The East Carolinian, April 12, 1984








�he
(EuralMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community
since 1925
Vol.58 No.g 5
Greenville, N.C.
Thursday, April 12, 1984
Education School
Programs Praised
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Co-New Editor
Once again the ECU School of
Education received positive feed-
back concerning it's teacher
education programs. An eight-
member team from the State
Department of Public Instruction
re-visited campus April 10th and
11th and reported Wednesday
afternoon that it would recom-
mend that all weaknesses
previously addressed are no
longer a problem.
William Heller, dean of the
College of Education at UNC-
Chapel Hill and head of the SDPI
team said, "We are recommen-
ding that the deficiences cited
previously are no longer ap-
propriate and that all standards
are met
Besides reviewing past pro-
blems, the committee's purpose
was also to study the department's
proposed Middle Grades pro-
gram. "The new program is wor
thy of approval Heller said.
Although the report is just a
recommendation, Dean of the
School of Education, Charles R.
Coble is very optimistic about the
future. "I am very pleased with
their report Coble said.
Overall policies the group
studied included purposes and ob-
jectives, professional laboratory
experiences and the student per-
sonnel program. Special areas
scrutinized were professional
education, special education,
home economics at the dance
study level, and the proposed
Middle Grades program.
"We feel, in talking with the
chancellor, vice chancellor
associate dean of the graduate
school, the dean, various
members of the faculty, and
especially the teacher education
council, that significant changes
have been made in the governing
See SDPI, Page 3
Qyerj1400Students Petition For Issue
PIRG Referendum Scheduled
Wllh only (wo wwks left in the �� � HUtitl ' The BOOlcS ��" ��- � "
tester, these gu)s .re gett.ng � rty �, stlldying for �,� ,��� ,�,� . - fc
B DARRYL BROWN
Managing rUJItor
SGA President Paul Naso, after
receiving a petition with more
than 1,400 student signatures
Monday, is going ahead with
plans to hold a campus-wide, stu-
dent referendum on April 24 con-
cerning a Public Interest Research
Group at ECU.
Naso said he received the peti-
tions, which stated that the signers
support PIRG and call for a full
student body referendum, from
Student Attorney General Harry
Dest, who had to validate the peti-
tion signatures.
According to Article VII of the
SGA Constitution, students must
have signatures from 10 percent
of the student body on a petition
to call for a referendum. Ten per-
cent of the ECU enrollment is ap-
proximately 1,350.
When the petition is submitted,
"the (SGA) president shall, if he
is notified by the Attorney
General that the petition is in
good order provide that the
referendum be conducted ac-
cording to Article VII.
The vote must be held between
11 and 16 days after the petitions
are submitted.
Naso said the referendum will
be run like an SGA election. "All
the precincts are going to vote on
it he said. "I've just got to get
things arranged so the people can
vote
Naso said an elections chairper-
son and committee would be ap-
pointed and the vote would pro-
bably cost SGA about $300.
"I think the voice should be
heard Naso said. "Let the
students vote on it
Naso expects lobbying by
groups for and against PIRG to
be heavy until April 24. "It's go-
ing to be big student activism on
campus in the next ten days he
said.
PIRG Organizing Committee
Chairman Jay Stone was glad the
referendum was approved. "I'm
really happy to see that
democracy has been vindicated
he said. "It's a grass roots calling
by the people for support for
PIRG and the chance to take ac-
tion on it
Stone and several volunteers
spoke to classes, organizations,
fraternity and sorority houses,
and dorm residents for almost
three weeks to collect the
signatures.
PIRG organizers started the
petition drive after the SGA
Legislature decided it was un-
constitutional for the legislature
Welfare Committee 8-2
Against Mandatory Fee
Naso
to call for a referendum.
PIRGs arc defined as non-
partisan, non-profit, student
funded research and advocacy
organizations run by a student
Board of Directors. There are cur-
rently no PIRGs on public univer-
sity campuses in North Carolina,
but some private institutions in-
cluding Duke University and
Davidson College have PIRG
chapters.
Al984-8Appr0priations
Group
Forum Musical Organization
Student
(Travel)
Student Forum Musical Organization
SOULS
Phi Omega Pi
Poetry Forum
Student National Environmental Health
Association
ECU Sign Language Club
VAF
Marching Pirates
Marching Pirates Band Day
Phi Alpha Theta
Parks and Recreation
1FC
Army Cadet Association
Phi Beta Lambda
Graduate Business Association
Psi Chi
NAACP
CADP
SLAP Svmposium
ESCOTA
ECU Rehab Association
Allied Health Student Organization
ECU Cheerleaders
Alpha Phi Omega
Phi Sigma Pi
ECU Frisbee Club
Marauders
ECU Playhouse
NCSL
Executive Council ECU Survival Kit
Senior Class Gift
Executive Council
AFROTC
Alpha Kappa Delta
Request
$17,351
19,970
16,715
NA
1.100
900
1.380
52,500
6,340
2,475
500
2,680
7.380
NA
NA
8,040
1,025
1,650
2,700
1.346
526
1,182
750
4,880
300
300
550
550
20,000
2,255
2,000
4,000
38,826
3,000
540
223,285
Appropriation
6.630
0
3,475
NA
550
190
490
6,630
5,000
0
200
1,400
350
NA
NA
1.905
315
930
775
190
341
270
450
870
150
200
315
350
7,000
1,975
0
2,500
37,566
500
260
81,777
By KIM CRAIG
Suff Writer
A resolution opposing a man-
datory fee to be added to student
tuition bills was introduced by
committee member Dennis Kil-
coyne at the SGA Student Welfare
Committee meeting Tuesday night
and passed by the committee 8-2.
The resolution endorses a
university policy that would not
allow any student group to in-
clude a mandatory fee on tuition
bills as its funding method.
The resolution, if passed bv the
legislature, would only voice sop-
port for such a policy, since the
SGA does not have the power to
control fees on tuition bills.
The bill originally mentioned
Public Interest Research Groups
as an example, but the committee
deleted the reference to PIRG
before passing the bill, referring
instead only to "any student
group
PIRG organizers at ECU
originally tried to found the
organization with a fee which
students had to pay on tuition
bills but could get a refund for.
They later switched to an optional
fee which students may choose to
pay.
Committee chairman David
Brown said the bill referred only
to mandatory fees, and did not
prohibit voluntary or optional
fees on tuiiion bills.
"The Student Welfare Commit-
tee has always supported any stu-
dent's right to donate to any
See PIRG. Page 3
Annual Requests For $223,285.82
Nearly Triple SGA Appropriations
By DARRYL BROWN
Muili Ullor
The SGA Legislature will vote
Monday on 1984-85 annual ap-
propriations, and figures were
released Wednesday showing re-
quests for allocations were almost
triple the amount of the SGA
budget.
The SGA is working with a ten-
tative budget of $99,123.25 for
the next fiscal year beginning July
1 according to Appropriations
Committee co-chairman Jim En-
sor. Of that, 17 percent or
$17,346.57 is set aside to ap-
propriate during the 1984-85
legislature. Ensor released the
figures Wednesday to The East
Carolinian.
More than 30 student groups re-
quested a total of $223,285.82,
while the legislature can ap-
propriate only 81,776.68. Includ-
ed among the money the
legislature must appropriate is
$37,566 for the SGA Executive
Council, leaving $44,210 for all
ether groups, according to Ap-
propriation Committee records.
Several groups related to ECU
arts schools and departments
traditionally take a large bite of
the SGA annual appropriations.
Ensor said this year the committee
decided to put aside 60 percent, or
$26,526.41, of eligible funds to
divide among the arts groups.
For the remaining 28 groups,
who requested a combined total
of $102,244.82, only $17,684.27
remained in the budget as the
committee had divided it. The
largest cuts went to such groups as
the Society Of United Liberal
Students, who requested $16,715
and to whom the committee
allocated only $3,475; and the
Graduate Student Association,
who asked for $8,090 and will
receive $1,905, assuming the com-
mittee's recommendations are
passed unchanged Monday.
Ensor said the committee will
submit its budget recommedations
for the 35 groups in one bill so the
legislature will not have to vote on
each groups separately. If
vy 1 �V 1 1 -mgroups, according to Ap- each groups separately. If
Black Scholarship, Fundraiser Benefit Scheduled
ecu News Bureau Headlining the evening's enter- manv n" h u 'ii h
mtmmmm tainment will be New York musi- JESJTEST'lS: "?� E" �. according to Jacoui recommendation and an ess
legislator wants to charge a
specific group's funding, a two-
thirds vote by the legislature is re-
quired to consider it.
Ensor said because so manv
budgets had to be drasticallv cut,
the committee tried to appropriate
money only for fall semester ac-
tivities when possible, tilling
groups they could go tc the
legislature next semester to re-
quest additional funding.
Ensor said the committee will
submit two other bills, one recom-
mending that the summer
legislature appropriate $2,000 for
the "ECU Survival Kit an in-
formation booklet for off-campus
students. The other bill is a pro-
posal for a new SGA by-law
stating that the legislature must
give the organizations from the
art, music and drama departments
at least 80 percent of the amount
allocated the previous year. Ensor
said this was to give those
organizations financial security in
planning their budgets, since they
use SGA funds for basic expenses.
The
Friday, April 13, the Organiza-
tion of Black Faculty and Staff of
ECU, along with the ECU Black
Alumni, the Society of United
Liberal Students and the Citizens
of the PittGreenville Black Com-
munity will sponsor the first an-
nual Black Scholarship and Fun-
raising Benefit for the Ledonia
S. Wright Memorial Scholarship
Fund. The benefit will be held at
American Legion Post 39 on St
Andrews St. in Greenville from 8
t0 10:30 p.m.
Headlining the evening's enter
tainment will be New York musi
cian Dr. Edward V. Bonnemere
and Mario Hunter of Beaufort
Community College, according to
benefit entertainment chairperson
Joyce Pettis. Bonnemere is a com-
poser of religious music as well as
being a talented jazz pianist. He
has studied at Julliard, New York
University � where he received a
BSMA is music education � and
Hunter CoUege where he also
earned an MA. He is presently
teaching in the New York City
schools but finds time for exten-
sive lecturing and performing at
many universities. He will be per-
forming both solo and with
Hunter as accompianist.
Hunter is a graduate of the
North Carolina School of the Arts
and is presently a visiting artist at
Beaufort Community College. He
will perform two pieces on the
clarinet, the first with Bonnemere
and the second with ECU music
faculty member Timothy
Hoekman.
The Ledonia S. Wright
Memorial Scholarship Fund was
originally founded about seven
years ago, according to Jacqui
Hawkins, president of the ECU
Black Alumni Chapter, but it has
not been until recently that
enough money has been donated
to fund the scholarship. Therefore
Hawkins hopes that the annual
benefit will make it possible for
the $200 scholarship to be award-
ed regularly. The two recipients of
this year's award will be announc-
ed at the benefit. Applications for
the scholarship have been ac-
cepted from any minority student
with more than 32 semester hours
completed and a 2.5 or better
OPA. Hawkins added that a
recommendation and an es a
stating the applicant's future
goals in terms of career and com-
munity service are also con-
sidered.
Hawkins will also present a
tribute to Wright at the benefit.
Before Wright joined the ECU
faculty in 1974, she had taught at
Roxbury Community College,
Boston College, Tufts University,
Harvard University and Simmons
CoUege. At ECU Wright was a
member of the faculty of the
School of Health and Social Pro-
fessions. She died in June, 1976.
Announcements2
Editorials 4
style 6
Sports 9
Classifieds 11
� Features Editor Gordon
Ipock and writer Mkk LaSalle
bid farewell to readers. Si
related stories, page 7.
� For a preview of Saturday s
Purple-Gold game see sports,
page 9.
�r
A: ��. - � �





JTHE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 12, 1984
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serxing the campus iximmumtv
sine 192.1
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
flclal newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned
operated, and published tor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate: 130 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville N.C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian
Old South Building, ECU Green
ville, NC 27834
Telephone: 757-aJaa, 3a7 430
TWIRLERTRYOUTS
When April ISttv 29th and May 5th
Where Meet in the Lobby of the
Music Building at 2 00, Tryouts start
at 3 00
For more information contact
Tom Goolsby 757 6982 or Beth
Webster 752 5490
SIGN LANGUAGE
The Sign Language club will be
having a meeting at 6 30 on Monday
April Uth We will be showing the
video tape of the Fantasy perfor
mancel See ya there I!
WOMEN IN
MINISTRY
A panel discussion will take place
Thursday. April 12, 1984, 7:X PM at
the Newman Center, 953 E Tenth St.
on the role of women In ministry
Come and hear women Invllved In
various types of ministry answer
questions about their ministry. The
discussion is for women who are in
terested in ways of being involved In
ministry and who would like to hear
of more options or who want to know
how women already In ministry
perceive their effectiveness, this will
be a good opportunity to learn
SPORT CLUB COUNCIL
The eighth and last meeting for the
1983 84 Sport Club Council will be held
Aednesday. April 18, 1984at4:00p.m
m Room 105B of Memorial Gym
nasium Attendance is required of
representatives of active sport clubs
Representatives must submit at the
meeting the following Spring
Semester Report, 1984 85 Fall
Semester Schedule, 1984 85 Facility
Request 1984 85 Club Officers, and,
198384 Club Notebook Persons or
groups interested In the Sport Club
Program are invited to attend the
meeting Sport Club Council
Meeting Weds April 18, 1984, 400
p m , Rm 105B Mem Gym
BAKE SALE
Phi Eta Sigma will be having a
bake sale Friday, April 13 in the lob
by of the Student Store and Soda
Shop. Come get your goodies for
good luck on Friday the 13th.
Delta Sigma Theta
Come party with Delta Sigma
Theta on Friday, April 13, from 10-2
at the Cultural Center. Student 75
cents. Others 11
HOMECOMING
Applications are now being ac
cepted for the 1984 Student
Homecoming Committee Chalrper
son Applications can be picked up at
either the Mendenhall Information
Desk or the Alumni Center. The
deadline for applying for this position
Is Friday, April 13.
FLATBALL PLAYERS
Attention: All Flatball Players: the
� rates are going to Raleigh this
weekend (April u & 15) to dominate
over all the other Plastic Flatball
Phanatlcks In our conference. Total
Irate participation Is of utmost Im
portance for this ideal opportunity.
I rates � get psyched for an excep
tlonal performance. Be there!
PI KAPPA PHI
PI Kappa Phi � This weekend Is
"the" weekend. Everyone get ready
for the Annual Rose Ball at Nags
Head's Armada Inn. it will be a
great party 11 We will have a happy
hour at 200 West tonight Everyone
come and relax with yours friends.
Volunteer swimmers are needed to
help with mentally and physically
abused chlldrn at Memorial this Frl
day. Ask for Tony Banks. Listen out
for the "All Campus Party" coming
up the day before reading day
Throw down party 11
FACULTY
Get your baskets ready I The an
nual faculty children's easter egg
hunt, sponsored by Jr. Panhellenlc,
Is April 17 at 4:00. Children bring
their own baskets and meet on the
west grounds beside Spllman
CLASSIFIED ADS
Vou may uw the form at right or
um � separate sheet of paper if
you need more Hoe. There ere J3
units per line. Each letter, ounc
tuatlon mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
Pce at end of line If word
doesn't fit. No ads will be ec
cepted over the phone. We
reserve the right to refect any ad.
AN eds must be prepaid. Badsss
'J�pti Ibe or fraction of a hay.
ffas�c print legsMyr Use capital �1
lowu case letters.
�"�� �� THE EAST CABOUNIAN
����� �� im Teeeaay before
Weil
Name
Addresi
CityState.
Np. lines
tt
.Zip.
.Phone
-aiTjeper hoc J.
JLLi
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No UMCTtKMU
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SCHOLARSHIP
Leoonia S Wright Memorial
Scholarship � Criteria Afro
American student enrolled full time.
At least 2 5 overall GPA At least 32
semester hours to oe completed by
the end of Spring semester Amount &
Date of Award Twoi2' two hundred
tX2O0! scholarships to be awarded for
the 1984 85 academic year (Sioo each
semester' Application Procedure
Application forms are located m the
Financial Aid Office Complete and
return to Or Dennis Chestnut
Psychology Department. Speight 109
Application Deadline Wednesday
April 11 1984
Recipients to oe announced April 13
FERRARA SUMMER
PROGRAM
A tew openings still remain in the
ECU Ferrara Summer Program
May 7 June 8 1984 Through the Col
lege of Arts and Sciences in coopera
tlon with the University of Ferrara.
faiy ECU students who participate
will earn 6 hours of general education
redits All Courses will be conducted
n English at the University of Fer
'ara and lodging provided in univer
.ity housing Contact Dr Eugene
Syan BA 102 or Geraldine Laudati.
'57 6250 before April 15
AIR BAND CONTEST
At the Elbo April 17. 1984 a' 6 00
p m Sponsored by PRC Sign up at
the Elbo
CAR WASH
The pledges of Zeta Beta Tau
Fraternity would like to announce
that they are holding a car wash on
Saturday, April 14th at McDonalds
on loth street between the hours of
10 a m and 2 p.m Come and get
vour car washed before the Purple
Gold game1
ICE HOCKEY
Wanted. Faculty or Staff
members who enjoy watching peo
pie suffer to be the advisor of tne
"� ice hockey team We also neeo
more players who would like to put
the hurt on the ACC Teeth are not a
requirement for either position Con
tact George Sunderland at 752 8525
SOULS
SOULS on the mall The Stu
dent Body ot East Carolina Universi
ty is cordially invited to this annual
event sponsored by the Society of
united Liberal Stduents Please join
us There will be food and fun in the
sun for everyone April 12, 1984 from 2
p m to 11 p.m Please join us in our
Annual Spring Celebration.
SCHOLARSHIP
Applications are now being ac
cepted for the RAY JONES
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIPforfull
time students at East Carolina
University sophomore or above, who
meet the following criteria Must be a
resident of Pitt County, Demonstrate
financial need Demonstrate an In
terest in the field of alcoholism, and
Agree to a concentration (6 s.h
minimum) in alcohol and or
alcoholism related coursework dur
ing the term of the scholarship
The scholarship will be awarded for
a period of one academic year
1984 85, and shall be for in state tui
tion and fees
Application are available (and
should be returned to) AlcoholDrug
Education Committee, Room 306, Er
win Hall Deadline April 20, 1984
For more information, call 757 6649
EDMISTEN'M
All students interested In joining
the campus organization to elect
Rufus Edmlsfen as Governor In 1984
please contact Betty Casey or Macon
Moye (ECU coordinators at 752 0312
ALPHA PHI SIGMA
End of the year party open to all
social work ano corrections maior�
students and faculty are welcome.
This will be held on April 16at918Col
lege View Aprs The fun will begin at
5:30 with food and your favorite
beverage Hope to see you there I
ICE HOCKEY
If you are Interested In playing Ice
hockey at ECU next year, please con
tact George at 752 8525. Games will
be played against teams such as
UNC, N C. STATE, DUKE, ASU, and
Fort Bragg. Anybody, regardless of
experience or skill, Is encouraged to
inquire.
LACROSSE
Finally it's here. Lacrosse at ECU
There will be a Lacrosse match at
ECU for the first time. Come on out
and enjoy the game of excitement.
The game will be played on Saturday,
April 14. The time and place will be
posted Practice will be T, TH, and
Frl. from 3 5 p.m.
SPRING RETREAT
On the weekend of April 13 15 the
Baptist Student union will be having
a Spring Retreat at Emerald isle
Rev W. H. Murphy will be leading on
the topic of Resurrection: Applica
tlon of the Holy Week cost is $25,
which Includes Transportation,
meals, and housing. For details call
7524646
MANAGEMENT
There will be a meeting, Thursday,
April 12 for all members of SAM In
room 104 Rawl at 3:00 Elections will
be held during the meeting All
members interested In holding a of
flee please sign up at Dr Ecksteins
office room 209 Rawl before April 12
PHI SIGMA IOTA
Dr. Linda Kauff man a fellow at the
Matlonal Humanities Center, will
.peak on "Discourses of Desire:
Ovid's Herlodes, The Letters of
lorse, Letters of a Portuguese
fun on Thursday, April 12 at 730
j.m. In Mendenhall Multipurpose
00m. Everyone Is Invited to attend
TUG OF WAR
Remember registration will be
taken through Monday, April 16 for
the intramural Cork Tug of War
Competition will be held on Wednes
day, April 18. a mandatory captains
meeting will be held on Monday,
April 16 at 7 p.m. In Memorial Gym
Room 102.
BEWAREI
Beware forces of darkness and
evil I There will be a meeting of the
College Republicans In room 221
Mendenhall Castle il S30 tonight.
New head Knights (officers) will be
elected. All knights and fair maidens
are urged to attend Help us slay the
liberal dragons! Shellds and swords
are optional I
GOLDEN GIRLS
Tryouts for the ECU Pirates
"Golden Girls" dance squad will be
April 14 15. the first mandatory
meeting and practice will be 10 AM.
Saturday, April 14. Don't miss your
chance to dance with the mighty
"Marching Pirates I"
SUMMER JOBS
Summer Jobs on OUTER BANKSI
Most mln. wage and no living
quarters furnished. Most obs begin
April 2. NEED cooks, waitresses,
cashiers, maids, etc Over 300 open
ings now listed. Contact Job Service
(261 2885) Mon Frl for more info.
SUMMER SURVIVAL
Next Wednesday will be the last
night that inter Varsity will meet
this semester.The meeting will be
held at 6.30 In Jenkins Auditorium
Come learn some tips for surviving
the summer!
MANAGER NEEDED
SGA is looking for a Refrigerator
Rentals Manager! if interested fill
out an application In the SGA office
before 2 p.m Tues April 17.
HOME RUN DERBY
Registration for the home run der
by will end April 12 the event being
held that same day on the Women's
varsity softball field Sign up through
April 12 for this slugging activity
ZBT
To the Brothers of Zeta Beta Tau,
lust a reminder that there Is a very
Important meeting Sunday at 9 00
p.m In Mendenhall Student Center
Your attendance Is required! Con
gratulatlons go out to all the new
members of the Executive Board,
and a big THANKS to the past ad
ministration
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
Ttva Brothers of tho Eta Ng chapter
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc in
vlte everyone to view their display of
fraternal paraphenalla, in the west
area show case, Mendenhall Student
Center.
MARKETING ASSOC
American Marketing Association
will be selling a NEW type of
painter's hat, starting April 18th,
Wed. Featuring "l Love ECU" In
Purple & Gold! Great accessory for
those summer days on the beach. An
Item you cant pass up - show your
Pirate Pride & get your "I Love
ECU" hat for only 82 00! Purchase
them at the AMA pig plckln on the
18th 8. "Barefoot on the Mall" on the
19th I
PHI BETA SIGMA
The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity inc will be sponsoring a
Jr. Miss Phi Beta Sigma Pageant on
April 27 at the Ramada inn Anyone
who would like to share In this event
with a talent that you would like to
perform on this date are asked to
contact Richard Dawklns at 758 9405
or any brother of the fraternity as
soon as possible.
BAHAMA MAMA PARTY
Bahama Mama Party coming
soond! April 19th at the Kappa
Sigma House The party starts at 4 30
so get your tickets �arly See any
brother or little sister for tickets
PHI ETA SIGMA
Those members who signed up to
bake something or work at the bake
sale please don't forget that it is
this Friday. We also have the picnic
this Sat, April U at Greensprlng
park for those members who signed
up to go All members should attend
the meeting Wed April 18 Be
There 11
TEACHERS EXAM
A special administration of the
National Teacher Examinations
Core Battery number 3 and the
Specialty Area Examinations will
be held on Saturday, May 5 In
Speight Building at East Carolina
University An examinee may
reserve a space at center by calling
the center and designating the
desired test and or obtaining
registration form contained In the
bulletin and returning same to the
supervisor prior to the closing date
Closing date for registration Is Fri
day, April 20
GAMMA BETA PHI
The Induction of new members In
to Gamma Beta Phi will be held on
Thursday, April 12 at 7 p.m at the
Ramada Inn Installation of new of
fleers will also take place All new
members for the spring semester
must attend The participation of
other members Is optional Please
attend If possible. Refreshment will
be served following the ceremony
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
We will be having a Silent Dinner
Thurs, April 12th at 630 p.m at
That's Amore, right across from
Carolina East Mall, if you need a
ride, meet In front of Brewster at 6:15
p.m. Come on out 'cui we're wentln'
to see yal
BKA
Beta Kappa Alpha. Banking &
Finance Fraternity will have a
meeting Thursday, April 12, at 5:30.
in Rawl 103 If you would Ilka to
come to the Banquet please attend
this meeting or contact one of the of
fleers (7522093) The Banquet is
Thursday, April if, at 700 p.m at
the Sheraton Greenville. The
Speaker will be Mr Berk Barbee of
Wachovia Bank a Trust Co Cost per
member is u 00 Including dues
Non members will cost $8.50
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
The Brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity Inc announce their Miss
Black and Bold Pageant 1984. All In
terested young ladies should call
752 9741 or contact any brother to
secure an application.
LACROSSE
The ECU Men's Lacrosse game
will be played at 12 noon on Saturday
the u beside Flcklen Football Field
Also, It will be the only home game
this year, so come on out and enjoy a
good game of Lacrosse There will
be practice Thursday and Friday at
3 p.m.
ANGEL CITY
Angel City Usher for the play April
'�. 19, 20, and 21 and see the play free
Sign up sheets are located In Messick
Theatre Arts Building
COMPLETE
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SAT. In Concert April 14
Budweise
�rfc -

