The East Carolinian, March 29, 1984






Stou
(Earnltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since W5
voi.58 0.r 5z
Thursday, March 29, 1984
Loan Defaulters Get
Stricter Penalties
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NnMBfltoi
Widespread abuse of the SGA
loan funds has necessitated the en-
ticement of strict measures
against students who have
defaulted on their loans.
According to SGA Treasurer
Becky Talle, there are currently
46 emergency medical loans
outstanding, a total of $6,093.
These loans can be taken out for
up to six months. Of the 46
outstanding loans 70 percent are
six months old or older. 10 per-
cent are less than six months old
and 20 percent are current.
The depletion of the loan fund
is so severe that, 3 weeks ago,
Talley said, "we couldn't even
make any loans; we didn't have
any money
In order to try and rebuild the
loan fund, Universin Attorney
David Stevens began mailing out
letters in mid-February to
students delinquent in loan repav-
ment. The letters told the student
the amount owed to the SGA and
also stated that, if the loans were
not repaid within two weeks, the
school would file suit against
them.
Some loans were repaid follow-
ing receipt of the letters, Talley
said. However, the majority were
not and Stevens is now in the pro-
cess of filing suit against some of
the offenders. The students will be
sued in Magistrates' Court in their
home counties and, upon convic-
tion, will be required to repay
their loans and all court costs in-
curred.
"It's bad that students who use
it will not pay it back so that
others can use it Talley said. "It
makes me mad when we can't give
somebody money because so-
meone else hasn't paid back a
loan added outgoing SGA
President Paul Naso.
Previously, students who did
not repay loans had their records
tagged in order to prevent them
from graduating until restitution
was made. Unfortunately, Talley
said, they were graduating
anyway. The new system should
"provide a safeguard for student
monies said Mike Dixon, chair-
man of the rules and judiciary
committee.
A rescue worker searches through the remains of a mobile home in
Taylor s Trailer Park on Highway 43 outside Greenville. Several
houses and trailers were destroyed in the area. At least 10 people died
from tornados hitting Pitt County Wednesday night, and at least 43
Gov. Hunt To Visit Hendrix
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Gov. James Hunt will present a
speech on the topic of "Nuclear
Defense and Arms Control" on
Tuesday night in Hendrix
Theatre.
The speech is being presented as
an extension of this year's Phi
Kappa Phi symposium said Dr.
Fred Broadhurst of the School of
Technology. The svmposium
topic is Peace and War 1984:
Power and Moral Responsibility,
and this is the first time the pro-
gram has been extended in such a
manner.
Broadhurst stressed that this
"major policy address" will be
g'ven in a "scholarly
perspective Hunt will hold a
press conference in Mendenhall
prior to the event and the speech
itself will start at 8 p.m.
After Hunt speaks, there will be
a controlled question and answer
session. Dr. Angelo Volpe, vice
chancellor for academic affairs
will be in charge of preparing the
questions and Chancellor John
Howell will perform introduc-
tions.
The event is open to the public
and all interested students are in-
vited to attend.
were killed throughout North Carolina. About 126 people were admit-
ted to Pitt County Memorial Hospital, where a spokeswoman called it
the worst disaster since the Village Green apartment explosion one vear
ago.
Rep. Martin Speaks To
Pitt County Supporters
Martin
Ten Dead In Pitt County
Tornados Devastate Region, Kill 43
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
and DARRVL BROWN
with suff and I PI rrports
Tornados smashed through
North Carolina Wednesday night,
killing at least 43 people and caus-
ing hundreds of injuries,
authorities said.
A spokeswoman for Pitt Coun-
ty Memorial Hospital confirmed
early Thursday morning at least
ten people dead and 126
hospitalized from tornados
throughout the county.
The number of dead and in-
jured has "been going up every 15
minutes or so the
spokesowoman said. The hospital
was at a level three disaster alert
about midnight, meaning at least
50 to 75 incoming patients, but
went to level two by 2 a.m.
Twenty-three people were treated
and released.
There was no way to determine
if any ECU students were injured.
the spokeswoman said.
Taylor's trailor park on
Highway 43 outside Greenville
was one of hardest hit areas, with
several houses and mobile homes
completely destroyed. "They've
got one hellacious mess out
there said Greenville Fire-
Rescue Chief Tony Brannon.
"There's nothing left" of several
houses and trailers, he said.
An evacuation center was set up
at D. H. Conley High School out-
side Greenville for those left
homeless or released from the
hospital.
The National Guard was called
out to help local authorities cope
with blocked roads, power
outages and general confusion in
the aftermath of the storms.
In Porterstown near Greenville,
one person was reported dead.
Cars were thrown several hundred
See RESIDENT, page 3
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Staff Hrllcr
"The East Carolina School of
Medicine is a vital part of rural
medical care in eastern North
Carolina said Republican can-
didate for governor Jim Martin.
Martin visited Greenville Mon-
day and spoke at a fund raising
dinner at Greenleaf Hall that
night. There were 416 in atten-
dance, including Democrats as
well as Republicans.
Martin said ECU and Pitt
County's ability to achieve their
goals inspired him to believe he
could become the next governor.
"I remember when they told you
there could be no med school at
ECU said Martin, "but vou did
it
The Republican candidate went
on to discuss his goals for North
Carolina if elected governor. Mar-
tin cited his top priority as being
teacher salaries. At a reception
before the dinner Martin said
many students no longer want to
enter the field of education
because they can't make a living
from it. "Paying the sarre thin
whether a teacher is good, bad, or
brillant is not enough said Mar
tin.
Martin pointed out when
Governor Holdshouser held office
North Carolina teacher pay rose
from 2th in the nation to 20th
Currently, however. North
Carolina has dropped to -Uth in
teacher pay in the U.S.
Martin also cited his wish u
eliminate the North Carolina in-
tangible and inventory taxes, sav
ing these taxes drived industry
away from the state thus causing
unnecessary unemployment,
"these taxes are self-imposed han-
dicaps on those who don t have
jobs because the taxes drive
business out of our state said
Martin.
At the end of the dinner Mar
tin, a member of the ECU Pirate
Club, was presented with an ECl
football jersey by Sandy Hardy,
chairman of the "Martin for
Governor" campaign on campus
here.
Z?m College Financial Aid Offices 'Bothered'
' �� j ��'��������������������Mi
Qunpuses May Lower Requirements
CPS and Staff Reports
Despite howls of controversy
during debates over new rules re-
quiring students to make
"satisfactory academic progress"
in order to get financial aid, cam-
pus aid offices have been bothered
by it more than students so far,
reports from around the country
suggest.
Some observers, moreover, say
mission on Student Financial
Assistance reported that, while all
schools require students to main-
tain satisfactory academic pro-
gress in order to get aid, few col-
leges actually monitored their aid
recipients' porgress very closely.
The commission, created in
1980 to draw up student aid bills
for Congress, could find few ex-
the new rules - aimed at forcing amples of colleges taking away aid
students who don't keep their
grades up off the federal aid roles
- may actually convince some
campuses to lower their minimum
grade requirements to qualify for
federal aid.
The new federal rule, which
went into effect on January 1st
and which aid offices around the
from students with bad grades or
who took too long to get through
college.
Colleges individually must now
publish guidelines for just how
Martin says the rule, however,
could convince some schools to
lower their academic standards
for making satisfactory progress
in order to make the new federal
paperwork easier to do.
Indeed, the major impact of the
new rule will be on campus aid ad-
ministrators, not students,
sources suggest.
"I'm sure intentions were
good says Clint Cooper, district
dean of students for Miami-Dade
Community College. But he adds
that keeping track of the academic
records of the thousands of
fast a student must progress over students who drop in and out of
The typical early-morning mass of students wending their ways down
College Hill. No matter where you go on campus, there are lines.
six years toward 120 hours, and
submit reports on each aid reci-
pient's compliance with those
country are now trying to imple- guidelines.
mem for the first time, stiffens Financial aid offices must also
old academic progress" re- identify recipients as part- or full-
quirements time, account for dropped courses
the U.S. Department of in computing students' aid
Education now requires colleges eligibility, and be ready to bar aid
to make students maintain to students who don't keep pro-
satisfactory academic progress" gressing toward their degrees at
toward completing 120 credit the pace prescribed by the
hours within six years. school's guidelines
That means students must keep "I don't know that there's go-
making the progress during terms ing to be any measurable impact
in which they don't receive any on students says Dennis Martin
.�Z' � of the National Association of
Sohie institutions are just to Student Financial Aid Ad-
darn lenient' in letting students ministrators
with bad grades or without a clear The major chance is that, when qucu�c t siet
dqgmprosram keep getting aid, being checked for eligibility for undergraduate aid director
rv rtf,nCHclmn?'a US" ,fedcral �� a studcnts entirc 'ol- The new regulation has not had
Dept. of Education spokesman. lege academic record - not just a a great effectlt ECU mJtotat
Last April, the National Com- part of it - will be examined. Boudreaux ���' 7�
urban commuter schools, ever
when they're not receiving any
aid, puts a big new burden on the
aid office.
Cooper questions "the real
need for such a regulation"
because Miami-Dade, for one,
already enforces its satisfactory
progress guidelines.
"We've been doing it for
years adds Marcia Sexton, aid
director at the University of Col-
orado, although "we were not
previously monitoring those
students who have not been on
aid
At Yale, the regulation "is not
going to require any change in
academic policy reports Jac-
queline Foster, Yale's

financial aid. "When a s:udent
applies for financial aid, until
Jan. 1, we did only a qualitative
evaluation, not a quantitive
evaluation Boudreaux said.
He added that, with the reten-
tion period being used, while they
were technically using only a
qualitative evaluation, the reten-
tion period added a quantitative
aspect.
"Now we're using the
qualitative, which is the same as
we've always used, but in addition
we've added a quantitatie re-
quirement that is a minimum of
12 hours per semester passed, not
just attempted anymore
Boudreaux said.
Students must pass twelve
hours per semester with a
specified grade point average and
must also be making "satisfactory
progress" which indicates degree
completion within 11 semesters.
"The government says you
can't use 'satisfactory progress'
only for those terms for which the
student wants to get financial aid.
You have to look at his overall
record Boudreaux said.
"It's going to effect those who
attempt hours but do not pass
he said. If a student does not pass
the required number of hours dur-
ing a semester in which he has
received aid, he is put on
automatic probation, and re-
quired to pass the number of
hours necessary by the end of the
year.


