The East Carolinian, March 22, 1984






?
SThc
(Earnluiian
Serving the East Carolina campus communit
'y since 1925
Vol.58 Nw4T 5
Thursday, March 22, 1984
Rainey, Mooring Win
Top SGA Positions
2,041
B, JENNIFER JENDRASIAK McPar.land received
. . votes and Lane 2,067.
John Rainey collected more This year's race was a contrast
votes in yesterday's SGA elections to last year's since there were four
than two of his opponents com- candidates vying for the presiden-
bined to become the 1984-85 SGA cy. Last year there were only two.
president. Georgia Mooring was
elected SGA treasurer, while Mike
McPartland and Lee Lane, both
of whom ran unopposed, were
elected vice president' and
secretary.
In addition, three of the four
winners last year were female; the
opposite is true this year.
Brigel extended congratulations
to Rainey and also said he wished
to thank everyone who helped him
- �'UM1 KHJIU1IC
Rainey received approximately with his campaign.
47 percent of the vote with 1,079
ballots. Jay Brigel was second
with 616, Mark Niewald received
445 and Greg Shelnutt collected
143.
Of the 2,242 votes cast for
treasurer, Georgia Mooring
received 1,259, or 56 percent. Jay
Johnson pulled in 983 ballots.
I think the victory was the
result of a lot of hard work by
many people Rainey said. "It
was a very tough campaign and
we had a very good field of can-
didates
Rainey added that he wanted to
continue many of the trends
started by this year's president,
Paul Naso. "I want to pick the
ball up and carry it further he
said. He also emphasized his com-
mitment to his campaign plat-
form, saying "I don't want to dif-
ferentiate between campaign
rhetoric and performance next
year
The number of students voting
in the election showed an "in-
creased interest in student govern-
ment Rainey said. Approx-
imately 17 percent of the students
voted, a total much higher than in
the fall legislative election, in
which approximately 10 percent
of students voted.
"I feel very good about John,
said outgoing President Paul
Naso. "He's a qualified candidate
and he has his heart into student
All Smiles
ECU Education School
Receives Good Report
Concerning Programs
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Co-Newi Editor
After a long-awaited visit
from the National Council for
Accreditation in Teacher
Education, the ECU School of
Education received a positive
report concerning its teacher
education programs.
"The team gave their report
to the teacher education facul-
ty yesterday and were
favorably impressed with the
progress we have made in ad-
dressing the weaknesses cited
in the earlier visit said
Charles R. Coble, dean of the
School of Education.
Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs Angelo A.
Volpe was equally excited
about the NCATE visit. "We
certainly feel very positive
about the committee's
report Volpe said. He add-
ed, "We're optimistic regar-
ding what NCATE's recom-
mendation for accreditation
of our teacher education pro-
grams will be
Coble said that the commit-
tee praised the School of
Education's governing
structure but also recommend-
ed ways to improve a few
J
Volpe
other aspects.
The 13-member comittee
visited campus Monday
through Wednesday to meet
with selected faculty members,
students and teachers and to
thoroughly review all of the
teacher education programs.
The official NCATE report
will be released sometime in
June.
MARK BARBER - ecu p
Newly elected SGA President John Rainev is " . u- �
campaigning. Inset above is Georgia Muring trure" "8 " " " �' �"d
Nationwide Tuition Increases
May Surpass Inflation Rate
ECU Crime Watch Program
Receiving Little Student Input
i�t � Lassiter said. HeaHdrH that Pi�m. . .
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Co-Nrw� Editor
The central campus Residential
Watch Program at ECU has been
effective in one sense but ineffec-
tive in another, said Chairman
Steven Lassiter.
The program, which began last
October, was designed to operate
in a similar manner to the Com-
munity Watch Program. Lassiter
said the number of crimes has
decreased but there has been little
student participation as far as get-
ting hall captains. "Some halls
participate better than others
�"
Lassiter said. He added that Flem-
ing Hall is doing the best with no
reported crimes.
"Students were initially suppos-
ed to take an active role Lassiter
said when explaining one goal of
the program. "Residents were go-
ing to make the program work
He said because student participa-
tion is somewhat low, a different
approach will be instituted next
year. "It will be more of an
educational thing to alert students
of the hazards and what to look
for in reporting crimes
Lassiter praised the Department
of Public Safety for their involve-
ment with the program. "They've
been very helpful in responding to
calls he said.
In an effort to familiarize
residents with the program, pam-
phlets that read "Be On The
Lookout For Crime" have been
distributed throughout each
residence hall on central campus.
The halls also have orange and
black stickers on the main en-
trance and exit doors that read
"This Residence Hall Is Protected
By Residential Watch
The SRA recently approved the
program for campus-wide use
beginning next fall.
(CPS) � Tuitions at many
schools next year promise to go up
much faster than the inflation
rate, according to scattered recent
announcements by administrators
around the country.
Schools as diverse as Loyola of
Maryland, Metropolitan Com-
munity colleges of Kansas City,
and the universities of Missouri
and Rochester have already an-
nounced price hikes for next year
that are more than double the cur-
rent annual inflation rate of 4.6
percent.
New Hampshire, the State
University of New York system,
Syracuse, Lehigh, the Georgia
State system, Miami, Kentuckv,
DePaul, Oklahoma, New Mexico,
Bismarck Junior College, Stan-
ford and the California communi-
ty college system, among many
others, recently have unveiled
plans to raise tuition for the
1984-85 academic year by more
than 7.5 percent.
The hikes, moreover, follow
years of double-digit increases for
students.
For example, it costs 12 percent
more to attend a four-year public
college this year than it did last
year, according to the College
Board's annual college cost
survey.
Four-year private college tui-
tion went up 11 percent, while
two-year campus tuitions increas-
ed by nine percent, the survey
found.
Though national averages for
1984-85 school year tuition hikes
won't be compiled until next fall,
recent announcements by in-
dividual colleges suggest the up-
ward tuition spiral will continue.
Administrators say the in-
creases are necessary to compen-
sate for the federal and state
budget cuts of the last four years,
to make long-delayed salary in-
creases to faculty members, to
restore and build facilities put on
hold during the budget crunches,
and to try to recover from the sky-
high interest rates of the reces-
sion.
"Colleges got killed when in-
terest rates were 18 percent ex-
plains Dr. Gary Quehl of the
Council of Independent Colleges
in Washington, D.C.
"We have not caught up with
budget cuts adds Dr. James
Quann, Washington State's
registrar. "We've not yet
recovered
Pondering why tuition rates
should exceed the inflation rate,
Merideth Ludwig of the American
Association of State Colleges and
Universities says "speculation is
that (the increases are) to take
care of things that have been put
off for a long time
One long-delayed piece of
housekeeping is faculty compen-
sation. Recent studies illustrate
college teachers' buying powers
are now lower than they were in
1972, thanks largely to a decade
of high inflation touched off by
the Arab oil embargo of 1973.
"Faculty salaries haven't kept
up with inflation Quehl
observes. "We're playing a catch-
up game
"Our salaries are basically in
the cellar by national standards
says Richard Rhoda of the Ten-
nessee State University and Com-
munity College System.
To bring them up, Tennessee
colleges hope to hike tuitions by
as much as 10 percent for next
year, while the state legislature
ponders increasing state higher
education funding by 12 percent,
Rhoda notes.
Nationwide, state support for
colleges has risen 14 percent over
the last two years, according to
Dr. M.M. Chambers cf Illinois
State's periodic surveys of state
higher education funding.
But those average increases ap-
parently have not been enough to
compensate for severe cutbacks in
the amount of money campuses
received from the federal govern-
ment since 1980.
Consequently, many schools
are now asking their students to
pay a higher percentage of what it
costs to educate them.
Administrators figure it's
"reasonable" for tuition to cover
about 25 percent of the cost of
education, with state, federal and
private monies paying for the rest,
See BUDGET, page 3
Edmisten 9s Political Aid,
Charles Smith, Killed In
Wednesday Airplane Crash
t
Sigma Sigma Sigma sorority members along with many other volunteers, manned the SGA poOs yesterday. ����� - mcu
ASHEVILLE, N.C. (UPI) �
Charles H. Smith, Attorney
General Rufus Edmisten's top
aide and political adviser who
died of injuries suffered in the
crash of a small plane, will be
buried Friday.
Smith, 47, died at Margaret
Pardee Hospital early Wednesday
after a twin-engine plane carrying
Edmisten aides and others crashed
in Henderson County.
The Justice Department's chief
administrator, Smith had worked
with Edmsten since Edmisten
became attorney general in 1974.
Smith's funeral will be held at 4
p.m. Friday at Trinity Episcopal
Church in AsheviUe, where he
grew up, Jay Eaker, a Justice
Department spokesman, said
Wednesday.
Friends and leaders of the
Democratic Party mourned Smith
Wednesday. A wreath hung on
the door of the Justice Depart-
ment.
"I'm heartbroken Edmisten
said after learning of Smith's
death. We will all miss him
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. said he
and Smith had worked together in
many political campaigns. Hunt
praised Smith as a man "who
dedicated himself totally to the
man for whom he worked.
"His loyalty and effectiveness
were without parallel Hunt
said.
In addition to Smith, five other
people four of them Justice
Department employees or aides in
Edmisten's Democratic guber-
natorial campaign were injured in
the crash, which occurred about
10p.m.
William Carl, co-owner of the
Golden Corral Restaurant chain
and a fund-raiser for Edmisten,
was bruised in the wreck. He was
hospitalized for observation but
was released later Wednesday.
Also aboard the plane were
Richard Carlton, an assistant at-
torney general on leave to serve as
field operations director for Ed-
misten's campaign; Dolart Sim-
mons, a Justice Department anti-
trust investigator; Michael
Carpenter, an assistant attorney
general; and Craig Gurgew, the
pilot.
The plane was returning to
Raleigh when it lost power in one
engine shortly after takeoff from
the AsheviUe Regional Airport.
� �s
I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN MABrtn QfM
THE EAST CAROiiK
J

