The East Carolinian, April 3, 1984






�he
(Earnltntan
Serving the Eastarolma campus
ommumty since v5
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
" Itk tuft reports
Donations of food, clothing,
shelter and time are characteristic
01 the student response to recent
requests for aid in the aftermath
of tornadoes that swept through
Pitt County last Wednesday.
"Students have been ' most
helpful, and I reallv appreciate
it said Ruth Taylor, a local Red
Cross representative.
The series of tornadoes left nine
people dead in Pitt County alone
and hundreds were injured. Ac-
cording to a spokesman for Pitt
County Memorial Hospital, 156
people were treated for injuries
sustained in the storm. There are
still 19 people hospitalized. "This
is the worst disaster the hospital
has ever had to deal with the
spokesman said.
Lt. Nelson of the National
Guard agreed. The entire Na-
tional Guard unit was activated
following the disaster and helped
search Taylor's Trailer Park for
victims, blockade and patrol
stricken areas, and unload equip-
ment. The unit is working 12-hour
shifts and "basically a lot of over-
time Nelson said.
Suzanne Shepherd, a physician
at the hospital, put the hospital's
disaster plan into effect following
notification of the storm damage
according to Georgette Hedrick'
director of the Office of Informa-
tion and Publication at the ECU
School of Medicine.
Dr. Joe Williamson, a medical
school faculty member, was in-
strumental in the coordination of
the efforts of the disaster pro-
gram, Hedrick said. The hospital
emergency department is staffed
by medical school faculty.
A disaster relief center has been
set up at the new Greenville
warehouse, and, according to
Assistant to the Chancellor Dick
Blake, aid is needed for the
distribution of donations. "Man-
power is needed he said, adding
that teams of six students would
work best, although any
volunteers are welcome. The
warehouse is open from 9 a.m. to
9 p.m. and information can be ob-
tained by calling 752-2800.
WZMB News Director Mike
Butzgy said that, upon receiving
word of the disaster, the campus
radio station began staying on the
air 24 hours a day and broad-
casting public service an-
nouncements every 15 minutes
asking for donations to aid vic-
tims. The station raised $1,500
worth of food and clothing and
provided shelter for 63 people
through the announcements, But-
zgy said.
Both the Sigma Nu and Lamda
Chi Alpha fraternities offered
shelter to those left homeless,
although no one took advantace
of the offer.
Sigma Nu provided food, as did
the Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority.
Victims
Chris Cuelio, commander of
the ECU Army ROTC unit, sajd
the ROTC cadets are helping the
Red Cross in processing emergen-
cy relief. They started helping to-
day and will continue working for
the rest of the week.
The Red Cross center is at the
Faith Pentecostal Holiness
Church on East 14th Street. "A
lot of groups have called wanting
to help Taylor said. "I'd like to
express my thanks to many
students and others from the
university who have volunteered
their time. Everyone has been so
wonderful about getting things
done
ECU football players were sent
by Coach Ed Emory to unload
cargo planes and trucks which ar-
rived with donated clothing and
furniture. Also, Emory said, some
football players helped with the
clean-up of the debris and will
help unload more goods this
week.
Mark Niewald, president of the
Student Residence Association,
said the date for Outstanding
Residence Hall Contest entries has
been extended in order to allow.
students to collect more points by
helping with disaster aid. "Our
thing is manpower. We've got
plenty of that Niewald said, ad-
ding that approximately 50
students have already helped in
some way.
A concert featuring Hank Snow
and other Grand Ole Oprv stars
has been scheduled for Sunday,
April 8 in Minges Coliseum, Blake
said. The concert is being spon-
sored by ECU and concerned
citizens. There will be two shows
one at 4 p.m. and 8 p.m and the
admission charge will be $5, with
proceeds going to aid "victims of
the tornado tragedy
The stars will be paying their
own way to Greenville and all
labor is being donated, Blake
said.
SGA Legislature Approves Bills
In addition, .ampus public
safety officers have donated their
time and Chancellor John M
Howdl has provided monev, from
non-state funds, to pav for elec-
tncitv and other costs associated
with the concert.
We're trying to focus on
families who do not have a place
to live and also to supplement
funds provided bv the Red Cross
and state and federal govern-
ments Blake said. He added
that the aid will not duplicate
assistance already provided
Through the concert, he said.
"ECU can involve itself in a ma-
jor role in the region
Volunteers are still needed to
help with the concert. Further in-
formation can be obtained from
Blake's office at "57-6105
Damage on the ECU campus
was limited, said a maintainence
department spokesman. The only
real damage was caused bv a tree
falling on a state car, he said.
$1,000 To Be Donated
tRYL BROWN, �-ww.
�H
- . . -
rs sucn as this greeted manv of th dri �,i. � . . �� - ��
lo be done h large. P P'e are mdm ln lhe dean-up effort, the amount of work remaining
Scheduled Renovation For
Fleming Residence Hall To
Be Completed By Fall Of '84
By DARRYL BROWN
ManagiBf Mltor
The SGA Legislature Monday
approved a $1,000 donation to the
Pitt County Disaster Fund and
supported a move to make
defaulting on SGA loans a viola-
tion of the university Code of
Conduct.
After a lobbying effort by
President Paul Naso urging sup-
port for the bill, the legislature
passed by consent the $1,000 ap-
propriation to aid victims of tor-
nadoes in Pitt County last week.
Nine people were killed in the
county last week by the storms
and hundreds were injured or left
homeless.
"There are a lot of people out
in the rural areas who didn't have
any housing insurance legislator
Jim Ensor, who introduced the
bill, said. Losses in the county
have been estimated at more than
$10 million.
Speaker of the Legislature Kirk
Shelley urged students to
volunteer their time to help
operate the county warehouse,
from which many of the relief
supplies are distributed.
"Those guys (operating the
warehouse) are about worked to
death right now Shelley said.
"They've been going prettv much
straight the whole time" since the
disaster Wednesday night, he
said.
Rules and Judiciary Committee
Chairman Mike Dixon brought
forth the Naso-Epting Resolution
to Rehabilitate the SGA Loan Ser-
vice. The resolution called for
defaulting on loans to be added to
the Code of Conduct thus giving
grounds for disciplinary action bv
the university.
The SGA can only support the
proposal since it does not have the
power to formally make the addi-
tion.
Overdue SGA loans currently
total more than $6,000.
By KIM CRAIG
uff�rlier
A renovation of Fleming
Residence Hall is scheduled to
be completed by the fall
semester, according to Dan
Wooten, director of Housing
Operations.
The revisions will include
rewiring the building and in-
stalling florescent lights in the
rooms. The old heating unit
will be replaced with a central
heating system, and a central
air conditioning unit will also
be added. Carpeting will be
p.aced in the hallways, and the
lobby will be refurnished and
recarpeted.
The total cost of the renova-
tion to Fleming is not available
because the cost audit has not
yet been put out for bids.
An open forum will be held
in the near future to discuss
having a quiet dorm, Wooten
said. The purpose of the
forum will be to ask student
opinion and to propose which
residence hall will become the
quiet dorm. The proposal will
more than likely affect the
students living in central cam-
pus, Wooten said.
The quiet dorm proposal
has been the subject of much
controversy.
3
In other action, the SG4.
Legislature passed bv consent a
bill supporting a � 'multiple-use
student identification card The
card, developed under the direc-
tion of Associate Dean of Univer-
sity Unions Rudolph Alexander
would consolidate the current stu-
dent ID, activity and library cards
into one. The new card will cost
$2.50.
The legislature also heard a
short speech by 1st District con-
gressional candidate John Gillam.
who is challanging incumbent
Walter B. Jones in the May 8
primary.
Gillam stressed his heme of
young, active, agressive leader-
ship for the region. "Eastern
North Carolina is numter one in
almost every statistic that you
don't want to be numbet one in "
he said. "We have not had our
fair share, and it's because we
have not had energetic
leadership
Holocaust Symposium Held
Bv DALE SWA NSON t. w- �.
wwa
College Republicans, SOULS Hold Meetm?
Wilkerson Speaks To Groups
By ELIZABETH BIRO vMrc in th,�
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Sufi Writer
The ECU College Republicans
and SOULS welcomed guest
speaker Sylvania Wilkerson at a
merged meeting of the two groups
March 29.
Wilkerson was the first black in
Wayne County history to run for
county commissioner as a
Republican.
He ran for county commis-
sioner in 1982, after serving 11
Announcements2
Editorials4
Entertainment6
Sports8
Classifieds9
In the March 29 issue of the
East Carolinian the time for
Gov. Hunt's speech was incor-
rectly given. The correct time
is 7:30 p.m.
years in the armed forces and do-
ing undercover work for the
Chicago police force.
Raised in a Midwest Republican
community, Wilkerson said he
was suprised by North Carolina
politics. It seemed strange, he
said, when he was told by the
voter registrar in North Carolina
that if he did not register as a
Democrat, he would be unable to
vote. Wilkerson said he felt many
people in North Carolina go to the
polls believing they are not allow-
ed to vote unless they vote for the
party they registered with.
"1 found, not that it's supposed
to, but the party you register
under in North Carolina does
make a difference as to how you
are treated and what will happen
in politics Wilkerson said. He
said he noticed these things when
he became involved with his own
campaign.
Wilkerson decided to run for
Wayne County Commissioner
because he was unable to run his
locksmith business as he liked,
due to government restrictions in
the small private business sector.
He also said President Reagan's
victory in 1980 inspired him.
"Electing Ronald Reagan in 1980
?
was the first big step since maybe
1860 in trying to get the country
back on the road it is supposed to
be on Wilkerson said.
"I don't understand why so
many blacks flock to the
Democratic party Wilkerson
said. "Throughout the history of
the Democratic party as it pertains
to the black community, there
hasn't been anything significant
that Democrats have done, in-
cluding getting the black popula-
tion involved in American
politics he said.
According to Wilkerson,
Democrats have hurt minorities
by making promises and attemp-
ting to appeal to special interests.
There are so many interest groups
who want to preserve what they
have but don't understand how
their goals are accomplished, he
said. This causes problems not on-
ly for the president, who must ap-
peal to this broad field, but also it
is misleading to the country,
Wilkerson said. When politicans
try to appeal to special interests,
as recently being done by
Democratic candidates, it
misleads the people because our
See BLACK, Page 5
Suff Writer
Genocide, or the massacre of an
entire people, is nothing new to
humanity as witnessed by the
American Indians and the eastern
Europeon Americans, but the
Holocaust of World War II in the
Nazi death camps is the most
significant and horrible in history.
On Saturday, March 31, ECU
Hillel sponsored a symposium on
this tragedy. The purpose of the
symposium, as expressed by Vice
Chancellor for Academic Affairs
Angelo Volpe in his welcoming
remarks, was to be sure "the
tragedies of Auschwitz,
Treblinka, Bergen-Belsen, and the
other camps do not fade into
history Symposium Moderator
Dr. Martin Schwarz, expressed a
more personal purpose as an "op-
portunity to honor those members
of my family that died as martvrs
in the camps The subject was
approached from four angles:
historical, educational, Jewish
theology, and Christianity.
Speaking on the historical im-
pact of Hitler's massive progroms
was Dr. Karl Schleunes, history
professor at UNC-G and author
of The Twisted Road to
Auschwitz. The emphasis of his
presentation was a comparision of
the Nazi rise to power of the
1930s and the French Revolution
of 1792, with comments on man's
apparent fall from grace in the
former episode. He related this to
the Nazi ideology of "Volksge-
meinschaft (blood community)
that would cause an ed to what
they saw as "racid chaos The
destruction of European Jewry
was their means to this end.
Schleunes also commented en the
sanity of the Nazi leaders, who
professed "the disappearance of
the Jews will usher in a new
millenium as being good, sane
men, with insane ideas.
Dr. Bramy Resnik. ECU
foreign language professor and
Holocaust survivor, spoke briefly
on his experiences as a survivor
after the camps were liberated,
but most of his presentation
centered on the need for
Holocaust education. He did not
dwell on the horrors of the camps,
but said only "when the camps
See HILLEL, page 5
The Fabulous Knobs entertained more than 1,500 students at a concert aSZSST "
������ - -
- -i

f





I HI Km i Roi 1NIAN
Af'KU v !4
Announcem
LOAN FUND
All Naifooal Direct Student loan
Borrowers are reminded o� me exit
intarviaw requirement upon gradua
tlon or mow othervnie not returning
to ECU Fan semester u as
undergraduate or graduate students
Tne interview is necessary to inform
NDSL recipients ot the repayment
schedule provisions tor loan
cancellation and other pertinent m
torma'ion v ou are requested to
report tc the Mult. Purpose Room ot
the Mendenha' Student Center a'
5 30 p m on either Apr.i 3 Apr .
