The East Carolinian, March 27, 1984






1
Bhe
Serving the East Carolina
GLutalinimi
campus community since 1925
Circulation 10,000
Rise In Political Involvement
Seen Among ECU Students
A student looks over literature ahm.t iw,� . �"Y ATrso� -�" "��o l.6
�Soca Functions, Fundraisers Scheduled
SOULS Plans Activities
By DARRYL BROWN
Political activism among ECU
students is on the rise this election
year in comparison to previous
years as more students are becom-
ing involved in local, state and na-
tional politics, and political
organizations at ECU are seeing
an increase in active membership.
Students have a wide range of
opportunities to involve
themselves in the political process
this year in North Carolina with
tight races for the U.S. Senate and
governor as well as the presiden-
cy, congressional seats and
various state offices.
One of the strongest and fastest
growing political groups on cam-
pus seems to be Students With
Hart, an organization to support
Democratic presidential candidate
Gary Hart. Headed by former
ECU political science student
Charles Sune, the group is con-
sists almost entirely of students
and is the leading organization for
Hart east of Raleigh.
"People really came out of the
woodwork" to support Hart
Sune said. "It's been a ground-
swell of support
Sune, who came to ECU in the
late 1970s and has been actively
involved in campus politics, said
students seem more interested and
involved in politics than in the
previous several years. "I really
believe I can see some activism
now that I've never seen on cam-
pus he said.
The Hart organization is the
one most independent of student
political groups in the area. With
little assistance from local or state
groups, Sune's committee works
on publicity and voter education
as well as fundraising for Hart.
The group, for instance, is plann-
ing a fundraiser Wednesday night
for Hart at The Attic, and three
local bands with student members
have donated their services.
"We're pretty far ahead of
most Hart organizations in the
state, " Sune said. "Locallv
we're expected to raise our own
expenses
Dennis Kilcoyne, state
parliamentarian and former presi-
dent of the ECU College
Republicans, also sees an increase
m student political activism.
"There's definitely more involve-
ment" by students in the political
process than in previous years,
said Kilcoyne, a junior political
science major.
Kilcoyne said his organization
has 88 members, its highest
membership in more than 10
years. "The last time we were
See INTEREST, page 6
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nrw, Editor
The Society of United Liberal
Students is currently in the pro-
cess of planning many different
events and is becoming more ac-
tive on campus, according to
SOULS President Jimmie
Hackett.
One event SOULS is now work-
ing on is SOULS on the Mall to
take place April 12. Hackett said
that, although manv activities are
tentatively scheduled, none have
been confirmed yet. The National
Black Caucus of American
Students, for which Hackett is
regional director, will meet at the
same time. The caucus consists of
students from across the state.
Hackett said he hopes students
will be made aware of the purpose
of the caucus by the scheduling of
this event.
A convention of caucuses is
planned for later this year.
A fundraiser to raise money for
both SOULS and for sickle cell
anemia research is scheduled to
start Wednesday. SOULS will be
raffling off a 10-speed Univega
bicycle. Members of the organiza-
tion will be selling tickets for $1
each.
In addition to social activities
Hackett said SOULS also plans to
work on things which further
define its purpose. The constitu-
tion and organizational tactics
will be studied to determine how
to "reach further into the com-
munity Hackett said.
North Carolina Congressional
Candidate Tom Gillam spoke at
last week's SOULS meeting.
Hackett said one of Gillam's
topics was the need for initiating a
change in North Carolina politics.
Gillam also talked about sickle
cell anemia and daycare centers.
The need for new industry in the
state as well as the necessity of ob-
taining new agriculturally based
industries were also stressed by
Gillam.
Concerning the general goals of
SOULS, Hackett said, "I want to
It's 'Business As Usual'
During Weekly Meeting
Business at the I7rh ����&�� r r ��. i ,
Hackett
make blacks a lot more pro-
gressive than they are now and
show them that there are oppor-
tunities available to them on this
campus
On Thursday, SOULS, the Col-
lege Republicans and the NAACP
will have a joint meeting with
Sylvanie Wilkerson of Goldsboro,
a black political activist, as guest
speaker.
Many New Cours
Added To ECU's
Fall Curriculum
Business at the 17th session of
the SGA Legislature was fairly
routine Monday night in com-
parison to recent meetings. The
group passed a series of bills by
consent and appropriated $650 to
the Visual Arts Forum to send two
students to a convention in
Miami, Fla.
The legislative meeting was
highlighted by a resolution
presented by Rules and Judiciary
Committee Chairman Mike Dix-
on, calling for "more stringent
enforcement of residence hall
study hours
The resolution is non-binding
and is only a record that "the
SGA Legislature goes on record as
supporting" stricter enforcement
of quiet hours by dormitory hall
-epresentatives and resident ad-
visors. There was some debate as
to the feasibility of stricter en-
forcement and who in the
residence halls would actually be
responsible for and effective at
enforcement.
Two friendly amendments were
added calling for the resolution to
be sent to Associate Dean and
Director of Residence Life
Carolyn Fulghum and to
residence hall directors.
A member of the Screenings
and Appointments Committee
also announced there are still
openings for SGA representatives
from Jarvis, Jones and Flemine
halls.
By DALE SWANSON
Staff Writer
Proposed curriculum changes
for next year are fairly routine
and little debate is expected in
their finalization, according to
William Grossnickle, chairman of
the ECU Curriculum Committee.
The changes were made too late to
be included in the next edition of
the undergraduate catalogue,
which went to press in February
but will appear in a supplement
next summer.
Among the more significant
changes was the addition of two
new English courses; ENGL 4319
(Teaching English and Language
Arts in the Middle Grades) and
ENGL 4970 (Literature for the
Younger Adolescent). Degrees in
Art have also been revised to in-
clude Art 1905 (The Dimensions
of Art), 5980, and 5981 (Studies in
Contemporary Art). These addi-
tions should not affect any
students presently in the School of
Art. A new class has also been
proposed by the Physical Educa-
tion Deptartment; PE 3278 (Skin
and SCUBA Diving Leadership
Program), which should augment
the already strong SCUBA Diving
program.
Grossnickle stressed that all of
these changes are relatively stan-
dard and should be officially
ratified by the Faculty Senate on
April 17. They then go to
Chancellor Howell for final ap-
proval.
Some other changes coming up
for approval include changing two
degree titles. Office Administra-
tion will be changed to Ad-
ministrative Services, and PRC
degrees will become Leisure
Systems Studies if no objections
arise. A new degree in Middle
Grades Education has been pro-
posed along with a new BABS
degree in Economics. ECU
presently offers only minor
degrees in Economics. These title
changes and degrees must go on to
be approved by the Board of
Governors after they pass inspec-
tion by the Faculty Senate and the
Chancellor.
Other curriculum changes in-
clude a very small revision in the
Military Science minor; the addi-
tion of Chem 3450 as a prere-
quisite for 5550, changing the BS
in chemistry; a change in prere-
quisites and hours for several PE
courses.
NCSL Delegation Wins
Most Improved Award
B .IF;ilPPO U-vnn a o� a
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
�w� Editor
The ECU delegation of the
North Carolina Student
Legislature won the award for the
most improved delegation at last
weekend's state-wide Annual Ses-
sion of the organization.
The Annual Session is held each
containers was also proposed.
In addition to receiving
award for most improved delega-
tion, the ECU contingent also
came within one vote of being
elected best delegation in the
state, losing to UNC-Chapel Hill
Braxton O'Neal, ECU's new
delegation chairman,
&ye�hthe �Ald ca5ito1 Buiidine in ��"� hZSESi zn
Kaleigh. Accordine to fcrirt- Hm.c c�.� -r-uH n me
.What a way to cool off between classes!
� ICU fw La
Student Welfare Committee Conductin
Raleigh. According to Kirk
Shelley, former delegation
chairperson, more than 180
students from 17 schools par-
ticipated in the event. Eighteen
students from ECU attended.
Both bills proposed by the ECU
delegation were passed. One bill
concerned the attempted homicide
statute. According to Shelley
although there is currently a fairly
light punishment given for an at-
tempted murder conviction, the
bill proposes a stricter sentence of
20 years to life in prison.
The other bill passed during the
session would make it mandatory
to give classes on prevention and
control of venereal diseases at the
high school level.
According to Shelley, many
other "interesting" bills were pro-
posed. One, the Billboard Pro-
liferation Act, won the Outstan-
ding Piece of Legislation Award
Signs for "South of the Border
were cited as the reason behind
the bill. A beverage container law
involving a tax on all beverage
House. Sandi Thurman
James Caldwell were both on the
Conference Committee, which
was responsible for obtaining
compromises between House and
Senate bills. Anne Clayton was a
member of the Awards Commit-
tee.
Accoiding to Shelley, approx-
imately 50 percent of all bills pass-
ed by the Annual Session are turn-
ed into state law by the N.C
General Assembly.
"There was a lot of j;ood
debate and there were a lot of peo-
ple from ECU talking on the
issues Shelley said, "We did
great
rr gsgtgrg viruruute onauctine Poll
fL��KHb�J?Media Topics Of Survey
nducting a survey' a marketing cla.� nnrfpr rh. dirJ. ,un,e surXcy concentrates on tex- survey will be tabulated hv mm. . .i� �,� K
The
The SGA Student Welfare
Committee is conducting a survey"
this week to determine student
opinion on a variety of issues
ranging from library hours and
book purchasing to fall break and
The survey was put together by
a marketing class under the direc-
tion of assistant professor Hawa
Altuner of the School of Business.
The welfare committee outlined
general topics, and the class wrote
to committee Chairman David the survey
Brown.
"We're trying to find the best
way to help students on campus
Brown said, noting his committee
often hears general complaints
but "we need some specifics
Tables for the survey have been
set up in the Student Supply
Store, Mendenhall Stuaent Center
and the allied health building. The
survey will run through Friday,
March 30.
tbook n? y concentratc$ ?n tex- survey will be tabulated by com-
m�VLP Cef and Purchasin� puter, he added,
methods, and on Joyner Library
tiomarltiS68; ST'm QUeS" BrOWn said the results "M be
�2LnL?2? t0 .the P"5 malyzed fey his committee and
oninSL u� uestl0ns �k for Presented to the organizations or
K �" th? eduling of fall university aoministratioTthaTthe
aueVt'inn ,S "�? a serics of Questions concerned. "It'll give us
univafiitv �" miscdlaneous some lobbying clout with the ad-
and event services' organizations ministration Brown said, "And
"Hrvrwn we wU1 toke action" based on the
JW. we'U have some results, he said.
Brown �� �by mil-April Brown said he hopes the survey
said. Portions of the am become "a standard thing for
the Student Welfare Committe to
do and can be used for the next
two school years.
The Student Welfare Commit-
tee ran a similar, smaller survey
earlier this semester.
The earlier survey found that
parking problems were the pro-
blems most frequently cited by
students. In addition, many
students were bothered by the
high price of books and would
favor a textbook rental system.
Announcementsj
Editorials 4
Entertainment 7
Sportsjn
Classifiedsg
� See newly elected media
heads, Jim Ensor, Ruben In-
gram, Ellen Moore, and Gary
Patterson on page 3.
� Today the Pirate Baseball
Team will play the 4th ranked
team in the nation, UNO
Chapel Hill. See BUCS, pan
10. ' "
� Victims of the Village
Green apartment complex ex
plosion are still seeking com
��� for their losses. See
BLAST, page 5.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN MABCVir 1984
Announcements
The East Carolinian
String tht campus community
unct 1925
Published every Tueiday and
Thursday durlno the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
tlclal newspaper of East Carolina
University, owned operated and
published for and by the students
of East Carolina University
Unless otherwise noted, unslgn
ed editorials on the opinion page
are the newspaper's opinion
generally written by the manag
Ing editor
Subscription Rate UO yearly
The East Carolinian offices are
located in the Publications
building on the campus of ECU.
Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Send address
dances tc The East Carolinian.
2na cioor Publications building,
ECU Greenville. NC 27834
Telephone 757 6366 6367 6309
HART BENEFIT
STUDENTS WITH HART In
association with THE ATTIC will
hold a benefit concert on Wednesday.
March 28, beginning at 8PM in THE
ATTICS Phoenix Room The concert
will feature THE TREND. PROTEUS
and EXIT BLOOM three Green
vide area bands comprised of
students Admission will be a S2 00
donation to the Gary Hart campaign
The nationally televised debate bet
ween the presidential candidates will
also be presented beginning at 8PM
SCIENCE SOCIETY
There w.11 be -neefmgof the Deo
vonSoenceSoc et on March r 1984
at 4 00 pm in Rawl 105 Paul Kester.
an industrial Research Engineer
Burroughs Wellcome will be
speaxmg on mini computer applica
tions of management science A
demonstration is also planned
NDSCL BORROWERS
AH National Direct Student Loan
Borrowers are reminded of the exit
�nterview requirement upon gradua
tion or those otherwise not returning
to ECU Fan Semester 1984 as
unaergraouate or graduate students
The Interview s necessary to inform
NDSl Recipients of the repayment
schedule provisions for loan
cancella'on. and other pertinent in
formation v0(j are requested to
report ?c tr-e Mufti Purpose Room of
the Mendenhaii STudent Center al
5 30 p m on either April 3, April 9 or
Ac- , 11 1984
BEACH WEEKEND
The Cathol.c Neman Center is go
'r-g !c tne be h Km a retreat. Apm
4 8 The theme of trie weekenc is
Newman - Corrng Together it
.11 be a time for reflection and fun on
the beach' � The cost is $15 ana a 13
deposit s requirea Sunday. April 1st
after Mass Come to the beach with us
and he'p make Newman a better
place11I
PI KAPPA PHI
The P, Kapps will be collecting for
PUSH (Play units for the Severely
Handicapped) this week Look for
booths set up ,n front of the Student
Store th,s week Help support this
needy and worthy cause The "A"
Softball team will play this Monday
and Wednesday at 5 00 p m The "A"
sottball team will piay this Monday
and Wednesday at 7 � pm and the
B handball team plays Thurs at
8 30 p m Everyone should help sup
port these teams! To �� �
Ch, o s we hope all of you are ready
to party this Thursday night
HEALTH ALLIANCE
Attention members - We will be
meeting Thursday, March 29th, at
5 30 m Mendenhaii room 238 Please
be on time for this very important
meeting if VOu have not paid your
dues, you will be expected to do so
and you are to turn in your money for
the fund raiser Reports will also be
made regarding the special projects
that have been completed So don't
forget and be on time
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next meeting of Gamma Beta
Phi will be held on Thursday March
29. 1984 In Room 129 Speight at 7 00
Please take note of the change In
location. Also, don't forget the bake
sale on Tuesday, March 27 Tickets
tor the give a way are due at this
meeting Look forward to seeing you
there
NAACP WORKSHOP
The ECU Chapter of NAACP will
sponsor a workshop this Saturday,
March 31, at 12 30 p m. in
Mendenhaii The guest speaker will
be Miss Rosa Shearion White, a
Iwayer The topic will be "Blacks on
Black and White Campuses.��
Everyone is cordially invited!
CIVIL WAR
Dr Charles Peery, from
Charleston, S.C will present an il
lustrated slide lecture on "Civil war
Blockade Runners" at 730 pm
Thursday, March 29, in Brewsfer
B 103 The presentation will be spon-
sored by ECU s Maritime History
and Underwater Research Program
HEY-HEY-HEYII
This is the last week to order your
SRA semi formal Mardi Gras pic
tures Stop by Room 224 MSC between
the hours of Tues 12 5 Wed 15
Don't forget!
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ is spon
soring "Prime Time" this Thursday
at 7 p m In the Old Joyner Library
Room 221 Please loin us tor fun,
fellowship, and Bible study We are
looking forward to meeting you
PARTY
SPEAKERS
Come learn more about Central
Amer,ca especially Nicaragua and
El Salvador � in a spec a 1 presenta
tion to De heia at the ECU Cathouc
Newman Center on Tuesday March
7 Varyknon Sisters Patricia Mur
'a, anc Julie Miller, ho have both
worked In Central America for
several reas will share their
various experiences at a special sup
per meeting, which will beg.n at 6 00
pm All nterestea persons are
welcome to attend and discuss during
the presentat.on For more informa
tion p.ease call the ECU Newman
Center 953 E 10th Street at 752 4216
HAPPY HOUR
Be tne Macpy Hour lines with the
K a s at 200 West on Fnoay afternoon
Usual Happy Hour prices with the
oest current mus.c Also start the
wee off right at the KA Happy Hour
at Beau's. S.iaa.s 8 00 until 11 00
a n- Beau s s Greenviie's newest
iaht no?
DEMOCRATS
After a long absence the Voung
Democrats are back We are having a
meeting t0 o.scuss our direction and
elect new officers If you are m
terested attend Thursday night
Room 238 Menoenhali 7 30 p m
NAACP ELECTIONS
The ECU Chapter NAACP 1984 85
elections will be held April 2, 1984 at
6 00 p m room to be announced Ap
plications mar be picked up March
?2 April 5. 1984 at Mendenhall's infor
mation desk. 250 Jarvis Dorm or 502
Greene Dorm Return application to
250 Jarvis Dorm by April 5, 1984. 5 00
p m
TRYOUTS
Be a part of ECU'S awardwmmng
squad 1st Mandantory meeting
March 26tn at 5.30 at Mmges Col
Wl Don tm.ss out on your chance
to get nvoivea with P,rate Athiet.cs'
PU.S.H.
Pi Kappa Ph, Fraternity will be col
lect.ng for P u S H (Play Units for
the Severely Handicapped) this week
m front of the Student Supply store
Any donation will be greatly ap
preciateo If you don't have time to go
By the Supply Store donations will be
taken at the house (756 3540) Also
there will be a Push a thon this Satur
day here m Greenville Everyone
should heip support the needy cause
because it is for a good purpose
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
mart Service m the Bloxton House is
tfftf ng �hese one hour sessions to aid
vou .n developing Better interviewing
Skills for use in your job search A
film and discussion of how to Infer
view through this service will be
shared Each session will be held in
the Career Planning Room at 3 pm
Come on any of the following dates
March 21 and 27
SCHOLARSHIPS
The English Department Invites
applications for the Russell M
Christman Memorial Scholarship.
awarded annually to a lunior English
major for exceptional academic
achievement, outstanding potential
m the field of English, and significant
involvement in extracurricular ac
tivifles The amount of the award is
1500 00 Applicants should complete
the Student Scholarship Form
(available from the Student Flnan
cial Aid Office) and send It. together
with a brief letter describing their
academic achievements, extracur
ricular activities, and plans for fur
ther study or career goals to Russell
M Christman Memorial Scholarship
Committee, co The Department of
English The deadline for applica
tions is April 13, 1984. For further In
formation contact Erwln Hester, 101
English Department Annex
UGLY MAN
ON CAMPUS
Attention: come vote for the ugliest
man on campus Campus organiia
tions will be sending their represen
'at.ves to the Student Supply store on
April 2 April 6. Proceeds from the
contest will be going to the new
Ronald MacDonald house to be built
here m Greenville Come out and sup
port your favorite organization Vote
for a good cause
MANAGEMENT
The Society for Advancement of
Management will be meeting Thurs
day, March 29 at 3 00 in Rawl 104
Discussed in the meeting will be an
overview of the activities for the rest
of the semester Guest speaker will
be William c Bowen owner of the
Wash Houses in this area. All
members are asked to please attend
CO-OP
Cooperative Education is a pro
gram which helps students gain
valuable experience related to their
career goals through alternating
periods of academic study with
periods of off campus employment
The Co op Office, located In 313 Rawl,
currently has job openings for sum
mer and fall '84 interested students
should stop by today to get more In
formation, to complete the necessary
forms, and to sign up for interviews
AMBASSADOR
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Past President's club of the
ECU alumni Association is offering a
scholarship to an Ambassador in
order to express their deep epprecia
tion for the vast amount of volunteer
service that the ECU Ambassadors
contribute to the progress and
welfare of ECU. The recipient must
be an ECU student who is a member
in good standing of the ECU Am
bassadors and must be of such
classification as to be a senior in the
fall semester of 1984 Any Am
bassador who is interested should
pick up an application after March 21
in the TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center Applications should be com
pleted and turned in by April 4.
Pre Greek Week Party for
everyone t he Lambda Chi Alpha
house, Fri 3 X) 84. 7 00 p m until 20
kegs
THE HOLOCAUST
A Symposium on the Holocaust is
being conducted on ECU campus It
will take place on Saturday, March
31. starting at 1000 am Many
speakers will be available to Inform
and share with you the events and
rememberances of the event
10 00 11 30 session will be at Room
'02 in Brewsfer B 2 00 3 00 session
will be in Mendenhaii Student Center,
Room 244 Everyone is welcome and
there is no admission charge The
event is being sponsored by ECU
Hillel
WEIGHT LIFTING
An organizational meeting will be
held Tuesday March 27 at 7 00pm in
Memorial Gym Room 105 B Anyone
welcome to attend if you have ques
tions call Jeff at 758 6382
FELLOWSHIP
The third session in the exposition
of II Timothy will be conducted
Wednesday night in Jenkins
Auditorium at 6 30 Our speaker will
talk on "Godlessness in the Last
Days " Come join us!
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��?ort publication
WZMB
Listen in to ECU'S Campus Radio
Station this Sunday morning for the
latest sound in contemporary Chris
fian music Sundays. 6 10 AM on
WZMB. 91 3 FM, you II hear the Con
temporary Gospel Show
SPRING FLING 84
It's Coming! Spring Fling 84! Phi
Tau House. Fri . April 6th Be there
RESUME WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House is
offering one hour sessions to help you
prepare your own resume Few
graduates get jobs without some
preparation Many employers re
quest a resume showing your educa
tion and experience Sessions to help
will be held in the Career Planning
Room at 3 p m Come on any of the
following dates March 20 and 28
STUDENTS WITH HART
Now is the time for a new genera
tion of leadership if you are fed up
with the politics of nostalgia and look
ing for new solutions to the nation's
problems join students with Hart We
are the vanguard of a new
democracy We will be meeting at
Mendenhaii, every Thursday at 8 pm
(ask receptionist for room number)
EDUCATION STUDENTS
The Department of Speech
Language S. Auditory Pathology will
be providing a make up of speech and
hearing screening for the studr.tts M
who missed It In January. �
The screening will be held on Tues �
day, March 27 and Wednesday. �
March 2� from 5:00 7 OO p m. In the �
SLAP Department which Is located In
a trailer adfacent to Belk Building on Z
Charles Street �
No appointment is needed �
DIET ANALYSIS
rtYtC,an haV y��r own Personal
diet analyzed by the Student Dietetic
1984 at the Student store with the aid
of a computer The analysis will ten
you which nutrients are missing in
your diet so you can improve you?
nutritional intake Don't miss
great experience to learn more about
nutrition and your diet You owe itto
yourself! T0
WINDSURFING
The Outdoor Rec Center is offering
a mini clinic on Windsurfing This
clinic will be held March 28 from
7 30 9 00 pm in Memorial Gym
Swimming Pool All students, faculty
and staff are invited to attend
PRCCLUB
There will be a meeting Tues
March 27 at 7 30 p m in MSC Room
244 Final plans to be made to attend
the NCSU m.ni conference And bring
money for your T shirts
AMBASSADORS!
Don't forget our general meeting,
m MrCh M �' 5 00 in the
Mendenhaii Multipurpose Room We
will be discussing elections, member
sh,p and the USC trip There is also a
speoal surprise planned! Be sure to
onerta
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
All Occupational Therapy students
and interested persons art asked to
attend the ECSCOTA meeting on
March 27 at 5:30 In room 203 Allied
Health Building.
AUCTION
Sigma Phi Epsllon and Alpha
Omleron PI w,� .po ft-
"WJ PRE GREEK WEEK - KICK
2�pmACT'ONSuApr.Ms at
2 p.m. Pre-Greek Week cups will be
� sal. com, start off Grelk weet
DNK9E,VS�,aV' ' W'm " "EAL
TALENT SHOW
if you like to see Talent and have
alot of fun at the same time, be sure
to come to the Talent Show sponsored
by the Sweethearts of the Kaopa
Alpha Psl Fraternity, irtc , w Wed
March 28 from 7 to 9 p rr at
Mendenhaii in room 244 Tickets are
! 00 and may be bought from any
KAPPA SWEETHEART Hope to see
you there!
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Advanced NAUl Scuba April 10 in
'erecting with Others April n. Basic
Sailing April )2, Latin American
Dance Apm 20, Continental Dance
April 20 Contact Division of Contmu
mg Education, Erwin Hall
TUG-OF WAR
Sign up Monday. March 26 or Tues
day. March 27 for the Co Rec Tug Of
War competition Teams consist of i
man ana 3 women not exceeding �
total team weight of 1000 pounoj
Sign up in Memorial Gym room 204
REP WANTED
The department of intramural Rer
Services is looking for mtereste �
students to assume the role of ao"
visory Council Representatives A
representative from each part.cpa
�ion division ,s needed (Pres.den-
Fraternity, sorority. Residence
men. women, coed independent,
and Clubsi Applications deadline s
Apm 2. and they may be picked up in
Memorial Gym room 204
WMM.

COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
a'O Gree iviMe Blvd
754-3023 �24 MRS.
PLAZA SHELL
?4 hour Towing Service
ti-Haul Rentals
Available
SniAJT HOUSE
Mon. & Tues.
Nile
&' 2 Chopped
Sirloin &
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$3.99
2 Locations
2903 E. 10th St
500 W Greenville Bivci
Fri. & Sat.
Nite
Wed. S: Thurs.
Nite
&3 Beef Tips
& Salad Bar
$3.99
1 Boz. Sirloin
& Salad Bar
$4.69
Now Featuring Fix It
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cotaera s
518 SOUTH COTANCHE SI
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
752-0688

We carry a complete Ine of part t accessories
NEW LOCATION
756-7114
UNIVERSAL KOKO MATS
KONTS BMW 2002 SHOCKS
AUDI 5000 & 4000 WIND DEFLECTORS
QualityParts at a Reasonable Price
PAPA KATZ
Your Adult Entertainment Center
Lingerie Show by Loris
March 27th (Tues.)
Doors open at 8:00 pm
Show start at 9i00 pm HH 8-9
$3.00 members $4.00 guests
(for Men 8f Women)
Limited seating � Coma oarfyl
T
?
Weds. 10:00
Men Get One Keg Free
Come Early
Just or the Ladles - returning by
popular demand April 13th -
LENNY PANARO & PURE HONEY.
Saturday Nite
John Moore Beach Show
Lady Members Free All Nite
Doors Open 8:30
Happy Hour Til 9:30
c -
or?
� �.oa
Proteitionaily Monogd
8y�8v rem
I� e1
P.O.I
Greenville, il
919
�MaJLaJL
� ��� fje. � "
I
i
M
Ensor
J
The EC I Media Board sele
general manager at WZMB; R
was reappointed u editor of tl
Selections for the general mam
Larcenie,
BSTEPHKS
HARDING
Ml Vkrllt.
Larcenies and DWI's
headed the �
crimes this wet �
of the 41 crimes reported
ere larceny related. A
student's class ring
found in the
of a housekeeping
member and there were
seeral rep
firewori
in the ECU Can
Police Daily Ofi
Arres; .
are:
�I
larc
n
i
I
la-
through
March 19,4
A male student r�
receiving a n a
friend
taken an overd
a.m. � a report of the '
larcenj of S26 from a w
purse in room 323 Rawl;
9:40 a.m. � A re
vandalism to room 151 I I
L'mstead Hail: 11 J
� larceny of currency C
from room 509 Green
Hall; 2 p.m. � Tl
ring of a Res;
found in the possession
of Eula House Ennis. I
housekeeping staff, Cot
ten Hall; 4:45 p.m. � A i
report of the larceny and ei:l
breaking ar.d entennw I P I
room 419 Green H
p.m. � A confidential a
source reported Dav;d F. �
Gibbs and John B Co
Thomas, both of ?60 repi
Garrett Hall, were in purj
possession of counterfeii exo
controlled substances; 10 I
p m. � a report of the M
larceny of a blue sapphire A n
and diamond nag from dismi
room 315 Tyler Hal A
report of the larce:
bracelet from room 313 repo
Tyler Hall; 10.10 p.m. � e'r
A female student I j
reported receiving harass- parl
FAr
i'VlA.i A HI i.
� OS r�o� r Ho
GRtts t NC a83A
9- 9 58 32
' i�" �.
� -
Private room, full!
refrigerator, bed
furnished with ea