Announcements
The East Carolinian
Strung iht campus community
�ksstJMJ
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
In0 the summer.
Tr� East Carolinian is the of
"clal newspaper of East Carolina
University, owned, operated and
Published for and by the students
of East Carolina University.
Unless otherwise noted, unsign-
ed editorials on the opinion page
�r� the newspaper's opinion,
oenerally written by the manag
Ing editor
Subscription Rate no yearly.
The East Carolinian offices are
located In the Publications
building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, N.C
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
2nd Floor, Publications building,
ECU, Greenville, N.C. 27(34.
Telephone: 757 634, 437, 4309
CO-OP
Cooperative Education Is a pro-
gram which helps students gain
valuable experience related to their
career goals through alternating
periods of academic study with
periods of off campus employment
The Co-op Office, located in 313 Rawl,
currently has ob openings for sum
mer and fall '84 Interested students
should stop by today to get more In
formation, to complete the necessary
forms, and to sign up for Interviews.
OCCUPATIONAL
THERAPY
All Occupational Therapy students
and Interested persons art asked to
attend me ECSCOTA meeting on
March 27 at 5:30 In room 203 Allied
Health Building.
LACROSSE
PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers, pledges, and little
sisters of Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity
would like to invite everyone out to
700 West tonight (Mar 23) Come Out
and drink a few cold ones with your
blends Everyone who is affiliated
with the PI Kapps should remember
to wear their jerseys this Friday
Also there will be a "Party by the
lake' this Friday before Happy Hour.
We are having a car wash this Satur
day (March 24) at the Plaia Shell on
Greenville Blvd PUSH week (Play
units tor the Severly Handicapped) is
next week March 24 31 Everyone
help support this worthy cause PS
You Chi O's should go ahead and
start practicing how to party
SEMI-FORMAL BALL
Delta Sigma Theta and Omega Psi
Phi present a semi formal ball at the
Sheraton inn. March 24, from 9pm
to 1 am Advanced tickets are M 00
tor a couple and $4 00 for singles For
further information contact Ms
Arnerta Taylor at 752 0333 We look
forward to seeing you at this event
ATTENTION
The Gamma Beta Phi Honor Socie
ty will hold a bake sale on Tuesday.
March 27. 1984 at the Student Store
Also tickets will be sold in which a
give a way of $100 worth of records, a
portable TV, and 2 prizes of J25
worth of records will be made in
April Our special thanks to Apple
Records for their support in this pro
iect
BIOLOGY CLUB
This is If! Dean D.H. Hayek,
Associate Dean for Student Affairs ai
the East Carolina School of Medicine
will speak at the March 24th Biologv
Club meeting His presentation will
mark the last of the three part pro
gressive Medical School entrance
series for Health Professions Month
So If you've missed parts 1 and 2,
don't make the mistake of missing
part 3 There will be a brief social
beginning at 7 pm in BN 102 followed
by Dean Hayek!
If you did not see the ECU UNC
Lacrosse match last weekend, you
missed a great match There will be
another Lacrosse match this
weekend In Durham against Duke's
Lacrosse club The match will start
at 100 pm Saturday, March 24 on
the fields beside the football stadium.
This match should be even more ex
citing than last weekend's match.
TALENT SHOW
if you like to see Talent and have
alot of fun at the same time, be sure
to come to the Talent Show sponsored
by the Sweethearts of the Kappa
Alpha Psi Fraternity, inc on Wed
March 28 from 7 to 9 p.m. at
Mendenhall In room 244. Tickets are
$1 00 and may be bought from any
KAPPA SWEETHEART Hope to see
you there I
STUDENTS WITH HART
Now is the time for a new genera
tion of leadership if you are fed up
with the politics of nostalgia and look
ing for new solutions to the nation's
problems join students with Hart We
are the vanguard of a new
democracy We will be meeting at
Mendenhall, every Thursday at 8 pm
(ask receptionist for room number).
TALENT SHOW
There will be a talent show at im
manuel Baptist church on Friday,
March 23, at 8 p m. The show Is soon
sored by the Baptist Student Union
and all proceeds will be used for stu
dent summer missions. We Invite you
to participate or lust come and
watch. Refreshments will be served.
For more info, call 752 4444.
EDUCATION STUDENTS
The Department of Speech
Language & Auditory Pathology will
be providing a make up of speech and
hearing screening for the sfudnets
who missed It In January.
The screening will be held on Tues
day, March 27 and Wednesday
Marcr, 28 from 5:00-7:00 p.m. in the
SLAP Department which is located In
a trailer adjacent to Belk Building on
Charles Street
No appointment is needed.
YEARBOOK PORTRAITS
Don't forget that a Vardan's Studio
Photographer will be In the BUC
CANEER office until Friday, March
23, 1�4 to make portraits for those
who have not had fhelr pictures made
yet These pictures will be In the NM
BUCCANEER and will appear there
only if you have your picture made
before Friday. Photos are made bet
wean the hours of 9:00 and 12:00 and
100 to 3:00 dally In the BUCCANEER
office. 2nd floor of the Publications
Building behind the Library. Come
and sign up for a time outside the of
flee.
BKA
Mr Tom Pauling of North State
Savings S. Loan will speak at the next
meeting of Beta Kappa Alpha, Bank
ing and Finance Fraternity on Thurs
day, March 22, 1984 at 5 30 In Rawl
Room 103. We will make plans and
get a "heedcounf" for the Annual
BKA Banquet, tentatively set for
Thursday, April 19 at the Sheraton
Greenville.
CARWASH
Attention guys and galsl The Inter
national Student Association is hav
Ing a carwash on Saturday, March
24th from 10 2 p.m. behind
McDonald's on 10th St. We also have
a meeting at 4:00 in Mendenhall Stu
dent Center followed by a party at
Val's place. Come and support your
local ISA Organization!
YOOOHOOOI!
The SRA Mardi Gras Party pic-
tures are back! Come check them out
and place an order Stop by the SRA
office in Mendenhall Office hours for
photos will be on Monday from 10-12
and 5 8pm and on Tuesday and Thurs
day from 12 5. Hope to see you there
cause all of the pictures are great.
ARCHERY CLUB
The ECU Archery club will be
having its first official practice of the
spring semester today. Thursday
March 22 at 400 pm . on the practice
range at the bottom of college hill
There will be discussion about the
tournaments coming up this spring
All persons Interested are invited to
come to the practice For more infor
matlon please call Gene Taylor at
758 7440 or Todd Vanhoy at 752 8748
FRISBEE
Don't miss the Natural Light
Ultimax Ultimate Frisbee Tourney
this weekend at the bottom of College
Hill. Some of the best teams in the
Tri-State area will be there com
petlng for cash and prizes Don't miss
this spectacular Frisbee event! Girls,
come on down and check out some hot
ultimate players to party with
Ultimax '84.
NEW YORK DELI
All your favorites from the Big Ap
pie, Cornbeef, Pastrami, Knishes,
Dr. Brown's Soda and much more.
Come on out March 25 at the All pur
pose room In Mendenhall. The time
1:30 3:00, Cost M.J5 plus the extras
Hillel members half price SHALOM
HUNT COMMITTEE
All students interested in working
for the Hunt Senate Committee are
invited to attend a meeting at 2 P M
today in Room 241, Mendenhall
TOURNAMENT
Come see the 1st annual
ZBTBudwelser Soccer Tournament
March 24 & 25. Sat. from 9 5, Sunday
912 4, 3430 For information call
7523178
NAACP ELECTIONS
The ECU Chapter NAACP 19(4 85
elections will be held April 12, 1984 at
4:00 p.m. room to be announced. Ap
plications may be picked up March
22 April 5, 1984 at Mendenhall's Infor
matlon desk, 250 Jarvis Dorm or 502
Greene Dorm. Return application to
250 Jarvis Dorm by April 5, 1984, 5:00
p.m.
AUCTION
r,i'1�mJBhl Epllon an A'Pha
Om cron PI will sponsor the First An
nual PRE GREEK WEEK - KICK
OFF AUCTION. Sunday. April l,t. a,
2 p.m. Pre Greek Week cups will be
the right way, party with the REAL
DONKEYSI "cm-
BSU
Program rescheduled: Nevln
Snyder, former U.S. Army chaplain
in Vietnam will speak at PAUSE this
Thursday, March 22, at 7 pm at the
Baptist Sfudnet union All are
welcome.
NAACPMEETING
There will be a NAACP meeting on
Thursday, March 22, 1984 at 4 00
pm in room 240
KOCHANSKI CONCERT
Wladimir Kochanski. the "People's
Pianist will be performing in
Wright auditorium Monday evening
March 24th at 8 pm Kochanski com
bines solid musicianship with subtle
showmanship which always results in
tremendous popular response He
breaks with tradition by speaking to
the audience during the concert His
programming, too, Is unconventional,
embracing the wide range of periods
from Baroque to modern, and of
styles from classical to popular and
folk. Tickets are on sale at the Cen
tral Ticket Office at 3 for students
and $4 for the public. If available,
tickets will also be sold at the door.
CROP WALK
Don't forget that this year's CROP
Walk for Humanity will be held this
Sunday afternoon beginning at 12:30
at Green Springs Park Walk Cards
are still available at the ECU
Newman Center for persons who
would like to walk Persons wishing
to sponsor a walker or wanting more
information are urged to call the
Newman Center, 752 4216
EDMISTENM
All students Interested in joining
the campus organization to elect
Rufus Edmisfen as Governor In 1984
please contact Betty Casey or Mecon
Moye (ECU coordinator at 752-0312.
THE HOLOCAUST
A Symposium on the Holocaust is
being conducted on ECU campus It
will take place on Saturday, March
31, starting at 10.00 a.m. Many
speakers will be available to inform
and share with you the events and
rememberances of the event
1000 1130 session will be at Room
102 in Brewster B. 2:00-3:00 session
will be in Mendenhall Student Center
Room 244 Everyone is welcome and
there is no admission charge The
event is being sponsored by ECU
INTER-VARSITY
Meets in Jenkins Auditorium at
4 30 on Wednesday nights. The next
two weeks, we will still be studying 11
Timothy. Come on out and worship
and fellowship with us!
CO-OP
Student wanted to work at a day
care center with handicapped
children for the summer. One posi
tion in Rocky Mount and one position
In Tarboro. Minimum wage. Student
must qualify for financial aid by com
Pletlng confidential statement in the
financial aid office. See Co-op Rawl
310 for additional Information.
CHAIRPERSON NEEDED
Application, .re now being ac
cepted for the position of the l�S Sfu
Chairperson. Applications can be
JrZSrr " Mendenh.
.Wthlspo.ltionrF'rTd.T
STUDENTS WITH HART
H.rfTS Amrl�"� with
Hart committee will meet on Thurs
�.�� �' �� � P.m. in
Mendenhall room 244. Call 752 4935
for more Information. Get Involved
? ��rt ' " "�"�ration of
leadership.
HAPPY HOUR
Beat the Happy Hour lines with the
KA's at 200 West on Friday afternoon
Usual Happy Hour prices with the
best current music. Also start the
week off right at the KA Happy Hour
at Beau's, Sundays 8:00 until n 00
a.m. Beau's is Greenville's newest
nioht soot
AMBASSADORS!
Don't forget our general meeting.
2 Ti�Y' March ?� �' 5:00 in the
Mendenhall Multipurpose Room We
will be discussing elections, member
sp and the USC trip. There ,s also a
special surprise planned! Be sure to
arTfjno
ECU MARSHAL
Any student interested in serving
as a University Marshal from
graduation in May 1984 through April
1985 should file between March 23 and
March 30 Filing applications are
available in the SGA office,
Mendenhall Student Center
Minimum requirements are the at
tainment of at least 44 credit hours by
the end of this semester and a 3 0
overall academic average Questions
should be directed to Dean Carolyn
Fulghum, 757 4771.
CARWASH
The Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity inc
will be sponsoring a car wash this
Saturday at McDonalds. Location is
at the corner of 10th and Cotanche
Streets, why not be sure and have
your car clean for the weekend' The
brothers of PBS Inc will be waiting
for you at 9:00 a.m. to wash your car-
spotless
COLLEGE REPUBLICAN
The CR's will meet in the Mulfi
purpose Room of Mendenhall at 5 30
p.m. Join the conservative cause
STUDENTS WITH HART
HartToTmV " A�r��" "
Hart committee will meet on Thurs
day. March 22, at 7 30 p m ;�
Mendenhall room 244 Call 752 4935
for more information. Get involved
fear " 0e-r8,i0"
DIET ANALYSIS
You can have your own personal
diet analyzed by the Student Dietet,c
Association on Tuesday, March 27,
1984 at the Student store with the aid
of a computer The analysis will tell
you which nutrients are missing in
your diet so you can improve your
nutritional Intake Don't miss this
great experience to learn more about
nutrition and your diet You owe if to
yourself!
WE'LL RAY YOU TO GET INTO
SHAPE THIS SUMMER.
r�-f