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-�-�� an m
Electr
(C PS) � Ell
News Network.
pcnmental ric.
medium that dc
tional and
local college
students via
message boards,
parenth has becorr
hit.
ENN re-
nounced it ha �
150th campus
plans to be o
more camp
next few
SDPI Vi
Continued From Ps
of teacher
this car .
when r. �.
mental pur
jectn
The studeni
program ii
are
evalua:
.edure.
dent
study. - i
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of study, and I
programs
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PANIC
April 14
P
K
M
Electronic News
XHgjAST CAROLINIAN APRIL 12 1984
(CPS) � Electronic
News Network, the ex-
perimental new campus
medium that delivers na-
tional and a smattering of
local college news to
students via moving
message boards, ap-
parently has become a bifi
hit. 6
ENN recently an-
nounced it has wired its
150th campus, and has
plans to be on 50-to-100
more campuses "over the
next few months
reports Richard Mackey
ENN's chief operating
officer.
While Mackey
wouldn't say if ENN is
Profitable yet, his
outlook is clearly bullish
and the response of the
schools with ENN
message boards has been
good.
"We've been real
satisfied with the
response from students
says Becky Deave'r,
publicitv manager for the
University of Texas-
Austin's student union.
"It doesn't cost the
school anything, and we
can send our campus ac-
tivities promotions off to
have them displayed on
the boards along with the
news and information
she says.
The electronic bulletin
boards � similar to those
used by banks and other
businesses � display
news, information and
ads 24 hours a dav.
Becomes A Hit
SDPI Visits School
C ontinued From Page 1
of teacher education on
this campus Heller said
when referring to depart-
mental purposes and ob-
jectives.
The student personnel
program involves such
areas as admissions,
evaluation, assessment
procedures, records, stu-
dent load, residence
study, transfer policies,
procedures for recom-
mending certification,
time limit for completion
of study, and follow-up
programs. "In our opi-
nion, the standard was
met, Heller said.
"Policies and procedures
are indeed well stated
Three areas were in-
cluded under professional
laboratory experiences �
definition, duration and
criteria. The school
received positive feed-
back in all areas;
however, the SDPI team
made recommendations
in the duration section.
The committee strong-
ly recommended that the
duration of student
teaching be increased to
full-time "We have some
concern that that (the
present amount of time
all o ted for student
teaching) is not sufficient
exposure Heller said.
All special areas
previously mentioned
were commended,
however, the team sug-
gested a facultv member
be added to the special
education program.
"The middle grades
program as proposed
looks very good Heller
said. He added that
recommendations for
curriculum should be
acted upon as soon as
possible. "The cur-
riculum should be in
place before students are
enrolled in the program
Heller said. "The second
aspect is to be sure that
efforts are made to find a
coordinator
Toni Parrerson, assis-
tant director for program
approval concluded the
meeting by expressing her
appreciation to the
teacher education faculty
for their hard work and
cooperation.
The committee will
submit its report to the
state evaluation commit-
ENN gives the message
board equipment to par-
ticipating schools, installs
it, and connects the ser-
vice into the company's
mainframe computer in
Dallas.
"We derive our income
from selling ads to com-
panies like American Ex-
press, the Wall Street
Journal and Jostens (a
manufacturer of class
rings and other school
paraphernalia) Mackey
explains.
I �� .
A 20-character ad that
would go to all the cam-
puses ENN serves would
cost an advertiser $15,000
a month or $157,000 for a
year.
But advertisers can go
to some � or all �
ENN's campuses, too. To
advertise to University of
Maryland - College Park
students, for example
would cost $400 a month
for a 20-character
message.
Like most ventures
the newspaper inserts, a
new ad-supported music
videotape syndication,the
Campus Entertainment
Network � that seek to
appeal to the college
market, though, ENN
mostly disregards smaller
campuses.
The reason is that
advertisers pay "per im-
pression or number of
times students see their
messages. The fewer the
number of students on a
campus, the fewer poten-
tial impressions there are.
Consequently, ENN and
the others can't charge
advertisers enough to
make a big enough profit
from smaller campuses.
"We're selectively
targeting ourselves to a
$45 billion a year
market Mackey says.
His boards now reach a
potential of "about 2.2
million" students, he
says, adding up to
"about 40 million im-
pressions each month
"Every morning we
program the day's news
and sports, along with
what's happening on each
particular campus, into
the campus' own com-
puter that drives the
message boards
Mackey says. "The
messages recycle about
every eight minutes, and
are roughly 80 percent
news and information,
and 20 percent ads
PassesCommittee 8-2
Fee Procedure Rule OK'd
led From P.O. i . 4,
Coble
tee (which meets June zv
and 21). From there it
will go to the board. The
ECU School of Educa-
tion will not receive the
final word on the decision
until August.
Write The
Campus Forum
Continued From Page 1
�gnhe wants to Brown
said. We just oppose mandatory
More than 1,400 ECU students
signed a petition last week suddo
fng PIRC and calling fo? a
campus-wide vote on the issue In
eluded m the PIRG proposal is an
optional $3 fee on the ECU tu"
on bill each semester
A tuition bill collection system
would add extra work to the
already overburdened Cashier's
Office, Kilcoyne said.
"If all student groups started to
ask for funding through fees, it
would be a big mess Kilcoyne
added.
"We try to be fair to all
groups said committee chair-
man David Brown. The reference
to PIRG was deleted from the
original resolution.
Buy, Sell
Trade
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I f





4
JUie lEaat ararolfnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, cMnq
Darryl Brown. .����,� &���
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK. N �� j.T. PlETRZAK. zw� ow,u,�,
Tina Maroschak. cw� m. Mike McPartland. ��, w.
Ed Nicklas. �, ��v tom Norton, cm a,
Gordon Ipock. . m� kathy Fuerst, ��, �anattr
Mark Barker, cm va� Mike Mayo. � s
April 12, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
I P1�P6E A BILLION
10 THE FLAT
OF THE WHT WING
WERNMENTOF
EL SALVAPOR
ANPTO7HEPEATH
SQUAPS FDR WHICW
tTSTANP5
ONE NATION,
UNPERFEPi
INDEFENSIBLE WITH M-165 ANP
traB HOWITZERS FOR ALL ,� f
Some lady from health and human services gave her an
irradiated apple
� Campus Forum
I
Conservative Diatribe Draws Detractors
Mr. Ipock's supposed book review
(under the initial headline "Book Ex-
poses Media Manipulation") is merely
a facade for his direct intent to besmear
Public Interest Research Groups.
"Communist Agents Try To Infiltrate
PIRG a second headline given to the
article, is not only misleading, but un-
true.
Mr. Ipock should also be made aware
of the fact that there are no formal ties
between Ralph Nader and PIRG. Ralph
Nader is merely a well known consumer
advocate who endorses PIRG. There
are no financial or partisan bonds. Mr.
Ipock's statement that "Nader heads
PIRG" is incorrect.
I find it amusing that Mr. Ipock
wrote an article about media manipula-
tion to do just that � manipulate the
readers of The East Carolinian. By
presenting incorrect statements and ill
thought opinions, Mr. Ipock has tried
to unfairly inflict his opinions on this
paper's readers.
Peggy Ann Riebling
Music
Freshman
concerning the "great work" is purely
your opinion and not factual. I per-
sonally believe most liberals become
very knowledgeable about the bible,
then decide whether to accept it or not.
Conservatives, on the most part, accept
the Bible according to blind faith. Of
course you will disagree. For the
record, I have attended an Episcopalian
Church for 16 yars. I was a Crucifer
for every Sunday Service. I have been
both baptised and confirmed. I attend-
ed Baptist-controlled Campbell Univer-
sity where I took several religion and
philosophy courses and went to chapel
twice a week. In my spare time I often
read the Bible and other religious texts.
I am also a liberal that knows more
about the pros and cons of Christianity,
and a few other religions for that mat-
ter, than you ever will.
Kyle D. DeBank
Junior
Political Science
� � �
� � �
When I transferred to East Carolina
after two and a half years at Campbell,
I felt assured that I would not be sub-
jected to constant articles in campus
papers concerning conservative ideas
and policies. Obviously, I was
mistaken.
It has been a difficult task trying to
eat while reading articles entitled "Gary
Hart Linked to Pro-Soviet Organiza-
tion" and "Communist Agents Try to
Infiltrate PIRG" and last, but not least,
Mr. Ipock's conservative commentary.
It's a shame that I am supposed to feel
so un-American, so un-patriotic and
nothing short of a "commie" if I do
not agree with the gospel according to
Gordon.
Before you get ready to take out pen
and paper Gordie, here's the punch
line. I agree 100 percent with your right
to believe and even write in The East
Carolinian your conservative views. To
be sincerely complimentary, Ipock
often does take the time to do his
homework and, in a sense, occasional-
ly writes a decent commentary.
Lyndon B. Johnson accurately defin-
ed politics as "the art of compromise
The great political scholar V.O. Key,
Jr. echoed and expanded the art of
compromise in political policy making.
Hoping that Ipock and The East Caroli-
nian aren't offended by the fact that
Johnson was a Democrat and great
leader of the civil rights legislation, and
that Key is a brilliant, moderately
liberal political scholar, I propose the
art of compromise should be used con-
cerning editorials and commentaries in
The East Carolinian. Why not allow a
liberal commentary to run beside
Ipock's? Why not print stories about
conservative mistakes? I could swallow
reading articles entitled "Gary Hart
Linked to Pro-Soviet Organization" if I
could also read an article such as
"Reagan Appointees Facing Allega-
tions Involving Unethical Behavior I
would also like to see articles pointing
out the millions of tax dollars being
spent in Central America while
graduates from East Carolina can't find
jobs.
Don't get defensive Gordon, I'm not
threatening to put both my feet up your
ass like your liberal art major friend.
Heaven forbid, I'm not like that
Kremlin-crazy, wacked-out art major. I
only ask for equal print for different
political ideologies. How 'bout it!?
In conclusion, I would like to rebuke
one comment that went too far in your
April 10 article. The fact that most
liberals don't know anything what-
soever about the Bible and will simply
refuse to accept it rather than listen to
arguments proposed from conservatives
How can you, Mr. Ipock, level im-
precations at any group for its alleged
lack of knowledge of the Bible, when
your moral casuistry implies a complete
ignorance of the teachings of Christ?
Christ taught us that violent behavior
was useless in the eyes of God. Useless,
mind you, until moneylenders usurp his
house. What are moneylenders, Mr.
Ipock? Here in the states they seem to
be closely affiliated with the Republican
party. In fact, the moneylenders Christ
ejected from the synagogue were closely
affiliated with the conservative political
core of Israel under the Roman occupa-
tion. What did Jesus do to the
moneylenders, Mr. Ipock? He drove
them out in the mean streets of the city
where they belonged � with their
fellow thieves and whores. I think it's
time we honored this event by perform-
ing a similar act. Mr. Helms and Mr.
East let too many carefully memorized
verses slip from their tongues as they
proceed to vote for the perpetuation of
war and misery on this planet.
They have cast stone after stone
through a very real (not hypothetical)
communications network and mass
media campaign reminescent of Hitler's
Volkische Beobachter (the pseudo-
journalistic organ through which Hitler
aired his ridiculous political views and
labeled certain 'radicals' as enemies of
the state.)
When you invoke the Bible to sup-
port your politics, consider this: Jesus
Christ was crucified for his 'radical'
stance against a conservative ad-
ministration. His crusade for charity,
peace and the abolition of ignorance
resulted in his being labeled a
'troublemaker The plump, conser-
vative moneylenders were overjoyed at
his execution. Do you, Mr. Ipock, sug-
gest that Christ, too, had ties with the
Communist party?
Then I suggest that you and those of
your ilk back off: The next time you
prepare to crucify your enemy, he may
bite back.
Derek Collins
Senior
History
� � �
It is often an adventure in regret and
disappointment to find and read the
numerous headlines and topics that
Gordon Ipock is able to apply to one ar-
ticle. This past Tuesday's East Caroli-
nian provided another such adventure.
Under the headlines "1984 Is Here"
and "Book Exposes Media Manipula-
tion Mr. Ipock began what one is left
to assume was a book review and pro-
ceeded to delve into other journalistic
genres such as commentary and news
reporting on the state, national and
local level. As the article continued on-
to other pages of the paper, the
headlines became increasingly confus-
ing as to the article's original intent or
its content. For example, "Gary Hart
Linked To Pro-Soviet Organization
and "Communist Agents Try To In-
filtrate PIRG both of which seem to
be far removed from the article's
original purpose, that of a book review.
Indeed one begins to wonder if Mr.
Ipock chose to use such a format merely
as a facade to express more commen-
tary under the guise of a features article
(an opportunity he has under his col-
umn "Conservative's CommentaryA
View From The Right) Mr. Ipock
seems to all but ignore the book except
as it serves to support his position. If
such accusations seem irrelevant to a
criticism of the article, consider the ir-
relevance of an article that discusses
such out of place elements as Sen. Gary-
Hart, Mr. Patrick O'Neill and Public
Interest Research Groups (about which
it seems Mr. Ipock is misinformed: As a
consumer advocate, Ralph Nader is In-
terested in PIRG's researching of
various consumer issues, but the direc-
tion and funding of PIRG organiza-
tions and activities is done directly
through the members of each individual
PIRG � not Mr. Nader, nor com-
munist infiltrators) under the pretense
of providing the reading public with a
book review.
Later in the article Mr. Ipock ex-
presses his fear of the reliability of
several news sources, notable The
Scientific American and The
Washington Post, but fails to question
or even expound upon his own. For
those curious, James L. Tyson, author
of Target America, was born in 1916,
and educated at both Harvard and New
York University. Of his many jobs and
positions, those of market research
director for Time, Inc and market
researcher for IBM would seem to make
him a reliable source for information
on the American media and any in-
fluences upon it, but the reader is never
given this information. What little in-
formation that is given is so confused
and riddled with Mr. Ipock's personal
biases that one must sift through the
rubble only to guess at what is factual,
researched information and what is not.
Truly an unfortunate circumstance in
the name of journalism.
Greg Shelnutt
Art,
Senior
'Dorm Scam'
Monday night in Slay dorm there was
a gathering of about 60-90 people in the
lobby to discuss the recent plans of
changing Slay Dorm into a "quiet
dorm" and Umstead into an all Female
dorm. The Central Campus represen-
tative told everyone in attendance Mon-
day night that the issues of making
these changes were advertised
thoroughly throughout the campus.
Speaking for all the residences of Slay
and Umstead, we heard virtually
nothing about these changes.
There is no need for a quiet dorm if
the resident advisor's job is done cor-
rectly. Their main job is to simply keep
things quiet during quiet hours. If there
is a need for a quiet dorm then I feel
there is a need for a "raise hell" dorm.
This minority want everything to be so
nice and quiet so they can study all by
themselves in their rooms. Let's get one
thing straight, it is not that quiet even at
home. You don't tell your father to
turn the ballgame off so it will be quiet
in your bedroom, you don't tell your
mother to get off the phone with your
aunt so the house will be quiet, and no
matter what you tell your little brother
he is still going to run around the house
making as much racket as he possibly
can. Dormitories are supposed to create
an atmosphere close to that of home,
not of Joyner Library. In college
nothing comes on a silver platter, and
you supposed to go get the education;
the education is not suppose to come to
you. That is what this minority of quiet
dorm advocates want it to do.
In college you supposed to have the
inititive to do something extra or go
that extra yard. If you want to study so
you may get an education you should
go to the library or some alternative
place. You're in college and if you can't
do that little bit extra then get the hell
out.
You cannot cater to every little
minority group that comes up bicker-
ing. Sure you should listen, but you
should do what's best for the majority
of the people. If the quiet dorm goes on
through as planned, the next thing that
will is that the Student in the East
Carolina gay community will want as
dorm to themselves. I'm sure there is
enough to fill up a dorm (or maybe
two). They will say they don't need
quiet but they need to live in harmony
or something like that. You just cannot
cator to these special interest minority
groups, you have to do what's best for
the majority of the people.
One reason that Slay dorm is the
"prospective sight for the quiet dorm is
that, along with being co-ed, it (has)
facilities (for) the handicapped.
Everyone seems to think the handicap-
ped need quiet. Well the ones I know
don't and I live with them 24 hours a
day, 7 days a week. Every handicapped
person I talked to said they did not
want to live in a quiet dorm. Oh, but
then the quiet dorm committee has the
perfect solution. Every handicapped
person who did not want to live in the
quiet dorm could live in either Garrett
or Cotton. But then they are taking
away there right (and I stress right) to
live in a co-ed dorm that is not a quiet
dorm.
When Mark Niewald proposed the
quiet dorm it looked great on paper,
not to mention being a springboard to
his ill-fated campaign for SGA Presi-
dent. He did not look at the pros and
cons of his proposal and see which
would benefit the majority. Regardless
of what was said, the quiet dorm issue
was not publicized enough and the
students never had a chance to voice
their opinion on the issue. I feel since
Mark Neiwald and the student govern-
ment have completely screwed up the
situation over the quiet dorm, the hous-
ing administration should intervene and
veto this proposal before a major in-
justice is done. If not, simply let the
school vote on it. Slay and Umstead
dorms have shown there disapproval by
a written petition with some 400
signatures.
I feel I have stated legitimate reasons
why Slay dorm should not be the sight
of the quiet dorm and most importantly
why there should be no quiet dorm in
the first place. As some one said at the
meeting Monday night, people have
been going to college and getting
degrees for years and years without a
quiet dorm; why should there be one
now?
Todd Barrow
Freshman
General College
Umstead and Slay. After a considerable
delay, he answered that there was a lack
of interest in coed dorm living and that
coed dorms were always the last to be
filled. The overall consensus among the
residents was that they, when given the
option, chose to live in a coed dom.
The female population, which include
158 out of approximately 330 residents,
said that they feel safer living in a coed
dorm. What will happen if a girl living
in Umstead all-girl dorm is being
harassed in the lobby? It is easier, in a
coed dorm, to run down the hall to call
for assistance than to be attacked while
waiting for someone to call security in
an all-girl dorm. Also, if a female is
followed home by a suspicious looking
male, she would feel safer knowing that
there are men willing to assist her if she
needed it. Have you ever wondered
what those blue lights are for on cam-
pus? Well, there are none located near
or around Umstead or Slay. Does this
mean that we win have to pay addi-
tional money for the use of blue lights
at our disposal?
Enough said about Umstead; what
about Slay? We say discrimination,
discrimination and more discrimina-
tion. What will happen to the handicap-
ped students in Slay? It is considered as
a prospective sight of the "Quiet
Dorm Most handicapped students,
when asked, stated that they want to
live in a coed dorm also. If Slay is
changed and they do not want to live in
the quiet dorm, they will have to move
to Cotten or Garrett. This takes awav
the benefits they have strived so hard to
work for and achieve. It will take the
handicapped students an additional
15-20 minutes to get to their classes
What will happen to the aids of the han-
dicapped? Will they be forced out of
Slay if they do not want to live in a
quiet dorm or out of Umstead if they do
not want to live in a single sex
dorm? Helping the handicapped for
many is their only source of income and
many become emotionally attached to
the handicapped.
If the residents of Slay and Umstead
Residence dorms were informed of this
matter earlier, action would of been
taken sooner. Well, student life, SGA.
and housing why was this issue so well
hidden and why were we kept in the
dark?
Lisa A. Vigezr
Sophomore, Business
Umstead Hall
A Word, Sir
Sir:
There is no apostrophe in yours.
There is no "e" in truly.
Yours truly,
David Lunney
Professor of Chemistry
(Editor's note: Sir, Thank you. We
need all the help we can get.)
� � �
Due to poor advertisement and
neglect, the residents of Umstead and
Slay Residence Halls have been hit with
a bombshell. The Committee for Stu-
dent Life has taken away our rights to
choose to live in a coed dorm. If each
student has to pay over $400 per
semester for a dorm room, should they
not be given the option of living where
they choose? During an under-
publicized forum meeting recently, a
representative of Student Life was ask-
ed why the changes were to be made in
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Jovner
Library. w
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Utters
are limited to two typewritten pages
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
'��� and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
I
3
1
�-N
w�
Kissingc
(CPS) � Former
Secretary of State Henr
Kissinger's recent visits to
two campuses have
brought back some of the
same kinds of confronta-
tions his policies in Viet-
nam and Chile provoked
a decade ago.
Last week 53 protestors
� 17 of them Universitv
of Texas students � were
arrested during a
demonstration against
Kissinger's appearance at
a campus forum on Cen-
tral America.
Only three davs before
the Mai
Kissmge
similar s
America
of Sout:
activists
and teac
prior to
pearanc
The
were the
the anti
tions ot
and earl
ficials
Stud
Florida
:td
Hart Ope