Apr ! 11 i�84
CADS
The mavenc organization ot Com
Puter Apphcat.ons in Decision
Science A D S will meet Thurs
aa� Apr 5fh 4pm ,n Raw 130 ' �,
a great vhance t0 get involved In an
ongoing proiecf for Student Gove-
ment Nominations tor officer .
b� discussed ss elections for nrv
semester are upcoming Tne ttme to
�cl snow vembersh.o ,s open toali
s'udents it- an -�?'?�' � cofT1
Outers or ho would like to learn
graduate or undergraduateI
'0r v�vr tufure See you Thuriaay me
9m
SIGMA THETATAU
S.gma Theta T�j the Sat.ona
Honor So. et, of Nursing will hold
"ducfion of new members on Satur
oav Apr- j 9U a eleven am nfne
JenmsArtBuidingAud.tonum Dr
Eio.se Lew.s. Dean ot the School of
Nursing UNC Greensboro a
spea� or me Quest for Excellence
-ew .nductees family fr.enas
ami memoers are r ,c ar,tnc
ASPA ELECTIONS
" "� A-er.van Socety tor person
-e Ao - s'rat.on will hold exec
� ve office elections on April u. 1984
at 3 00 p m n R8vfc; rm jo All
un ors ano Sophomores maioring In
Business Admm are invited to al
�en0 Old members are encouraged to
0ivt their support
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
The Brothers ot the Kappa Alpha
P Fraternity inc would like to ex
tend to everyone a cordial mvitat.on
to attend the.r Sem, Formal kappa
koronat.on Ban tobeheidSat April
at the Ramada Inn from � p m t0 i
m Aom,ss,on will be �5 00 single
ci MOO couple T.cketsmaybepur
-hased from any brother of kappa
�'� pfta P ot an, kappa Swer'near t
e look forward t0 seeing you th
MANAGEMENT
There will be an information and
sign up sheet for all members of SAM
who are interested in going on the
tn-a.h tr.p Saturday. April 7 There
- also be a sign up sheet tor anyone
"iterested In running for offices on
Dr Ecksteins I jor room 209 Rawl un
HI April 12
BEEFNIGHT
Tonight at the Bept.st student
Center we are having Wendy s night
�hd volleyball tor everyone and
anyone who wants to have tun Bring
your own beef and we II see you at
EDMISTEN 84
AH students interested m loining
the campus organization to elect
Rutus Edmlsten as Governor in 1984
please contact Betty Casey or Mac on
Move (ECU coordinators at 7� 0312
LACROSSE
T here w.H be a Lacrosse match this
weekend at state The match will be
at 12 00 on Saturday April 7 if will
be as excting as Our last two matches
were Lacrosse players there w.ll be
Practice T TH.anoFr, at 3 00 Also
H you have not payed dues you must
Pay by Friday or you can t Diay
FANTASY
KNOX'84
e-p 3f a mee'ng 0, student,
� n Tues April 3 st the Pltl
�� Headquarters l6�u Arlington
a' c 30 p t-
CADP
here De a eet ns c( ,ne Cam
Pus A cono- ana Drug �-og'8rr
"�� Apr sth at 5 00 In 2,fj Er
"in Ha -r.c8rswllltwd,KlJsseo
PHI BETA LAMBDA
-ne Qtr Crofl C-ac'e' zri Ph Beta
-flDda will hoia Its ast meetmg on
Aeanesoay Apr ; 4 �� 4 pi.m n Ra
' D,ease a"e?
RUGBY
Pa.e neeceo Mus be strong
' rated zee ated anc -a
earner balls eamthegae n the j
� matches rema nlng. Pracl e is
'es Aec anc Thors s1 ,
�e nterested comeonoot I I
c ease n0 geexs Mat,� �- .
weexenc! v�r;� - a. : x p m
aga.ns- Apoaiacn.an st
PLANT SALE
-e- � �. a' timt � . once
more rte

the Biolog i wM
� nent s sponsor
plant sale � A . �. . 5 ft
! - - Apt jfron � Wan
'forget a
�� . . �
BEACH WEEKEND
Newman ���.�- . go
"g to the beach for a retr il A(
5 � " � � Of MX a
Newman com.ng Togethei
oe ' me fot Heel � �
the beach The cost s sis ana a S3
depos s -eQiJ -eo Sunday Ap-
after Mass Come to the oea' - a �
help make Newman a 0etter
Diacr-
GAMMA BETA PHI
Tne riexl gpnpa meet rtg of Gam
-a Be'a Pn DP ne.a on Thurs
day. Vfl .5 i984 at 7 oo P -
Spe.gr- Room iW p,ease a�ena anQ
don t forget t0 - - . . �. an0 tirke,
final p ans for gc - .
Na ona Conver- on A ze a�
ed
come io.n the Sign Language Club
tor an evenmg of m.me sign ano
song The club will be performing
Popular movie ano broadway themes
ano current popular songs Sign
language skills are not necessary to
appreciate me performance Enjoy
the Fantasy Tuesday April 10 at 7 30
P.m. In Wright Auditorium Admls
S'on is free to everyone
RACQUETBALL
The ECU club Racouetbail Team
will be hostng a three day racquet
ball tournament in the early fall (or
ail students' into about the tourna
ment will be discussed on April 4, at
5 00 p m m Memorial Gym room 102
We will also nominate officers for
next year ana set up plans for clinics
�ree to team members) and tourna
ment travel m the fall Any and all in
terested students please attend
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
" Ke Accounting Society wit! hold ot
� :ers election on April 9 1984 In the
coffeehouse of Mendenhall at 4 00
pm
SUMMER CAMP
v worfc n tnp
Poccns a 'fP-pser'at,ve lr0m
ra n tr,e Nor
er ' ' nately ISO
Mevn v0rK will be
' �� 4 � onduct mer
- op now for an mfe- . . a
H � Saw, 313
' A A a-eer
' � B ano Piacen � � ter n
, � 1 H
NUTRITIONT SHIRTS
�'�� Association
1 " s' "�- " �WrU ano SWeat
' t floor of ,he Mome
Econ I If no one s pre
� '� �� �"or another
� � "he -herne of most- -�
" s � '�� �� rhereare
Olors a iafcie to
- BUY a
' ��' � � �� Wednes
SCHOLARSHIP
Applications are now being ac
cepfed pr rhe David b an0 wnia h
S'eye-s Scholarship )0r
jnaergraouates enrolled in the Divi
s or of Soc.al Worn The S500 00
Scholarship will be awarded for the
fan semester of 1984 The rec.pient
win be selected on the basis of
academic excellence financial need,
good citizenship and dedication to
'he Soc.a' Work and or Criminal
Justice professions Applications are
available from and should be return
ed to The D'vision of Social Work.
Room 3U. Allied Health (Carol Belk)
Buildmg Deadline April 20. 1984
For more information call 575 6961
ext 219
SPRING FLING 84
Spring Fling 84 is coming
Everyone is invited to the all campus
party at the Phi Tau house Friday.
April 6th There will be live music
and plenty of your favorite beverage
Be sure to get your ticket for the
beach weekend tor two at Ramada
inn at Atlantic Beach from any Phi
Tau member Don't miss this big
event
INSANITY
Dr Selwyn Rose Forensic
Psychiatrist Attorney will speak at
Jenkins Aud on Apni 6 at 10 00 a m
Are Killers Insane in North
Carolina' ,s the fascinating topic
Don't m,ss this exciting lecture
Also Ps, Chi scholarships are still
available Deadline is April 2
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ Is soon
soring Prime Time" this Thursday
at 7 p m In the Old Joyner Library
Room 221 Please loin us for fun.
fellowship and Bible study We are
looking forward to meeting you
FELLOWSHIP
"Be Prepared In Season ana Out of
Season" is the topic of this week's
inter Varsity meeting This will be
the final week of the Exposition on 11
Timothy Come fellowship and grow
with us!
WZMB
Looking for some music that'll give
your ears a treat? Listen to WZMB
we've got the sounds that can't be
beat On every Sunday morlning from
6 am to 10 am The Contemporary
Gospel Show is coming out the cam
pus airwaves at 91 3 FM We've got
some great groups like The im
Petals Glad, Amy Grant. David
Meece and much much more So
tune on every Sunday morning for
some rock founded on The Rock'
BLOOD DRIVE
Army ROTC will be sponsor,ng a
blood drive Apni ,10 Any campus
organ,zat.on with 20 or members can
compete for food and other pr,zes
donated by local merchants by Uay
ng the oest turnout (percentage-
Prepare to party when your group
yns For further information call
LSAT
The Law sooi Admission Test
'LSAT, will be offered at t ��
Carolina University on Monday June
'� I9�4 Appi,atIOn blanks are lobe
completed and mailed lo
LSAT LSDAS Box 2000 R Newtown
PA 18940 Reg�trat,on dead. � ,
�� 17 1984 Registration,
Postmarked after mis date mu� ,�.
accompanied by � si 5 non
refundable late registration me
NTE
Dr John S Chiider, Director.
ECU Testmg Center. annountes a
special administration of the Na
fionai Teacher Examinations Core
Battery no 3 (Professional
knowledge! and me Specialty Area
Examinations to be held at East
Carolina University on Saturday
May 5. 1984 Person, interested In
registering for this special ad
ministration are urged to contact the
ECU Testing Center Speight
Building, room 105 Greenville N C
Telephone (9191 757 6811. no later
than April 15 1984
SIERRA CLUB
Author and veteran backpacker
Allen DeHart will be the Sierra club
guest speaker 8f if, April 9th
meeting Along with a slide presents
t.on Mr DeHart will discuss the pro
gres, of the Mountain to Sea Trail, a
70 mile wide corridor spanning Norm
Carolina and connecting maior
Population center, with outlying
natural resources He will also
discuss the NC Trans Association
Mr DeHart 1, the author of North
Carolina Hiking Trails as well as
guide book, to hiking trails in
Virginia and Sokufh Carolina
The Sierra Club meets at the First
Presbyterian Church on Nth and Elm
Streets in Greenville at 8 pm Non
members are welcome to attend
ALPHA PHI ALPHA
Alpha Ph, Alpha Fraternity mc is
having an interest meeting. Wedne,
day April 4th at Mendenhall Student
Center In room 221 at 7 p m
AMBASSADOR
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Past President's club of the
ECU alumn, Association is offering a
scholarship to an Ambassador n
order to express the.r deep apprec a
tion for the vast amount of volui I
serv.ee that the ECU Ampass.
contribute to the progress 1
welfare ot ECU The recp.ent � �
be an ECU student who .5 a meml 1
In good standing of the ECU An
bassadors and must be of �
classification as to be a sen,or - �� ,
fall semester of 1984 An,
bassador who is .nteresteo should
P'Ck up an application after Ma-
in �he Taylor Slaughter Al
Center Applications should be com
pleted and turned m by April 4
a'
GRE
The &r�Ou,i, Ra
Will be offered �t a , u
Un,vert, on sa n lay . na � i��4
'�i I .a" only Appiat,on
blank, 8f, to 1()mt � f
1 to e' o. �� . re � � . r �. ,
B UA Pi rv N .
�' n, must be pott - . ed no
�f�i �� i May 4 ,984 �
�� be i ta ned d
'r" B �� �-� Boon j ip, w
butldtng
GMAT
�� ata Manage i �
sion Test ,GMA' w tx .�.�. �.
f Ml carol,nfl unlvers t on ��
"� June 16 1984 Application blank,
are to be . op,etec ano malle
GMAT Educational Testing Se � e
Bo, 966 R Princeton N j 08540 Ap
Plication, must b� po,f marked no
'ater man May ,4 1984 AppCaf,on,
may be obtained from the ECU
Test.ng center Ro0m ,05 Speight
Bunding Greenville n c 27834
SPRING FLING 84
Spr.ng f , nfl e , oming
Everyone � . � . � ,Q fne
PHi TAU house April 6th to part,
There is also a raffle for a Beach
Weekend for two at Ramaca
Atlanta Beach The tr.p includes a
tank of gas and 150 spending mone,
Get tickets from ar, phi tAu
" ���'�,oer
PHI BETASIGrVA
DIETETIC ASSOC
. n . ' .
'
�' 5 30 . .