o
V
V,
If you have at least
two years of college left,
you can spend six weeks at
our Army ROTC Basic
Camp this summer and earn
approximately $600.
And if you qualify, you
can enter the ROTC 2-
Year Program this fall and
receive up to1,000 a year.
But the big payoff
happens on graduation day.
That's when you receive
an officer's commission.
So get your body in
shape (not to mention your
bank account).
Enroll in Army ROTC.
For more information,
contact Captain Heldur Liivak at
757-6967 and come to our information
session on March 27 from 4-6pm in
Mendenhall Student Center.
ARMY ROTC
�KALLVOUCANK.
ECU MARAUDERS
Meeting March 22 at 1 00 p m in
Mendenhall Mulfi Purpose Room All
members please attend Newcomers
Welcome
KAPPA BALL
The Brothers of the KAPPA
ALPHA PSI FRATERNITY INC .
would like to extend to everyone a
cordial invitation to attend their an
nual KAPPA Coronation Ball to be
held Sat April 7. at the Ramada Inn
from 9 p m to 2 a m Admission will
be �5 00 single and S8 00 couple The
dress attire will be formal Tickets
may be purchased from any brother
of KAPPA ALPHA PSI or any KAP
PA SWEETHEART We look forward
to seeing you there!
SIGN LANGUAGE
Sign Language club is having a
meeting Monday night in Mendenhall
room 224 Come at 4:30.
AMBASSADOR
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Past President's club of the
ECU alumni Association is offering a
scholarship to an Ambassador In
order to express their deep apprecia
tion for the vast amount of volunteer
service that the ECU Ambassadors
contribute to the progress and
welfare of ECU. The recipient must
be an ECU student who is a member
in good standing of the ECU Am
bassadors ana must be of such
classification as to be a senior in the
fall semester of 1984 Any Am
bassador who Is interested should
pick up an application after March 21
in the TaylorSlaughter Alumni
Center. Applications should be com
pleted and turned in by April 4.
RUGBY
There will be a Rugby match
against UNCG this Saturday at 200
behind the Allied Health building Br
mg your cooler and come out and root
for the ECU Ruggers
GRANT
The National Endowment for the
Humanities has announced a unique
grants program for individuals under
21 to spend a summer carrying out
their own non credit humanities
research projects The Younger
Scholars Program will award up to
100 grants nationally for outstanding
research and writing projects in such
fields as history, philosophy and the
study of literature These projects
will be carried out during the sum
mer of 1985 The application deadline
is September 15, 1994
For guidelines, write to Younger
Scholars Guidelines CN, Rm. 424, The
Naitonal Endowment for the
Humanities, Washington, DC. 20504
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House is
offering these one hour sessions to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your job search. A
film and discussion of how to inter
view through this service will be
shared Each session will be held in
the Career Planning Room at 3 pm
Come on any of the following dates:
March 21 and 27
SPEAKERS
Come learn more about Central
America - especially Nicaragua and
El Salvador � in a special pr -�nt.
'ion to be held at the ECU Catholic
Newman Center on Tuesday. March
27 Maryknoll Sisters Patricia Mur
ray and Julie Miller, who have both
worked In Central America for
several years, will share their
various experiences at a special sup
P�f meeting, which will begin at 4 00
Pm All interested persons are
welcome to attend and discuss during
the presentation For more intorma
tion, please call the ECU Newman
Center, 953 E 10th Street, at 752 4214
TRYOUTS
�� � part of ECU � awarawmning
Sduadi 1st Mandatory meet.ng
March 24th at 5 30 at Minge, Cot
'Seum Don , mit ou, �� f0uf ctianct
to get involved with Pirate Afhiet.csi
REBEL
The 9U REBEL is rr It you
haven't seen copies m Mendenhall or
classroom buildings you can pick one
up at the REBEL office, on the se
cond floor of the publications
building
MARAUDERS
ECU Marauders Meet.ng 22
March at 7 00 p m m Mendenna
Mulfi Purpose Room All members
please stand Newcomers welcome
HAPPY HOUR
Sigma Sigma S.gme Sororit, ,
sponsor,ng a Happy Hour Sunoa,
March 25 at Pantana Boos trorr
I 30 until with 12 pitchers Come ana
party with me SlGMAS!
RUGBY
24E2U00VSF,eidCsueh'UraV MrCh
Health Building ' Benei A�


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OFF
ALL
RINGS,
Lobb
(CPS) - -Were still
waiting in the wings to ee
what will happen� sav
Nancy RaJey of the
tion Committee for
Higher Education, which
is supposed to coordinate
public efforts to fight for
education budgets in
Congress.
College lobbvists, adds
Dallas Martin of the
tionaJ association of
dent aid counselors,
aren't planning anvt-
special to fight the'latest
round of proposed stu-
dent aid c .
Indeed, college lob-
byists in general seem to
have greeted the most re-
cent aid proposals ��
released in Presider.
Reagan's Februar,
budget message �
low-keyed, a.d-back
response that contr
vividly with the .
calls to action a
mobilization efforts of
the last two yc
The crisis .alls are no
longer necessary, they
say, because the i
fident Congress m
diminish education I
ding during an election .
year.
A few Washington
observers, however.
worry the lobbyists have !
a "false sense o:
security and recall the
last time they displayed
such confidence � ti
1981 � Congress cut the
federal education budge:
by a hefty 12 percent.
In 1982 and 198?, the it
lobbyists beat back more I
dramatic budget cuts bv
sending a constant stream
of alarmed press relea-e-
out of Washington and
flying a constant stream
Budget To
Increase
Next Year
Continued From Page 1
explains Joseph
Marks of the Southern
Regional Education
Board.
But recent audits in 14
southern states, for in-
stance, found tuition
covered only about 19
percent of a student's an-
nual education costs,
Marks savs.
The University of
Georgia has imposed 15
percent tuition hikes for
three straight years,
Marks reports, and Loui-
siana State has hiked tui-
tion 38 percent over two
years to bring student
contributions up to near
the 25 percent mark.
m
Date: March21.22.23 Time:9:00Mn"�4:�30pm
Place: student supply Deposit- Jgn �T
STORE MHERFF JONES
Yet at Washington
State, students already
pay 33 percent of the
costs of their education.
"You can really look at
this in two ways sug-
gests Dennis Martin of
the National Association
of Student Financial Aid
Administrators.
"You can look at it as
raising tuition at two or
three times the inflation
rate, and you can wonder I
how people figure what I
the inflation rate is he
says, "or you can see that f
the percentage (tuition)
increases for next year are r
much lower than last f
year's
But no one is predic- i
ting increases will stop U,
altogether in the future, M
even when faculty salane (H.
are improved and budget H
cuts are mended. Bl
"I don't think that's
going to happen says
Robert Lytle comptroller
of Northern Arizona
University. "The costs of
educating students are
continually going up
.
tiim. .nA1 w �





MARAUDERS
ve ijennali
I Wefc Q -e
HAPPY HOUR
- ioay
' 1 BOOS from
i Come ana
RUGBY
� Ware
"W Aii,ea

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TMilASTCAjRoiiN,AN
MARCH
!S�S4
Iff WE
fOlWD
bring
TMMD
29

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u IFUL
ler!
ss ring"
�J 4:00pm
00
:f JONES
'
Lobbyists Oppose Budget
ATTENTION: ,
GREENVILLE AREA RECORD BUYERS
(CPS) - "We're still
waiting in the wings to see
what will happen says
Nancy Raley of the Ac-
tion Committee for
Higher Education, which
is supposed to coordinate
public efforts to fight for
education budgets in
Congress.
College lobbyists, adds
Dallas Martin of the na-
tional association of stu-
dent aid counselors,
aren't planning anything
special to fight the latest
round of proposed stu-
dent aid cuts.
Indeed, college lob-
byists in general seem to
have greeted the most re-
cent aid proposals �
released in President
Reagan's February 1st
budget message � with a
low-keyed, laid-back
response that contrasts
vividly with the clarion
calls to action and
mobilization efforts of
the last two years.
The crisis calls are no
i nger necessary, they
say, because they're con-
fident Congress won't
diminish education fun-
ding during an election
year.
A few Washington
observers, however,
worry the lobbyists have
a 'false sense of
security and recall the
last time they displayed
such confidence � in
1981 � Congress cut the
federal education budget
by a heftv 12 percent.
In 1982 and 1983, the
lobbyists beat back more
dramatic budget cuts by
sending a constant stream
of alarmed press releases
out of Washington and
flving a constant stream
of mobilized, well-briefed
college presidents into
Washington to tell Con-
gress how more cuts
would affect their cam-
puses.
This year, "it's possi-
ble that if there's a
reason, we'll have a new
conference" later in the
budget process, Raley
says
"Our strategy says
Charles Saunders,
governmental affairs
director for the American
Council on Education
(ACE) and a leading
force in organizing op-
position to the Reagan
college budgets of the
past, "is to lobby our
constituencies to work to
oppose the cuts by telling
their representatives in
Congress what the budget
will do to their
programs
Peter Rogoff of the
Coalition of Independent
College and University
Students (called COR-
PUS) adds that most col-
lege groups in
Washington will work
together to make unified
counterproposals to Con-
gress this time.
And the Action Com-
mittee, organized in late
1981 just after Congress
made its first big aid cuts,
"still has a hotline and we
still meet weekly Raley
points out.
The plans are less ag-
gressive than in the past,
she concedes. "Maybe
it's because the cuts pro-
posed, at least on the face
of it, aren't as drastic
But, warns Kathy Ozer
of the U.S. Student
Association (USSA), "we
can be assured of real
cuts if we don't wage a
major battle
Ozer is one of the few
college lobbyists urging
an activist response to the
proposals.
She contends the pro-
posals are in fact drastic,
and if approved could
eliminate 1.3 million stu-
dent grants and loans for
the 1984-85 academic
year and beyond.
"If we talk about keep-
ing up with (federat stu-
dent aid) service at 1980
levels Ozer explains,
"it would cost $23
billion
The Reagan ad-
ministration's proposed
$15.5 billion budget for
the 1985 fiscal year,
however, is almost 50
percent less than what it
would take to restore aid
programs to 1980 levels.
(The fiscal year dates
from Oct. 1, 1984 to
Sept. 30, 1985).
The 1984 fiscal year
education budget totalled
$15.4 billion.
Ozer argues that, just
to keep aid programs
functioning at 1983-84
levels � which are now
eroded by inflation and
high interest rates �
Congress would have to
appropriate $17 billion.
Reagan also has pro-
posed to make it harder
for middle-class students
to get Pell Grants, and to
eliminate the National
Direct Student Loan,
State Student Incentive
Grant and Supplemental
Educational Opportunity
Grant programs.
To battle the pro-
posals, USSA and
COPUS hope to attract
7000 students to its Na-
tional Student Action
Lobby Day on March
26th in Washington.
The groups will bus
students to Washington,
and then shepard them to
Capitol Hill to pressure
legislators into resisting
the cuts, Rogoff says.
But Dallas Martin, one
of the most effective cam-
pus lobbyists in
Washington, is already
quietly optimistic "Con-
gress will react favorably.
Maybe we will see some
slight increases in pro-
grams.
"There will be a chance
of selective increases
Saunders adds, "but not
across-the-board in-
creases
They don't think it's
likely Congress will
abolish the three aid pro-
grams, either.
Yet they didn't think
there was much chance of
Congress cutting aid in
1981, recalls Bob Aaron.
Aaron, now a Universi-
ty of Houston ad-
ministrator, was with the
ACE in 1981.
Lobbyists then "felt,
well, he's a new presi-
dent, and we've got pro-
blems with the economy,
and we don't want to ap-
pear unpatriotic by not
taking our share of cuts,
and I frankly don't think
we took it very hard
Aaron says. "And, if
you'll pardon my French,
they got the shit kicked
out of them
Three weeks after Con-
gress passed the
November, 1981 cuts, the
Reagan administration
announced it would next
Budget To
Increase
Next Year
C ontinued From Page 1
explains Joseph
Marks of the Southern
Regional Education
Board.
But recent audits in 14
southern states, for in-
stance, found tuition
covered only about 19
percent of a student's an-
nual education costs,
Marks savs.
The University of
Georgia has imposed 15
percent tuition hikes for
three straight years,
Marks reports, and Loui-
siana State has hiked tui-
tion 38 percent over two
years to bring student
contributions up to near
the 25 percent mark.
Marsh's Surf & Sea
Panama Jack Short Sleeve
T-shirts $6.00
Muscle Shirts
? Childrens Panama Baby Shirts
Men & women bathing suits
Quick Silver Mini-skirts
Wind surfers
Skate boards & parts
Hacky Sacks
RayBan sunglasses
New Portsider women sandles
Rainbow sandles
Coming SoonGNS Madras shirts & shorts
New O.P. shorts
Yet at Washington
State, students already
pay 33 percent of the
costs of their education.
"You can really look at
this in two ways sug-
gests Dennis Martin of
the National Association
of Student Financial Aid
Administrators.
B
Sti ro food
I
M
m
m
"You can look at it as
raising tuition at two or
three times the inflation
rate, and you can wonder
how people figure what
the inflation rate is he
says, "or you can see that
the percentage (tuition) M
increases for next year are
much lower than last
year's
But no one is predic-
ting increases will stop
altogether in the future,
even when faculty salane
are improved and budget
cuts are mended.
"I don't think that's
going to happen says
Robert Lytle comptroller
of Northern Arizona g
University. "The costs of
educating students are
continually going up
A WARMED OVER
BURGER TYPE FOOD
USUALLY COOKED BEFORE
BREAKFAST AND SERVED
AFTER LUNCH. LET
SUBWAY CURE YOUR
STYRO BLUES.
IU
m
m
m
758-7979
288
E. St. Si.
m
WMiMzMMii
lisiiSjiajjafigijj
� �
seek to slash federal col-
lege funding by another
50 percent.
At that point, lobbyists
re-organized to mobilize
the nation's colleges for
an all-out budget fight,
Raley recalls.
They successfully
fought back most of the
cuts, although a recent
College Board analysis
suggested federal student
aid programs have been
cut a total of 21 percent
since 1980.
Aaron attributes their
less urgent response this
year not only to the less
fearsome numbers and
congressional attitudes,
but to an "Ivory Tower"
unease with lobbying.
Educators, he says,
"are highly uncomfor-
table" working in Con-
gress.
"When their feet aren't
to the fire and the conse-
quences (of the budget)
aren't that sharp he
speculates, "their tenden-
cy is to back away a
little
"I think many
(educators) think of lob-
bying as somewhat
tawdry he concludes.
"And maybe it is. But
that's the way it works
"We don't like to use
the work Hobby " Raley
explains. "But the
mechanisms are now in
place. We're ready to
gear up to a high level of
activity if we have to
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PAPA KATZ
Your Adult Entertainment Center