Presidential politic
came into full swing in
Eastern North Carolina
this week as the first
presidential candidate
campaign office opened
in the 1st Congressional
District Tuesday
North Carolinians
With Hart a group sup-
porting Sen. Gary Hart.
D-Col opened an office
in Greenville at 20" A E
5th St. Staff and more
than two dozen sup-
porters held a reception
which began at 1 p.m.
Three area television na-
tions covered the even:
Decorated with blue
and white ballons and
scores of Han poster
the headquarters featured
20-minute video tape of
the candidate outlining
bis "new ideas" and
policies on major issues.
The office also has in
supply several position
papers by Hart on a
variety of topics.
The director for Har
North Carolina cam-
paign, John McArthur,
attended the event, which
was organ zed by 1st
District coordinator
Charles Sune.
��
with the
port
Sune
org.
grc
and wt
ri u
mg
Sune
bv Dr
the i
Re ;
Har
lead i
Mondi

GIGANTI
To Be Held in S
On Saturday,
Multi-Fami
icker. Numerous An
Items. Lamps. Dishes,
niture. Ladies Shoe-
Cabinets. Chairs. P.
Refrigerators & Hundr
muc
h. much more
Absolutely No Sale prior
5-9 PM
Thurs.& Fri.
� ALL YOU CAN EAT
Buffet To All . Fll
� Fillets Breaded nSe
Help Yourself to 1
� SERVED WITH
SEAFOOD CHOWDI
FRENCH FRIES
2 VEGETABLES
HUSHPUPPIES
it� our





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DEATH
WHICtf
AND
ifORALL
I
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was a Sack
and that
the iast to be
sus among the
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coed dorm.
which include
residents,
ving in a coed
Ten if a girl living
is being
br? It is easier, in a
ne hall to call
acked while
. all security in
so, if a female is
us looking
I owing that
issisi her if she
ou eer wondered
Ih's are for on cam-
f one located near
or Slay. Does this
have to pay addi-
: use of blue lights
Umstead; what
aj discrimination,
e discnmina-
:he handicap-
' It is considered as
I of the "Quiet
apped students,
that they want to
;� also. If Slay is
o not want to live in
will hae to move
This takes away
e stnved so hard to
eve. It will take the
ents an additional
get to their classes.
c aids of the han-
s be forced out of
want to live in a
f Umstead if they do
! in a single sex
i handicapped for
'urce of income and
nonally attached to
f Slay and Umstead
ere informed of this
Ition would of been
l. student life, SGA,
� as this issue so well
�ere we kept in the
Lisa A. Vigezzi
Sophomore. Business
Umstead Hall
d, Sir
postrophe in yours,
truly.
Yours truly,
David Lunney
rofessor of Chemistry
tSir, Thank you. We
ve can get.)
Rules
van welcomes letters
us of view. Mail or
V office in the Old
pcrws from Joyner
verification, all let-
fhe name, major and
jress, phone number
Vie author(s). Letters
h typewritten pages,
neatly printed. All
to editing for brevi-
Vbel, and no personal
Permitted. Students,
vnting letters for this
I that they are limited
:sues.
i
- -
5
x
I
Kissinger's Campus Visits Cause Protests
APRIL 12, 1984
(CPS) � Former
Secretary of State Henry
Kissinger's recent visits to
two campuses have
brought back some of the
same kinds of confronta-
tions his policies in Viet-
nam and Chile provoked
a decade ago.
Last week 53 protestors
� 17 of them University
of Texas students � were
arrested during a
demonstration against
Kissinger's appearance at
a campus forum on Cen-
tral America.
Only three days before
the March 22 incident,
Kissinger canceled a
similar speech on Central
America at the University
of South Florida, where
activists had held protests
and teach-ins in the days
prior to his scheduled ap-
pearance there.
The Texas protests
were the largest here since
the anti-war demonstra-
tions of the late sixties
and early seventies, of-
ficials say.
Students in both
Florida and Texas ob-
jected to Kissinger's
$20,000 speaking fee, but
concentrated their
demonstrations on the
Nixon and Ford ad-
ministration official's
foreign policy record.
Most recently, Kiss-
inger headed President
REagan's Commission
on Central America,
which recommended in-
creasing U.S. aid to
American-supported
regimes by $8 billion over
the next five years.
The former secretary's
scheduled campus ap-
pearances on the report's
behalf began stirring up
some groups as soon as
they were announced.
At Texas, ad-
ministrators tried to stop
trouble before it began by
warning the Austin
chapter of the Committee
in Solidarity with the
People of El Salvador
(CISPES) not to protest
during the visit, not to
take signs or posters into
the auditorium in which
Kissinger was to spea to
stop nonstudents from
passing out leaflets, and
to let the university
preview the leaflets
before letting CISPES
hand them out.
CISPES sued, charging
the rules violated its
rights to free speech and
assembly.
A U.S. District judge
agreed, but upheld the
university's right to
throw hecklers and
posters out of the
auditorium.
At South Florida in
Tampa, Political Science
Professor Harry Vanden
lectures about the former
secretary's complicity in
Hart Opens Local Campaign Office
Presidential politics
came into full swing in
Eastern North Carolina
this week as the first
presidential candidate
campaign office opened
in the 1st Congressional
District Tuesday.
North Carolinians
With Hart, a group sup-
porting Sen. Gary Hart,
D-Col opened an office
in Greenville at 207A E.
5th St. Staff and more
than two dozen sup-
porters held a reception
which began at 1 p.m.
Three area television sta-
tions covered the event.
Decorated with blue
and white ballons and
scores of Hart posters,
the headquarters featured
20-minute video tape of
the candidate outlining
his "new ideas" and
policies on major issues.
The office also has in
supply several position
papers by Hart on a
variety of topics.
The director for Hart's
North Carolina cam-
paign, John McArthur,
attended the event, which
was organized by 1st
District coordinator
Charles Sune.
"We're very pleased
with the opening day sup-
port for Sen. Hart
Sune said. "The area
organization has really
grown by leaps and
bounds in the last month,
and we expect that sup-
port will continue grow-
ing
Sune cited a recent poll
by Dr. Walter DeVries of
the N.C. Opinion
Research Inc showing
Hart with a substantial
lead over rival Walter
Mondale in the Northeast
section of the state.
"We feel Gary Hart
will carry North Carolina
and particularly the 1st
District by a good
margin Sune said.
"The latest poll shows
Hart leading Mondale by
a 19 percent margin in the
1st District
Sune said Hart's plat-
form should appeal to
many North Carolinians.
"Gary Hart's ideas will
be appealing to our state.
He stands in support of
tobacco and in support of
strengthening our con-
ventional military forces.
A lot of people forget
Hart comes from a state
whose second largest in-
dustry is agriculture he
said.
Hart is considered an
expert on military affairs,
Sune said, and is a
member of the Senate
Armed Services Commit-
tee.
BEST PRICES
IN TOWN
$1.50 Pitchers
�99 Subs and Burgers
Fresh Fried Onion Rings
the armed overthrow of
the Chilean government,
films like "Dr.
Strangelove and a
three-hour teach-in.
"Kissinger's policies
have caused a great deal
of suffering and pain
throughout the world
Vanden explains.
As campus activity
mounted, Kissinger's
"booking agency called
and said he would have to
cancel" the March 19th
event, relates Troy Col-
lier, director of South
Florida's lecture series.
"We weren't given a
specific reason he says.
Kissinger's
Washington, D.C. office
did not return College
Press Service's phone
calls.
"I don't think (Kiss-
inger cancelled) because
of protests says Don
Walker of Harry
WAlker, Inc a New
York booking agency
that arranges lectures for
Kissinger, James Watt,
Gerald Ford, Helmut
Schmidt and others.
"We've represented
him since 1977, and this is
the first college lecture
he's cancelled Walker
says. "He just told us it
was personal
The prospects of pro-
test didn't stop Kissinger
from going to Texas,
where bedlam erupted
when he took the podium
before a crowd of 1,000.
When the smoke cleared,
police had arrested 53.
None was a CISPES
member, officials report.
"I'm not exactly sure
what's going to happen
with (the arrested)
students says Glen
Maloney, a Texas ad-
minstrator. "It's going to
take a while to get things
cleared up
The students will face
disciplinary hearings, and
the university will re-
evaluate its demonstra-
tion policies, he says.
CISPES's national
headquarters in
Washington, D.C. says it
wasn't behind the Florida
and Texas incidents,
though it "is encouraging
students to find out what
speakers will be coming
to their campuses for
graduation ceremonies
far enough in advance to
organize responses, says
Van Gosse, CISPES's
campus activities direc-
tor.
Agent Walker declines
to say which campuses
Kissinger might visit this
spring.
"It would definitely be
interesting" to know
Kissinger's campus
schedule, Gosse says.
Kissinger's not the only
speaker serving as a
magnet for protestors this
spring, however
Deep
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205 E. 5th St.
Located Across from Apple Records
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yf
v
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�.