.olved witt
DZ BIG BROTHERS
B,g broth mating b. Ar
Apr,l48'� K � ,
Part Donorgethatyour.a
do for me slave saie Alpha, De�a
AHSmg � tomgh, ana we �
Hope ever,one � �
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STUDE NTS Al T M HAW T
AtVBASSADOBES
-
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HARDING
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ISA
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SPRING FASHION
� �. - - �� ��
� �
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STEAIf HOUSE
2 L' - �'
2903 E
"soc A Grec
ad is' Beamn� ' '
and 15! Be mere or be oblong
NAACP ELECTIONS
The ECU Chapter NAACP 1984 85
election, w,ll be held Apr 12. 1984 at
6 00 p m room to be announced Ap
Plications may be picked up Marcr
22 April s ,984 8t MendenhaH's ,ntor
mat,on oesk 250 Jarvis Dorm or 502
creene Dorm Return application to
250 Jarvis Dorm by Apr 5 1984 5 00
p m
CONTEST
The Department of
Unions is sponsoring a .dec j
contest ,n the Amosem,
area of Menoennan Student r.
The contest will v �
Apr 2, ,984 a- 8 30 � V .
da, Apr ,6 84at 5 00 v . ,
score must pe ver,f,ed . ��
B.n.aras Center Superv sor H
scorer, on ea h .Qf� "
receive a pr�e For turner 0f .
P'Ck up the rule, a- I
Mendenhall Student CenP,
PIRATE WALK
Closing date is Apn, 15m
aiII be a mandator, meeting for all
persons assoc ated with P ra- - .
and those interested on Apr '��- i
escorts please return their ;a�P�� ,t
th s time Ron tangle, ana the Sfu
dent Government appre
ever,ones coooerat,on throug
the ear Tf,anx ,ou
Mon. & Tues.
Nite
M Chopped
-Sirloin cV
saJad Fiar
$3.9 �
Wed. & Thurs
Nite
J Beei 1 ipS
& Sakid
$3
Fri. & Sat.
Nite
$c 1 8oz. Sir
Salad Bar
4.69
The-e
nine :t
man
to
We
'A C '
to th
of ' .
Mc:
Mai

do
THE
and
ueen
NORTH
Coming Friday
Delbert
McClinton
with Central Park
PHI ETA SIGMA
ere A bean -portant meeting
' ' es -c 3 a 5 30 n 'oc :�
Mendenha Af � m electing new
officers for ne ,ear AewmaisoDe
d'Scussing the upcoming initiations
and oake sale All memper, should
a"ena
BAHAMA MAMA PARTY
Bahama Mama Party coming
soon mi Apr,1 19th at me kappa
Sgma House The part, starts at 4 30
so gel . - � s �, , Sep an
brother � ttle S s'er for tickets
HOMECOMING
Applications are now bemg ac
cepteo tor the 1984 Student
Homecoming Committee Chairper
son Applications can be p.cked up at
timer the Menaenhall information
Desk or the Alumn, Center The
deadline for appyling for th position
is Friday. Apr.i 13
occcooos
GREEK WEEK SPECIAL
BUY ANY WHOLE
SUB & I -4
FOR ONLY $2.19
1 " � I AM :
FREE DELIVERY
752-2183
4th Streel
Doors Open at 8:00
Tickets available at both
Record Bars, 4Apple Recorcfe and
King and Queen North
Gill for information
757-1314
Now Featuring Fix It
ourself Potato Bar
Free with meal.
AEROBICS
It Should Be So Much More Than
"Do 8 of this, Do 8 of that"
At The Aerobic Workshop il is!
We Specialize In Aerobics
mThe Fun Way
To Fitness'9
Phone 757-16(
417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown Greenville
Puzzle Ai
Corr
When girls want a vacation
filled with fun, sun and romance,
they go to Fort Lauderdale
L
In the March :
M.chael M kinn
possesing pyrotechni
Gihbs and John
residents of the �i
Where all your dreams come true 5W
PHONE AHEAD FOR FASTER SERVK f -
?
East Carolina University's
Student Union
Needs Chairpersons For The
Following Committees
1 Forum Committee - Select, and promotes lectures, symposiums, or other
grams that will .merest the student body and Umversity community.
Public Relations & Publicity Committee - Will package publicity and coor
promotion of the Union.
Recreation Committee - Plans and promotes the following activities:
� ACU-I Tournaments (i.e. bowling, billiards)
� Clubs (Table Tennis, Chess, Backgammon)
I � �Ee�:rtion Act,v,t,es (,ce Geam B;n�'w��- -�)
I � Production Committee - Responsible for programs -Dinner Theatre, Madrigal Dtnner
Student Center decorat.ons, receptions, and other programs - not contracted out.
I TraVeJ T "T an 7mot- foUowing types of trips: weekend excur-
sons, tnps scheduled dunng the holidays and during the breaks, and also sponsors the
Q I ravel Adventure Film Series.
i
Applications for committee chairpersons are available at Mendenhall Student Center's
Wormatton Desk, or the Student Union Office (Room 234 -Mendenhall Sen
Renter), hor more informat.on contact the Student Union Office a. 757-661 I ext
211 Jarv
2 Blocks fi
Orenon' �
SPfausmauK
B I
Gallo Wine
-r
Coca-Co
89
TB-SIAB PICTURES .IK PRODUCTIONS AILAN CARR PRODUCIION "WHFRf THF RrtK Uf
mmnKNotm-fsiutor jfffmmmukm- mZ
�tssifnr -���$
AUNA STFWARI
SYLVESTER LEVAY
STARTS FRIDAY, APRIL 6 AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU

X ash our es N
Shopping
University Eccj
X asJh s '
Attendant on duu a
VdIscolint"
Student Ch! Recei
grocer ordV v
coupon to cashier - Jj
Same
Address
ID Number
Limit one discount per
Fxpifr-5





AMBASSADORES
auaaorea Ooo'f forgtt our
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eeo �ia we win an oo out to
"�"� Please plan
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rw Wtsl 4-ea Res.oenca Council
I Spnn0 Fashion ex
iflama on Apr i RH at 7 p m n
I Dorm fashions will be pro
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2 vocations
2903 E 10th St
'500 W Greenville Blvd
Wed. & Thurs.
Nite
$ J Beef Tips
SaJad Bar
$3.99
V v " Sirloi
om
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99
Phone 757-1608
417 Evans St. Mall
Downtown Greenville

l)fc
'84
�:
i
v
&!
)rs ARE'
)NU AUNASTEMT
KSBSnUSIBIfNi
�iar�icTio
"TSjysBB Haas1"

IEAR YOU
Tornado Causes Damage To Manv
��, STEPHEN Ar, Bui.din, and G�� 0 �W ATA�11J
I HI JAMAKOl INKS
AlHIl i 14
HARDING
Staff Wiftar
Near normal numbers
of crimes were reported
this past week. There
were two reports of
assault and several of
larceny and vandalism.
There was one report of
nine males streaking near
the Wright Building and
many reports of damage
to vehicles due to
Wednesday's severe
weather. Crimes reported
to the ECU Department
of Public Safety from
March 26 to April 1 were:
March 26, 10:25 a.m.
� A report of a key
bioken in the lock of
door at 202-C Belk Hall;
3:30 p.m. � A female
student reported being
assaulted by her ex-
boyfriend in the parking
lot between the Jenkins
Art Building and Garrett
Hall.
March 27, 4:43 a.m. �
A report of damage to the
window pane of a
residence hall door; 11:50
a.m. � A report of
damage to a vehicle when
towed by Anderson's '76;
3:40 p.m. � A report of
the larceny of the
telephone from the se-
cond floor lobby of the
Student Health Center;
4:15 p.m. � A report of
the larceny of a pocket-
book and backpack in the
Music Building; 7:35
p.m. � Anthony R. Hill
of Kinston, N.C. was
placed in protective
custody for being public-
ly inebriated and was
banned from campus for
suspicious activity;
Ulysses Wiggins of Red-
wood Apts. was banned
from campus for
suspicious activity; 8:07
p.m. � A report on a
blue phone that a female
student fell and cut her
head; 10:50 p.m. �
William Bradley Shaffer
of 331 Umstead Hall was
found in possession of
stolen property, the
English Department An-
nex sign; 11:30 p.m. �
Melvin Devoge Chapman
of Grifton, N.C. was
banned from campus for
suspicious activity.
March 28, 1:31 a.m. �
A report that approx-
imately nine white males
were streaking and
creating a disturbance
south of Wright building;
2:45 p.m. � Jeffery T.
Jones of 160 Jones Hall
was found in possession
of a pair of Knum-
chucks; 4:45 p.m. � A
report a key ring lost or
stolen from a classroom
in the B wing of Brewster
Building; 6:38 p.m. � A
report by a student staff
member that he knew
who discharged
pyrotechnics on 4th floor
of Aycock Hall; Room
412 Aycock Hall was
searched with positive
results, residents were
William Strickland and
Ron Brown; 9:45 p.m. �
Monica M. Navarro and
Donald Franklin Sovall,
both of Winston Salem,
N.C. reported damage to
their vehicles due to the
storm; 11:50 p.m. � A
report three black males
were using the dance
studio of the Drama
Building without permis-
sion.
March 29, 10 a.m.�A
report of damage to four
vehicles due to the storm
north of White Hall; 2
p.m. � A report by a stu-
dent of unauthorized use
of his telephone and the
charging of calls; 2:10
Puzzle Answer
p.m. � report of
larceny of money from a
Purse in room 103 Joyner
Library; 3:10 p.m. � A
report of the larceny of a
vehicle south of the
Radiation Therapy con-
struction site; 7 p.m. � A
report of an open vending
machine in the north cen-
tral lobby area of Minges
Coliseum; 10 p.m. �
Jennifer Tippett of 109-A
North Meade St. was ar-
rested for DWI; 11:30
p.m. � A report of the
larceny of a vehicle nor-
theast of Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center.
March 30, 1:05 a.m. �
A report of the larceny of
a vehicle east of Clement
Hall. It was recovered
north of Jones Hall; 2
a.m. � A report of van-
dalism to a fire alarm
case on the third floor of
Scott Hall; 3:02 a.m. �
A report of an affray on
fourth floor of Jones
Hall; 12:30 p.m. - A
report of larceny of
money from room 618
Green Hall; 5 p.m. �
The milk vending
machine in the canteen of
Aycock Hall was found
unlocked; 8:40 p.m. �
Sgt. Lawler received a
prank call about a distur-
bance on the sixth floor
of Tyler Hall; 9:30 p.m.
� Two female students
were victims of a gun
assault south of Jarvis
Hall; 11 p.m. � a cam-
pus citation was issued
for driving on a sidewalk.
Accused was Joseph G
Barber of 500 F-1 Kings
Row Apts.
March 31, l.Jl a.m. �
A report of the larceny of
two fire extinguishers
from the fourth floor of
Jones Hall; A lock was
reported malfunctioning
on the north central
curfew door of Umstead
Hall; 1:54 p.m. - A
report of a students'
television stolen from
Slay Hall; 2:30 p.mA
report of a vehicle
damaged due to storm;
6:01 p.m. � A report of
vandalism to the
southeast curfew door of
Greene Hall, 9:30 p.m. �
A report of a domestic
dispute between Roger
Alan Baker of 700 E
10th St. and Vicki Lynne
Goodman of 521 Tyler
Hall; Jeffrey D. Brown
of 110-B Scott Hall was
listed as a suspect for
possession of stolen pro-
perty and possession of a
controlled substance and
paraphernalia found in a
room after a search war-
rant was obtained b
Capt. Wiggins; 9:42 p.m.
� A report of damage to
a vehicle in the Tyler
parking lot;
NEED MONEY FOR SCHOOL
Read The Classifieds
Corrections
�-�. �,�,e wrong roo� ZTZZo
TUESDAY NIGHT
COLLEGE NITE
6:30-10.00 All ladies with
College I.D. Skate Free
Tuesday April 3,1984
vrTa't ECU5 hdP V�U fi"d 'he m�ney '� 'manCe VMr remaini"
More than $3 000.000.000 in financial assignee is available ,o s.uden.s
annually. SAS can f,�d f,ve to 25 sources of financial assistance appropriate
tor your individual qualifications.
A new computerized service. SAS has reached thousands of sources of
financial aid, and fed the results of that research into its vast data Hanks.
When you complete a detailed SAS Dataform. the programmed computer
gets to work selecting the sources of assistance just right for you.
Processing fee is onlv $39. Results are guaranteed.
SAS - the service you can't afford not to use.
