annual spring festiva:
of live intertainment and
games will be held Thurs-
dav, April 19, on the
campus mall beginning at
noon.
The band Big Zukes
will start off the festival
and the collegiate enter-
tainer of the year, Ron
Danan, a comedian, will
emcee the event. Other
entertainment includes
the astrologer Marcella
Ruble, caricaturists, anti-
que photography, and the
sign language club's Fan-
tasy group. Music will be
provided by The
Amateurs, Downtown,
and Sally Fingerette.
The festival, sponsored
by the Student Union
Special Events Commit-
tee, is designed to provide
an opportunity for cam-
pus and other organiza-
tions to do public rela-
tions work by selling
items or giving out infor-
mation. Last year aprox-
lmately 3,500 people at-
tended and the same at-
tendance is expected this
year.
A $100 gift certificate
from the Record Bar and
records, T-Shirts and
steak dinners will be
awarded as prizes for dif-
ferent events.
"It's relatively cheap
entertainment for the
students Festival
Chairman Bruce
Shackelford said. "It's
an opportunity for them
to get out and have some
fun without spending a
lot of monev
'All Of Me' Is Second
Movie To Premiere At
Mendenhall This Year
Continued From Page 1
success that
Police Academy in par-
ticular had.
Much of the success
that Hendrix Theatre has
been experiencing, and
that has aided in bringing
these previews, can be at-
tributed the 15 member
film committee, Cobb
said. "I don't mean to
brag, but I believe we
have the best, hardest
working film committee
among North Carolina
schools Cobb said. "A
year and a half ago the
films we were having
were not pulling in big
crowds. When I became
president, the first thing I
did was increase the film
committee from five to
fifteen members said
Cobb, who feels that a
larger committee, though
more difficult to work
through, brings in the
needed variation of ideas
to select movies that the
student population as a
whole will enjoy. The
present attendance rate at
Hendrix of about 4,800
students per weekend
movie indicates the suc-
cess of his new and im-
proved committee. "We
try to select movies that
the students want, not
just Films we (the com-
mittee) want, which is
what the old committee
tended to do said
Cobb. He also said that if
you want to see All of Me
to come early. La:
month's screening s
1,200 students in line fc
the 800- seat Hendrix.
There will only be one
showing of the film since
it is a sneak preview.
New SNA President
Hopes For Changes,
Welcomes Suggestions
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Fcatarn F-diior
Newly elected officers
for the Student Residence
Association for the
1984-85 school year are:
President, Deborah Gem-
bicki; Vice President,
Juan Velasquez;
Secretary, Lycia Ross;
Treasurer, Carolyn Gary;
and Publicity Chairper-
son, Karen Griffin. All
five, who were elected
April 4, ran unopposed.
Gembicki said she
would like to see a lot of
changes occur next year.
"I would like to see
something done about the
washer-dryer situation in
the dorms she said. "1
would also like to try to
get study rooms in each
dorm
Concerning student
participation, Gembicki
said she would "like to
see RAs get more involv-
ed with SRA
"I'm willing to listen to
any suggestions, opinions
or gripes Gembicki
said.
New officers will be
sworn in April 17 at the
SRA banquet.
Buy, Sell
And Trade With
Student Opinion
Presidential Picks
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Staff V rltrr
. Students were asked if they sup-
port a specific candidate in the 1984
presidential elections.
I
� I
I Tom Allen, Junior, History �
-gi"Gary Hart because I just don't
Bagree with a lot of Ronald Reagan's
policies and I think Hart is the only
DemoJfatic candidate with good
alternatives
Kasra Behfar, Freshman, Pre
med, � "I support Reagan because
even though he has made some
mistakes overall he has had a good
administration
James Jones, Sophomore, Ac-
counting, � "Mondale because I
think he can get the job done better
than any of the other candidates and
he has the necessary experience
Tim Randall. Sophomore,
Business � "Reagan because I
think he has done a good job so far.
I think he is a good man and he
would make better decisions
overall
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Senior Class Assembly
and
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"An occasion for seniors only
DATE: Tuesday, April 17th, 1984
TIME: 5:00 p.m.
PLACE: Jenkins Auditorium Art
Building, central Campus, ECU
Guess whars in it for you?!
� Ideas on getting a job
� Professionalism
� SrlS'Sl a?ff,of voyr life" after graduation,
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� Senior Class "info"
� 84ward Social and Reception following senior
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CCHAHG
Shaping Up
Aero
B TINA MA
V :th warm weather
are likely to be e
jogging through the par-
The fitness crac
still going strong
reason many of these
exercise for relaxation,
transportation. So w
Amer �
How do they stay
aerob rig, ar ex�
on cardiovascular fitnes
Kreiter of the The Satur
is a "unique
dance I :
Jacki Sorensen creat
While b rj Puerto R
an exercise program for
men stationed there. Si i
program developed by Dr.
took his 12-minute run- j
well on the test, Sorenser
dancing had kept her he
figure, in shape. This cc i
combine dance with aer
Technically, aerobic dan
program that condition i
and blood vessels by dem
life-supporting system strei
use. The program involve
and bending to the r
stimulating and challeng
the same benefits that jc.
ming provide.
Aerobics is appealir.
aerobic dancing
Workout participants
walk, jog or run the dances,
to "do their own thing
Musi
B PATRICK IKI.rO
Music Television is the gj
daddy of the rock
tion. Run on the same fe
radio station, it stays on x
twenty-four hours a day anl
be hooked up in stereo I
dollars extra. MT w
it wants to play and has an
rner.t of video jockeys
the role of radio c
D.J.s. MTV does have one
vantage over radio, howevd
"TV" in MTV is thede. I
tor � MTV s visual. The re
an exciting and differeni
native to "NTV" (what I
to call network television).
Videos range from sexv
high heels ar.d garter belts.
The Cars, Missing Person.
totally outrageous que
Real Life and rugged heavy
romps with the likes of
Crue. There are virtually no
Shepard
i
To Debu
" Wry Spoof of Holly
"A Surrealistic Comedy
"A Freefall of Imagery"
a few catch phrases u4
theatre critics to de
playwright Sam Shepard'
Broadwav hit ngt
Connie Voder and Eric
CITY, a surrtahstk coi
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Features
ShapingUp For Summer
APRIL 17. 1984 Page 7
Aerobicise To Health
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Feaiani Miior
KSging through thew'Soh6'
The fitness craze that started some ten years ago s
still going strong. Getting in shape is not the only
exerc' �f T CTerei. howeveTsSS
exercise for reIa.xat.on, enjoyment, and for cyclers
transportation. So what about the other 36 minion
Amenauuj who exercise three or more times a day?
ae oh, iin " Sta m Shape? Manv Participate in
In Ia f' a? exercise Pr�8ram which focuses
Keener ,fahSCrf f'tnCS fun- According to Ted
Kreiter of the The Saturday Evening Post, aerobics
is a unique hybrid of pure exercise and chorus line
iidnv.t steps.