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THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 27
1984
Announcements
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TV East Carolinian
PwMiaitad awry TucMay and
Thursday dwrlng m acadamic
V- arw avary Wednesday dwr
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The Cast Carolinian it fha of
?Iclal newspaper of Eaaf Carolina
University, owned operated and
published for and by ma thxtentt
of Cast Carolina University
Uniaaa otharwtaa notad. unslgn
ad editoriait on tna opinion page
���� ma newspapers opinion,
oonarally wrlftan by tna mmn
Ing editor
Subscription Rate uo yaarly.
The Kaat Carolinian offices art
located In the Publications
building on tna campus of ECU.
Greenville, N.C
POSTMASTER: Sand addreaa
chenga to The Eaaf Carolinian,
md Floor. Publication building.
ECU. Greenville, N.C TTtU.
Telephone: 7S7-4M. M7, too
SPRING FLING �4
Spring Fling 14 It coming.
Everyone It Invited to com to tna
PHI TAU nous April em to party.
There la alto a raffle for a Beach
Weekend for two at Ramada Inn at
Atlantic Beach. The trip include a
tank of gat and ISO tpending money.
Gat tickets from any phi TAU
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
We'd Ilka to invite you to tna Silent
Dinner at fc 00 on Thurs. night at the
Blue Moor, cat. Com on out and
tign with usi Also w will be having
Fantasy Rehearsal at 7:30 after the
Silent Dinner in the Library Lab. See
va'll there!
NAACP ELECTIONS
Th ECU Chapter NAACP NM t5
�lection will b held April 3. tu at
00 p.m. room to be announced. Ap-
plication may be picked up March
M April S. l4 at Mendenhall's Infer
matlon desk. ISO Jervls Oorm or 50!
Greene Dorm Return application to
.10 Jervli Oorm by April 5. IffM, 5 00
p.m.
BIG BROTHER RUSH
For Alpha Phi Sorority will be held
today at the Tree House from 4.00 to
7 oo Come out and party with m Big
Brothers end Sisters of Alpha Phi.
MANAGEMENT
The Society for Advancement of
Menagement will be meeting Thurs
dey. March 79 at 3 00 In Rawl 104
Discussed In the meeting will be an
overview of the activities for the rest
of the semester Guest speaker will
be William C. Bowen owner of the
wash Houses In this area. All
members r asked to please attend.
NAACP WORKSHOP
The ECU Chapter of NAACP will
sponsor a workshop this Saturday.
March 31. at l30 p.m in
Mendenhall The guest speaker will
be Mist Rosa Shearion White, a
Iwayer The topic will be "Blacks on
Black and White Campuses "
Everyone Is cordially Invited!
AUCTION
Sigma Phi Epsllon and Alpha
Omlcron Pi will sponsor th First An
nual PRE GREEK WEEK � KICK
OFF AUCTION. Sunday. April 1st, at
7 p m Pr-jrfc waak cup will be
on tl Com start off Greek Week
th right way, party with th REAL
DONKEYS!
AMBASSADOR
SCHOLARSHIPS
Th Past Pr�idnrt club of th
ECU alumni Association Is offering a
scholarship to an Ambassador in
order to express their deep apprecia
tlon for the vast amount of volunteer
service that the ECU Ambassadors
contribute to the progress end
waHare of ECU The recipient must
be an ECU student who it a member
m good standing of the ECU Am
bassadors and must be of such
classification as to be a senior in the
fall semester of 1W4. Any Am
bassedor who is Interested should
pick up an application after March ji
in the TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center Applications should be com
pieted end turned in by April 4.
ECGC
The East Carolina Gay Community
will meet Monday, April 1 at 7:30
p.m Th meeting will be held at the
Catholic Newman Center, fS3 E. 10th
St (at the bottom of College Hill). All
interested persons rt cordially In-
vited to attend
NUTRITION T-SHIRTS
The Student Dietetic Association
will be selling T-shirts and sweat
shirts on the first floor of the Home
Economic Building. If no 009 is pre-
sent contact Eliene OKIeff or another
SDA member The theme of the shirt
is "Nurtriflon is the Cove There ere
many siies and colors available to
select from so come by and BUY a
T-shirt before the Deadline. Wednes
day April 4. 14.
TRACK
Registration begins Monday, April
2 for the annual Track Meet This
event will offer both field and running
events, and will be held at Bunting
Track Registration will end Thurs
day, April 5.
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be an important meeting
on Tues April 3 at 5:30 In room 247
Mendenhall We will be electing new
officers for next year. We will also be
discussing the upcoming initiations
and bake sale All members should
attend
THE HOLOCAUST
A Symposium on the Holocaust is
being conducted on ECU campus, it
will take place i Saturday, March
31. starting at 1000 am Many
speakers will be available to inform
and share with you the events and
rememberances of the event
10:00-11:30 session will be at Room
102 In Brewster-B. 2:00-3:00 session
will be In Mendenhall Student Canter,
Room 244 Everyone Is welcome and
there is no admission charge The
event Is being sponsored by ECU
Hillel.
SCHOLARSHIPS
Th English Department Invite
applications for th Ruti M
Chrlstm�n Memorial Scholarship,
�warded annually to a lunior English
mior for exceptional academic
achievement, outstanding potential
In the field of English, and significant
Involvement In extracurricular ac-
tivities The amount of the award Is
tSOO 00 Applicants should complete
the Student Scholarship Form
(available from th Student Flnan
clal Aid Office) and sand It. together
with a brief letter describing their
academic achievements, extrecur
ricuiar activities, and plans for fur-
ther study or career goals to Russell
M Chrlstman Memorial Scholarship
Committee, co The Department of
English. The deadline for appllce
tlons Is April 13, 134. For further In-
formation contact Erwln Hester, 101
English Department Annex.
CO-OP
Cooperative Education is e pro-
gram which helps students gain
valuable experience related to their
career goals through alternating
periods of academic study with
periods of off-campus employment.
The Co-op Office, located in 313 Rawl,
currently has ob openings for sum-
mer and fall '04. interested students
should stop by today to get more In-
formation, to complete the necessary
forms, and to sign up for Interviews.
GOLF
Registration begins Monday, April
2 for the Intramural Golf Classic.
This event will be held at the Ayden
Country Club. Registration ends
Wednesday, April 4. Teams and par
ticipants will play 11 hot of Golf
ALPHASIG BROTHERS
The Alpha Slg Brothers, along with
Crystal Coast Charter Service, will be
selling raffle tickets this Friday and
next weak. Tickets will cost one
dollar. The winner of the drawing, on
April 12, will be entitled to a full day
crusie on a 30 foot sail boat with five
friends. You may claim the cruise on
any weekend in April or May. For
more info, call 757 351. PS. We hop
all of the Tri Slgs are ready to
partylll
EDUCATION STUDENTS
The Department of Speech
Language �, Auditory Pathology will
b providing make-up of speech and
"��ring screening for the studr�tt
who missed It In January.
The screening will be held on Tue
day, March 37 and Wednesday,
March 20 from 5:00-7:00 p.m. In the
SLAP Department which Is located In
a trailer edlecent to Balk Building on
Charles Street
No appointment Is needed
IRATES
Congredutatlons Irate for hosting
another successful end fun filled
Ultimate Tournament, 3rd Place �
not bad I Thank you I All Plastic Flat
ball Pheneflcks re expected to play
every Tues Thurs. and Sun. at bot
torn of Hill t 3:30 p.m. We are going
to Raleigh April 14 l 15 to play In an
A.C.C. Ultimata Tournay for place
ment In our conference Be there, or
be oblong.
HEALTH ALLIANCE
Attention members � We will be
mtlng Thursday, March 2th. at
5 30 In Mendenhall room 230 Please
b on time for this vry Important
meeting, if y0u have not paid your
���. you will be expected to do so
�nd you are to turn In your money for
the fund raiser. Reports will also be
made regarding the special prolects
mat have been completed. So don't
forget end be on timed I
ALPHA XI DELTA
Alpha XI Delta and IFC happy
hour, this Friday at the Attic with
Mexx Warrior, 4 00
PHI BETA SIGMA
The brothers of Phi Beta Sigma
Fraternity inc. wilt be sponsoring a
Jr. Miss Phi-Beta Sigma Pageant on
April 27, 1904 at the Ramada inn
Anyone who would like to share in
this event with a talent that you would
like to perform on this date are asked
to contact Richard Dawklns at
7SI 9405 or any brother of the fraterni
ty at soon as possible
CLA88IF1ED ADS
1 - o nay us m form t right
ot use a separate sh�t of
paper if you need mor linos
Thoco art 33 units per line
Each itHor. punctuation mark
and work space counts as ana
unit Capitalize and hyphenate
wor� properly. Leave space
at end of line If word doesn't fit.
No ads will be accepted over
the phone We reserve the right
to reieo any ad. All ads must
be prepaid Enclose 75 cent
or ne or fraction of a line.
p"�� print legibly) Use
capital and tower case tetters.
Return to the Media Board
secretary by 3 p.m. the day
Before publication
j 1�lliiMIIMIM
DIETETIC ASSOC
The Student Dietetic Association
will have their last meeting of this
semester on April 3, 1914. The
meeting will be held in the Dining
Hall In th Horn Economics Building
at 5:30. Everyone I Invited to attend
and get Involved with the Student
Dietetic Association.
JUNIORS
Starting a resume now mmy be a big
help when you look for a summer fob
or as you take stock of your education
or past work experience If you have
worked on a farm or had a paper
route, then you have had some ex-
perience Your part time work can
have a lot to do with the 100 or career
In which you begin after graduation
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next general meeting of Gam
ma Beta Phi will be held on Thurs
day, March 29, 194 at 7:00 p.m. In
Speight Room 139. Please attend and
don't forget to bring tickets and ticket
money Also, final plans for going to
National Convention will be announc
ed
YARD SALE
Alpha XI Delta house. 501 East
Eleventh St 9:00 em. 3-31-14.
SUMMER CAMP
Summer Cimp work in the
Poconos A representative from
Camp Starlight located In the Nor
them Poconos, approximately 150
miles north west of New York, will be
on Campus, April 4 to conduct inter
views. Sign up now for an interview
time at the COOP office in Rawl 313
interviews will be held at the Career
Pfenning and Placement Center in
the B1 ox ton House
PLANNING
AND ZONING
The Greenville Planning and Zon
Ing Commission will hold a workshop
session on Tuesday, April 3, 1914 at
7:30 p.m. in the Council Chambers of
the Municipal Building located at the
corner of Fifth and Washington
Streets to discuss the land use Intensi
ty rating system.
HAPPY HOUR
The PHI TAUS are having a happy
hour this Thurs March 29 from 9 12
at th Tree House. Si admission �
discount pitchers Come out and Par
tyll
KAPPA SIGMA
Brothers, Pledges, and Little
Sisters, the annual Champagne
Breakfast will be held Saturday.
April 7 at 8 30 am at the Ramada
Inn. Come by the house and sign the
list. Parent's Weekend Is April 14 and
the Bahama Mama Beach Party will
be April 19 Be ready to party next
II
TRIBESON
THE HILL
No, not college hill, however it's
the title of a best selling book by Dr
J Mclver Weatherford. Dr Weather
ford will make two presentations on
Friday, March 30th The first presen
tatlon, TRIBES ON THE HILL: The
Rituals and Realities of the US Con
gross, will begin at 12:00 noon in
Brewster D 112 The second presenta
tlon, METHOD AND MADNESS IN
SOCIAL SCIENCE RESEARCH
How do we KNOW what we think we
KNOW?, begins at 2:30 p.m in
Brewster D 303. For more informa
tlon, please contact the department of
Sociology, Anthropology and
Economics at 757 443 Don't miss
these stimulating presentations!
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Happy 1st Birthday
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SUBS
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BONUS PRIZE
I cup of Tea
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3rd price 20 Subs
East Carolina University's
Student Union
Needs Chairpersons For The
Following Committees
� Forum Committee - Selects and promotes lectures, symposiums, or other related pro-
grams that will interest the student body and University community.
Public Relations & Publicity Committee - Will package publicity and coordinate total
promotion of the Union.
� Recreation Committee - Plans and promotes the following activities:
� ACU-I Tournaments (i.e. bowling, billiards)
� Qubs (Table Tennis, Chess, Backgammon)
� Special Recreation Activities (Ice GeamBingo, Watermelons, etc.)
� College Bowl
Production Committee - Responsible for programs -Dinner Theatre, Madrigal Dinner,
Student Center decorations, receptions, and other programs - not contracted out.
Travel Committee - Plans and promotes.the following types of trips: weekend excur-
sions, trips scheduled during the holidays and during the breaks, and also sponsors the
Travel Adventure Film Series.
Applications for committee chairpersons are available at Mendenhall Student Center's
Information Desk, or the Student Union Office (Room 234 -Mendenhall Student
Center). For more irrfonriation contact the Student Union Office at 757-6611 ext.
4b I Jm
MOOOOOOOOOOOOOQ,
REP WANTED
The department of Intramural Rec
Services is looking for interested
students to assume the role of Ad-
visory Council Representatives A
representative from each partlclpa
tlon division is needed (President,
Fraternity, Sorority, Residence,
men. women, caed independents
and Clubs) Applications deadline is
April 2, and they may be picked up in
Memorial Gym room 204
"WHAT'S NEW"
The ACM is sponsoring a lecture
series, "What's New one of which
will be held Thursday, March 29, at
7:00 P M. In BC 103. The lecture will
feature a representative from IBM to
discuss mainframe computing All in
terested students are welcome to at
tend
PI KAPPA PHI
The Pi Kapps are collecting for
PUSH (Play Units for the Severly
Handicapped) this week in front of
ttie Student Store There is also a
Push a thon in Greenville this Satur
day Everyone help support this wor
thy cause The newly elected ex
ecutive Archon � Steve Hall, Vice
Archon Executive � Jeff Luedeke.
Vice Archon Revenue � Jimmy
Hardee, Treasure � Steve LaRoque.
Secretary � Bob Canupe, Warden �
Kevin Manning, Historian � Jerry
Smith, and Chaplain � Scott Smith
will meet at Mendenhall Thurs at
4 00 p.m.
PIRATE WALK
Closing date is April 15th � There
will be a mandatory meeting for all
persons associated with Pirate Walk
and those interested on April nth All
escorts please return their jackets at
this time Ron Langley and the Stu
dent Government appreciate
everyone cooperation throughout
the year Thank you
ANTIQUE AUCTION
An antique auction to be held in
Tarboro's National Guard Armory on
March 31 will feature hundreds of
items from all over Edgecombe
County Some of the proceeds of the
auctions will go to benefit historic
preservation projects throughout
Edgecombe County Of the items sold
at the auction, there will be an early
Victorian walnut bed, a mid l?th cen
tury oak wardrobe, several dining
room sideboards, a workable oak
pump organ, a pair of early 19th cen
tury brass andirons, a large two-tier
mantel, lots of antique furniture,
glassware, china collectibles, and
much more
BEACH WEEKEND
The Catholic Newman Center is go
ing to the beach for a retreat, Aprn
A The theme of the weekend is
"Newman � Coming Together " it
will be a time for reflection and fun on
the beach! The cost is 115 and a 3
deposit is required Sunday, April 1st
after Mass Come to the beach with us
and help make Newman a better
placeI
CHI OMEGA
The Chi Omega Sorority will be try
ing to party with the Pi Kapps tonight
(March 29) at the Pi Kapp House The
party starts around 9 00 pm You
girls go ahead and get your som
breros out and get ready to party
Western Mexican style
JOSH FILM SERIES
Josh McDowell is one of the most
popular speakers on university cam
puses today In the last 15 yrs , he has
spoken to more than seven million
students and faculty at 400 univer
sities in 62 countries Josh is the
author of 21 best selling books ana
has been featured in 19 films and 2 TV
specials. Come and hear Josh at Hen
drix Theatre April 1'2, 8 X p.m This
Sun and Mon
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
The Brothers of the Kappa Alpha
Psi Fraternity inc would like to ex
tend to everyone a cordial invitation
to attend their Semi Formal Kappa
Koronation Ball to be held Sat , April
7, at the Ramada Inn from 9pm to 2
a.m Admission will be tS 00 smgie
and MOO couple Tickets may be pur
chased from any brother of Kappa
Alpha Psi or any Kappa Sweetheart
We look forward to seeing you there'
SAB
The Student Athletic Board will
sponser a car wash March 31, at
Hardees located on Greenville Blvd
10 am 4pm Cost $2
CONTEST
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring a video games
contest in the Amusement Games
area of Mendenhall Student Center
The contest will run from Monday
April 2. 1984 at 8 30 A.M. until Mon
day. April l6. 194 at 5 00 P M Each
score must be verified with the
Billiards Center Supervisor Highest
scorers on each video game will
receive a prize For further details
P'Ck up the rules at the Billiards
Center on the bottom floor of
Mendenhall Student Center
UGLY MAN
ON CAMPUS
Attention come vote lor the ugliest
man on campus Campus organua
tions wii' oe sending their represen
tatives to the Student Supply Store O"
April 2 April 6 Proceeds from the
contest will be going to the new
Ronald MacDonaia house to be built
here in Greenville Come out ana sup
port your favorite organ.zation vote
tor a good cause
PLANT SALE
Hey It that time of year once
more when you ran find some
fabulous buys on plants Once agam
the B'Oiogy Club along with the
Biology department ,s sponsoring the
plant sale it will oe Thurs Apr.I 5
and Fri . April a from 7 30 a m 1 00
P m So. don't forget and come early
for the Dest selection
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
There wil: be a speoai meeting of
the College Republicans ton,grt A iti
Wimtlspeaker Sylvan aVS ��ersor
Sr Mr Wilkerson will he speaking on
Minority Affiars ana how the govern
ment works for mmorit.es Anyone
interested is welcome to attend The
meeting will begin at 5 30 m room 221
Mendenhall See you there'
ZBT LITTLE SISTERS
This weeks htt'e s.sters meeting
will be held n the basen-ent gj
Umstead Dorm at 5 p m Thursday
March 29 1984
FELLOWSHIP
inter vars't, Chr.5t.an Fellowship
meets every Wednescay n.gh? at t 30
in Jenkins Auditorium We sng
fellowship, ana praise the iora Don't
you want to oe a part of us7 You
meet some great people '
COOP
Stuaent wantea to orx a' a o&.
care center with ranaca.seo
children tor the summer One pos
tion in Rocky Mount ana one posit.or
in Tarboro Minimum wage Student
must quality tor financ al aid Dy com
pleting confidential statement m the
financial a'O office See Co OP Ra
310 for additional information
INSANITY
Dr Seiwyn Rose Forensic
Psychiatrist, Attorney wm speak at
Jenkins Aud on April 6 at 10 00 a m
"Are Killers insane In North
Carolina is the fascinating topic
Oon't mi� this exciting lecture'1'
Also Psi Chi scholarships are still
available Deadline is April 2
STUDENTS WITH HART
Now is the time for a new genera
tion of leadership if you are feo up
with the politics of nostalgia ano look
mg for new solutions to the nat.on s
problems ioin students with Hart we
are the vanguard of a new
democracy We will be meeting at
Menoenhall. every Thursaay at 8 pm
1 ask receptiontst for room number
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
it you lixe to party, e sure to come
party with the KAPPA ALPHA PSi
Fraternity mc at the Cultural
Center Friday night. March X from
ICOOpm 200am Refreshments
may be purchased Admission is 7J
��. See you there'
FILM SERIES
campus Crusade tor Christ .s soon
sor ng the Josh Film Ser.es I 5
Sun and Mon n.ghts at 8 30 p m ,c
Mencirix Theatre The topics wilt te
Sun - Skeptics Quest ana Mon �
How to be a Good Lover" These
Him will be entertaining, open a- j
r-onest Aamission is tree tor a
students and facui'v
HOMECOMING
Applications are now being a;
cepted for the 1984 Student
Homecoming Committee ChaIrpsr
son Apphcations can be p.ckeo up a'
e-fher the Mendenhall intormat.on
Desx or the Alumn, Center The
deadline for appylmg for this posif.or
s r.oar April 13
SPRING FASHIONS.
- Aes' Aa Residence Counc
s presenting a Spr og Fashion ex
travagania on Apr.i 5th at 7 p m in
Garrett Dorm Fashions will be pro
� �ded 0, area stores So lump into
Spring w,th wne. Roses. 8, Dreams
BAHAMA MAMA PARTY
Banama Mama Party comma
soon April ,9tn ar Kapca
Sigma House The party starts at 4 x
so get your t.ckets erly See a
brother or little s.ster tor tickets
BLOOD DRIVE
Army ROTC w.il be sponsoring 8
ciooo ar.ve Apni no 11 Any campus
organization with 20 or member, can
compete for tooc ana other pr,2es
oonatec oy local merchant by hv.
n 'he best turnout ip�rcen,w,
P-ecare to party when your group
wms For further information can
757 6967
SPRING TUNIE-UI
THE SAVINGS ARE IN HIGH GEAR!
DAN FOGELBERG
WINDOWS AND WALLS
including
The Language Of LoveBelieve In Me
Let Her GoGone loo Far
Sweet Magnolia (And The
Travelling Salesman)
"I
6.99
LP&
TAPE
CASSETTE
NO PARLEZ
including
ever I Lay My Hal (Thais My Momei
Come Back And Stay
Iron Out The Rough Spots Sen
Love Will Tear Us Apart
6.919
LP&
TARE
CASSETTE
FOOTLOOSE
ORIGINAL MOTION Pl( Tl KK
SWMVTR.M k
featuring
BONNIE TYLER�Holding Out For A Hero
KENNY LOGGINS- I m Free
(Heaven Helps The Mam
MIKE RENO (of Loverboy 1 and
ANN WILSON (of Heart (-Almost
Paradise Love Theme From Footloose
SHALAMAR�Dancing InjC
CYNDI
LAUPER
SHE'S SO
UNUSUAL
including:
Money Changes
Everything
Girls Just Want
lb Have Fun
When You Were Mine
Time After Time
All Through The Night
7.99
LP&
TAPE
CASSETTE
NENA
99 LUFTBALLONS
including
99 Red Balloons�'Just A Dream
99 LuttballonsRette Mich
0
6.99
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TAPE
CASSETTE
6.99
LP&
TAPE
CASSETTE
CBS RECORDS AND TAPES SPECIALLY PRICED THROUGH APRIL 4TH
Record Bar
RECORDS, TAPES & A LITTLE BIT MORE.
PITT PLAZA CAROLINA EAST MALL

