The East Carolinian, April 10, 1984






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QlutalMun
Serving the East Carolina campus c
ommunity since 1925
Vol. 58 No. 5 55
Tuesday, April 10, 1984 Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Dest Rules On Legislature's Powers
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK a � , M. k7
�����ka�ia� decision last month hut ch�,M rw
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nw� Editor
The SGA Legislature has the
power to propose a referendum
and legislators demonstrated that
ability as recently as 1978, Student
Attorney General Harry Dest told
the legislature Monday.
Dest made the ruling in
response to an appeal filed by-
legislator Mike Dixon protesting
the legislature's decision last
month not to call for a referen-
dum on a Public Interest Research
Group at ECU. Speaker of the
Legislature Kirk Shellev inter-
preted the SGA Constitution to
mean that only the student body,
with a petition, can call for "a
referendum, and the legislature
has no pow-r to do so. The
legislature upheld his decision.
Dest's ruling Mondav had no
bearing on the PIRG referendum
decision last month, but should
serve as a guideline for future ac-
tion. He said the "ruling shall
stand unless disputed and ap-
peals on the decision must be
made to the Review Board.
"The meaning of Student In-
itiative in Article VII in my judge-
ment, unequivocally grants the
student body the right to re-
quest a referendum on issues they
feel the SGA is not addressing
Dest said in a prepared statement.
"However, in Article VII in no
way or form denies the right of
the legislature to propose a
referendum. Therefore, Article
VII does not limit the power of
referendum to the student body
Dest cited a resolution passed
by the legislature on Feb. 9, 1978,
calling for a student referendum
on campus publications.
Dest said he consulted Dean of
Orientation and Judiciary James
Mallory and chairman of the
political science department
Tinsley Yarbrough on the inter-
pretation.
The decision says in effect that
the legislature's action last month
was unconstitutional. However,
the action will stand and a new
referendum will have to be
brought out to test Dest's ruling.
"At this point there seems to be
a deliberate impasse between the
attorney general and the
legislature Shelley said after
Dest made the ruling. "The point
itself is moot right now about that
resolution" calling for the
referendum last month, he said.
In other business, David
Brown, chairman of the student
welfare committee, reported that
results from the student welfare
survey should be available bv next
Student Governments OK
New System Of Delegation
week. The committee is also look-
ing into the feasibility of pro-
viding a bulletin board listing
students selling textbooks and
students wanting to buy textbooks
in order to aid in cutting down the
amount of money spent on books.
The welfare committee also met
with Ira Simon, director of dining
services to discuss some of the
problems students are having with
the cafeteria situation. Several
changes in service hours have been
made due to the meeting.
Former Speaker of the
Leg.slature Chris Townsend
spoke on the need for student in-
volvement in politics, citing the
fact that the public often counts
on student apathy when propos-
ing issues such as the raising of the
drinking age.
A resolution supporting the
voting rights of non-Pitt County
residents was passed by the
legislator. "Voting is a right'and a
privilege said Glenn Maughan
who initiated the resolution!
"Many students are being denied
the right to vote and participate
He said the use of absentee ballots
is too difficult and students
should be able to vote where thev
are living.
There was a good deal of debate
on the resolution, with Kirk
Shelley opposing the idea. Shelley
said he was not opposed to stu-
dent voter registration in general
but felt that "students would be
better off voting in their home
counties He said the date of the
primaries is after the end of the
semester and therefore most
students will already be at home
Dixon replied by saving the
absentee ballot process is cumber-
some and an inconvenience. "In
Dest
other counties this inconvenience
is no inconvenience he said. The
resolution was passed and will be
mandated to the Pit! County
Board of Elections.
A bill proposing the selection
an SGA secretarty pro tempore to
preside in the case of the
secretary's absence was also
presented. After much debate on
the status of the person as a
legislator, the bill was sent bac -
committee and will be introdu
again next week.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
News Mnor
A new system of student delega-
tion to the University of North
Carolina Association of Student
Governments was initiated for the
first time at last weekend's
meeting in Chapel Hill.
This was the last meeting for
outgoing SGA presidents and the
first for newly elected presidents.
Outgoing President Paul Naso
and President-Elect John Rainey
attended the meeting along with
ECU students Scott Epting. Jim-
mi- Hackett and Mark Niewald.
A new system which allows for
two student delegates from each
school has just been put into ef-
fect. Permanent delegates will be
appointed next year by Rainey.
'The meeting was very produc-
tive and positive Naso said. One
topic discussed was the formation
of the legislative assembly, Epting
said. It is hoped that this assembly
will perpetuate more student in-
volvement in the system. The
students attending this weekend
were attending on a trial basis.
Mark Niewald was elected
treasurer of the organization. One
of the major goals for next year,
according to Epting, is to get the
financial situation secure and to
provide more funding for ac-
tivities. Naso has requested a $1
per student fee increase, approx-
imately $.10 of which will go to
the UNCASG. "We want to pro-
mote the organization Epting
said. "One of our major assets is
the sharing of ideas
Rainey said he was pleased with
the meeting and feels the SGA
should take a more active role in
the UNCASG. "I plan to take a
very active role as president he
said. "We need to take the
organization and reach out fur-
ther and have a greater voice He
included another meeting at ECU
in his plans, and said he would
also like to look into the possibili-
ty of a regional meeting which
would include the student govern-
ments from several states. "We
share a lot of ideas, hopefullv next
year we'll be a bigger voice he
said.
"The potential power of the
organization may never be realiz-
ed until they reach out into the
various campuses and make the
average student aware of the op-
portunities they have to be involv-
ed with the UNCASG Hackett
said

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!i!�l?ro8rams �ff�- Help Finding Summer Employment
����; UKAaiAK everywhere there is a business " interns for th cm� � -�.mi VY MMM VII I
The career olannin. ,�HnL SZ? IS "Z.� Often, perience. "The more work ex- Th,v � , .
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newi Editor
For many students, finding a
summer job is a necessity,
whether they need experience
money or just a diversion.
However, finding the right sum-
mer job, or even finding a job at
all, is often not an easv task.
Several ECU services have pro-
grams to help.
Everywhere there is a
business, there is a potential job
said Furney James, director of the
career planning and placement
service. When looking for a job,
he said, students should "go to
everywhere there is a business
The career planning and place-
ment service has several programs
to provide students with summer
job opportunities. There is an an-
nual camp day, which is co-
sponsored with the cooperative
education department. Approx-
imately 20 camps participate. The
service also has the College Place-
ment Annual on file. The annual
lists companies that provide sum-
mer employment for students.
James cited internships as a
good source of summer employ-
ment. Companies such as BB&T
and Purdue often hire students as
interns for the summer. Often,
James said, the companies are
"looking at the students as poten-
tial full-time employees
Another summer job oppor-
tunity mentioned by James is sell-
ing books with companies such as
Southwestern Publishing and The
Varsity Company. This, he said,
"provides good experience for a
select few � you get paid for what
you do
Students often go looking for a
job and expect a high wage. Many
summer jobs pay only minimum
wage, James said, but added that
what is really important is the ex-
perience. "The more work ex-
perience you have, the better off
you'll be he said. "Summer
work experience is invaluable
The Department of
Cooperative Education also has
services available to job-hunting
students. They maintain a bulletin
board listing all summer jobs and
also occasionally list jobs in The
East Carolinian. Carolyn Powell,
a coordinator for the department
said students can come by the
department, located on the third
floor of Rawl and register and
talk to one of the coordinators.
They can suggest which com-
panies are hiring and also give job
leads.
"It is getting a little late for
summer jobs and the situation is
very competitive Powell said.
"We can't guarantee students
anything, but we can give them in-
formation she said.
ECU will hire some students
this summer, said Melvin Buck,
director of personnel. Each sum-
mer approximately 20 students are
hired to fill on-campus painting
jobs. Some of the positions have
been filled, but there are still
openings. Buck said
The Employment Security
Commission in Pitt County plac-
ed 996 students in jobs last year,
said Jim Hannan, commission
manager. "We have jobs he
said, "the important ning is to
get registered right new Last
year, he said, there was one full
crew of students working in the
cucumber fields. In addition, the
office also has openings for retail
positions � nine students were
placed in retail jobs last week. The
commission does not charge a fee
for its services and has special stu-
dent applications.
Edmisten Claims Campaign
Is Pitt County's Biggest
I.) y k i
Ust weekend �� UNC-Chnpel Hill, ECU Irackster Craig While qualified in the high hurdles
MICHABL SMITH - ECU Photo Lab
for the 1984 Olympic trials.
Annual SOULS On The Mall Scheduled
SOULS on the Mall will take
Place on Thursday from 2 p.m. to
5 p.m. and again from 6 p.m. to
Jj P.m. The Society of United
Liberal Students is sponsoring this
annual event which will feature
f�od, fun and information.
The event is a "chance for
students to discover the different
organizations on campus said
SOULS President Jimmie
Hackett. Organizations such as
the Preprofessional Health
Alliance, the NAACP and The
Ebony Herald will have booths to
provide information about their
activities.
Hotdogs and hamburgers will
be sold and there will be games
and prizes. One event scheduled is
?
a volleyball tournanrit. The
event is open to the public.
The Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity
will be having a slave auction and
the Omega Psi Phi fraternity will
be performing in a block show at
5 p.m. In addition, there will be a
dating game and SOULS
members will be selling raffle
tickets for a UNIVEGA bicycle to
be given away at Barefoot on the
Mall. Proceeds from the raffle
will benefit SOULS and sickle cell
anemia research.
There will be music from 6p.m.
to 11 p.m. and WZMB will pro-
vide the disc jockeys. "We hope
that all students will come out and
join us for this day of fun in the
sun Hackett said.
This article is the first in a series
of brief features on the major
gubernatorial candidates.
By DARRYL BROWN
M .nnjmg Editor
The Edmisten campaign now
claims it holds the record for the
biggest political fundraiser in Pitt
County history � about 1,075
people in the Sheraton last week.
And that's par for the course in
the Edmisten campaign, they say
� people come from everywhere
to support the Democratic can-
didate.
Rufus has earned his wide base
of support, staffers say, by wat-
ching out for the average North
Carolina citizen during his tenure
as attorney general. Throughout
his campaign literature there are
constant references to his work on
comsumer issues and homeowner
policies. He strengthened the
Consumer Protection Section of
the attorney general's office in the
10 years he has been there, and
has sponsored 21 bills that are
now N.C. laws protecting citizens
with some of the nation's toughest
standards.
Edmisten has fought mortgage
overcharges and recovered
$300,000 in fines when in-
vestigating illegal operations in
the Southern Bell Corporation.
But looking out for the average
guy is supposed to come to Ed-
misten naturally; after all. he grew
up on a small family farm near
Boone, N.C. He later went to the
University of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, where he graduated
with honors in political science
and religion. He worked for
North Carolina's veneranle Sen.
Sam Ervin and managed to an
outstanding law school tenure.
Such an upbringing gives Ed-
misten the same values as most
North Carolinians, and triis com-
mon bond allows him to work
closely with them, on ther needs.
Edmisten was the first state-wide
official to call for a Victims Com-
pensation Fund and he fought to
have the bill made law. He created
the N.C. White Collar Crime Unit
to investigate crime in business,
and he pushed for the stave's first
drug squad in the State Bureau of
Investigation.
On the hot topic of the political
season, education, Edmisten
drafted the legislation lor the
Teacher Competency Testing Pro-
gram and defended it in court. He
has also pushed for other educa-
tion legislation such as the
monitoring of academic progress
in public schools.
Fighting for the real n:ds of
the citizen is why Edmistei: draws
a strong and wide base of support
from people across the state, staf-
fers say.
�i�� �.�?�
" � !�.





THE EAST CARmiNiAM
APRIL 10. 1984
l
'

Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving tkt campus community
11923.
Pvbllahed ever Tueaday and
Thursday during me academic
yaer and every Wednesday dur
Ing the aummar.
The Em( Carolinian It ma of
flclal newtpeper of East
Carolina University, owned
oparatad, and published for and
by �na students of East Carolina
Unl varsity.
Suaecrletten Rate: tM yearly
The Cast Carolinian efftces
are locate m Dm OM Seat
ftvlMint an ttta campus i tCU
Oreenvtfle. M.C.
POSTMASTER: Sand address
changes to Tha Ea�f Carolinian,
Old South Building, ECU Green
vllla. NC 2734
Telephone: RJNNi 4347, tm
SCHOLARSHIP
Applications ara now being ac
cepfed for the RAY JONES
MEMORIAL SCHOLARSHIP for full
time student- at East Carolina
University, sophomore or above, who
meat the following criteria: Must be a
resident of Pitt County, Demonstrate
financial need. Demonstrate an In
terest in the field of alcoholism, and
Agree to a concentration (6 s.h
minimum) In alcohol andor
alcoholism related courseworli dur
Ing tha term of the scholarship
Tha scholarship will be awarded for
a period of one academic year
��� and shall be for In state tul
tion and fees.
Application are available (and
should be returned to) AlcoholDrug
Education Committee. Room 306, Er
win Hall Deadline April �. )s4.
For more information, call 757649
FANTASY
Coma oln tha Sign Language Club
for an evening of mime, sign, and
�ong. The club will be performing
popular movie and broadway themes
and current popular songs. Sign
language skills are not necessary to
appreciate the performance. Enjoy
tha Fantasy. Tuesday. April 10 at 7 30
p.m. In Wright Auditorium. Admit
slon Is free to everyone.
SENIORS
Now Is your chance to keep up with
events at ECU. after you graduate.
The Pirate Club is offering free
"Crew Club" memberships for
graduating seniors. This consists of a
purple and gold report, dacals, priori
ty on season football and basketball
tickets and much more end thit is
completely free. Contact the Pirate
Club office at 757-417S, or Mark
Niewald at 757-4009 or stop by our
booth at the Student Supply April lj &
13, or Barefoot on the Mall April 19
HOME RUN DERBY
Regittration for the home rvn der
by will end April u the event being
held that same day on the Women's
varsity Softball field. Sign up through
April lj for this slugging activity.
SCHOLARSHIP
Applications ara new being ac
ceoted for tha David B. and Wllla H.
Stevens Scholarship for
undergraduates enrolled In tha Dlvi
�ion of Social Work. Tha 1500.00
Scholarship will be awarded for the
fall semester of 194. The recipient
will be selected on the basis of
academic excellence, financial need,
good citizenship, and dedication to
the Social Work andor Criminal
Justice professions. Applications are
available from and should be return
ad to The Dlvltlnn of Social Work,
Room 314. Allied Health (Carol Balk)
Building. Deadline: April 20, 114.
For more Information call 57S-e96l,
ext. 219.
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
The Brothers of me Eta Nu chapter
of Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity inc. In-
vite everyone to view their display of
fraternal paraphenalla, in the west
area show case. Mendenhall Student
Center.
FLATBALL PLAYERS
Attention: All Flatbed Playert: the
Irates are going to Raleigh this
weekend (April 14 & 15) to dominate
over all the other Plastic Fiatball
Phanatickt In our conference. Total
irate participation it of utmotf Im
portance for this ideal opportunity
Irates � get psyched tor an excep
Nonai performance Be there!
LOAN FUND
All Naltonai Direct Student Loan
Borrowers art reminded of the exit
interview requirement upon gradua
tion or those otherwise not returning
" ECU Fall Semester, 19�4. at
undergraduate or graduate ttudents.
The Interview Is necessary to Inform
NDSL recipients of the repayment
tchedule, provltiont for loan
cancellation, and other pertinent In-
formation. You ara requested to
report to the Multipurpose Room of
the Mendenhall Student Center at
5:30 p.m. on either April 3, April 9, or
April ll, i9t4
SPORT CLUB COUNCIL
The eighth and last meeting for the
1W3 U Sport Club Council will be held
Wednesday, April la, 19�4at4:00p.m
In Room 105B of Memorial Gym
nasJum. Attendance Is required of
representatives of active sport clubs
Representatives must submit at the
meeting the following: Spring
Semester Report, 1984 15 Fall
Semester Schedule. 194 (5 Facility
Request, MM-15 Club Officers, and,
I9t3�4 Club Notebook. Persont or
groupt interested In the Sport Club
Program are Invited to attend the
meetingSport Club Council
Meeting, Weds. April l�, 19�4, 4:00
p.m Rm. 105B, Mem. Gym.
ICE HOCKEY
If you ara interested In playing ice
hockey at ECU next year, please con-
tact George at 752525. Games will
be played against teams tuch at
UNC, N. C. STATE, DUKE, ASU. and
Fort Bragg. Anybody, regardless of
experience or skill. Is encouraged to
inquire.
PHI BETA SIGMA
The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity inc. will be sponsoring a
Jr. Miss Phi Beta Sigma Pageant on
April 27, 194 at the Ramada Inn.
Anyone who would like to share In
thit event with a talent that you would
like to perform on this date art atked
to contact Richard Dawkins at
7S 905 or any brother of the f raterni
ty as soon as possible
WOMEN IN
MINISTRY
A panel discussion will take place
Thursday, April 12, 19�4, 7:30 PM at
the Newman Center, 953 E. Tenth St.
on the role of women In ministry.
Come and hear women Invllved In
various types of minittry answer
questions about their ministry. The
discussion It for women who ara In-
terested in ways of being involved In
ministry and who would like to hear
of more optiont or who want to know
how women already In minittry
perceive their effectiveness, this will
be a good opportunity to learn.
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ It soon
soring "Prime Time" thit Thursday
at 7 p.m. In the Old Joyner Library
room 221. Please loin ut for fun,
fellowship, and Bible study. We are
looking forward to meeting you.
FEAR OF FINALS
The ECU Counseling Center will of
fer a free workshop to assist students
who experience high levels of stress
over final exams. Relaxation skills
will be taught and practiced, and
strategies for taking exams will be
covered. The workshop will meet
from 3-4 PM in 305 Wright Annex on
Tuesdays, April 17 and 24, and on
Wednesdays, April is and 25
Students should plan to attend all four
sessions. For further Information or
to sign up. Call the ECU Couteling
Center at 7S7-�6�i. or stop by room 307
Wright Annex.
RUGBY
Practice this week, Tues Wed
Thur at 4:00 pm. A team election
will be after practice on Tues. Home
same this weekend against UNC CH,
at 2:00 pm, behind Stratford Armt
�ring your coolers, rain or thine
Now players welcome
PHI SIGMA IOTA
Dr Linda Kauff man, a fellow at the
National Humanities Center, will
speak on "Discourses of Desire:
Ovid's Heriodes, The Letters of
Helorse. Letters of a Portuguese
Nun on Thursday, April 12 at 7.30
p.m in Mendenhall Multipurpose
room. Everyone is invited to attend.
TWIRLERTRYOUTS
When: April 15th, 29th and May 5th
Where: Meet In the Lobby of the
Music Building at 2:00, Tryouts ttart
at 300
For more information contact.
Tom Gooltby 757 e982 or Beth
Webster 752 5690
STUDENTS WITH HART
Now Is the time for a new genera
tion of leadership, if you are fed up
with the politics of nostalgia and look
ing for new solutions to the nation's
problems loin Students With Hart. We
ara the vanguard of a new
democracy We will be meeting at
Mendenhall. Ask receptionist for
room number) every Thursday at
p.m For more Information call
752 4935 or 757 3566.
HOMECOMING
Applications are now being ac
cepted for the 194 Student
Homecoming Committee Chairper
son. Applications can be picked up at
either the Mendenhall Information
Desk or the Alumni Center. The
deadline for applying for this position
is Friday. April 13.
FERRARA SUMMER
PROGRAM
A few openings still remain In the
ECU Ferrara Summer Program,
May 7 June 8, 1904. Through the Col
lege of Arts and Sciences In coopera
tion with the University of Ferrara,
Italy, ECU ttudents who participate
will earn 6 hourt of general education
credits. All Courses will be conducted
In English at the University of Fer
rara and lodging provided in unlver
slty housing. Contact Dr Eugene
Ryan, BA 102, or Geraldine Laudatl,
757 6250 before April 15
SOULS
SOULS, on the mall � The Stu
dent Body of East Carolina Univerti
ty it cordially invited to this annual
event sponsored by the Society of
United Liberal Stduents. Please loin
us. There will be food and fun in the
sun for everyone. April 12,1904 from 2
p.m. to 11 p.m. Please loin us in our
Annual Spring Celebration.
LACROSSE
Finally If t here, Lacrosse at ECU
There will be a Lacrosse match at
ECU for the first time. Come on out
and enoy the game of excitement.
The game will be played on Saturday,
April 14. The time and place will be
posted. Practice will be T, TH, and
Fri. from 3-5 p.m.
SCHOLARSHIP
Ladonla S. Wright Memorial
Scholarship - Criteria: Afro
American student enrolled full time,
Af least 2.5 overall GPA, At least 32
semester hourt to be completed by
the end of Spring semester Amount &
Date of Award: Two(2) two hundred
(200) scholarships to be awarded for
the 1904-I5 academic year $ioo each
semester). Application Procedure
Application forms are located In the
Financial Aid Office, Complete and
return to: Dr Dennis Chestnut,
Ptychology Department, Speight 109
Application Deadline. Wednesday
April 11, 1904.
Recipients to be announced April 13.
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
The Brothers of Alpha Phi Alpha
Fraternity inc. announce their Miss
Black and Bold Pageant 1904. All in
terested young ladies should call
752 9741 or contact any brother to
tecure an application.
EDMISTEN'M
All students Interested In loining
the campus organliatlon to elect
Rufus Edmlsten as Governor In 194
please contact Betty Casey or Mecon
Moye (ECU coordinators at 7S2-0311.
SPRING RETREAT
On tha weekend of April 13 15 tha
Baptist Student Union will be having
a Spring Retreat at Emerald Isle.
Rev. W. H. Murphy will be leading on
the topic of Resurrection: Appilca
tion of tha Holy Weak, cost is $25,
which includes Transportation,
mealt, and housing. For details call
752 4646.
ALPHA PHI SIGMA
End of the year party open to all
tocial work and corrections maors
ttudents and faculty ara welcome
Thit will be held on April 16 af 91i Col
lege View Apts. The fun will begin at I
15:30 with food and your favorite I
beverage. Hope to see you therel
ECGC
Tha Eaat Carolina Gay Community
will have it-s last meeting of the
�ameater Monday, April 14 at 7.30
p.m. Tha meeting will be held at the
Catholic Newman Cantor. 953 E Win
St. (at the bottom of College Hill).
Afterwards, their will be a social. Br
ing your favorite beverage andor
something to snack on. All interested
persons are cordially invited to at
tend.
PI KAPPA PHI
Brothers, remember that the an
nual Rose Ball Is this weekend.
Everyone be ready for a malor party
at the Armada at Nags Head. This
week it "Brother Appreciation
Week You little sisters do your big
brother right.
Everyone listen out tor the Pi Kapp
"End of the Year Party " it will be
the day before reading day by the
lake at the PI Kapp House
AIR BAND CONTEST
. At the Elbo. April 17, 194. at 1 00
p.m Sponsored by PRC Sign up �t
the Elbo.
BAHAMA MAMA PARTY
Bahama Mama Party coming
soon April 19th at the Kappa
Sigma House The party starts at 4 30
so get your tickets early See any
brother or little sister for tickets
MANAGEMENT
There will be a meeting Thursday
April 12 for all members of SAM in
room 104 Rawl at 3 00 Elections will
be held during the meeting. All
members interested in holding a of
flee please sign up at Dr Ecksteins
office room 209 Rawl before April 12
BIBLE DISCUSSION
Co-ed Group Bible discussions on
Tuesday, 730 P.M. In Mendenhall i
room 212 Everyone is welcome
Classified ADS
Vou may use the form at right or
tm a teparata ahaat of paper if
you neod more Hoes. There are 33
units per line. Each latter, punc
tuaflon mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
�Pce �t end of line If word
esn't fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone. We
'�serve the right to reject any ad.
AH ads must be prepaid. Eadoat
75 per lime or fracboo of a baa.
Ptceat print legibly! Use capital sad
lower cat letters.
��� THE EAST CAftOUNlA
���� 7 tm Teeaaar before
r-�'r1r ,�
GOLDEN GIRLS
Tryouts for the ECU Pirates
"Golden Girls" dance squad will be
April 14 15. the flrtt mandatory
meeting and practice will be 10 AM.
Saturday, April 14. Don't miss your
chance to dance with ne mighty
"Marching Plratesl"
PIRATE WALK
Closing date is April 15th � There
will be a mandatory meeting for all
persons associated with Pirate Walk
and those interested on April 11th. All
escorts please return their jackets at
this time. Ron Langley and the Stu-
dent Government appreciate
everyones cooperation throughout
the year. Thank you.
Library Expenditures Lagging
(CPS) � Total
operating expenditures
for the nation's college
and university libraries
lagged nearly seven per
cent behind the inflation
rate between the 1978-79
and 1981-82 school years,
according to a new study
by the National Center
for Education Statistics
(NCES).
But it was only one of a
number of severe
economic blows college
libraries have suffered
over the last several
years, the study points
out.
Salary increases for
library workers also fell
seven percent behind the
inflation rate for the
same three-year period.
Total federal funding for
libraries dropped over 23
percent.
Moreover, total book
acquisitions at the 3000
campus libraries surveyed
decreased by over nine
percent, the study shows.
"Overall we found
that, while costs have
continued to go up,
library expenditures have
really been lower than the
inflation rate notes
David Sweet of NCES's
Office for Educational
Research and Improve-
ment.
"We're not sure if the
decreases are part of the
general (funding cutback)
phenomenon that hit all
colleges and universities,
or if libraries were hit
more severly than col-
leges in general he says.
Likewise, a 26 percent
cut in funding for the
University 0f
Oklahoma's library
"may bring us down to a
low academic level says
library assistant Lenore
Clark.
After the cuts go
through, "we won't be
any better than a com-
munity college library
she laments.
Similar problems are
occurring at campus
libraries nationwide
NCES's Sweet
acknowleges.
A
3
�s
Sidewalk
One Table
Books 25lb.
New Remainder
Books Up to 65
Off Pub. Suggested
SQe
FOOD & DRINKS
Popcorn � Candy Apples
15-PEPS!
Cotton Candy
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
WRIGHT BUILDING
Owned & operated by East Carolina University
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contact
so at
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I AIR BAND CONTEST
I e Eibo April 17. 194 at too
I NDortKxeo bv PRC Slfln up �r
If bo
tHAMA MAMA PARTY
i-ra W�r"� Party corning
Apr i i�tti at tt�� Kappa
ous Tte oarr starts at 4:30
.our r.ckr� early See any
iff- m �!� S'S'er tor tickets
MANAGEMENT
e � oe a "lee'ing, Thursday
: �or an memberi of SAM in
104 ��� a' 3 00 Election will
held 0nrtn ?�� rr�e�ftng All
nt�ri nrrested .n holding a ot
r �� Sign op a' Or Ecusfeinj
r room x Ha! oetore April �j.
BIBLE DISCUSSION
M Srojp B'bie discussions on
'� p� in Mendenhall,
2 Ever or is welcome