TALENT SHOW
J! T: "kt t0 Ta,en'a� ��
� W o� un at m, Mme fime
D� Ce ;� � T" S" isonsoreo
� N S�e�mearf1 o� m, k8DM
�"B D� Crafermty mc ��- Wee
r 28 r�� 7 to 9 nrr �,
Mm hi room 244 T,c�et, are
JX m -a. oe sough, ,rom
- AS�EEAB' Nooefosee
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
vanceo NAU Scba Sc- g n
When -r- M Base
LaMn i � ?' can
-� ncntal Dance
X Confirm
Enwm Ma
TUO-OF WAR
S.gn up Monday. March 24 or Tu
�.V. March 27 for th, Coac
War competmon Teams co?
W�l team wei0h� aj )000 DOuL
REP WANTED
Tft department of Intramural R
-or, CounTs �
Memory Gym room P'rkM �P
STEAK HOUSE
Mon. & Tues.
Nite
J 2 Chopped
Sirloin &
Salad Bar
53.99
Fri. & Sat.
Nite
2 Locations
203 E. lotfist
500 W. Greenville Blvd.
Wed. & Thurs.
Nite
&3 Beef Tips
& Salad Bar
$3.99
I 8oz. Sirloin
& Salad Bar
$4.69
Now Featuring Fix It
Yourself Potato Bar
ree with meal.
cro hop
COTANCHE STREET1 I
N.C. 27834
'��
Ensor
t
rt�' a. n.v,s Ma . 3
More Than 100 Participate
In CROP Walk For Hunger
1984-85 Media Board Heads
Larcenies Top Campus Crimes
By STEPHEN
HARDING
af Writer
Larcenies and DWI's
headed the list of campus
crimes this week. Fifteen
of the 41 crimes reported
were Iarcenv related A
student's class ring was
found in the possession
of a housekeeping staff
member and there were
several reports of
fireworks in use. Entries . . . .
Pohce'oanv'off03111,5 ��" �f neTfrom
Police Daily Offense and the Central Ticket Offire
thrrroS gLh�8 f�2MarCah 19 � MendenhallkesSdent
Mar h IQ L 3re: CentCr; 8:15 P�- - A
4 mti U 2 am- report of the larceny of a
A male student reported bicycle and lock north of
receiving a call from a Joyner Library 9 35
ing telephone calls n�H o x
March 20, 2:30 a.m. � � � -Per. of . �gh, on ,�c
Lev. Johnson of Green- larceny of a backpack ?7 n��r �f Sla HM-
v�Ie, trespass na in Gar ann 1 , DacKPack '15 a.m. � a rrrvt
- na, isi rasas Si-a�gS &"s"
church groups to help the
rett Hall; 11.30 a.m.
Levi Johnson of Green-
vi He was arrested for
felonious entering and
larceny of a watch and
currency from room 115
Garrett Hall; 12 a.m. �
A report of larceny of a
wallet from the racquet-
n i rs
rr jfJO prtfvk ttom
ihc QwaHtk area hr�v
d 'he etemmtt during
'he I ?th Annu�j k p
NNaJk for Hunger Sun
d� The 2( k.lomrter
��lk uarted from (,fcrn
Spring p,fk Mt l2 M)
PM . although heaw
rain forced mnv par
"upants not lojofcl in the
eent. including man
ECU Mudenu Never
thele. man School
aged children (as well as
several adults and ECU
students) carried on with
the walk, which became a
success after all. The
walk, which encircled a
long route around Green
ville, raised an estimated
S4.000, some of which
Hunger rcJh wouidve helped
complained about his
daughter being harassed
by the track team
coaches; 10:24 p.m. � A
report the blue light
phone west of Jarvis Hall
was out of order; 10:45
report of possible van-
dalism to a vending
machine in the lobby of
BelkHall; 12:12 p.m -
A report of a vehicle van-
dalized south of Scott
"all; 10 p.m. � Michael
needy.
Mike
Hamer. a
friend saying she had
taken an overdose; 8:30
a.m. � a report of the
larceny of $26 from a
purse in room 325 Rawl;
9:40 a.m. � A report of
vandalism to room 151
Umstead Hall; 11.15 a.m.
� larceny of currency
from room 509 Green
Hall; 2 p.m. � The class
nng of a student was
found in the possession
of Eula House Ennis,
housekeeping staff, Cot-
ten Hall; 4:45 p.m. � A
report of the larceny and
breaking and entering of
room 419 Green Hall; 6
p.m. � a confidential
source reported David F.
Gibbs and John B.
Thomas, both of 360
Garrett Hall, were in
possession of counterfeit
controlled substances; 10
P-m. a report of the
l�i, w ���vWusri- was out of order- IAd u n 7� � fxm
bal court area at Minges p.m. - A rerortThe w S H pm- Micha�
Coliseum; 4:30 p.m. handle of thouthw� hs Minney and Jeff
curfew door of VnT CW1S Scott- both of 208
Hall was broken . HaJ1' �� found
March 23 tiu Possession of drug
-j�� RaipnrHf STte -3
�4 Aycock Ha.1 was gSSSiy gSi�
discharging
found in possession of
�aiy J3 pyrotechnics; 1:25 am
tl?nh ArePu�rt that the John Allen WelisSeSc"
telephone in the north of- of Lee. MA, w�i SS2
was found
pyrotechnics.
for DWI; 6:33 p.m. - A
report of breaking and
entering and larceny from
a video machine in the
gameroom 0f
Mendenhall Student
Center.
March 24, 12:30 a.m.
� Charlie Mack Best, Jr
of 110-B Howard Circle
was arrested for DWI and
fice of the Power Plant
was ringing continuously
March 21, 10:04 a.m.
� Thomas A. Jones of
Greenville was
transported to the Pitt
County Memorial
Hospital Emergency
Room by Greenville
Rescue due to a mild
ArDorofih4? Pm- WaS "� fo,
tw Zs 5,arCCny�Kf �nC-Way street Eolation
1 "n.gs ��d a watch on Library Drive- 1 a m
from a laundry room on - Norman h�'
either the third or sixth LeihnS�-K ISldor
floor of Fletcher H�li if ??�,t,ch Was ����
;n ll r,cicner Hail; for DWI on James Street-
he west lawn at Minges was unlockr? 1�
�ucrrD,ands1irowmen, h�"�����
recCovPerJ18 ??���ed ��idenUy;
March 22 7-? . �, pm- Two
larceny of a blue sapphire A report the gl4 o7'thl fiT" WCFC rCmOV-
and diamond ring from figftL SL?S "
room 315 Tyler Hall; A of Flanagan wal broS BuTdin MuSk
report of the larceny of a out; 1038 a m a ' u ?'
bracelet from room 313 report ofeSeWofl 25, 12:09 a.m.
Tyler Hall; 10:10 p.m. - vehicle owned hv ma � Z A uUbjCCt was found
A female sf�dent EtaS? kJ &w2 StfJ u"
reported receiving harass- parked' south ot Thl Jtm.
Cooimof, utMi the
2� "� dPtXHnting
Nt added that -j! furrv0
tnjt to h bmmiUd jv
rei walking af-er all I
'hink wr did . ftXHJ )Gb
f r d�d rane quite a
bit of morjci. "
laune Be.k.
wphomore. partiClpated
"h ,hc ('mmj Sigrna
s'�m �ororu (,nc 0f
thrcf ECI gr0ur,
repreNented Sundav S.ie
vaidtwai a good cause,
'bough - I .s reads to
walk, raining or not The
course was pretts good
although the homestretch
along 10th St. was pretty
rough. �" '
Kyle Grubbs. also a
member of the sorontv,
agreed. "It was a lot of
fun, I guess j, wa
good exercise, too she
said. "Still, I think more
People from ECU should
our Khool look good
Both the participants
and organier agreed
'hat the response to the
project was positive Joes
Sae, a sophomore,
worked with the Baptist
Student Union in coor-
dinating the project He
'ted. "The thing was
ers cli organized, and 1
think that the people who
got involved were great "
Margie Gallagher, an
EC L Home Economics
professor, chose the
CROP Walk as the
semester service project 1
for the Gamma S.gs.
Gallagher, the Gamma
ig advisor, stated. "The
girls were really receptive
to the idea, and we really
put some effort into it
But was the walk worth
all the trouble and effort?
"We wouldn't have been
here if we didn't think we
uld help replied
senior Gamma Sig Becky
Garrison
think a was a suc-
cess, even though the rajn
kept some of the people
fwav said R,cnard
Barnes. a sophomore
who helped the ECU
Newman Center with the
project.
Becaus of tie limited
Participation due to the
weather, plans are now
underway to have a possi-
ble second walk for some
of the other people who
did not take part on Sun-
da v.
Voice
Opinions
Alflie
Campus
Forum
&. �
no
I
mm
Sti ro
Sjji 53
f5od
m
WEDDING PLANS?
Central Book And News
Can Help You
Bridal Bibles
Engraved Wedding
. VI Invitation
Napkins
Thank-You Notes
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 9:30 til 9:30 7 Day. A Week
A WARMED OVER
BURGER TYPE FOOD
USUALLY COOKED BEFORE
BREAKFAST AND SERVED
AFTER LUNCH. LET
SUBWAY CURE YOUR
STYRO BLURS
Mr
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
Reproductive Health Care
208
E. Sth St.
758-7979
208
E.5t Si
AWMAL�0MM�Al
1 05 Airport Rc
Green
vilce. NC 27834
1919)758-0327
Combination Special
Trout, Shrimp
and Deviled Crab
lllMlilLte
Undersaving, nor. judgmental care that
nclud� abortion for women of all ac
Counsehng for both partners s avalabte
Spedal Servxes and rates for students.
ages
WE'U. PAY YOU TO GET INTO
SHAPE THIS SUMMER? n
i weekends.
Si
mk
m
W
j
-�v
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I�fx0i
I
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gsgttete
m
Pirates Landing
Private room, fully carpeted,
refrigerator, bed, and desk
furnished with each apartment.
tfi-i
-rj
Gmplex has sun-deck, gazebo,
outdoor grills, laundry facilities on site.
AmJCATTON FOR RENTAL
Toteuionolly Monogad ly
Uremco
�v inc.
Ml Ai I hAll MtAMAOCMINt
P.O. Box 6026
Greenville, NC 27834
919758-6061
Name:
Present Addrm:
Real From
How long at this addrest:
Hlett than two year, previous addrm
V renting, from who:
if student. Home Address
Parents Names:
I
S
MYwR�nrno�ForTln�Sinn��AndN.rtF
TelepKnne:
l
If yon have at least
two years of college left,
you can spend six weeks at
our Army ROTC Basic
Camp ths summer and earn
approximately $600.
And if you qualify, you
can enter the ROTC 2-
Year Prqjram this fall and
receive up to1,000 a year.
But die big payoff
happens on graduation day.
That's when you receive
an officer s commission.
So get your body in
shape (not to mention your
bank account).
Enrol! in Army ROTC.
For more information,
contact Gtptain Heldur Liivak at
757-6967 and come to our infennation
�ession on Mtrch 27 from 4pm in
"Memknhall Student Cater.
fcKAffigE&BE.
-�
'� �'��V
' 1
' iatt
� ' . ��.