i
Rescue worktrs �earch t
outside Greenvilii
"there's nothing left i,f several
from tank. hut no fire u
le High School near
Sociology
Lectures
B SI hPHr
HARDIM,
tt
1
"fgM
� iw i� laiffsjff)! n, ���� ��
- � - � -
� �"� � � �ia�a�nm��i e. m
r�. v
Dr J.
Weathe
anthropoid g
two ta
Ma :
ment of Soc
thropc
Econoni
The firsi lecture
titled "Tribe
� The Rituals
Realities of the U.S. (
gress It will be
noon m Brewster, D
The talk �
an investig
rituals of U.S. C
and will be pi
much the same w a
imes:igat:on
ciem tribe.
A second
held a: 2 3
Brewster, D � :
"Method a
Social Science R
� How Do w e Kri
This will he a :�.
discussion on methods
research as
thropologists
Vea
e :he spc
department
6 p.m
Inn.
Weathc
investigations
areas as well.
Violence
Discussed
B KIMCRA1C
S �" ife
Puniti e a- . e
violence will bt
of the 23rd annual Fa-
Life Conference
held April 2 enkin
Auditorium.
Dr. Gertrude v
will be the
speaker. -
sight into cultu-
social forces
the a 11 i t u
behaviors l
violence if the
Presen t at v is n
elude: Violence ga
Children. Child and V
Battering and Incest
General Background.
W i 11 i a n s a
psychologist in private
practice in St. I
where part oi her work is
reserved for abused
children and adults
is a diplomate in chmcal
psychologv of the
American Board oi Pro-
fessional Psychology and
has served as director and
chief psychologist at the
Child Guidance Clinics oi
the City of St. Louw
Williams w as the foun
ding editor of the Journal
of Clinical Child
Psychology and also a
member of the first Task
Force on the Rights of
Children and Youth of
tn� American
Psychological Associa-
tion.
N





T
E MS WITH HART
a -lew anera
� ftm are ��, up
��"V8 a and too
� "ahon $
- Hart vVe
a new
-eeng a�
' rwrsday at I Dm
X " L'Tiber:
ALPHA PSI
e to come
- �ha PSl
� e Cultural
- 30 from
- � esrirnenfs
-son is 75
SERIES
" Si ssoon
-� i�t es NHa
� 3C p m in
. .5 will be
SOd MOD �
T rtese
' ng open ana
�or all
BECOMING
- rie.ng ac
indent
"te Chairper
ea up at
"ation
"�" Tne
" s position
UNG FASHIONS
- 3e�ce Council
is"on ex
' i ' p m in
a pro
-np into
� � i D eamj
A PARTY
C om I ng
appa
I �5(1 4 X
'� � See any
' ' ' Ctofl
-CD DRIVE
nsortng a
� :ampus
mttara can
prixn
s . mv
r Broup
� �a' on call
UP
GEAR!
PARLEZ
6.99
LP&
TAPE
NENA
IFTBALLONS
iiOons'jusi A Dream
Rene Mich
6.99
LP&
TAPE
CASSETTE
�H APRIL 4TH
4
(
Resident Tells Of Glass Breaking,
Trailer Shaking, Falling Into Pieces
Wreckage From Tornado
� Lab
ouSud: :�z;?2 -Si'Jrsti mobe home in ihrt t��" - ���
Sociology
Lectures
HARDING STOHEN
�Uff Writer
Dr. J. Mclver
Weatherford, a cultural
anthropologist, will give
two talks on Frida,
March 30. The talks are
sponsored by the Depart-
ment of Sociology, An-
thropology, and
Economics.
The first lecture is en-
titled "Tribes on the Hill
� The Rituals and
Realities of the U.S. Con-
gress It will be held at
noon in Brewster, D-l 12.
The talk will be concern
an investigation of the
rituals of U.S. Congress
and will be presented in
much the same way as an
investigation of an an-
cient tribe.
A second lecture to be
held at 2:30 p.m. in
Brewster. D-302). is titled
"Method and Madness in
Social Science Research
� How Do We Know
This will be a technical
discussion on methods of
research as used by an-
thropologists.
Weatherford will also
be the special guest at the
department's banquet at
6 p.m. in the Holida
Inn.
Weatherford has done
investigations in other
areas as well.
Violence
Discussed
By KIM CRAIG
Nllff � filer
Punitive and sexual
violence will be the theme
of the 23rd annual Family
Life Conference to be
held April 2 in Jenkins
Auditorium.
Dr. Gertrude Williams
will be the featured
peaker, sharing her in-
sight into cultural and
social forces that shape
'he attitudes and
behaviors leading to
violence in the family.
Presentations will in-
clude: Violence Against
Children, Child and Wife
Battering and Incest:
General Background.
Williams is a
psychologist in private
practice in St. Louis
where part of her work is
reserved for abused
children and adults. She
is a diplomate in clinical
Psychology of the
American Board of Pro-
fessional Psychology and
has served as director and
chief psychologist at the
Child Guidance Clinics of
the City of St. Louis.
Williams was the foun-
ding editor of the Journal
of Clinical Child
Psychology and also a
member of the first Task
force on the Rights of
Children and Youth of
L"e American
Psychological Associa-
tion.
'�ntinurd t mm r'�g J
frr-
Off I
cd with �
teir; �
�trcn ,n.
I Nftfi ibeei
wrapped
Utlllt) poicv
A local resident, k.r.
BusltCT, described
n.ido rutting his bone
H famil) heard .� - imM
uiK and .i
in their mobile h.
five got undei
matress, heard more win-
dows breaking, l
trailei shaking, .ind ii
seemed like it (the trailer)
just rolled ova real slow
ly, and the next thing we
knew we were outside
behind the car
The sides of the trailer
were blown awa)
"We looked around
and saw our neighbors
crawling from under their
trailer Banker said. "It
was where ours used to
SSZZ ���"�"
' a ;��
I � � .
��
r weft a
' people r -
High Sen :
' e using
rmrrftrrus shelter. anj
I
'�
" ' ' I �� r
W ' � : mayoi
� AnJc. saJ Nfvrr,
Ithl had bec
: Bertie C ount)
before midnight
Wiliiford, speaking
from the command post
for the county, said there
had been "extensive pei
s' ll injuries "
Wiliiford said the
storm hit the area around
9 p.m leveling several
homes.
"There's nothing left
hut the foundations he
S
r

u � , ,
I I
� "� -an,
tit Ccru
a �
See John Kiun pjijjr 6
MAKE TRACKS FOR THE
BESTEATIN'ALL AROUND!
The next time you stop by for the Best Eatin brinq
along this money-savin' coupon.
" "sTemk!IbFbTscuhThd
0rm6e juice $1.29
I oZ T� SSanv 0,h8r 0ff8rs 0Her o duf-8 � KSKSS
only a, part.c.pat.ng Hardees Restaurants � m � � I
ghMay31 '984 �4� J' 1
I � co.ki Systems inc 1 lll WlflbVj �� I
tBuuuloMsrldrDmm �Iul
QUIXOTE TRAVEtS
TRAVEL-SUMMER of 1984 j
Eurail Youthpass$290
Britrail Youthpass$ 95
New York to Luxemburg$589
round trip with FREE bus connection
to Germany Holland Belgium
In Britain: 5 days car & hotelfrom185
p.person (no air included)
Book early for best fares - call for brochures:
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
lc; Cotanche St.
Greenville, N. C. 27834
Phone 75-u2j
1
I DCn,o MBrS OP
ONE PRICE SALE
X -���
� SPORT COATS Vaws.ssoo S65.00
l ir �� �
� PANTS V.IUOS6000 $15.90
Onedoup 2 $30.00
SWEATERS v.iuettosso.oo $17.90
1 -oog Sleeve
� SPORTSH1RTS v�ms.oo S17.90
VEST $1000
1 n� Sleeve
TS�$10.00
SWEATERS$1000
-OOg & Short Sleeve
DRESS SHIRTS20 Off
ALLSAIFSFfHAi
� Alterations Extra
i Cash, Checks, or Bank Cards
STEINBECK'S
Downtown
ONLY
I p JiBi momsmami nii
I rombmaiion w.th any other offers Offer good after 10 vT AM VT
Iparncipatrng Hardee . Restaurants through � " "
May 31. 1984
Har,ie�s Food Systems inc
Haideer
i
i
i
� WEIGH
STATION
Weight Control Service
Will Meet You 12 Way!
To salute the students, faculty &
personnel of ECU, We're Cutting the
Cost of A Six Week Program in Hall!
The First Fifty ECU students, faculty
f Personnelto Bring In This Ad Will
Receive A 6-Week Reducing
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(Next to Bond's) Open 7:30am-5.30pm MWF. 7:30-5.00 TTH
� �
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.�acij .j