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in funding for the
diversity 0 f
Iklahoma's library
lay bring us down to a
academic level says
frary assistant Lenore
la-k
tter the cuts go
;ugh, "�e won't be
l better than a com-
lity college library
laments,
similar problems are
curnng at campus
'anes nationwide,
Sweet
enow leges.
1
DRINKS
indy Apples
'EPS!
Candy
(CPS) - When a lone-
ly candidate named Gary
Hart visited Albanv in
May, 1983, Gov. Mario
Cuomo was too busy to
see him.
Hart's organizers gave
up trying to book a room
at the State University of
New York-Albany cam-
pus because, as one
organizer remembers it,
they were worried the
candidate couldn't draw
a crowd big enough to fill
one.
Things have changed.
In the weeks before the
April 3 New York
primary, the campus
chapter of Americans
with Hart had about 100
volunteers, about 40 of
whom were "active
says Michael Schmall, the
campus campaign's co-
coordinator.
Hart Receives Much
gglCAOtJNjj mm i0lvw
And while there is stu-
dent support for both
Walter Mondale and
Jesse Jackson on the
campus, Patty Salkin, the
officially-uncommitted
head of the Albany State
Young Democrats, con-
cedes that "from what
I've seen and personal
contact, I'd say there's a
lot of student interest in
Hart
Indeed, for the first
time since 1972, a
Democratic presidential
candidte seems to have
caught fire among a
broad cross section of
students around the
country.
Over 5000 students
heard Hart speak at the
University of Illinois two
weeks ago. About 1200
showed up to listen to
him at Cal-Berkeley,
while another 300
couldn't get in. During
the Massachusetts
primary. Hart handily
won student precincts in
Amherst.
Now Eric Schwartz,
Hart's youth coor-
dinator, speaks of
mobilizing a nationwide
volunteer corps of 10,000
students to match Walter
Mondale's volunteers
from organized labor.
At Marquette, Hart
seems to be drawing a lot
of support on a campus
that is "about 80 percent
Republican reports
Kevin Jereczek, president
of Marquette's Young
Democrats' chapter.
With the possible ex-
ception of schools in New
York and Pennsylvania,
adds the nominally-
uncommitted Dave Smith
Radio Request Halted
By KIM CRAIG
Suff W rltrr
A petition filed bv
WECT-TV, Channel 6 in
Wilmington to the
Federal Communications
Commission has placed a
freeze on the license ap-
plication for a public
radio station to be based
near Greenville, said
David Wright, director of
engineering at public
radio station WUNC in
Chapel Hill.
In September 1982,
Greenville citizens and
members of ECU faculty
agreed to support the
proposal of a public radio
station in Pitt County.
Along with the support of
the City Council, the
Greenville City School
Board, and the mayor,
Vn UNC agreed to help the
proposed station meet
National Public Radio
standards. The ECU
Faculty Senate also voted
unanimously last week to
help support the pro-
posal.
Last year, WUNC ap-
plied to both the FCC for
a license to operate a new
public radio station and
to the Public Telecom-
munications Facilities
Program for construction
funds. Even though the
funding proposal was
found favorable, the
PTFP was unable to
grant the requested funds
because the FCC applica-
tion has been delayed due
to opposition from Sta-
tion WECT-TV.
Channel 6 has filed a
"petition to deny" the
construction of a public
radio station in Green-
ville because non-
commercial radio stations
at the bottom end of the
FM dial can interfere
with the reception of TV
Channel 6.
Station 88.3 was the
original proposed fre-
quency, but it is located
close to the lower limit of
the FM dial.
The FCC has now im-
posed a freeze on all ap-
plications for public
radio stations which
could potentiallv in-
terfere with Channel 6
reception.
Attorneys for WUNC
said the freeze should not
apply to the proposed
Greenville station and the
FCC has no legal or
regulatory basis to delay
or deny the grant of a
license. The Chapel Hill
station recently learned
that the FCC has an
"unannounced policy"
of freezing all public
radio applications which
are opposed by TV Chan-
nel 6, without reviewing
the validity of the com-
plaints, according to
Director of Radio Gary
Shivers. The attorneys
feel the FCC has frozen
the new station applica-
tion even though the sta-
tion does not meet all the
requirements of delaying
license application.
"The FCC is not acting
in accordance with public
rules and regulations
said WUNC Engineering
Director David Wright.
In January, funding
proposals were reac-
tivated to the PTFP and
construction funds
should be granted this
spring if the FCC acts
favorably on the applica-
tion for the new station,
Shivers said.
In case the FCC does
not grant the license,
WUNC is working on
proposing a new frequen-
cy (90.5) which would be
higher on the FM dial. If
the station is given this
frequency, Channel 6 has
agreed to lift the "peti-
tion to deny as long as
the frequency will not in-
terfere with their station,
said Jim Rees, a Green-
ville member of the
WUNC Advisory Coun-
cil. However, a religious
station in Wilson has also
applied for this new fre-
quency.
Another public radio
station (89.5) in New
Bern at Craven County
Community College
which is scheduled to go
on the air in May, has
also objected to the Pitt
County station.
Representatives of the
New Bern station feel
public radio in Greenville
would represent a
duplication of service.
If the FCC grants the
license, Rees stated, the
earliest the station would
begin operating would be
next spring. The station
would be built over a
period of five years, but
would begin transmitting
out of WUNC. At the
end of the five years, the
new station would have
full studio facilities and
be locally operated.
Jim Ensor, manager of
WZMB, also supports the
proposal of a public radio
station. Rees commented,
"The station in no way
will conflict with WZMB,
but will enhance because
they will no longer feel
obligated to play certain
types of music, and will
become more student
oriented
of Young Democrats'
headquarters in
WAshington, D.C
"campuses are pro-Hart
as opposed to Mondale
"I sense a great lack of
enthusiasm and lack of
inspiration for
Mondale says Cathy
Campbell, Berkeley's stu-
dent body president.
Campbell believes
Hart's "spunk" and
faithful evocation of the
Kennedy style probably
help attract student sup-
port as much as anything.
Mondale's student
organizers contend their
volunteers are more con-
cerned with issues than
Hart's.
"Students who look at
the issues and not at ap-
pearance are swinging to
Mondale claims
Valarie White, national
student coordinator at
Mondale headquarters in
Washington.
Mondale's campus
supporters, adds Sean
O'Brien of SUNYA's
Students for Mondale
chapter, are more "com-
mitted" than Hart's.
"Rather than jumping on
the bandwagon, they are
a determined group
In a sort of reverse
bandwagon effect,
O'Brien says "we got 10
new members" after Hart
beat Mondale in the New
Hampshire primary in
early March.
"Since New Hamp-
shire, (the campaign) has
really started to roll
adds Schmall of Hart's
campus group. Schmall
says he has 40-45 active
volunteers. O'Brien says
he has 30.
Both have been cour-
ting student support �
and the immensely
valuable free labor that
comes with it � for a
long time.
Hart, for example,
made campaign hops
through northern
California and Colorado
campuses as early as spr-
ing, 1982.
Hart spoke against the
nuclear arms buildup to
University of Denver
students in May. 1982
The month before,
Mondale delivered the
same message at Yale.
Mondale and his fami-
ly have worked campuses
in all the big caucus and
primary states for the last
two years. Hart's reach
has been a little shorter,
due primarily to having
less money to spend.
Still, by last
November, Patti Grogan,
president of the national
Young Democrats, told
College Press Service,
"There is no student can-
didate. No one has really
touched the hearts and
minds of students across
the nation
The early primaries
and caucuses appear to
have changed that.
"I think there is a
revival of student ac-
tivism contends Chris
Phillips, a Hart national
student support coor
J mat or
"Student activism is
coming around a little
bit sayj Brian
Grossman, president of
the University of Illinois'
College Democrats, of
the campus support for
Hart But "we still have a
little way to go to get
students involved
Involved or not,
students historically
don't vote. Only 30 per-
cent of the registered
college-aged voters ac-
tually cast ballots in the
1980 presidential race.
"The problem is get-
ting people out to vote
points out Ilise Levine, a
Hart worker at SUNYA.
The Jackson cam-
paign, which appears to
have wilted after a
uproarious campus start
last fall, has had the most
success in actually bring-
ing new voters into the
system, the observers sug-
gest
At SUNYA, the stu-
dent Democrats' am-
bitious voter registration
plan has run out of
money, and now relies on
"word of mouth Salkm
says.
The College
Republicans, on the other
hand, say they have a
registration budget,
which they'll use for the
general election.
At SUNYA, College
Republicans chapter
President Will
Kamishlian says that, un-
til the general election in
the fall, his group will
"sit back and watch the
Democrats slit each
others' throats
"The interes: is there"
in supporting President
Reagan's re-election
drive, Kamishiian says,
though "it's not on the
surface
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i 11
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�1? last (Earnltnfan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, a����,
Darryl - - tt
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK. v� J.T. PlETRZAK. ,v� ((V 0,f,umf
Tina Maroschak. m. a, mike McParti and. m.
Ed Nicklas. im MM tom Norton. � - u
Gordon Ipock. m, a, rathy Fuerst. , tr,
Mark Barker, (m m Mike Mayo. mwaj.g
April 10. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
SGA Duties
Knowledge of System Essential
Members of the SGA Legislature
ought to do more than pass ap-
propriations by consent. A little
knowledge is a dangerous thing,
especially when mixed with a
moderate amount of power.
The SGA, like most large
organizations, has a few people
who carry the load and do all the
work; the rest show up enough to
hang on, but invest precious little
real time and energy.
The legislature has an important
job, and its members are given a
trust by the student body. There is
considerable power in the SGA
Legislature to shape university life,
and its servants must accept the
work that goes along with the
privilege and responsibilityof their
offices.
That's why the events last night
and of a few weeks previous in the
legislature are so disturbing. Far
too many of the legislators are not
knowledgeable enough in routine
parliamentary procedure to con-
duct a standard meeting; Speaker
Kirk Shelley regularly takes time to
explain the rules and procedures
legislators must follow to carry out
items of business. And worse yet,
virtually none are familiar enough
with the SGA Constitution to ex-
plain or debate what it really says.
That point became woefully ob-
vious a few weeks ago when there
was a major question of constitu-
tional interpretation concerning the
legislature's power to call for a
referendum. The situation was
sticky and complex, and virtually
only one person in the room knew
the Constitution well enough to in-
terpret it � Shelley.
The trouble is, interpretation is
just that � one person's idea of
what he thinks the Constitution
says. In this case, the Constitution
did not expressly say anywhere that
the legislature can call for a
referendum, but neither did it say
that it could not. It said only that
the student body can � Shelley
took that to mean only the students
can, and the legislature absolutely
cannot.
Things get murkier. The referen-
dum concerned an ECU Public In-
terest Research Group, something
Shelley opposes and even made a
special trip to his former committee
to vote against. Now, let's give him
the dubious benefit of the doubt
and say he did the right thing and
kept personal feelings out of this,
i.e he didn't make his interpreta-
tion to stop PIRG. After all, he is
a man of good conservative convic-
tions, and such a strict interpreta-
tion of the constitution, implying
no powers that are not expressly
writ, would probably suit him. But,
if he or anyone else in his position,
with the power to control the
debate, were to abuse their office
and construe rules to suit their own
ends, the legislators would be
powerless to stop it. You see, no
one else in the room that night
knew enough about the constitu-
tion or the interpretation of it to of-
fer more than token challenge to
Shelley. Though the legislature
ostensibly debated it, in the end
Shelley's decision was rub-
berstamped by the legislators, part-
ly because they knew no better,
partly because they wanted to get
home. (Things really turned far-
cical when Shelley had to explain
the procedure legislators could use
to argue for or against him; he had
to tell the rules of how they could
challenge his interpretation �
"trust me)
Monday, three weeks later, we
find out that Attorney General
Harry Dest considers Shelley's in-
terpretation, and the legislature's
decision, all wrong. He studied the
case, asked advice of professional
scholars, and came to the conclu-
sion that the legislature can call for
a referendum. (In fact, it was done
in 1978.) Now, no one expects a
legislator to match Dest's hours of
research when a question pops up
quickly on the house floor. But one
does expect a legislator to be
familiar with the constitution,
familiar enough to be able to inter-
pret it and use it: as familiar with it
as their colleague Kirk Shelley.
There were obviously those who
disagreed with Shelley's interpreta-
tion, and with valid reasons; but
they just were not able to articulate
their reasons within the rules of the
forum.
So, a little knowledge is a
dangerous thing � the knowledge
of how to pass a bill or ruling but
without knowledge of what it really
does or means. There are times
when the responsibility of the
legislature is considerable � it's
not all just appropriating $50 for
some awards banquet � and it is
then that legislators need most to
live up to their obligation and the
trust students have placed in them.
It is then when the shirking of their
responsibilities is most harmful and
dangerous.
Bill Prediction Is No Trick
sdfcr
?
By GREG RIDEOUT
Interesting things should be passed
along. That is the job of a newspaper �
telling you things you don't know. A col-
umnist usually gives out his information in
an opinionated way, but sometimes, as
"Dragnet's" Jack Webb used to intone,
it's "just the facts
Neat and keen to one person is dull and
boring to another. My gee-wiz tidbit is for
those of us who enjoy technology and
politics. It seems as if two researchers can
figure out the fate of a bill via a statistical
model in a computer. I know. It doesn't
sound novel. But think of the implica-
tions. The two inventers have.
Economist W. Mark Crain and graduate
student Donald R. Leavens analzyed more
than 1,500 bills and deduced about a
dozen factors that influence passage. They
then took these 12 criteria and predicted
seven bills in committee would make it to
the House floor. Seven did.
The neat thing is that technology just ac-
celerated a process known to savvy Capitol
Hill dwellers. The factors, you see, had
nothing to do with the merits of the bill
itself. No, the factors all related to the
"folkways" of Congress.
The adherence to the traditions of
seniority and specialization, the two
researchers knew, had a lot to do with
what legislation gets enacted. So, among
the bits of information they threw into
their computer were how powerful the
people who supported a particular bill
were and their ranking within committee.
They also only studied committees because
the researchers knew a favorably-reported
bill usually passed a full vote.
What all this leads to is that they're sell-
ing their "Billcast" services to lobbyists.
This new device could manage and direct
lobbying efforts by corporations and in-
terest groups to areas that indicate need.
Lobbying would be streamlined. Some are
already convinced.
Exxon, Union Carbide and
Westinghouse have signed up for the
George Mason University professor's and
grad student's services. They will be pay-
ing up to $10,000 for them.
Technology and politics are now united
in yet another way. Pretty soon, it seems,
politics will be more machine than people
oriented. I do not favor one way over the
other. Politics must march onward, and
innovations such as this are part of the
trail of time.
Me, I just think it's neat. The way the two
guys figured all this out and are now sell-
ing it. Only in America.
OF COURSE IT5A SUCCESS I JUST WISH WE HAP PUT IT
IN k LITRE HIGHER ORBIT
Hart Should Be Democrats' Bet
With
By MORTON KONDRACKE
Throughout his cold, lonely year in
the single digits, Gary Hart never
doubted that he would emerge tirst as
Walter Mondle's chief rival, then as the
Democratic nominee. He has reached
the first goal in dazzling style and
though the second remain a lutie
beyond his grasp, Hart says he is sure
not only about getting nominated but
also about getting elected president.
"I hate to say things like that because
it always comes out in black and white
sounding more arrogant than 1 intend
it he said in an interview aboard his
campaign plane, "but I'm telling you
that my instincts tell me I can do it
How? "Look he said, "the Reagan
strategy is to do two things � blame all
the problems on the Demo rats and
practice what I call the politics of
distraction � try and get people to pay
attention to abortion, school prayer and
other highly polarized social issues and
not deficits and the arms race I'll take
both those away from him, and I'll be a
smaller target for Reagan than a tradi
tional Democrat would be
On the issues level of general election
strategy, Hart plans to put Reagan on
the defensive on such issues as the
federal budget deficit, the continuing
unemployment of 9 million workers
("the only people back at work in the
recovery are the ones he put out of work
in the recession"), the failure to rebuild
basic American industry, the deteriora-
tion of the infrastructure, and the loss of
U.S. leadership in trade and technology.
Assuming Hart is nominated, a major
tactic of his race against Reagan will be