-se�f&B

�lic �a0t Carolinfan
Serving the East Carolina campus
community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. w�.
Darryl Brown. - grin
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK. �, j T p,ETR
TINA MAROSCHAX. cwn�, MlKF Mrp ' � 0��
Ed Nicki as c McPartland. m. �w
LU "R-KLA5, Sports Editor TV�kJ KI.�
Gordon Ipock . Norton, o �,
m�S' Kathy Fuerst' ����
Mark Barker. amm � M,KE Mayq
v�cv
March 27, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
PIRG Push
Good Opportunity For ECU
Students as if they mattered.
That's the title of a pamphlet on
Public Interest Research Groups
but it is also in large part the pur-
pose of those organizations � giv-
ing students the organization
resources, opportunities and
abilities to matter, to make a dif-
ference in their community and
state.
There is currently a movement
on campus by students to establish
a PIRG, (the catchy acronym for
Public Interest Research Groups) at
fcCU. The organization is impor-
tant for many reasons, to many
people � especially students and
citizens in the community.
If established here, ECU-PIRG
would be the first such organiza-
tion on a public campus in North
Carolina. (Private schools such as
3 and Davidson already have
PIRGs.) Its successful and effective
operation alone would be enough
to bring recognition to ECU and
probably imitation by other UNC
campuses, especially if ECU
students are responsible for convin-
cing the UNC Board of Governors
to clear the way for PIRG. But that
is not the most important aspect,
what really matters is the vehicle
students would have for affecting
change and taking action in their
community, for helping fellow
students and citizens, and for
enhancing their educational oppor-
tunties at the university.
PIRGs are student operated, stu-
dent funded organizations that
work on student designed projects
(often related to consumer or en-
vironmental affairs). They are run
by an all-student Board of Direc-
tors and would be funded, at ECU
by an optional fee; students would
have the choice each semester to
pay on their tuition bill, a $3 fee to
fund PIRG.
Student can earn academic credit
with PIRG and work on many
career-development skills: writers
can produce pamphlets and
publications, science students can
do environmental tests and
research, political science students
can do congressional research and
work with politicians � the list
goes on. Students can choose to
work on such things as shopping
guides, co-op stores, energy conser-
vation off-campus housing, tax
workshops, or myriad other pro-
jects including an important
challenge to ECU students - the
reform of voter registration laws in
rut County to permit students to
register and vote locally
In short, a PIRG at ECU will be
beneficial for all concerned In-
terested involved students can work
and public speaking, research,
writing and organizational skills
and students with little time but
who are still concerned can help
fund the PIRG and suggest
research topics. Students would
elect their peers to the Board of
Directors and hire a full-time staff
member or two to keep the
organization running smoothly
from year to year.
The PIRG fee will be the only
optional fee students pay each
semester, yet also the only one they
completely control. Students have
no choice but to fund the health
wntir,�. intramural program,
Mendenhall movies or the Media
Board, to name a few. The support
for PIRG is a support for student
power and responsibility; it is a
chance for ECU to take a leading
step forward in the community and
m the university system.
Loi
South Africa
WMfigtf �wic MfKE PETERS I
(C I
minjstra:
confident
able to absc
� of huge
creases b
more studei
using more
despite a
showing thj
is di
Lehsgr
ry�ng to off-
percent tuitioi
next you
loans a
students
ford of
tre
Blast
B TINA MAW
(Almost) Everybody's Paradise
BvDARRVI nunw v "vMifh a e���� i
"South Africa" bannered across
top, I didn't expect to find the above
comments mixed in the copy below it It
never crossed my mind one would por-
tray that nation as the idyllic vaca-
tionland that anyone would want to
visit.
I could write the ad much more honest-
ly:
Well, it's on the southern tip of the
continent.
That's just the beginning.
Unlike anywhere else on the conti-
nent, every citizen is classified into one
By DARRYL BROWN
Why it s part of Africa.
Well, it's on the southern tip of the
continent. J
That's just the beginning
In common with the heart of Africa
you'll find nature untouched'by man
Vast reserves of wildlife, roaming across
great plains punctuated by majestic
mountains. �����
i,ZOU" fl1d & deserts and
tush, green forests. Warm winters under
blue skies.
J�- � m, of W "oJJouTrZTolps.
Why its not. aay-
Fortune hunters came and unm vrod ��� ou �e JO percent of the popula-
te wealth that makes South AfrZuJ Tr0 "Africans ca� �e.
que on the continent f �' l'Ve " most habitable areas of the
ft is a country of golden beaches and �?" iHf. 5? earn H'a" one-tenth
seas of flowers. TUvingait- Tnth ob " " " �
tenng nightlife. Fashionable shopoine And ti.
districts. Extradinary museums m n.ilL &. must leave the "
When , saw a full-page advertismem hnZrT �
m Time magazine last month with The 17rceZZf'tu
Campus Forumnwmm�mm �
are whites control three-fourths of the
land. And all of the world's richest dia
mond and gold mines.
They enjoy the world's best personal
domestic service.
And control the government unfet-
tered by representation for black
Africans.
And for touring foreigners, there's Q
special privilege. American and Euro-
pean blacks are treated as honorary
whites while in the country, able to visit
most anywhere.
7�tg cities and fashionable
nighthfe All at affordable price,
because it's run by slave labor
JturlsrltrQCu Uonallanguaesa�
cultures. (Though most are not legal
citizens, allowed to enter college or to
own property.) s
Who could argue with such an irresti-
ble vacationer's paradise? No wonder
eVeu7"ry �f NDFth Car0lma �
UmT �1StCn t0 ,ts students' lobbv
sSut? A?-1" ??ney fr�m comPan.es in
South Africa. The nation ,s truly unique
m the world. No � here else is a native
popuat.on so diverse, governmental
institutions so creative, nationai
resources and human rights so im-
aginatively distributed.
ench of ga
.
really h .
more than i
pre-da
Village Gn
corrr
changej
lives
still reh
The I
betur-
4 of
Alum
Bv Miu i
tours and a
ECl
The
lun
two i
gen. director
relations "We a:
Protester's Actions, View Short-sighted
Refutations of Reputations:
Images On A Shoe String
By HENRY FAIRLIE
About a century ago, I wrote a series of
articles for Punch, the leading humor
!T8�eBritain' under the running ti-
tle, The Anatomy of Reputation I was
IIUF1? un those Public figures who,
although they seem to have said or done
very little of any merit, nevertheless pop
up all the time, as members of royal com-
missions or other advisory bodies, and
even as the chairmen of nationalized in-
dustries.
One person I singled out was Barbara
Ward (later to become Lady Jackson), a
half-journalistic, half-academic economist
whose duties have included everything
from serving as a member of the Pontifical
Commission on Peace and Justice to ad-
vising Lyndon Johnson on Vietnam
I came to the conclusion that she was
appointed to such commissions because
she was a) a woman, b) an economist, and
c) a Roman Catholic. And so any govern-
ment wishing to make some commission
ook representative could, so to speak, kill
three birds with one stone.
aflVfT(He WiU onJy 59a wek
after the elections in November). He has
for many years been the most
Pol. .can in Tennessee. He is alsoVetiring
after four very impressive years as majori-
hnl?dCK �Ithe Senate - refution of
those who dismissed him as a lightweight
when he ran for the presidential nomina-
thinking he is wise. With his popularity in
it Zn Sta,tC now unassaiable, and with
ms naional reputation higher than ever
hlZ g� dwn in history �� what the
headlines used to call a "Solon
whenPona.ti0KS ln t0� 0ftcn P� on
Thfnk of St��V u� cnd one's eer.
woiSd 15 Nixon's reputation
SSXfJV had not "� 5
mistake P makin� a simiIar
Although Mick LaSalle is often
ridiculous and irritating, he and
Features Editor Gordon Ipock have
provided a refreshing change from the
liberal rhetoric which for so long has
Plagued The East Carolinian. But, just
when you thought it was safe to read it
again, The East Carolinian has once
again run a letter from everyone's
favorite liberal, Patrick O'Neill. In his
letter O'Neill brags of his latest in-
dulgence in civil disobedience. He tells
of running up to a U.S. senator with a
placard shouting the same, old, time-
worn statements that Mr. O'Neill hopes
win make him famous someday.
It is obvious that those "rose-
colored glasses" O'Neill always wears
are there to stay. I wish he would
remove them just once. Then he might
!�! s,tatements such as "Stop the
XJCi T really emPly d mean-
ngless when you consider the complexi-
SL� st-West relations. Hollering
Cwdrtn? race" is Uke h0erins
not rt a,CanCer Datient- II � J�st
not that easy. I agree with Mr ,fc
"Nnrf inThC East CoHnian,
com&W"I,aSUbJeC,�fin�dibte
R,Ln�U think that RonaJd
Reagan wants a nuclear war, then you
are being ridiculous. Reagan is simolv
doing what he and his S,liticalTany
feel is the most viable solution to the
arms race, protecting democracy as we
know it until an agreement can be
made.
In O'Neill's letter he says that he will
IV1" (Helms) is not returned to
the U.S. Senate (I can picture O'Neill
sticking his tongue out after that
remark.) I assume he means that he will
vote against Helms in the upcoming
election What a novel idea, voting for
a candidate who will run the country
the way you like. I wish that he would
vote and be quiet about it. If there is so-
meone he feels would be a better presi-
dent or senator then I wish he would
vote for that person in November. Until
that time, those that are in office at the
present deserve the same respect that
Mr. O Neill would wish upon his can-
didate. This is called democracy,
O'Neill. Look it up!
Bill Green
Junior
Finance
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, acrats from Jovner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfsj. Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages
double-spaced or neatly printed All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permuted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Washington is an obvious place in which
to study the anatomy of reputation. I long
ago ceased to expect any convincing
answer to the question, "What has Elliot
Richardson ever done?" But there is one
question I am still dogged enough to pose:
"What has Bill Moyers ever said?"
Since he turned his back on his mentor
and patron, Lyndon Johnson, when the
going got tough in Vietnam, Moyers has
gone from program to program, from the
networks to PBS and back, boring each
audience to tears. With eight more months
of television post mortems on the
pnmanes, the caucuses, the conventions
and the election, we mush gird ourselves
for many evenings of his piffling waffle.
But will someone write to me when he says
something?
I was talking with some friends the other
day of Howard Baker's decision not to
"�� u Ilbam Lcast Heat M�on's
at itJSftZSE Was PubIished I glanced
at it, and decided not to read it, for it had
sScSoCfhnfr0th; fiUing "� sucn
shces of nourishment. Since I am about to
embark on my own cross-country trip I
have just read it from start to finish. There
are a few good things in it. A good quick
observation is his use of �lSffi
alJ-town cafe to judge whether the food
ml be good. The more years the calendar
go back, the better the food will be
But as a "journey into America it is
unenlightening It is self-indulgent 'search
dWlTrf !iather than for African. Or
dmary life does not really concern him.
One would not know from the book the
�cf of a spoonful of grits anywhere in the
pSLiJH nowmany people go the Wrigley
field on a Wednesday afternoon. The
book is vacuous. Yet it was rapturously
praised by the critics, building another
reputation on the flimsiest of supports.
I challenge anyone to tell me what they
earned about America from "Blue
Wf?S- T101 who " to "�wer
mi put it on the same post card they send
telling me what Bill Moyers has ever said.

CWVM
taoe dan g
zan see f i
bes' r j
For a
CAN I WAN VOU S0M� MONEV ?
mmmmm
mm
? m�m
� "� . �
��
��� .1





I HATE
MONPALES
sgsi
T
:w
m MfKE PETERS f
�'c
V
who
s Paradise
ne "rt whites control three-fourths of the
t Umd. And all of the world's richest dia-
1: mond and gold mines.
They enjoy the world's best personal
: mestic service.
And control the government, unfet-
�d by representation for black
. ins.
And fo- touring foreigners, there's a
special privilege. American and Euro-
pean blacks are treated as honorary
whites while in the country, able to visit
most anywhere.
Thriving cities and fashionable
ightlife.All at affordable prices
oust it's run by slave labor.
A wealth of traditional languages and
cultures. Though most are not legal
citizens, allowed to enter college or to
property.)
Who could argue with such an irresti-
Me vacationer's paradise? No wonder
the Universit) of North Carolina System
refuses to listen to its students' lobby
and divest its money from companies in
South Africa. The nation is truly unique
in the world. No where else is a native
population so diverse, governmental
institutions so creative, nationaJ
resources and human rights so im-
aginatively distributed.
P � � �
leir
Short-Sighted
lidate. This is called
VNeill. Look it up!

ft
ipi
rty

I
to
leill

Kill
ing
for
itry
)uld
SO-
;si-
)uld
tatil
the
that
lean
democracy,
Bill Green
Junior
Finance
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes tetters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the author(s). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
ItfV