For free and complete information, contact:
STUDENT AID SERVICES
P.O. Box 3759
Greenville, NC 27836-3759
MUSIC TELEVISION with MTV
16ft SCREEN
Overton s
Supermarket. Inc
211 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks from ECU
Overton � Salutes Greeks During
Busch Beer greek week
6 pack- 12oz cans $1.89
&5CH ase price $7.50
Gallo Wine
Chablis, Rhine. Rose, Burgundy
1.5 Liter Bottle -
$2.99
Coca-Cola
2 Liter Bottle
89
Limit 2 with10.00 or more food
order. Additions Coke's1.19
Wash Your Clothes Next Door While
Shopping at Overtoil's!
I University Econo Wash
Washes 75 � 1
tendantjm dutyjifter dark for you security.
57d1scouot1c6upon
Students Only! Receive a b discount on your
grocery order of $10.00 or more. Present ID and
coupon to cashier at time of purchase.
Name
Watch Yourself at Mr. Gattis
Instant
Replay.
wm
iv,
0
presents
All SING in the SPRING
featuring a.i�KkTr.KKft.
TTKO and &.
A "MTV" feature you don V
want to miss.
8:00pm April 3 Wright Auditorium
ALL Campus invited
to come watch.
At Mr. Gafti's your big event car
come to life again. We'll VIDEO
taDe ball games, concerts, parades,
fraternity & sorority parties, collegiate &
intramural sporting events just ask and then you
can see ,t all again on our big screen TV while you enjoy
the best pizza in town.
For an instant replay, see your neighborhood Mr. Garti's
Corner of Colanche and 10th Phone 758-6121
The brat puu in town -w-
phone
752-3172
Cliffs
Located 1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. Ext.
Monday thru Thursday
�e WEIGH
STATION
Weight Control S rvice
Will Meet You 12 Way!
To salute the students, faculty &
personnel of ECU, We're Cutting the
Cost of A Six Week Program in Half!
Address,
ID Number
Limit one discount per ID number.
Expires 4-7-84
Popcorn Shrimp�
$2.95
Ocean Perch $1.99 �
Seafood Cakes $1.99
French Fries or Baked Potato,
JossecSaladmay be substituted for slaw 35- extra
ANY ECU students, faculty
personnel to Bring In This Ad Will
Receive A 6-Week Reducing
Program for ONLY
$62.50
(Regular cost1 19.70
plus $5.00 registration)
Offer good ONLY urnl
April 11
Call 756-88891
for a free, no obligat� consultation
You can lose 16-28 lbs. in 6-weeks
No contracts, shots, drugs, or pre packaged foods
Our Reducing Program offers food selections from ALL of
The Basic Food Groups
Daily Weigh-ins & Counseling provide a Strong Support Base
Our Daily Vitamin Supplement Contains No Harmful Drugs
IT ONLY TAKES TWO
THE WEIGH STATION AND YOU!
214 E. Arlington
(Next to Bond's) Open 7:30am-5:30pm MWF. 7:30-5:10 TTH

V�
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�te Eaat atarnlttttau
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, w.a
Darryl Brown. ��,�, �,�,��
J. T. PlETRZAK, ftrertororfvai JENNIFER JENDRASIAK, n,ws emo,
Mike McPartland. �,��, �� Tina Maroschak. cw� �,w
Tom Norton, o �anatrr Gordon Ipock, w� ���,
Mark Barker. o�w, w�Bwr Ed Nicklas, ort, &i,w
Michael Mayo. r��c� s Kathy Fuerst. ��, u.
April 3. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Disaster Response
Students Prove Good Citizens
They called it the worst disaster
to hit the region in years, maybe
ever. In one night, dozens were kill-
ed, hundreds injured by tornadoes
in Eastern North Carolina. All
around the fringes of the city,
houses, trailers, powerlines and
forests were swept away.
Somehow, downtown Greenville
and the ECU campus were spared
the worst effects of the disaster.
But that didn't stop local
volunteers, including many
students, from pitching in to help
the devastated region and its
residents.
Students need to be commended
for their generous and energetic
response to the needs for
assistance. The campus radio sta-
tion, WZMB, was on the situation
as it developed, and stayed on the
air through the weekend in an ef-
fort to raise relief assistance for
area victims.
The SGA Legislature ap-
propriated $1,000 to the Pitt Coun-
ty Disaster Relief Fund. Frater-
nities donated rooms for the
homeless. Many groups donated
clothes, food and other needed sup-
plies. Most of all, many students
donated time to help clean-up the
ravaged region and man the
warehouse for relief supplies.
Response from citizens and
businesses throughout Eastern
North Carolina and beyond was
Foreign Policy
tremendous, and students should
be proud they are a part of it.
Students proved they realize that
they are part of a larger community
beyond the campus; they do not
just live on university grounds for
nine months a year and then return
to distant hometowns.
Students have shown they feel
apart of the whole community in
Pitt County, and care about it.
Now the city and county needs to
realize this and accept students as
part of the area. Gone are the days
when students were militant, long-
haired, counter-culturites; they
care about their community as well
as their campus and contribute to it
greatly. County officials need to
recognize the rights of students as
well as students' contributions to
the community; they need to take
more than student dollars in the
economy and assistance in times of
need. They need to encourage stu-
dent input in local affairs and allow
students the right to vote locally.
They need to permit students to
register to vote in the town where
they live most of the year and to
which they contribute so much.
Students can be proud of their
contributions to the community,
last week particularly. One would
think such active, concerned
citizens would be allowed full rights
and opportunities in the local
political process.
Hunt Paper Important
Things are looking up at ECU.
In one semester the university has
hosted a forum for five of the ma-
jor N.C. gubernatorial candidates,
had a three-day lectureseminar
series with veteran media expert
and political analyst Frank
Mankiewicz, and tonight perhaps
the biggest event of all. Gov. James
B. Hunt Jr Democratic candidate
for the U.S. Senate, will unveil his
foreign policy position paper to an
ECU audience in Hendrix Theatre.
The speech is important and pro-
mises to be good for many reasons.
First, Hunt's presentation is spon-
sored by the ECU Phi Kappa Phi
honor society as an extention of its
February symposium "Peace and
War in 1984 Hunt, who said he
was a member of the honor society
in college, has promised a scholarly
presentation of his ideas rather
than political rhetoric.
Curiously, no one really knows
what exactly will be in the paper,
what exactly Hunt's detailed ideas
are on issues such as national
defense. Even insiders in the Hunt
Senate campaign say the exact con-
tent of the presentation is being
kept very tight.
The speech will reveal what is
probably Hunt's most important
position paper. As governor he has
virtually never had to deal with
defense issues. He has made stands
on such issues as economic policy
and education where he has been
active as governor, but for a public
servant moving from the state level
to the national, defense is a vital
area in which he must prove his in-
terest and knowledge.
ECU is lucky to host such an
event, and in such a scholarly
forum as the Phi Kappa Phi sym-
posium. Whatever one's political
affiliation, the event will be in-
teresting the audience and impor-
tant to the state. Tonight should
prove to be a memorable one for
the ECU audio tape archives.
SGA President Calls
For Students' Support

Fellow students,
As most of you already know, a series
of tornadoes touched down throughout
North and South Carolina last week. For
most of us here at the university, it was
just an inconvenience for an hour or so. It
was a nuisance having to be stranded at
the library or in the room until the storm
subsided. However, for many it was a
nightmare devastating lives as well as
livelihoods. It is important that we take a
moment to give thanks for our safety and
good fortune.
In this time of tragedy, there is a need
for help. Many, as you know, are
homeless and are living from day to day
on donated supplies. The federal and state
governments have been working diligently
to aid and comfort these victims. We too
can help in many capacities. The football
team has taken the lead in helping unload
supplies to the homeless. The SGA has
donated refrigerators and money towards
the cause as well. There is an immediate
need for food, money and manpower. My
reason for writing today is to ask for a
unified effort from all organizations,
social and service alike, to volunteer some
time or to organize some sort of fund
raiser or food drive to help meet the de-
mand. In addition to the organization, I
implore each to contribute what they can
to help these people. Let us let our com-
munity know that we are indeed here and
ready to help. It is times like these that
our true selves are tested.
Sincerely
PaulNaso
Networks Abuse Polls, Predictions
By GREG RIDEOUT
Television has helped define presiden-
tial politics for more than a of a quarter
century, but its presence seems especially
dominant this election year. The tube in-
fluences campaigns and voting, can-
didates and voters. One caters to TV; the
other responds to it. And the most
ominous influence the one that seems
to threaten both free press and the sanc-
tity of the secret ballot is exit polling.
Exit polling in and of itself is not bad.
It sheds needed light on the scientific
and sociological factors involved in
voting. The polls are able to explain
where one candidate gets his support
and why he can rise so meteorically from
obscurity. The advantages for the can-
didates are obvious. They can identify
their core constituency and reach out to
people who aren't likely supporters. Of
course, private pollsters provide this ser-
vice for politicians, but the networks ex-
tend it to us.
The media itself is the reason, in a lot
of cases, why a person votes this way or
that. This we can accept as a part of our
technological society. What we can't ac-
cept are predictions. It is an affront to
our societal values. We are finding out
that the one constant theme running
throughout each caucus and primary is
that we know the winner before there
really is a winner. The networks, eager
for Neilsen points and in quest of the
eternal "scoop told us who won the
Iowa caucuses before they had ever
begun. New Hampshire and the Super
Tuesday states were no different. They
call it a "projection" and telecast it into
our homes under the slogan "the
public's right to know
VievPoint
" Campus Forum-
Yes, the public has a right to know-to
what has happened or is happening but
not what might happen. They don't
want to be told what they did before
they do it. Projections lessen their vote
value and, consequently, their belief in
the system. An erosion of this belief is
the first signs of a crumbling democracy.
Yes, television interferes in other ways,
but one that directly conflicts with the
voting process itself. This is one
technological development we don't have
to adjust to.
Like Yogi, I believe it's not over til it's
over, and when it's over then tefl me
who won. Then tell me why who won
won. I'm willing to answer questions to
accommodate posterity but not to help
networks earn more money, I want to
know my and your vote counted.
So, what should be done? This is
where the conflict hits hardest. Legisla-
tion isn't the answer because it can't be
the answer. If a law were passed to nar-
row the First Amendment through any
type of prior restraint, only a short leap
of the imagination takes you to press
censorship. No law, as Justice Hugo
Black said, means no law. The solution
lies with the networks themselves, but
they better act quickly.
NBC, ABC and CBS, along with the
cable channels, should impose a
moratorium on projections. They must
truly act in the public's interest; not to
stop predicting would be a shirking of
their responsibilities. Above all else,
government and the press must serve the
people. They have exhibited excellence
in this respect in the past; they can do so
in the future. The consititution is coun-
ting on it, or else.
'Fiery' Letter Draws Sharp Criticism
I was amused by the letter from
Charles D. Shavitz (East Carolinian,
March 29). A fiery letter indeed, it
blasted Patrick O'Neill for a few of the
most irrelevant reasons I've yet seen.
Mr. Shavitz failed to acknowledge the
very valid point Mr. O'Neill recently
made clearly illustrating the fact that
we have an opportunistic hypocrite
representing us in Washington.
Then he states, "Patrick O'Neill
stands cowering (is this physically
possible?) behind his weekly protest
sign, a yellow belly if there ever was
one
I fail to see the connection. I'd love
to be there when he calls a group of
picketing auto workers in Detroit
"yellow bellied What is a yellow bel-
ly, anyway? Does he resemble a red
neck, Mr. Shavitz?
I will be the first to agree that The
East Carolinian is a fine paper,
definitely my first choice among
available papers. But to commend the
staff for an improvement in "editorial
content and balance" is going a bit too
far.
Have you ever heard of Gordon
Ipock, Mr. Shavitz? His endless bar-
rages against anyone so unfortunate as
to be a Democrat are published in vir-
tually every issue of this paper. He
even has a regular feature entitled
"Conservative CommentaryA View
From the Right
Differing opinions will be found on-
ly in "Campus Forum
Balanced? I must ask you, Mr.
Shavitz. Do you really read this paper?
James W. Leutgens
Sophomore
General College
I'd like to start off this letter by
quoting your "Forum Rules in
reference to the criteria you set for
those who submit letters to the Cam-
pus Forum. You state: "All letters are
subject to editing for brevity, obscenity
and libel, and no personal attacks I
find it inconceivable that you can print
this criteria in the same forum as that
in which you have printed the most re-
cent attack upon Patrick O'Neill. (I
emphasize the words "Most recent
because letters of this nature are not
rare.) Calling someone "yellow
bellied referring to them as being
"totally without worth and making
the reference that, "If he (O'Neill)
were a horse he would have been shot
long ago is what some may consider
a personal attack.