to play upon fears of what a second
Reagan term would be like. Hart said
that in spite of the economic recovery
and generally favorable public attitudes
about Reagan, "people will vote against
him out of fear of nuclear war, a Pen-
tagon out of control, and fear of the loss
of American lives in Central America,
the Persian Gulf and Lebanon
Hart has found a compelling way to
attack Reagan on the budget deficits: he
raises the issue to the level of ethics.
"The Reagan deficits threaten the sur-
vival and competitiveness of the
economy for decades to come he told
a University of Georgia audience. "I
believe these unjustified and unaffor-
dable deficits represent an economic
Vietnam that will come back to haunt
your generation as long as you live. For
the first time in this nation's history, one
generation is stealing from future
generations to pay for the immediate
greed of a handful of interests and to get
President Reagan re-elected. This is an
example of economic immorality
Another line of attack that Hart in-
tends to employ is "corruption" among
Reagan appointees. In a late-January
speech in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, Hart
charged that "almost 50 high-ranking
officials in the Reagan administration
have faced serious allegations involving
criminal wrongdoing, unethical
behavior or abuses of power and
privilege
He cited such cases as Richard Allen's
acceptance of $1,000 and three watches
from a Japanese inerviewer; Anne Bur-
ford's coziness with industrial polluters;
stock market investigations involving a
former National Security Council of-
ficial, Thomas Reed, and a former depu-
ty defense secretary, Paul Thayer; and at
least five cases of potential conflict of
interest.
1 he speech got tittle notice a the time.
but it will be ievived in an effort to show
that officials of this anti-government
don't mind using government to enrich
themselves.
Unlike the sort of Democrats Reagan
could lambast as "captives of an anti-
growth, dinosaur mentality Hart of-
fer ; an appealing future of growth, pro-
sperity and opportunity � and also of
equalitv. justice, peace and idealism.
Does the country yearn for
its first two-term
presidency since Ike's, or
does it want yet another
"fresh start'1?
Hart's vision is every bit as optimistic
as Reagan's, and he tops it off in talking
to college audicnccb with this dig: "Our
nation hasn't passed its prime. Our
leaders have That line brings almost as
much applause as the never-failing, "We
should not send American boys to die
unnecessarily in Lebanon, for Persian
Gulf oil, or to serve as bodyguards for
Central American dictators
Hart's political strategy is to hold the
traditional Democratic base �
minorities, liberals, workers and issue
activists � while reaching out (as Walte;
Mondale couldn't) to independents and
moderate Republicans.
Reagan's strategy meanwhile, is to
peel off so-called "weak Democrats" �
southern whites and urban blue-collar
workers � as he did in 1980. That is
crucial constituency, representing 25
percent of the electorate and the
"politics of distraction" is crucial to
keeping it.
According to the public opinion
analyst William Schneider, Reagan also
is trying to pull at this group by
"neutralizing the economic issue" �
talking up the current recovery to get
workers to forget the 1982 recession.
Hart will try to remind them about 1982,
scare them about 1985, and inspire them
about the future.
He is also relying on his Senate record
� "perfectly acceptable to all elements
of the Democratic party in the North
and Northeast Hart says � and on the
unifying desire of labor and other
groups to be rid of Ronald Reagan. And
Hart, like Mondale, will try to expand
the core Democratic turnout by en-
couraging voter registration and get-out-
the-vote efforts among southern blacks,
Hispanics, younger women and others.
He said he knows he needs to reach out
more to blacks and he plans to do so by
"symbolic actions such as visiting
Tuskegee Institute.
Hart's "new generation" appeal is
designed to overcome ideological dif-
ferences withing the 61-million-strong
cohort of voters between 25 and 44 years
old, and especially within the "baby
boom" group, aged 29 to 38, which
represents 23 percent of the electorate.
The most salient characteristic of
younger voters, according to Schneider,
is their independence from the two par-
ties and their formative political ex-
periences of Vietnam, Watergate and the
economic insecurity of the 1970s. Hart is
offering them non-interventionism, an
aversion to special-interest politics and a
renewal of the economy.
Accusations that Hart is a cool,
piagmativ . lb I help
him with thi. group, manv of v horn
voted for John nderson lasi time
Anderson's "national unity" campaign
plans for 1984 would b� . lercul bj a
Hart candidacy Indeed, Har; telis
young audiences he'll establish a
government I
without saying shat that means beyond
equalit) foi women.
On one level, this campaign really
may boil down to a generational con-
flic does the country yearn for its first
two-term president since Ike's, or does
it want yet anothci ' fresl -tart"1
If Hart is the nominee, it wil. mean
that the Deomc iriv. Par at leasl, was
ready for its own generational leap this
year rather than in 1988 as on Gary
Hart, among politicians of his age
group, seeniv to ha- e seen. Tne televi-
sion networks, anothei leading
American institution. hac replaced an
older generation of anchormen
(Cronkite. Chancellor. Reynolds) with a
new generation (Rathe. Brokaw, Jenn-
ings). We'll see in November if the coun-
try wants the same sort of toothy new
face behind the big anchor desk in the
Oval Office studio.
Hart currently leads th; president in
the Gallup Poll, but the president has
the White House and the capacity to
shape the terms of the debate. Neither
side would be wise to underestimate the
other. Ronald Reagan has been beaten
by Republicans, but never by a
Democrat.
Gary Hart, it he wins the nomination,
will have done it by shrewdly exploiting
the flaws m Walter Mondaie's s:rateg
of inevitability and by toughing it out
against the establishment of his party.
Reagan vs. Hart ought to be some con-
ies
"Campus Forum
One Question:
English To
Anthropology?
In response to Alex Albnght's
criticism of Charles D. Shavitz in the
Thursday, April 4 issue of The East
Carolinian. I ask the reading public to
ponder:
How does a so called lecturer in the
English department become an over-
night expert in anthropology?
Jay B. Shavitz
Grernville
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. M,ii! or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfsl. Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Stuaents
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Crime B
�y STEPHEN
HARDING
Vandalism and larceny
contributed to the rise in
campus crime last week
along with a number of
DWI's and curfew and
visitation policy viola-
tions
On April 4 a computer
was reported stolen. The
Public Safety Depart-
ment is offering a $100
reward for information
leading to the arrest and
conviction of person(s)
involved in the larceny.
The School of Business
added $150 to the reward
for a total or" $250.
Incidents reported to
the ECU Public Safety
Department from April 2
through 9 were:
April 2, 12:45 a.m. �
A female student
reported receiving narass-
ing phone cads; 1:30a.m.
� John Durwood
Moore, Jr. of
Washington, N.C. was
arrested for DWI; 3:45
a.m. � Teresa M. Faison
of 402 Fletcher w as found
in violation of curfew and
visitation policy; 8:42
a.m. � Margaret A.
Staabof 413-D Belk Hai
was written ud for
disorderly conduct for
use of vulgar language on
the east side of Joyner
Library; 5:12 p.m. �
Housekeeping Services
requested assistance with
a disgruntled employee;
11:35 p.m. � A female
student reported being
verbally assaulted north
of Ficklen Stadium.
April 3, 3:10 p.m. � A
report of vandalism to a
vehicle parked west of
Scon Hall; 3:45 p.m. �
A report of larceny of a
purse from a third floor
voice practice room in the
Music Building; 4:20
p.m. � A report of the
larceny of PA speakers
from Fletcher Hall; 4:48
p.m. � A report of van-
dalism to a computer ter-
minal in reference room
105 in Joyner Library; 11
p.m. � A report of the
larceny of the panic bar
and lock assembly from
the southwest curfew
door of Jones Hall, some
of which was recovered.
April 4, 1:20 a.rr � A
report of the larceny of
property from the nor-
LaSalle
Studies
Incidents
An investigation of
sexual harassment of
students by professors
has been initiated by
Mick LaSalle. An upcom-
ing "expose" on the pro-
blem is planned. "This is
no joke. There's a serious
problem here and I'm
perfectly serious about
getting to the bottom of
it LaSalle said.
Although LaSalle's in-
vestigation is still young,
he said he's already un-
covered many incidents
of harassment. "I'm not
talking about students be-
ing asked to dinner or
coffee he said. "I'm
talking about women be-
ing pressed against walls
or being psychologically
manipulated by men who
have a great deal to say-
about their academic
fate
LaSalle sa d that most
of ECU's professors are
responsible individuals
and doesn't expect to dig
up a lot of involved in-
dividuals. "The pattern
so far indicates a few peo-
ple making a lot of moves
on mosthvywa women
students. The girl gets
scared, keeps quiet, and
leaves the guy free to try
�fain later, on the same
girl or on a new one
LaSalle is currently
conducting confidential
interviews with students
who fed they have been
exually harassed at
Those interested in
LaSalle can do
io at 758-9474 or
'52-0341.
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Question:
h To
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the
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1 Mail t)r
1 ice in (he Old
1 toy net
1 Ment nation, all tet-
1 fw Iuh, major and 1 foew, phone number V :he author(s). 1 etiers
I vpewritten pages, I 1 or near I printed. All eel to editing for been-h nJ ftfee, � j no personal I be pt 'nuted Students, � ' ror (his minded that they art limited K five issue
Crime
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
�y STEPHEN
HARDING
SMTWiMw
Very
Vandalism and larceny
contributed to the rise in
campus crime last week
along with a number of
DWI's and curfew and
visitation policy viola-
tions.
On April 4 a computer
was reported stolen. The
Public Safety Depart-
ment is offering a $100
reward for information
leading to the arrest and
conviction of person(s)
involved in the larceny.
The School of Business
added $150 to the reward
for a total of $250.
Incidents reported to
the ECU Public Safety
Department from April 2
through 9 were:
April 2, 12:45 a.m. �
A female student
reported receiving harass-
ing phone calls; 1:30 a.m.
� John Durwood
Moore, Jr. of
Washington, N.C. was
arrested for DWI; 3:45
a.m. � Teresa M. Faison
of 402 Fletcher was found
in violation of curfew and
visitation policy; 8:42
a.m. � Margaret A.
Staab of 413-D Belk Hall
as written up for
disorderly conduct for
use of vulgar language on
the east side of Joyner
Library; 5:12 p.m. �
Housekeeping Services
requested assistance with
a disgruntled employee;
11:35 p.m. � A female
student reported being
verbally assaulted north
of Ficklen Stadium.
April 3, 3:10 p.m. �A
report of vandalism to a
vehicle parked west of
Scott Hall; 3:45 p.m. �
A report of larceny of a
purse from a third floor
voice practice room in the
Music Building; 4:20
p.m. � A report of the
iarceny of PA speakers
from Fletcher Hall; 4:48
p.m. � A report of van-
dalism to a computer ter-
minal in reference room
105 in Joyner Library; 11
p.m. � A report of the
larceny of the panic bar
and lock assembly from
the southwest curfew
door of Jones Hall, some
of which was recovered.
April 4, 1:20 a.m. �A
report of the larceny of
property from the nor
theast corner of Aycock
Hall, some of which was
recovered; 2:30 a.m. �
James Marion Pearce of
Hamlet, N.C. was ar-
rested for DWI and driv-
ing while license was
revoked on College Hill
Drive; 10:10 a.m. � A
report of breaking, enter-
ing and larcency from a
pastry machine in the
canteen of Greene Hall;
7:50 a.m. � A report of
breaking, entering and
larceny of a computer
from room 238 Rawl
Building; 10:40 a.m. �A
report of larceny from
the basketball area of
Minges Coliseum; 7:48
p.m. � A report the
coins in a candy vending
machine in the Garrett
Hall canteen were accessi-
ble.
April 5, 1:38 a.m. � A
report of the larceny of
the receiver and cord
from the house phone in
the lobby of Belk Hall;
6:05 p.m. � A report
that the sandwich
machine on the second
floor of the Allied Health
Building was unsecured;
6:15 p.m. � Shequita
Ratliff of 501 Greene
Hall reported being
threatened by Danetta
Moore of 711 Greene
Hall; 10:20 p.m. � A
report of a disturbance
on the tenth floor of Cle-
ment Hall; 10:45 p.m. �
A report the glass panel
of a phone booth nor-
thwest of Scott Hall was
broken; 10:50 p.m. � A
report of Vandalism to a
basketball goal post east
of Belk Hall.
April 6, 1:25 a.m. �
Christopher Keith Hardy
of Jay, Fla. was arrested
for DWI and found
operating a vehicle
reported stolen to the
Escambia County
Sheriff's Office in Pen-
sacola, Fla; 1:30 a.m. �
Kurt Dennis Feike of 172
Aycock Hall was arrested
for DWI; 4 p.m. �
Danetta Moore of 711
Greene Hall was arrested
for communicating
threats to Shequjta
Ratliff of 501 Greene
Hall; 10:20 p.m. � Jeff
Michael Ramey of 210-A
Scott was found
operating a vehicle after
consuming alcohol; 11:45
p.m. � Joan Marian
Holder of 219 Unstead
Hall and Cora Elizabeth
Clark of 202 Umstead
Hall were reported con-
ducting themselves in a
disorderly manner in
Greene Hall; 11:58 p.m.
� A report of a
suspicious and
unescorted, black male in
Greene Hall.
April 7, 12:24 a.m. �
A report the inside galley
door to the cafeteria in
Mendenhall Student
Center was unsecured; 3
a.m. � Marianne
Vischetti of 310 Gotten
Hall and Christopher. S.
Miele of 482 Jones Hall
were found in violation
of curfew and visitation
policy in 310 Cotten Hall;
8:38 a.m. � A report of
two black males acting
suspicious in the Spilman
Building; 5:30 p.m. � A
report the doors to the of-
fices of Coach Ed Emory
and the secretarv were
unlocked; 10:10 p.m. �
Curtis R. Hall, Samuel E.
Tyson, and Yul Wells, all
from Greenville, were
banned from campus for
disorderly conduct in
Mendenhall Student
Center and at the
southeast corner of
Greene Hall; 11:40 p.m.
� A report of vandalism
to a motorcycle parked
south of the Bloxton
House.
April 8, 12:25 a.m. �
Sean Kevin Olson of
101-B Belk Hall was
given a campus citation
for exceeding the posted
speed limit by 15 mph or
more on College Hill
Drive; 1:15 � A report
of vandalism to the win-
dow between first and se-
cond floors in the central
stairwell in Slay Hall;
Allan Rainford Watkins
of 201 E. 8th St. and
Gregory Ryan of 217-D
Board Action
Belk Hall were found in
possession of and
discharging pyrotechnics
on the second northwest
wing bathroom; 9 a.m. �
A report the medeco lock
of door number 2
Ragsdale was unlocked
and malfunctioning; A
report art type murals
were stapled to a wall on
the main floor of
Ragsdale; 9:20 a.m. �
Bill Congdon of 203-D
Belk Hall was found in
possession of a key to
door number 8 of the
Music Recital Hall; 10:25
a.m. � Demetra Jay
Gooding of 123 Fletcher
Hall and Bill E. Mc-
Collum, a non-student,
were found in violation
of curfew and violation
policy in room 123 Flet-
cher Hall; 11.10 a.m. �
The windows to room 117
Flanagan were found to
have no locks and were
temporarily secured; 7:05
p.m.
Freshman
Freshman
Possession of mari- Guiltv
luana �
Possession
firearms
of Guilty
Decision
Probation for one year
Fine � $125
Written reprimand
Voluntary work � 40
hours
Junior
Stealing
Guilty
Fine � $50
Written reprimand
Probation for one year
Restitution
Sophomore
Possession of
counterfeit dr ugs
Guilty
Sophomore
Possession of drug
paraphernalia
Guilty
Drug and Alcohol
Workshop
Probation for one year
Voluntary work � 40
hours
Written reprimand
Fine � $60
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FAMILY RESTAURANTS
LaSalle
Studies
Incidents
An investigation of
sexual harassment of
students by professors
has been initiated by
Mick LaSalle. An upcom-
ing "expose" on the pro-
blem is planned. "This is
no joke. There's a serious
problem here and I'm
perfectly serious about
getting to the bottom of
it LaSalle said.
Although LaSalle's in-
vestigation is still young,
he said he's already un-
covered many incidents
of harassment. "I'm not
talking about students be-
ing asked to dinner or
coffee he said. "I'm
talking about women be-
ing pressed against walls
or being psychologically
manipulated by men who
have a great deal to say
about their academic
fate
LaSalle said that most
of ECU's professors arc
responsible individuals
and doesn't expect to dig
up a lot of involved in-
dividuals. �'The pattern
so far indicates a few peo-
ple making a lot of moves
on mostly young women
students. The girl gets
scared, keeps quiet, and
�caves the guy free to try
again later, on the same
girl or on a new one
LaSalle is currently
conducting confidential
interviews with students
who feel they have been
sexually harassed at
ECU. Those interested in
contacting LaSalle can do
so at 758-9474 or
752-0341.
1 OS Airport Ro
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(919)758-0327
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Souls on The MaII
The Student Body
of
East Carolind University
is cordially invited
to this annual event
sponsored by the
Society of United Liberal Students
Please join us. There will be food and fun in th
sun for everyone
Apml 12, 1984
2 p.M. - 11 p.M.
Pe�).se torn us in our
Annu.il Spring ("elcbr.ition
fyrWml
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1 HI I S1 CAROl IN!AN
APRIi 10, 1984
Genital Herpes Studied
By TINA MAROSC HAK
A study on genital
herpes indicates that the
need exists for both in-
creased quantity and im-
proved quality of educa-
tion. "Date reveal that
these (ECU) college
students have little ac-
curate knowledge about
genital herpes except that
it is incurable said Pro-
fessor and Counselor
lona J. Ryan and
Associate Professor of
Health Education
Patricia C. Dunn, after a
recent study.
Dunn and Ryan col-
lected data from 1,011
ECU students in 35 sec-
tions of the Health 1000
classes by questioning
them on their actual
knowledge of herpes.