Jack! Sorensen created aerobic dancing in 1969
hile living in Puerto Rico she was asked to prepare
1 exercise program for the wives of the Air Force
men stationed there. Sorensen studied the aerobics
Program developed by Dr. Kenneth Cooper and later
took his 12-minute running test. After performing
-ell on the test, Sorensen realized that her lifetinTe of
figure, in shape. This conclusion gave her the idea to
combine dance with aerobic exercise
Technically, aerobic dancing is a physical fitness
program that conditions the muscles, heart, lungs
and blood vessels by demanding that this internal
ite-supporting system strengthen through healthy
use. The program involves vigorous jumping, kicking
and bending to the beat of music; it offers a
stimulating and challenging workout with many of
the same benefits that jogging, bike riding and swim-
ming provide.
Aerobics is appealing for several reasons. First
aerobic dancing is an individualized program'
Workout participants decide for themselves when to
�alk jog or run the dances. Students are encouraged
to do their own thing both stylistically and inten-
sively Second, progress can be easily observed by
monitoring the three heart rates of interest in aerobic
dancing: resting heart rate, working heart rate and
recovery or cool-down heart rate
Resting heart rate indicates how hard the heart is
working, normally. The average RHR is 78-84 beats
per minute for women and 72-78 for men. Healthy
persons may find that as they become involved in
aerobic dancing their RHR decreases significantly
indicating that the heart has become stronger
working heart rate estimates the intensity and ef-
fectiveness of the workout. As the exercise becomes
vigorous the heartbeat increases to supply more ox-
ygen to the muscles. This develops aerobic fitness
The cool-down heart rate is taken five minutes after
exercise hasstopped.lt indicates how the intensity
level has affected the body. "uensny
��aK-aPSther m?st enc�uraging reason to
aerobicise is for the visible changes - the loss of
unwanted inches and a firmer phisique. If combined
wrtfa a sensible diet, weight loss may occur because
he workouts are high calorie burners and demand a
lot of energy. Participants burn 500 calories in a
vigorous 45-minute class, which compares with
sw mming for one hour at 30 yards per minute. For
as long as six hours after the workout, one can expect
to burn twice as many calories resting as would nor-
mally be used up at rest.
thu6 conseluence of aerobic dance is
he regulation of hunger. During the workouts blood
is borrowed" from the less active blood systems
such as the stomach and delivered to the more active
skeletal muscle system. Until the blood supply
returns to the stomach, the desire for food
diminishes.
Aerobic fitness produces other beneficial results
besides the loss of inches and pounds. As participants
progress they build up tolerance and can continue
activities for reasonably long periods of time without
See AEROBICS, Page 8
zsrs!ssssssrjsssS
Music Television OffersAlternative
By PATRICK FELTON
Simff Writer
Music Television is the grand-
daddy of the rock video revolu-
tion. Run on the same format as a
radio station, it stays on the air
twenty-four hours a day and can
be hooked up in stereo for a few-
dollars extra. MTV selects the acts
t wants to play and has an assort-
ment of video jockeys who play
ihe role of radio's corresponding
D.J.s. MTV does have one big ad-
vantage over radio, however. The
'TV in MTV is the deciding fac-
tor � MTV is visual. The result is
an exciting and different alter-
native to "NTV" (what I now like
to call network television).
Videos range from sexy girls in
high heels and garter belts, to the
The Cars, Missing Persons, or to
totally outrageous quests with
Real Life and rugged heavy metal
romps with the likes of Motley
Crue. There are virtually no limits
to creativity on MTV. The most
creative and often most popular
videos are placed in heavy rota-
tion, meaning they receive the
greatest amount of airplay during
a twenty-four hour period. Other
videos are placed in a medium or
light rotation category.
When MTV executives first
presented their idea of a twenty-
four hour music channel to record
companies (during the time
preceeding MTV's debut on
August 1, 1981), the companies
felt that they should be paid for
the videos MTV was soliciting. In
the rebuttal, MTV convinced the
companies that the channel would
be providing free advertising for
album sales and therefore pay-
ment would be the exposure they
received.
The effect of MTV on record
sales appeared not in two years
but in less than six weeks. What
made the happening even more
outstanding was the type of
groups that experienced these
sales. Through well done videos
groups such as The Human
League, Adam Ant and Duran
Duran broke through to
American viewers and record
buyers. Before MTV many of
these groups were unknown to the
masses.
Many groups, after appearing
on MTV, shot to the top of the
music charts. For instance, in
1981 Def Leppard's "High and
Dry album originally did not do
overwhemingly well in sales. The
pictures of the group on the
album tell the story. The hair is
long, mangled, and 60-ish and
their faces are so pale it looks as if
they gave blood every day to
intentionally look that way. In
1982 Def Leppard came up with
their "Pyromania" album, which
has the same sound as "High and
Dry However, a few other
aspects of the band were different
� visual aspects. Through the
magic of more modern haircuts
make-up and cloths in Def Lep-
pard's heavily rotated videos on
MTV, "Pyromania" was outdone
in sales in 1983 only by Michael
Jackson and The Police. The
commercials worked.
Commercialism on MTV also
has substantial effects on other in-
dustries. The movie industry is
one of the chief benefactors. With
a definite shift to more music-
saturated movies, there came a
new strategy by movie producers
to release videos with songs and
scenes from a movie weeks before
the release of the movie in hopes
of luring people to the movie A
good example of this is the title
song from "Footloose" and ac-
companying video being released
well before the 1984 mid-February
movie premier. "Footloose" the
single was well into the top 40 by
the opening date, so the audience
could sing right along with Kenny
Loggms (who performed the
song), if they wanted to during the
movie.
MTV is making a lot of people
happy and rich, so as long as it is
around the record companies will
continue producing videos for
MTV. Consequently, the videos
will probably get be ter and better
as competition for heavy rotation
spots increases.
Poetic Voice Arises
Shepard's Satirical Comedy, 'Angel City'
To Debut Wednesday At ECU Playhouse
��A 11e� � . . .
'A Wry Spoof of Hollywood;
'A Surrealistic Comedy and
"A Freefall of Imagery" are only
a few catch phrases used by
theatre critics to describe
playwright Sam Shepard's Off-
Broadway hit Angel City,
which is soon to be produced by
the East Carolina Playhouse,
Wednesday through Saturday,
tPrr- 18'2L at 8:15 Pm" in
McGinnis Theatre on the ECU
campus in Greenville.