I, however, am not surprised that
you have printed such a letter, even
though it does contradict your "forum
rules It is blatently representative of
your ongoing contention to oppress
those who oppose the ultra-
conservative reactionary opinions of
the majority of your staff. The
privilege of the press is a powerful one;
it should be used with discretion, not
abused and used to setup those with
different opinions, in order to have
them slaughtered in your next issue.
Justin R. Kennedy
Freshman
Political Science
(Editor's note: Ultra-conservative reac-
tionary opinions, Mr. Kennedy? That's
a switch. We do not "set up" anyone
in the Campus Forum. We only print
the letters we receive; they are not our
opinions but those of the reading
public. We do not encourage letters for
or against Mr. O'Neill or any other
person or issue. We print the opinions
people send us; the frequency in which
they come is not our design but is
determined by the frequency with
which people write them. All view-
points are printed.)
Forum Rules
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Studerts
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Shock, Acti
First ReactL
Disaster Sit
Stereotypical reactions
to disaster and normal
reactions to disaster are
often quite different,
said ECU assistant pro-
fessor of psychology
Susan McCammon.
There are four phases
that typically occur as
normal reactions to a
disaster, she said.
The first phase is a
period of shock and
disbelief, during hich
people are unabe to
:omprehend the realitv
of
per
by
di
aut
an
mo
:
du
SP
Black Politic
To Two Gro
Effects Of
Continued From Page 1
our
system is not based on
race or color.
Wilkerson discussed
what he felt were two ma-
jor aspects of the national
budget, social security
and defense. He felt both s
were necessary, but al
defense should be the
Herpes Cas
Not 'Astro,
Across EC
By TINA MAROSCHAK
(4-miEt
Although fairly promi-
nent across many college
campuses, the incidence?
of herpes at ECU are not
"astronomical said a
physician a: the Student
Health Center Wednes-
day.
Herpes, a disease
generally transmitted
from one wet surface to
another, is presently in-
curable, therefore all that
can be given to victims is
moral support, said
DRA
Wed. Api
Adm. $1.1
1
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(2M
with
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.�����:�
�1!
tictions
t's not over til it's
over then tell me
me why who won
� er questions to
posterity but not to help
noney, I want to
te counted.
d be done? This is
hits hardest. Legisla-
ecau.se it can't be
were passed to nar-
mendment through any
only a short leap
you to press
v Justice Hugo
f ' The solution
I - emselves, but
CBS, along with the
iild impose a
ions. They must
s interest; not to
a shirking of
Above all else,
must sere the
:ed excellence
'hey can do so
Lition is coun-
Ise.
ticism
ed to setup those with
order to have
our next issue.
Justin R. Kennedy
Freshman
Political Science
ervativereac-
' KennedyThats
'�or "set up" anyone
Forum He on!v print
ve; they are not our
of the reading
t encourage letters for
'Neill or any other
print the opinions
the frequency in which
' our design but is
the frequency with
'hem. All view-
Wed.)
m Rules
t verification, all let-
de the name, major and
J � iress, phone number
I ' the author(s). Letters
� typewritten pages,
neatly printed. All
iect to editing for brevi-
Pd libel, and no personal
Pe permitted. Students,
1 writing letters for this
ded fo they are limited
? issues.
iOWIRACT.
. ' � "�
Shock, Action Are
First Reactions To
Disaster Situations
of what has actually hap-
Ct� . , pened to them,
to Sical reactions This phase is followed
LtX? I" �� n�rmal b one in which e in-
reactions to disaster are dividual resorts to
2lWle d,fferent- automatic action to try
fT��r ass,sta"t Pr�- and do what needs to be
W�n �L Psycho,�8y done. Contrary to
McCammon. popular belief, McCam
, Hi I S I AK i I' A
A.PRI1 �. 184
There are four phases mon
that typically occur as does
normal reactions to a
disaster, she said.
The first phase is a
period of shock and
disbelief, during which
People are
comprehend
said, the person
not generally in-
dulge in panic.
Following the action
phase, the individual
feels a feeling of ac-
complishment and
unable to spends time recovering
the reality from immediate stress.
The fourth phase
usually occurs within 48
to 72 hours of a disaster
and is characterized by
anxiety, depression,
helplessness, insomnia
and withdrawal as the
impact of the disaster
begins to surface. In
order to promote adjust-
ment during this phase,
it is important for the
victims to be able to ex-
press their feelings in a
supportive atmosphere,
McCammon said.
Counseling services
for any ECU students af-
fected by the disaster will
be available through the
Counseling Center. In
addition, the Student
Health Service and
various campus ministers
have offered their time
for counseling.
Hillel Sponsors Symposium
Continued From Page 1
were first liberated
we walked around in a
daze Resnik emphasiz-
ed that "education is the
only way to ensure that
these tragedies are not
repeated He noted that
while study of the
Holocaust in universities
has intensified lately,
(over 400 schools now
have classes, including
ECU with HSEM 2010,
Literature of the
Holocaust), high school
history books average on-
ly twelve lines each con-
cerning the tragedy.
"The Holocaust: A
North Carolina Perspec-
tive
an audio-visual
Black Politician Talks
To Two Groups About
Effects Of Registering
Continued From Page 1
our
system is not based on
race or color.
Wilkerson discussed
what he felt were two ma-
jor aspects of the national
budget, social security
and defense. He felt both
were necessary, but
defense should be the
priority. According to
Wilkerson, Reagan has
not over spent on
defense. He said recently
76 percent of the budget
went into other programs
besides defense. Some of
these programs Wilker-
son said are unnecessary
and only hurt the
economy.
Herpes Cases Are
Not 'Astronomical'
Across ECU Campus
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
C�-N�w�iaHoc
Although fairly promi-
nent across many college
campuses, the incidences
of herpes at ECU are not
"astronomical said a
physician at the Student
Health Center Wednes-
day.
Herpes, a disease
generally transmitted
from one wet surface to
another, is presently in-
curable, therefore all that
can be given to victims is
moral support, said
Jolene Jernigan, a family-
nurse practioner at the
Student Health Center.
Counseling services are
available, however, said
Assistant Professor in
Counseling Steve Deters.
"What we deal with are
student's reactions he
said. "Dealing with those
feelings is very impor-
tant
"Lives can go on more
or less normally with
modification and adjust-
ment Deters said.
presentation produced by
the North Carolina
Council on the
Holocaust, was also
shown. This slide show
gave a very good over-
view of the Holocaust us-
ing North Carolinians
who had been there to aid
in expressing the in-
humanity they had seen.
Personal accounts were
given by actual camp in-
mates, liberating soldiers,
and people who had been
living in Germany at the
time.
The next speaker was
Reverend Graham
NaHouse of Our
Redeemer Lutheran
Church in Greenville,
N.C. Rev. NaHouse
reiterated much of what
was already said on the
Holocaust and added, as
a response to the
Church's silence during
the tragedy, that "The
Church should never
again let its prophetic
function lie dormant
"The fact that Christians
failed to enact their faith
as a group was a traged
in itself he said.
VSSSSSSSS'
The final speaker was
Rabbi Robert Shafran of
Temple Israel in Kinston,
N.C. His lecture dealt
almost entirely with the
effect the Holocaust has
had on Jewish theology.
He divided Judaism into
tow general sects: Or-
thodox and Non-
Orthodox. Orthodox, be-
ing a strict obeyance to
the faith that God is om-
nipotent and has perfect
justice, has altered very
little since, in it, man can-
iot question God. But in
the many non-orthodox
sects, new Jewish
theologies have
�ssS,
developed. According to
Rabbi Shafran, many
Jews have turned to Rab-
bi Rubinstein's, (author
of After Aushchwitz),
"God is dead" school of
thought.
This r e a c t i o n a r v
theology holds that "if
the Holocaust did not call
God's intervention, then
nothing will Shafran
also noted two other
theologies � that of a
finite God who does no?
intervene and that of a
new defiance to survive in
spite of persecution.
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�-�
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
?
Entertainment
Latest Tarzan Film
Technically Brilliant, But No Heart
By GORDON IPOCK
Fralara MItor
Greenville's Plaza Cinema was literally packed last
Friday evening for the local premiere of Grevstoke:
The Legend of Tanan. Lord of the Apes. Extensive
pre-release publicity hinting an epic-like film had ex-
pectations high. Unlike the sappy Hollywood Tarzan
films of the 30s and 40s, Greystokepromised the true
legend of Tarzan, faithful to Edgar Rice Burroughs'
original book, but coupled with the marvels of
modern cinamatography a 20th century legend
finally done right.
I left the theater impressed with the technical
merits of Greystoke, but for me, the old black-and-
white Weismuller classics � "Me Tarzan you
Jane"� are still unsurpassed for sheer entertain-
ment.
The problem with Greystoke is it attempts a
serious interpretation (packed with philosophical
questions about the nature of man) of of a tale that
an only be considered sacchrine fantasy. It asks to
be taken seriously, something only a waterhead could
do. Thus, the viewer eventually is forced into a deci-
sion: "Either I'm stupid for taking this seriously, or
the people who made it are stupid for asking me to
After an hour, my date was groaning.
The movie covers huge chunks of time and
distance. Lord and Lady Clayton, Scottish
aristocrats, are shipwrecked on the coast of
equatorial West Africa. A few months later, Lady
Clayton gives birth to a son. She dies of tropical
disease, and a pair of apes invade the tree house
where she and Lord Clayton live. The female ape,
whose infant has recently died, attacks Lord Clayton
bludgeoning him senseless with her huge, furry mitts
and steals the human child. The she ape cares for the
habe, Tarzan, as if he were her own. As he grows, he
learns to forrage for termites and other gorilla food
in the dense tropical rain forest. We see Tarzan at age
five and at age 12, a mud-stained jungle urchin pick-
ing lice from his fellow apes and munching bugs and
berries. These are some of the best scenes of the film,
believable in their realism, and captivating. (I was in-
tensely concerned for the child.) Eventually Tarzan
.natures and after discovering a stout knife, he uses
;he weapon to become the dominate male of the ape
tribe.
Tarzan finds a Belgian explorer who has suffered
an arrow wound from a pvgmv attack against the
- eedy expedition of Edwardians he is guiding. Over
a period of months, the Belgian teaches Tarzan to
speak and convinces him to return to civilization.
At this point, the film � for a while � became in-
teresting, no doubt because humans are infinitely
more intriguing creatures than are apes.
Tarzan, it turns out, is actually John Clayton, the
grandson of the Earl of Greystoke and heir to half of
Scotland. His carriage pulls up to a countrv palace
where scores of servants and maids in crisp white
aprons await their new master. Obviously intelligent,
John (Tarzan) is quick to adapt to the complexities of
Edwardian aristocracy. The Earl's young American
ward, Jane Porter, falls in love with John who is a
striking figure in his rustic tweeds with long flowing
hair. Jane is no prude and in time initiates John to to
the joys of real manwoman sex. But to insure a PG
rating, the film shows a passionate kiss on the neck
and leaves the rest to our imaginations.
John appears to have it all, the largest estate in
Scotland and a beautiful woman to share it with. A
reasonable plot would have had John triumph over a
cunning threat from Jane's former and now jealous
suitor, a plot to invalidate his birthright or in some
other way steal his estate. But instead, Greystoke
takes an absurd turn. The makers suggest that,
although reared by animals, John is more sensitive
than the sick Edwardians. At the opening ceremonies
of a nearby museum devoted to Darwinistic ideas,
John discovers Silverbeard, the ape that served as his
jungle father, locked in a cage and awaiting the disec-
tion table.
Oh joyous reunion! John reverts to Tarzan and
releases Silverbeard. They run amok through nearbv
streets and finally nee to a local park. The police are
called who, without hesitation, blast Silverbeard out
of a tree with a high-powered rifle. Edwardian
England is too sick and barbarous for the sensitive
John. He returns to pristine Africa. Jane politelv
refuses his invitation to join him.
By the film's end, I could have cared less what Tar-
zan and Jane did. The movie is so intent on exploring
the duality of TarzanJohn, (part beast, part man)
that I could not empathize with this creature, much
less admire him for any heroic human qualities he
might have possessed. I just couldn't relate to so-
meone who's convinced he's a gorilla and wants to
spend the rest of his life jerking off in the treetops.
Let the bum go good riddance!