'Perhaps no other
disease in recent times,
with the possible excep-
tion of AIDS, has
generated such fear and
wariness about sexual
contact among sexually
active individuals as
genital herpes they
said.
Among the
respondents (60 percent
female and 40 percent
male), females tended to
know slightlv more about
the symptons of genital
herpes than the males.
However, no significant
difference existed bet
ween students who were
educated on the subject.
Approximately 72.8 per-
cent of the students
surveyed were freshmen.
During the fall of 1983,
"students were asked to
respond to 16 multiple-
choice questions relatie
to the situation in terms
of cause, transmission,
symptoms, recurring
symptoms, stages of in-
fectiousness, complica-
tions, treatment, and
diagnosis of genital
herpes Ryan said.
Results showed that
females responded cor-
rectly to questions in five
areas more frequently
than males. "Females in
significantly greater pro-
portion than males knew
1) the agent that causes
genital herpes is similar to
the one that causes cold
sores; 2) the symptoms of
active herpes in the male;
3) the symptoms in the
female; 4) the most ac-
curate means of diagnos-
ing herpes is by having a
viral culture; and 5) a per
son can have both Herpe,
Type I and Herpes Typo
II infections at the same
time stated the report.
Seventy percent of the
students said they receiv-
ed most information
about herpes (in terms of
mass media sources) from
magazine articles. Televi-
sion and radio were
sources for 63 percent of
the respondants. "Only
42 (.04 percent) students
indicated that they had
not received any informa-
tion about herpes
through the mass
media stated Dunn and
Ryan's report.
"Despite the exposure
of these students to con-
siderable mass media in-
formation about genital
herpes and, in the case of
22 percent of the
students, actual
classroom instruction
about the disease, this
study reveals the level of
accurate knowledge
about herpes is meager
stated the report.
Ryan and Dunn found
that "students not only
lack accurate understan-
ding about genital herpes
but have insufficient
knowledge to take the
necessary steps to control
the spread of the disease
and to get treatment
The two will present
the paper this month at
the American College
Health Association
meeting in Atlanta,
Georgia.
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Rose Cites Previous
Case As Precedent
For Insanity Pleas
ByDALESWANSON
sun Wrllrr
"North Carolina,
along with many other
states, is still using a
140-year-old case as the
precedent for its 'guilty
by reason of insamt'
plea said Dr. Selwin
Rose, forensic
psychiatrist and attorney,
in a Friday lecture entitl-
ed "Are Killers Insane In
North Carolina?"
Rose began his lecture
with a short history of the
law as it applies to the
mentally ill. He described
the 1843 case of Daniel
McNaughton, a paranoid
schizophrenic who tried
to kill Sir Robert Peele.
McNaughton was
declared insane by the
court and was sent to an
institution. This historic
case has since been used
extensively as a precedent
for handeling insanity
pleas both in Europe and
the U.S.
The rest of Rose's lec-
ture dealt with three dif-
ferent cases in North
Carolina whereby he was
used as an authority to
determine the
defendant's mental state.
In each case he stressed
how the present laws for
handling insanit pleas in
North Carolina are not
compatible with the ad-
vances psychiatric study
has made since 1843. He
also stressed the problem
of juries that respond
more to emotion than to
the directions of the court
and how these responses
bring about gross incon-
stancies.
Many states in the U.S.
are changing their laws
and updating them to
work better for both the
defendant and society,
bul North Carolina seems
to remain behind when
handeling the criminally
insane, Rose said.
Applied Philosophy
Sponsors Conference
On Pharmaceuticals
Bv TINA MAROSC HAK
C MMM Fditur
"Business Ethics And
The Drug Industry" will
be the topic of an April
12 and 13 conference in
Applied Philosophy.
Various company and
university representatives
will present papers on
issues relating to the
marketing of phar-
maceuticals , drug safety
in the U.S. and abroad,
and business ethics used
by companies pursuing
profit.
The first session will be
held Thursday at 3 p.m.
Dr. Tal Scriven of
California Polytechnic
State University, San
Luis Obispo, will present
a paper entitled "Utility,
Autonomy, and Drug
Regulation "Post-
Marketing Survelliance:
New Challenges, New
Problems" will be the
topic of the second lec-
ture given during this
time. It will be presented
by Dt HuRh Tilson of
the Burroughs-Wellcome
Company.
That evening at 7:30,
Elizabeth Clark of the
Upjohn Company will
speak on "Ethical Con-
siderations in Phar-
maceutical Marketing in
the Developing World
Westminster Institute for
Ethics and Human
Values speaker Dr.
Michael Bayles will give a
paper entitled "Brand
Name Extortionists, In-
tellectual Prostitutes, and
Genetic Free Riders
The third session at
9:30 a.m. on Friday will
feature Dr. Bert Spilker
also of the Burroughs-
Welcome Company.
Spilker will speak on
"Ethical Considerations
in Designing and Con-
ducting Clinical Drug
Studies "Risk and
Regulation in the Drug
Industry" will be the
Final paper of the con-
ference. Dr. Mark Sagoff
of the University of
Maryland, College Park
will address the issue.
Easter Monday
Library Hours
8 a.m. to midnight
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THE EASTCAROI INI AN
?
Features
APRIL 10. 1984
TheCradle Will Rock
1937 Original
Plays Hendrix
The Acting Company, on tour from the John F.
Kennedy Center, will present Marc Blitzstein's con-
troversial musical theater piece The Cradle Hill
Rock, directed by John Houseman, producing ar-
tistic director for the company. This critically ac-
claimed production, which was originally staged off-
Broadway for a limited run with alumni of The Ac-
ting Company, will be performed at McGinnis
Theatre on the ECU campus Tuesday April 10 at 8:15
p.m.
The Cradle Hill Rock, when first produced in
1937, combined musical comedy with a strong pro-
labor statement in the midst of the Great Depression.
The play is satire on the evils of a town run by a cor-
poration.
The original Mercury Theatre production, produc-
ed by Houseman and directed by Orson Welles, was
to be nresented under the auspices of the Federal
Theatre Project when word came to halt production.
On June P. 193 a single performance was given
under extraordinary circumstances with Blitzstein sit-
ting at an on-stage piano while his cast sang and
spoke their roles from their seats in the audience. The
audience had gathered outside the original theater
from which the production was banned and waited
for word as Houseman and Welles frantically search-
ed for an alternative place to present the show. Once
the announcement was made, the audience followed
the actors uptown to the new theatre, almost doubl-
ing in size by the time the show went on later. Six
months after, on December 6. the play opened to
unanimous rae reviews on Broadway. Ten years
later, a revival under Leonard Bernstein's baton was
an enormous success at New York Center.
The current production has been staged by Mr.
Houseman in the style of the 1937 original. Perform-
ed on a bare stage, the production incorporates
Brechtian staging techniques with the on-stage piano
player again delivering scene-setting announcements.
Mr. Houseman has had a long and auspicious
career in the theatre and movies as director, producer
and Oscar-winning actor. In addition to the projects
Houseman and Welles produced for the Federal
Theatre, they were responsible for the famous
oodoo MacBeth, the 193" modern dress version of
Julius Ceasar and on radio the renowned "Men
From Mars" broadcast that staggered America in
1938.
In 1968 Houseman was appointed head of the
drama division of Julliard. He contiued to hold that
position, and in 19"2 he also assumed the artistic
direction of The Acting Company, initially formed
with Julliard graduates. His latest book, Final Dress,
the third volume of his autobiography series, will be
published this year.
Musical direction for The Cradle Hill Rock will be
by Charles Berigan. costume design by Judith Dolan,
sets by Mark Fitzgibbons and lighting by Dennis
Parichy.
Tickets are S5 for ECU students, S7 for vouth age
14 and under and S10 for ECU faculty, staff and the
public. All tickets are S10 at the door. Tickets are on
sale at the Central Ticket cfice, Mendenhall Student
Center.
Page 7
Demand facts;
don Y give in
to argument of
intimidation.
By GORDON IPOCK
fnimrn f Allot
I was in Kroger's late Sunday
evening with Mick LaSalle. I was
telling Mick about the wimpy-
looking men in Jane Fonda's
workout book for pregnant
women when an old friend
came marching around the frozen
food aisle where we were talking.
The girl is 19, pretty and I'd
always considered her intelligent
and mature for her age.
Conservative's
Commentary
.a view from tie right.
Ella Hammer (Davenia McFadden) sings of the workingman's fate as reporters look on in The Cradle Will Rock
1984 Is Here
Book Exposes Media Manipulation
By GORDON IPOCK
Featam W filer
The tragedy in Orwell's 1984 was not
that the people were slaves to govern-
ment, but that they were slaves and did
not know it. Their government kept
them enslaved by total control of the
media, including the manipulation of
the language itself. The thought police
were everywhere in case someone
mangaged to think beyond the media
output.
Well, we're smack in the middle of
1984, and Orwell's prophetic
nightmare is already a reality for a
third of the world's people � those
under the spreading yoke of com-
munism.
In his book Target America: The In-
fluence of Communist Propoganda on
U.S. Media James Tyson explains that
the West has much stronger economic
systems than the Soviets and possesses
a decisive edge in technology � even
weapons technology � over the
Soviets. But because of their mastery
of propaganda, the Soviets are winning
the struggle with the free West for
domination of the world.
Before Lenin ever went to Russia, he
was a publisher, the managing editor
of the Communist newspaer Iskra (The
Spark) and later a pamphleteer. He
understood that the struggle for the
control of men's minds was of more
importance than military victory. Thus
today, the Soviets employ more than
six million propoganda agents and
spend more than $3 billion a year
within the Soviet Union to keep their
own population subjugated much in
the manner of Orwell's 1984.
Tyson points out that the Soviets
also realize the value of propaganda in
spreading communism outside the
U.S.S.R. In 1950 Stalin said, "If I
could control the movies, 1 could con-
trol the world (This was before
Stalin knew of the power of television.)
And as Molotov said, "Who reads the
Communist papers? Only a few people
who are already Communists. We
don't need to propagandize them.
What is our subject? Who do we have
to influence? We have to influence the
non-Communists if we want to make
them Communists or to fool them. So
we have to try and infiltrate the big
press, to influence millions of people
and not merely thousands Thus
states Tyson, "While Americans were
developing methods of mass produc-
tion, mass advertising and market
research � techniques for producing
and selling goods � the Bosheviks
were devising methods of selling Com-
munism to the world by clandestine
propaganda, understood as a method
not of intellectual argumentation but
of political warfare
Tyson goes on to explain that the
Soviets have more than half a million
agents working around the world out-
side the Soviet Union spending another
See GARY, Page 8
Prima Ballerina Gives Master Class
Prima ballerina Mellisa Hayden potca en attitude. Miss Hayden win conduct master classes In ballet daring
ECU's seventh annual Day of Dance.
Renowned ballet artist Melissa
Hayden will be featured at East
Carolina University's seventh an-
nual Day of Dance workshop to
be held Sunday, April 15, in the
Messick Theatre Arts Center in
Greenville. The workshop, for
dancers at all levels of training,
will include classes in ballet,
modern dance, jazz and tap
dance. Miss Hayden will conduct
master classes in ballet. Other
classes will be taught by ECU
dance faculty members Mavis
Ray, Jerome Jenkins, and private
studio dance instructors Sherryl
Mercer and Pat Downey-Kuhn.
Miss Hayden has earned a
secure place in the history of
American ballet through her suc-
cessful career as a performer and
now as a teacher of young
dancers. For 28 years she was a
leading ballerina with the New
York City Ballet and American
Ballet Theatre. At the beginning
of Miss Hayden's professional
career, John Martin of the New
York Times wrote: "A more
powerful dramatic dancer or a
more technically superb one
would be hard to find On the
20th anniversary of her associa-
tion with the New York City
Ballet, dance critic Clive Barnes
wrote: "She has survived and sur-
vived, and more pertinently, she
has gotten better and better. (New
York City Ballet's) Melissa
Hayden is its greatest dancer
In 1945, she joined American
Ballet Theatre, and in less than a
year she was a soloist performing
with the company here and
abroad for two-and-a-half years.
There followed an extended tour
of Cuba and South America with
Alicia Alonso's company. In
1949, George Balachine and Lin-
coln Kirstein invited her to join
their newly formed company,
New York City Ballet. For the
next 24 years, except for a two-
year return to American Ballet
Theatre, Melissa Hayden was a
leading ballerina of this world-
famous company, the closest
thing to a star in Balanchine's
starless system.
Miss Hayden announced her
retirement in 1973, and her final
session with the New York City
Ballet was a personal and artistic
triumph. In her honor, Balan-
chine choreographed a farewell
ballet, "Cortege Hongrois and
the company's Spring Gala in
May 1973 was marked by the
presentation to Miss Hayden of
the Handel Medallion, New York
City's highest cultural award.
Following her retirement, Miss
Hayden spent three years as artist -
in-residence and director of ballet
at Skidmore College. She has been
honored with the Albert Einstein
Award, the Dance Educators
Award and the Mademoiselle
Award, and she holds honorary
degrees from Skidmore College
and Siena College.
Today she heads Melissa
Hayden, Inc her dance studio in
New York City where in-
termediate and advanced students
and young professionals from all
over the country have a chance to
study with one of America's most
distinguished ballerinas. This year
Miss Hayden is teaching ballet at
the North Carolina School of the
Arts in Winston Salem.
Registration for the Day of
Dance is limited to dancers
10-years-old or older. The fee is
$10 per person. Because classes
will be filled on a "first come,
first serve" basis, pre-registration
is encouraged; however, registra-
tion will be accepted in person the
morning of April 15 subject to
class availability. Additional
details and pre-registration forms
for the workshop are available
from the Department of Theatre
Arts, East Carolina University in
Greenville. Offices are located in
the Messick Theatre Arts Center,
"Gordon Ipock she said with
hate seething from her brow. "I
think you're a disgusting,
sick I won't repeat the exact
words that made up her profane
invective. But with her finger wag-
ging and her long hair flying, she
finished her tirade with a threat of
putting both her feet up my ass.
LaSalle was dumbfounded, and
so was I. Before I could get an ex-
planation, she'd stomped off up
the kitchen-ware aisle, perhaps
waiting with a frying pan if I
should follow and ask fo: one. I
headed to the check-out rattled.
LaSalle and I decided thai maybe
my articles in this paper had
something to do with this old
friend's suddenly abusive
behavior. We could think of no
other reasons.
I have a reason for mentioning
this personal episode. The girl's
attack is an extreme example of
the argument of intimidation, a
favorite device the left uses to
browbeat its critics into submis-
sion. (This young lady has ex-
cellent left-liberal credentials:
she's an art student and has
parents who teach at ECU.) Ac-
tually, such an argument isn't an
argument at all, but a substitue
for an argument. No facts are
mentioned; no rational dialogue
or logical debate of the issue is
raised. However, mos: left-
liberals temper their criticisms
much more effectively. For exam-
ple, a class discussion may go like
this:
"I was reading an ar:icle in
Reader's Digest you say, "and
the writer said " You hear
snickering and stop in mid-
sentence. "What's wrong?" you
ask the guy across the room.
"Reader's Digest?" he says
with a sick giggle. "Is that the best
source you can give?" Then the
entire liberal goon squad breaks
into laughter.
If your're the average guy or
girl, you'll clam up right then
because you suddenly feel unsure,
even foolish. You feel like these
liberals know something you
don't, and if you make some sort
of plea to the professor for
fairness, he's likely to join the
snub too. (Often, it's the pro-
fessor who plays the liberal goon
squad like a violin: they re his
chorus section.) At best the prof
will smile, offer you a look of
false comfort, clear his threat and
say, "Next question
You've had. your argument
beaten without uttering a word,
and you go home feeling whipped.
However, if you'd ignored the
laughs and condescending looks,
the odds are good that mister
liberal wise guy wouldn't have
had a credible counter. He pro-
bably doesn't know any more
than you do, but you've sur-
rendered to a bluff and a threat:
the bluff that he knows something
he probably doesn't, and the
threat of being ostracized by the
group. You've succumbed to peer
pressure and intimidatior, not
logic or facts.
If you really want to see this
liberal browbeating at high form,
try mentioning the Bible as a
source for an argument. Oh, the
howls and shrieks of derision that
will erupt if you quote God's
word. "Surely you're not
serious?" someone will assert
pompously. And if you're like
most students, you'll fall all over
yourself apologizing for your ef-
frontery to logic.
But listen. You want to really
know why most left-liberals refuse
to argue the Bible with you. (This
is just between the two of us,
See DON'T, Page 9
rt
. . - - -���,�.
. � a � � i � � ,