Shepard is perhaps best known
as the actor who portrays the
veteran test pilot Chuck Yeager in
the motion picture The Right
Stuff. In addition to the Academy
Award nomination he received for
his performance in the movie,
Shepard has also received the
Anrwxjacj
�test Um I
Connie Yoder and Eric Sox "tripping the Hght fantastic" In the ETIT mh - �mn ���
CITY. . �� .��. forXri �T XgtZZXZZJ��
coveted Pulitzer Prize in
playwrighting for Curse of the
Starving Class. Soon after the
Pulitzer announcement, The New
York Post called him "the most
influential young playwright in
America Carol Rosen of
Modern Drama said, "Sam
Shepard is a playwright of zap-
pop-pow action, and he is a
playwright of comic-book verbs:
his plays flash, zoom and screech
across the stage
In Angel City Shepard has
written a satirical comedy about
one of America's greatest myths:
Hollywood. The play relates the
story of a fast-fading production
company as it trys to save its latest
movie from the grasp of financial
and artistic disaster. The producer
hires a young stuntman to save the
eight-million dollar picture, and
to everyone's shock, the stuntman
invokes the help of Indian charms
to transform the picture into a
disaster movie. The style is flip, ir-
reverent and chiefly fun.
Angel City is directed by
ECU Theatre Arts faculty
member Cedric Winchell. It is, for
him, a play that "asks us to quit
listening to commercial images, to
transcend false values and to
come back to our true selves " He
went on to say, "We have elected
to present this show in a sur-
realistic comic style, emphasizing
a number of popular stereotypes
that we think audiences will iden-
tify with a great deal
ByMIKEHAMER
Suft Writer
Hal J. Daniel III, ECU Pro-
fessor of Speech, Language,
and Audio Pathology, has
published a volume of poems
that are both refreshing and
distinctive, emerging as the new
poetic voice from the swamps
of eastern North Carolina. As
Long As You're Not Cold is
Daniel's first book of poems,
and I'm sure it won't be his
last. Though he hasn't been
writing poetry for very long,
Daniel has already published
works in Rolling Stone, Tar
River Poetry, Margarine
Maypole Orangoutang Ex-
press, and The Sun to name a
few.
The book begins with a
razor-sharp edge of emotion as
Daniel talks about the pain of
separation from his son in
"High Point Clout He
begins by acknowledging the
wisdom of Solomon: "You
can't split a child-down the
middle and goes on to
observe:
When he was five
he caught largemouth bass,
watched us play poker,
and called his grandmother
a Buthole
From this strong beginning,
the book continues with images
from youth, alternating bet-
ween his and his son's
childhood. In "Fridays" we get
a view of youth from the
perspective of someone follow-
ing a school bus (Bus Mother)
as it drops its young fledglings
off at their separate nests on a
Friday afternoon:
Stop. A skinny black girl runs
on her toes
through lime collards and red
speckled hens
to the sweet chocolate arms
of her silver gray grand-
mother.
Her younger brother trails
thinking only of big cookies
Go.
From childhood images,
Daniel gives glimpses of
parents, childhood friends and
acquaintances. He then gives a
series of both craziness and
woman poems that remind me
of Bukowski and Brautigan.
One of my favorites from this
section is "Breadcrumbs
Last night I wrote
I loved you
and your oatmeal cookies;
tonight I write
I hate you
but I still love
your oatmeal cookks
The last poems tune in to a
concern for the local environ-
ment. An excellent piece from
this section is "Weyerhausen"
which is dedicated to the
pileated woodpecker whom
Daniel calls, "the Spike Jones
Daniel
of the Swamp He observes:
Wishing for hard woe ds
in northwestern time?
we curse
the men who plant pines.
As Long As You're Not Cold
has been published in Green-
ville, and each of the 177 copies
were hand made. Diane Maisel
a 1983 graduate of the ECU
School of Art, designed the
book, chose the paper and
thread, and bound each book
by hand. The covers were
designed by George Anita and
printed by Susan Fechol.
Even though As Long As
You're Not Cold is not evenly
strong in the quality of it
Poems, the volume makes me
anxious to rend whisit Hal
DarnePs next batch of poeVns
will have to say. �JWnis
?��- ?� .�,� n, ��,���1 t� �- �� -
- -
'�' iMi.W�m��rM� o� ��.��� m
.wrqi.idm
.?s3E
7M
6.





8
THE EAST CAROL INI AN
AFRll 17, 184
?
A Student s Tale Of The Graduatin' Blues
By N.K. HOGGARI)
Suff Whin
Pay heed, you
underclassmen, while I
relate a tale of woe.
You have all been told
of the great reasons for
coming to college. And,
I'll bet, in your darker
moments, those days just
before exams, you drag
yourself along with those
same reasons.
Listen, now, before it
is too late � before you
become a graduating
senior with them
graduatin" blues.
Why are people willing
to spend four or more
years of their lives suffer-
ing outrages from pro-
fessors, abuse from ad-
ministrators, and anx-
ieties from examinations
and. ugh' research
papers? The standard
answers, though they are
legion, come down to but
a few.
1. The It's-For-Your-
Future reason. All
through high school your
teachers and parents tell
you that "If you don't go
to college, you'll end up a
bum Now think. Think
hard. What's so bad
about beine a bum� Let's
look at the facts.
There is a popular
misconception that all
bums are alcoholic
degenerates who live hor-
ribly lonely lives. Now
this just is not true. Sure
there are a lot of bums
like that, but not all. A
great many bums live
perfectly normal, happy
lives. They mooch off
relatives or panhandle.
This is self employment.
If there are people willing
to gi e it, why not take it?
Another large group of
overlooked bums are the
extremeh wealthy, con-
tented jet-setters. This
group of bums constantly
get their pictures in the
tabloids and trade
papers. What a great life!
Not only do ou get to
go to France for the Can-
nes Film Festival,
Hollywood for the Oscar
parties, and the Carib-
bean to watch the U.S.
imade tiny little islands,
but you are respected and
admired by everyone.
Eer facet of your life,
every nuance of your per-
sonality is emulated.
What do you have to do?
Party and have a good
time. What fun.
Okay, 1 know you've
got to be born into money
or marry into money to
become a jet-setter, but
why not give it a shot? All
you "hunks all you
"foxes go for it. Quit
school if you must. The
dumber you are the better
your chances. It is well
known that jet-setters
have an aversion to ar-
ticulate, knowledgeable
people. Too much college
will spoil you forever.
You'll never make the jet-
set if you get educated.
2. Next there's the old
You've-Got-To-Make-
Something-Of- Yourself
reason for going to col-
lege. Poppycock. You
don't think you're good
looking enough to be a
jet-setter? You say you
want to be rich and
powerful? You want to
do something good for
humanity? You want to
do something that's self-
fulfilling? You won't find
it in college.
Sure, you can get your
degree and go on to a real
"profession But what
does a profession get
you? Look around. Look
at all the businessmen,
the professors, the doc-
tors, and the musicians.
They do look very happy
for a few years. They
look fulfilled. They have
respect and admiration.
But check out the ones
that have been at it for
seven or eight years.
Disillusionment abounds
and they become burned
out husks. The spark in
their eyes has turned
grey.
Only a few look con-
tent. But they're not. Not
really. The happy looking
ones are the politicians
and the corporate heads,
and they only look happy
because they have the
power to ruin the lives of
other people. Freud
would call this displace-
ment.
Most professionals
thought they could make
a real difference in the
world. Look at your pro-
fessors, for example. The
ones who have been
teaching for a few years
know that all their
students want to do is
screw off. Oh, they'll tell
you that one inquisitive
student makes all the stu-
dent apathy worthwhile.