i;
WrWwmm
S0M� MOMEVj
m
' -�'
Loans, Aid
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH 27, 1984 5
CPS Ad
ministrators say they're
confident students will be
able to absorb another
year of huge tuition in-
creases by resorting to
more student loans and
using more financial aid,
despite a recent study
showing that financial aid
is drying up for students.
Lehigh, for example, is
trying to offset a nine
percent tuition hike for
next year by making more
loans available to
students, says Agnes Gif-
ford of the school's
treasurer's office.
ement
At Chicago State
University, Budget and
Planning Director Wayne
Rath says students won't
be pi iced out of school
"because major scholar-
ship amounts also in-
crease in a percent equal
to increases in tuition.
That's been consistent
oer the years
It may also be chang-
ing.
"Nobody really ex-
pects that federal pro-
grams will grow by very
much the next few
years says Dennis Mar-
tin ol the National
Association of Student
Financial Aid Ad-
ministrators in
Washington, D.C.
A January, 1984 Col-
lege Board study,
moreover, concluded
federal aid to students
has declined by 21 per-
cent since 1981, making
campus costs markedly
more difficult to finance.
The study blamed the
phasing out of Social
Security benefits for
students and tougher
restrictions on
Guaranteed Student
Loans for letting tuition
increases outpace in
creases in student income
and aid each year since
1980.
As a result, students
have been going deeper
into debt to pay their
way, Martin says,
While some schools
like Lehigh have big "in-
stitutional" loan funds to
help students finance
their educations, Martin
says "community col-
leges and some of the
smaller public colleges
and independent
colleges" have trouble
making up the increased
Blast Victims Seek Damages
costs to students.
Even if they can, Mar
tin adds students can't
keep going into debt in-
definitely.
"It's conceivable he
says, "that schools that
can't balance the need for
their own fiscal health
with students' ability to
pay will find themselves
with an unacceptably
high defaulty rate in the
future
And new federal laws
keep some students from
borrowing more money
even if they want to.
Northern Arizona stu
dent Albert Arvallo, for
one, works summers but
must keep his school
work jobs to a minimum.
"If you work, they will
cut down on your
students loan
"My parents' income
went up, and now 1 won't
qualify for a loan says
Becky Johnson of
Bismarck Junior College
in North Dakota.
"My parents' income,
although not big, was at a
level I couldn't qualify
for aid echoes DePaul
junior Jeni Jagow.
"They've taken us ,o
the limit adds Delaware
senior Scott Webber.
Some students sav
they're over the limit.
"My sister won't go to
school now says Vivian
Burge of Los Angeles Ci-
ty College.
"She was on her way to
college, but now she's
looking for a training
program" because LACC
has become too expensive
for her, Burge says.
"Tuition explains
Michael Alexander of
Chaffey College in Aha
Loma, Cal "puts an ad-
ditional burden on poor
people. We will see a
change in our student
population because there
will be fewer colored,
Hispanic and fewer
minorities overall
Washington State
junior Judith Dillard says
she knows of "people
who aren't coming back
here" because of rising
tuition.
Enrollment figures,
however, suggest higher
tuitions haven't driven
many people out of col-
lege in the past.
ByTINAMAROSCHAk
0 Nr�, fdllor
As the sun rose and the
stench of gas lifted from
the air, victims of the
disaster realized what had
really happened. A little
more than a year ago a
pre-dawn explosion at the
Village Green apartment
complex in Greenville
changed many people's
lives, some of whom are
still rehashing its effects.
The 12 lawsuits filed
between July 29 and Aug.
4 of lasi year against the
apartment owners and
several corporations are
still pending, and accor-
ding to Kenneth E.
Haigler, attorney for the
plaintiff no end is in
sight.
The March 2, 1983 ex-
plosion killed one stu-
dent, David Martin, and
injured 12 others. Mar-
tin's fither, Dennis O.
Martin, filed suit last Julv
on behalf of his son and
is seeking $1.5 million in
damages. Martin was kill-
ed instantl) after being
thrown from his second-
floor bedroom.
Eleven others injured
in the blast filed lawsuits
last August in Wake and
Pitt counties and are
seeking a total of $3.8
million in compensatory
damages and $1.9 million
in punitive damages.
The complaints state
that a large amount of li-
quid propane gas, the
substance used to heat the
dryers in the laundry
room, leaked out of the
system. The gas was ig-
nited by an electrical
device on a hot water
heater.
Landlords and several
companies involved in the
sale, installation, and
maintainance of the dryer
and its gas supply are be-
ing accused of negligence.
Because the lawsuits
are still pending, Haigler
refused to comment on
the proceedings.
The section of the
apartments that was
destroyed by the blast has
still not been rebuilt.
�'
And Trade
With The
Classifieds
Alumni Day Planned For April 14
BvMOllVRISH
By MOLLY BUSH
NUff Uiilrr
April 14 has been set as
the date for the ECU
Alumni Day, an annual
event with receptions,
tours and a Pirate foot-
ball game for visiting
ECU graduates.
"The purpose of
Alumni Day is
two-fold said Don Leg-
gett, director of alumni
relations. "We want to
� I � las a
� nradei k i . mg our
umi i h . . ortunity
is here. It gives he alum-
ni the han. i back
together on campus and
renew old memories
Leggett added. He said
that it also gives us an op-
portunity to renew ac-
quaintance, v-ith
classmates and pro-
fessors.
"We concentrate on
those classes having reu-
nions Leggett said.
There is an additional
focus on the special
groups � alumni
celebrating their Golden
(1934), and Silver (1959)
anniversaries and the
Senior Alumni Group (all
classes prior to 1934).
The activities planned
include a reception, cam-
pus tours, the annual pur-
ple and gold spring foot-
All
talk brotherhood.
Pi Kappa Phi is
doinu something
M�WWB(J'llW�
ball game and pre-game
"Pigskin Pig-Out
Party professional
society meetings and the
Annual Alumni Associa-
tion Luncheon meeting at
which Outstanding
Alumni awards will be
presented.
"This year more than
ever before, we are focus-
ing in on the professional
Custom crofting
&
Jewlery Repair
fair prices
guaranteed work
Bring This Ad for
25OFF
14K Chain Repair
by Les Jewlery
120 E. 5th Street
758-2127 10-5 TuesSat.
societies Leggett said
For reservation or
more information contact
Taylor-Slaughter Alumni
Center.
OCCOCOOCOGOGCOO!
gattej
sandwiches
steaksandwiches
pizza, ice cream
convenient
fast service
located on the hill
services
B Chapter
Wheelchair Push Athon in Greer
Please, help us help them.
ill
AppQe fyccii&s
'ssrsssss,Hilv�s,��s,�,��,
r
Watch Yourself at Mr. Gattis
Instant
Replay.
lot t u 91
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Mofis�i Iga.a�.
898 LUt-Sle Price 5.99
New release! by.
Nena
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Van Helen
Golden Earring
Judas Priest
The Alarm
Thomas Dolby
The Cars
Pretenders
TDKSA90Sle
Reg. 4.99-On Sale-
3.99; 2 for 6.99!
'ast Carolina dining
East Carolina University's
Student Union
Needs Chairpersons For The
Following Committees
� Forum.Committee - Selects and promotes lectures, symposium, or other related oro
grams that w,ll mterest the student body and University communt ?
i Public Relations & Publicity Committee - Will package publicity and coordinate total
promotion of the Union.
Recreation Committee - Plans and promotes the following activities:
� ACU-I Tournaments (i.e. bowling, billiards)
� Clubs (Table Tennis. Chess, Backgammon)
� Special Recreation Activities (Ice Cream Bingo, Watermelons, etc.)
� College Bow I '
Production Committee � Responsible for programs -Dinner Theatre. Madrigal Dinner.
Student Center decorations, receptions, and other programs � not contracted out.
Travel Committee - Plans and promotes the following types of trps: weekend excur-
stons. nos scheduled dunng the holidays and during the breaks, and also spomors the
I ravel Adventure Film Series.
Appl,caons for commmee chairpersons are available at Mendenhall Student Center
rrnatton Desk, or the Student Union Office (Room 234 -Mendenhall sSL
Umter). hoi more mformatton contact the Student Union Office at 757-6611 ex
soooocoooccooooocoooc
and Zk8W Lumhda � "Kapl� � Hy,
and Storm. We hope to see you again next year.
Greek All Stars This Buds For You!
fwf �y-frv -





JiiEEASTCAROL INI AN
MARCH 27, 1984
?
Interest In Organizations Increases
( nnlininxf LrM�, n. u ,K �??
Continued From Page 1
were even close to that
(membership) was '72
he said.
Student Republicans
currently have no campus
organizations for specific
candidates, according to
Kilcoyne, but individuals
are working with local
organizers. There is little
competition among
Republican candidates
for whom most ECU
students work. President
Reagan, Helms and
gubernatorial candidate
Jim Martin all have only
nominal opposition. As a
result, Republican
students tend to be more
unified and can concen-
trate their efforts.
"The basic task of the
College Republicans is to
get Ronald Reagan re-
elected Kilcoyne said.
"(And) a lot of us are
working independently
on Jim Martin's cam-
paign
The College
Republicans are also
working with student
groups in an effort to
woo support for can-
didates. Thursday night
they are sponsoring a
speaker with the Society
of United Liberal
Students and the NAACP
to discuss voting issues
with minorities
There are also commit-
tees working on campus
for gubernatorial can-
didates such as Eddie
Knox and Rufus Ed-
misten, and for Gov.
James B. Hunt, who is
challenging U.S. Sen
Jesse Helms' re-election
bid this year.
Macon Moye, a junior
history major and head
of the campus Edmisten
'84 committee, said his
group has "about 25 ac-
tive students we can call
on Moye said the cam-
pus organization works
closely with the Pitt
County coordinators and
with Edmisten's state-
wide campus coor-
dinator.
Moye speculated the
political process is star-
ting to "appeal to
younger people One
reason may be that in a
crowded field of con-
tenders, gubernatorial
candidates are courting
college students because
"a heavy campus vote
could make the dif-
ference Moye said.
Former SGA Speaker
of the Legislature Chris
Townsend is heading up
the ECU Knox '84 com-
mittee working for
former Charlotte Mayor
Eddie Knox in the
Democratic gubernatorial
race. "I think North
Carolina student interest
is going to be up from
previous just because its a
contested race" for
governor, Townsend pro-
jected. He added that
students haven't had an
opportunity to work for
state campaigns on a
large level in the last
several years. "In the last
eight to ten years there
Senate Committee at ter. Students in Raleigh
ECU, a fledgling and Chapel Hill, for in-
organization that held its stance, Naso noted are
first meeting last week allowed to register in
but already has an active their college towns
group of about a dozen Such a coalition would
students The committee be unusual considering
with "die-hard conser-
vatives
Along with increased
student involvement,
Sune said "the issues are
plans to focus on inform
ing students about Hunt,
but is also working on
fundraising and voter
registration efforts.
A common interest
among most ECU student voi.ea tnose who a -
hasn't been a major state- political organizations is activ?'tenoTd to work
wide office open voter registration in Pitt together across
County. The county cur
rently
the polarization of parties
in the last few years, ac-
cording to Sune. Sune
said in the late 1970s,
though students were
much less politically in-
volved, those who were
Read The
Classifieds
WEIGH
STATION
Townsend said
Hunt and Lt. Gov.
Jimmy Green have held
their current Offices since
1976 with little opposi-
tion, and Edmisten has
been attorney general
since 1972.
Townsend said the
campus Knox organiza-
tion has ten to 12 active
students, but he "expects
that to pick up" as elec-
tions near. The students
work closely with the
local and county
organizers, he said.
"Mostly what we're do-
ing now is manning head-
quarters and helping out
there Townsend said,
adding that they work on
fundraising only with
county organizers.
Outgoing SGA Presi
denies most
students who live in
Greenville only during
the school year the right
to register and vote local-
ly. Kilcoyne called for a
bipartisan effort to
challenge the local
policies, and Naso's com-
mittee is planning to talk
to the State Board of
Elections about the mat-
party
lines. "I came to school
on the heels of the Satur-
day Night Fever genera-
tion he said, noting the
disinterest of students
then. "I'm not sure if I
started school today I'd
be on the same side as
some of those I work with
back then Sune, who
considers himself a "pro-
gressive" Democrat, said
he worked frequently
Will Meet You 12 Way!
To salute the students & facultv of ECl
We're Cutting the Cost of A Six Wee!
Program in Half!
HESEARCH PAPERS
TOLL-FREE HOTLINE
800-621-5745
IN ILLINOIS CALL 312-922-0300
?�J ��RS' RESEARCH. ROOM 600
.?07 S. Dearborn. Chicago. IL 60605
dent Paul Naso is heading
up the Jim Hunt fo.
I ���
Call Pirate Walk 757-6616
DOivepsapy 1
Weight Control Se
r
The First Fiftv ECU student
faculty to Bring In This Ad V
Receive A 6-Week Reducing
Program for ONLY
$62.50
(Regular COM f
plu5 15.00 n
Offer go.id ONLY
30To60
;
I �SSS3SS0'dta-
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Lenses at our Everyday Low Prices!
Must
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SOFT CONTACTS
INt 1 I 1)1 s $
( Mil Kl I
59
00
PAIR
All NON PHI M RIPTION
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We Can Arrange
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Call 758-8889
rat j hee.
CAMP-SPECIALISTS
Several openings remaining for Jrs Srs and Facultv Staff a
j skilled specialists qualified to teach youngsters in Tennis. Land
j Spom, Gvmnast.es. Dance. Arts & Crafts. Ceramics. Water
bkaag. Nature at one of the leading coed camps in N.E. Penna
gContact the Co-op Office for on campus interview on April 4 or I
-all (305) 389-4050 until Apnl 2.
You can lose 16-28 lbs. in 6-weeks
No controls, shots, drugs, or pre packaged foods
Our Reducing Program offers food selections from ALL of
The Basic Food Groups
Dailv Weigh-ins & Counseling provide a Strong Support Base
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SUNGLASS LENSES
with purrhdtr of Iramrt it our
regular p�,�ulots available
rf Brtmn. Grav & Fade
NON PRISCKIPTIOS
LF-NSfSOM Y
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Phone
756-4204
PALACE

703 Gre�vtlle Blvd (Aero- From Pin P.�. N�, ToRmJ
H.rrl, Llcen.edOptlcLn Open 9 30 . m to 6 p m M
oeammy fall semester - � revue uhus available
Student Condos
SALES PRICES START AT $27 500
UP TO 95! FINANCING
on -Frl
RINCCOLD TOWERS
At The Campus 'East Carolina University
Were building a special place for East " rr
campus in your "vZ?" - �ve - ne� to
three s.des by ECU property, Ringgold Towersis� T Un't$ � ded on
on-campus dormitories. " S ,s doser to classrooms than some
Recent changes in tax laws make ownership of this rvr
mvestors and parents of students. Wed like toE m�B0w boeh
prov.de a special place for you ,0 live ���ZZ hom R,n��� Towers can
vestment requiring very little down payment ' P"ents with � "cellem
Sales information:
Ringgold Development Co Inc.
105 Commerce Street
P O. Drawer 568
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 355-2698
Rental information:
WARD PROPERTY
torn commiuci
N. e. lyau
�1� 7setio
i�I.HBM.�fc�i�mr �' " �
THF FA�:T(
(BO(
Ton
out the
to him �

He pr
one
pollen ai
err
"H
latc
and �
av�ake
A short st
abortion i
century.
In
-
dried r i
pita .
his
the thin
Opc
I en
abs
re
n

D-
alo
I
back
i! W8
day
-

T'r (
I
-
To





Read The
Classifieds
� WEIGH
STATION
W eight Control Service
Will Meet You 12 Way!
1 o salute the students & faculty of ECU
We re Cutting the Cost of A Six Week
Program in Half!
The First Fifty FCl students or
faculty to Bring In This Ad Will
Receive A 6-Week Reducing
Program for ONLY
$62.50
(Reguiai cosi 51 l�.70
d0N' V until April 4
Call 758-88891
f