Lingerie Show by Lori's
March 27th (lues.)
Doors opon at 8:00 pm
Show starts at feOO pm HH 8-9
$3.00 mtmbtri $4.00 guests
(for Men 8r Women)
Limltad seating - Coma aarlyl
I
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Just for the Ladies - returning by
popular demand April 13th -
LENNY PAN ARC & PURE HONEY.
10th St. Ext.
At Rivertolutf Rd.
Papa mm to A Private aub
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Wednesday Nfte
Greenville's First & Still 1
LADIES LOCK OUT
8:30 -10-00
Free Draft & Wine
Saturday Nite
John Moore Beach Show
Lady Members Free All Nite
Doors Open 8:30
Happy Hour Til 9:30
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Ot �� a , f
i





?
2Ure East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, gm
Darryl Brown, �� ,
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK. � J.T. PlETRZAK. o
Tina Maroschak. c�. e�, mike McPartland, m
ED NlCKLAS. sports Emor JoM NORTON, cdu ifamuj
Gordon Ipock. w� �,� kathy Fuerst. � a
Mark Barker, o� �� Mike Mayo, t s�rv�v
March 22, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
CROP Walk
Event Vital To Awareness
In a country that has a big pro-
blem with people gaining too much
weight from eating too much food,
it is important we be reminded
at least periodically that most peo-
ple's trouble in many areas of the
world is just the opposite � starva-
tion.
Americans probably spend
enough money on such things as
health spas, jogging suits and
Gigi's Vitamin Z Hollywood Eat-
all-you-want Diet Book to alleviate
a large part of the world's hunger
problem if such funds were spent
on the problem. The problem is not
resources; the world for several
years has had the ability to feed all
its inhabitants. It is more a problem
of allocation, development and
wise use of those resources;
American farmers are paid not to
grow food because we have too
much, while people in many areas
of the world starve. And so it goes.
That is why the CROP Walk for
Humanity this Sunday in Green-
ville is as much an effort to show
solidarity and concern and to bring
attention to the problem as it is to
raise funds. Too, that is why it's
important for students and other
citizens to be aware of, and par-
ticipate in, the event. Those on
tight budgets can walk without
donating money, and students busy
during the Sunday walk can spon-
sor a participant.
In any case, the event should
raise the awareness of those in the
area to the hunger problem. Relief
workers cannot snap their fingers
and raise a million dollars like, for
instance, collegiate football can.
The walk will be successful if
$5,000 is raised, but that is just
another irony that the CROP walk
should remind us of: many millions
go to football players, movie actors
and diet books; precious little goes
to feed those who will otherwise die
of starvation.
Prayer Vote Correct
The U.S. Senate is to be com-
mended for voting down Tuesday a
proposed constitutional amendment
for prayer in public schools. The ac-
tion took courage considering the
"pressure of some groups (and Presi-
dent Reagan) in an election year to
�brand senators "irreligious Still,
every senator cast a ballot on the
issue � a rare occasion in the
Senate.
Of course, one is not irreligious
or atheistic if one opposes the
amendment; the National Council
of Churches for example, (a federa-
tion of 31 mainstream Protestant
and Orthodox demoninations
claiming 40 million members) op-
poses the proposal. But that is not
what one will hear from many of the
amendment's proponents.
There is simply no need for the
amendment unless one wants to
advertise and promote a religious
faith. For one, as Harvard constitu-
tional expert Laurence Tribe points
out, prayer in school is not forbid-
den; only official, organized prayer
is. Students can always pray, but
public schools may not set aside
specific times for them to do so
publicly, in front of their
classmates.
Also, many proponents of the
amendment are not satisfied with a
moment of silence in which children
may pray. The Rev. Jerry Falweil is
typical: "We didn't fight for the
right to keep silent But most
religions teach that God can be
spoken to just as well silently as
aloud; thus vocal prayer must be
done for the benefit of those in the
room, not for the individual himself
(other than to display and affirm his
faith to others).
Most importantly, however, is
that religion is first a personal and
family matter, taught and encourag-
ed by parents, developed in church.
Children praying regularly at home
with their family and in religious
practices are not likely to weaken in
their faith because they do not pray
publicly at school. Indeed, one
would think those same values
would have them pray regularly
during the school day � before a
meal, to start off the day, on the
bus, before a test.
The arguments that lax moral
values are caused by the absence of
public school prayer are obviously
fallacious .The argument breaks a
basic rule of logic and science:
correlation does not prove causa-
tion, i.e, because two things happen
together doesn't mean one caused
the other. The 1960swerea turbulent
time in American society for many
reasons, hardly caused by just the
removal of public prayer from
schools.
The frequently heard argument is
tried but still true: public prayer
necessitates peer pressure, and the
embarassment and imposition is
just too great to have those who do
not praying leave the room or sit
while others stand.
There are many ways to show
others one's religious faith; prayer
is permitted individually in public
schools; religion should be taught
by one's family and one's church;
there is no need nor justification for
public prayer in schools. Eighteen
Republican and 26 Democratic
senators should be commended for
there courage and judgment in the
vote against the amendment.
Meese's Days Are Limited With
Danno, McGarrett On His Trail
By GREG RIDEOUT
The tall, dark-haired man stepped off
the plane. There was a nip in the
Washington air; you could tell he wasn't
used to it. He was here on business. It
was a favor to a friend on the Senate
Judiciary Committee. As he strode con-
fidently through the terminal doors to
meet the person picking him up, you
could see the deep tan that betrayed the
dark glasses he was hiding behind. It was
McGarrett, Steve McGarrett � Five-O.
He had a job to do. The governor per-
sonally asked him to look into an in-
vestigation by the judiciary committee.
Seems that the would-be U.S. Attorney
General needed scrutinizing. His name
� Edwin Meese. A slick and tricky
politico type given to evasive answers
and behind-the-scenes wheeling and
dealing. McGarrett likened him to an
island racketeer. Five-O would get the
truth.
McGarret and his men checked into a
Washington hotel. And as he pushed the
shudder aside and stared out the win-
dow, he thought about the case. Then,
suddenly, he wheeled around, stabbed
his index finger in the air and banged his
fist on the imitation oak table.
"Gentlemen he said. "Let's go over
what we got so far
"Steve said Danno, "the suspect,
Meese, is apparently dealing in govern-
ment jobs. Each job apparently costs a
different amount, depending on how
much financial trouble Meese is in
"That's right, Steve confirmed
Chin Ho Kelly. "A John McKean
bought a seat on the Postal Board for
$60,000. And a deputy undersecretary
position at the Department of Interior
went for $32,500. A Thomas Barrack
got that one, Steve
"All right men McGarrett said,
"we know he's guilty. Ooh, and he's a
smart one. But he'll make a mistake
"And when he does McGarrett sternly
said, "we'll be there, and we'll nail 'em.
"But Steve Danno piped in, "the
president's behind him, and according
to one of my contacts, he's not gonna let
his boys testify at the new hearings
WievPoint
"That's right, Steve Chin Ho said.
"Oh, he'll testify McGarrett said as
a slight smile curled his lips. "Duke, you
and Dano bring this guy, Reagan, in
McGarrett sat at his make-shift desk.
The president, he knew, wanted his
crony as the people's highest lawyer.
The president could then continue his
plans to disassemble all progress on
judicial and civil rights issues over the
last 25 years. Meese, he thought, would
do anything for his mentor, including il-
legalities, as evidenced by the Carter
briefing papers incident.
The phone suddnely rang.
"McGarrett Steve said.
"Steve, It's Che the crime lab
wizard said. "I think I've got something
here
"I'll be right there
r- Campus Forum
At the lab, Che showed McGarrett
how he'd lifted a set of Meese's prints
off two incriminating memos. Che had
also deciphered a garbled tape of
Reagan and Meese discussing the issues
"Good work, Che Steve had said.
Steve returned to his office. He found
Dano, Kelly and Mr. Reagan waiting for
him.
"Steve Dano said, "This is the
president
Mr- President Steve suddenly
said, "why are you continuing to sup-
port a man who is obviously unworthv
of the job?"
"Well, Jack Ronnie began, "first
let me say I really love your show. Of
course, I should of had the part. But. I
got this one, so it's okay. So, now, well.
Mr. McGarrett, he's my buddy, and he
only lied about a couple things
"Mr. President, I'm afraid your an
accomplice; we have evidence
"Well, ooh, um, say, Steve, I don't
need any trouble. Tell you what. I'll
withdraw Ed's name and put you up for
the job. How about it ?"
"No dice! We're going to get Meese.
You can go now, Mr. President. After
you resign, you're mine
The McGarrett team drove wildly over
to Meese's White House office
Meese?" McGarrett said.
"Yea, what do you want
a JYoX?'TC under arrest- suspicion of
defrauding the American public "
"You can't. I'm famous "
"Oh yeah McGarrett said sternly.
Book'em Danno
Helm 9s Pro-Life Stance Inconsistent
In North Carolina these days a lot of
attention is being paid to the upcoming
Senate battle between Jesse Helms and
Jim Hunt. So in the midst of all this ex-
citement I was glad to have the oppor-
tunity recently to personally challenge
Jesse on several of his positions.
Our impromptu encounter took
place on Jan. 23 in Washington D.C.
as Helms was getting ready to address a
group of abortion opponents assembl-
ed for the March for Life, a march held
each year on the anniversary of the
1973 Supreme Court decision which
legalized abortion.
Moments after March Chairperson
Nellie Gray introduced Helms as the
best person babies and voters have in
the U.S. Senate, I dashed out of a
crowd to approach the speaker's plat-
form. (It was an opportunity I couldn't
pass up.) Here was a group of 50,000
people referring to themselves so "Pro-
Life" while at the same time extolling
the virtues of Ronald Reagan and Jesse
Helms, two men I consider to be the
most anti-life individuals now in public
office.
"Right to Life Means No to War �
Stop the Arms Race and Abortion
was the inscription on a placard I held
high above my head as I proceeded to
address the crowd an instant after the
applause had subsided for Helms.
An Associated Press story quoted
me as saying "What are you (Helms)
going to do for the born?" as Helms
spoke of protecting the unborn. That's
not exactly what I said, and Helms had
not yet begun to speak, but the gist of
the quote was basically accurate.
I participated in the March for Life
because I am personally and morally
opposed to abortion. But unlike the
vast majority of those present for the
march, I am not prepared to offer my
political support to the likes of Helms
and Reagan purely on the basis of their
opposition to abortion.
Together these men have worked
hard to drastically slash necessary
social programs that help many of our
most needy citizens. At the same time,
both of these men are supporting the
largest � and most wasteful �
military budget in our nation's history.
The anti-abortion movement has
somehow managed to corner the
market on the term "pro-life As long
as a politician is opposed to abortion
� unequivocally � then he's O.K. by
the anti-abortionists. Even if he's pro-
death penalty, pro-nuclear arms race
anti-social programs, etc. Abortion is
the "only" life issue as for as this
group is concerned. I think it's Ume the
anti-abortionists begin to live up to
their pro-life title or change it to what
it truly is : pro-unborn life.
During the March for Life rally it
was Helms who did the interrupting
when he said, referring to me (seconds
before I was physically carried away)
Don't you feel sorry for someone like
that � all mouth and no action
Such a remark was presumptuous on
the senator's part. I would like to
assure him that I am taking plenty of
action" to see to it that he is not
returned to the U.S. Senate as my
representative. How's that for a
mouthful?
Patrick O'Neill
Green Wile
Simple Slogans, Speeches Won't Suffice
Rv mDnmy nww
By GORDON IPOCK
Last week a soap-box forum was
organized by once and future ECU stu-
dent Patrick O'Neill. It generated some
controversy, and one student wrote a let-
ter to Campus Forum concerning the
events of that day. I was mentioned in
the letter. Like Patrick, I spoke to the
crowd.
Why do people like Patrick and
myself feel compelled to address our
fellow man? First, we're both idealists,
concerned about the present state of af-
fairs. Second, we're also both realists.
We understand that ultimately it is you,
the people, who decide this nation's
policies both at home and abroad. Thus,
if we want to see our ideals realized, it
will be through you, the voting public.
But back to the soap-box forum. I
found it an embarrassing experience
because it amounted to little more than
an obtrusive harangue which the
students both on the mall and inside ad-
jacent classrooms were forced to suffer
through.
And it was futile.
Nuclear war is a subject of incredible
complexity. It merits a semester course
rather than a five-minute speech. Rapid
advances in technology are changing old
theories that once were the foundations
deterrence. There's recent history to
fonsKler, the psychological makeup of
U,S' � the U.S.S.R our national
foal, past conflicts, relative economies,
�S�,W1,d ??mptd out on the
subject I could go on and on
JSH SL?1" dew information
on the subject. If you're really interested
vwSfl IU �hare1S
you. It will take some reading. If you
want answers, they're there
But voter, beware of slogans packag-
ed with the simplicity -mdsubtS.
ofajcigarette ad. the kind thrown atvou
fiom. soap box. NuclearS?�2
'A up ail
B KIM CRAIG
Or
into
as a
Fren
boar
farm
S10C
for
housj
iasts
It is rare when college
students are given the
chance to travel to
Europe, but a program
established by the
Foreign Language
Department, known as
"Aupair allows
students to do just this
Four New SC
Continued From Page 1 tc
government. I look for- "
ward to working with him
during the transition Lir.
period.
Treasurer-elect Moo-
ing said she sincerely ap- j j
preciated the student tur- w
nout. She also restated
her piedge to be available dec I
Student Opinio
SGA
W
L
FL1
OneL
Open SJ
Located
J 25IOE. 10Street Greq
m m i m im ft � r r m m
5-9 PM
Thurs.& Fri.
� ALL YOU CAN EA'
Buffet To All The
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� SERVED WITH
SEAFOOD CHOWI
FRENCH FRIES
2 VEGETABLES
HUSHPUPPIES
with our
MWP11
Jte