Who are they kidding?
That one student is pro-
bably the one who will
become a professor �
who in seven years will be
saying the same things.
It's just a vicious, self-
perpetuating circle of
misery.
3. Finally, there's the
I-Just-Want-To-Get-An-
Edu cation reason.
Whaaaat? Go read a
book.
But lest I sound too
depressing, college life is
all right. A little creative
scheduling and you can
sleep until noon every-
day. You can party every
night. At least, that is,
until you get too far
behind.
When you find
yourself in a tight spot �
a test in two days, a paper
in three � all that is re-
quired is several dozen
pots of coffee and a cou-
ple of all-night study ses-
sions. This is a lot of fun
if done in moderation.
You can generate ar-
tificial pressure to break
the monotony of constant
partying and sometimes
you can even get some
nifty, sleep-deprived
hallucinations.
Admit it, it's a great
life. Ah, but what about
after college? Does the
good life continue? Or,
rather, is the good life
possible?
Nay, I say. 1 spend six
years in the "real world"
and it's tough. You have
to get up every morning,
usually before seven, and
you are completely
subservient to your boss
Think professors are
tough? What can they do,
flunk you? You can take
the course again. Bosses
can fire you. End your
career. It's bosses who
create those poor
alcoholic retches we
touched on earlier. No
more artificial pressure
which you control, now
there is constant, never
ending pressure which
vour boss controls.
It's a no-win situation.
If you don't do your job,
you're fired. If vou do
your job, the boss pilc-
up more work until you
can't do your job.
What can be done?
There are only so many
openings for bums. It is a
tough question. All that
you can do is graduate
and do the least objec-
tionable thing.
I graduate next month,
just as you will graduate
one day. What will I do?
What advice can I give to
those of you who will
follow me?
None.
PRODUCTION:
7,
Aerobics Dance Programs Increase
Coordination,Endurance,Flexibility
PRESENTED BY:
The Ef&rOwouMA PiayhwIe.
Continued From Page 7
becoming
breathless and overly
fatigued. The body also
recovers more quickly
from active workouts.
Most aerobic dancers
report having more daily
energy and healthier com-
plexions; this is attributed
to improved blood cir-
culation. Aerobic danc-
ing increases flexibility,
balance, coordination,
body control, rhythm,
and dancing ability. The
conditioning program
itself combines flexibility-
training, muscle toning
and endurance.
A typical dance class
begins with a 10 to 15
minute period of stret-
ching exercises and sit-
ups followed by six to ten
aerobic dances. Heart
rates are monitored after
each dance to ensure that
they reach working level
but do not exceedsafe
limits. After about 45
minutes, class ends with a
slow cool-down dance
and some post-cool-down
stretches to gradually br-
ing heart rates down.
Aerobics classes have
popped up all over the
United States. ECU of-
fers aerobics as part of its
physical education re-
quirement. Greenville
also has a number of spas
that offer several aerobics
dance classes daily.
WHEN:
WE-D-SAT.
APR It- ktf-2.1
�;�5 p.m.
ECU STUDENTS:
WHERE: CALL
-theatre. 757"6ot
Car ner
Sh-eets
tUU b IU DENTS: j� �n � ft
GENERAL PUBLIC: 11 ftf)
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports�
APRIL 17, 1984 p�ge 0
Robbie Bartlett was runnin
STA�JL�Y LKAKT - KCU MM Lb
Quarterback Position The Focus At PurpoW �07
By RANDY MEWS would have passed the ball a lot half mm Vll lVO' I,
B RANDY MEWS
laafcM Sporti Editor
With three of ECU's leading
quarterback candidates out of ac-
tion for the Purple-Gold football
game, junior college transfer Rob-
bie Bartlett emerged as the star of
the game in leading his Gold team
to a 12-6 victory Saturday after-
noon at Ficklen Stadium.
Bartlett looked just like last
year's star quarterback Kevin In-
gram, as he effectively combined
both facets of the offensive game
in rushing 15 times for 100 yards
and connecting on six of 13 passes
for another 96 yards.
Ron Jones, who emerged as the
number one quarterback during
spring drills, was injured in prac-
tice Wednesday and did not par-
ticipate in the game.
"I would have liked to seen
Ron Jones, Tony Kyser and Dar-
rell Speed all take a snap Pirate
head coach Ed Emory said. "If
Jones had been out there we
would have passed the ball a lot
more
WaJk-on freshman Brian Watts
stepped in for Jones to lead the
Purple team and did a respectable
job as he completed six of 15
passes for 168 yards and one
touchdown.
After both teams were unable
to gain more than 10 yards on
their first possession, Bartlett led
the Gold for the first score of the
game after taking over on the Pur-
ple 27. Bartlett connected with
Brent Hollerook for 43 yards on
the first play of the drive and then
an assortment of running plays
moved the ball the remaining 30
yards for the touchdown.
Following an exchange of
possessions, the Purple took a
punt from its own seven and
drove the length of the field in on-
ly four plays. Jimmv Walden
began the drive with an 11-yard
carry, and Watts ended it with a
76 yard touchdown strike to
Amos Adams with 8:35 left in the
half.
After another exchange in
possessions, the Gold got a break
as Keith Ford picked off his se-
cond pass of the day at the 31.
The Gold team kept the ball on
the ground for the next nine plays
as Bartlett and Terry Paige did
most of the damage, picking up 27
and 23 yards respectively. It came
down to third-and-two on the pur-
ple 10-yard line with less than a
minute remaining in the half, but
Bartlett was sacked by Dave
Thomas to end any hopes of a
touchdown.
Jeff Heath, who suffered
through a slump at the end of the
1983 season, was called on to kick
a 29-yard field goal, but the at-
tempt sailed wide to the right.
"Our kicking game was
miserable Emory said. "Our
program suffered a great loss with
the death of Jack Boone (last
year's kicking coach), but I ex-
pected it to be the strongest part
of our game we didn't even
Pirates On Their Way To Bid I
make an extra point
The punting game was a dif-
ferent story, however, as last
year's starter Jeff Bolch punted
the ball three times for an average
of 46 yards per kick. "I was real
pleased with Jeff's performance
Emory said.
Emory was also happy with the
defensive effort on both sides.
"The defense needs to grow up
because they are so young he
said, "but their intensity was
good Emory especially noted
the play of Ford (three intercep-
tions, four tackles), saying he ex-
pected the defensive back to fill
the shoes of Clint Harris.
Neither team was able to sus-
tain a drive in the second half un-
til the Gold took a Bolch punt
from its own 26 with 10:17 left in
the game and drove 74 yards in 12
plays for the touchdown. The
drive was highlighted by a 19-yard
pass from Bartlett to Tony Smith
and a Pat Bowens eight yard
charge up the middle for the
score. Once again the extra point
attempt failed.