Besides its dehumanizing theme, the film also took
a lot of crude and unnecessary swipes at Victorian
and Edwardian values. This was puzzling since
Greystoke was directed and produced bv Hugh Hud-
son who burst upon the filmmaking scene with his
uplifting Chariots of Fire, a film that glorified man
onH I- r iw -a I t . .j i i J
and England. Granted, 19th century England spawn-
ed Marxism and Darwinism, the two most intellec-
tually and morally bankrupt ideas ol the last 200
years, (both the foremost curses of the 20th century)
but the Victorians and Edwardians were hard:
rapacious villains this film makes them out to be
The advertising hype foi Greystoke promises a
great film. And it delivers much of thai pro-
superb cinematography, beautiful location filming in
Scotland and Cameroon and convincing apes p
by laborously trained gymnasts and dancers' in
monkey suits.
But the film has no heart. An episode of "Dallas"
has more human drama. The le-zend of Tarzan is a
tasy, something that Hollywood of old realized
superb!) Hudson's purpose of ex-
pend of Tarzan and alternating to
t a. some sort of missing link in the theory of
ev' "M have been better served bv a reature-
!ent'h documentary. This mixture of science and fan-
- ' r and an insult to the public's m-
: ice
'11 take Johnn) Wdsmuller and Maureen O'
Sullivan an da
Marvin Gaye Shot Dead
By GORDON IPOCK
Fcatvu Editor
Marvin Gaye is dead.
The singer known as the Prince
of Soul died Sunday after a gun-
shot wound to the chest. Gaye was
shot during an argument with his
father. The senior Gaye has been
taken into custody by Los Angeles
police.
After a brilliant singing career
that spanned most of the '60s,
Marvin Gaye was one of the very
few great soul singers of that era
that successfully made the transi-
tion into the '70s and was still
regarded a singing star into the
'80s. Indeed, in 1983 he received
his first Grammy Award ever for
his hit single "Sexual Healing A
man of immense talent, Gaye was
able to keep that talent in tune
with the times. Blessed with a
soulful voice, Gaye could croon a
soothing ballad and inject stirring
passion at just the right moment.
Marvin Gaye was famous for his
smooth-voiced singing stvle.
Gaye scored his first hit in 1962
with "Stubborn Kind of Fellow
A string of hits followed on the
Motown label through the mid
and late 60s: "You're A Wonder-
ful One "How Sweet It Is (To
Be Loved By You) "It Takes
Two" (with Kim Weston), "I'll
Be Doggone "Little Darling (I
Need You) "I Heard It
Through the Grapevine" and
"Too Busy Thinking About My
Baby" just to name a few.
Gaye teamed with singer Tarn-
mi Terrell to record several smash
hits: "Ain't No Mountain High
Enough "Your Precious
Love "If I Could Build My
Whole World Around You" and
"Ain't Nothing Like the Real
Thing Gaye and Terrell blended
together like butter and honev,
but her death in 1970 was such a
blow that Gaye did not perform
on stage again for four years.
During the early '70s, Gaye us-
ed his musical talent to comment
on pressing social and ecological
problems. He scored hits with
songs like "What's Going On
"Mercy Mercy Me (The
Ecology) "Inner City Blues
(Make Me Want to Holler)" and
"Save the Children His sense of
social justice was right on the
mark and kept his music on the
cutting edge of the times.
Despite his tremendous success,
Gaye also had problems. Besides
the death of Tammi Terrell, two
divorces marred Gaye's search for
happiness leading to problems
with drugs and alcohol. Through
the late '70s, he skirted financial
disaster, eventually declaring
bankruptcy.
But like John Lennon, just
when it seemed the once-great
singer had nothing else to offer his
fans, he mounted an impressive
comeback in the early '80s with
fresh material and a new direc-
tion. But also like Lennon, a
tragedy has taken Gaye's life.
When most people � especially
today's younger generation who
grew up in the late 70s � think of
60s music, they think of the
Beatles, the Stones and rock and
roll. But soul music was just as
strong a musical force in that
decade, as the recent film The Big
Chill reminded us so well. And no
singer had a bigger influence on
the music of that generation than
Marvin Gaye, the Prince of Soul.
For his many loyal fans, his death
is a great tragedy.
Marvin Gaye, 1974
Diverse, Busy Week For School Of Music
Wind Ensemble
Patriotic music and a new com-
position for band will be featured
at the April 8 concert of the East
Carolina University Symphonic
Wind Ensemble, conducted by
Herbert Carter. The concert,
scheduled for 8:15 p.m. in Wright
Auditorium, is free and open to
the public.
Works to be performed include
Prokofieff's Opus 99 March, Per-
cy Grainger's "Colonial Song"
and "Mock Morris the Claude
T. Smith "Festival Variations"
and Vincent Persicheti's "A Lin-
coln Address a work incor-
porating spoken excerpts from
Abraham Lincoln's Second In-
augural Address.
James L. Rees of the ECU
Theatre Arts faculty will narrate
"A Lincoln Address ECU
music alumnus Dale Hair will
guest conduct the Grainger
"Mock Morris a Scottish folk-
dance.
The concert will also include
"Ceremonial Music for Band" by
Robert Palmer, a work commis-
sioned by the N.C. Bandmasters
Sl2f v5�llmmh? 5? E"We �� �� �� April 4 concert. The ECU Symphonic Tned. by thc " Bandmasters
wind Ensemble will perform on April 8, and an open-house program on weddinc music is slated for Anrii i Association and first performed
w � ,uicu iur Apni . m utan restrict Band Clinic
i
on campus earlier this year.
The Palmer work incoporates
the tune of East Carolina's Alma
Mater song.
The 50-member Wind Ensem-
ble is the select touring band of
the ECU music school. It has per-
formed on concert tours of several
states and at national band direc-
tor's and musicians' conventions.
Guest conductor Hair, now a
graduate student in the ECU
School of Music, was formerly
band director at Douglas Byrd
High School in Fayetteville.
Flute Ensemble
The 15-member Flute Ensemble
of the East Carolina University
School of Music will perform in
concert April 4 at 7:30 p.m. in
Fletcher Music Center Recital
Hall.
The Ensemble, directed by
graduate student Kelly Via, will be
assisted by pianist Val Parker,
bassist Becky Hollowell and per-
cussionist Kim Summers.
Works to be performed are
James Christensen's arrangement
of the J.S. Bach "Air from the
Suite in D arrangements of two
Carlo Gesualdo madrigals, the
Pachelbel Canon in D, composi-
tions by Ronald Yates, Rvohei
Hirose, Luigi Zaninelli and Den-
nis Hugh Avey.
The concert will conclude with
excerpts from Henry Mancini's
"Pink Panther Suite arranged
by Amy Rice-Young.
Flutists and piccolists in the
ensemble are all advanced music
students at ECU. The concert is
free and open to the public.
Wedding Music
Music appropriate for weddings
will be performed and discussed at
an open house program set for the
East Carolina University School
of Music, April 7, from 10:30
a.m. until noon.
The open house, co-sponsored
by thc ECU School of Music, is
designed for prospective brides,
church musicians and other in-
terested persons.
Included in the program will be
pre-nuptial music, vocal and in-
strumental solo music, choral
music and music suitable for
bridal processionals and nsces-
sionals.
Dr. E. Robert Irwin, professor
See HERE, Page 7
Idol's Lates
Creative, DA
B PAT FULTON
Billv Idol.
The name conjures up
images of electric-blond
hair, plenty of black
leather, spiked gloves.
maybe a cross in the ear
or a chain around the
neck, and an unforget-
table sneer. Billy Id
energetic, radical and
(from what I understand)
a lot of fun at parties All
of Mr Idol's features
make him quite ar.
dividual.
Of course, with this
sort of image, most peo-
ple tend to either grc
adm.re Idol or f
dislike him. Not on.
Billy Idol different
looks and actions,
music reflects the sc
type of individual! He
has his o�- style
somewhere between rock
and heavy metal.
Up to row. Idol has ,
not experienced t oo no
big success on the T,
singles chart. His b g
single hit. 'Hot in
ty came at a time �
most folks sa d
who?" but bougfc
single for its n
value alone. Then ca
MTV. After Bv :ame
up with the White A
ding" video and - �
album sale- soa-
probably stopped w
ing about single- sales.
"White Wedding'
Here Come:
Continued From Paje 6
of organ at ECU, wfll
discusss appropiare .
positions concerning
theological and musical
criteria for the sele.
of sacred wedding m
Twenty musicians,
eluding advanced student
performers from the
ECU muse school.
Greenville area profes-
sional musicians
faculty oboist D�
Hawkins w;ll per-
selected works.
Organists scheduled
perform are Mark Can-
sor and Sharon Irwin of
Greenville, Michael
Regan of Bargaw, Val
Parker of Kinston,
Gerald Herring and Jim-
my Crawford of
Goldsboro. Becky Jones
of Olin and Sylvia ,
of Washington.
Vocalists will be
Valerie Segraves and
Amie Keyse of Green-
ville, Pamela Bndgman
of Elizabeth C
Dorothy Spencer
Plymouth. Philip Brown
of Rockingham. R:vK
Barwick of LaGrange
and Charles Maxwell of
Raleigh.
Other performers are
violinist Tracy Daly of
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i his MrifH
s a
I
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g to
of
Fan-
- in-
n O
9C
n m D, composi-
te Vates, Ryohei
'aninelli and Den-
-onclude with
Henry Mancini's
te arranged
oung.
piccolists in the
U advanced music
I The concert is
the public.
nate for weddings
I and discussed at
ogram set for the
niversity School
7, from 10:30
u e. co-sponsored
iool of Music, is
ospective brides,
1 and other in-
le program wilJ be
pic, vocal and in-
music, choral
�sic suitable for
mals and reces-
Irwin, professor
t. Page 7
Idol's Latest Album
Creative, Different
niJLgAglCAROLlNlAN APRIL 3 1984
By PAT FELTON
BMTWMtai
Billy Idol.
The name conjures up
images of electric-blond
hair, plenty of black
leather, spiked gloves,
maybe a cross in the ear
or a chain around the
neck, and an unforcet-
table sneer. Billy Idol is TSTi 37
S2KL iradlHcal and 1984- "Rebel �" �
a ot of fnn ifUnderstanc at 46 and the Rebel Yell
of Mr IHnrPar ieS' Ml album was at 36 on e
makehim ?" Billboard charts, both
d��Jr QU ' " m" with bullets besid them.
nf � u M �s a diverse
�,? �f Wlth this h1- �nly one song,
n?rr?�HTa8m�St Pe0" "B,ue Highway com
pie tend to either greatly across with sound
break into the Top 40,
but the biggest effect of
the video was on album
sales.
Since then, Idol has
done the videos "Dancin'
With Myself" and most
recently "Rebel Yell"
which is off his album of
the same name. As of the
admire Idol or fully
dislike him. Not only is
Billy Idol different in
looks and actions, but his
music reflects the same
type of individuality. He
has his own style,
somewhere between rock
and heavy metal.
Up to now, Idol has
not experienced too much
big success on the Top 40
singles chart. His biggist
single hit, "Hot in the Ci-
ty came at a time when
most folks said, "Billv
who?" but bought the
single for its musical
value alone. Then came
MTV. After Billv came
up with the "White Wed-
ding" video and his
album sales soared, he
probably stopped worry-
ing about singles sales.
"White Wedding" did
similar to "Rebel Yell.
The cuts on the album
range from slow to
medium to fast tempo.
Two of the songs which
could easily be accepted
into Top-40 land are
"Eyes Without a Face"
and "Catch My Fall
"Eyes Without Face" is a
smooth, rhythmic tune
with a slow tempo. Idol's
unique voice comes
through well in this song,
mixed with a slick
keyboard arrangement
and a soothing female
background singer
"Catch My Fall" is a
bouncy tune with a steady
beat and some horns add-
ed for flavor.
One of the best-
produced songs on the
album is "Flesh for Fan
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Billy Idol's latest offering, Rebel Yell.
tasy, which flows well swells out these lyrics-
by mixing a heavy bass Face to face
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create a mystic sound. You see and feel
Idol does a good job sing- My sex attack, sing if
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Rebel Yell.
Here Comes Bride
Continued From Page 6
of organ at ECU, will
discusss appropiate com-
positions concerning
theological and musical
criteria for the selection
of sacred wedding music.
Twenty musicians, in-
cluding advanced student
performers from the
ECU music school,
Greenville area profes-
sional musicians and
faculty oboist David
Hawkins will perform
selected works.
Organists scheduled to
perform are Mark Gan-
sor and Sharon Irwin of
Greenville, Michael
Regan of Burgaw, Val
Parker of Kinston,
Gerald Herring and Jim-
my Crawford of
Goldsboro, Becky Jones
of Olin and Sylvia Wall
of Washington.