�H Cant (Eawltafan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, g,
Darryl Brown. - B-ir.
Jennifer Jendrasiak. mmm, j T Piftb?
Tina Maroschak. cv MlK� McPartland. �.
tD N.CKLAS. w,�. ToM Norton crrdt
Gordon Ipock. Eduor
Mark RaB,pB athy Fuerst. �,Managtr
mark barker, ow MlKE Ma
March 29, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Writing
More Verbs, Less TAnd F
True or false
1.) The writing skills of
American students today are in dire
need of improvement.
2.) Writing is becoming a
specialized trade, one that certain
people are trained especially for
and the rest are barely capable of.
3.) Specialized writing programs
are good for those who major in
them but will never replace writing
requirements in regular classes;
they tend to foster the image of
writing as a specialized trade rather
than a basic skill required of all col-
lege graduates.
4.) Colleges today need to re-
quire more written assignments.
5.) Students in all majors should
be required to write essays on tests.
6.) In classes smaller than 30
students, teachers should never give
in multiple choice form what can be
done by essay tests.
7.) There is no excuse for tests in
majors such as English and history
to be in the form of multiple
choice, fill-in-the-blank or true-
false.
8.) Term papers of at least three
or four pages in length should be
required in all senior-level liberal
arts and humanities courses, and in
most classes at the sophomore and
junior level.
9.) In subjects such as science,
math and computer science, where
essay tests and term papers are
often not applicable, teachers
should when possible require
briefs, chapter summaries or book
abstracts.
10.) No English, history,
philosophy, language, social
science, business or political science
major should be allowed to
graduate without having written at
least one paper of ten pages or
more.
11.) The ECU College of Arts
and Sciences needs to make a major
overhaul in its writing re-
quirements, creating a college-wide
policy of mandatory term papers in
all majors, with the possible excep-
tion of some science and math
courses.
12.) The college should banish
forever multiple choice and true-
false tests, and reprimand any
teacher with a class of fewer than
40 students for giving one.
13.) The college needs to study
the feasibility of an optional (but
encouraged) undergraduate thesis,
and departments need to push
senior honors thesis programs more
among their better students.
14.) Students will rarely do more
than what is required of them.
15.) The administration needs to
take the lead in making these im-
provements; they cannot wait for
students to ask for more classwork
and tougher requirements.
Answers: all of the above are true.
People Get Fed Up When
The Sewage Starts Flying
In Commissioner's Race
By DARKYL BROWN
There's a hotly contested race this year
that's being swept under the rug by the
media but deserves a lot more attention.
The neck-and-neck race for Greenville Ci-
ty Drainage and Sewer Commissioner bet-
ween Tim Blunt and Jesse Shmeltch is tur-
ning into quite a heat indeed, with a
mutual banter of negative campaigning
and counterattacks rarely equalled in
Down East politics.
It all started when Shmeltch raised a lit-
tle money with some friends over in
Beaufort County for his Greenville cam-
paign. He started raking in such a pile of
loot, in fact, that the opposition got ner-
vous, then started charging that of
Shmeltch might be more beholding to the
neighbors than the homefolk. What kind
of sewer man is he going to be, anyway,
always thinking of that garbage in the nor-
thern counties?
Bye and bye, Blunt just had to do
something. Shlemtch was just hauling in
the dough by the truckload and nobody
was paying attention. Shlemtch had a cam-
paign coffer so full the commissioner's job
looked like it was in the bag. Blunt figured
what's good for the goose is good for the
gander, so he snuck down to Craven
County, where some in-laws helped him
raise a little campaign loot.
Thing is, at the same time he started say-
ing the sewer commissioner shouldn't be a
?
commissioner from Beaufort or Martin cr
Bertie Counties, but ought to be the com-
missioner for Pitt County, since that's
where all the sewage is that his supposed to
be managing.
Shmeltz jumped on that. Next thing you
know, all over Pitt County were signs say-
ing:
Blunt For Greenville Sewer Commissioner
P.O. Box 4, Highway 9
Whiskey Lick, N.C Craven County
Under it were the words: "Something is
wrong here. What's a Pitt County native
doing raising funds in Craven County?
And all the time saying the commissioner
ought not be from Beaufort or Bertie
County. What's going on, Tim? Where do
you stand?"
Blunts people were steaming. Never
mind that Shelmtch raised three times as
much money in Beaufort as Tim raised in
Craven, the ads were making them look
bad.
"But they was all cousins the Blunt
spokesman said. "Everyone one of them
Craven County people have kin in Pitt
County. I bet Shmeltch don't have no kin
in Beaufort County
But Shmeltch wouldn't stop. He kept on
about Blunt raising money outside the
county, and who he'd be beholding to,
God forbid he should become commis-
sioner, and wouldn't the people rather
have a man who was a loyal servant of the
people and a God-fearing Christian.
But more annoyed than anyone else
were the people who had to put up with all
the bickering. No one was talking about
who was going to run the sewage treatment
plant better, or who had the new ideas
about dumping in the Tar River, or who
would bring a new generation of leader-
ship to the sewage commission. They
didn't talk about anything that people like
to hear about in a candidate. All they
heard was who was raising money in the
next county, and whether it was OK
because they were kin or in-laws or
whether they'd be beholding to some
strangers over the county line.
A point came when people were just
about fed up with Blunt and Shemltch
They figured they both belonged in the
sewage business, being how they were
already so good at handling a lot of it.
Unions Better Than Alternatives
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
Every now and then, the Supreme
Court hands down a ruling which
receives little publicity yet promises to
have a tremendous impact, this time on
labor-employee relations. A recent deci-
sion, which will allow financially troubl-
ed companies � not necessarily
bankrupt ones � to scrap union con-
tracts, is one such decision.
The five-to-four vote allows any com-
pany which declares itself in financial
quicksand to tear up union-negotiated
contracts. This is a dangerous and sur-
prising decision which will return to
haunt company executives who will now
gleefully take advantage of it.
Let's face it. Many conservatives, in-
cluding those on the Court, have a
lingering suspicion of labor unions.
After all, they say, unions are mainly �
but not solely � responsible for the
decline of America's industries, par-
ticularly in the import-export area,
because of their excessive wage
demands. I agree. But what are the alter-
natives to our present unions? And are
these alternatives more desirable than
what we have now?
One alternative is hard-core socialist
Campus Forum
and Marxist labor organizations similar
to many of those in Britain. How do we
get these? Simple. We get our corporate
big-shots to concentrate on constricting
the unions now in existence. For exam-
ple, companies nationwide can begin
declaring that their money problems are
caused by the excessive wage demands
unions have forced on them. They can
chuck the contracts and compel the
workers to accept lower wages and
benefits. Then we'll hear the Marxists
shout, "See, you cannot compromise
with capitalist. They're interested only
in squeezing every dime's worth of sweat
and tears from you before you are
discarded. Make us your union leaders.
We won't knuckle under. You'll get
more money because we'll show the
capitalist pigs who's boss Voila!
Although it will take time, before you
know it, our unions will really be left-
wing. If anyone thinks today's
brotherhoods of workers are radical, he
ain't seen nothin' yet.
Another alternative is to pre-empt the
need for militant unions, as Japan has
done. There, although workers salaries
are low, side benefits are high. Com-
panies provide housing, paid vacations,
dating services, recreational facilities.
cheap medical insurance, etc Executives
go out of their way to experience and
understand how their workers live.
Result: workers trust and admire their
company superiors and see no need for
adversarial unions American-style.
In the U.S the best example of a
paternalistic company is the Adolph
Coors Brewing Company of Colorado
The benefits it provides its workers are
similar to those in Japan. Consequently.
Coors employees have gone beyond the
Japanese example by rejecting AFL-CIO
attempts to organize them.
American unions, now over 100 vears
old, may have already fulfilled their ma-
jor purpose. Membership represents on-
ly twenty percent of the work force, and
that number continues to decline. But if
the unions, which have been a vital force
in shaping representative democracv, are
destined to fade away, the process
should take place naturally. If the
government takes any actions allowing
companies to hasten their demise, a
serious labor backlash could begin m
tant, left-wing unions, like the kinds
which nearly wrecked Britain, are just
what our unstable economv does not
need.
Real Men Don 7 Editorialize News
r.�l LX 1 . .
Ah, real men! Men who dash out of
a crowd to approach the speaker's plat-
form. (Men like Patrick O'Neill). Men
who carry placards of protest in front
of the post office. (Men like Patrick
O'Neill). Men who are convicted and
spend time in prison. (Men like Patrick
O'Neill). Men who would give away
our country's freedom at the expense
of a weakened defense capability.
(Men like Patrick O'Neill).
Real men? The real men are those
willing to stand tall for America,
defending liberty and freedom. Patrick
O'Neill stands cowering behind his
weekly protest sign, a yellow belly if
ever there was one. Face it folks,
Patrick O'Neill is totally without
worth. If he were a horse he would
have been shot long ago.
I would like to commend the staff
and management of The East Caroli-
nian for working hard to give the
students, faculty and staff a newspaper
we all can be proud of on our campus.
The improvement in news and editorial
content and balance has resulted in the
finest' newspaper I have seen since I
first came to this campus in 1977
Please do not allow your efforts to be
set back by those such as Patrick
O'Neill who attempt to manipulate the
press by editorializing the news.
Charles D. Shavitz
Pirate Club
East Carolina for their outstanding
contribution to our community, and
for their continuing faithful support of
the Red Cross bloodmobile.
Annette Dawkins
Greenville Service League
Students Supportive
The Greenville Service League has
assisted the Red Cross with blood col-
lection in Pitt County for a number of
years. While the general population
and industry have provided significant
support, the single largest group of
contributors are the students of East
Carolina University. Although tem-
porary members of our community,
they take the time and effort to donate
blood with their only reward being the
knowledge that they are helping so-
meone in need.
Tbe Greenville Service League would
like to formally thank the students of
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the ad
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Utters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
You Want ro iake.
PIWER, ACTING AMD CRBffioM
sniffMee Oust what are. you
5T0DV1M6 To BE ?
Classri
(CPS) � Minontv
students tend to arrive
earlier for class than their
white counterparts, and
cluster themselves near
the back and sides of
classrooms when the
choose their seats, accor-
ding to one L'niversitv of
Maryland researcher
"There seems to be an
unspoken, natural agret
ment between minontv
25th Annual Evei
and
the
choJ
plan
fesJ
pan
arm
'Gree
By TINA MAROSCHAK
C�-Nr�, Mho,
ECU fraternities and
sororities will participate
in the 25th annual
"Greek Week" April 2-8
According to James B
Mallory, associate dean
of Orientation s
Judiciary and Inter
Fraternitv Council ad-
visor, the event startec 23
years ago as a banquet
eoi
T
dam
I
re "A
wil

i
ni
Buy,
Sell
And Trade
With
Classifieds
ON the
April
1 to 6
V If rain conceri
held ini
Wright Audit.
THE ped:
Bringing us Bad
tnaje
fjrif Co�ege Press Service
mmmMm&
� . . - �
i.i lin u � � ��
nno m m ����





!HJ I AST AKOI IMAS
MAR H 2V vk4

aOKr-
atives
ranee, etc. Executives
t) to experience and
their uorkers live.
rust and admire their
and see no need for
mis American-style.
he best example of a
any is the Adolph
in) of Colorado.
s workers are
Japan. Consequently,
nave gone beyond the
ting AFL-CIO
:hem.
ver 100 years
fulfilled their ma-
ibership represents on-
work force, and
decline. But if
nave been a vital force
�native democracy, are
vay, the process
c naturally If the
an actions allowing
r demise, a
could begin. Mili-
is, u'ke the kinds
ain, are just
I economy does not
Vews
their outstanding
our community, and
thful support of
mobile.
Annette Dawkins
� He Service League
mm Rules
,arolinian welcomes letters
p points of view. Mail or
our office in the Old
mg, across from Joyner
- cation, all let-
the name, major and
address, phone number
f the authorfs). Letters
two typewritten pages,
neatly printed. All
t to editing for brevi-
md libel, and no personal
he permitted. Students,
taff writing letters for this
inded that they are limited
five issues
iRM you
177
h��nL
w
Classroom Behavior Of Minorities Studied
(CPS) � Minority
students tend to arrive
earlier for class than their
white counterparts, and
cluster themselves near
the back and sides of
classrooms when they
choose their seats, accor-
ding to one University of
Maryland researcher.
"There seems to be an
unspoken, natural agree-
ment between minority
and white students as
they arrive for class and
choose their seats ex-
plains sociologv Pro-
fessor Gilda Haber, who
recently completed a
study of student seating
patterns at five Maryland
colleges.
"The minority students
arrive early for class, and
choose to sit around the
peripheries of the
25 th Annual Event Scheduled
classroom, leaving the
front and center sections
untouched she reports
"The WASPS (white,
Anglo-Saxon Pro-
testants) arrive later, and
quickly occupy the center
of the classroom
Ninety-four percent of
the seats in the back of
the average college
classroom are filled by
minority students, Haber
found.
"Minority she adds,
might mean black,
Hispanic, Indian, Jewish
or Catholic students.
Although her ongoing
study has yet to yield con-
crete reasons why some
students voluntarily
segregate themselves,
Haber believes it may
have something to do
with the way the
minorities feel toward
society in general.
"It could be they simp
ly won't identify with be-
ing at the front of the
class, or that they don't
relate to their professors,
who are usually white
she speculates.
The same pattern oc-
curs at all-black colleges,
too. Black students there
will also leave the front
and center sections of the
classroom vacant the
longest.
Haber found that
students generally don't
change seats, either.
"Once a student sits in
a seat even one or two
times, the rest of the class
seems to remember and
leave that seat empty
even if the student misses
class several times or
'Greek Week' Set For April 2-8
V1AROSCHAK and a tew tu�n�- -r,
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Co-Newi Mtloc
ECU fraternities and
sororities will participate
m the 25th annual
"Greek Week" April 2-8.
According to James B.
Mallory, associate dean
of Orientation and
Judiciary and Inter
Fraternity Council ad-
visor, the event started 25
years ago as a banquet
and a tew events and
evolved into what it is to-
day.
The Greek banquet and
dance will be the first
event of the week. It will
be held Monday, April 2
at the Moose Lodge and
will begin at 7 p.m. and 9
p.m respectively. "STA
Express" will provide
music for the evening.
Other activities for the
Buy,
Sell
week include the follow-
ing: Tuesday, 4 p.m
Kappa Alpha Track
Meet, to be held at E.B.
Aycock Junior High
School; Wednesday, 3
P-m Sigma Tau Gamma
Tug-A-War, to be held at
the fraternitv house;
Thursday, 3 p.m Kappa
Sigma "Funky Nassau
to be held at the fraterni-
l house; Friday, 3 p.m
ATTIC
Phi Kappa Tau "Spring
Fling (all-campus par-
ty),to be held at the
fraternity house.
Weekend activities in-
clude a party at Moser's
Farm on Saturday and Pi
Kappa Phi Field Day on
Sunday. Moser's Farm
will begin at 12 noon and
will feature the band,
"The Sponge Tones
Sunday's event will begin
moo
at 11 a.m. and will be
held at the fraternity
house.
All activities are ex-
cluded to greeks with the
exception of "Spring Fl-
ing
Panhallenic and IFC
will split the cost of the
bands, however each in-
dividual sorority and
fraternity must pav for
the amount of beverages
changes to a different
seat she discovered.
She even found grades
are related to where
students sit in class.
"Grades tend to be
highest in the front and
center, and drop as you
jo to the back and sides
�f 'he classroom she
says.
But she thinks those
grade patterns have more
to do with how students
perceive their instructors
and places in the
classroom than with
sutdents' intellectual
abilities.
Yet "that's what I'm
trying to find out now
she adds.
Register To Vote
And Trade
With
Classifieds
i hurs.
WZMB
Ladies Lite
Nite
'The
Trend9'
r fee Girls
Tri-State
Auto Body
Fri. IFC
wgJHappy Hour
MAXX
WARRIOR
�XJ Admission
I
50 limited Be
er
Expert body repairs, paint Jj
jobs, frame straightening, and jj
S 24 hour towing. �
107, Discount to all ECU
Students.
un.
"The Pedestrians"
$1.00 ECU
Free Beer on Admission &
Super H.H. All Night
(Bring in Ad)
24 kcu,
tOWINC
SFRVICC
(over the bridge)
1512 N.Greene St.
Day 758-0778
Night 756-4775
756-8604
PIRATE WAL
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
Positions for PIRATE WALK
EXECUTIVE COUNCIL
are now open.
Please apply in Mendenhall
Rm. 228 from 9-5 M-F.
ON the Mall
April 1st
1 to 6 pm
MILLER HIGH LIFE