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN APRII 0, 1984

-s��Sfe

Senator Sponsors Celebration
Gary Hart Link
Continued From Page 7 world hunger pover
$3 billion a ty. Granted, dismantling
year spreading propagan- the Pentagon might tern-
da and disinformation - porarily provide more
is
and the United States is
their number-one target.
He explains the methods
these agents use to recruit
citizens both within and
outside the media. Few
citizens knowingly
cooperate with Soviet
agents by becoming
traitors or Communists
themselves � though
some do, often in-
dividuals in positions of
power and influence. But
many good citizens join
what appear to be grass-
roots movements that
have ostensibly noble
purposes: to end world
hunger, stop racism and
sexism or promote peace.
But ultimately, these
group's goals only further
Soviet foreign policy.
How often have you
heard left-wing activists
condemning the U.S.
defense budget by saving
defense money could bet-
ter be spent fighting
U.S. that consistently no idea that the KGB
support Communist calling the shots
goals. These groups are Understanding
money for social welfare nown s the ft lob- America's obsession with
money ior social welfare by, and most are h ghly legalities and the im
programs, but obviously, respected and often mense influence of the
quoted in the
the real benefactor would
be the Soviet drive for
world conquest. Tyson
also explains how Soviet
propoganda agents try to
link such themes as sex-
ism and racism (which
we're all against) to anti-
war and disarmament
propoganda. It's worth
noting that although
racist, South Africa is the
lone major obstacle to a
Communist takeover of
the southern half of
Africa: thus the constant
in the major
American media as im-
portant sources of infor-
mation. For example, the
World Peace Council
located in Helsinki,
Finland is funded directly
from Moscow. About 60
percent of its staff are
KGB agents. It works
directly through the U.S.
Peace Concil in this coun-
try. The U.S. Peace
Council is headed by
veteran American Com-
munist Pauline Rosen.
legal profession within
the U.S. prompted the
formation of the Na-
tional Lawyers Guild,
another Communist front
group with considerable
influence. The National
Emergency Civil Liberties
Committee is another
known Communist front
group. Its members in-
clude Jane Fonda and
husband Tom Hayden
(former SDS
and Jackson
barrage against the racist These two groups direct
South Africans aimed at the "nuclear freeze" and
the media to take a soft
line on Communism,
whether in the form of
our former struggle in
Vietnam or the present
one in Central America,
or promoting disarma-
ment. Women Strike for
Peace, Clergy and Laity
Concerned and the Fund
for Peace are just a few
of these think tanks. But
perhaps the most influen-
tial is the Institute for
Policy Studies. Establish-
ed in 1963, it recently
celebrated its 20th birth-
day. U.S. Senator and
presidential candidate
member Gary Hart organized its
the 20th anniversary celebra-
tion and George
front groups like the
World Peace Concil to in-
fluence U.S. foreign
policy through the media
and directly. For exam-
Pic, the Institute for
Policy Studies frequently
gives journalistic
workshops that well-
known and respected
journalists attend, in-
cluding, for example,
present and past editors
of the Washington Post.
Tyson explains that in
the past, Soviet pro-
paganda consisted mainly
of the party line pumped
out by the official Soviet
press and broadcast
media. It was obvious
and ineffective. But now,
getting America to sever
trade and diplomatic ties
with Pretoria. Only the
Soviets would benefit
from such a move.
Tyson devotes a large
chapter of the book to ex-
posing the network of
Communist front groups
and think tanks in the
"world peace"
movements through an
extensive organization of
grass-roots peace groups
affiliated with
"mainstream" church
groups and citizens
organizations. The
average concerned citizen
involved on this level has
LaSalle Abandons
Pregnant Girlfriend
publisher of Scientific
American. (Ever notice McGovern was the'prin- wS'lhiiS
oftTn 'auT5 S2S- 22 Wpuka- " net JoS of tort group'
otten quote Scientific these two men's foreign the Soviets work to ce
American when needing policies in regard to ap- their patylirTprintedin
�y?sZtJret PCaSing .W�rld C�m- themainstreaAmericaS
nihtary is no threat.) munism. McGovern was press. Then, Tass and
a strident advocate of
abandoning Vietnam to
the Communists, and
Gary Hart now advocates
a similar U.S. pull out of
El Salvador. Both have
consistently supported
sharp reductions in U.S.
defense capabilities.
Tyson goes on to show Washington Post
how these groups of the highly critical of
plied by your adversary is
highly effective � both
on the Soviet people and
abroad. "You don't
believe us?" the Soviet
leaders say. "Then will
you believe Tom Wicker
of the New York
Times?"
I experienced first-
hand recently how these
front groups work to get
their message into the
mainstream imedia. A
group called Promoting
Enduring Peace sent me,
the Features Editor, a
press release and letter
promoting their "Third
Annual Peace Cruise on
the Volga Their letter
began: "In a recent arti-
cle in the New York
used. The story in the
April 5 East Carolinian
called "Central America
Discussed" is a good ex-
ample. A group of leftists
working through the
ECU Newman Center us-
ed a young idealistic staff
writer and a sympathetic
editor to publish a biased
denunciation of U.S.
policy in Central
America. Perhaps all felt
they were genuinely doing
good and were sincere in
their beliefs, but the end
product might just as well
have been written in
Moscow and mailed to
this paper as a press
release. The majority of
university newspapers are
just as easily
Times Anthony Lewis (a manipulated, arid unfor
long-time liberal colum- tunately, so is most of the
Tyson also explains
how certain liberal foun-
dations support research
and publications that
ultimately support the
spread of Communism:
The Stern Fund, Rubin
Foundation, The Fund
for Peace and others.
Tyson also exposes the
many left-liberal think
tanks whose purpose is to
influence Congress and
far-left lobby cooperate
with known Communist
Ivestia (the Soviet Media)
simply quote the
American press to pro-
mote their goals. A
typical evening news
broadcast in the U.S.S.R.
contains numerous
quotes from the New
York Times and
- all
U.S.
policy. This type of in-
direct propoganda sup-
nist) stated that the only
way to lessen the danger
of nuclear war was to im-
prove relations Well I
hope you see the techni-
que used now, a front
group quoting a left-
liberal columnist sym-
pathetic to communism
uses the media to further
Soviet goals and give
them the credibility of the country as the right
T,mes- Leftist murderers
Sometimes, neither the usually called rebels lef-
paper nor the reporter in- tists. revolutionaries or
volved realizes he is being See COMMUNIST Page 9
professional press.
Look at the coverage
on El Salvador, for in-
stance. Notice how fre-
quently the term "right-
wing death squads" is us-
ed but never "left-wing
death squads despite
the fact that leftist guer-
rillas have killed ten times
as many peopl; in that
has.
are
The following letter
and accompanying
photograph were sent to
the East Carolinian. We
can neither confirm nor
deny the truth of its con-
tents, but we will print it.
To the East Carolinian
If you guys only knew
half the stuff I could mail
in on this Mick LaSalle
fellow. Where did you
ever get a hold of that
slime? Its taken me seven
months to track him
then things hit the
but
fan.
"Out he said.
"I think I love ya,
Mick I said. "I think
I'm gonna have your
baby" � and bang! he
split like a bat out of hell.
I had a hunch he'd try to
write (or what he calls
writin') when I couldn't
find my typewriter.
It's your baby, Mick �
and your number's corn-
in' up soon, so you better
cover yourself good
Love,
Vivian LaSalle
down.
geez! I must'av
been to every post office
bulletin board on the East
Coast and Mexico, and it
turns out you're lettin'
this turkey work for you!
What's worse, is you're
lettin' healthy, normal
people read the twisted
stuff he puts out. My
God! They're just kids,
and they're readin' stuff
about dead legs and
things like that. You guys
have gotta be nuts.
And what's all this
about "broads?" Yeah,
Mick knows a lot about
broads all right. He's had
some of the finest money
can buy. But that's gonna
stop after I get my hands
on him. I mean, how was
I supposed to know that
he'd been in the sack with
half of Newark! You
know, he "seemed" OK
when I first met him
Wed.
The Trend
Proteus
Exit Bloom
Gary Hart
Fund Raiser
Thurs. WZMB
Ladies Lite
Night
In Concert
Night Hawks
Fri. PANIC $1.00 ECU
TUESDAY NIGHT
COLLEGE NITE
6:30-10:00 All ladies with
College I.D. Skate Free
MUSIC TELEVISION with MTV
16ft SCREEN
Pregnant and alone, Vivian LaSalle
deserted her; but she's on his trail
says Mick
igade
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Continued From Page 8
popular liberation
fighters � but rarely the
terrorist killers they are-
Tyson goes on to pre-
sent several extensive case
studies that document
and examine how Soviet
propaganda was used in
the media to ultimately
influence U.S. foreign
policy. These studies in-
clude Vietnam, Cam-
bodia, the campaign
against the Agency for
International Develop
ment, the campaign
against Vietnamese labor
unions, getting the Carter
administration not to
deploy the neutron bomb
and the Soviet -drected
U.S. media war against
the CIA in the 0s(lt is
worth noting that u.mle a
senator and as vice-
president, Walter Mor
Don't Form,
On Popular
Continued From Page 7
reader.) It's became the
majority of them know
almost nothing aboj! the
good book. Other le:
have told them it's just a
collection of old-
fashioned, unscientific
nonsense not wortnv cf
being read. So they've
never read it and arc
capable of holding an in-
telligent discussion on its
contents. Rather than ac-
mit their ignorance, they
simply refuse to accept it
as evidence and gie you
puzzled looks or snicker
at you until you back off.
Peer pressure is a big
part of the argument cf
intimidation, and no
college-age person likes
to feel rejected or laghe
at by "the group It's
the same sort of pressure
tactic you get u,
friends are exhorting
to smoke pot or
drunk. You never get an
intelligent argumen: on
the wonderful benifits of
pot You're threatened
with group rejection
you don't conform.
da I
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zation
used. The story in the
Vpril 5 East Carolinian
ailed "Central America
I � usscd" is a good ex-
c v group of leftists
g through the
Newman Center us-
ung idealistic staff
a �-vmpathetic
mblish a biased
on of U.S.
c in Central
Perhaps all felt
� e genuinely doing
were sincere in
but the end
ghl just as well
been written in
A"d mailed to
- Is a press
e The majority of
euspapersare
easily
� and unfor-
so is most of the
IMF hASIAROl IMAN
AHKI1 i
'he coerage
r, for in-
No ce how f re-
arm "nght-
.ad" is us-
w "left-wing
despite
' st guer-
ten times
pie in that
as the r.chi has.
derers are
Jbels, lef-
maries or
�MMl MM. page 9
RLD
I
adie uh
ate Free
s
CREFA
?U
$399
e.
$349
re
ow.
it enlarged,
cuter.
Communist
Continued From Page 8
popular liberation
fighters � but rarely the
terrorist killers they are.
Tyson goes on to pre-
sent several extensive case
studies that document
and examine how Soviet
propaganda was used in
the media to ultimately
influence U.S. foreign
policy. These studies in-
clude Vietnam, Cam-
bodia, the campaign
against the Agency for
International Develope-
ment, the campaign
against Vietnamese labor
unions, getting the Carter
administration not to
deploy the neutron bomb
and the Soviet-directed
U.S. media war against
the CIA in the '70s. (It is
Try
and Aaron, Congressional in
dale was instrumental in Party, he made many Mondale
the virtual dismantling of concessions to the backed up by elements of vestigative com
mL � nat,�nr McGov?" wing and their the far-left lobby com- uncovered Communist
most effective means of sympathizers, including pletcd their hatchet job of working withinTe U S
w I,� V,cf-Prcsident' the CIA. mcdia. This was in the
Walter Mondale. Large Notice how denuncia- 40s and 50s before the
members of appoint- tions of the CIA are a Soviets had developed
combating the spread of
Communism. During his
tenure as vice-president,
Mondale either fired or
retired 800 CIA agents �
half the agency � and
most were personnel in
covert intelligence or
counter intelligence.)
Tyson devotes about 40
pages to the far left's war
against the CIA. This is
just a bit of it: "When
Carter took office in
1977, the war against the
CIA was widened to an
entirely new battlefront.
Carter himself and his
associates had no
preconceived ideas about
worth noting that while a further limiting American
senator and as vice- intelligence. But in order
president, Walter Mon- to unify the Democratic
ments in the new ad
ministration went to
ultra-liberal and radical
followers of this group,
including Anthony Lake,
who took charge of
Carter's transition team
for the State Department,
and David Aaron, who
became second in com-
mand of the National
Security Council under
Brezenski. Lake had close
ties to the Institute for
Policy Studies, and
Aaron had been on the
Board of the Center for
International Policy, one
of the Fund for Peace
radical think tanks
Infilti
groups had a 100 percent
pro-Soviet balance.
Several writers showed
the same 100 percent
bias, specifically
Seymour Hersh, Gareth
Porter, Morten H.
Halperin and Saul Lan-
dua.
I applied this balance-
sheet method to former
East Carolinian staff
writer and news editor
liberal Congressmen have Patrick O'Neill's entire
But what is the purpose dismantled most of the output over the last two
PIRG
common theme of cam-
pus leftists. They never
mention the KGB.
Patrick O'Neill even did
an anti-CIA book review
in this paper by an author
of the radical left.
their present capabilities
But in the past two
decades, laws have been
passed making it illegal
for the FBI to investigate
internal subversion, and
Don't Formulate Your Values
On Popular Opinions of Peers
Continued From Page 7 in truth, most people people!
reader.) It's because the form their beliefs based Even in Congress'
majority of them know on the threat of accep- For example, I've got a
almost nothing about the tance or rejection by their transcript of Jesse Helms'
;ood book. Other leftists peers. While you're report to the Senate on
speaking, your peers need
have told them it's just a
collection of old-
fashioned, unscientific
nonsense not worthy of
being read. So they've
never read it and are in-
capable of holding an in-
telligent discussion on its
contents. Rather than ad-
mit their ignorance, they
simply refuse to accept it
as evidence and give you
puzzled looks or snicker
at you until you back off.
Peer pressure is a big
part of the argument of
intimidation, and no
college-age person likes
to feel rejected or laughed
at by "the group It's
the same sort of pressure
tactic you get when
friends are exhorting you
to smoke pot or get
drunk. You never get an
intelligent argument on
the wonderful benifits of
pot.� You're threatened
with group rejection if
you don't conform.
only nod their heads or
smile and you follow
their cues. "Yes, we need
to support a nuclear
freeze. It's the very thing
to do you'll hear
yourself saying. Your
peers smile and nod and
exhibit all the signs of ap-
proval without uttering a
word. But perhaps you
mention something about
a Soviet threat, and im-
mediately you see brows
raise, heads draw back,
hear throats clear and
you quickly change your
tone. "I meant to say,
certainly it's Reagan
who's the villian, not the
Soviets. Reagan's the
problem. Dump
Reagan The brows
relax, smiles return and
Martin Luther King's
Communist ties. The
evidence is overwhelming
and irrefutable. (Come to
my office and read it
before you send a nasty
letter to Campus Forum;
at least you'll know some
facts.) But not one
Senior argued the validi-
ty of Helms' facts. They
couldn't. So they tried to
humble the man with per-
sonal attacks and tried to
ostracize him Ted Ken-
nedy all but threatened to
put both his feet up
Helms' ass in a vain at-
tempt to muzzle the guy.
It didn't work on
Helms, and it won't work
on me. You shouldn't let
it work on you. As a
friend told me, "Becom-
ing a liberal is an emo-
the heads nod again, and tional process; becoming
you're safe, comforted by a conservative is a learn-
their signs of approval. jng, growing process
That's the way most Discover the truth, and
left-liberal arguments go, then don't back down.
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of this massive Soviet
propoganda war against
the U.S.? More than one
Soviet defector has told
us bluntly � even before
congressional hearings.
The Soviets have a three-
part strategy: (1) to hide
the enormous Soviet arms
buildup under a
smokescreen of detente
and SALT negotiations;
(2) a gradual take-over of
other weaker countries by
pro-Communist regimes,
leading to the eventual
encirclement of the U.S.
on the outside; (3) a
massive, secret propogan-
da campaign designed to
weaken and demoralize
America from the inside.
Lev Navorzov, a Soviet
defector who had worked
with their propoganda
organs, says "the main
Communist propaganda
goal is to lull the West in-
to complacency and hide
the facts of the Soviet
military build-up until
their superiority is so vast
that they can impose
Communism on the
democrocies without hav-
ing to fire a shot (Just
as Kruschev boasted they
would.)
Tyson points out that
in the past, the FBI and
Congressional commit-
tees that once in-
vestigated Communist ac-
tivities. Other govern-
ments have uncovered
Communist agents and
sympathizers working at
semesters he worked at
this paper. He failed the
test miserably. Many of
his news stories dealt with
the ECU campus and
were therefore neutral.
But whenever O'Neill
the highest levels of their wrote about matters af-
national media � all who fecting U.S. foreign
admitted to slanting the policy, he never deviated
press to portray the
Soviets or their goals in a
favorable way. Since the
U.S. is presently
powerless to perform the
investigative work
necessary to expose possi-
ble Communist agents
within our own media
and government, Tyson
recommends the use of a
balance-sheet method to
evaluate organizations
and individuals. All
books and articles
published by individuals
or groups are examined
to determine how closely well. He combined
they follow the official standard themes
Soviet propaganda line at
that time, to determine
whether what the work
advocates benefits Soviet
or American goals. Tyson
applies this balance-sheet
method to several of the
most noteworthy
organizations, such as the
Institute for Policy
Studies, and all of the
from a line that ad-
vocated appeasement of
communism and U.S.
disarmament.
Does that make O'Neill
a Communist? No, not at
all. But the question is
worth pondering. O'Neill
once admitted to me that
he "believed in and sup-
ported the idea of a one-
world socialist govern-
ment Certainly his ar-
ticles were a means of
promoting that vision
and influencing ECU
students to accept it as
the
of
racism and sexism in the
usual Soviet porpaganda
style to hammer away at
any U.S. foreign policy
that advocated strength
and firmness in dealing
with the Soviets. And
O'Neill had a vague
background. He rarely
was a student while work-
ing at this paper. His sole
purpose seemed to be
promoting themes consis-
tant with Soviet pro-
poganda of the moment
Considering the loose
supervision of this paper
and the young idealistic
liberals that have
dominated it s staff, it
would have been an easy
target for any subversive
who might have wanted
to use it.
Since ECU students
may soon be voting on a
PIRG (Public Interest
Reserch Group) for this
campus, it is worth
noting that Tyson also
mentioned Ralph Nader's
organizations (Nader
heads PIRG). Tyson said
that several Communist
propoganda agents who
had defected had men-
tioned Nader's organiza-
tion was been repeatedly
targeted for infiltration.
Whether PIRG has been
successfully infiltrated by
Communist agents at this
time is unknown, but
PIRGs have recently been
active supporting
nuclear freeze movement
and other typically left
causes that adun
Soviet goals.
1 highly recommeiid
Target America to i
professional journals'
and journalism teacher
and students. In it Tyson
gives more worthwhile in
formation on how tin
U.S. media operates thai
any textbook I have read
in my 21 hours of jour
nalism courses at thi
school. It should be re-
quired reading for Jour
nalism 4100. Also
anyone who ever watcher
TV news or reads a
newspaper should read
this book for a betk-r
understanding of how the
news he gets is shaped
After all, this is 1984.
Target America is sold
by AIM (Accuracy in
Media), 134! G. Si
N.W Washington, D.C
20005. It sells for $10 in
hardback edit on.
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ns ii
is
I iul ou
otus.
I HI 1 ASl C AKOl INIAN
Sports
. I
Hurdler Qualifies
For Olympic Trials