Vocalists will be
Valerie Segraves and
Amie Keyse of Green-
ville, Pamela Bridgman
of Elizabeth City,
Dorothy Spencer of
Plymouth, Philip Brown
of Rockingham, Rick
Barwick of LaGrange
and Charles Maxwell of
Raieigh.
Other performers are
violinist Tracy Daly of
Hickory, trumpeter Dave
Reep of Nebo, flutist
Lynn Marks of Greenville
and harpist Ruth Walker-
Moskop of Greenville.
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4'

If
THE EASTCAROl INI AN
Sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN ph
AFR1I 3. 1984
Page 8
Pirates Defeat JMU; Tar Heels Get Revenge
Shank Scores Winner
By ED NICKLAS
Sparta Editor
Senior Todd Evans singled in
the tying run in the seventh inn-
ing, and Mark Shank raced home
on a wild pitch moments later to
give the Pirates an important 4-3
conference victory over James
Madison at Harrington Field Sun-
day.
With the win, ECU raises its
record to 17-6 overall and 4-2 in
the EC AC South. JMU drops to
17-5 and 2-2.
Winfred Johnson (4-2) pitched
the full nine innings for the
Pirates, giving up nine hits and
walking only one in his best
outing of late. Johnson also con-
tributed at the plate, hitting his
seventh home run of the season
with the bases empty to inch
closer to the team record of 16
homers set by Bobby Supel in
1978.
JMU pitcher Justin Gannon,
who kept the Pirates in check
most of the game with off speed
tosses, was credited with the loss
despite giving up only four hits in
six innings.
"The kids played well and
hard ECU coach Hal Baird
said. "We squandered a couple of
scoring opportunities, but it is a
big win.
"James Madison is a class out-
fit. We have to feel good to win
against a team of their caliber
Johnson was happy to get back
in the groove after losing two
straight games. "I felt pretty good
today he said. "The last couple
of games I didn't feel as good, but
my fastball was good (today)
In the first inning, ECU put two
men on base but was unable to
cross the plate. With one out,
Todd Evans reached on a fielder's
choice and Johnson lined a single
to center field. However, Mike
Williams was caught looking at a
third strike to end the inning.
James Madison scored the
game's first run in the second inn-
ing. Mike Reeves and Carey
Nemeth led off with singles to
right field, and a Steve Cullers
sacrifice bunt moved both runners
to second and third. Glen Deren
then chopped a grounder to se-
cond baseman Steve Sides, but
Sides was off balance in making a
nice effort to get to the ball and
had to make the play at first as
Reeves scored from third.
ECU came back to tie the game
in its half of the second inning as
Greg Hardison knocked in Chris
Bradberry with a sacrifice flv.
ECU took a 2-1 lead on
Johnson's homer in the third inn-
ing, and the Dukes threatened in
the fourth, but Sides kept two
JMU runs from scoring with a
diving stab.
In the fifth, JMU scored two
runs to take a 3-2 lead. The
damage came on Jeff Urban's
single to center field, which
brought home runners from se-
cond and third base.
Gannon shut the Pirates down
in the fifth and sixth innings, with
the help of an over-the-shoulder
catch by centerfielder Deren on
long fly ban by Johnson, but ECU
came back in the seventh to take
the lead for good.
Sides led off the inning with a
double and Shank reached on an
error; Gannon had seen his last
batter. The Dukes brought in
Randy Foster, who in turn struck
out pinch hitter Mark Cockrell
and Greg Hardison.
Foster walked David Wells to
load the bases, however, and
Evans followed with a single to
center to bring home Sides to tie
the game move and Shank to third
base.
The intimidating Johnson then
came to the plate. Trying to keep
the ball low, Foster threw a wild
pitch and Shank was waved home
by third base coach Gary Over-
ton. Shank scored easily, sliding
into home before catcher Cullers
received the toss from Foster.
Johnson cruised through the
final two innings, surrendering
only two singles and being helped
by a Hardison-to-Sides-to-Evans
double play in the eighth.
GARY PATTERSON - ECU PUdtO Lao
ECU'S Steve Sides scored the tying run in the Pirates' 4-3 win over James Madison Sunday.
UNC, 17-5
North Carolina evidently
remembered ECU's 4-3 victory
last week, as the Tar Heels pound-
ed out 24 hits in defeating the
Pirates 17-5 yesterday at Chapel
Hill.
"It was one of those games
where they had a good day at the
bat said ECU assistant coach
Gary Overton.
Also, Overton said, "There
were an exceptional number of
seeing-eye hits
Freshman Mike Christopher
started and took the loss for the
Pirates, now 17-7. Ken Turner
picked up the win for UNC,
holding ECU to five hits.
One of the ECU's five hits was
by catcher Jim Riley, who knock-
ed in two runs with a second-
inning double.
The Pirates have a two-day rest
before hosting a powerful N.C.
State team Thursday night a Harr-
ington Field. This weekend, ECU
will return to conference match-
ups, as they take on Richmond
and James Madison on tie road.
White Takes Second In High Hurdles
By PETE FERNALD
SUff Wrtltr
The ECU men's track team
continued to add to its winning
season at the Florida Relays in
Gainsville, and according to
Pirate head coach Bill Carson,
more records were broken than at
any other meet this year.
Carson proudly said that the
4x400 relay teams turned in their
"finest performance in a relay
meet in the last four years
The 4x100 relay team consisting
of sophomores Erskine Evans,
Nathan McCorkle, Henry
Williams and Joe Dingle, placed
second with a time of 40.79
seconds. The sophomore Pirates
beat such notables as Alabama,
Auburn and Florida State, but
lost to the Mississippi due to a bad
TRACK
handoff between McCorkle and
Williams.
"Carson thought we'd place
fourth, but we made him eat his
words and placed second
Williams said. "We had a great
meet. There was great competi-
tion and we were fired up for the
meet. I think we can qualify for
the nationals
In addition, Dingle turned in
his best performance of the
season, and according to Carson
it was "the greatest race Joe
Dingle ran since at ECU
The 4x400 relay team consisting
of Willie Fuller, Reuben Pierce,
Eddie Bradley and Chris Brooks
went to the 4x400 finals and Car-
son said they would have placed,
but an A & M runner bumped into
Pierce and destroyed any hope of
a Pirate victory.
In another mishap, freshman
Phillip Estes used the wrong han-
doff receiving technique in at-
tempting to grasp the baton from
Nathan McCorkle, and the 4x200
relay team ultimately placed sixth
with a time of 1:26.10.
Sophomore Craig White
dominated the high hurdles,
leading Mississippi's notable
Tony Dees, until he hit the eighth
hurdle and lost the lead. White
was able to hold on for second
place with a time of 14.11
seconds. "It was the best hurdle
race for Craig this season said
Carson.
Teammates Chris Brooks and
Maurice Monk placed tl ird and
fifth in the long jun:p with
distances of 24.85 and 24 25 feet.
Sophomore Brooks sustained an
injury in the event and according
to Carson will be held out activity
for a week.
Carson said that he was "really
happy with the squad and their
conduct at the meet Mississippi
and ECU were the only teams at
the meet that placed in three
events.
The next scheduled meei for the
explosive Pirates will be the UNC
relays in Chapel Hill this
weekend, April 6.
Pirate Netters Split Weekend Matches
ECU Photo Lab
mwm ��V PATTERSON � K .�.� rn�
The men beat UNC-W last Thursday but dropped its match yesterday.
By MEG MOREADITH
Staff Writer
The ECU Men's tennis team
defeated UNC-Wilmington by
score of 9-0, while the women's
team lost 6-3 to Davidson, on
Minges' varsity courts this
weekend.
Yesterday, the men lost 9-0 to
an Atlantic Christian College
team which consisted entirely of
foreign-born players.
In last Thursday's win over
UNC-W, coach Pat Sherman said
the men played well as a team.
TENNIS
Assistant coach Keith Zengel was
especially pleased with the play of
John Anthony, who filled the
number two doubles spot with
Barry Moran. "He did a real good
job and played well said Zengel,
who was also complimented the
performance of Greg Lloyd.
For the women, Sherman said
number-five ranked Heidi Bun-
ting played her best match of the
season.
"ECU (women) played a tough
game said Sherman, "consider-
ing it took four and a half hours
for Davidson to beat us
Miriam Beck and Cisi Bolten,
playing third and sixth,
substituted in the match after sit-
ting out most of the season due to
injuries. Sherman said both
played well even though they had
practiced for only a week prior to
the match.
Number-one ranked Janet
Russell, who will not return for
the fall season, played well accor-
ding to Sherman.
Sherman is pleased with the
progress of the women team.
She says it is difficult for the
players to continue to have
positive attitudes. "The women
are doing a super job and have im-
proved greatly since their first
match against N.C. State said
Sherman.
The women's next match is Fri-
day against Guilford, while the
men take on Pfeiffer Wednesday.
Both matches will be held at 3
p.m. on Minges Varsity Courts.
Seminoles Defeat Pirates
Softball Team Drops Three Of Four Over Weekend
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU women's softball
team dropped three of four games
over the weekend, splitting a
doubleheader with Francis
Marion on Friday, then losing two
games to powerful Florida State
Sunday afternoon.
In its opening contest against
Francis Marion, Pirate starter
Stacy Boyette was magnificent
from the mound as she retired 18
of 20 batters in pitching a one-
hitter.
The Pirates were far from
magnificent while at bat,
however, as they only managed to
cross the plate one time after
seven complete innings of play.
"Defensively we're playing well,
but we're just not hitting the ball
like we're capable of ECU head
coach Sue Manahan said.
Yates was the only FMC player
to get a hit off Boyette, as she led-
off the game by knocking a single
into left field and then managed
to reach second base on a throw-
ing error by centerfielder Bonnie
Smith. Yates advanced to third on
a flyball by Costas, and then
scored Francis Marion's only run
of the game when she came home
on a sharp grounder by McCleod.
Although the Pirates managed
to hammer out 11 hits, they were
unable to score a run until the
sixth inning. Pam Young, who
was three-of-four, got things
started as she belted her third con-
secutive single of the game to lead
off the inning. Carla Alphin
followed by hitting into a fielder's
choice, which advanced Young to
second.
ECU got a break in the middle
of the inning as FMC pitcher
Bumstead got rattled and walked
Wendy Ozment and Tamara
Franks to load the bases with two
outs. The pressure finally broke
Bumstead as she unleashed a wild
pitch which enabled Young to
score from third.
With the score tied at one and
entering the final inning of play,
FMC got only their second player
of the game on base, when
Castros made it to first after
Young mishandled a grounder.
Castros could only make it to
third, however, as Boyette bore
down to retire the next three bat-
ters.
The Pirates were unable to
score in the bottom of the seventh
but won the game in the first extra
inning of play as Alphin scored
from third on a Franks blast into
center field.
Fiday's second game was even a
lower scoring affair than the first
contest, as Francis Marion
outlasted ECU 2-0.
The Pirates shaky pitching was
their downfall, as FMC scored
both of its runs in the third inning
off of Phyllis Willis, who entered
the game in relief of starter Robin
Graves after just one complete in-
ning.
Summerall led off the inning
with a walk, then advanced to
third on a Renfrow single. Sum-
merall scored FMC's first run as
Yates reached first on an error,
then Renfrow quickly followed
suit and scored as Franks commit-
ted an error.
At that point in the game,
Manahan decided to make a
change and put Young on the
mound. Young was brilliant as
she allowed only two hits for the
duration of the game, but the
damage had already been done as
the Piartes would never come
close to challenging FMC's lead.
Alphin was the only Pirate to
get a base hit during the game, as
FMC's Freemond matched
Boyette's sterling performance of
the first game in also pitching a
one-hitter.
Sunday's games against highly-
regarded Florida State also turned
a pitcher's duel. In the first game,
it was Boyette versus Kyler. There
were 17 strikouts. Both went the
distance, Kyler allowing three
hits, Boyette four.
At the end of seven complete in-
nings, the score was ECU 0, FSU
0. Both teams had several oppor-
tunities to score, but neither was
able to capitalize. Extra innings.
The eighth inning was quiet,
but in the top of the ninth Florida
State exploded for two runs. Bahn
led-off with a single. Kyler then
reached on an error. She was
followed by O'Neal who suc-
cessfully completed a hit-and-run,
enabling Bahn and Kyler to make
it to second and third. On the en-
suing play, Miller hit a shot right
at shortstop Tamara Franks, and
the Pirates were able to nab Bahn
at the plate.