J - prepacka
"� rs I od seie lions from AJ .1. of
ng provide a Strong Support Base
Supplement Contains No Harmful Drugs
-Y TAKES TWO
STATION AND YOU!
7:30"�S:30pm MWF, 7:30-5:00 TTH
'5 AVAILABLE
bdos
IT $27,SH
� ' . �
:s
woersity
:Y students to l,ve - neYT
rnun.ts Surrounded on
t0 Cl3SSrw than some
finished Each unit will be
renti
ng to
Pherty aDdvantageous for both
' h"w Ringgold Towers c�
f P-�nts w.th an excel, n"
THEgASTCAaol(N(AN
(BOOM!)
more days and I'm fortv " h? u,adlac' Three
face. He sat VwEtZff �d rubbed
to him. He felt re ieved "Oh thipty spot next
�� He thought? and St?phpe8d�o t o "
Pollen all humpineach o,h lh n�we� and the
entered the pTEL �"
�'Houold1sIiinoWLb,0nha,red ljttle girl.
stantaneous STofSfc wTo' EL? 3" "
later: 40-25) he figured! .�' � ' baby a -vear
S.0 50-J aZ�0
abortion in the 21st
century.
More Sick Fickshun by:
Mick LaSalle
Entertainment
MARCH 27. 984 Pafe7
Jned him�lf ,�'�?ou3S nd pufoh" ?' Then "
Plaslic shavina mal r, P n thc transparenl
Scooping his briefcase off his desk he �n.ii ,
lvI imf 'k8" d�0r �pencd mmediateh, having on
recently been re-sensitized to Tom's bodv Hi, �m
tapala rolled out. The car roof op"ned Tom dL
ed m and sat down. The roof closed. He p?e sed he
fou d n T and Z1'Pped �ut fhe dri?eJav He
a id I 'eaiSK en(ing Stat'�n- A Mu'ak v"�of
an old Dead Kennedys rune came on. Tom hummed
Band The Dice
Roll Hot Seven
With New L.P.
Question: What do you Bet u.h�� . -
singerguitarist from Bermudfa 2J� "�'
SSWaJSSSS
and shopping mails of Toronto ' POr" Ptacs
to TT,e nif" ,hil �v�n"� first learned to dance
�,��� srsrj'sr �5
reminds you why you wen, �,over r�k V I
Hayden Vialva �fXS3.ES heS� ST!
I eaveii -k . ag8?rv e Framptom and Chuck
Leave, Chris and the band have turned out a r�
n roll record the likes of which hasn't hn fc!2
shot s the J ,h,ng5- 55 X -n
Tom had a good job. He worked as a consultant
r a firm that made parts for Bodv Drvers First tak
mt! the job on a whim, when he'and Jamie moved
ba.k to I ong Island to collect on the inheritance his
secret "e "�W had his own ��ce
It was late afternoon. Tom sat at his desk his
chai h� CnmplVeu SetUing back in his swivel
chair he swallowed his afternoon iranquilizer and
closed his eyes, Images from his youth floated by in a
�j' "��� y: Cornell, concerts and
fault WCre dead bUt U WaS thdr OWn damned
Then the door opened. Tom's secretary, Miss Fox,
Long Is md Central High School class of '96
entered. Mr. Young, your wife is on the phone
lorn adjusted the miniature camera, combed back
his hair and smiled "Mkc Fr.v aa
you you're a fox? ' d any�ne ever tdI
She was confused. He was on a roll "Th,n k
Young leaped forward n'h.s chair S ?
e camem off to the side �Se h,tt,ng
"What's going on?"
"Our daughter is pregnant
What? Are vou sure7"
RJghtY:ndIr0ouTnolPre8nsSCkan y�V bdieVC 't?
aroundlin a daze blubbered " Wa,king
maket Verll anythin� t0 Tom "anted to
hS He maSe rLVh C WCrC reaching oul to comft
ner He made reaching gestures into the camera
Two months and thank God Jamie saidI "Ar
H thr'$ time for the vacuum cleaner
He cleared his throat. "Where's Lisa now?"
Pun' h:donr,r�T�om hC'S "� � " l� be
Tom made a face. "I'll be home right away He
hung up, and his wife disappeared.
inner with their debut aJbum
mediately. The sooner this is ended the
all concerned. Jamie.
Tom drove like a lunatic, up the tree-lined road
into the quickly accomodating and highlv sVmS
garage which was surrounded by hedges' When he
got inside the house, he found this note
Tom,
The Doctor was willing to take her im
Tom crumpled the note, hesitated throwing ,t on
he ground long enough not to. He shoved the pUr
into a pocket of his suit jacket, then p.cked ud fhe
newspaper and walked into his studv HeemovS
h.s jacket and tie and sat down at a table sized de
"That calls for a drink Tom said. So he broke
President Stallone, the seventh most powerful man in
the world, stared back at him. "Adrian' Xh�"
Tom wailed Then he looked around for "heTdellat
would give him something to do.
It came. He leaped to the storage closet whinrwvi
open the door and plunged himfelf onto pUef
S�fc2?2L?i b�XeS- He threw stuff around uS-
ti he found what he wanted - the box containing his
old albums. "Rock and roll he veiled like a
drunken slob. Then he staggered out of the closet
holdmg fifty records like they were tables of stone
He grabbed the first one and threw it on The
record was old and scratchy. But Tom jumped
around, forty years old, mouthing the words ad
strumming an imaginarv guitar
Music blared. He walked to a book shelf and pull-
ed down a novel. Summer of '82 was the title - the
author, a thinner, shorter-haired Tom Young
rMTH�� !T,Ied k"owin8lv at his younger self. He
read. About the author: Thomas R. Young was
born in New York City in 1962. He received his A B
from Cornell in 1984, and his MA. from a cor-
respondence course in 1986. He is, at present, an in-
sructor m the English department at the State
University of New York at Stony Brook. He resides
in the town of Stony Brook with his wife and infant
daughter. This is his first novel. "
Tom lay down on the couch with his book He
mumbled "I'm a genius, I'm a genius and un-
buckled his pants to get comfortable. He tried to
read, but the music was blaring. He was too relaxed
to get up and turn it off. He was too dizzy to read
anyway.
So he lay back more comfortably on the couch his
book over his face, his younger self smiling at'the
ce.hng He breathed up and down. And the music
kept playing.
Yelling.
YdUng�Ung' �ne nighl Up' trv" to roll over.
thedav8'5 CeS OPenmg Suddenl lhe
steonhe s � a " d a
earY�"WeTnusn "A now ���� ��
sL iusl let your :alher handle you dearie "
"Come in
nXZ L,Sa- ' MW nim � SMcd Tom �
J2FiZ SCnmC "i? f�r 'OU to �vc � W Punish-
ment, she sd, and then ihe room
until she saw the half empty bottle of DfewaE
Shk0c. "Shit, JL'kwJtSSr Shc
No Of course not he lied. "Oh mavbe ,v,rv
so often a glass of wine at dinner. Or twofo occa
on But no more Who do you think vou" Sk-
ng to here anyway - the town drunk? He pYuVed
Lisa. I mean, this is a joke Face it. You're fifteen
Back when I was a kid, in the 80s, girls J�
well into their 30s. Or maybe just thfgirls f knew �e
that as it may. I just hope you've learned sonShing
from this absurd fiasco �ncining
it DadTh" hHSiVaiedu then Spoke- "rm having
it, Dad. That s why Mother s upset "
"Having it
I!1 "?�� ll-rm going t0 have e babv
He yelled. But what do ou think you're talking
i � Z empty suit? Ycu're flfteen years old
Lisa shuddered at his raised voice and choked out
please?' make ne VaCUum k' Dad
Young took a deep breath. It wasn't over vet But
S'y h;ek f rdie; daughter seemed so in!
nocent like an imbecile. "Then have it If that's
what you want. It'll be okay "
Lisa looked up in surprise. "Oh, thank you, Dad-
dy. It struck Tom's ears like she were dght vears
old and he just brought heme a chocolate"rabS?
He wondered if he were doing the right thing
She came toward him and hugged him, still saving
See (BOOM!). Page 8 g'
Chase Top Violinist
U.S. Bronze Medalist Performs At Fletcher
Violinist Stephanie Chase
r

By GORDON IPOCK
Fcalam E4t�
xa TC 55 in store for ,ocal music lovers. On
SSd3y' !tVnih Vi�linist StePhanie Chase will per-
fonn on the ECU campus in A.J. Fletcher Recital
Ms Chase is best known for winning the bronze
medal ,n the 1982 Tchaikovsky Competition
Moscow, the top American prizewinner. Before her
Senwlr08 5 M?SC�W' thc youthful
bmh?n(SSTi22JZ? " gaining much atttion
both in the United States and in Europe. Both before
"l Moscow performance, she has chriSd
Prize?n?h,rhWOn ncmer2US 8Wards inc,udin� fi"t
the V�$ f hlCag� SvTOPhony Youth Competition,
SfiiV n Ward for thc BuffaJo Philharmonic the
Mu fc aiC"LTn �? ?cnNational Federation of
SteoSmV SJ Da!f GuB- DmUV Competition.
Stephanie Chase began her study of the violin
under her mother, Fannie Chase. She continued with
SSS3T �f thC JJiard Sch001 h theT
ternationally renowned violinist Arthur Grumiaux.
H42 onTo? S PCtrU$ Gua� vJofiTSS
makim0 cxamPcs of v��ian violin
She has earned excellent reviews for her perfor-
mances at Carnegie Hall, Alice Tully Hall
Washington D.Cs John F. Kennedy Center the
Dorothy Chandler Pavilion in Los Angeles and a?
London's Barbican Centre and QueeTT Elizabeth
it hch-ll8hJlt0.nc�fthecritic,s Praise has varied,
GloSe�Henn.8,�W,ng- F�r eXamp,e' thc ton
Olobe. Her playing is commanding. The grand
manner comes naturaUy to ho thetound is W
and beauufid, the technique, an unpnvTbma
uon of security and bravura she plays witii��
panache and temperament tLSb2 SS
�She played the very devil out of the fiddJe �'
Ms. Chase will be accommmi�, kI !? �'
Marie McDermott, anenTu T" Am,C
20, but also an VmSSJR
other awards S-tlftR�
ed the Accompanying Prize at hL i� ward'
Tchaikowsky CJeSion l�J? ��Ml
forms extensively as a cJi�mtIJ � She also per-
H'P'Gt)04i0�im�0mQm� '��?� ���-��-� -?






8
HE k-ASl v. rdi INIAN
MARCH 27, 184
Tar River I
'V
(BOOM!)
Continued From Page 7
"Thank you " He closed
his eyes Hi daughter
.id whocvei the boy was
He couldn't imagine it.
But he could picture it It
got him sick
! isa left the room
� om sat dou n in a lounge
til and fell asleep.
Five minutes later,
Jamie entered quietly and
found her husband snor-
ing She smiled fien-
dishly, picked up the
Dewars and poured it
� : r hi head "He
' Id it " he groaned.
11 en, with the empt)
lie -he beat the hell
of him "What do
�i mean she doesn't
c to get the vacuum
cleaner?' (Boom!)
la en't i u eer heard
re prod uctive
eed t Boom !)
'What are you doing
here, anvwav, � jerking
Off?" (Boom!)
Tom tried to think. He
remembered a line from
his boxing days: "Once
the brain dies, the body
dies " Or was it the other
way around? He tried to
go to the body on his
wife, but Jamie landed
with a bottle-fist com-
bination that sent him
sprawling onto the bear
skin rug.
She pulled him up by
the hair and held the bot-
tle over his head. "All
right, it's either you or
the baby. Which one of
you gets it?"
"The baby! The
baby Tom heard
himself saying.
And so the kid was
doomed.
(Boom)
� ��TRICTfD JS-
�� I'UMlMnti m
��:�' "��!�� CUM
Psycho Killer
Qu' est-ce que c' est?
A UNIVERSAL-OAK PICTURE
"Richard Franklin, the director,
and Tom Holland, the writer,
haven't robbed the grave.
They've opened it up to have some
fun
� Vincent Canbv,
THE NEW YORK TIMES
By GORDON I POCK
(catena Mil or
According to Thomas Wolfe,
you can never go home again.
But that's a theme the makers of
Psycho II don't buy, especially
when going home means a sure-
fire, money-making sequel to the
classic horror film Psycho.
The original Psycho was releas-
ed in 1960. It was directed and
produced by that master of the
macabre, Alfred Hitchcock and
starred Janet Leigh and Anthony
Perkins.
Perkins played sicko Norman
Bates, a queer sort of fellow who
ran an out-of-the-way motel a
motel where not many people
��
checked in � and even tewer
checked out. It was easy to tell
Perkins had a screw loose. He
often broke into uncontrolled
smirks and giggles, like he knew
something he wasn't telling. And
he had a habit of dashing up the
hill to an old Victorian mansion
where his cranky old mother liv-
ed. And Ma liked knives, liked
plunging them into nude women
in motel showers.
Hitchcock builds the suspense
slowly in Psycho to a sudden
shock. It's a formula that works
and has become the standard for
all horror films. Of course the
famous scene in Psycho is the
unidentified knife-wielding hand
punching, slashing, ripping and
crunching into soft flesh I
blood pours down white fl
and swirls rnernlv acros the
shower tiles and down the di
Perkins is back 22 v
later � in Psycho II Rid
Franklin directs this honw
ing; Tom Holland wrote it
original was written by fa
Stefano from the novel by R �
Bloch. Whether Franklin's film
measures up to Hitchcocl
classic is for you to dc
Psycho is Wednesdav ever. g
film at Hendnx Theatre 5
showtime), and Psycho II plavs
Thursday, Frida and Satui
evenings (shows at and 9
p.m.). Admission is h �
I.I), and aaivitv card
THE
LADIES NIGHT AT
THE KING AND
Death Threats Force LaSalle
To Cancel Press Conference,
But Film Series Will Be Shown
B GORDON 1POCK
,4If
�Lr�iurrs editor
i a press i on
11 cast
bum!
I could hardiv believe
i n md
age in th
oks. a- si j
ephone
. ; - lie
i
1 i ida
lasi � ��. ek
I asl ai olinian was
ing a couple of
telej I ne calls per
from radical
l groups from all
h counti Two
' feminist groups
the I os ngeles
d one militant San
I i icisco group who call
themselves UI AM
(l nited 1 esbians gainst
Me phoned in death
against the ' sw ine
A band of
si bikers vowed to
ride non-stop from
Detton for a chance to
' ge; 1 aSalle
In the face of such
stile threats, FaSalle
has cancelled the Tuesday
press conference (today)
was scheduled for
noon in room 247 at
Mendenhall.
"� wa I'm gonna let
�; azj broads get a
i mug said
" 1 hey find out
im, and I'm a
lOK
goner
When asked if calling
he t onference wasn't
in tact "wimping out
I .ialle responded: "Bet-
ter to be anonymous than
not to be at all. And then,
there's the rest of
womanhood to consider.
What good am I to them
after a gang of crazies rip
to shreds?"
Despite the threats.
LaSalle says he will go on
with his film series, Mick
LaSalle Presents Great
Broads of the 20s and
30s LaSalle will show the
first film in the series,
Camille, a 1936 classic
starring Greta Garbo,
tonight, March 27, at
8:30 p.m. in room 221 in
.Mendenhall.
"There could be trou-
ble admits LaSalle.
"You never know when
some crazy is gonna come
crashing the gate. But 1
hope these radicals will
have some respect for the
great Garbo
When asked about the
threat from the biker and
Marxist feminists,
LaSalle said, "There are
some things � sacred
principles � that are
worth risking your neck
for. I think Greta Garbo
is such a cause. This is
where I take mv stand
and
Five years of heavy dope smoking and this 18-year-
old needs Oil of Olav � badh.
��ot QUEEN NORTH
ueen WED.MAR28
X()KT" The Fantastic Shakers
8-12
All Dining Customers Admitted Free.
College I.DFree Admission
Til 7:30
Happy Hour 6-8
Coming: Thurs. Mar 29
The Original Platters and North Tower
April 25- The Fabulous Kays And Peter Adomis
Wed. May 30th- Jerry Butler And The Band Of Qz,
$ FREL DRYCLEANiNG $
BRING IN 3 AND GET 1 FREE!
The Lowest Priced Garment Is Free1
Present this Coupon By March 31 1984
S FREE DRYCLEANING
t
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fcitt It kt 3 Mm Art
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COUPON UK'C .M�uui,h MARCH II 194
$FREE LAUNDRY BRING IN 4 SHIRTS AND PAY FOR 3 ONE IS FREE! 4 for 3V
Present this Coupon By March 31.1984
CFREE LAUNDRYi
$��������?? ??????????�??????�����?�,
phone
752-1172
I
?
?
r
?
?
i
?
Cliffs
Seafood
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Monday thru Thursday
Popcorn Shrimp
$2.95
Ocean Perch $1.99
Seafood Cakes $1.99
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Located I mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. Ext.
� � , � -
�X � I ��

�? -� w
- � p
Am
B CORDON pO K
Out of more
thousand lite
magazines tha
poetry. Writer's Dige-
has selected I u -
Poetr as one
�'Top 50
September 1984
Writer's Digr
sen! a brief pr I
River Poet-
numeric,
other 4v
Writer's Dige
the "Poet
"today's
for pot-
Pet-
of Tar R
"Eva
50. f �
when ou
sider how mu
magazines ari
in this com
Write-
the First p .
recognize
of TKP
Poetry). For
secutive
onginalU
TRP havt
and ha
in The
Magazine �
Year B
Poetrv Ta
poem a:
w a s
Prize ant
These -
include.
tions
dn iduals Evei
TRP
acknowledgem
of dozer-
pub 11 s h e d
publisher and u
presses alike
House. I
Schuster.
Georgia Pres
burgh I
Millar a
othe
"On a
ONth
Apr
lto
& If rain col
h
Wright
thep:
Bringing us
i�






4
Tar River Poetry
Among Writer's Digest's Top 50
' a em
ar
1
R
Mat i,
-
' : 11

1
Mi

rsits
M


1
rRp
-
Poeti

-r of f t, - Poetrv
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
Congratulates
Johnny Rainey
On Being Elected
SGA President
Set Up Yourself.
ON the Mall
April 1st
1 to 6
pm
If rain concert will be
held in
Wright Auditorium.
THE PEDESTRIANS
bringing us Back to the Future
THE FABULOUS KNOBS
Welcome to Miller Time





t
?
?
THE FAST t'AROl INIAN
Sports
MAIM H 2 HW P' 10
Bucs, UNC At
Harrington Today
By ED NICKLAS
Sports E4ilor
The ECU baseball team will
take a 15-5 record into today's 3
p.m. game against nationally-
ranked North Carolina, and
although the stands will be filled
with purple-bleeding and anti-
Carolina blue boosters, the con-
test is just a pause in the horse
race for the ECAC South title,
says Pirate head coach Hal Baird.
"Because it's North Carolina,
the media and our students will
look at it differently says Baird.
"It's not as important as games
coming up this weekend against
(conference opponents) William
and Mary and Richmond
Baird intends to toss Robby
McClanahan or Jim Peterson
against the fouth-ranked Tar
Heels, but he plans to use more
than one pitcher to "tune up
before the weekend
UNC holds the series lead at
12-9, having won both games last
year by the score of 9-1. In 1982,
the Pirates beat the Tar Heels 2-1
during the regular season and 1-0
in the NCAA East Regional.
The Pirates have jumped out to
their best start since 1982, when
the went 16-4. But Baird feels the
team has not been severlv
challenged yet. "Anytime you do
that well you have to feel good
says Baird. "However, we have
played the easier of our
schedule
Last weekend, ECU, which has
won five of its last seven games,
defeated Ohio behind the strong
pitching of Jim Peterson (4-0) and
split a pair with conference foe
American University.
Baird was disappointed in the
loss to AU, but he realized his pit-
ching staff had thrown five days
in a row. "We were at the point
that we had tired arms he says.
Saturday, the Pirates scored
eight runs in the first two innings
to defeat American University
11-2 in the first game of a
doubleheader.
Lefthander Robbv Mc-
Clanahan (3-0) went the distance
giving up only five hits.
Mike Sullivan led the Pirate hit-
ting attack with four RBI's, while
Greg Hardison and Todd Evans
each collected two hits.
ECU got on the scoreboard
quickly in the first inning, as Har-
dison reached on an error and
scored on Evans' double.
Johnson's single moved Evans
to third, and David Wells walked
to load the bases. Mike Williams
followed with single to bring
home Evans and then scored with
Wells when Mark Shank lashed a
double.
In the second inning, the
Pirates hit the ball with the same
authority. Hardison and Evans
singled and Wells walked to load
the bases, then Williams was hit
by a pitch and Sullivan doubled to
account for four more ECU runs.
ECU played far worse in the se-
cond game, committing four er-
rors and leaving the bases loaded
in the last inning in losing 6-5.
ECU's Winfred Johnson (3-2)
lost his second straight game, pit-
ching 6 I, innings before being
relieved by Chubby Butler.
Johnson, however, kept the
Pirates in the game at the plate,
slamming two home runs.
The Eagles scored two runs in
the top of the seventh to extend
their lead to 6-3. The Pirates,
however, made a run of it in the
bottom half of the inning.
Mark Cockrell led off the inn-
ing with an infield hit and Steve
Sides walked and Hardison singl-
ed to load the bases. Shank, pinch
running for Sides, scored from
third on a wild pitch and Johnson
was intentionally walked to fill the
bases again with only one out.
ECU failed to tie the game,
however, as Wells struck out and
Sullivan grounded out to end the
inning.
With the split, ECU ran its
record to 15-5 overall and 3-1 in
the conference.
First Game
AU 000 020 0-2 5 1
ECU 440 021 x-11 11 0
Second Game
AU 003 100 2-6 10 1
ECU 200 001 2-5 8 4
Pirate third baseman David Wells look
OAR
s determined to score
V PATTIRSON
� SCI) Ptwfo l�b
More Quiche For Gastineai
'ing Back Real Men
By ED NICKLAS
OAR v PATTIHSOM - �CU MM I
ECU'S Winfred Johnson gets praise from teammate Craig Van Deventer
At a meeting in Honolulu last Wednesday. NFL owners
agreed that the players could no longer engage in taughtinc
celebrations. No longer can Mark Gastincau plrforii Kck
zone6 eXtraVaganza nor can the Fun Bunch frolic in the en-
Some say the banning will be disconcerting to the peoDle
who watch the games; the fans just won't be able to enjoy the
'he endzone�Ul SeCing " �ffensive team shake their tails in
I guess what will happen is that there will be increased
studies concerning the feasibility of novel techniques of spik-
ing � a look at the traditional "take that, pigskin
Running backs will dazzle the ball between their legs and
perform behmd-the-back slams; before spiking,8 Zc
receivers will atempt to balance the ball on their head as they
wSr �TnP K dT likC a bird in nint: e"ds
will spin the ball on their finger, drop it, kick it with their
heel and punch it with their fist; quarterbacks will hold the
ball between their legs, knock it out with one hand and spike
with the other.
But what about the poor defensive and offensive linemen
They get the short end of the stick on this deal. Sure the of-
fensive lineman can spike the ball, but they're not that good
NFL COMMENTARY
at it; their hands are too fat to grip the ball. What they're
good at is huddling up in the endzone and dancma It just
won't be the same.
The defensive linemen w,ll assuredly suffer mosi G
after a quarterback sack, how are thev gome to disi their
acting ability to future network emplovers Ho are they go-
ing to motivate themselves for the following play
ramifications are mind-boggling
It seems the players will have to alter their style anc return
to the blue collar, lower-paid football davs of Sam Huff
Charley Taylor and Ray Nitchske. Back then, you didn't see
these fellas performing ballet and disco on the field The
fellas certainly didn't eat quiche. And the funny thing is the
foolery aHended and enjoyed the gam without the tom-
The banning is going to be tough on the inflated and
pampered egos of today's NFL stars. "But .hat the heck
AfterJieT,n; . Wefn SaCnfiCe a feu thmgS' nht fellas�
Alter all, we get paid pretty good
Boyette Excels On And Off The Field
By RANDY MEWS
�at��i Sporti Editor
ECU currently stands at 9-5
after making the transition from
slow to fast-pitch softball this
year, and a large part of its suc-
cess can be attributed to
sophomore pitching sensation
Stacy Boyette.
Boyette is 6-0 on the season, has
gone the distance in each of her
victories and has an impressive
1.10 earned run average.
When not on the mound,
Boyette serves as designated hitter
for the Pirates. "We like to have
Stacy in the lineup even when
she's not pitching head coach
Sue Manahan said. "She has such
a great deal of intensity she seems
to motivate the rest of the team
Boyette said she doesn't do
anything special to motivate her
teammates, but explained her con-
stant grin might have something
to do with it.
"Whenever I'm pitching I
always smile she said. "It ir-
ritates the batters, and sometimes
it makes the people in the field
play harder
Aside from excelling on the
baseball field, Boyette is also a
standout student. She caries a 4.0
grade point average and was nam-
ed ECU's outstanding freshman
chemistry student last year.
"I don't go out and play until I
have my work done she said.
"It's hard to keep my grades up
with all the traveling the team
does, but I think I have the ability
to make a 4.0, so that's what I'm
going to keep trying to do
Boyette received a chemistry
award for placing higher then any
other ECU freshman on the
American Chemistry Society na-
tional test. Her score placed her in
the top 98 percentile in the coun-
try, but Boyette said chemisty
isn't even what she wanted to ma-
jor in before coming to college.
"Forestry is what I originally
planned to study, but the job op-
portunities are limited and there's
not much room for
advancement
Boyette also said anyone who
graduates with a forestry degree is
placed in a management position,
not out in the fields like she had
hoped.
Boyette hails from Hopewell,
Va a small paper mill town, and
said that's how she became in-
terested in forestry. While in high
school, Boyette received the Pul-
pand award which would have
given her a full scholarship if she
had decided to attend N.C. State
and major in chemical engineer-
ing, but Boyette said she felt more
at home at CU.
"When I was looking at col-
leges to attend I was only con-
sidering State and Virginia Tech,
but coach Manahan knew me
because she was from Virginia,
and talked me into taking a look
;at ECU. I practiced one day with
the team, and the atmosphere was
so much more relaxed than at
State, I decided to come here
In addition to Boyette being a
chemistry whiz, valedictorian of
her senior class, selected to Who's
Who among American high
school students in 1981 and 1982
and lettered four years in basket-
ball, she was also considered one
of the top high school softball
prospects in the country.
In her senior year she had a
record of 20-1, 168 strikeouts and
an unbelievable ERA of 0.82. She
was also named the United Girls
Softball Association's most
valuable player when she led her
summer league team to a second
place finish in the national tour-
nament in New Mexico.
If not busy enough with her
studies and athletics, Boyette also
indulged in the martial arts, tak-
ing karate lessons from the se-
cond grade up until she was a
junior in high school.
Boyette was a sixth-year black
belt at the time she had to give up
Karate, but said the lessons helped
her discipline and improve her
physical coordination.
Boyette said she only has time
to train in short spurts now that
she's at ECU but plans to take it
back up this summer. "I have a
dream of being a professional
kick boxer one day, so I want to
get back some of my foot
quickness
Upon arriving at ECU for her
first year of collegiate softball,
Boyette said things weren't exact-
ly as she expected because the
Pirates were still in the AI AW and
playing slow-pitch. "I thought
about transferring because I could
never get the hang of pitching
underhanded, but I stuck with it
and looked forward to the upcom-
ing year
Now that this year is here,
Boyette said she's glad that she
waited. "Some teams won't play
us because this is our first year in
fast-pitch, but we've worked real-
ly hard together and I think we
can compete with anybody
When asked if she thought the
Pirates could qualify for the
NCAA tournament, Boyette said
ECU is fighting an uphill battle.
"The selection precess is very
poor because there is no state
tournament, and it all depends on
who the NCAA picks.
"Last year George Mason was
42-2 Boyette added, "but they
didn't qualify because the selec-
tion committee didn't think they
played a tough enough schedule
Although it seems doubt full the
Pirates will make it to the
NCAA's this year, Boyette thinks
everything is going well for the
team. "We don't have any
superstars she said, "but if we
can stay together as a team we can
have a successful year
ByGENEWU
M�ff v�ni�.
The lii �
have been busv
two weeks com
three diffcrer.
naments. and t
word to descn
play is incoi
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"�OFESS.Cn I
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AUTO ACCIDENTS Spec!
personal irtior. � s.
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Stacy Boyette has a 6-0 nitr-k
� Pitch,n8 ord and � 4.0 G.P.A.
QUIX
TRAVrJ
Eurail oi
Britrail oi
New orkj
round trii
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QU
31(
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- - - -