The game came down to the
Purple's final possession with
2:30 left. Watts showed no signs
of letting the pressure of playing
in his first collegiate game get to
him, as he moved his team
downfield, hitting Ron Elv for 11
yards, Chris McGlawhorn for 12
and Ely again for 14.
Finally, it was all or nothing for
the Purple as it had possession on
fourth-and-seven from the 38
Watts dropped straight back and
ballooned a pass into the end
zone. The result was Ford's third
interception, ensuring victory for
the Gold with nine seconds left in
the game.
As time expired, it marked the
official end of spring practice for
the Pirates. They will return to the
gridiron in mid-August in
preparation for their Sept 1
season-opener at Florida St a
28-0 winner over North Carolina
in the Peach Bowl last December
Gold
22
54-291

0
13-6-2
3-40.3
6-1
3-15
29:47
Purple
First Dow is n
Rushes-Yardage 29-157
Passing Yaids 168
Return Yards o
Passing 17-6-3
Punts-Avenige 3.48.0
Fumbles-Lost l-i
Penalties-Yards 4-22
Time of Possession 18:13
By ED NICKLAS
Sporti E4ttor
The Pirate bats refused to cool
off last weekend, burning holes
through the gloves of Virginia
Wesleyan Saturday, as they
pounded out 12 hits to defeat the
Marlins 7-2.
The game was tied going into
the seventh, but the Pirates scored
three runs in that inning on a
Todd Evans RBI and a two-run
homer by Winfred Johnson, his
ninth of the year.
ECU, now 22-8, then added
two more runs in the eighth to
provide a cushion for winning pit-
cher Jim Peterson (7-0). The
freshman red-shirt sensation pit-
ched the full nine innings, allow-
ing just six hits and one walk
while striking out seven.
The victory, ECU's fifth in a
row, increases the Pirates'
chances in obtaining an at-large
bid to the NCAA playoffs. Coach
Hal Baird believes his team will
have to "finish real strong win-
ning six of its last eight games, in
order to be considered. However,
if the Pirates do not get an at-
large bid, Baird is confident his
team will reach the playoffs
another way � through the
EC AC South tournament.
"We should (get a bid) Baird
said. "But its hard to say that we
will because there are ACC teams
playing well He mentioned
UNC-Chapel Hill, N.C. State and
Clemson, who are having good
seasons, as all having the inside
track.
"Also he added, "we're in-
hibited by the fact that we've had
a lot of games rained out. And
we're a little inhibited by not hav-
ing a sports information director
right now (The sports informa-
tion office provides press releases
on the results and statistics of
each game. ECU is in the process
now of turning over the sports in-
formation director duties. See
related story).
Baird said a committee of
NCAA baseball coaches will start
meeting May 7 to determine which
teams get an automatic bid to the
NCAA playoffs.
"We're really happy to win five
games in a row on the road
Baird reflected on Saturday's vic-
tory, which raised ECU's record
to 6-2 away from home. Last
year, the Pirates were only 5-9-1
on the road.
"We have played well the last
few games. We really haven't had
a bad ballgame
And during the string of vic-
tories, ECU has begun to put the
puzzle together, filling in a potent
offensive attack to support strong
pitching. Baird provided two
reasons for the spree.
"It's a combination of things
he said. "First of all, we haven't
seen outstanding pitching. And
we are far enough along in the
schedule that the hitters are get-
ting their stokes down
As usual, the pitching was
superb Saturday, as Peterson stiU
has yet to suffer a loss. The one
walk given up by Peterson reduc-
ed the team's walk average to two
per game, which Baird said is pro-
bably the best in the nation and
really an unbelievable" statistic
In Saturday's game, ECU got
on the scoreboard first in the
fourth inning to take a 2-0 lead
David Wells and Evans walked
and Johnson singled to bring
home WeUs with the first run
Evans came home with the second
run on Chris Bradberry's single
In their half of the fourth, the
Marlins tied the game on four
singles. After Bruce Matthews
and Joe DiGiacomo reached on
base hits, they came home on con-
secutive singles by Matt
Eschelman and Andy Hesington.
Greg Hardison, who continued
to hit well with two base knocks in
the game, doubled to lead off the
seventh inning. He then came
home for the go-ahead run when
Evans reached on an error, and
Johnson sent his homer over the
right field fence to build the Pirate
lead to three.
ECU added two more runs in
the eighth, on base hits by Steve
Sides, Jabo Fulghum, Hardison
and Wells.
Individual Statistics
Rushing: Gold - Bartlett
15-100, Baker 14-63, Bowes 5-24
Hill 7-38, Paige 6-38, Lewis 6-21 �'
Purple - Watts 5-15, Franklin
4-12, Walden 8-44, Branch 4-11
Richardson 5-55, McLawhorn
1-2, Fuller 2-10.
Passing: Gold � Bartlett 6-33-1
96; Purple � Watts 5-1S-2 168
W'alden 0-2-1 0.
Receiving: Gold - Holbrook
2-54, Hampton 2-10, T. Smith
1-19, Pope 1-13; Purple � A
Adams 2-121, Patton 1-10, Elv
2-25, McLawhorn 1-12.
Czaja, Bradley
Off Only 12
By SCOTT POWERS
Staff Wrtt�
"We probably played our best
golf tournament of the year, but
everyone else just played better
said Pirate golf coach Jerry Lee,
as ECU finished tenth out of
12 teams at the Tar Heel Invita-
tional in Chapel Hill last
weekend.
North Carolina captured the
team championship when Bryan
Sullivan birdied the first hole in a
sudden-death playoff, after the
Tar Heels and Clemson lad battl-
ed to a tie at the end of regulation
with scores of 855.
"We had three players who did
exceptionally well in Chris Czaja
Mike Bradley and Don
Sweeting said Lee.
Czaja finished with a hree-dav
total of 220 with rounds of 73 73
74 while Bradley also came in at
220 with rounds of 72, 75 and 73
Rounding out the ECU scoring
were Sweeting at 223 Mil
!?5andMarkJcilat
ttb. ECU s team score was 897
Webb Heintzelman of South
Carolina fired a 208 to capture the
mdmdual honors, edging out
h�209 MaCflC' h� came
The Pirates will end their
season this weekend at the Old
Domimon University Invitational
NaiJ HetT1 ��lf C�Urse h
B K.lk.wl�6. .u anu vveilS. fhria Pt.I. r.k.M k . WT ttbr�o1 � CCU "1�t�Tj� at tK� c 7 "J�i�uui
C?1�1 T AU Es Into �� Basket For 4x100 Relay
9-hwm The 4x100 team consisting of Evans had hk factor c�i ?� r vv ��� m V'&tVf y
�u� Brooks, Erskine Evans. Joe 5? seconds. dte t �� n� J

By PETE FERN ALD
Staff Witt
"We threw all our eggs into one
basket trying to qualify the 4x100
relay team for the Nationals
That was head coach Bill Car-
son's explanation why Chris
Brooks, Henry Williams and the
4x200 relay team did not compete
in their respective events last
weekend at the Dogwood Relays
in Knoxville, Tenn.