B PEThrhKNAl l)
Miff �rll�r
�S
GARY PATTERSON - ECU Photo L�fc
ECU took the top three spots in the 100-meter dash in Chapel Hill over the weekend.
Henr Williams (first), Erskine Evans (second) and Nathan McCorkle celebrate after the
GARY PATTERSON - ECU Photo L
race.
"We showed the pet pl
North Carolina that E
have a great track . .
Those were the ei
words of head trad
Carson, as one of his
Craig White, qualified foi ihe
Olympic trials in the hig
at the UNC Relays at Chapel 1
over the weekend.
"It was a big i
there were some real g
competing said c a
The Pirate comj
great array of tal
such notables as I N
Hill, Wake Fores
Virginia Tech, North i
Central. St.Augu
Seaton Hali.
"It was an �
won more events tha
Carson added.
The lightning Fa
Williams, Erskine t
Nathan McCorkle domin
100 meter dash finishing
ond and tl
10 48, 10.3 .
Nati
teammate Mc
compete in the 200 metei I
finished first and fifth w
of 20.88 and 21.88 s
Williams fell si
for the Nationals
meters. But, said
Williams time could ha
result of an electrons I ii
"I feel that the ele
was wrong
hand timed Henry and
him a' 20 seconds "
In anothei
curance, Mc orkle . a
hamstring in the 200 m
expected to be out
three weeks.
Until McCorkle r
Penn Re!as in late A
plans to substitute hig llei
Craig White on the 4x
'earn.
"Craig is as fast
1
-

'
:

.
1
s a


'





.
.
.
� � -
-
Two More Fall
Pirates Beat Richmond, James Madison


By ED NICKLAS
sports Kdlior
If the Pirate baseball team ever needed a clutch
performance, it was last weekend on the road against
conference foes James Madison and Richmond.
Behind the pitching of Jim Peterson and Winfred
Johnson, the timely hitting of Mike Williams and the
lackluster fielding of Richmond, ECU indeed won
both games away from friendly Harrington.
With the victories, the Pirates raised their ECAC
South mark to 6-2 and overall record to 19-8.
The wins also put ECU in sole possession of first
place in the conference. However, regular season
standing is not used in determining the participants
for the ECAC South tournament at the end of the
regular season. Rather, an ECAC baseball commit-
tee, which includes ECU head coach Hal Baird, will
meet on May 5 and choose the teams to play in the
post-season tournament. "I know we'll have one
vote Baird said.
"Unless something unforseen happens, it would be
hard to envision us not being picked
In Saturday's game against Richmond, Winfred
Johnson (5-2) went the full nine innings and Rich-
mond committed six errors as the Pirates rallied to a
6-4 victory. The sophomore righthander gave up
seven hits while striking out four and walking the
same.
"He threw very well said Baird. "He was a little
shaky in the early innings, but our fielders kicked really didn't hit that well (in both games)
away a few
ECU took a 3-2 lead into the third inning, but it
didn't last long. In the bottom half of that inning,
Richmond's Bobby Woods lashed a double to knock
in two runs and give the Spiders a 4-3 advantage.
ECU, however, staged its own rally in the sixth,
scoring the final three runs. Williams led off the inn-
ing with a single and Steve Sides walked to put run-
ners on first and second. After Chris Bradberry mov-
ed Williams and Sides to second and third on a
sacrifice bunt, Mark Shank knocked in Williams on a
Spider error and Jim Riley brought home Sides, the
go-ahead run, on a sacrifice fly.
Greg Hardison provided an insurance run, poun-
ding a double to score Shank.
Peterson (6-0) matched Johnson and went the
distance in Sunday's 3-1 win over James Madison
Peterson game up only six hits against a Duke team
that was second in the nation in runs scored.
"Jim really didn't have his good stuff Baird
sajd, "but he located the ball well
In view of James Madison's offensive power
however, Baird felt Peterson was "really remarkable
to allow them to six base hits
Williams provided the difference in the score, driv-
ing in two runs with a bases loaded single. Bradberry
and Sides added two hits apiece in the game.
"We played a real sound game on Sunday Baird
said. "We played satisfactory game on Saturday. We

� ' 1
V

ft, r
V
I
Human Backstop
ECU catcher Jabo Fulghum warms up a pitcher earlier this ea�i
GARY PATTERSON ECU Photo Lak
Now that the Pirates have almost assuredlv wrap-
ped up a bid to the conference tournament, Baird is
eyeing an easier route to the NCAA playoffs � an at-
large bid. And he is quick to remind "his players to
avoid complacen j "
the schedule like the
Series Band said "I'm hoping they'll (the team)
understand the significance '
going ti
seventh game
at
t le
Eight Up, Eight Down � Ladys Win
By RANDY MEWS
�i Spam MHm
MARK BARBED � ECU
Stacy Boyette was Most Valuable Player.
The ECU women's softball
team swept through a field of
seven teams to capture the George
Mason Invitational Softball Tour-
nament championship this
weekend in Fairfax, Va.
"This is the first fast-pitch
tournament ECU has ever
entered Pirate head coach Sue
Manahan said, "and we were
pleased to come away with the
championship
The first two days of the tour-
nament consisted of round-robin
play in which every team faced
each other to determine the pair-
ings for the single elimination
tourney on the final day.
On Friday, the Pirates faced
SOFTBALL
eventual tournament runner up
Temple in their opening game and
narrowly escaped with a 2-1 vie
tory. In its other games Friday,
ECU breezed by La Salle 8-1 and
Townson State 8-3.
On the second day of action,
ECU coasted to victory in each of
its three games, defeating George
Mason 7-0, Virginia Com-
monwealth 6-3 and North
Carolina 9-2.
"We'd been going through a
losing streak the past few weeks
because we weren't hitting the
ball Manahan explained, "but
our bats caught up with our
fielding this weekend
The Pirates had onlv st -red one
run in their last four outings prior
to the tournament but came back
to outscore their opponents 64 14
this weekend.
ECU was seeded number one
going into the final da of single
elimination competition and
subsequently received a bve in the
first round.
The Pirates demolished i a Salle
18-2 in the semi-finals, and then
went on to defeat Temple 3-1 for
the championship.
ECU got excellent itching
from its starting rotation as Stacv
Boyette and Robin Graves picked
up three victories and Pam Young
collected two. However.
Manaha the enure tear
responsible foi the Pirate su
x "everyone had an except
tournament
Five Pirates made the all-
tournament team Carla Alphin
and Young made it as ui
players, Suyanne Martin at cat
sher, I ia Zmuda at shortstop
and Boyette at Pitcher.
Boyette also collected MVP
honors for her pitching perfor-
mances She threw a th ee-hitter
against Temple in the Pirates'
opening game, shutout George
Mason 7-0 and only gav- up one
run in the championship game
ECU improves to 17-9 with the
victories and w ill return I o action
next weekend to participate in the
Liberty Baptist tournament.
� - f
" -�
9 � � .��





4
?
12 TTffiEASTCAMOl NAN
MAR i. 29, wm
Team,Coach Compel
By MEG MOREADITH
Staff Writer
The ECU men's tennis
team had seven of its
Players and assistant
coach Keith Zengel com-
pete in the Greenville
Open Held over the
weekend at the River
Birch Tennis Center.
The Greenville Open, a
USTA sanctioned tourna-
ment attracted players
from 14 cities in North
Carolina, and two cities
in Maryland and Ten-
nessee.
TENNIS
In singles, three ECU
players advanced to the
quarter finals. Galen Tre-
ble beat Rar ly Howell of
Maryland, 6-0, 6-0. In the
second round Treble beat
Ruthledge, 6-3, 7-5. Tre-
ble lost in the quarter
finals to Dean Channell
of Freenville Country
Club, 6-1, 7-5.
Paul Owen defeated
Randy Bridgeman of
Greenville, 6-2, 6-1.
Owen also advanced to
the quarter finals
although he lost to Allen
Farfour, a former player
of Wake Forest Universi-
ty, 2-6, 6-3, 6-1. Farfour
went on to win the tour-
nament by defeating
Channell 6-4, 7-6.
Greg Willis upset fifth-
seeded Steve Walker of
Washington, 7-5, 7-6.
Willis beat Mt. Olive's
number one player,Olow
km hack, in second round
play, 6-4, 6-0. Willis then
advanced to the quarter
Finals and was defeated
by Kevin Burke of
Gastonia, 1-6, 6-2, 6-2.
David Creech upset
sixth seeded Norman
Bryant of Greenville. 6-4,
6-0. Creech was defeated
in second round play by
Paul Owen, 4-6, 7-6, 6-2.
David Turner beat
Kenny Love of Tennesse,
6-2, 6-4 in the First round.
Turner lost to fourth
seeded Tommy Wilcox,
7-5, 6-0 in the second
round
Greg Lloyd lost to Ken
ny House of Wilmington.
6-4, 6-3. House advanced
to the semi-finals and was
defeated by Channell.
6-3, 6-4. John Anthony
lost to Kuiback in the
first round, 6-2, 6-2
"The ECU players
were not expected to go
as far as they did in the
tournament said Coach
Sherman. "1 was very
pleased. All of them
played good tennis
Pirates End Regular Season In S.C.
By GENE WILLIAMS
Staff W rtln
The Linksters of ECU
were in action this past
weekend at Furman
Univesty and finished
15th out of 24 teams
entered in the NCAA
Division-1 tourney.
While not up to stan-
dard, the Pirates' play
GOLF
was definitely an im-
provement as they shot a
three-day total of 942.
The score wasn't poor,
considering the Pirates
were competing against
some of the best teams in
collegiate golf.
Wake Forest, always a
national contender,
finished with top honors
with a three-day total of
894, while Clemson came
in a close second at 895.
Mike Bradley led the
Pirates with rounds of 78,
74 and 78 to pace the
Pirates with a 230 total.
Inconsistency once
again haunted the
Pirates, nevertheless the
linksters will take their
act to the ECAC South
Tournament, April 9, to
tee it up against the very
best on the Eastern
Seaboard.
Classifieds
The Tournament will
be played at the Kings
Mill golf course on the
James River in
Williamsburg, Va. The
Pirates could salvage the
year by taking the
tourney title, which
would give them an
automatic berth into the
NCAA playoffs.
In doubles, ()�rn and
Channell teamed up I
defeat Dans and
Rauchback, M, 6 1 m
the first round, and heat
Hostetler and I ne. h J,
6-4 Owen and C'hannell
went on to the leau-finals
but were defeated K
Bailev and Blankenhorn.
6-4, 6-4
Treble and Zengel
defeated Ruthledge and
Whisnant 6-3. 6-1 In
their quarter finals match
against Farfour and
Wilcox, Treble and
Zengel lost by a close
score of 7-5, 7-6 Accor-
ding to Coach Sherman,
it was the best match of
the tournament.
Tin;
vA illis and I urner were
defeated in wad
plav bv Farfoui and
WUcOI 6-0. 6-2
Mono and reeh
defeated bb
Schaefa 6 Ml rhev
dcteatcu Bronson
and Hennemuth. 6-4,6-3
In the semi final M
and C reech lost i f I
four and Wikox, whi
vanned to 'he finals to
win h defeating Bailev
and Blankenhorn rS 4.
The EC I Men's Tennis
Team plavs Pembroke to
dav at 3.00 p.m. on
Mirtges varsitv courts.
I C I V omen s
Btl lam j I
defeated H, Gutlford rn a
� � with Russell
and M.j nder field in
giving I! its
onK winning mauh
"Guilford is a verv
tig, and thev were
even stronger this sear
Naid Coach Sherman
Heidi Bunting and Is
Mcvers improve with
every match that each
plavs Sherman said She
also added that Janet
Russell plaved well in
singles
The team next match
is todav at 2:30 at the
Riser Birch Tennis
Center in Greenville.
and
LADES NIGHT AT
THE KING AND
QUEEN NORTH
SALE
BOOM CLOSE te ECU. HOP. 7SH�44
LOOKING TO SUBLEASE furnished
� pt $270 month plus utll 5 blocks
from campus HBO, Showtime, Pool
ft lots more Call 7S�-�71
FOR SALE Sofa A Chair perfect for
student with apt S30 ea or both for
SS0 7 End Tables MJ Call 7SJ-4�n
after
l�M MT FUGI it-Speed 1 Must sell
MOO 7S7 170 7fter 7
TWO BORM APT available to
sublease tor summer sessions further
-fo 'S 93'4 Ask tor Dawn
FOR SALE Technics SH 1010 Stereo
Equalizer. Still under warranty
J100 00 or Best offer Call Chuck
757 I7�t Please Leave Message
POR SALE used but good ei-editor
m-chlef of the Buccaneer � has slight
knowledge of 7 production � good
deal � cheap � good with first
graders but only has mental capabili-
ty of kindgardener � call 757 �S01
anytime day or night Some of us are
always working most of the time
Thank you very much! 111
BEACH CRUISER ll Surfboard
7Ml 74
THERE ONCE WAS A girl named
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So she planned and she schemed had
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But finally settled for her hand
Happy B Day Charolette A Jennifer
TRACY DALLAS N Especially Mar
Wva sorry � the trouble I caused KIO
KENNY, JAY Great Jobl Had fon
gefn trashedi Kevin Dean PS Thanks
4 the firplace
LOST AND
FOUND
GUITARIST NEEDED for full time
ttP 40 band. Call Steve at rs-4n for
details.
LOST: Mary lane the Sheepdog in
vicinity of Student St. Big. fluffy
black and white. 14 yrs. of age. Needs
medication everyday. Call 711 MM.
WANTED
LOCAL CHURCH would Ilk person
to Keep church nursery 10:45 -1 noon
each Sunday. Could possibly be divid-
ed with another person. M each Sun-
day. Send resume' to Nursery
Helper, let Prince Rfl Greenville.
NC 27U4.
For J �taroom House, partlcally fur-
"Ubed, fully carpeted, central AC,
M fireplace tis.OO a month Call
FEMALE ROOMMATE wanted for
summer and fall, sioo mth. , utilities
one block from campus. 7SI-2020
TWO WSI'S NEEDED for waterfront
at Camp Loach apply to Ed Hodges:
Camp Leach Manager Iis E. Mth St.
Washington. NC J7M
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
I FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED
Wilson Acres Apts for summer. Rent
�J.S7 per month plus utMs Call
7M-SIML
ROOMMATES NEEDED for sum
marfall River Bluff apts. Call
HMM
ROOMMATE WANTED for summer.
House fully furnished. Private Room
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MISC.
WHEN A FRIEND has stereo system
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technicians at the TECH SHOP don't
cherge for repair estimates Call us
at 7S7Nlneteen Eighty
AUTO ACCIDENTS Specializing in
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Building. Greenville, North Carolina.
7M-4M0.
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time typing for feculty A students
754 1440
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Service
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Selectric Typewriter Call Lanie
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PERSONAL
KAPPA DELTAS want to thank all
the sororities who supported them
during Greek Week Congrats to our
new pledges
Sigma Tau
Gamma
Present
DRAFT NIGHT
Tues. April 1 01984 8:30-1:00am
Adm.$l.50 I8yrs.$l.00
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Come Early
Buy, Sell
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3NORTH WED. April
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8-12
All Dining Customers Admitted Free.
College I.DFree Admission
Til 7:30
Happy Hour 6-8
April 25- The Fabulous Kays And Peter Adomis
Wed. May 30th- Jerry Butler And The Band Of Oz.
Custom crofting
ft
Jewlery Repair
fair prices
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Bring This Ad for
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Doors Open At 8:30
Members S1.00
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PURE HONEY ,s a nat.onaiiv recognlZed -ate X'ouve from Atlanta starry
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THr I A
APRIL
Purple- Gi
Pigskin Pi
Party Sat
ECUs spring football
game, the annual Purple-
Gold clash, will take on
ne air this ear with a
to-da schedule of
festive activities A
13 14, surrounding
game slated for 4 p.m. on
Saturdav
All ECU students with
a valid identification and
activit) card wiS; be ad-
mitted to the game
charge
A majcr tailgate pi
motion is planned. h a
two-dav ceiebi i
call "The Great P
Purple-Gold F . I
Pigout Party Various
events will then
a massive p .
contest and e- .
pigs throughout Sa it
day.
"We �
a fun day for the er
familv in leac .
our annua . i
said Dave Ha A
Athletic Dii ;
Marketing. Ha
coordinated the
with the F
the sp
cookm' c v
Beer.
'Our : i .
tion wa
during th
vve
Pirate M
To Be N
Other "1
Pirate what d
ECU's mascot1 h
worjv
of "The Pa:e
Well, at preser
name reallv exists foi
V
jr
Pirate mascot. Bui
will change on A:
halftime of the ar
Purple-Gold spi
ball game.
"A contest is underwaj
in area elementary
schools right now to
an appropriate name foi
our Pirate mascot ex-
plained Assistant tfc
Director for Marketing
ECU Dave Hart J:
Individual . ass
within the area schoc -
grades one through
will be submitting names
in a contest to name
Pirate. A pane! of judges
will review all names sub-
mitted and pick the one
that is felt to be the be:
and most appropriate
name to tag our Pirate i
mascot.
The winning class �
get a picture with the,
Pirate to be framed ard
placed within the set
And each individual stu-
dent within the class will
get his or her picture
made with the Pirate
mascot to keep for
themselves.
The current look of the
Pirate mascot came about
with the beginning of last
football season, as the
athletic department
sought to upgrade the im-
age of the Pirate and tc
make the mascot more
adaptable to the many
facets of the athletic pro-
gram. The new Pirate
mascot, as well as other
logos of the university,
are now licensed through
a professional organiza-
tion out of Atlanta.
"We've had tremen-
dous response to our new
Pirate mascot and logo j
continue Han, "and wej
�a ! �� t . T �
� 1





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
APRIL 10. 1984
13
Purple-Gold
urney pigSkin Pigout
Party Saturday
The ECU Women's
Tennis Team was
defeated by Guilford by a
score o 8-1, with Russell
and Manderfield in
doubles giving ECU its
onl winning match.
"Guilford is a very
strong, and they were
even stronger this year
�aid Coach Sherman.
Heidi Bunting and Ty
Meyers improve with
every match that each
pias Sherman said. She
also added that Janet
Russell plaved well in
singles.
The team's next match
oday at 2:30 at the
Rter Birch Tennis
Center in Greenville.
HTAT
AND
EEN NORTH
mbers "
8-12
ed Free.
erAdomi,
Band Of Oz.
.V
'king
- 930
30
6O0
ervices
lAND :
0&
Y
For
Ladies
Only! IM
' Atlanta starring
Temiv touring the
On Sal Now'
15 00
I Tictw� HotO�f i
HavtTo
AITh�0oor
ECU's spring football
game, the annual Purple-
Gold clash, will take on
new air this year with a
two-day schedule of
festive activities April
13-14, surrounding the
game slated for 4 p.m. on
Saturday.
All ECU students with
a valid identification and
activity card will be ad-
mitted to the game free of
charge.
A major tailgate pro-
motion is planned, with a
two-day celebration being
call "The Great Pirate
Purple-Gold Pigskin
Pigout Party Various
events will then surround
a massive pig cookin'
contest and eating of the
pigs throughout Satur-
day.
"We're trying to create
a fun day for the entire
family in leading up to
our annual spring game
said Dave Hart, Assistant
Athletic Director of
Marketing. Hart has
coordinated the event
with the Pirate Club and
the sponsor of the pig
cookin' contest, Miller
Beer.
"Our tailgate promo-
tion was well received
during the fall and we
wanted to continue this
for our spring game but
make it bigger. So we've
got activities planned for
the entire family
A special appearance
will be made by L.C.
Greenwood, compliments
of Miller Beer, both Fri-
day evening when the pigs
start cookin' and Satur-
day morning for an
autograph session.
At 12 noon Saturday,
the Pirate football
players will stage a tug-o-
war with an elephant!
The Pirate Mascot will
get a new name at
halftime and Ed Emory
will have some help in
celebrating his 46th birth-
day.
"With the Pig cookin'
contest, fun for the entire
family, the football
game, a broadcast of our
spring game on radio, it's
all going to make for a
great day to be a Pirate
continued Hart.
"This being alumni
weekend will bring lots of
folks back to the campus
and we plan to provide
them with something like
they've never seen before.
We want to start a tradi-
tion on April 14
m
ADVERTISED
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
sale at or below the advertised price m each a&p Store eiceot as
specifically noted in this ad
fWCES OFFERED THRU S.t Apr.l 14 AT AP�NCren.ll�- NC ��������
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
DOUBLE COUPONS
CHECK WITH YOUR LOCAL AAP FOR DETAILS OH DOUBLE COUPONS
3 Beautiful Patterns Hand Painted Baroque
STONEWARE
)
SEE COUPON
BELOW ON
COMPLETER
PIECE
This Weeks
Feature
Cup
WITH EVERY 3.00 PURCHASE
49
Pirate Mascot
To Be Named
STANLEY LEAR Y - ECU Photo Lab
The ECU coaching staff is hoping Saturday's Purple-Gold intra-squad
scnmmage will produce someone to fill the vacated shoes of star quarterback
Kevin Ingram. The game is set for 4:00 p.m.
SAVE 50� LB.
COUNTRY PRIDE
Whole Fryer Legs
89�
Jumbo Pack
SAVE 31 � LB.
Other than "The
Pirate what do you call
ECU's mascot? In other
words, what is the name
of "The Pirate?"
Well, at present, no
name really exists for the
look forward to naming
the Pirate through our
contest
So, it will not be long
before "The Pirate" can
have his or her official
name!
se(k TuCer
Carolina past mall Lnrwnv,iu
Pirate mascot. But that
will change on April 14 at
halftime of the annual
Purple-Gold spring foot-
ball game.
"A contest is underway
in area elementary
schools right now to find
an appropriate name for
our Pirate mascot ex-
plained Assistant Athletic
Director for Marketing at
ECU Dave Hart Jr.
Individual classes
within the area schools,
grades one through five,
will be submitting names
in a contest to name the
Pirate. A panel of judges
will review all names sub-
mitted and pick the one
that is felt to be the best
and most appropriate
name to tag our Pirate
mascot.
The winning class will
get a picture with the
Pirate to be framed and
placed within the school.
And each individual stu-
dent within the class will
get his or her picture
made with the Pirate
mascot to keep for
themselves.
The current look of the
Pirate mascot came about
with the beginning of last
football season, as the
athletic department
sought to upgrade the im-
age of the Pirate and to
make the mascot more
adaptable to the many
facets of the athletic pro-
gram. The new Pirate
mascot, as well as other
logos of the university,
are now licensed through
a professional organiza-
tion out of Atlanta.
We've had tremen-
dous response to our new
Pirate mascot and logo
continues Hart, "and we.
Carolina east mall r'areenvillt
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purchase of $7.50 or more
"The Talented Five"
� Sugar Plum Lip Pencil
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Today, the toughest thing about going
to college is finding the money to pay for it.
But Army ROTC can help - two
ways!
First, you can apply for an Army
ROTC scholarship. It covers tuition,
books, and supplies, and pays you
up to $1,000 each school year it's
in effect.
But even if you're not a
scholarship recipient,
ROTC can still help
with financial assis- ft ffl ?J
tance�up to $1,000
a year for your
last two years in
the program.
For more
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contact Captain
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must act quickly to be
eligible for a scholarship
this year!
"4
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On Wednesdays
A P
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7W GrMfltvilte Blvd. Grcitvill�, n.C
?�
h JHc � �� ��"





14
THE EAST CAROLON1AN APRIL 10. 1984
?
Spring Coupon Sale
Now thru Saturday
Only.
Additional Savings On Our Everyday Low Prices!
$ 1.00 OFF
Crew Necks
Reg. $6.95 to $11.95
Good thru 4-14-84

$1
$1
a I
$ 1.00 OFF
W A
Sweat Pants
Reg. $6.95 to $8.95
Good thru 4-14-84
$�
$2.00 OFF
Hooded Pullovers
Reg. 10.95 to 12.95
Good thru 4-14-84
&2
c
$1.00 OFF
Baseball Shirts
Reg. 4.95 to 7.95
fcl
Good thru 4-14-84
$1
U.B.E
�!��� COTANCHE
GREENVILLE. N.C.
Downtown
Final Sale of the School Year � Prices Will Never Be This Low Again!
r-TiPPM
" " �' I inn -?�� ��� -�-� � mtm m m
;�-
�B





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Title
The East Carolinian, April 10, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 10, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.335
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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