IHr f AM k) IMAS
II WD
AN'
With
Trail
e showed McGarrett
of Meese's prints
memos. Che had
garbled tape of
Vleese discussing the issues.
s'ee had said.
s office. He found
Vfr. Reagan waiting for
-aid. This is the
Steve suddenly
u continuing to sup-
bviously unworthy
lie began, "first
e your show. Of
f had the part. But, I
� ay So, now, well,
mj buddy, and he
I Mngs
f I'm afraid vour an
e have evidence
say, Steve, I don't
rouble. Tell you what. I'll
name and put vou up for
about it ?"
j e're going to get Meese.
w. Mr President. After
� - re mine
ret! team drove wildly over
bite House office.
I McGarrett said.
a jo you want
arrest, suspicion of
I he American public
'm famous
McGarrett said sternly.
Janno
is tent
� term "pro-life As long
n is opposed to abortion
pally � then he's O.K. by
Zionists. Even if he's pro-
� pro-nuclear arms race,
rograms, etc. Abortion is
Jlife issue as for as this
lemed. I think it's time the
ists begin to live up to
title or change it to what
ro-unborn life.
March for Life rally it
'�ho did the interrupting
I, referring to me (seconds
I physically carried away)
feel sorry for someone like
jouth and no action
lark was presumptuous on
h part. I would like to
flat I am taking plenty of
see to it that he is not
Jthe U.S. Senate as my
le. How's that for a
Patrick O'Neill
Greenville
Suffice
ke. There's recent history to
lie psychological makeup of
the U.S.S.R our national
conflicts, relative economies,
la pumped out on the
could go on and on.
is much clear information
f1-y�u're really interested
1.1 u be glad to share it with
take some readins. If you
rs, they're there.
J, beware of slogans packag-
Isimpucuy � and subtlety �
F "J toe kind thrown at you
h box. Nuclear war isn't that
'A upair' Program Scheduled
MAX H22, 19U
ByKIMCRAIG
Staff Writ
It is rare when college
students are given the
chance to travel to
Europe, but a program
established by the
Foreign Language
Department, known as
"Aupair allows
students to do iust this.
Only girls are accepted
into the program, acting
as a "big sister" in a
French family. Room and
board are provided by the
family, along with about
$100 a month in return
or doing light
housework and watching
the children.
The program usually
lasts one summer, but in
the past, two ECU
students stayed on for a
full year.
After being immersed
in everyday French life �
from trips to the market
to taking the children on
walks or bicycling � the
girls eventually begin to
learn the French
language. The children
are major factors in lear-
ning French because they
are able to point at ob-
Four New SGA Officers Elected
Continued From Page 1
government. I look for-
ward to working with him
during the transition
period.
Treasurer-elect Moor-
ing said she sincerely ap-
preciated the student tur-
nout. She also restated
her pledge to be available
to all student groups.
"I'm elated she said.
Elections chairperson
Lindsey Williams said she
felt the election ran
smoothly. "The cam-
paigning and turnout
were excellent she said.
Unlike last fall's SGA
elections, there were no
Student Opinion
major problems. There
were minor problems
with the ballots from one
precinct, necessitating the
elimination of one box.
Williams stressed that
had the ballots from the
box been included, the
outcome would not have
been effected in any way.
Phillips
SGA Elections
By DALE SWANSON
Suff Wrlirr
Did you vote in the SGA elec-
tions? Why or why not?
Jenny Phillips, Foods and
Nutrition, Freshman � "Yes
because the people I voted for
would make good officers, and so
I wouldn't feel guilty if they only
lost by one vote
Chris Schiappa, Geology,
Graduate - "Yes, because I'm
concerned over who's controlling
the SGA. I think my candidate
was more intelligent than the
others
Jacqui Allan, Nursing,
Sophomore � "Yes because I
wanted the people I voted for to
win. I feel they should have mv
vote
Kevin Faison, Industrial
Physics, Sophomore � "No, I
was in classes all day and I didn't
have time between them
jects and request them in
French.
Grace Ellenberg,
French instructer and
supervisor of Aupair,
said, "The girls take con-
siderable pride in the fact
that on their return, they
can speak the language
without too much dif-
ficulty The girls are
also encouraged to take
French classes while in
France. Ellenberg said
the past experiences with
the program "have been
very favorable
Former participants in
Aupair have saved the
money their family
alloted them each month
for their return plane
ticket, or some have used
the money to travel
around France at the end
of their stay.
1�
The
Society of United Liberal Students
is now accepting submissions for
contestants in its annual;
Miss S.O.U.L.S. Pagent
Another benefit of the
program is that the girls
are often taken along
with the family on vaca-
tion. Students in the past
have gone to such places
as Lake Geneva.
Switzerland and Corsica.
An agency in France
provides the names of the
French families. Students
cannot choose which
family they want or the
geographic area.
The problems that are
faced can seem small later
on, but at the time they
can seem momentous
Ms. Ellenberg advises
that the girls who go,
"must have an adven-
turous personality and be
able to solve problems on
their own
April 9 Is The Last
Day To Register To
Vote In The May 8 Primary
Name:
Address:
Pho:
me
Deadline for submissions will be
March 22, 1984.
Please return submissions to room 239
Mendenhall Student Center or contact
Jimmy Hackett at 758-8390
Get the bugs o
Spring Tune-up
Reg. $12.50 Now $9.50
CRUISERS
New ship nents just arrived
i Bicycle Post
530 Cotanche St.
j 757-3616
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
march