"I wanted to keep everyone
healthy said Carson. "We won
the trials with the 4x100 team, and
I thought we had a good chance at
qualifying for the Nationals
The 4x100 team consisting of
Brooks, Erskine Evans, Joe
Dingle and Williams won the
trials with a time of 40.8 seconds.
In the finals, the Pirates came
in third, losing to top-ranked
Georgia and sixth-ranked Ten-
nessee with a time of 40.22
seconds.
"They brought their time of
40.58 seconds from the last meet
down to 40.22 seconds Carson
said. "They need a 40-flat to
qualify for the Nationals. They
are improving and should be able
to qualify at the Penn Relays
In one of his best races ever,
Evans had his fastest split time of
the season, running the second leg
of the 4x100 relay with a time of
9.58 seconds.
Unfortunately, Evans ran so
fast that he overan the third run-
ner, Joe Dingle. As a result, there
was a poor handoff and Dingle
got a bad start.
According to Carson, Williams,
the fourth and fastest runner,
salvaged the race by "running
down the kids from Georgia and
Tennessee
Evans ran against nine top run-
ners in the 100-meter dash, plac-
ing fifth with a time of 10.4
seconds.
"It was a great sprint for Er-
skine as he competed against
Calvin Smith, the nation's record
holder in the 100 Carson said.
Olympic hopeful Craig White
had an unfortunate mishap as he
placed "dead last" in the 110 high
hurdles with a time of 14.3
seconds.
"I didn't really have the proper
warm up time I needed before the
race White said. "It was a real
quick start but once the race
began there was a strong tail wind
that forced me into the first hur-
dle. After hitting the second hur-
dle I held off because I didn't
want to take a chance of gettina
injured ig
The mile relay team, with new
member, Vincent Epps, placed
seventh out of a field of 28 teams
with a time of 3:11.10.
Epps had an excellent lead off
time of 47.7 seconds and, accor-
ding to coach Carson, the team
had a chance at placing higher
They excepted the challenge well
and had a chance to place higher
but placed seventh Carson said
You run a 3:11 which is a good
time and ar still disjointed
because you place seventh"
The men's track team will tair-
aweekoffandgohonTforEa
before their next meet: UePeS
ion SiSl1 y lnis
jwjng with high hurdler Craia
White and Erskine Evans wlX
nms the 100 meters. ' �
Henry Williams will ixssiblv
mn in the 100 meters, but 52
wants to save him forXSS
relay. A final dcdSogi wtt�
ie by Carson later Uus week
Pa.
Genr,
u
9 i
.
Tex
In.
A .
a degree
Gennarelli
ed
the A
ft
���
1
��� a� ���. - � �
- - - �"� rraa���hl. 4






s
r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 1 19t4 11

����� .
U�rAN NUMH�T - ICU Wto
ntest
Purple
First Downs11
Rushes-Yardage29-157
Passing Yards168
Return Yards0
PassingP-6-3
Punts-Aerage3.48.0
Fumbles-Lost1-1
Penalties-Yards4-22
Time of Possession18:13
Individual Statistics
hmg: Gold � Bartlett
Baker 14-63, Bowen 5-24.
38, Paige 6-38, Lewis 6-21;
� Watts 5-15, Franklin
� alden 8-44, Branch 4-11,
fdson 5-55. McLawhorn
- - 2-10.
mg: Gold � Bartlett 6-13-1
rple � Watts 6-15-2 168,
n 0-2-1 0.
ing: Gold � Holbrook
Hampton 2-10, T. Smith
'Jope 1-13; Purple � A.
� 2-121, Patton 1-10, Elv
McLawhorn 1-12.
tja, Bradley
Only 12
iy SCOTT POWERS
J Staff Write,
e probably played our best
purnament of the year, but
ine else just played better
irate golf coach Jerry Lee,
,U Finished tenth out of
is at the Tar Heel Invita-
in Chapel Hill last
id.
hh Carolina captured the
championship when Bryan
hn birdied the first hole in a
n-death playoff, after the
leels and Clemson had battl-
p tie at the end of regulation
Icores of 855.
e had three players who did
ponally well in Chris Czaja,
Bradley and Don
ig said Lee.
Ija finished with a three-day
f 220 with rounds of 73, 73,
jiile Bradley also came in at
Ith rounds of 72, 75 and 73.
img out the ECU scoring
weeting at 223, Mike
I at 235 and Mark Arcilesi at
ECU's team score was 897.
bb Heintzelman of South
na fired a 208 to capture the
lual honors, edging out
on's Jim Macfie, who came
Pirates will end their
this weekend at the Old
uon University Invitational
Seascape Golf Course in
lead.
Relay
land are still disapointed
se you place seventh
men's track team will take
off and go home for Easter
their next meet: the Perm
in Philadelphia, April 27
a �n has mtCTcd the
4x200 and mile relay teams
with high hurdler Craig
and Erskine Evans, who
te 100 meters.
Williams will possibly
the 100 meters, but Carson
to save him for the 4x100
A final decision will be
by Carson later this week.
Softball Team Departs Tourney Early
By RANDY MEWS
MARK BARBER
Pam toung gets read to let one rip.
ecu Photo Lab
Gennarelli Named SID
Greenville, NC-ECU
has named Bob Gen-
narelli as sports informa-
tion director effective
April 23.
Gennarelli, 25-year-old
native oi Brooklyn.
NY but resident of
Texas for the last 10
years, joins the Pirate
program after serving a
senior assistant sports in-
formation director at the
University of Houston.
A graduate of the
University of Texas, with
a degree in journalism,
Gennarelli has also work-
ed as a sports writer for
the Dallas Morning Sews
and the Houston Post, as
well as freelance work for
the Associated Press,
L'SA Today and several
football-oriented
magazines in the state of
Texas
"We are very pleased
to add Bob Gennarelli to
our staff said Dr. Ken
Karr, director of
athletics. "Bob has had
numerous opportunites
involving multi-national
contacts both in college
and in his various posts
since graduation, in-
cluding national cham-
pionship events. His ex-
perience and contacts will
mean a great deal to our
expanding program
Gennarelli will assume
all duties of the sports in-
formation office in an ex-
pansion move in athletics
at ECU. Current sports
information duties are
held by Ken Smith, assis-
tant athletic director for
public relations. With
new operational setup,
Smith will continue as
assistant athletic director
with emphasis on the
Pirate Sports Network,
television and special pro-
jects for athletics.
"In order that we get
maximum potential from
our expanding athletic
program, we very much
need more staff with
more specialization in
certain areas noted
Karr. "This will now be
possible with Gennarelli
handling the information
duties and Smith concen-
trating more on the elec-
tronic aspects of our pro-
gram
� ECU won two of five
games this weekend at the
Liberty Baptist Softball
Tournament in Lyn-
chburg, Va but called it
quits on the final day of
competition and headed
for home.
"The field was ex-
tremely wet from hail and
heavy rain and we didn't
want to take the chance
of risking an injury
assistant coach Imogene
Turner said.