THh EAST C AROl INJAN
Mick Showcases
Styje
t Ua . �M � �,
Most Beautiful Women of ECU
Face it: The Homecoming Elections are all politics,
and the ECU calendar is a pathetic joke. If you really
want to know who the gorgeous ladies on this cam-
pus are. there's only one source: Mick LaSalle's Most
Beautiful Women of ECU.
Not too long ago mugs were coming up to me all
the time asking. "Eh. Mick! Do you have a workable
esthetic for appraising feminine beauty?" It got me
thinking. What was it that made me call one woman
beautiful and another one just "pretty"?
Mick
LaSalle
figure there's no hope.
The fact is, while every woman interviewed ex-
pressed a preference for the "tall, dark, and hand-
some type each woman went out of her way to
make it clear that this was a preference, not a require-
ment. Several women, in fact, said that good looks
weren't necessary at all. While I can't help but smile
suspiciously when I hear women say that, it's still ob-
vious to me that men put a much larger emphasis on
physical appearance than women do � even
beautiful women.
If you can hold on to your manhood in the face of
real beauty and real'ze the woman you're talking to is
just as uncomfortable as you are � if you can keep it
in your head that chances are the woman doesn't
even know she's gorgeous anyway � if you'd just
wake up and realize that all this stuff is fun, you'll
probably wind up with your share of beautiful
women.
Miss America types have never appealed to me.
Neither have cheerleader types or any of those other
types where a woman makes believe she's got rocks in
her head in order to get a guy. A woman like that
holds my interest for about as long as it takes to put
my pants back on. That's just the kind of guy I am.
In order for a woman to be beautiful, she's got to
have more than good looks. She should have a goal
in life � beyond men, beyond sex. She should have
the suggestion, somewhere in her eyes, of something
interesting going on inside her a calming serenity
a fascinating turbulence She should radiate a kind
of inner strength. Not a hard strength. A feminine
strength. And, lastly, she's got to be intelligent.
For the purpose of this article I met with hundreds
of women. I stopped pretty girls on the street. And I
talked to the dozens I encounter in my daily life. My
goal was to sort out the very best ECU had to offer,
and then to ask these women questions the average
slob reading this would want to ask.
My search led me to the five faces you see on this
page. Each woman in her own way embodies the
qualities I've outlined. Together, they represent Mick
LaSalle's Most Beautiful Women of ECU.
Kelly Boyette. (5'4 110 lbs blonde hair, blue eyes;
Theater.)
Kelly, 18, is a talented writer and an actress with
the maturity, composure, and sense of style most
women don't get until they're well into their 20s. A
shrewd sexiness is suggested in her eyes and smile.
Yet her outward manner is composed, soft-spoken �
yet outspoken � and clever.
Mary Farley. (5'7 113 lbs Dark hair, brown eyes;
Communications.)
Mary's face is so pretty that the first time you see it
move you're almost surprised. But Mary is charming
and witty and has plenty to say. (Not only that, she
can sing.) Committed to her goal of a communica-
tions degree, Mary, 20, a sophomore, will be leaving
after this semester to go to UNC-Greensboro.
Andrea Faulkner. (5'4 110 lbs light brown hair,
hazel eyes; Music.)
If Lisa Distefano were really beautiful, she'd pro-
bably look a lot like Andrea Faulkner.
Andrea, 20, is lively, expressive and funny.
Dedication and future success are written all over
her. Yet there's tenderness there too. Straight-
forward and direct, she has the kind of honesty rarely
found in women so unmistakably feminine.
Deborah Heaton. (56 110 lbs dark brown-
reddish hair, brown eyes; Music.)
Dark and exotic, Deborah, 20, has been compared
to everybody from Lauren Bacall to Sophia Loren.
The aura of mystery about Deborah remains even
after one realizes she's sensitive, warm, and kind.
A reliable source tells me that Deborah knows how
to make a man feel like a million bucks.
Carol Talt. (56 120 lbs light brown hair, blue-
green eyes; Interior Design.)
Carol Tait can radiate class even in the beat-up
sweatshirt she wears when working on her art pro-
jects. Outside of Jenkins, Carol dresses the way she
does everything � with taste and intelligence.
Sparkling, smiling, seemingly vulnerable but actually
strong, Carol is the embodiment of that old 1920s ex-
pression, "a Lady with sex appeal
In my interviews with these women, all of them
told me they like men who can make them laugh.
Confidence was mentioned by every woman as a re-
quired trait, as well as good manners. Kelly likes men
who are "worldly and well read Andrea likes men
who are "charming and sensitive Mary likes men
who have a "natural suaveness Andrea stressed the
importance of a man being committed to a lifelong
goal: "Look, I don't want a bum, okay? I'm
sorry. "
All the women expressed either a lack of interest
in, or a contempt for, the over-confident and the in-
secure male. Carol doesn't like "goofy" men. And
Andrea gets bored with the kind who "can't hold a
conversation Kelly seemed to have someone in
mind when she complained of "conceited,
materialistic gameplayers, users who take you out
just to show off And Deborah complained in
general of "assholes
All of the women mentioned going out to dinner as
what they like to do on a date, though most were also
attracted to the glamor of going to the theater. An-
drea likes going to orchestra concerts. Kelly likes go-
ing to a quiet place and listening to some old Blues.
Where does one meet a beautiful woman? "I meet
guys everywhere Carol said. And that seemed to be
the general sentiment. "It doesn't matter where
said Mary. All of the women agreed that bars are an
unlikely place to meet a man. Andrea said, "I don't
go out to socialize with strange people
The important thing isn't where you meet a
woman, but how you approach her. And here again,
there seems to be a consensus among the women. "I
don't care how they approach me Carol said, "as
long as they're not nervous, rude, or too anxious
Mary said that if a man is truly confident he'll know
if a woman likes him, will believe that he'll stay on
her mind, and so won't feel the need to come on to
her the first time.
Every guy wants a beautiful woman. But most
guys take a slant of themselves in the mirror and
Ik
Andmi Faulkner rwun
Deborah Heaton
GO�DON IPOCK
m 'm
Carol Tait
MICHAEL 9MTTH
Kelh Boette
t-o r� iron
Crazies At The Gate
"� -v?
Who Are Those Wacky,
Hard
By GORDON IPOCK
Featmrat Editor
Crazies at the gate, that's what the liberal crowd
calls them. They're the College Republicans,
vanguard of the New Right. They're mean, they're
mad, and they're multiplying
and they don't mind making a spectacle of
themselves in the process. When Governor Jim Hunt
visited ECU last week to speak as part of the Phi
Kappa Phi symposium on Peace and War 1984, the
ECU chapter of the College Republicans was waiting
and ready. About 20 CR's protested outside Hendrix
Theatre shouting anti-Hunt slogans and carrying
anti-Hunt signs. Earlier in the year when Hunt visited
the Greenleaf to kick off his campaign for Senate, a
cadre of CR's laid another ambush, standing on the
edge of the highway in the cold, dark rain � protest
signs in hand � as the big sedans filled with area
Democrats rolled by.
Says ECU CR chairman Tim Whisenant,
"Anytime Hunt shows up in this county, we're gon-
na be there waiting on him
This kind of go-for-the-throat intensity hasn't
been seen since the days of student rage in the 60s.
But then it was the New Left that was going for the
jugular of the establishment. Today, those former
leftist student radicals are now the establishment.
They're rapidly moving into government, academia,
the ch'irch and even business. For example, activist
College Republicans ?
Jane Fonda is now a successful capitalist en-
trepreneur and her husband Tom Hayden (an old
SDS radical) is a California state legislator �
although both retain their leftist ideaiogies.
Nationally, College Republicans is the largest stu-
dent political organization in America with 800 local
chapters and 32 strong, self-sufficient state federa-
tions. During this election year the clubs expects to
add another 25-50,000 student members. The CRs
have been called the sword and shield of Ronald
Reagan because the group works so hard to generate
support for the president on a grass-roots level. As a
result, 60 percent of all college students now support
Reagan making him the most popular president
among young people since John Kennedy.
It's not our job to seek peaceful co-
existence with the Left. Our job is to
remove them from power permanently'
Jack Abramoff
National Chairman College Republicans
Former national executive director Ralph Reed
leads ECU's CRs against Jim Hunt.
The CR's biggest triumph thus far has been
debunking the nuclear freeze movement on college
campuses. Although the Left worked hard to
generate student protests about he deployment of
U.S. missiles in Europe this past fall, the CRs across
the nation mounted a major counter offensive. Call-
ed Peace Through Strength, its goal was simple: the
deployment of U.S. missiles to counter the Soviet
threat in Europe without major protests on American
college campuses. This educational campaign work-
ed, and Reagan gave the credit to the CRs.
"No group has done more to expose the dangers
implicit in the 'nuclear freeze' movement said
Reagan. "College Republicans have helped to change
the course of history � and change it for the better
The president knew that if Vietnam-style protests had
materialized, he could have never deployed the
missiles.
National chariman of the CRs Jack Abramoff best
personifies the bull-dog qualities of the group. A
devout orthodox Jew, Abramoff is built like a
linebacker. A story goes that while putting up
Reagan posters in his native Boston during 1980, a
liberal activist spotted Abramoff and immediately
came behind him and ripped up a poster. An argu-
ment followed, and Abromoff settled it by breaking
the guy's jaw with a right cross. The posters stayed
up.
"It's not our job to seek peaceful co-existence with
the Left. Our job is to remove them from power per-
manently states Abramoff.
"We are committed to eradicating the radical Left
from American campuses said Juliet Sadd, the CR
chairman who led the anti-PIRG battle at Duke, at
last defunding the 12-year-old PIRG from that N.C.
campus.
The ECU College Republicans are by far the
largest and most active political group on this cam-
pus. Chairman Tim Whisenant claims 88 members.
True to form, the ECU CRs are the onlj eh
fightinc to keep the campus from estab -
PIRG at ECU. The battle is no bei-is wagi .
SGA. With their recent bold ami-Hunt r:v t
fight against PIRG, the group ha been i
name for itself. Tim and Denm agreed t es
what their group is all about.
Dennis: "Our short-term goal is to elec conser-
vatives to as many offices as possible, but cur ionc
term goal is to beat back and eventually .rush all
elements of the radical Left that have burro a eJ imc
campuses across the nation
Tim: "Also, because most campus medi is coi
trolled by the Left, our goal is to get the trutn out
the issues
" Why have you come out so strongly against Jim
Hunt? ' '
Dennis: "We had a lot of fun at our Hum i
demonstration. We don't apologize for our boldness
We believe many students believe prettv much like
do; they just don't have the courage to openiv
demonstrate their beliefs. It's our jobio spark the
hidden enthusiasm students have tor President
Reagan and Jesse Helms
Tim: "If more students realized the' veciouv
freedoms we have that the Left is taking awa the i
be protesting too. The Left had better get their gun-
control legislation passed before people find out "
EC: As a part of the New Right, some people think
CRs must all be members of the Moral Majoritv Is
that true?
Dennis: "We may not all be regular church people
but most of us place our trust in God and not in man
fS mJ Cathohc: our national chairman Jack
Abramoff is an orthodox Jew and our former na-
tional executive director Ralph Reed is a Southern
Baptist. Most of us do have a definite belief n God
but it s by no means uniform "
Tim: "We don't hold Sunday School at our
meetings, but God and country is a common theme
the bedrock that many of our principles rest aPon "
Republic? �" y�U d,fferem fr�m traJl�'
DennisWe despise the country-club Republicans
almost as much as the liberals. They're the reason
why the Republican party has not yet become ihe ma
jonty party. They sit on their butts and do nothing -
contribute nothing. They'd rather play golf than
E?t�rh2r& IhC coumr�"b has almost
lost the battle with the conservatives for control of
�S2JT� ���
TW-fV10! yOU attract more Macks?
nm. The Democratic Partv ha� �.r,ei� j L
minds of blacks and convintheu?
government assistance. They lead hlarirc �i� u
the carrot of social programsxchanefor�v?t�
votes; thatjnU keep the wealthy white uSer'Sukl
Ted Kennedy m power. We treat black luw
ancMndividual dignity STjattTtffi
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speed - recovery.
� ould ha e
fa lurougii sniffles
es, sera
rheumy eyes,
ach -
entire
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Soeciai
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car-a KMB - - I
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!Ht i an;Ak.i IN1AN
AHkll 2, 14
I