It came down to Collins, FSU's
leftfielder. There were two outs
and runners on first and third.
Collins pulled her team through,
smashing a double deep to left,
which scored both Kyler and
Miller. Final score, FSU 2, ECU
0.
In ECU's second game Young
did a respectable job on the
mound, allowing three runs on
four hits for the Lady Bucs. But it
was the performance of FSU's
Berube that kept the Pirate
faithful in awe. Twenty-one up,
21 down. A perfect game. Not
much action to report on this one,
folks.
ECU drops to 10-7 on the year
and will be in action again today
at 2:00 p.m. to take on North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
Mm- -� - -� - ��� m, .m �� � �
Georgetown
84
Houston
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B FRED LIEF
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SEATTLE
Georgetown, a team that
operated with grim preci
sion this season, can now
exhault in triumph
"It's a fabulous feel-
ing Georgetow:
John Thompson s
"We're elated to win
national championsh
With college b I
ball's clash of the titans
eclipsed by the extraor-
dinary p 1 a v
Georgetown' bench.
Hoyas defeated Hou
84-78 Mondaj - .
win the NCAA
In com:
magnificer
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William sc
and Michael Grahan
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I
THE EAST CARQUNlANpRi 9
enge
C, 17-5
Carolina evidently
red ECU'S 4-3 victory
as the Tar Heels pound-
A hits in defeating the
7-5 yesterday at Chapel
s one of those games
v had a good day at the
j ECU assistant coach
rton.
hrerton said, "There
exceptional number of
e hits
un Mike Christopher
d took the loss for the
ov. 17-7. Ken Turner
p the win for UNC,
CU to five hits,
he ECU's fixe hits was
Jim Riley, who knock-
o runs with a second-
ible.
rates have a two-day rest
lg a powerful N.C.
Thursday night a Harr-
d. This weekend, ECU
to conference match-
e :ake on Richmond
Madison on the road.
irdles
It was the best hurdle
raig this season said
lates Chris Brooks and
v placed third and
the long jump with
of 24.85 and 24.25 feet.
3rooks sustained an
tlw event and according
In will be held out activity
h said that he was "really
lth the squad and their
the meet Mississippi
were the only teams at
that placed in three
Ext scheduled meet for the
Pirates will be the UNC
Chapel Hill this
April 6.
tches
eason, played well accor-
ISherman.
lan is pleased with the
of the women's team.
s it is difficult for the
to continue to have
attitudes. "The women
lg a super job and have im-
1 greatly since their first
kgamst N.C. State said
omen's next match is Fri-
inst Guilford, while the
je on Pfeiffer Wednesday.
atches will be held at 3
Minges Varsity Courts.
M
r AMU Y LI At Y � SOI PM� Mi
�oftbaj action over the
Georgetown j
84
Houston
75
Hoyas Humble Houston
By FRED LIEF
l PI Saorts Writer
SEATTLE
Georgetown: a team that
operated with grim preci-
sion this season, can now
exhault in triumph.
"It's a fabulous feel-
ing Georgetown coach
John Thompson said.
"We're elated to win the
national championship
With college basket-
ball's clash of the titans
eclipsed by the extraor-
dinary play of
Georgetown's bench, the
Hoyas defeated Houston
84-78 Monday night to
win the NCAA title.
In completing their
magnificent run this
season, reserves Reggie
Williams scored 19 points
and Michael Graham 14
for the Hoyas.
Georgetown had to withs-
tand the excellent second
half of Houston's Alvin
Franklin, who scored 21
points and kept the
Cougars alive.
It was their play that
dictated the tempo of this
championship game
rather than the celebrated
showdown of centers bet-
ween Patrick Ewing of
Georgetown and Akeem
Olajuwon of Houston.
"We worked so hard to
get here Ewing said.
"We finally won it
In winning its first na-
tional title, Georgetown
became the first team
from the East in 30 years
to win the NCAA crown
since LaSalle in 1954. In
the championship game
in 1982, th Hoyas lost in
the closing seconds to
North Carolina.
The decision was not
yet another frustration
for Houston, which now
has been to the final four
three straight years
without winning the
crown. Last season the
Cougars were denied the
title on a final second
dunk by North Carolina
State.
"You feel awful,
awful, awful Houston
coach Guy Lewis said.
"They were in control for
the most part. We got up
early but they were in
control from then on
Thompson was
generous in praising
Lewis, whose coaching
stategy has been
repeatedly criticized.
"If he can't coach, I
hope I catch the disease
he's got he said.
Georgetown, terocious
on defense all season, was
coming off a 53-40
obliteration of Kentucky
in the semifinals. But this
game was not nearly as
easy as both Ewing and
Olajuwon encountered
They were in control for the most part. We
got up early but they were in control from
then on.9
� GUY LEWIS
AOVERTiSED
E
sa
s
ach of these advertised .terns .s required to be readily available tor "
ale at or below the advertised price .n each A&P Store eicept as 1
pecittcaMy noted m this ad J
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
foul trouble and left the
spotlight to some of the
less luminous names.
"I think we were
overall quicker than
Houston Graham said.
The focus ws clearly on
Olajuwon and Ewing in
what was billed as the
most celebrated
showdown of centers in
the history of the NCAA
title game.
But with both teams
swarming on defense,
their productivity was
limited. Ewing, 7 foot
All-America, finished
with 10 points and just
one basket in the second
half, while his 7 foot
Nigerian couterpart
finished with 15 points.
Each had nine rebounds.
"I don't know what to
say other than he got in
early foul trouble
Lewis said of Olajuwon.
"They told us before the
game started they were
really going to let them
play in there. But then
bing, bing, bing
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SUMMER R6NT entire 4 bedroom. 1
bathroom turn,shed houio,
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COTTAGE foe rant at N. Myrtla Bch
l bdrm. Sleeps a. Call mtooo,
NEED A PLACE fo live this sum
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Wilton Acres mst 3 Mocks from cam
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covrts, ne laundr facilities. Rent
SU4 7. Call 751-5
BABYSITTER � For reliable, warm,
competent and experienced baby-
si ttersaTSO-OOJJ.
MICK LASALLE - is beginning a
two-pert investigative report on sex
oal harassment on campus. If you
have information, call Mick at
7U-0474. or 752-0341. All calls eon
fidenfiai.
PERSONAL
MOPED LIKE NEW. top of the line,
less than 700 miles, new valve, over
MOO, first M50 takes It. Call 753-0531.
SURFBOARD - WRV. 00 inches,
Breat for intermediate surfer. Asking
S3� Call 752-0341.
SPRING FLING 04 - the Phi Tail's
will be having ttieir annual Spring Fl-
ing on Friday, April �th. Don't miss
this all campus event.
PAT SEE7 I can get something in the
paper tool Congrats on the editing of-
fer. Hope you enioyed our romp on
the study room couch � with my ris-
que lips and your risque underwear.
"�' I'm glad I waved I KAT
MISC.
LOST AND
FOUND
WHEN A FRIEND has stereo system
problems, tell mem that the audio
technicians at the TECH SHOP don-t
charge for repair estimates. Call us
at 757 "Nineteen Eighty
LOCAL CHURCH would like person
�o keep church nursery 10:45-12 noon
�ech Sunday Could possibly be divid-
ed with another person, u each Sun-
flay. Send resume to Nursery Helper;
30 Prince Rd Greenville, NC 27034.
AUTO ACCIDENTS Specialiiing in
personal injury litigation. J. David
Ouffus, Jr Attorney, NCNB
Building, Greenville, North Carolina,
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75140
LOST: Mary lane the Sheepdog in
vicinity of Student St. Big. fluffy
black and white. 14 yrs. of age. Needs
medication everyday. Call 752-5054.
WANTED
Free Admission
Where: Mendenhall Multi-Purpose
Rm.
When: April 9 (Mon) 8:00
Open to Gen. Public
Topic: Responsible Chemical
Usage
Sponsor: C.A.D.P
Speaker: Maggie French
Bottom &
Eye Round
20-26 lb.
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SAVE 1.00 LB
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Cut
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FROZEN
Baking "JQQ
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fVlLUSCIOUS RIP
mm
Fresh
Strawberries
basket
PARTY7 O. J. available on request
�or frats, sororities, dorm socials,
miers. etc. References available,
contact Watts at 757-3407.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER-
V,CE � experience, qualitywork,
ISM Selectric typewriter. Call Lanle
Shive 750-5301
typing SERVICE neat, fast,
reasonable. Call 355-2002.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED
House 5 miles from campus 750-541
ROOMMATE WANTED: House fully
furnished; serious students only.
Behind Belk Dorm. $130.00 per
month. Call 750-7470.
FEMALE ROOMMATES needed for
SummerFall. River Bluff Apts
752-014 ask for Kelly.
ROOMMATE NEEDED for Summer
JOSmont. v utilities. 1 mile from
campus. Call 752-025. Bus route.
SUMMER INTERNSHIPS: have two
openings for senior Journalism
students fo work on North Carolina's
largest weekly newspaper as
reporters � two others in advertis-
ing. The Alamance News, Oraham,
N.C. f 10-202-7051.
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL
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for just n.39
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$2.25 for a Pitcher of Beer
Feista Time
Everydav
5:00 until
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GENUINE BAKING
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Savings A
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,QKjB��x LARGE
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ALL VARIETIES
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5
- .� 4 .?
��?�-





Trivia Quiz
1 Who was the first
basketball coach at ECU?
2. Name the ECU pro
lessor who plaved on the
141-42 and (947-48 var-
sity tennis team?
3. What former head
basketball and baseball
coach was a member of
the 1939 football team0
4. What former award
winning News & Observer
feature writer was
member of the N41 foot-
ball team'
5. Where did ECU play
basdketball before
Memorial Gym was con-
structed'1
6. What year was the
school nickname
"Pirates" adopted1
What active Pirate
Club member and former
beer distributor was a
member of the 1951 varsi-
ty tenniv team?
22. ECU has experienced
one winless tennis season
during its brief history.
What year did this hap-
pen and who was the
coach0
23. What year did ECU
become a member of the
North State
Conference?
Basketball
24. What team did ECU
defeat to record its first
victory ever in football?
25. Who were the first
basketball scholarship
recipients at ECU and
what year were thev
awarded0
26. What year did
E.C.T.C. become East
Carolina University?
27. ECU dedicated
Memorial Gym on
.lanuar6. 1953. Who did
they play, who won. and
what present ECU faculty
member was on the
visiting team?
8 Who is the only head 28. What team did ECU
football coach at ECU to defeat in tennis to record
as head tennis their first team victory
e er?
29. Who did ECU play in
the 15 Tangerine Bowl
and who won?
30. What head football
coach at ECU has the
best won-loss percentage?
ch?
9. W ho was ECl s first
opponent in football?
10. What nickname did
ECU athletic teams use
prior to the adoption of
"Pirates"?
11 What former ECU 31. Who was Chairman
coach was credited with of the first Athletic
winning the most football Council at ECl
games ?
32. What former ECU
12. What year was the head football coach has
first intercollegiate tennis the worst won-loss
match held at ECTC? record0
13. VV'hat is the name of
the trophy that was
presented to the winning
team after each ECU-
Atlantic Christian Col-
lege basketball game0
14. Who were the well-
known co-captains of the
1959 ECU football ream0
33. What former ECU
football palyer is the cur-
rent Superintendent of
Hoke County Schools?
34. Who is the former
ECU football currently
the Athletic Director of
Pembroke State Universi-
ty?
15. What season did ECL 35. What 1954 ECl' foot-
not play a single basket- ball plaver had two sons
ball game and why? on the 1983 squad0
16. Who is the former
Dean of the School of
Education who played on
the 1942 varsity tennis
team0
17. What year did ECU
record their first perfect
reason in football0
18. Who recorded the
first tennis match victory
in ECU history?
19. Who did ECU play in
the Eastern Bowl in 1963
and who won?
20. Who was the former
varsity tennis coach who
was also a former head
soccer coach at ECU?
36. Who is the only ECU
football player to be
named Chairman of the
ECL' Board of Trustees?
37. Who holds the
distinction of scoring the
first touchdown in ECU
football history?
38. What former ECU
football player (1959)
later became head foot-
ball coach at Lenoir
Rhyne and Guilford Col-
lege?
39. WHo is the onlv
former ECU football
player to also serve as
Athletic Director at
ECU?
21 W ho did ECU play in All Questions were fur-
the Tangerine Bowl in nished by the Student
1964 and who won Athletic Board.
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Title
The East Carolinian, April 3, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
April 03, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.333
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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