If rain concert will be
held in
Wright Auditorium, �
9 6 4
Cups
T-shirts
Posters
and Painter
Caps
given away!
r
tyjm
THE PEDESTRIANS
Bringing us Back to the Future.
�'�
fHAXX
.�
:S"?3
�� -
-
�35,�H
THE FABULOUS KNOBS
Welcome to Miller Time
Mill
M
'
� ft m,m,fi i Hi,





�IHEEAST CAROLINIAN MABrn 29, 1984
Black Market In Computers Causes Worry
(CPS) � Rumors that
a substantial campus
black market in com-
puters has arisen in recent
weeks appear to be false,
but campus officials
worry that one may ap-
pear soon along with a
difficult sales war with
off-campus computer
dealers.
A USA Today
newspaper story in late
February alleged a large
computer black market
was forming on campuses
as students buy the
machines at a discount
from their schools, and
then re-sell them to others
at a profit.
But a College Press
Service check with a
number of campuses now
selling computers at a dis-
count indicates that,
while officials worry that
a black market may ap-
pear, none seems to be
functioning yet.
Apple, for one, had
shipped only about 48 of
its new Macintosh com-
puters by the end of last
week, making a black
market in the machines
very small, if it exists at
all, says company
spokesman Daniel Lewin.
"It's not like scalping
football tickets adds
Gregory Marks, who
oversees computing pro-
grams at the University of
Michigan. "For student
to buy 10 computers (to
re-sell) is beyond most
students' means
Nevertheless, all con-
cerned say they're wat-
ching campuses closely
for telltale signs of
emerging illegal computer
traffic, newspaper ads of-
fering to buy "used"
computers, students in-
dividually of collectively
buying more than one
machine at a time, etc.
"We're going to
monitor the campuses
real closely Lewin cau-
tions. "I would not want
to have any of our plans
published
Besides the 24 schools
that recently arranged to
sell Apple Macintoshes at
a $1,200 discount to their
students, scores of other
campuses recently have
started to sell computers
cheaply to their com
muni ties.
Fourteen universities
nave signed up to uuy and
sell new DEC 350 com-
puters at 65 percent dis-
counts.
This fall, Drew Univer-
sity will give all incoming
freshmen Epson QX-10
micros for about $1,700
each. Normal retail price
for the machines is over
$4,000.
Zenith, IBM, and
Texas Instruments,
among many others, are
developing similar dis-
count arrangements with
hundreds of campuses.
And many others are
letting students choose
their own brands in cam-
pus bookstores. All the
?
If
ACROSS
1 Wire nails
6 Rent
11 Feast
13 Continued
story
14 Faroe Islands
whirlwind
15 Corrupt
17 Note of scale
18 Away
20 Food
programs
21 Ocean
22 Secluded
valley
24 Vehicle
25 Imitates
26 Irritate
28 Game fish
30 Linger
32 Couple
33 Pertaining to
the mind
35 Post
37 Unit of Italian
currency
38 Comparative
ending
40 Play leading
role
42 Possessive
pronoun
43 Escapes
45 Nahoor
sheep
46 Saint abbr
47 Succeed
49 Roman gods
50 Bed canopy
52 Went by
water
54 Golfer Slam-
min' Sam
55 Burdens
DOWN
1 Progeny
2 Close-fitting
heavy jacket
3 Symbol for
silver
4 Parent:
colloq
5 Winter
vehicle
6 Units of
Bulgarian
currency
7 Before
8 Three-toed
sloth
9 Glossy fabric
10 Man's name
12 Heroic event
13 Petty ruler
16 Paper
measure
19 Blossoms
21 Liquor
23 Climbing
plant
25 Assumed
name
27 Illuminated
29 Male
sheep
31 Clothes-
maker
brands normally are sold
at discount prices.
Not surprisingly, then,
ads have already ap-
peared at Drexd and at
Notre Dame, asking
students if they want to
sell their new computers.
Notre Dame officials,
among others, have
developed a few stop-gap
measures to abort the
market.
Students who buy from
Notre Dame's store must
sign a "first refusal
clause" that "states the
person cannot sell the
computer for a period of
one year bookstore
manager Ric Haley says.
The university will sue
if it finds out the student
violates the agreement, he
warns.
The University of
Michigan is branding all
the machines it sells with
a "U of M" symbol and
serial number to
discourage black
marketeers.
Michigan also makes
students promise not to
re-sell the machines for
two years, or to pay a
$2,000 "liquidation fee"
to the school if they do.
Apple will now ask
students for a "moral
commitment" to use the
discounted Macintoshes
only for school work, to
keep them for a minimum i
of two years, and to
understand that re-selling
them may be grounds for
expulsion at some
And though other
schools are kerptng a
data base of serial
numbers and name, and
involve banks to
a partner to help
future legal fees
when pursuing black
marketeers, anti-crime
measures come down to
"people beheving they'll
be in trouble" if they re-
sell the computers, Marks
ya.
"It's not goint to be
water-tight he con-
"I don't think Apple
will pursue 50,000 peo
pie. do you?" asks Peter
Lang, sales manager of
Mighty Byte Computer
Center in Medford, NJ
"I don't think a lot of
this has been thought
out laments Gam
Distelhorst, head of the
National Association of
College Stores.
Distelhorst worries not
only that stores will lose
sales to Mack marketeers,
but that colleges that do
sell computers often
aren't set up to service the
machines afterward.
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
33 Fmgerless
glove
34 Dregs
36 Alit
37 Rosters
39 Corded
cloth: pi.
41 Forays
43 Man's
nickname
44 Fur-bearing
mammal
47 School
group: abbr.
48 Spanish for
"river"
51 Compass
point
53 Pelican state:
abbr.
Original
It's been nearly 25 years
since Domino's Pizza
delivered it's first pizza.
With that pizza, we
ushered in a new era of
free, pizza delivery in 30
minutes or less.
Since then, we've grown.
Now, we're delivering hot
delicious pizza to homes,
offices, dormitories and
barracks all across America.
Whenever you want the
taste of delicious freshly
baked pizza without the
hassle of going out, call
the original: Domino's
Pizza Delivers.
Check the Yellow Pages
for the store near you
Limited delivery areas
Drivers carry under $20
'1984 Domino s Pizza, Ire.
DOMINO'S
PIZZA .
DELIVERS
'SSSSSsfSSSS'SSS.
All fraternities
talk brotherhood.
PiKai
doi
I IK
Phi is
something
'it
B$ Chapter
Wheelchair Push Athon in Greenville
Pfeaschdpusheiptheia SatMarckai
Tornadoes Hit Down East
(MM Fro. P.K 3 �� � communities in �nd the rett would be
Robison. S.mp. 2? .e llowed to ,o home
Duplin, Lenoir, Wayne,
Pitt, Gates, Hereford,
Cumberland, Bertie and
Chowan counties.
Fdmonston said of-
ficials in Robison, Lenoir
and Pitt counties had re-
quested assistance from
the National Guard.
"We are activating
guardsmen to respond to "uurinburgsdRrxsrt
the requests Ed- Martin, hospital ad-
monstonsaid. ministrator. He said
Mike Tardis, director about a dozen of the in- .
of Scotland County jured probably would be
emergency services, said admitted to the hospital
hit by the storm
"It just made Martin said injured
toothpicks of some of our people began to arrive
homes Tardis said, about 8 p.m. with injuries
"There is extensive ranging from cuts and
damage to busineses, bruises to chest pains,
tobacco barns and farm Martin said a "large
equipment number" of the injured
About 93 people were came from cities in South
treated at Scotland Carolina.
Memorial Hospital in f
CAMP-SPECIALISTS
romianc for Jra Sn and Faculty Staff a
�pedalim quaitfied to teach youngrtm in Tennis. Land
' SYmm6a' DMCe' Am & G�h�' Ceramc. Water
�eg. Nature at one of the leading coed camp, in N E. P�
fBfSSH,p 0ffice for � CMI,PU� �" on April 4 a,
I (305) 389-4050 until April 2.
Reproductive Health Care
Under�nding. non-judgmental care that
includes abortion for women of � ages
Counseling for both partners is available
Special SetVcas and rates for students
PHI KAPfrA1
TAU
HAPPY HOUR AT
TREEHOUSE
Discount Pitchers
Thurs. March 29 9-12
?�e
i
Student Condos
SALES PRICES START AT $27,500
W TO 95! F1NAHC1HG
RINGGOLDTCMRS
At The Campus �East Carolina University
Were building s special place for East Carolina University snidenr. �
campus in your own privste. secure air-condirZtZSS. ?�" 2? �" � neat�
three side, bv afZ��ZZZ "lL� is dL stZ�5M�'
on-campus dormitories. � ctoiroma than tome
Recent changes in tax laws make ownership of this tvne nmn� i�
investor, and parent, of student Wed Ufato"hoTyT tZX? boch
provide . specisl plsce for you to live snd pmlaTC oremfSS? TOmm CM
investment requiring very little down payment m �"�
Sales information:
Ringgold Development Co Inc.
105 Commerce Street
P.O. Qrawer 568
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 355-2698
Rental Information:
910 7
Guest Po
Lecture,
On Raku
B GORDON IPOCK
itrmn r an v
"The market for crafts is i
strong right row, that if you'i
professional about what vou'i
doing, there's no reason to be
starving artist, ' says And 5 I
A potter by trade. Smith j
visiting ECU this Friday an
Saturday to give a lecture si
presentation and to conduci
ceramics workshop. He a ill fo
on raku potter his specials
Basically, Smith explain
raku is a firing technique tit
from the Japarese. It got it- j
from the tea ceremony. Somali
when a piece is firec in the
the kiln is allowed tc ceo! to ai
bient temperature before the pi
is removed. But with rak j, the
is taken from the kiln at
temperature.
"It crazes the glaze or
it explained Smith. "You
call the process a therm;
shotgun. You can hear h pinginj
The clay I use is designed tc
that kind of shot Smith also a
plained that raku pots are fired
a lower temperature. 51
degrees, than normal potte
which is fired at about 22(
degrees.
In a telephone interview froi
his home in Marseille, S.C .

s
Cherry B
Each year the cherry trees
blossoms, our first sign that
WhyB,
By Gregory S. Hennemuth
IO

The last time I tasted whit
store-bought "bread" 1 m
amazed at how people can reall
P�y good money for such a poc
product. The low quality
understandable once you look
the ingredients. Most likely, t.
first four ingredients of yot
store-bought white bread are,
descending order, "enrichedl
flour (bleached, high
Processed), water, corn sweetn
and lard. After these "principle;
"Jfredients you will find yeas)
sah and seven or more chemk
ranging from potassium bromaj
to calcium propionate This
wait some people � not I �
hread? I hardly believe these
the ingredients to produce "
staff of hfe
Pcppciidge Farm does make
P�ty food loaf of bread, but yc
Pay 51,35 or more for their
&gmim0Gmmmk �� -
� ft-4-m '?��� m ��mii mini ,�� �i�ii.ih� .as- �� �-��-
"���-� �� i�0�� em.