JtullkHf! l'�KIXs �o k.
X ft
ne a

lai
inser-
tl our long-
-ush all
ed mto
on-
ith out on
igainst Jim
ur Hunt
u � ildness.
� ve
openly
"ark the
President
the precious
� � �. fhe'd
heir gun-
find out
�ple think
i Ma ority. Is
:hurch people,
t in man.
:�. Jack
rmer na-
: Southern
in God,
I at our
� 'r is a common theme,
it principles rest upon
erem from traditional
ountry-duh Republicans
-� the reason
s not yet become the ma-
t butts and do nothing �
d rather play golf than
untry-club set has almost
nseratie for control of
e of the party, and we've
�et mure blacks?
Hartv has enslaved the
Inced them thev must have
ley lead blacks along with
s m exchange for votes �
Wealthy white liberals like
" treat blacks with respect
not just as a block of
- : �
Have Insect Problems?
Give Bugs The Bug
B DICK WEST
WASHINGTON (UPI)
Maybe I'm reading
more into the latest issue
o' Agricultural Research
than is there, but this
periodical seems to have
discovered a replacement
for chemical insecticides.
We all know about the
controversy that conven-
tional bug spray has
created. Some en-
vironmentalists claim
dangerous traces of insect
poisons have been found
in food and water intend-
ed for human consump-
tion.
Reacting to court suits
filed by environmental
groups, the U.S. Forest
Service recently banned
aerial application of her-
bicides on timber land
over which it has
jurisidiction.
Now suppose that '
rather than dousing pests
with harmful chemicals it
were possible to make
them come down with a
virus. Would that not
eliminate much of the
potential danger to
human beings0
Already, according to
Agricultural Research,
viral insecticide is
available for controlling
cotton bollworms and
Iworms, The same
deterrent also could now
be applied to earworms,
podworms and fruit-
worms that feast on corn,
soybeans, sorghum and
tomatoes, it reports.
'The potential for use
of microbial insecticides
s dramatic says the
Agricultural Research
Service. "More than
1,000 naturally occuring
microorganisms or their
products, including
viruses, bacteria, fungi
and protozoa, could hold
promise for the control of
major insect pests
1 don't know what sort
microorganisms
researchers are exerimen-
ting with, but I have in
mind the types of viruses
that cause head colds and
flu.
Do you see the beauty
of this system0 You don't
kill insects outright with
chemicals; you just make
them feel so lousy they
eat less.
Bear in mind the
stricken insects wouldn't
have the therapeutic ad-
vantages of chicken soup
to speed their recovery.
They would have to suf-
fer through sniffles and
wheezes, scratchy
throats, runny noses and
rheumy eyes, bodies all
aching and wracked with
pain, entirely on their
own
Insects on the infected
stalk could be counted on
to bat their contagious
germs over to the adja-
cent stalk. Thanks to all
the coughing and sneez-
ing, most of the bugs in
the corn field would be
calling in sick.
You don't have to be a
biologist to appreciate
what effect that would
have. Even a poor, con-
fused layman knows that
the onset of a virus is ac-
companied by a loss of
appetite.
A few of the right
microorganisms should
throw the little creatures
so far off their feed that
most of the crop they
normally munch on
would survive intact.
Agricultural Research
says farmers have been
reluctant to switch to
viral insecticides because
chemicals kill bugs much
faster than diseases. I can
understand that kind of
resistance, but it need not
prevail.
Permit me to point out
that if you can make a
bug feel so punk it wishes
it were dead, the impact is
the same as doing it in
with toxic chemicals.
LaSalle And Pal Hit The Road
B MI( K 4SAI If
M�ft Vkrllff
It was September I
was in Bethel, in that one
room dump 1 was living
in. I was dozing off,
when all of a sudden my
door burst open. Ipocic
bounded in
"LaSalle he said,
Bout time you did
some writing
"What do you mean?"
He threw one hand up
in the air. "VVeeelll, I just
got appointed editor of
the doggone Entertain-
ment section of that left-
wing rag they call the
East Carolinian. I want
you on my staff
Tta Whisenant (top left), Dennis Kllcovne,
Marie Flythe and Bryan King are part of the '
ore" of ECU's College Republicans.
Reproductive Health Care
ThtFlcMiNq
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Understanding - I ,�� enta i � " r
includes abortion foi womei ' i ages
Counsrlmc) tot hoth (kirtner is available
Special Servces and rates for students
Call 781 5553 days etenmus, and weekends
r
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natdeer
My girl whispered to
me, "Who is this guy
Mick?"
I told her to shut up,
and Ipock continued. "I
was just driving around,
see, and I got this vision:
A column to set straight
all the doggone wimps,
whiners, and nerds. What
do you say, Mick? I think
you're the man to write
it
I thought it over. "Will
I get in to movies free?"
He shrugged. "All
right. You're my movie
reviewer, then
That was seven months
ago. The fact that I'm
still with the paper is
thanks to Ipock. He's the
kind of guy who can spot
genius from a mile off.
And once he spots it, he's
willing to fight for it
In a couple of weeks
I'm gonna be leaving this
beautiful place, with all
its beautiful girls and its
springtime that starts in
March instead of May.
But already in November
I had a pretty good idea
what my Farewell Article
would say.
It was the week Who
Are The ECU Campus
Studs came out. All of a
sudden I was famous,
and it was fanny as hell.
One of my studs came by.
Oave Johns.on. He had
just put in a hard day
building furniture for his
private company, but he
wanted to talk.
"First of all, LaSalle, I
like your stuff. It's enter-
taining, insightful, to the
point. You hit hard, pull
no punches. I think
you're helping lots of
people
"Thanks I said.
"But let's face it. The
LaSalle Message is essen-
tially an elementary one.
You can condense almost
See LASALLE, Page 8
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.





8
JTHEEASTCAROI IN1AN
APRIL 12. 1984
ifS?.And Feates Editor Leave Paper
you say "into tl� � l JMS .� � I .� � �� A- -�, ,� or - on
Continued From Page 7
everything you say into
one sentence, man
Don't take no bullshit
He poured himself i
glass of
wine.
I'm
breaking out your Carlo
okay?" he said, and con-
tinued. "Face it, LaSaile
tional needs and
somehow reach in and
fulfill those needs. I don't
know how you do it, but
I've seen you do it more
than once
I sat back. What the
the guy was saying was the Village Voice or Roll-
ic Either consciously ing Stone for lack of
vvnat your dispensing to man was saying about me
me wimps, whiners, and was probably right. But I
nerds of this campus is never realized it. "What
first level Ladies Man in-
formation. You and 1
both know there's more
to the game than that
He was on a roll, but
that was nothing new.
Still the guy had mv at-
tention.
"Top Level 'stud-dom'
begins when you develop
whatever talent God gave
you to the point whre
that talent is uniquely
yours. For instance, I've
watched you, okay? You
ind a woman you care
do you think is
Johnston talent?"
He thought about
the
it,
or unconsciously, if a
man wants to become a
Ladies' Man, he's got to
develop his God-given
talents.
It seemed like a natural
topic for an article. But
then I thought about this
fat guy I saw at White
Dorm the week before. I
was waiting behind him
copy. We've made an ef-
fort to cover entertain-
ment on campus and
we've tried to offer a
like Mick LaSaile.
Which brings me to
LaSaile. What ever you
want to say about the
guy, he's not boring, and
much of the feature
ran his fingers through to use the lobby phone
XL??1' Y Probab,y He called upstairs, asked
that I m cocky. Like Ken- the girl if he could come
But we got people to pick
up the paper. And
basically, LaSaile had the
guts to say what everyone
knows is really the truth
but won't admit to
anyone else. That's what
made him controversial
and worth reading.
A lot of you missed
tucky Fried Chicken �
you do one thing, but you
do it right?"
I shook my head. "No,
Johnston. You're the
hero type. You get the
babes King Arthur
might've gotten, but he
hasn't been around for
awhile
up and see her. She said
no. And then he stood
there actually talking to
her for five minutes'
Finally, I had to kick him'
in the ass.
"These are some of my
readers, Johnston. A
sophisticated message
would be lost on a bimbo
like that I said. "He
still has to be taught the
basics
Johnston agreed.
"Maybe you can save this
idea for your last column,
then he said.
And so I did.
medium for aspiring stu- writing had previously
dent writers to publish been extremely boring
their works. With the This is a college
ftelp of press releases newspaper read bv a col
we've done well ac- lege crowd n 21� A 1Ql ot y�u missed
complishing the first tr? to be' a �E�2 LaSallc's first piece. "An
goal but only a fraction News andf ObserverTS rill?' � a.nd a
of the writing majors and the past feltSection CkntIcmju lt was
had been,�kLdiTl scream, well written and
grad students (no offfnse 5?T2S?�S fT�m RutgCrS t0 pursu
gang). Plenty of poetry ft's h�S � f P2K " MFA in theater- And
reviews, cello �SS S'SSffttTS ���?�
have
journalism minors
submitted work.
A few students have
contributed clever pieces,
(Eric Sandberg's inter-
view with Bullwinkle
Moose comes immediate-
ly to mind. Thanks Eric.
Give us some more.) but
considering the talent
that I know is out there,
Features should be
swamped with well-
written profiles, reviews
and such. This is a stu-
dent newspaper, and it
relies on student input.
No input, we have to run
wire stories or press
standard
Many people com-
plained that what LaSaile
was writing wasn't jour-
nalism. Of course it
wasn't! It was never
meant to be. Mick was
doing something akin to
new journalism and
didn't realize it. Others
objected to the intrusion
of his personality, but
Mick LaSaile was half of
whatever he was writing
about.
But now he's gone.
He's got a scholarship
For good or bad, all
things must come to an
end.
and the like. Certainly
there is a place for fine
arts, and we've covered
it. But there are a lot of
underclassmen out there
in the dorms who think
that stuff is drivel. Call
him low brow if you like,
but LaSaile was conceiv-
ed to appeal to the crowd
who traditionally never
read this paper. And I
think he did.
Sure, we had some fun;
CONSOLIDATED
THEATRES
!��
CHILDREN rlcif
ANYTIME H3Uj
30
Mick LaSaile
GREIF
421 Greenville Blvd
Phone 756-0825
2Forl
Special
(Pizza OnW)
Of fer Good Thru May 31st
Not Good With Any Other Specials
Buy One Pizza at Regular Price
And Get Another of Same Value
By GORDON IPOCK
Fratan Editor
All things must come
to an end, be they good
or bad. And so my time
as a writer and editor at
the East Carolinian is
over.
It's been different. On
that we can all agree. No
features on the
E.C.G.C, no profiles on
area Leftists or stories on
radical groups have lit-
tered the features pages
during my tenure as
1-3-5-7-9
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Evans
B ED MCKIAs
rli"
When the last p
when the last out is secured
the walk to the locker room
long one � that is �hen aii
memories start flowing b.
remember winning the E(
South title and plavine
Eastern Regional u
rival North Carolina. .
hopefully, for Todd Eva I
events won be the or. '
brances. The college A
would be a nice addition.
In his senior season a: El
mulii-fieider. prolific
co-captain Evans wo
nothing more than to parl
on an already marvelous
creation � a splenc
ped with a trip to NCAA
four.
As a four-year starter
his freshman year, f -
last two and alterna: .
season). Eans has -
ingredient in the ECU
concoction. In 1982. h
record-setting season while
ting .339: 189 at bats
record). 64 hits (school re
doubles (second, all-time)
RBI's (tied for second, a
But what is perhaps the rr.
statistic, and one that i
he leads the team in ga: j
hits this seascn. is that ht
out onl eight times in se:
at bat record.
Coming off las: ea
which the team playe.
When Gold h
LTR. Alexander
LGR. Autr
CT. Mitchell
RGN. Quick c
RTS. Bradi
TED. Pope
SES. Adams
QBR. Bartlett
FBP. Bowen or
G. Franklin
TBT. Baker
Natiotial
ww w w x m a ��� a By PETE FERNALD
�ar �rtkr
After winning the 110 rrej
high hurdle event in Chape!
last weekend. ECL" soph.
Craig White is looking forward
competing in the Nationals
Olympic team tryouts.
"I'm a positive thinking pers
and think I will be able to comj
with the best said White.
time I turned in last weekend pi
ved that I am one of the
hurdlers in the nation
According to White, the time
ran in the qualifying rounc for tj
finals was two-tenths of a seco
short of the National and Olvmi
standards.
Upon qualifying in the fim
Tin a pc
thinking
think I wl
compete
best
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mother was at the meet he a
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Even though White made
qualifying time at the UNI
Chapel Hill meet, he feds that
best performance was at
Sunkist Relays in Florida. "I fc
I ran better in Florida even thoi
I hit the next to last hurdlj
Without that error I probab
would have run my best time
White said.
Overall, White is satisfied wii
nis performance thus far in t!
season. "I'm very satisfi
becauae at the beginning of
season I suffered from a puih
mm�" !��!
Tt0twimmp'm r1' r T
" ��:?: IIAPVPMMMM