On the days the Pirates
did compete, Turner felt
the team played well!
defensively but did not'
hit the ball like they
should have. Poor hitting,
has plagued the Pirates
all year, and in three of
its five tourney games,1
ECU was shut out by the.
opposition.
In their opening game,
the Pirates shut out the
University of Charleston
3-0 behind a strong three-
hit pitching performance
from Robin Graves.
ECU got all they need-
ed in the second inning
when Suzanne Martin
singled, then was doubled
home by a Dawn Langley
1
blast to left field.
Charleston's only
chance to score came in
the sixth when the first
two batters of the inning
hit back-to-back singles,
but Graves retired the
next three to preserve the
shut out.
ECU picked up two in-
surance runs in the bot-
tom of the inning as Lisa
Zmuda and Martin both
led off with singles. After
a sacrifice, in which the
pair advanced to second
and third, Langley was
walked to load the bases
with only one out.
Tamara Franks followed
with a single to score both
Zmuda and Martin, but
the Pirates couldn't keep
it going as Langley was
thrown out at the plate on
a Sandy Kee grounder.
In thier second contest,
ECU's offense was
almost non-existent as
Pearson pitched a one-
hitter in leading her Ohio
State Buckeyes to a 1-0
victory.
The Pirates only got as
far as second base and
that only happened on
one occasion. It came in
the final inning when
Melony Ham made it to
first on a fielder's choice,
then reached second on
an error by Person.
Langley quickly ground-
ed out to end the inning,
however.
OSU scored its only
run on an error, which
also occured in the final
inning of play. Liepply
reached first on an error
by first baseman Langley,
moved to second on a
sacrifice to left, then was
singled home by Perkins.
The Pirates were edged
again in their third game,
dropping another
frutrating 1-0 decision to
Winthrop College.
Unable to produce at
the plate, ECU only got
two hits, and once again
never got beyond second
base.
Winthrop picked up its
only run in the fourth as
Sisley doubled deep to to
right, then came in on
another two-bagger by
Nichols.
Stacy Boyette, ECU's
only undefeated pitcher,
got the nod against
Virginia despite having
the flu. "Stacy was very
sick and didn't get out of
bed until the day she had
to pitch Turner said.
Although not 100 per-
cent, Boyette came
through as she has all
year long in leading her
team to a 4-2 victory.
The Pirates scored all
their runs in the fourth
inning, most coming as a
result of poor pitching.
Angie Humphrey led off
the inning with a single,
then came home on a
double by Martin. Cheryl
Curtis followed with a
single to score Martin,
then Ozment singled to
advance Curtis to third.
At that point, the
Virginia pitcher lost con-
trol as she walked
Langley, Franks and
Boyette to force in Curtis
and Ozment.
Virginia came right
back in the bottom of the
fourth score as O'Neal
tripled, and then was
singled in by Marks.
The Cavaliers picked
up another run in the
sixth, but it wasn't
enough as the Pirates
evened up their tourney
record at 2-2.
In their final game,
ECU was crushed 10-0 by
powerful Penn State. The
Bucs could only muster
three hits as Graves gave
up 14 in the losing cause.
The Pirates fall to
20-12 on the year, and
will be in action again this
afternoon at 3 p.m. in
Charlottesville to take on
Virginia.
� ?�
RESEARCH PAPERS
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12
JTHEEAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 17 1U


Participation Tax Cut
(CPS) � Athletes at
colleges playing under the
aegis of the National
Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics � the
group that coordinates
sports for the nation's
smaller schools � won't
have to pay an extra
$8.50 per sport tax in
order to play on their col-
leges' teams, delegates to
the NAIA's recent con-
vention decided.
Hoping to raise about
$1 million from athletes
over the next five years,
NAIA officials said they
wanted the money to help
pay for "non-income"
sports like tennis, and to
create an endowment to
help the organization
weather "unanticipated
decreases in revenues,
like if income from our
playoffs fell one year
explains Jack Rye,
Western Oregon State's
athletic director and
chairman of NAIA's
District Two.
"It would have been ic-
ing on the cake adds
Wallace Schwartz, the
NAIA's associate ex-
ecutive director. "Right
now we've got the cake
Schwartz says he's not
sure why the delegates
defeated the proposal,
but fee opponents at the
convention said they wor-
ried the fundraising
measure might be unfair
to athletes at some
schools.
"There were some
complications Rye
says. "It (the proposal)
would allow schools who
could afford it to pay the
fees for their students
The provision would
have given an advantage
to wealthier schools, and
also would have placed a
bigger burden on athletes
who play more than one
sport, opponents said.
"But on the positive
side, there was much
sympathy and support
for the intent" of the tax
measure among the
delegates, Rye says.
Schwartz emphasises
the NAIA is in good
financial shape, and
doesn't need the athletes'
money in order to sur-
vive. "This was no
desperation measure
Rye adds.
The NAIA will keep
looking for new ways to
improve itself financially,
however, both men say.
Schwartz says the
organization could im-
pose the fee on athletes
later. "The concept was
to plant the seed, and you
have to water it a few
years and see what comes
up
Rye says "the general
feeling" among the
member schools is that
"there might be a better,
less complicated way" to
raise money to start a
NAIA endowment fund.
Some athletic directors at
a recent District Two
NAIA meeting suggested
approaching corpora-
tions for donations.
Schwartz says the
NAIA's executive com-
mittee will discuss fun-
draising alternatives at its
summer meeting.
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Classifieds
SALE
ROOMCLOSE toECU . UOOn 2�
LOOKING TO SUBLEASE urn7�hl
apt $270 a month pus utft 5 blocks
from campus HBO, Showtime, Pool
ilotsmore Call ?58 6971
FOR SALE: 750 Honoa. Cal.fom,
frame, trick paint ob, hooker
headers, lots of chrome, SI ,600 or best
offer Car 57 741 or 756 3917.
FOR SALE.
Call 752 8967
run May 20 June 26 and July 1 Aug.
7 For more details call our Business
office at (909) 929-7143. Univ. Square.
Chapel Hill. The Place To Be At
UNC!
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted for
summer, furnished house to share S75
mth 2 blocks from campus. Great
location 752 3145.
RIDES
Twin bed. 2 dressers
ROOM for rent to responsible
female Reduced rent in exhanoe for
same duties 756 080C alter 5 30
FOR SALE: Almost new twin mat
fess for only 150 Call 752 1974 after
3 30
COFFEE TABLET with Ihree end
'abies ISO 6ft Bar 150 a Dresser $25
752 5879
RIDE NEEDED to and from New
Bern tor one or both summer ses
sions Call 752-8759 If Interested.
RIDE NEEDED to Charleston, s.C.
on Easter weekend. Call 752 7879.