rry
�vill pursue 50,000 peo-
ple, do you?" asks Peter
Lange, sales manager of
Mighty Byte Computer
enter in Medford, N.J.
"1 don't think a lot of
.his has been thought
;ut laments Garis
Distelhorst, head of the
National Association of
College Stores.
Distelhorst worries not
only that stores will lose
ales to black marketeers,
ut that colleges that do
ell computers often
ren't set up to service the
machines afterward.
Ml' 1
V USTS
-� . Sn and Faculty Staff a j
K"h voumwm in Tennis. Landf
& Cfifu. Ceramics. Water
mg coed camps in N.E. Penna.
campus interview on April 4 orj
?��?�� j��MMO�i
�???��?
A
AT
12
����??
rOO
THE EAST CAROL1NJAN
I will be
ting to
rboth
in can
kellent
Guest Potter Gives T
Lecture, Workshop
On Raku Technique
By GORDON IPOCK �
By GORDON IPOCK
Ftatarn Idlior
"The market for crafts is so
strong right now, that if you're
professional about what you're
doing, there's no reason to be a
starving artist says Andy Smith
A potter by trade, Smith is
visiting ECU this Friday and
Saturday to give a lectureslide
presentation and to conduct a �
ceramics workshop. He will focus been ri5K hingl "he said
BaascUaf.vtterLi;ShSPeCify- � 'n I was aidX family
Basically, Smith explained, ed on a dairy farm I was con
SHSftsras ss&raS5
trom the tea ceremony. Normally make them. I could only pm mv
asked Smith if his work as a potter
was a vocation or an avocation.
"I put in about 80 hours a week
making pottery said Smith.
"That's pretty full time. It's
definitely a vocation. However,
Smith explained it had taken hini
a while to make the transition
from amateur to professional pot-
ter.
"Ever since I was little, I've
bient temperature before the piece
is removed. But with raku, the pot
is taken from the kiln at full
temperature.
"It crazes the glaze or cracks
it explained Smith. "You might
call the process a thermal
shotgun. You can hear it pinging.
Tl. � . . , . �"e- nine, omiin woi
'J"L5 52'i?�- �o.�� a living.
medium with which I could both
design and make things.
Smith's first instruction came at
nearby Wingate College. Later he
went to Arrowmont in Gatlin-
burg, Tennessee to continue
perfecting his craft. In the mean-
time, Smith worked at other jobs
MARCH 29. 1V84 Paje 7
A sample of visiting craftsman Andy Smith's work:
trasted his growth as an artist and Carolina Designer Craftsmen for
craftsman as a steadv nmarcJor, u. - cn Ior
a raku pot.
that kind of shot Smith also ex-
plained that raku pots are fired at
a lower temperature, 1500
degrees, than normal pottery
which is fired at about 2200
degrees.
In a telephone interview from
his home in Marshville, N.C I
craftsman as a steady progression.
"But this past year, I haven't
been able to make enough pots
he said. "I've had such a demand
for work that I decided to go into
it full time
"I've been heading in this direc-
tion for about six years Smith
said. "I knew it would take
awhile. I've seen a lot of people
get excited about working in pot-
tery, charge into the field all at
once and fall flat on their face by
trying to go too fast Smith con-
the past five years. He has also
shown with the Ohio Designer
Craftsmen Winterfair and
American Craft Council fairs in
Baltimore and Rhinebeck. He has
participated in juried and invita-
CnL , F�"�.ipaicu in lunea and invita-
Smith works exclusively with tional shows with the Leaiue of
SSS?1? About a Quarter Charlotte Artists s7or?oook
of his sales are through retail craft
shows. The rest of his sales come
through galleries and interior
design firms, the latter being a
rapidly expanding market, he
said
Crafts in Springfield, Ohio, the
High Point Art League and the
Elm Street Gallery in Greensboro.
Andy Smith's work is currently
being shown in over 30 galleries
along the East Coast (from
Smithhawn work with ft, Sachf?o'F&� �SZ
It's Spring Again
far west as Chicago and Dallas.
Smith's Greenville visit is being
sponsored by the Clay Artists
Guild of Ayden, N.C. His March
30 lecture and slide presentation
begins at 8 p.m. in Jenkins Fine
Arts Auditorium. A reception will
follow. The following day, Satur-
day, March 31, Smith will give
two demonstrations at the ECU
Ceramics Department: a 10 a.m.
decoration and glazing session,
and a 2:30 p.m. raku firing and
summation. The events are free
and open to the public.
Want to buy
pot, cocaine?
Call Havana;
ask for Fidel
By GORDON IPOCK
Fntara E4M�r
Last month, East Carolinian
staff writer and fellow conser-
vative Dennis Kilcoyne wrote a
book review on Monimbo, the
latest effort by Robert Moss and
Arnaund de Borchgrave. The
novel, based on real facts, people
and events, is a thriller ihat details
the Soviet plot to hasten the over-
throw of the United States by or-
chestrating most of the world's
drug trade through client states
Bulgaria and Cuba.
Of course, our trendy liberal
friends (the ones enamored of
Gary Hart) laugh and snicker at
such simplistic tales, just as they
laugh when we suggest Moss and
de Borchgrave's first novel, The
Spike which details how the Soviet
KGB manipulates the U.S. media
through sympathetic front groups
of the radical left, is also based on
fact. There have been extensive
articles on both topics, Com-
munist involvement in media
Conservative's
Commentary
a view from the right.
Time To Get Rid Of
Winter's Stored-Up Fat
Cherry Blossoms Mean Spring
Each year the cherry trees in front of Austin and Rawl nut forth tkir
blossoms, our first sign that spring is finally here.
lovely
Why
By SHARON LEWIS
Staff Writer
Contrary to popular belief, spring is not
characterized by the gopher, or whatever
the little rodent is, finding his shadow on a
sunny morning. The first certain sign of
spring is a boost in the profits at the Dex-
atrim Company.
My eyes grew large and my mouth fell
open as I stared blankly into the full-
lenght mirror before me who on earth
was this blubbery ghost?
"Two-pieces are in this year, huh?" I
said to the saleslady beside me.
"Oh, yes! And that one is just your col-
or she replied with a "you-sucker-you"
look in her eyes. She must have meant
literally because the suit was as white as a
hospital sheet and did nothing for my
figure.
Once again, folks, it's here that
dreaded (for some of us, anyway) time of
year when we must, for comfort's sake,
reveal the meat we've accumulated over
the winter and ever-so-carefully hidden
beneath our bulky sweaters. The standard
questions always come to mind: Will my
friends still want to be seen with me? Will
strangers laugh at me? And if the answer
to either of these questions is uncertain, we
quickly pull on the faithful sweater until
we're more comfortable with ourselves.
Does anyone else feel a chill?
"Sweatpants syndrome as I like to
call it, is also spreading across campuses.
Sweatpants can be a functional asset to
one's wardrobe. They can serve many pur-
poses: First and foremost, they hide the
pork; second, they give the impression that
you're at least attempting to get into shape
(though people are catching on to this),
and third, sweats come in handy when
you've busted out the zipper in your last
pair of jeans. Also, for those who are in
shape, sweatpants can provide an excellent
opportunity to display what you'd like (no
underwear please!).
But now spring is here, and as the days
grow warmer our deceitful games can no
longer be justified. It's time to face our
alternatives.
1. We can get as fat as a hog and not
worry about it.
2. We can go on a diet and excercise pro-
gram.
3. We can be weird and wear sweatpants
and sweaters.
Having tried all three, I know the pros
and cons of each. As for number one, guys
won't break your heart because they won't
have a thing to do with you. And if
number three suits you (pun), then fear
not. Girls won't have anything to do with
you either. And to be crudely frank about
number two, dieting sucks. Surely there
must be an easier way to get the fat off.
This is gross, I know, but when I was lit-
tle well, younger I secretly wanted to
get a tapeworm so I could eat all I wanted
and still be thin. Then I found out that you
can die from them. Oh, well. Plan B?
They can make babies in a test tube.
They can put men on the moon. Wouldn't
you think they'd have invented an anti-fat
pill by now? I found an advertisement in a
magazine hawking an amazing new pill
that would just "eat off" the fat. Stupidly
enough, I ordered it. You know what it
eats? Your stomach lining I threw up for
a week!
And I guess everyone has taken the stan-
dard diet pill at some time. They do me ab-
solutely no good. Maybe it's because I
don't eat because I'm hungry. (I have no
concept of hungry or full.) I eat simply to
hear myself chomp.
I Firmly believe in the importance of be-
See TIME, Page 9
By Gregory S. Hennemuth
Staff WrMw
The last time I tasted white
store-bought "bread" I was
amazed at how people can really
pay good money for such a poor
product. The low quality is
understandable once you look at
the ingredients. Most likely, the
first four ingredients of your
store-bought white bread are, in
descending order, "enriched"
ffour (bleached, highly
processed), water, corn sweetner
and lard. After these "principle"
ingredients you will find yeast,
salt and seven or more chemicals
ranging from potassium bromate
to calcium propionate. This is
what some people � not I � call
bread? I hardly believe these are
the ingredients to produce "the
staff of life
Peppcridge Farm does make a
Pretty good loaf of bread, but you
pay 11,35 or more for their pro-
Your Own Bread.
duct. However, and this may be a
new idea to many ECU students,
why not make your own bread?
For the price of a pretty good loaf
of store-bought bread, you can by
Five pounds of whold wheat bread
flour. At Kroger and Food Lion,
five pounds of whold wheat flour
will cost approximately $1.15, and
white, unbleached flour, will cost
79 cents.
Now, I don't want to calculate
a cost benefit analysis for baking
bread because many variables are
involved: opportunity cost,
energy cost, nutrition benefit, etc.
It's probably cheaper dollar-wise
to buy bread. The real reward of
homemade bread is eating it and
knowing you made it with your
own two hands. I would like to
clear up a couple of misconcep-
tions about baking bread: It takes
too much time, and it is hard to
do. The bread-baking schedule
See WHY, Pate 9
the caeamkab. Try baking your own nutritions whole-wheat
������liiMiBannnnannnnnnnBl
manipulation and the drug trade,
in Reader's Digest, but that silly
little publication isn't
sophisticated enough for liberals
to bother picking up, riuch less
reading. Our trendy liberal friends
continue to believe Dennis and I
are suffering from delusions of
commie paranoia.
My delusions were heightened
considerably last week when
NBC's Nightly News ga e details
of the evening's top news story: A
large force of Columbian govern-
ment troops and police made the
biggest drug bust in the history of
the world. They fought a fierce
battle with communist jiuerrillas
in the jungle of Columbia and
eventually siezed 13.8 tons of co-
caine worth an estimated $1.2
billion. As all TV new is, the
report was superficial. I watched
the same story a half-hour later on
ABC's evening news. T ley also
covered the drug bust bui: did not
mention that communi.it guer-
rillas were running the operation.
Knowing all TV network news
organizations take their cues from
the New York Times and
Washington Post, I weni to the
Times for details.
There was the story on page one
(March 20): "biggest drug bust in
history of the world About 40
Columbian government troops
had flown in to the jungle airstrip
(It even had landing lights) and
captured a huge cocaine process-
ing plant. Then they fouglit off a
fierce counterattack by an
estimated 100 communis: guer-
rillas. U.S. Ambassador to Col-
umbia Lewis A. Tambs had ac-
companied the government forces
and verified the facts.
According to Tambs, the secret
complex consisted of 10 cocaine
processing laboritories, a com-
missary, housing, showers � a
virtual community � on the
banks of the Yari River in Ca-
queta Province in the jungles of
southern Columbia. What's
more, the U.S. Drug Enforcement
Administration estimates the total
U.S. yearly consumption of co-
caine to be about 50 tons; so the
13.8-ton bust represents potential-
ly a quarter of the entire U.S. co-
caine consumption for the year.
The bulk of the cocaine originated
in Bolivia and Peru but wtis pro-
cessed at the guerrilla complex in
Columbia.
According to Tambs, two guer-
rilla groups, both factions of the
Columbian Communist Party
operate the drug trade: the Col-
umbian Revolutionary Armed
Forces and the April 19 Move-
ment. A guerrilla defector ex-
plained how the guerrillas run a
Mafia-style drug system where
they offer protection to growers in
return for payment money a
single group collets nearly $3 4
million a month in this manner
according to the defector.
Several airplanes and helicon-
tors were also confiscated atthe
jungle complex. The Columbian
government said they had strona
evidence that the communn ts us-
See CASTRO, Page t
!i�wWta�i�n��'� n �m mtum �
� n, fm
�-� .
�;��� fc





THEEASIRQHN1AN MARCH29. 1984
?
Delta Releases 'Disturbing The Peace
Richard Vates is con
tinually gaining recogni-
tion as one of America's
masterful contemporary
novelists. His view of or-
dinary people coping with
the complexities of
modern life has been hail
ed as "built to last" rhe
Chicago Tribune Book
World) and "wonderfull)
perceptive brilliantly
written" (The Boston
Globe).
This May, Delta
Books Se mou r
I awerence will publish
Richard Yates' long
unavailable novel,
Disturbing The Peace. It
will join Revolutionary
Road. liars In love,
Eleven hinds of
I onliness and The Faster
Parade in the Richard
Vates Delta
Books Seymo u r
1 awerence library.
When originally
published in 1975. Distur-
bing The Peace was
awarded a Literary
Award b the American
Academy of Arts and
Letters, and was a Book
of-the-Month Club Alter-
nate Selection. The New
York Times described
Disturbing The Peace as
"powerful a terribly
human hue and cry and
The Atlantic Monthly
called it "realistic
brilliantly rendered
Vates novel is a
psychological profile of
John Wilder, a successful
New York advertising
salesman. Wilder has at-
tained "the American
dream he has an attrac-
tive Manhattan apart-
ment, a country home
and a wife and son who
care for him. But despite
his obvious ac-
complishments, Wilder
discovers that his success
is hollow, and he slowly
embarks on a self-
destructive downward
spiral that finds him, at
last, in a mental hospital.
With family and friends
unable to help him,
Wilder begins the long
journey on the road to
recovery. His relapses
and tentative victories are
portrayed from his
perspective with "deadly
precision" (Publishers
Weekly).
Disturbing The Peace
is an extraordinary ac-
complishment � the
story of Richard Wilder
demonstrates the
frightening consequences
of insecurity. Richard
Yates captures the pain,
clarity and uncertainty of
one man's steady loss of
control in today's
modern world.