er
tor good or bad, all
ings must come to an
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 12. 1984
Page 9
Evans Furthers EC Tradition
CHILDREN tfl erf
ANYTIME l-JUi
OVIES
�ping Canter
HAPTER
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By ED NICKLAS
When the last pitch is made,
when the last out is secured, when
the walk to the locker room is a
long one � that is when all the
memories start flowing back. You
remember winning the ECAC
South title and playing in the
Eastern Regional and beating
rival North Carolina. And
hopefully, for Todd Evans, those
events won't be the only remem-
brances. The college World Series
would be a nice addition.
In his senior season at ECU, the
multi-fielder, prolific hitter and
co-captain Evans would like
nothing more than to sparkle nuts
on an already marvelous sundae
creation � a splendid career top-
ped with a trip to NCAA final
four.
As a four-year starter (left field
his freshman year, first base the
last two and alternating both this
searon), Evans has been a main
ingredient in the ECU baseball
concoction. In 1982, he had a
record-setting season while bat-
ting .339: 189 at bats (school
record), 64 hits (school record), 13
doubles (second, all-time) 37
RBI's (tied for second, all-time).
But what is perhaps the most keen
statistic, and one that expains why
he leads the team in game-winning
hits this season, is that he struck
out only eight times in setting the
at bat record.
Coming off last season, in
which the team played below par
(21-17) and Evans stats were not
a high as in '82 (the team played
nine fewer games, however), the
Pirates are once again carrying on
the ECU baseball tradition, which
has had only one losing season
since 1951. The Pirates are 19-8
and Evans is at the helm, hitting
.312 and leading the team in hits,
RBI's and game-winning hits. He
also set a school record for career
base hits this season.
"We are as talented as we've
ever been since I've been here
says Evans of the team. "We have
as much ability as the other four
years. There is no reason not to
make the regionals.
"James Madison did it last year
and we feel like we are in the same
class
The team is talented, yes, but
very young � three freshman and
two sophomores play regularly.
Evans feels he plays key role in
their maturation. "I play primari-
ly a leadership role he says. "I
try not to put too much pressure
on them; I just let them play
Well, if demonstration is the
best form of teaching, Evans is a
good role model. "In hitting, I see
myself as a leader he says. "It's
(confidence) something coach
Baird tries to stress. You've got to
want to be in there when the game
is close
And to Evans, Baird's words
are well taken. Evans describes his
special relationship with Baird the
last four years as being "super
"We get along real well he says.
"There are no personality con-
flicts. Our personalities seem to
hit it off real well. He's always
been fair to me.
"Probably the biggest thing is
his philosophy on the team and its
relationship with the coaching. It
is not an authoritarian or
autocratic type system. Players
have input.
"It's been great to play here. I
wouldn't play anywhere else.
Well, all good things must come
to an end and hopefully that end
for Evans will be at the college
baseball World Series. But,
there's the future to look at, and
Evans seems to have all his bases
covered well (excuse the pun).
"Like everyone else, I want to get
a chance to play pro ball he
says. "If not (play professional
baseball), I would like to coach,
preferably at the college level
A history student, Evans is also
not excluding graduate school
from his future plans. He says he
has considered doing graduate
work, but he would like to take a
year off from school and give
baseball a chance.
But forget the future for now.
So Evans will sprint out, as he
usually does, to left field or first
base, whatever the case may be,
for the last time this season, but
he has certainly left his mark at
ECU � that is to say, many
marks. There is one mark,
though, that would sit MUite well
with him and the team. Need it be
said?
QAHY PATTERSON � SCO
Todd Evans shown here in 1982 when he set two school records
Harrison Gets
Extension
ECU has extended head basket-
ball coach Charlie Harrison's con-
tract through the 1986-87 season.
Starting three freshmen in most
of the games, Harrison's team
posted a 4-24 record last season.
The Scotland Neck native led
the Pirates to a 16-13 record in his
first year at ECU (1982-83).
Long Receives
Year Honor
Former ECU offensive lineman
Terry Long has been named the
first annual University Book
Echange Player of the Year. UBE
Will donate $1,000 to the ECU
Foundation in Long's name.
Long, who is awaiting the up-
coming NFL draft, is ECU's first
concensus first team All-America.
He was selected to the AP,
Kodak, Walter Camp and Foot-
ball Writers teams.
"We feel that Terry Long is the
best football player ever :o play at
ECU, so naturally we wanted to
honor him as our first layer of
the year said Don Edwards,
manager of UBE. "We plan to
make this an annual cent and
future players may be men or
women from any sport at ECU
Long will be at the UBE this
Saturday from 11 a.m. to 12
noon. Bill Clark, president of the
Pirate Club, will present Long
with his award at 11:30 a.m.
PURPLE-GOLD
Saturday March 14, 4:00 p.m.
Ficklen Stadium
Purple-Gold Scrimmage Set For Saturday
When Gold Has The Ball
When Purple has the Ball
LT R
LG R
C T.
RG N
RT S.
TED.
SES.
QBR.
FBP.
G.
TBT.
� Alexander
. Autry
Mitchell
. Quick
Brady
Pope
Adams
Bartlett
Bowen or
Franklin
Baker
W. Mack or LE
J. Williamson
L.HaU LT
M. Rainbow SG
I. Sokolhorsk RT
D. Thomas RE
P. Jordan LB
? LB
K.Walker LC
R. DHlahut RC
J. Martin SS
V. Wynn FS
LT
LG
C
RG
RT
TE
SE
QB
FB
TB
T. Livingston
M. Powers
S. Ward
P. Davis
B. Henson
B. Porter or
J. Patton
A. Adams
R. Jones
R. Branch
J. Walden
R. GUUard or
K. Banks
J. Grin age
C. Santa Cruz
D. Plumb
V. Smith
D. Reid
T.Johnson
T. Pittman
C. Adams
J. Turner
K. Ford
LE
LT
NG
RT
RE
LB
LB
LC
RC
SS
FS
Nationals, Olympic
By RANDY MEWS
AuisUat sporti Editor
After completing one of its most successful seasons
ever as the 20th-ranked team in the final Associated
Press Poll, the ECU football team is ready to take to
the field once again for the annual Purple-Gold
clash.
The event is scheduled for 4 p.m. Saturday, and
will be surrounded by a host of festivities including a
bikini contest, pig roasting, tug-of-war with an
elephant, the naming of ECU's mascot and a special
appearence by former all-pro defensive lineman L.C
Greenwood.
"This is their day Pirate head coach Ed Emory
said in reference to Saturday game. "The players
aren't going to be graded on how they perform but
the amount of effort they put forth. We want
everyone to have fun and enjoy themselves
This is the first year the intra-squad scrimmage has
been surrounded by a busy schedule of activities, but
Emory doesn't think the festivities will detract from
how his players perform.
"I think all the excitement should get their
adrenalin flowing. Everybody's family will be out
there, and I don't know of a person on my team that
doesn't want to play well in front of their mama
Emory said one of the most important aspects of
Saturday's contest will be getting all the players in-
volved in a game-like situation. "We have a ot of
redshirt freshman who have never played in a college
game before. When we go down to Florida State
(ECU's opening game this fall) we want to make sure
See PIRATES, Page 10
By PETE FERNALD
Staff Writer
After winning the 110 meter
high hurdle event in Chapel Hill
last weekend, ECU sophomore
Craig White is looking forward to
competing in the Nationals and
Olympic team try outs.
"I'm a positive thinking person
and think I will be able to compete
with the best said White. "The
time I turned in last weekend pro-
ved that I am one of the best
hurdlers in the nation
According to White, the time he
ran in the qualifying round for the
finals was two-tenths of a second
short of the National and Olympic
standards.
Upon qualifying in the finals,
hamstring which affected me for a
long time. I'm over that injury,
I'm strong now and happy with
my performance the last couple of
weeks
In preparation for the Na-
tionals and Olympic trials, which
take place in Eugene, Ore. later in
June, White plans to follow a
strenuous workout schedule. He
will adhere to a schedule of lifting
weights, jogging and running
sprints.
"I'm over the process of being
hurt White said. "What I need
to do now is not to slack off at all
because the competition out there
is extremely tough. I plan to train
a lot harder now that it's getting
closer to the Olympic trials
'I'm a positive-
thinking person, and I
think I will be able to
compete with the
best
White said that his success was in
part due to his mother. "My
mother was at the meet he said.
"She was a mental boost for me
going into the finals and I tried
even harder
Even though White made his
qualifying time at the UNC-
Chapel Hill meet, he feels that his
best performance was at the
Sunkist Relays in Florida. "I feel
I ran better in Florida even though
I hit the next to last hurdle.
Without that error I probably
would have run my best time
White said.
Overall, White is satisfied with
his performance thus far in the
season. "I'm very satisfied
because at the beginning of the
season I suffered from a pulled
Unfortunately, due to bad
weather, White has been unable as
of late to practice up to his stan-
dards.
"I haven't been able to get
out White said. "I'd like to do
some sort of strenuous exercise
every chance I get as far as
sprints. Those are an important
part of my racing stamina
When White competes in the
Nationals, he will be running
against such powerhouses as
Eugene Norman of Rutgers, Jack
Pierce of Morgan State and Jeff
Pyle of William and Mary.
"For the Nationals, I think
with a consistent 13.7 seconds I
can make All-America and
possibly win the event White
said.
White
for the record he will improve his
time for the Olympic trials this
summer.
The wonder of how Craig
White became such outstanding
runner stretches back to his high
school years.
"I always liked to run White
said. "I started running track in
my ninth grade year. It was
another activity to participate in
and I felt that I could excel in it
White excelled so fast that he
ran on the Junior Olympic team
his senior year in the summer of
1982. "All my life I had decent
speed White said. "As I put in
more time I got faster
He proved to be an all-around
athlete when he won nine letters in
in high school.
Carson had a good idea of
White's talent. "He was a very
good athlete as a junior lie said.
"I returned to check up 0:1 Craig
in his senior year and beciime in-
terested in him for our track pro-
gram
White became interesied in
ECU because it competed against
the top teams in the country. "I
wanted to be exposed to the best
competition possible White
said.
Now in his second year a: ECU,
White enjoys the campus and
local atmosphere. "I enjoy going
out when I get a chance because
most of my weekends are taken up
with track road trips White
'I pray to God all the
time for strength. I
pray He'll keep me
healthy for the
Olympics
OA�V PATTMSOK - �CO
The Sky's the Umit for Craig White.
At the Olympic trials, where the
competition gets even tougher,
White will face top rivals Greg
Foster and Pittsburgh's Roger
Keynes, an All-America. "A 13.5
should be a sure bet for me to
make the team White said.
The road to the Olympics is a
hard one, and White feels that it is
an honor to alone participate in
the trials. "If I make the team, it
is an honor White said. "It's an
honor for me to reach the stan-
dards to qualify. To place or more
a less win, it is another honor to
represent my country
"I'm proud to represent my
peers, the people I grew up with
� really everybody he added.
One of White's goals for the re-
maining meets is to break former
Pirate Marvin Renkin's outdoor
record in the 110 high hurdles.
Renkin holds the record with a
time of 13.84 seconds, and White
hopes that in the process of going
track, football and basketball at
East Duplin High School in his
hometown, Chinquapin, N.C. Be-
ing all-conference in all three
sports and gaining over 1000
yards as a running back in foot-
ball, White was any coaches
dream.
He was recruited by UNC, ECU
and Elon in football alone. In
basketball, White received interest
from Appalachian and Pem-
broke. "The coaches saw me play
football and track and knew that I
had a lot of potential to be a good
athlete in basketball or football in
any division said White.
ECU head track coach Bill Car-
son saw White at the North
Carolina State track meet in both
of White's junior and senior years
said. "I really like ECU, it's close
to home and we have a nice foot-
ball program
White plans to play wide
receiver on the 1984 football
squad and hopes to do well. "If 1
do good I'll have a good shot at
the NFL said White.
Currenuy, White is working
towards a business administration
degree and hopes to own a sports
store in the future.
"I'm very pleased witti my
GPA right now and am buckling
down for final exams White
said. "Basically, I'm a student
athlete. I pray to God all the time
for strength. 1 pray he'll keep me
healthy for the Olympics
- � ?
m aim � mm ��� �" � �5 -
� ftll �W;
jwEK
II
? i