THE EAST CAROLINJAN
MARC H 22. 19M
i

Punk's Not Dead Yet
It's alive and
multiplying on
College Hill.
P�0�o by Debfee L. G.mb.ck,
A punk judge at Tyler Dorm.
By JENNY LMEADOR
Staff Writer
It's expression, dancing, rebellion, fashion and
freedom. Actually, it's Punk. Whether punk is in or
out is anyone's guess, but last Thursday night in
Tyler, punk was definitely in. If you like abstracts
and wild variety, such as a mixture of funk and punk
this was the place to be for the "First Annual Punk
Rock Variety Show" on the Hill. The spectators
smiled and laughed and bobbed with the beat of the
show. But, if you missed the punk event, then your
view may only be tainted by what you have seen
downtown or on the latest videos. Both spectators
and other students have obviously formed their own
opinion about the good and the bad, and the survival
and the eventual end of the Punk Rock Show and the
Punk Rock Era.
"It's an expression of society. People just do their
own thing � there are no restrictions to punk rock. It
varies as people do and just seems to be one of those
stages people go throughwas one coed's response
when asked, what is punk rock?
Maybe the limitless restrictions are kind of an en-
ticing freedom, an excuse to be different without say-
ing a word. Yet if you're not into shagging or disco,
or tap or ballet for that matter, then maybe the jerky
twitching girations turn you on. Even if the music
and the movement goes, I have a feeling punk
fashion just might be here to stay.
"The fashion and just the craze of dressing weirdly
gives you a chance to let go of your inhibitions says
senior Elizabeth Hart. "It makes people not respect
you, but be wary of you. They don't want to touch
you they just stand back She also said, " the
closing of J.Js was a sad moment in the history of
Greenville
Punk is one of those styles you either appreciate or
you don't. Many students don't like it and see it as a
fad simply hanging on. Extremist Angie Maynor
said, "I don't like it. It's ridiculous and extremely
immature Artist Ellen Whitman said, "I don't like
punk rock. I have a Hank Williams, Jr. album in my
room. Why do you think I don't like it?"
Runner Regina Kent doesn't like it either. "1 think
it looks too different � out of the ordinary. The only
time I see people punking out is on holidays or when
people are going to parties, but I don't see it that
often any more
So perhaps punk is simply hanging on by a few
strange threads. It comes down to a matter of sur-
vival for those still pulling bucks in the punk
business. Naomi McLaurin didn't care too much for
punk either, but did admit she liked The Cars (a rock
band). Her gave her reason for believing the punk
scene is still: "It has survived because everyone
strives to be different, and punk gives them a chance
to be different
Melissa Reed also had an interesting idea about
why punk has survived this long. "It's a way for peo-
ple to rebel in a safe way she said. "I like it because
it brought mini-skirts and leather pants back into
See PUNKS, Page 7
Page
John Rose lays down the rap of "The Red Rat Story
Animation Film At Hendrix
Compromise,
the hinge
liberal minds
pivot upon.
By GORDON IPOCK
Ftanra fMiot
It amazes me that once an in-
dividual develops his beliefs, they
tend to be consistent, ie con-
sistently liberal or consistently
conservative. For example, on
most any given issue, I feel
reasonably sure I can predict
which side a fellow like Jay Stone,
a well-known campus liberal, will
take. Whether its arms control,
defense spending, social pro-
grams, foreign policy, PIRG �
you name it � Jay and I will, with
few exceptions, be drawn to op-
posite views as surely as opposite
ends of a magnet polarize
themselves.
Why is this?
I believe there are a few basic
concepts that govern how we look
at matters, certain modus operan-
di that act as hinges for all our
decisions and judgements. The
"right versus fair" concept I
discussed last week is such a fun-
damental hinge our minds pivot
upon, and I pointed out the flaw
in the current obsession with be-
ing "fair how it is a form of
non-thinking.
The Secret's In The Bean
Gourmet Cofft
Attention all arty types, film
buffs and high-tech vidio freaks.
Synthetic Movements � New
Directions in Contemporary
Animation is coming to Green-
ville just for you.
This informative program is for
all serious artists, especially com-
mercial artists, and for artists in-
terested in animation and the
latest technical aspects of film
animation. It's also for anyone
who has an ounce of curiosity.
Twenty filmakers, all related to
recent developments, are
represented in this program of
short animated films. Twenty-
three films are divided into two
programs titled "Toward the Ab-
solute film and
"Redefinitions Program I
features films that seek a visual
music in a reductive style, concen-
trating on rhythm, surface move-
ment and spatial relationships.
Program II features films that
utilize high-tech processes such as
optical and matte printing,
computer-generated and syn-
thesized imagery and other
means.
Synthetic Movements is spon-
sored by the Visual Arts Forum of
ECU's School of Art. It will be
presented Sunday, March 25 at
7:30 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
The program is open to all
students and the public, and ad-
mission is free.
Synthetic Movements is
organized and distributed by the
American Federation of Arts.
Conservative's
Commentary
.a view from the right.


By GORDON IPOCK
Feature Editor
Americans love coffee. We con-
sume over three billion pounds a
year that's 450 million cups a
day. The average coffee drinker
guzzles the stuff like water,
averaging a quart between sunrise
and bedtime. If wine is the na-
tional beverage of France, coffee
is surely the national drink of the
U.S. But while Frenchmen have
elevated the making and drinking
of wine to a national art,
American's passion for coffee has
been a strictly blue-collar love af-
fair. Work and coffee go together
like well, the coffee break. Like
salt, sugar and flour, coffee is one
of the basics of American life.
But Americans are finding there
can be more to drinking a cup of
"Joe" than a simple yes or no
about cream and sugar. Taste
buds from Sacremento to Savan-
nah are awakening to the infinite
possibilities of the coffee bean. In
Greenville, no less than four
businesses are now selling
gourmet coffee.
Eileen Huber owns and
operates Eileen's Special Occa-
sions, a wine, cheese and gourmet
foods shop in the Greenville
Square Shopping Center. She
began selling gourmet coffee this
past fall and is now doing a brisk
business selling about 60 pounds a
week. According to Eileen, many
of her customers � the serious
connoisseurs � are Europeans.
"I have several, that when the
coffee comes in, they'll chew on
the bean to determine the quality
of the coffee she says.
Fine coffee is never ground
before it is sold. Grinding releases
the flavor. Even when sealed in-
side an airtight container and
stored in a freezer, ground coffee
can begin losing its goodness
within a week. A serious con-
noisseur has his own coffee
grinder. He buys the beans whole
and grinds only enough for his im-
mediate needs.
Since gourmet coffee ($6-8 a
pound) is more expensive than
commercial blends, many people
reserve it for special occasions,
especially when guests are involv-
ed.
"An exotic coffee is the frame
of a picture for those special even-
ings says Eileen. "You cook a
gourmet meal, and it's not com-
plete unless you finish it with a
good cup of gourmet coffee.
i�
The Good Life
The only problem is after
tasting gourmet fare, a real coffee
lover has a hard time palating the
standard brands from the super-
market shelf. I realized that just
this afternoon. I stopped in
Gourmet International,
downtown on Fifth Street, and
had a cup of coffee made from
freshly ground French-roast
beans. As I sipped the coffee and
let it wash slowly across my
palate, taste buds fired first on the
tip and center (mostly reacting to
the two lumps of sugar) and final-
ly on the sides and back of my
tongue (erupting to the full flavor
and winy twang of the dark-
roasted, oily beans). My next cup
of home brew tasted flat and dull
in comparison.
Mrs. Jeng Ja Kim, who owns
Gourmet International, sells
gourmet coffee not only by the
pound or fraction of a pound, but
also by the cup. That way, in a
relatively short period of time you
can become familiar with all 12 of
the coffees she sells. Try Planta-
tion Kenyan today, and compare
it to Hawaiian Kona or Cafe
Amaretto tommorrow.
"We don't make any money
selling coffee like this says Mrs.
Kim. "It's just a way to introduce
people to the different gourmet
coffees. I want people to really
taste what gourmet coffee is
like
Actually, coffee comes in about
100 different varieties from two
basic species of coffee plants: the
Arabica is grown at high eleva-
tions and is of high quality;
Robusta is a lower-grown, hardier
bush found mostly in Africa. Dif-
ferent coffees get their names
from the country they're from:
Columbian, Ethiopian, Javan,
Mocha Sanani (Yemen) and Costa
Rican just to name a few.
Weather and soil variations give
each region's coffee a unique
taste. But the second and perhaps
more critical factor in determining
taste is the way the beans are
roasted. The names French roast,
Viennese roast or Itallian expresso
come from the way the beans
(usually Columbian) are roasted,
not from the country in which the
coffee is grown. Other coffees are
blends and are so named: Mocha
Java, Turkish blend,
Copenhagen; or they are flavored
coffees and thus derive their
names: amaretto and Swiss
chocolate almond. Indeed,
gourmet coffee can be as
fascinating and satisfying a pas-
sion as fine wines.
But the caffeine! You say you
just can't take the caffeine.
A good selection of gourmet
coffees are available in decaf-
feinated versions. But be prepared
to pay a price � both in money
and flavor. A recently developed
method that uses only water in-
stead of a combination of water
and chemicals leaves more flavor
in the beans. Two European com-
panies, Coffex in Switzerland and
Rombouts in Belgium, share the
secret. Because the beans must be
shipped to Europe and back, and
treated, decaffeinated coffee
usually costs about a dollar a
pound or more than the same
blend with caffeine. But despite
this improved process, some
flavor is lost.
"Caffeine does add spark to
coffee explains Eileen. "Lets
face it, that's what caffeine is �
the edge of coffee. And when you
take it away, it is a little duller
Personally, I enjoy that jolt of
energy a good cup of coffee can
give, whether first thing in the
morning or anytime during the
day. When there's work to be
done, a cup of "Joe" always
makes the task seem a little easier.
But like a lot of Americans, I'm
learning coffee is more than just a
kick in the pants to be slugged
down on coffee break. Gourmet
blends add an aesthetic dimension
to America's blue-collar love af-
fair with coffee.
Exotic gourmet coffees are one of life's finest
Another abstract concept that
liberal minds routinely hinge upon
is that of compromise. In fact,
compromising is the basic medus
operandi for today's liberals
usually their means of enacting
fairness. People who regualarly
compromise are considered fair-
minded, stable, mentally well-
balanced and just plain gcod.
Those who are hesitant to com-
promise, who think twice before
climbing on the band-wagon of
popular thought or refuse to
climb on, are seen as extremists
and therefore dangerous. But iust
like "fairness" the concept of
compromise has been perverted
from its original meaning as well,
and thus it is now a flawed hinge
in the collective thought process
of modern liberals.
Webster's New World Dic-
tionary gives the following defini-
tions: as a noun, "a settlement in
which each side gives up some
demands or makes some conces-
sions as a verb, "to settle or ad-
just by concessions on both
sides The meat of the concept
of compromise, whether as a verb
or noun, is "concessions" by
"both sides But I will stress
another dimension, that of value.
Each side must be willing to con-
cede something of value. Also,
each side must hold a common
principle in their dealings.
For example, say I am a
sharecropper and you are a lan-
downer. It is spring and time for
planting. You will provide land; I
will provide labor, and we will
share the autumn's harvest. You
offer to split the harvest, 60 per-
cent for yourself and 40 percent
for me. You are providing the
land and the seed, you argue. But
I am supplying my mule and my
own labor, and for that I want 00
percent, and you should accent
40. We compromise by agreeing
to split the harvested crop equallv.
We have both conceded
something of value: money. We
have compromised. We are both
operating on a common principal:
that of fair trade.
But suppose you put forth your
offer, conceding an extra 10 per-
cent of the profit to me, and I res-
pond thusly: "I reckon not. You
know, you've got a mighty fire
barn on your place. It'd be a
shame for it to burn down. I don't
reckon that'd be likely to happen
if I get my 60 percent If you
agreed to my terms, this would
hardly be a compromise. First of
all, we would be operating on two
different principles: you, fair
trade; and me, terrorist extortion.
And secondly, you would have
conceded something of value, and
I would have conceded nothing it
all. No, if you accepted my terms
you would not be compromising
but making a unilateral conces-
sion and surrendering a principle.
Such a bogus "compromiae"
seemi obvious, but it is just th�
See MINDS. Paje 7
Punks Inv
Continued From Page 6
style. And besides, what's
wrong with orange
hair?"
Of course there's
nothing wrong with
orange hair. Melissa has a
tinge of it herself.
But just when you
think the last flicker of a
fire is smoldering, so-
meone throws another
piece of paper into the
flame. Recently a mid-
night brainstorm of
Rebecca Thomas's caus-
ed such a flame. As she
lay in bed, a bit restless,
she began to wonder what
would draw a crowd and
would be fun at the same
time. That's when the
idea of having a "Punk
Rock Variety Show"
struck her. Rebecca, be-
ing the P.A. (programm-
ing assistant) in Tyler,
presented the idea to the
staff and other Hill
P.A.s. "I got a great
general reaction and
decided to carry through
with it she said. With
the help of Mike Pitts.
P.A. in Belk, and other
volunteers, the "First
Annual Punk Rock
Show" got under way.
Last Thursday evening
over 125 onlookers
gathered in Tyler lobby to
see the main events which
were lash
ing, actin
and then
group wi
punk, bu
the Ome
group,
as the (
singing
judges,
Ward am
ingtcn.
first anc
prize m
Talent,
Enter:a p.
The
dance
tunate
Newrna
Jeanni
Miller.
Nina (
Wilson ;
around
And Tt
ved "Cm
Have F
:unate
arra
farmer ;
jumpsu:
flowe-v
eac
special
pink ani
rored
tights, i
and orai
In the
ment.
showed
Minds Hi
Continued From Page 6
sort of "compromise"
that liberals within the
media and government
constantly urge upon the
United States in our deal-
ings with foreign powers.
When our leaders refuse
to "compromise they
are labeled extremists
dangerous and intran-
sigent.
Consider the stalled
talks between the U.S.
and Soviets regarding in-
termediate nuclear
missiles in Europe.
Cherneko has stated the
Soviets are ready to
return to the bargaining
table, but as a pre-
condition, Reagan must
agree not to deploy
anymore Euro-missiles
and to remove the hand-
ful of missiles already
deployed. When Reagan
refuses, Chernekc issues
warnings of "grave con-
sequences" that could in-
crease the liklihood of
nuclear war. In effect.
Chernei
cent of
e begit
don't
mum
about
Reagar
sucr !
and is
tremist
intrant
Soviet
med.a.
CongresJ
med:a
Sim
rebels
refuse
populaij
point
poeple
and atti
them wi
men: , i
for bes
same
gressmt
column!
York
out
D'Aubi
such a
1 I �
WZMB
LADES LIGHT
NIGHT til 11:00
50CAdm. 65t3�r
WA
CAROLINA
GAME
AT 9:30 on 7 TV
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' �HHii I l�
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r .�p