In addition to his
novels in the
DeltaSeymour
Lawerence collection,
Richard Yates is also the
author of A Good School
(which will be released in
a Delta edition this fall to
coincide with the publica-
tion of Mr. Yates' newest
novel, Young Hearts Cry-
ing). His awards include a
National Institute of Arts
and Letters grant as well
as a Guggenheim
fellowship.
Castro
Continued From Page 7
ed the aircraft to feriy 'ho
processed cocaine to
Cuba where it is traded
tor guns. The planes then
fly the guns back to the
Columbian communists
who are beginning a
Marxist revolution
similar to the one in El
Salvador. According to
the New York Times arti-
cle. "I eftist geurillas and
drug traffickers were
working together in a
Jrugs-for-guns deal that
'hreatened Columbia's
democracy Tamhs
stated the operation had
been m existence for a!
least two and mavbe three
ears.
I was curious wh ABv
News, in their broadcast,
did not mention the com
n:anis( guerrillas at ali
But the major media hai
been consistently guilt
not exposing Cuban
ar.d Soiet subversive ac-
tions agains the U.S. �
een when the evidence
has been blatantly as-
tound i
For example. Colonel
Stefan Serdle. one of
Dope
the most important oi-
ficials ever to defect from
the Soviet block, worked
with the Bulgarian Com-
mittee for State Security
(KDS). a sister organiza-
tion of the Soviet KGB.
He brought with him 500
sensitive KDS
documents, one concern-
ing the subject of
destabilizing Western
society through, among
other tools, the narcotics
trade. There is presently
overwhelming evidence
that Bulgaria is the
Soviet's central conduit
for drugs and weapons
deals. Reader's Digest
editor Nathan M. Adams
in his Nov. 'S3 article
details how drugs from
the Middle and Far East
are exchanged in com-
munist Bulgaria to pur-
chase guns for guerrilla
and terrorist groups
around the world through
the Bulgarian state trade
enterprise known as
klNTEX. The media has
ignored this evidence.
Closer to home. Cuba
operates as the hub for
drug trading in the
Western hemisphere. The
press has also ignored
this. The Febuarary issue
of Conservative Digest
pointed out that little was
reported in the press
"about testimony before
a Miami grand jury by a
confessed Cuban spy,
Mario Estevez Gonzalez,
on drug-running between
Havanna and the U.S.
Later it was retold to a
Senate hearing chaired by
Senator Paul Hawkins by
Estevez himself � again
receiving no nationwide
press coverage.
Here is what Estevez
told the grand jury and
the Senate panel:
After receiving inten-
sive training in espionage
in Cuba, he was smuggled
into the U.S. as part of
the Mariel boatlift in
1980. Among the 125,000
Cuban refugees in that
immense migration,
Estevez said. Castro's in-
telligence agency, the
DG1, selected not only an
estimated 5,000 to 8000
hardened criminals but
also between 300 and 400
secret agents Estevez
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went on to say he had
received specific instruc-
tions from the highest-
ranking Cuban
authorities "that it was
important to fill the U.S.
with drugs
State Department
Deputy Secretary James
Michel told a Miami drug
caucus hearing in May
1983 that Fidel Castro in
early 1979 considered a
scheme "to begin dealing
with narcotics smugglers,
using Cuba as a bridge
and support base for the
networks to the U.S. and
as a means to aid Cuba
economically and to con-
tribute to the deteriora-
tion of American
society
Estevez said the huge
profits from the Cuban
drug trade were used to
finance and arm terrorists
operating in Central
America and Columbia.
Michel has testified that
there is also strong
evidence the Nicaraguan
Sandinistas partially
financed their successful
revolution through drug
trafficking and are still
doing so.
All this information
has been available but ig-
nored by the major print
and broadcast media.
Thus the trendy liberals
snicker and scoff at the
idea of a "communist
threat "How absurd
they laugh. But when
communist guerrilla
groups are making the
munist threat" like Uncle
Ronnie and Uncle Jesse
tell us there is. I know it
flys in the face of radical
chic, but the man selling
them their coke just may
be a commie.
Is Your Car Ready For That Trip To
The Beach?
NEW & USED
R�tr�ad Tlr�s
$7.00 Up
evening TV news and the Considering all the name
front page of the New changes, birth date
York Times with their changes, signature
massive narcotics deal- changes and his get-the-
ings, when the evidence is U.Sout-of-Central-
so overwhelming, maybe America-because-the-
even trendy liberals (the Cubans-are-reallv-prettv-
kind enamored of Gary good-people foreign
Hart) will have to pull policy, I almost wonder if
their heads out of the Gary Hart didn't come to
sand and admit that yes, the U.S. on the Mariel
there just may be a "com- boatlift.
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that follows will not
much time to prepare,
and it is ea
For those of you
have done little oo
the initial overhead
buying supplies ma seem
expensive Remen
that the benefits w
be realized. To succec
this recipe you will net
large mixing bowl (se
quart size), tw
sheets measuring
long-handle woo
plastic spoon ai
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bread. Firs! the
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cup oatmeai and
cracked whea-
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enhancer)
3. 1 tabiesp
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4,
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5 iil.
6. 1 cup c
reduce cost
Time To Peel
Winter's Sto
Continued From P�j
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dieting situati
a stan
dard time I
I stick to it religi
it's always tomorr
But this time i
going to do it. It's
and time has come
ing these gam
And what better
than Marc I
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f
THE EAST CAROL1NMANmaRCH 29. 1984 9
rolinian Staff
1 o X isfi
ietrzak
i .
h or Thar Trip To ?
The Beach?
rEa-LUBE
14.88 -
29.95 size
3Dle
SMTI INSPCCriONSTAriLh
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DPENMOM PR
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water and '�: cup milk) m wW I
Continued From Page 7
that follows will not take
much time to prepare,
and it is easy.
For those of you who
have done little cooking,
the initial overhead of
buying supplies may seem
expensive. Remember
that the benefits will soon
be realized. To succeed at
this recipe you will need a
large mixing bowl (seven-
quart size), two cookie
sheets, measuring cups, a
long-handle wooden or
plastic spoon and a stur-
dy, flat surface to knead
bread. First the ingre-
dients The lrregardless
Cooks, Gordon, 1982.):
1. 1 cup oatmeal or
cup oatmeaJ and '2 cup
cracked wheat or bran.
2. 1 tablespoon salt (this
is an optional flavor
enhancer).
3. 1 tablespoon veast (1
pkg).
4. Vx cup honey or
molasses.
5. X cup oil.
6. 1 cup cold milk (to
reduce cost, use Vi cup
water and ' 2 cup milk)
7. 1 cup unbleached white
flour.
8. 5 cups whole wheat
flour.
9. Vi cup ground raisins
(optional flavor
enhancer).
10. Vi cup ground
sunflower seeds (optional
protein booster).
11. corn meal.
Now the schedule: A
good time to plan on bak-
ing bread is on the
weekend or after work or
classes when you get
home. Plan on staving
home for two-and-a-half
hours.
When you come back
from classes or whatever,
you usually kick back
veg out, go running, or
go biking to wind down
right? Well before you do
your relaxation ritual, set
aside 30 minutes and run
to the kitchen, pull out a
saucepan and add 1 Vi
cups of water and 1 teas-
poon of salt. Bring the
water to a boil; then add
the oatmeal or oatmeal
and cracked wheat. Off
the heat, let this pan sit
for 10 minutes. Mean-
while, pour the package
of yeast into a bowl with
V2 cup of warm water;
hot water will kill the
yeast, and your bread
won't rise; so make sure
it is luke warm. After the
yeast is dissolved stir it
up. Ten minutes have
passed, and now combine
the oatmeal mixture,
honey or malasses, oil
and cold milk in the large
mixing bowl. Mix this
thoroughly for 30
seconds, stirring with
your long-handle spoon.
Pour in the yeast mixture,
and then stir in the white
flour and beat vigorously
for three minutes. Add all
at once the five cups of
whole wheat flour and
amalgamate until it is
unstirable and non-
sticky
The next procedure,
kneading the dough, is
not complicated and can
be a very relaxing ex-
perience. Now ladies and
gents, let your imagina-
tion run wild! Dump the
dough on your flat
kneading surface sprinkl-
ed with flour, and
sprinkle more flour on
top of the dough. Begin
kneading by pushing your
palms down on the
dough, fold over, push
down again, turn dough
over repeat. If you had
a bad day, karate chop,
punch or spank the
dough. The main thing is
to work the flour into the
dough until it is a com-
pact, elastic and smooth
mass. Keep adding flour
as needed to prevent the
dough from sticking to
the counter or your
hands. This will take ap-
proxiamtely 5-7 minutes
Place the dough in a
large, well-oiled mixing
bowl, (I only have one
large mixing bowl, so I let
it soak while I'm
kneading for easy clean-
ing) and turn it over a
couple of times. Cover
the bowl with a small
towel and set in a warm
place to rise for one hour.
This may seem like a
time-consuming process,
but once you get the hang
of it, believe me, this part
takes about 30 minutes.
While your bread is ris-
ing, go for your run or
just veg out � it's called
time management. It does
not matter if you let it rise
a little over an hour.
When you come back
to your pride and joy,
punch down the dough
and slap it on a clean, flat
surface. Sprinkle corn on
the cookie sheets. Pull off
small handfulls of dough
and roll on the counter-
top into a ball-shaped
roll. If they are sticking
to your hands, rub your
hands with oil (next time
add more flour to your
dough). Put all the rolls
two inches apart from
one another and not too
close to the sides of the
cookie sheets. If they are
sticky, rub the tops with
oil. Cover with towels
and let rise for 30 minutes
m a warm place (warm
oven). Use this time to
veg out or to take a
shower. Don't bang the
rolls at this time, and
when you come back,
preheat the oven to 425
degrees � make sure you
have taken out the rolls
first! Bake for 20-30
minutes until golden
brown. Cool on racks.
Right out of the oven
they are delicious with
butter or just plain.
Freeze the ones you won't
eat for a few days to keep
them fresh. Try steaming
the rolls for dinner; I like
them best this way! Good
luck, and from now on,
don't waste your money
on processed flour, lard
and worthless chemicals.
Time To Peel Off
Winter's Stored Fat
Continued From Page 7
mg organized in any
dieting situation. I've set
a stan
dard time for dieting, and
I stick to it religiously
it's always tomorrow
But this time I'm reallv
going to do it. It's spring,
and time has come to br-
ing these games to a halt.
And what better time
than March. It's the
American Dietetic
Association's 12th annual
"National Nutrition
Time This year's theme
is, "Everyone wins with
good nutrition Maybe
I'll go on a diet with low-
calorie balanced meals �
the four food groups
even. Wouldn't it be a
scream if I became a
health nut� That would
beat drugs and worms.
And small balanced
meals are supposed to be
the best way to lose
weight.
It's spring, and two-
piece bathing suits are in
this year vou know.
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Each of thM advartiMd items .1 ra
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11 :
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THIS IS THE STORY
OF A SMALL
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Against all
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10
�JHEEAST CAROL IN I AN MARCH 29, 1984
FHfc EASTCAROI INI AN
Sfiorts
HR's.Hurler
Pace Pirates
Bucs Beat 4th-Ranked Heels
By ED MCKLAS
Sportj F.dltof
How does it feel to beat
Carolina?
"Feels great said ECU's win-
ning pitcher Jim Peterson.
"I'd be lying if I said it wasn't
nice said ECU coach Hal Baird.
In fact, it was so nice ECU's
Winfred Johnson shook his fist as
he rounded first base following
his sixth inning home run that
gave ECU a 4-2 lead � a lead thev
kept until the final out when
shortstop Greg Hardison received
a toss from second baseman Steve
Sides and stepped on second.
"We've been telling our kids all
along we can beat the best
teams said Baird, whose club
had just defeated the fourth-
ranked Tar Heels.
The Pirates ended up winning
by a 6-4 margin, but anyone leav-
ing after the first inning would
have thought differently.
ECU looked nervous in the
opening frame. UNC's Walt
Weiss singled, moved to second
on a passed ball then took third
on a ground out. He then came
home when catcher Jim Riley
mishandled a Peterson curve ball,
and the Tar Heels quickly held a
1-0 advantage.
Scott Johnson followed with a
line drive home run over the right
field fence, and it looked as
though the Tar Heels were going
to repeat last year's 9-1 trouncing.
But Peterson (5-0) kept the
Pirates in the game, giving up on-
ly three hits and no runs over the
next five innings in stifling the Tar
Heels.
It looked as though Peterson's
effort would be wasted, however,
as the Pirates were unable to get a
hit off of UNC's Mike Bryant,
who shut down the Pirates
through the fourth inning.
The fifth inning was a different
story for the Pirates, as junior
centerfielder Mark Shank ignited
ECU with a two-run homer. Sud-
denly, the score was tied 2-2, and
the Shank's blast would become
contagious later in the contest.
Clutch fielding by the Pirates
kept the score tied in the top of
the sixth. After Jeff Hubbard flew
out to Hardison, Scott Johnson
and Todd Wilkinson followed
with singles. Baird came out to the
mound to talk to Peterson, and
the next batter. Matt Merullo,
grounded to Sides, who flipped to
Hardison, who gunned the ball to
first for the inning-ending double
play.
In the bottom half of the inn-
ing, the Pirates looked as if they
were going to blow the game
open. Sides led off with a walk
and moved to second on perfect
sacrifice bunt by Hardison. Sides
then moved to third on a groun-
dout, and the righthanded-hitting
Johnson sent his homer over the
opposite field fence to give the
Pirates a 4-2 lead.
UNC narrowed the lead to 4-3
on a Devy Bell solo homer in the
seventh, but Hardison smashed
ECU's third two-run home run of
the day in the bottom half of the
inning to give the Pirates a 6-3
lead going into the final two
frames.
In the eighth. UNC's Walt
Weiss led off with a double down
the right field line and scored
following two consecutive
sacrifice flies. Third baseman
David Wells took the pressure off
Peterson, however, making a nice
fielding play on a hard hit ball to
his left to end the inning.
The Tar Heels threatened again
in the ninth inning with one out,
as Peterson walked Mike Jedzinak
and gave up a single to Bell. Peter-
son got the next hitter to ground
to short, but the Pirates couldn't
turn the double play and runners
were left on first and third with
two outs.
It was then that Baird came to
the mound to talk to Peterson,
who was about to face the left-
handed hitting B.J. Surhoff.
Baird let Peterson pitch to
Surhoff, who had gone hitless in
three previous trips to the plate
against the ECU pitcher. Peterson
didn't let Baird down, as Surhoff
grounded out to end the game.
"The kid (Peterson) had pitch-
ed so well said Baird, when ask-
ed why he didn't play the percen-
tages and bring in a lefthander to
face Surhoff. "He had done well
before against Surhoff and he had
thrown only 80 pitches up until
the final inning.
"He did a great job. He battled
back and kept the ball in the
ballpark
For Peterson, the strategv was
to get the ball over the plate. "We
have a good defensive team he
said. "I threw strikes and let them
play
The Pirates will take a 16-5
record into this weekend's impor-
tant conference games against
William and Mary and James
Madison. The team plays the In-
dians at Williamsburg but returns
home Sunday to play the Dukes at
2 p.m.
Mark Shank rips an 0-2 pitch over the right field fence
t
5 �m p
Mike SnMrvaa awaits the alga five' cereaoaJei.
How sweet it is
Will Need Quarterback to Get Ball To Hnnri Kerr
Photos by GARY PATTERSON - ECU Photo Lab
� ECU 4, UNC 2
By DON GROSS
Sl.ff Writer
such notables as Terry Long,
Kevin Ingram, Norwood Vann
The Pirate football team is Clint Harris and Ernest Byner
coming off one of its finest years Four more players have been lost
ever, having sported an 8-3 record through academic deficiencies
and been ranked 20th in the coun- "We are very, very young in
try by the Associated Press. most areas comments Emory
days into spring "You just don't lose that many
Emory: 'We Want To Win In '84'
es as Trrv I nnr, 1�. .j " �
training, there are many question
marks concerning the team.
Twenty-six players from last
year's squad have been lost
players and not bleed internally.
One of the biggest problems
facing the team will be filling the
quarterback slot. Ingram and
through graduation, including back up John Williams were both
lost to graduation. "If we can get
one of our present quarterbacks
to emerge says Emory, " it will
mean a lot to the success of our
offense because we have one of
the best receiving corps in the na-
tion. But, you've got to get the
ball to them
Henry Williams, Ricky Nichols,
Stefon Adams, Amos Adams and
Damon Pope are the receivers
Emory speaks so highly of. "I
would put them up against
anybody he boasts.
Emory plans on running
basically the same offense as last
year � the Option-I.
The defensive squad was the
most hard-hit by the graduations.
The line lost four ends, three
tackles and last year's starting
noseguard. There are nothing but
rookies to fill the vacated posi-
tions. "We look like a nursery
school out there admits Emory,
"We're that young
The linebacking corps and
secondary have been plagued with
injuries, but Emory thinks the
talent is there for a strong
defense.
Surprisingly, this year's team is
physically stronger in the weight
room than last year's. "We've
had many injuries, but the team
has shown great intensitv in the
first week of practice adds
Emory.
The Pirates have had a great
year recruiting-wise, but Emory is
quick to caution that a team can't
rely right away on recruits to
come in and fill starting positions.
Emory is sure that this te im has
the potential to become a major
power in the future, and he says
with a confident look in his eye
"We want to win in '84
Somehow, you've ,ust got to
believe him.
EC Weakness Is Inexperience
The Key Question:
�Ar FATTBMION - 8CU MM,
Can the Pirates fill this man's shoes?