Personal
RESPONSIBLE FEMALE ROOM
MATE to share furnished 2 bedroom
apt. In nice apt. complex. $152.50 plus
Vj deposit plus U utilities. Available
May 1.
bedroom at Wilson Acres, 3 blocks
from campus. Next to pool, tennis
courts, laundry.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for summer
Furn. room In 4 bedrm. house
$I25mth plus Ui utilities. Come by
406 Rotary Or near Campus Security
5th St.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED:
TWO OR THREE Roommates need
ed for summer. Nicely furnished apt
with washer. $275 monthly plus low
utilities. Call anytime 758 2876.
ROOMMATE WANTED: 4 summer
M5 plus M ufll, 1 ml to campus bus
Call 752 6265
ROOMMATES NEEDED for sum
merfall River Bluff Apts Call
7588822.
nnuLC
Semi-Boneless
Smoked Ham
14-17 lb.
avg.
soQoeo
ELBOPC DEFT
1974 pinto $495, Table 8. Chairs 30
'52 1001
SOFA AND LUVSEAT, exc. coffee
and end table new $300 758 9122 PM
MISC
CONGRATULATIONS to Michael P.
Monahan who Is now an officer in the
United States Marine Corps, but was
always a Gentleman I Your support
system will continue to back you
forever I
MONICA C. The warmth of your hug
lingers even when I'm alone. Thank
vou for a great weekend and for all
the times we are together. Love, Bob
S
WHEN A FRIEND has stereo system
prooiems. tell them mat the audio
technicians at the TECH SHOP don't
charge for repair estimates Call us
at 757 Nineteen Eighty .
auto accidents Specializing -
personal injury litigation J. David
Duffus. jr , Attornty, NCNB
Building Greenville North Carolina
758 6200
QUALITY TYPINS BM
Typewriter, 15 years experience Full
time typing for faculty & students
756 366C
HAPPY BIRTHDAY Dwayne. I hope
you had a good onel � Your Buddy
Mary.
WANTElT
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Service,
all typing needs 758 5488 or 758 8241
COLLEGE STUDENTS will find This
offer attractive $200 w k.sales and
service car helpful. Call 756-3861.
ATTEN UNC�CH SUMMER School
Students neeo a place to live wo
hassels of subletting Granvill
Towers is the place for you! � Air
conditioning, 15 meals per week,
swimming pool, great parties plann
ed, and weekly maid service. All for
only $365 per 5 wk session Sessions
LOCAL CHURCH would like person
to keep church nursery 10:45 - 12 noon
each Sunday Could possibly be divid-
ed with another person. $6 each Sun-
day Send resume' to Nursery
Helper, 309 Prince Rd Greenville,
NC 27834
SUMMER WORK � Travel, earn
$3800 Students must be hard workers
and have entire summer free. Inter-
views today and Wednesday at 4:00
and 7 00 Brewster D 202
WANTED: Gay relationship. Discre-
tion assured P.O Box 8342, Green
vllle, NC
PART TIME TELEPHONE Work for
the summer Flexible hours, apply in
person at Southern Credit Adlustors,
308 Evan's Street Mall, Greenville.
FEMALE ROOMMATE Wanted for
summer. Fully furnished apt
WasherDryer $100 a mo. plus 13
utilities. Cannon Court 752-3434.
3 ANNUAL
AlfeAND(asrTET
TIES APRIL Ii98f 8 53-1:00 ANA
ADM f I OO 8YP5. HOO
SAVE 50' LB.
Chuck Roast
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Bone
In
lb.
SAVE 20c LB.
Young Turkeys
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED
10
10 lbs.
and up
lb.
$��!&
jRj ioctva, YEAC FBtE ELeo
r IT CA$H, 14E4 ,1 VEAC FREE ELBO FBfc
J KE�, i YEAR FGEE C&SS -ro THE. ElBO
�si fj
.APPLE DECO&DS
BICYCLE POST
BLUE tAOOKi CAFE
CWlCO$
-THE CCEAMEBY
CRCJW KiEST
THE EDUCATION CEKJTEC
FOQ. HE0D$ ONLY
4U6E WARDWABE
SAVE 40
.Crisp Celery
MAC SUBP SEA
PEPSI COLA
P.Z.ZA INN
R R NflTAC, W AC
STADIUM CLEANER
TREEWOUE
UBE.
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
49 Gree.tville Blvd.
756-3023 �24 HRS.
PLAZA SH
24 hour Towing Service
L-Haul Rentals
Available
ENTRIES CAN SIGN UP AT TME ELBO
�2?! TUES LIMIT .5 BANDS
-JOjDVANC� REGISTRATION'
Reproductive Health Care
Trlf flcWNq
CENtER
;�'���'�! � 11 luiljrrvntal 1 are that
� .it- .o' 'or women o all ages
sefeng � r bo ;a"ner s available
Special Ser ces and rates foe students.
a. 781 5553 days eveninos. and weekends.
E325E3
SAVE SO LB
Ripe Tomatoes
RE!iW �
Savings yA
Kraft Dressings I Banquet Pot Pies
t- T- I� L I � . I ITU urn � - . . �
FRENCH � ZESTY ITALIAN � CATALINA
CREAMYJTALIAN � CREAMY BUTTERMILK
� CHICKEN � BEEF � TURKEY
MACARONI & CHEESE � SPAGHETTI
msz-w
Congratulations
to all
Graduating Seniors
Don t leave Pirate Athletics
Behind When You Graduate
SALE! SAVE70� -
M-l Pert Flav-O-Rich at,
ALL FLAVORS
O �1. 700
ixer
SWl FT �
Skmk
.J�V.it 10 -CAS5 FfK CL 5TCrnfcK f Cttl.
FREE
Graduation Present
to you
from the ECU
STEAK HOUSE
2 Locations
2903 E. 10th St.
500 W. Greenville Blvd.
Mon. & Tue.
Nite
tf 2 Chopped
Sirloin &
Salad Bar
$3.99
Fri. & Sat.
Nite
Wed. & Thun.
Nite
3 Beef Tips
& Salad Bar
$3.99
1 8oz. Sirloin
& Salad Bar
$4.69
ONE $30 CREW MEMBERSHIP
I ���( P A&P COUPON ��!
1984 Pirate Club Membership
Now Featuring Fix It
Yourself Potato Bar
Free with meal.
fW�
Name
State
Zip
IHte of graduation

gt
Clip Aaaakatioa, FU Oal, aM aafl lo:
laatl Mf la iMp
ECUPftatodBb
CfeaaaataKNC 27134
or eal 757171 to alga a NOW
IA&P COUPON
SAVE 56CON
ANN PAGE
Mayonnaise
i A&PCOUPON
SAVE 20 ON
PLAIN � SELF-RISING � BREAD
Pillsbury Flour
kQOOO MM f�, �a�aj. m m u
���TO,a�Wia�l7looi��ll
SAVE 30c ON
KRAFT PARKA
Margarine Qtrs.
A&P COUPON
SAVE30ON
JANE PARKER
Brown & Serve Rolls
am micnom Aaepio cm
w
ri$
&&' i
a�
t
'c if
&
.t1�TAA
) AAP COUPON
Senior Citizen
Discount
5�o off Total Purchases
On Wednesdays
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miit
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 17, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 17, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.337
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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