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27. WS4 Page 10
�y mttbbson - ECU WKrt, L�
Js looks determined to score.
r Gastineau;
k Real Men
NFL COMMENTARY
s are too fat to grip the ball. What they're
huddling up m the endzone and dancing. It just
linemen will assuredly suffer most Geez
back sack, hou are they going to display their
it to future network employers? How are they 20-
I tivate themselves for the following play- The
tions are mind-boggling "� 1 ne
ueth4naaryerri,rha?jo a,ter their ste and r��"
lin ?o"er;paid fo0lba11 da's of Sam Huff
alor. and Ray Nitchskc. Back then, you didn't see
I a orming ballet and disco on the field. The
' SLS?" qU1Che" And the funnv thin? �� the
I ended and enjoyed the games without the torn
lea
?oftSS vp t0Ugh �n the innated and
egos of today s NFL stars. "But vshat the heck "
�. we can sacrifice a few things, right fellas-
get paid pretty good
-
��;
-
"Kpij'
V -
-W - �
tte has a 6-0
K����
�cu
P,lchin r�ord and a 4.0 G.P.A.
THfcETXtoij 19W
By GENE WILLIAMS
The iinksters of ECU
have been busy the past
two weeks, competing in
three different tour-
naments, and the only
word to describe their
P'ay is inconsistent.
At South Carolina, the
Pirates finished in last
Place while competing
against eight NCAA divi-
S1�n I teams. South
Carolina won the tourna-
GOLF
ment by 20 shots over
perennial power Wake
Forest.
"This is possibly the
worst tournament we've
Played since I've been
around sighed coach
Jerry Lee.
Indeed it was, as Lee
lamented over the incon
wstency of his players.
'They are playing very
erratic and I don't know
what to do. They've got
me guessing right now
The Pirates continued
their inconsistency at
Campbell, where they did
slightly better, finishing
in 10th place out of 13
teams.
In fairness to the
lmksters, the team was
not at full strength.
Academic loads are con-
sidered when choosing
the traveling squad, and
for the tournament at
Campbell a couple of
players were left back at
ECU to concentrate on
their studies.
Campbell won the
tourney with a team total
of 906. ECU finished at
941, 35 shots off the
pace.
"I
they
on
don't know what
have their minds
Lee said, "but
� r �.uncioaas are con- on Lee said, "but ,
fcCU Tracksters Have
they're not mentally
prepared when they tee it
up
This might very well be
the cause of inconsistent
play from the Pirates who
some say are the best
golfers ECU has had in a
long time.
March 19-21 the
Pirates were on the road
to compete in the Duke
Ivitational. At the end of
the second day, they were
in a comfortable position
Tournaments
at ninth place out of 24
teams. However, the
third day brought ques-
tionable playing condi-
tions as well as inflated
scores, and the Pirates
could do no better than
19th place.
Despite the finish,
Mere was sparkle of ex-
cellence in the play of ris-
ing sophomore Mike
Bradley. Bradley's three-
day scores were 77, 76
and 68 � his first col-
legiate subpar round. Lee
was pleasantly surprised.
"I was real pleased with
Mike's performance
said Lee. "1 wasn't ex-
pecting it because he shot
20 shots worse at CamD-
bcll
This type of all or
nothing play has plagued
the Pirates during the
season, and Lee is
wondering what move to
make next. "I don't
By PETE FERNAND
sum �rtm
The ECU men's track
team turned in one of its
best efforts of late in the
Braves Invitational at
Pembroke University
over the weekend.
"It was the best meet
this year indoor or out-
door maybe the best
performance in two
years That was one of
many proud remarks by
head coach Bill Carson
on the men's track team. !
"The guys worked very
hard for four straight
days in preparation for
the Pembroke meet
Carson added.
TRACK
The men's team had an
outstanding meet with 11
of its members placing in
one or more events. The
addition, the Pirates
broke two school records
and set a new meet
record.
The 4 X 100 relay team
anchored by Henry
Williams set a school
record with a time of 40.8
seconds. Unfortunately,
Williams fell and was dis-
qualified for being out-
side the exchange zone on
the handoff
With upcoming meets
and the need for Williams
to be healthy, Carson was
reluctant to let him par-
ticipate in another event.
Eventually, Williams
convinced Carson to let
him enter another event.
In turn, Williams placed
first in the 200 meter dash
with a time of 21.03
seconds. Williams com-
mented: "I was mad and
upsetI wanted to show
everyone what a good
team we had
Ershire Evans con-
tinued the fast Pirate
pace by placing first in
the 100 meter dash. Ac-
cording to Carson, Evans
had "a tremendous time"
of 10.21 seconds.
"I really didn't concen-
trate on breaking the
recordthe race comes
first said Evans, whose
time set a meet record.
Ruben Pierce added to
the Pirate victories by
placing first and setting a
meet record in the quarter
mile with a time of 47.37
seconds.
Others placing in the
quarter mile were
William Fuller (second),
Eddie Bradley (fourth)
and Vincent Epps (fifth).
Substituting for Craig
White, who pulled a
hamstring, Walter
Southerland placed first
Meet
know what to do " k.
sadI'll just 'keep
changing the lineup until
we find one that works
With half the season
gone, time h running out
for this year's edition of
Pirate golfers to turn
theoretical greatness into
reality. Nonetheless, the
team will head to Furman
next week and try to
achieve some consistency
in its play.
in the 110 high hurdles
with a time of 14.39
seconds.
Phillip Estes rounded
out the Pirate runners
with a fourth place in
both the 100 meter and
200 meter dashes with
times of 10.7 and 21.8
seconds
Teammates William
Richardson and Hans
Bothmann finished third
and fourth in the half
mile with a time of
1:55.14.
In his first race, Rob
Rice finished third in the
440 intermediate hurdles
with a time of 55.20
seconds. Coach Carson
commented that "Rice's
time was awfully good
Two players not par-
ticipating in the meet due
to injury were Craig
White, who had a pulled
hamstring, and Nathan
McCorkle, who ran a
relay but experienced leg
pain.
Other players not
panticpating were Chris
Brooks and Maurice
Monk, who according to
Coadarsonwerebeing
saved for next week's
meet. "I decided to lay
them off Carson said.
Overall, Carson said
that the men's track team
really did well. "Henry
Wilhams had the fastest
200 meter run this early in
the season he said.
Carson went on to say
that "Evans, Pierce and
Williams lead the track
team at this point
Evans and Pierce. like
Williams, also had ex-
tremely fast times in their
events this early in the
season.
The next meet for the
Pirates will be the Florida
Relays in Gainsville, on
March 30 and 31. Carson
is enthusiastic about the
Florida meet and thinks
that the Pirates could
finish in the "top 5 in a
couple or few of the
relays.
JT � v r Sutherland placed first commented that "Rice'
� Nettan Squashed Bv Hnrn
ttl�l�n( sport, Mllur ����B 7"���M�
The ECU men's tennis
team was defeated 8-1 by
the Harvard "B" team
yesterday afternoon on
East Carolina's varsity
courts.
"Harvard has a well
rounded team assistant
coach Keith Zengel said.
"We just didn't have it
today
The only bright spot
for the Pirates was the
play of the number one
doubles team of Paul
Owe�-�nd Gaien Tronic
"ho escaped with a 7-5,
6-4 victory.
The Pirates fall to 4-4
on the spring season and
10-10 overall with the
loss, and will be in action
again March 29 against
tennis r Tl7�n"r'rmi rrrr-r
UNC-Wiimington on the
varsity courts at 100
p.m.
Results
Ken Klienfield (H) d.
Paul Owen 7-5, 6-1; Peter
Palonduian (H) d. David
Creech 6-2, 6-1; Matt
Porteus(H)d. Galen Tre-
ble 6-1, 6-4; John Simon
(H) d. Greg Lovd 6-4
6-U Keith Collar (H) d
Garth Vincent (H) d!
David Turner 7-6, 6-1.
Owen-Treble (ECU) d.
Kleinfield-Simon 7-5,
6-4; Porteus-Palouduian
(H) d. Creech-Moran 7-5,
6-4; Vincent-Collar (H)
i 5C Medium Soft
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j with purchca of 4 tocos,
SuP�r Supr�m�, or Super
I Burrit� Expires April 15. 984
I
L.r�, on, coupon pe, cuttoma, pe, v
2 FREE Tacos
with purchase of
2 at reg. price
Expires April 15. 1984
264 By Pass
Next to Toyota East
"Hcocn
Sigma Tau Gamma
Present
GoldFish Eating
Contest
ues Mar. 27,1984
Classifieds
Overton 's
Supermarket. Inc
AM
Prizes: 1st $100.00
2nd 50.00
Adm.$1.00
18yrs $2.00
Sponsored by:
Pet Village
Blue Moon Cafe'
The Creamery
Heart '3 Delight
Crows Nest
Chicos
P.T.A.
For Head's Only
Jobbies Gym
Aano 's
Wright Bras. Bike Shop
Wash Pub
3rd 25.00
Happy's Pool Room
Domino's
Bicycle Post
Pocket Music
Mr. Gattis
SALE
ssn Et " ,iov �po"��ti
??�!?��� ECU. stoo 753 2M4.
TYPING SERVICE Fait, NhI,
Raaionabla call J55-HM2.
SUMMER RENTantiTtTbadToomTj
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MISC.
PERSONAL
211 Jarvis Street
2 Blocks from ECU
"Home of Greenville's Best Meats"
Pabst Blue Ribben Beer
12 pack - 12 oz. cans
$3.59
Two ways
GET IN SHAPE!
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AUTO ACCIDENTS SpoclalUlmTln
Personal inury llthjatlon. j. David
D"���t, Jr Attorney, NCNB
oufld.ng. Oreenvill North Carolina,
'Se-4200
ZALIMENI, SANKSTON, AND
TUCKER too, should have special
meaning to you. Think real hard and
9o �o the door to find our pros, and so
much morel JS
STEVE Congratulations on becoming
the NEW PI KAPPA PHI ARCHONI
I knew you could do it when you
pledged two years ago-Best of
luck t-Alt my love-Lii
party, dj Available on request
for Frats, Sororities, Dorm Socials.
Mixers, etc. References available.
Anheuser-Busch
Natural Light Beer
contact Watts at 757-3417.
WANTED
or l ROOMATES to share apt. at
�Bs Head this summer. v� Mock
'rom beach Only SIM cai David
'Vi-Utl.
ROOMMATE WANTED: $132 somo
plus half utilities. Eastbrook Apts
Call Robert at 7Sa-e7tt.
FEMALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
House 5 miles from campus 7SI-S411.
WANTED: People who can really
party to come to Phi Kappa Tau's all
campus Spring Fling on Friday
April ethl
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED
$47.$0 rent and � utilities. One mile
from campus, call Doug at ?s: i��3 or
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12 pack - I 2 OZ.
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QUIXOTE TRAVELS
TRAVEL - SUMMER of 1984
Eurail Youthpass$290
Britrail Youthpass$ 95
New York to Luxemburg$589
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In Britain: 5 days car & hotelfrom185
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Phone 757-0234
Pepsi Cola
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Limit 2 with $10.00 or more food
order. Additions Pepsi's1. 19
Wash Your Clothes Next Door While
Shopping at Overton's!
University Econo Wash
Washes 75 1
. AitendanLon dutyafter dark for you security
5DISCOUNT COUPON"
Students Only! Receive a 5 discount on your
grocery order of10.00 or more. Present ID and
coupon to cashier at time of purchase.
HEAVY HANDS By AMF American
'Aerobic Weights That Upgrade Your
Exercise Program
'Urge & Regular Handles $19.95 pr.
(For Different Hand Sizes; 1 Lb. Each)
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I

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"Mfr- ��aj ill ii ,i ��.





12
H"AMMRn MARCH
ls�84
r
Waltrip 10
CHARLOTTE, N C
(UPI) - Darrell Waltrip
crew Chief Jeff Ham
mond and car owner
Junior Johnson recent 1
met again with NASCAR
over Waltnp's finish at
Atlanta International
Raceway March IS
Jeff Hammond said
Monday NASCAR told
the team it would let it
know something, "either
late Monday or first thing
Tuesday At 5 p.m.
Monday, Hammond said
neither he nor Johnson
had received word from
NASCAR concerning
Waltrip's 10th place
finish.
But NASCAR
spokesman Chip
Williams told UPI that
review of the evidence
presented at Fridav
night's meeting had been
completed and Waltnp's
finish would remain 10th.
"The meeting Friday
night was not a hearing
Williams said. "One of
our competitors re-
quested a meeting with
Bill (France) Jr. and he
rearranged his schedule
to grant it to him.
"It (evidence) has been
(reviewed) and placed in
perspectne with other in-
formation we do have
and there has been no
change. And to the best
of my knowledge there
will he no change
France is the president
of NASCAR.
Williams said he was
not informed of when the
decision was made.
1 nit it ally after the
Atlanta race ended,
Waltrip was listed as
finishing fifth. But within
an hour reporters cover-
ing the race were told
W altrip had not made up
a lap on the last caution
flag and his finish was
listed as 10th.
By finishing 10th,
Waltrip lost the lead in
the battle for the national
championship and drop-
ped to third. Waltrip and
his team contended the
lap was made up.
KKK Testifies
WINSTON-SALEM,
N.C. (UPI) - Klansmen
went to a 1T9 "Death to
the Klan" rally as a
"citizens group" that
planned to stand silently,
wave the American Hag
and protest communism,
but the rally turned into a
shootout, a Klan leader
said.
Did the Klan plan to
heckle the communists
Virgil Griffin's attorney,
Fred Harwell, asked him.
"We planned to stand
in silence and wave the
American flag Griffin
said Mondav "If flying
the American flag is
heckling, I guess we were
going to heckle
Did the Klan take the
communists' slogan,
"Death to the Klan
seriously Harwel asked
"1 thought the com-
munist party wanted us to
lose our membership and
go away Griffin said.
"No, I did not" take the
slogan seriously.
Griffin, a Grand
Dragon in the Klan, was
the first of nine Klansmen
and American Nazis to
testify in federal court.
They are accused ofJ
violating the civil rights
of demonstrators at a
Nov. 3, 1979 "Death toj
the Klan" rally sponsored)
by the communists.
Gunfire erupted during
the rally in a
predominantly black
Greensboro housing
development shortly after
a caravan of Klansmen
and Nazis drove by. Five
demonstrators were kill-
e d .
Five of the nine defen-
dants now on trial were
acquitted of murder and
noting charges in a state i
trial in 1980.
Griffin said he told
Klan members not to br-
ing guns or wear their
robes at the rally. He also
denied seeing anybody-
take guns in the caravan.
"I told them I didn't
want any guns Griffin
said. "I told them that
communists may spit on
you and call you dumb
bastards. I told them not
to say anything, but if
they were hit, to hit
back
The Klan went to
Greensboro "as a
citizens' group to fly the
American, Christian and
Confederate flags to pro-
test communism Grif-
fin said.
Griffin also said he
wanted the Klan to go to
Greensboro because he
knew there would be
reporters at the rally and
thought the publicity
would help recruit new
Klan members.
On the morning of
Nov. 3, about 30 people
met at a house in
Greensboro, Griffin said.
Klansmen and Nazis
moved out when co-
defendant Edward
Dawson told them to go.
Griffin said Klan
members relied heavily
on Dawson for leader-
ship. Several times, he
said Dawson was in
charge of the group.
Klansmen did not
know Dawson was a
Greensboro police infor-
mant at the time of the
rally.
Before the group left
the house. Griffin said he
took a .25-caliber pistol
he had been carrying out
of his pocket and told the
group. "I'm taking this
in the house because I
don't want to get arrested
for carrying a concealed
weapon
Griffii testified he
decided to surrender to
the FBI after he read an
article in the Nov. 10 edi-
tion of The Charlotte
Observer that said police
were looking for him.
Griffin turned himself
in the next dav.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 27, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 27, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.331
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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