By RANDY MEWS
AMtataal Sports MJlor
The ECU women's softball
team made the transition from
slow to fast-pitch this year, and
Pirate head coach Sue Manahan
said she is pleased with what she
has seen of her team thus far.
"The team as a whole was very
eager at the outset of the season to
learn fast-pitch Manahan said.
"A lot of the players had never
even played fast-pitch before (the
North Carolina high schools sanc-
tion slow-pitch), but they didn't
let it bother them and that made
the transition a lot easier
Manahan said a lot of the
younger players were in awe after
the Pirates' season-opening loss at
nationally-ranked South
Carolina, but quickly added,
"Once they realized they were
capable of competing with
anybody on our schedule, there
wasn't that much pressure
When the Association of Inter-
collegiate Athletics For Women
closed down its operations, ECU
entered fast pitch. The NCAA
was the only conference left which
offered a post-season tourna-
ment, and it only sanctioned fast-
pitch.
The Pirates entered the NCAA
last year, and currently stand at
9-5 on the season. Although they
are having a successful year,
Manahan doubts her team will
recieve a bid into post-season
play.
The NCAA has a committee
which selects several participants
out of each region based on their
record and level of competition,
and Manahan said the Pirates are
in an extremely tough region that
stretches all the way from Virginia
to Florida.
"We're playing top teams such
as Florida State, South Carolina,
Penn State and George Mason,
but we're not playing enough of
these teams to be considered by
the selection committee she
said.
Although the chances of ECU
making it to the NCAA tourney
are slim, Manahan said she has
been satisfied from what she's
seen out of her team. "We've im
proved every game from the
beginning of the year, and I think
well continue to improve as the
season goes on
The team set goals at the begin-
ning of the season to hav? a
30-win season and be the best
earn ,n the state, and although
the goals will be tough tass to
achieve, Manahan thinks thev
both are within reach.
"We're young, and our
weakness is inexperience, bit we
dont have any weak positions
and I expect our team to get better
and better as the season pro
gresses pro
NN�naMMM
PennsvUama i Itim
sunda afternoon
third in tht
AER
It Should B
"Do8oftl
At The Aer
We Speciali
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&
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W03ShQP
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ARMYNI
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$ij





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
mJ

-S�R5.
'�1
'pptw��
g�tw.� ,�
k m
am
� J0f i
3
five' ceranoaks.
-
84'
Pirates have had a great
-ruiting-wise, but Emorv is
"caution that a team can't
?ht away on recruits to
and fill starting positions,
ry is sure that this team has
lential to become a major
In the future, and he says
confident look in his eye-
Ian t to win in '84
fhow, you've just got to
Ihim.
lence
t of her team. "We've im-
every game from the
ig of the year, and I think
pntinue to improve as the
�oe on
?am set goals at the begin-
tne season to have a
reason and be the best
the state, and although
Js �u b� tough tasks to
Manahan thinks thev
within reach.
I're young, and our
fs is inexperience, but we
lave any weak positions
pcct our team to get better
per as the season pro-
�CH 29, m
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU Irates hosted
the first Ultimate Frisbee
Tournament of the newly
formed South Atlantic
Coast Conference this
weekend, at the bottom
of College Hill.
The Irates finished"
third among a six-team
field, which included
clubs from the University
of Pennsylvania, Ap-
palachian State, UNC-
Wilmington, Wake
Forest and Duke.
The first day of the
tourney was played under
blue skies and
temperatures in the upper
60's, but the Irates had a
tough time of it, losing to
both Penn and UNC-W
by the score of 15-9 in
their first two matches.
Ultimate
ECU came back in its
final match of the day,
however, by defeating
Wake Forest. In other
opening-day games,
UNC-W defeated Wake
and Duke, while Penn
also defeated the Blue
Devils.
Sunday's play started
out in a steady downpour
with ECU going up
against Appalachian. The
Irates took an early lead
and held on to win a
rough match 15-10 and
clinch the third place
trophy.
As the skies cleared,
the championship came
down to a rematch bet-
ween Penn and UNC-W
to see who would take the
$75 first prize. Penn
made it look easy, as they
coasted to a 15-6 victory.
Pennsylvania
UNC-Wilmington
East Carolina
Appalachian State
Wake Forest
Duke
Final Tournament
Standings
4-0
3-2
2-2
2-3
1-4
0-3
ODU Defeats Pirates
Mudsville?
STv'X'rnT FriSb T" M'ebn"eS � � P'�� �"� �

By MEG MOREADITH
Staff Writer
The ECU Women's
Tennis Team was
defeated by Old Domi-
nion University by the
score of 9-0 yesterday
afternoon at ECU's varsi-
ty courts.
"ODU has been a
traditionally strong
team said Coach Sher-
man. She said ECU is
working hard and is im-
porving with each match,
but the Monarchs were
just too powerful.
Number four seed Ty
Meyers won the most
games in singles with a
Bucs Unable To Win A Set Fall 9-0
Tennis
score of 6-2, 6-4. Coach
Sherman said that Lynn
Wallace played her best
match this year and the
Janet Russell also played
well.
"Ty Meyers and Laura
Zaloludek played their
best (doubles) match even
though they lost Sher-
man added.
The team's next home
match is Saturday at 9:00
a.m. against the Harvard
"B" team, while the men
play at 1:00 p.m. against
Guilford.
Results:
No.l Janet Russell vs.
Sasee Bacon, ODU
6-0,6-0; No.2 Ann
Manderfield vs Barbara
Hund ODU 6-0,6-2; No 3
Lynn Wallace vs. Becky
Russell ODU 6-0,6-0-
No.4 Ty Meyers vs!
Desirei Lecmeto ODU
6-2,6-4; No.5 Heidi Bun-
ting vs. Sue Holtz ODU
6-1,6-1; No.6 Laura
Zaloubek vs. Lisa
Thearle ODU 6-0,6-0
No.l Russell-
Manderfield vs. Bacon-
Hand ODU 7-6 (7-5), 6-1;
No.2 Wallace-Bunting vs.
Russell-Leemeto ODU
3-6, 6-3 (retire); No.3
Zaloubek Meyers vs.
Cherin-Thearle ODU 5-7
7-6 (6-4).
MILLER PICKS
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417 Evan St. Mall
Downtown Greenville
NOW
AT
"A Little Bit of Mexico"
Accepting Applications for:
Cooks, Waiters, Bartenders
Apply April 3-5 Between 10am-5pm
AT
Employment Securities Commission
SOFTBALL MEN
I � Gamblers
2. Bombers
3. Hustlin Stickmen
4. SoftbaJlers
5. Kappa Alpha Psi
SOFTBALL WOMEN
I � Eliminators
2. Tyler Enforcers
3. Sig Ep Golden Hearts
4. Un Kappa Fifth
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irr
iassssftw
TEAM HANDBALL MEN CO-REC VOLLEYBALL
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2. Phi Kappa Tau "A"
3. Trimville Bandits
4. Kappa Sigma "A"
5. Enforcers
1. Body Snatchers
2. Sig Ep Plus One
3. Biohazards
4. Charlie
5. De-feet
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And they're tx)th repre-
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i
Two ways to
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Thurs. Nite :
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12
m
v.s
X

MAR H is4
f?� Slhers Return To Defend Tourney
Xollehall Spikes Into
Acfion
( o Rec Vollevl
began Monda s jn
M nges Col
teams appeal I
favorites T'Ik
imPs the Bo n
SN XI t UK Ks
(lames w
nights beginning at
m I cams conten
fo� the title include
N�K Kp Plus One. Bod)
Snatchers, De-Feets,
Biohaards, Ma
stailicms andharlie. Be
watching foi continued
ates
learn Handball Rolls
On
N ' two weeks oi
� mam hand
asts are mak
their run foi
npus honors With
Classifieds
SALE
��? APT
� -
Call T 6363
bathroom

HOC-
ROOM AVAILABLE!
campy, Ca -
MISC.

BARBEi


- - - 10
v
I
-
-

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t$a. -
i ROOM wil
' ' � ess than the
oom 100 yards from
� IO� Randv a' r$1 ua I
' D J available on request
� v dorm socials
I available
11 '5' 348'
PERSONAL
- BIG BROTHER advisor
"is tor puttmg up with
s. . � we know we ii
i fh your guidance Love
� Ph Big Brothers
w Sh vou could come �o Myr
aster Just wanted to
al vou re my hrsl
r he Chi Oi are ready to
-� ' 10 don t ro � .
" i "jnln foi maKmg
well imi From youi
still two weeks remaii
in the regulai sea
some favorites include,
kappa Sigma, Kappa
Alpha. IriimilU Bandits,
and Phi kappa I an.
In women's action.
teams to look for are the
Heartbreakers. I instead
Jockettes, and I !cr En-
forcers.
n action lasi
Kappa Sig, Marshall
Halls tied the men's in-
dividual record foi mosi
goals scored in
He scored I -
against Beta '
Good luck io i
handball ;
Still swininy.
A
tramural softball
petition I
Bombers
regulai i
he numbei tv
(.amblers
teams will a
bati
wa to pla ��
Kappa Xlpha Psi and
Hustlin Stiekmen.
In omen' i
Eliminators appeal I
the (cam
champs the Heart-
breakers
pla 1 mstead Jockettes
and the I ones
Be X Re
Next
Activities
Mi
i
Bui
VX . . V
horseback riding
Groui
mformatioi
W A Mil)
beds
�MM ATE wanted
(rom campus :s� Mil
People interested ,n com
�' Dart Sprmg Fl,ng 84
Phi Tau House
'��MATE WANTED
s" ' 'd �"� "alt u1iii1.es One
can Doug at
-
ROOMMATE WANTED
a or Fall Spring
E WANTED H
� ous student
i

ROOvmatE �
:
Ove
Supermarket, Inc
21 1 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks from ECU
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats
Pabst Blue Ribben Beer
S3.59
Anheuser-Busch
Natural Light Beer
Pepsi Cola

89c
thSlO.O - food
litioi ' $1 !Q
Wash Your Cloth ' t Door While
Shopping at)verton'sJ
University Econo Wash
Washes yg )rr)()ad
5 DISCOUNT COUPON
Students Only! R, , , a 5� discount on your
Srorcn order of10.00 or more. Present ID and
oupon lo i ashier al time of pun hase.
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Address
II) Number
Limit onedia ounl per Ii) number.
Expires 4 �i! 84
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Hardggj
FREE FLORIDA ORANGE JUKE OR
COFFEE WITH PURCHASE OF A
BACON & EGG BISCUIT
Offer good at partcpating Hardees restaurants. Please present coupon before orderma
One coupon per customer, per order, please. Customer must pay any sales tax due
Coupon not good m combination with any other offers.
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours through April 4,1984.
BCEB. COFFEE OR 0 J . COUPON. BACON BISC
1964 Hardees Food Systems. Inc
Mardeer
FREE FLORIDA ORANGE JUKE OR
COFFEE WITH PURCHASE OF A
SAUSAGE & EGG BISCUIT
Offer good at partcpating Hardees restaurants Please present coupon before ordennq
One coupon per customer, per order, please Customer must pay any sales tax due
Coupon not good m combination with any other offers
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours AprH 5-11,1984.
SGEG COFFEE OR O J REDUCED, SAUSAGE BISC
1984 Hardees Food Systems. Inc
.Hardezr
FREE FLORIDA ORANGE JUKE OR
COFFEE WITH PURCHASE OF A
BACON & EGG BISCUIT
Offer good at partcpatmg Hardees restaurants. Please present coupon before ordennq
One coupon per customer, per order, please. Customer must pay any sales tax due
Coupon not good m combination with any other offers
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours April 12-18,1984.
BCEB COFFEE OR 0 J COUPON. BACON BISC
1984 Hardee s Food Systems Inc
.Harden
FREE FLORIDA ORANGE JUKE OR
COFFEE WITH PURCHASE OFA
HAM A EGG BISCUIT
Otter good at participating Hardee s restaurants Please present coupon before ordenrw
One coupon per customer, per order, please Customer must pay any sates tax due
Coupon not good n combination with any other offers
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours April 19-25,1984.
HMEG COFFEE OR O J . COUPON HAM BISC
1984 Hardees Food Systems. Inc
-Hardecr
FREE FLORIDA ORANGE JUKE OR
COFFEE WITH PURCHASE OF A
CHOPPED BEEFSTEAK & EGG BISCUIT
Coupon not good in combination with any other offers. y-wAuue
Offer good during regular breakfast menu
hours April 26 - May 2,1984.
SKEG.COFFEEOROJ COUPON. STEAK BISC 1984. Hardees Food Systems. Ire
Hardeex
NEW! TURKEYCLUB
SANDWICH, REGULAR FRIES
AND MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $199
One coupon per customer, per order, please. Customer must payany sates taxduV
Coupon not good m combination with any other offers.
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours through April 4,1984.
TCLB. REG FRY . MD DK . MEAL DEAL TCLB
1984 Hardees Food Systems Inc
.Hardeer
BACON CHEESEBURGER,
REGULAR FRIES AND MEDIUM
SOFT DRINK $199
Offer good at partcpating Hardees restaurants Please present coupon before ordennQ
One coupon per customer, per order, please Customer must pay any sates tax due
Coupon not good m combination with any other offers.
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours April 5-11,1984.
1984 Hardees Food Systems Ire
BC8.REG FRY MD DK MEAL DEAL BCB
.Hardear
r
Offer good at partKpatmg Hardees restaurants Please present coupon before ordennQ
One coupon per customer, per order, please Customer must pay any sales tax due
Coupon not good n combination with any other offers
L-s
NEW FISHERMAN'S FILLET
SANDWICH, REGULAR FRIES
AND MEDIUM SOFT DRINK SL69
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours Ai
BISH. REG FRY . MD DK MEAL DEAL BISH
regular bi
prfl 12-18,
1984.
1984 Hardees Food Systems Inc
������������������
Hatdeer
NEW! TURKEYCLUB
SANDWICH, REGULAR FRIES
AND MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $199
CcxxlalparticvatrigHrcteesnastaurants Please present coupon before ordenrw
One coupon per customer, per order ptease Customer must pay any sates tax due
Coupon not good n comtanation with any other otters
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours April 19-25,1984.
TCLB REG FRY MD DK MEAL DEAL TCLB
1984 Hardees Food Systems Inc
Hardecr
REGULAR ROAST BEEF
SANDWICH,REGULAR FRIES
AND MEDIUM SOFT DRINK $L89
Offer good at partapatmg Hardees restaurants Ptease rjresertccxxxi before ordenna
One coupon per customer, per order, ptease. Customer must pay any sates tax due
Coupon not good in combination with any other offers
Offer good after regular breakfast menu
hours April 26-May 2,1984.
ROB, REG FRY . MO DK . MEAL DEAL. ROB

1984. Hardees Food Systems. Inc
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 29, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 29, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.332
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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