10
JTHEEASTCAROLINIAN
APRIL 12, 1984

Pirates Face Off In Purple-Gold Scrimmage
Continued From Page 9
everybody's concen-
trating on the game and
not looking into the
stands.
Emory said that play-
ing against your own
teammates is different
than against an un-
familiar opponent, but
just being in front of a
crowd is enough of an ex-
perince in itself for
everyone involved to
benefit from the game.
"If we have good
weather and a large
crowd, everybody on the
team's going to be ex-
cited. We're not going to
have 60,000 or 70,000
people like we will in
Florida, but any player
would rather do well in
front of his home crowd
then against people they
don't know.
Emory will soak up all
the action from the game
on the sidelines, as defen-
sive coordinator Tom
Throckmorton heads the
purple team and offen-
sive coordinator Don
Murray leads the Gold
squad.
The teams were divided
by splitting up the seniors
and letting them pick the
teams. "They got to do
everything Emory said.
"The seniors chose the
coaches, who they
wanted to be on their
team, the managers and
even the trainers
Although Emory said
his team looks like the
"Pitt County Hospital"
as 16 players will be
unable to play due to in-
juries, he is still looking
forward to an exciting
game this Saturday.
"We've come to reach
a standard where we
won't tolerate anything
but a 100 percent effort
We've come together and
we've got unity, now it's
just a matter of putting it
all together
All ECU students with
a valid ID or activity card
will be admitted.
Bikini Bash
Miller Beer vmII bein entering the cootesl
sponsoring a bikinishould sign up at the
contest with a $25 firstPirate Club at 1 p.m
pne as part of thewith judging slated to
events surroundingbegin at 2 p.m. For
ECU's Purple-Goldmore information eon-
football game thistact Dave Hart at
Saturdav5-6491 or the Pirate
All those interestedClub at 757-6178.
Baseball Team Wins 20th
18 Hits lead to 18-7 Win
Classifieds
SALE
MISC.
By ED NICKLAS
The ECU Pirate bats
came alive yesterday,
pounding out 19 hits to
defeat nearby Norih
Carolina Wesleyan 18-7.
Mike Williams, Chris
Bradberry and Mark
Council each collected
three hits for the Pirates,
now 20-8 overall.
Williams also had a two-
run homer and knocked
in five runs.
Robby McClanahan
(4-1), relieved by Bob
Davidson in the eighth in-
ning, picked up the win
for ECU.
"It was a pleasant sur-
prise said assistant
coach Gary Overton.
"We hadn't shown a lot
of offense and today we
did. Everybody hit well
Overton said Wesleyan
threw their number two
pitcher, Brian Bullard,
but the Pirates jumped on
him early and raced to an
11-1 lead through seven
innings.
Wesleyan, however, at-
tempted a rally in the bot-
tom half of the seventh to
close the gap to 11-6. But
ECU ignited for seven
more runs to put the
game out of reach.
"We had a good day
all around Overton ad-
ded.
BOOM CLOSE to ECU. HOP. 7M-M44.
LOOKING TO SUBLEASE furnished
�pt. S170 � month piui util. s blocks
from campus. HBO, Showtime. Pool
lots moro. Coll MMgl
TWO BORM APT ovallablo to
subloasa for summor sosslons further
Info 74-4174 Ask for Dawn
BEACH CRUISER B Surfboard
751-17M
FOR SALE: 7SC Honda, Californl
framo. trick paint ob, hookor
hoadors, lots of chroma, �i,00 or bast
oWf. Call 757 1441 or 7S4-W17.
PIONEER PL410 Turntable for sale.
Price Is nee. Call 7M-44M Hu�h.
FOR SALE.
Call 752-tM7.
Twin bed, 2 dressers.
Nir.HTril R r
G'eenT.lie �'
LAHNN
Fri. April 13th 9:00
$2.00 Members
$3.00 Guests
Every Fri. Mexican Delight Happy Hour with
pitchers of Mexican Delight and other Happy
Hour Specials. Pitcher Beer $2.00, Special
Prices on Mixed Beverages.
MOPED-im- 350 miles, has basket
for books, 15 plus MPO, no parking
hassles. Asking MM. 753-41M or
757-31M.
COTTAGE for rent at N. Myrtle Bch.
i bdrm. Sleeps 4. Call BMW,
WHEN A FRIEND has stereo system
problems, tell them that the audio
technicians at the TECH SHOP don't
charge for repair estimates. Call us
at 757 "Nineteen Eighty
AUTO ACCIDENTS Speclalixing in
personal inury litigation. J. David
Duffus, Jr Attorney, NCNB
Building, Greenville. North Carolina,
754-4200.
OUALITY TYPING � IBM
Typewriter, 15 years experience. Full
time typing for faculty B students.
754-1440
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Service.
all typing needs 754-541 or 754-1341.
COLLEGE STUDENTS will find this
offer attractive. 5200 w.kvsales and
service car helpful. Call 754-341.
PERSONAL
2 OUR DECEASED HALFPINT who
was a quart that never filled herself
up. We still love u even though u were
taken away by the POLICE when u
impersonated a GURU Have u turn
ed 2 HUMUS N the ground? We know
all your suicides R fake. Its just your
BIGHEAO and your SHADOW
WANTED
LOCAL CHURCH would like person
to keep church nursery 10 45 12 noon
each Sunday. Could possibly be divid-
ed with another person. 54 each Sun-
day. Send resume' to Mwrtmiy
Helper; 30� Prince Rd Greenville,
NC 2734.
TWO WSI S NEEDED tor waterfront
at Camp Leach apply to Ed Hodges
Camp Leach Manager 215 E 11th St
Washington. NC 27444
1 FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Wilson Acres Apts tor summer Rent
? 3 57 per month plus �Mem. Call
754 5121
WANTED People interested in a keg
of beer. See any senior Alpha Xi
Delta
ROOMMATES NEEDED for sum
mer Fully turmghed apt at Wilson
Acres-4 blocks from campus Pool,
saunas, tennis court and cable Rent
SSI 00 for a private room On ECU bus
route Call 7S7 1407
3 FEMALE ROOMMATES needed
immediately! 120 Georgetown Apts
across from campus Rent 573.75
Call after 12 M pm 752 1477. Deposit
required I
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
the summer Fully furnished Apt
4100 a month including utilities Good
location Call 752-470
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted tor
the summer 542.00 per month plus
utilities Nice condo call 7544374
TWO ROOMMATES needed for bo'r
sessions of summer school Call Befti
or Karen 757-j
ocooog�gaoocoeooooooooooeo�&oc
oocooceoc
�i-State
Auto Body
��8
I
i
Coming Wed. 18th Berlesque Lingerie
10 women, 4 men bnOW
Adv. Tickets $3 & $4
Night of Performance $4 & $5
Expert body repairs, paint �
jobs, frame straightening, and IS
24 hour towing. �
107. Discount to all ECU
Students.
(Bring in Ad)
(over the bridge)
24W 1512 N.Greene St.
fCySp Day 758-0778
fiWASH
HOUSE
BEER-VIDEOS-POPCORN
Night 756-4775
756-8604
Qoceoooooocosocooc?
HAPPY HOUR DAIL Y 5-7
12 ounce draft 2 5 untilendoj semester when using laundromat
� OPEN For Summer School
� Fluff & Fold � Air Condition
� Fully Attended � Color Cable T.V.
We have double-load washers Only S1.00
"COUPON
Good tor 1 Free Wash
with another wash
EgmesAgnl 18J 984
RESEARCH PAPERS
14.789 to choose trcm � all auotact
Rush $2 tor the current. 306- page cata-
log Custom research 4 thesis assis-
tance also available
HeM.rrk. l 1322 lOaho Ave. �206WX
Los Angeles. CA 90025 (2131477-8226
&
�,et
�?&
V-r.611
pA
SS2
c�2
q
c
n
& ��
.o"35�j
�2
�Co $ftQ-9
3C!2c�5. tHsfS-H.
SPORTING GOODS
BONDS
218 ARLINGTON BLVD.
756-6001
H.L.
HODGES
210 E. Fifth St.
752-4156
THE EAST CAROL IN AS
APR H
Garrett H
By VICKIE
Browned
txx .
Golf Champs Crowned
The IntramuraJ Golf
Classic completed its
season of play Thursday
April 5. Thirteen men's
teams and seven women's
teams finished the 18 hole
course at the Ayden
Country Club.
Taking first place
honors in the men's divi-
sion were the Garrett A
team and Kappa Sigma
Fraternity. Both teams
completed the course
with a team score of 310.
For the crew from Gar-
rett, Gene Williams
finished with a score of
75, followed by Mark
Williams with a "6.
Rounding out the Garrett
team was James Glenn
and Miles Pursur with "8
and 81 respectively.
K.C. Loughlin lead he
Kappa Sigs with a score
of 73 followed by Dae
Sadlowski and Rick
KraJdel with scores of 75
Marshall Walls rounded
out the team with a
finishing scor; of 8' Pi
Kappa Phi frater:
finished in :hird place
while Phi Kappa Tau and
theGarrett B team took
forth and fifth places
respectively.
Individual tournament
championships went to
Stephen Larogue
shooting a score of "1 to
capture second place
honors. Wesley Johnson.
Sn
lavl
&
3KiaT7" - M: A "
I OS A rood- Rr
GREEN. E NC 27834
9-9 �'SB C-32-
FA(
211 Jarvis
2 Blocks froi
"Home of GreenvilU
Anheuser-Buscl
Busch Beer
Gallo Wine �
Lays Regular PJ
Coca-Co
2 L.ter BoJ
99
Limit 2 with
order. Additi
STARTS FRIDAY AT THEATRES EVERYWHERE
Wash Your Clothes
Shopping at C
University Ecu
Washes
Attendant on duty after darlt
Students Only! Receive a
grocery order of10.00 or
coupon to cashier at tit
Name
Address
ID Number .
Limit one discount
Expires 4-1;
M
fP
l WHUfWqW"
wa�i07 ySMmtm
����
- ���
ly � �-� � iin i�. ijrtmM ��ifcimi
, i :� p





II
D
ERE
Garrett Hall Wins Golf Classic
DON'1 Bl I.I.I I BEHIND
1 N mi CLASSIFIEL
H U Kit
Brownell
hit nipsrow ned
1
V �
t.arrt-U
Kappa sijjma
Williams
Mark
James (denn
Pursur

�appa lau

ECU IMKAMl KM s
iif
Robert Knocks and K (
1 oughlin
i
1
I ler Pros
Barb hadnell. Paula
Hays, G we nd I y n
Redferi Kobbi
I weed
Mpha Phi
lpha Ielfa
i
Socialize with IR-s

- �
-�

Swingers C,el K ad
Home Run ltih

(lubs in ction
M
FAMILY REi � fsJTS
Overton 's
Supermarket. Inc
21 1 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks from ECU
"Home oi Greenville's Best Meats"
Anheuser-Busch
Busch Beer
� s - ,
i
Gallo Wine
Lays Regular Potato Chip
$2.99
99c
Coca-Cola
99r
n r
r.
I N
urlothes Next Door While
hopping at)vertons!
University Econo Wash
Washes yg per load
� after dark for you set urity.
5 discount'coupon
� ' ml' Rei eive a 5i JiS4 mint on your
f $10 00-or more. Present ID an
� n f�i ashier at time �f pun ha -
me
' 'imit on Mini per II) number.
xpires 4-1 4-N4
dend Kicking of! home
con in will
ns I ,i, learn
( ' i gain si
I uke w ill begii u 12
ihe intram
fields ad iav eni to I ;k
Stad B i
i ugby
( hapel
Mlied H
frisbee
� will travel to Raleigh
I hi IKN War Is Set.
.
Id vv ednes-
3 beg
be
Mondi
and
M
. a i 7
irds
.
�r
Easi Carolina University's
Student I Jnion Board of Directors
itions (or two Da Studenl
� Perm. The respon
men �l Dii include:
he Studenl I nion Pre?
ommittee chairpei
mg the- Student I inon Bu :
� ?licv fur th ident I Inion
Deadline to apply: Tuesday, April 24, 1984
i





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Title
The East Carolinian, April 12, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 12, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.336
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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