Pagt
ompromise,
e hinge
eral minds
vot upon.
B CORDON POCK
tnum tdllcw
amaze me that once an in-
develops his belief's, thev
D� consistent, ie con
itlj liberal or consistently
ative. For example, on
I an) given issue, I feel
onabl) sure 1 can predict
'eliou like Jav Stone,
' s ��� pus liberal, will
Whether its aims control,
e spending, social pro-
eign policy, PIRG �
meii � Jay and 1 will, with
ceptions, be drawn to op-
as surel) as opposite
magnet polarize
I
basic
- en .v we look
dus operan-
inges for all our
idgements. The
concept I
�: a fun-
- pivot
the flaw

� rn
nsenative's
mmentan
ui fht nnht.
pon
tin good
com-
"efore
aj
I
� � it just
of
"�erted
.
nge
process
Vh H or id l)ic-
tmMh
1 ing defini
n in
� es up some
e , oces-
to settle or ad-
J .onvess;ons on both
The meat of the concept
amisc, whether as a verb
Mons" by
I will stress
nsion, that of value.
be willing to con-
�alue Also,
W a common
e in alings.
�ay I am a
"pper and you are a lan-
1 It is spring and time for
ig Vou will provide land" 1
rovide labor, and we will
Jhe autumn s harvest. You
o split the harvest. 60 per-
yourself and 40 percent
e. You are providing the
id the seed, you argue. But
luppiying my mule and my
bor. and for that I want 60
and you should accept
- mpromise by agreeing
I the harvested crop equally
have both conceded
fing of value: money. We
mpromised. We are both
igon a common principal-
fair trade.
Oppose you put forth your
conceding an extra 10 per-
I the profit to me, and I res-
nusly: "I reckon not You
you've got a mighty fine
fn our Place. It'd be a
for it to burn down. I don't
that'd be likely to happen
t my 60 percent If you
to my terms, this would
be a compromise. First of
�would be operating on two
� principles: you, fair
fnd me, terrorist extortion
fondly, you would have
d something of value, and
have conceded nothing at
if you accepted my terms,
uld not be compromising
�mg a unilateral conces-
surrendering a principle
a bogus "compromise"
)bvious, but it is just the
- MINDS, P
IHEJASTCAROLINIAN
Punks Invade Tyler
Continued From Page 6
style. And besides, what's
wrong with oranae
hair?"
Of course there's
nothing wrong with
orange hair. Melissa has a
tinge of it herself.
But just when you
think the last flicker of a
Fire is smoldering, so-
meone throws another
piece of paper into the
flame. Recently a mid-
night brainstorm of
Rebecca Thomas's caus-
ed such a flame. As she
lay in bed, a bit restless,
she began to wonder what
would draw a crowd and
would be fun at the same
time. That's when the
idea of having a "Punk
Rock Variety Show"
struck her. Rebecca, be-
ing the P.A. (programm-
ing assistant) in Tyler,
presented the idea to the
staff and other Hill
PA.s. "I got a great
general reaction and
decided to carrv through
with it she said. With
the help of Mike Pitts,
P.A. in Belk, and other
volunteers, the "First
Annual Punk Rock
Show" got under way.
Last Thursday evening
over 125 onlookers
gathered in Tyler lobby to
see the main events which
were fashion and model-
ing, acting and dancing,
and then a miscellanious
group who were not so
Punk, but full of funk,
the Omega Mu Sigma
group, otherwise known
as the Old Maid Society
singing sisters. Three
judges, Joe Lewis, Mark
Ward and Tommy Cov-
ington, determined the
first and second place
prize winners of the
Talent, Fashion and
Entertainment categories.
The first act was a
dance by The Unfor-
tunate Ones, (Cindy
Newman, Lori Miller,
Jeanni Keating, Scotia
Miller, Caycee Poust,
Nina Consalvi, Amy
Wilson and Vicki Gorrie)
around the preppy-clad
Andy Terrell as they pro-
ved "Girls Just Want to
Have Fun The Unfor-
tunate Ones sported an
array of outfits such as
farmer pullovers, a black
jumpsuit, mini skirts and
flowered beach shorts,
each having her own
special accessories � hot
pink ankle socks, mir-
rored shades, black
tights, white tennis shoes
and orange hair.
In the modeling depart-
ment, Wanda Battle
showed off a black polka-
dotted mini-dress with
white ankle socks and
black spike heels. Novell
Russell also did some
strutting and modeled a
turquoise satin dress. She
was followed by Court-
ney Smith who wore a
pink sweater, a blue cord
mini skirt, a black straw
hat and blue nylons. For
their second act they ap-
peared as the Stylists and
won second place in the
talent category. Follow-
ing them the Omega Mu
Sigma sisters sang their
spinster declaration say-
ing they had "No man,
leading a single life
Their three chorus act got
the most applause and
won them second place in
the entertainment
category.
John Rose, a drama
major, was the only male
to compete in the show.
Fitting to his talent, John
did a monologue story of
the "Red Rat Story It
was odd enough to see
him dressed in black
jeans and vest, a chain
belt and high-top boots
with his hair greased back
and safety pins sticking
through his clothes as
well as his arms and
cheek, but to hear him
tell the story of purple
cops, green giraffes, blue
pwT "nd Reb� t"� "v,�8TupT!
providing the music,
Mike Kleinert said it was
fun to watch. Sheril
Waldron summarized the
evening as "original and
good, but most of all, it
was fun
elephants and the big red
rat was even stranger.
Nonetheless, he won first
place in the talent and
fashion categories.
The crowd's reaction
to this presentation of
punk also varied. Mark
Ward said, "I though it
was fantastic "It was
nice. I got a good laugh
commented Lisa lyon.
RA. Tinger Simmons
said, "It was different,
definitely a Punk Rock
Variety Show The man
So, if you're ever in the
mood to be different and
don't want an excuse,
PUNK OUT! It's not
dead yet, and you're not
alone when it comes to
exhibiting a flare of self
expression
-q ���; uww, i iic man expression.
mas Hinge Upon 'Compromise'
iiaH Prnm Pano f ���
Hasten and tournament information
available at Mendenhall Information
desk.
Continued From Page 6
sort of "compromise"
that liberals within the
media and government
constantly urge upon the
United States in our deal-
ings with foreign powers.
When our leaders refuse
to "compromise they
are labeled extremists
dangerous and intran-
rigent.
Consider the stalled
talks between the U.S.
�nd Soviets regarding in-
termediate nuclear
Nssiles in Europe,
terneko has stated the
viets are ready to
turn to the bargaining
table, but as a pre-
condition, Reagan must
agree not to deplov
anymore Euro-missile's
and to remove the hand-
ful of missiles already
deployed. When Reagan
refuses, Cherneko issues
darnings of "grave con-
sequences" that could in-
crease the liklihood of
nuclear war. In effect,
Cherneko wants 100 per
cent of the harvest before
we begin talks, and if we
don't go along, he's
mumbling something
about a barn burning.
Reagan rightly refuses
such a "compromise"
and is labeled an ex-
tremist � dangerous and
intransigent � by the
Soviet government and
media, and by liberals in
Congress and in our own
media.
Similarly, Marxist
rebels in El Salvador
refuse to participate in
popular elections. At gun
point they compel the
poeple to "compromise"
and automatically include
them within the govern-
ment as a pre-condition
for begining talks. The
same liberals, Con-
gressmen in Washington,
columnists with the New
York Times, etc lash
out at Roberto
D'Aubisson for refusing
such a "compromise
They echo the the party liberals within academia
line from Moscow and as well stress "com-
rrom lass. promise" as the basis for
Whlfm "k ,mistakue- decision making. It is the
What many believe to be hinge their minds pivot
to be a compromise is ac-
ATTIC
tually a unilateral conces-
sion, a surrender of prin-
ciple, and once this has
been established as the
basis for negotioations, a
total surrender is just a
matter of time. Jesse
Helms expressed this
truth well when in 1959
he said:
"Compromise, hell!
That's what has happen-
ed to us all down the line
� and that's the very
cause of our woes. If
freedom is right and
tyranny is wrong, why
should those who believe
in freedom treat it as a
roll of bologna to be
bartered a slice at the
time
But on issue after issue,
the Gary Hart's and
Walter Mondales, the
liberal Congressmen and
columnists, and the
upon. Thus, they are con-
sistent in their counsel for
unilateral concessions
and surrender of prin-
ciples.
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THfc EASTCAROI INIAN
Sports
marc h . W4
Page h
McClanahan, Peterson Lead Bucs
Pirates Split Doubleheader With Northwestern
By ED NICKLAS
QpMtoMfcN
ECU pitcher Winfred Johnson
gave up two home runs in the first
game of a doubleheader yesterday
afternoon at Harrington Field,
bul he got revenge in the second
game, sending a blast just inside
the right field foul pole in extra in-
nings to give the Pirates a 3-1 win
and a split with Northwestern.
"It was close said Johnson
(3-1) of his homer which was
almost pushed foul by a strong
wind that helped four balls over
the fence during the
doubleheader. "I think everyone
on both teams all day were trying
to hit one out there
ECU coach Hal Baird was
pleased to recover and win the se-
cond game, after surrendering a
1-0 fifth inning lead. "I was hap-
p as heck to get out of that he
That was a good one
because they have a good club.
They are the best team we have
played
Northwestern, now 4-5, had
lost three straight games to Camp-
bell coming into today's game,
but nevertheless played like the
team that won 35 games the
pre ious year.
The Pirates, 114, lost the first
I ame 4-2 as Nothwestern pitcher
John Trautwein went the
distance, giving up only six hits,
three of which came in the third
inning when the Pirates scored all
of their runs. Trautwein struck
out three and walked two.
Northwestern did most of its
damage in the second inning,
scoring three of its five runs.
Joe Girardi led off the inning
by powering a home run over the
inimitable right field fence. After
a groundout, single and fielder's
choice, Al Quintana lined a single
to left to knock in the Wildcats'
second run.
Michael Huff punched a single
up the middle to move Quintana
to second, who scored on Dan
Grunhard's RBI single to left
center.
Reggie Hammonds drilled a
Johnson pitch beyond � quess
where � the right field fence in
third inning to give the Wildcats
their fourth run of the game.
After giving up eight hits and
four runs in the first three innings,
Johnson settled down and shut
out the Widcats out over the final
four while giving up only three
hits.
ECU scored all of its runs in the
third, as shortstop Greg Hardison
drilled a two run homer over �
guess where � the right field
fence. The Pirates had a chance to
add another in the same inning,
but Johnson hit into a double play
with Todd Evans on first base,
who had reached on a single to
left.
The Pirates threatened again in
the last inning � the bottom of
the seventh. Rightfielder Mike
Williams was hit by a pitch to lead
off the inning and took second
when leftfielder Mark Shank was
thrown out at first on a dribbler
back to the pitcher.
Then, Mike Sullivan, pinch hit-
ting for catcher Jim Riley, walked
to put runners on first and second
with one out. Second baseman
Steve Sides, who lashed a double
earlier in the contst, hit into a
double play to end the game.
The sparse, cold crowd saw a
pitcher's duel in the second game,
as Northwestern's Bob Miller and
ECU's Robby McClanahan threw
superbly. Miller went the
distance, giving up only six hits
until Johnson's game-winning
home run. McClanahan had a no-
hitter going into the fifth inning
and gave up a mere three hits
before being relieved by Jim
Peterson (3-0) in the eighth.
The Pirates scored the game's
first run in the fifth inning, as
Sullivan lashed a double with two
outs and came home on catcher
Jabo Fulghum's line-drive single
up the middle.
The Wildcats quickly tied the
score in the next inning. Greg
Beck led off the batting order with
a single to right field, then took
third on an errant throw to second
base by Fulghum. Mike Huff then
lined a shot to center, and Shank
made a diving stab, but his throw
was late to the plate as Beck tagg-
ed from third.
The Wildcats threatened to take
the lead in the top of the eighth, as
they put men on first and second
with only one out. But Peterson
came in to relieve McClanahan
and got the next two Wildcat hit-
ters out on a fly to right and a
ground out to the catcher.
"Robby did a great job Baird
said.
"I had good stuff Mc-
Clanahan said. However, at the
end, he said, "I was losing a little
from my fastball
Mike Christoper and Bob
Davidson are slated to pitch in
today's doubleheader against
Ohio University, which is schedul-
ed to begin at 1 p.m.
First Game
ECU 002 000 2�2 5 0
NU 031 000 0�4 11 0
Second Game
ECU 000 010 02�3 7 1
NU 000 001 00�1 4 1
Winfred Johnson's game m
pole
STANLEY LEAHY - E
inning home run was just inside
CU Photo LJt
the foul
Sof(bailers Give UNC First Loss
Pirates Slam Heels
Fjm Yo�og. Wendy O� Crl. AlpM�. Phyllis WiHis. S. M.nln .�� tZSZZZZZZ
By RANDY MEWS
Aatetaal SoorU EMtor
The ECU women's softball
team handed North Carolina its
first loss of the season in splitting
a doubleheader with the Tar
Heels, 2-1 and 0-6.
The Lady Pirates managed only
two hits in the second game, but
took advantage of poor pitching
in the fourth inning to defeat the
Heels.
UNC starting pitcher Marsha
Brown struck out the first two
batters in the bottom of the
fourth, but became rattled after
walking Carla Alphin, Angie
Humphrey and Stacy Boyette to
load the bases.
After a long discussion with her
catcher, Brown was still unable to
settle down, walking Wendy Oz-
ment and Bonnie Smith which
enabled Alphin and Humphrey to
score.
At that point, ace pitcher
Virginia Augusta was called to the
mound. Augusta retired the final
seven batters, four by strike out.
"Their pitcher (Augusta) is the
best we've faced all year Pirate
Coach Sue Manahan said, "but
she came in after the damage had
already been done
Carolina threatened to tie the
game up in the top of the sixth,
but good defense allowed the Tar
Heels only one run in three at-
tempts at homeplate.
Powers led off the inning by
reaching first on an .Alphin error.
Holt then followed with a single
to put runners on the corners with
only one out.
After a Boyette fastball hit the
dirt and got by catcher Lisa
Zmuda, Powers tried to steal
home, but was tagged out bv
Boyette.
Holt managed to get all the wav
to third on the play, and then
scored the Heels' only run of the
game when Augusta reached first
on an error by shortstop Tamara
Franks.
Faircloth drove a ball into
center field on the next at bat, but
Augusta was thrown out at the
plate to end the inning.
Boyette retired the final three
batters to end the game, compil-
ing four strikeouts along the way.
"They were undefeated, so it's
a nice win for us Manahan said.
"I'm not totally satisfied with our
play, but I'm excited about where
we are (9-5) at this point in the
season and I hope we can continue
to learn every day
Augusta got the start in the first
game, and made the Pirates look
like a pee-wee softball team on her
way to a no-hitter.
After walking the first batter
she faced, Augusta retired the
next 21 batters in row, 10 by
strikeout.
The Heels got all they needed in
the first as Jarrell tripled, and
then was singled in by Powers for
a 1-0 lead.
Carolina picked up another run
in the top of the second. Burton
led off the inning with a walk and
then adv anced to third on a Loflm
single. Burton crossed the plate
after a sharp grounder To. Everette
was mishandled by first baseman
Dawn Langley.
In the fifth, Everette walked
and then stole second on the ensu-
ing pitch. After Powers reached
first on another error, Augusta
singled home Everette to give the
Tar Heels a 3-0 lead.
Powers was the next tc score on
a single by Holt, and after a dou-
ble steal in which Augusta reached
third and Holt second, ECU pit-
cher Pam Young struck out Brux-
ton to end the inning and get the
Pirates out of a jam.
UNC picked up their rinal two
runs in the last inning as Jarrell hit
a booming two-run homer over
the center field fence to close out
the scoring at 6-0.
ECU returns to action next
Tuesday in the Virginia Invita-
tional Tournament in Charlot-
tesville, Va.
First Game
UNC 100 020 0-6 8 0
ECU 000 000 0�0 0 3
Second Game
UNC 000 001 0-1 0
ECU 000 200 x-2 3 2
EC Netters Face Tough Foes
By RANDY MEWS
Bonnie Smith takes a cut.
MARK BARBER � ECU
LAB
AMMaat8�arti
The ECU men's and women's
tennis teams were crushed Mon-
day afternoon, the women falling
to Peace, 8-1, while the men were
defeated 9-0 by North Carolina
State.
"Peace is very strong in tennis
and has a lot of depth ECU
head coach Pat Sherman said.
"Their number one seed is ranked
First in this state, and their
TENNIS
number three player is ranked se-
cond in South Carolina
The number one doubles team
of Janet Russell and Ann Mander-
field were the only Ladies to win a
match for ECU, as they defeated
Yancey-Barton 6-4, 6-0.
Manderfield also drew praise
from Sherman for her perfor-
mance in singles. Although she
lost, Manderfield took Peace's
number two player into three sets,
7-5, 5-7, 6-2.
Russell, ECU's number one
player, didn't have much luck in
her match, losing to North
Carolina's top-ranked player. 6-0,
6-1.
In the number one men's
match, State's Clint Weathers im-
See PEACE, Page 9
W��� Powrlifter Sets Records In State Championship
��� says ECU strength coach Mike summer. However, that chanr. d�-id� hcii�. I'm ct�rt;�� .?j u JJL . .
By ED NICKLAS
When most ECU students think
of powerlifting, the name Terry
Long almost always comes to
mind. But there is another over
says ECU strength coach Mike
Gentry. "Her lifting is on the
same parallel as some of the foot-
ball players
In the championship, which
was held in High Point, the
SSL" 22Lri Sf aga �

is neither a football player nor an
All-America. She is, though, the
North Carolina powerlifting
champion in her weight class. Her
name: Amy Bo wen. Her total in
the recent North Carolina State
Powerlifting Championship: 833
� a new state record.
"She has done a super job
jor (sports medicine concentra-
tion) set three other state records
in addition to her total score. Her
160 pound bench press, 320 squat
and 353 deadlift are unsurpassed
in North Carolina. Not content to
rest on her achievements, Bowen
is training for an upcoming meet
in June and the Nationals this
summer. However, that chance decide because I'm starting over
may never come. with light weights she says.
"Two months ago I hurt my Bowen began to dabble in
��tu S?C Says" weights when she was in the tenth
The doctor said I was pushing grade, but not very seriously, she
my disc out she adds, pointing says. When she came to ECU, she
to her back. "I didn't want to risk was a shot putter on the track
lt" team, but realized she had other
Mom and Dad want me to talents and other interests,
quit and not risk my back She decided she couldn't weight
So Bowen has to change her lift and shot put at the same time,
strategy a bit, and in turn she is so she made a logical decision
now working on lighter weights to The other shot putters were bigger
lessen the chance of an injury and taller than she was � so why usually
while still maintaining her train- not give weightlifting a shot, players
pretty good she says. "I did bet-
ter at first than in track, so you do
things you're good at
And good she is.
"I just started getting into it
she adds. "It's new and
everthing
says "they
Bowen spends three days a
week in the weight room, and a
good portion of that time is spent
alone. She says there might be one
other person working out �
one of the volleyball
But sometimes she has
ing. Right now I don't have to "Coach Gentry said I would do the company of the football
players, and Bowen
help me a whole lot
For the time being, Bowen is
just "working with a whole lot of
reps" and not trying to push
along too fast, at the expense of
her back. With hopes of healing
she could possibly be ready for
June's competition. But even if
she can't continue to compete
with her back problems, weightlif-
ting will still be her favorite sport
'I don't think I'U ever stop lifting
but might stop lifting heavy
weights she says. "I'U do it ju�
to Keep me doing something
Ul A,
Bruce
B Vl( Kl BROW SKI I
K I liirtairu
Pres.eaj.on Softball Win-
ners Crowned
The Miller Intramural
Preseason Softbali tour-
nament v. i �d this
past weekr
weather wa- perfect for
48 men' lean . ered
in competition Play
began on Fdav and :
gressed ti
Sundav afternoon It
an exciting as the
same two tea
meet three
times in order I �
champion The
teams � e Bomber
and the Gamblers
Their first mee' .
the final game
undefeatec
the bottom of I
inning, the scre
at s c v
Gambl
final b;
home
Ga
on
Racon
EC
Peace, N
Continued I mm f'j �
EC
prove�
on the�
derr
6-2. 6-1.
The V.
trouble
as not one ma-
E.C.U
'Simply d
b��frir �������

i
!
l:





ucs
STANLEY LEARY - ECU Photo Lab
run was just inside the foul
Heels
1-0 lead.
Jarolina picked up another run
the top of the second. Burton
off the inning with a walk and
en advanced to third on a Loflin
gle. Burton crossed the plate
r?r a sharp grounder MV Everette
is mishandled by first baseman
awn Langiey.
the fifth, Everette walked
then stole second on the ensu-
J. pitch. After Powers reached
r � on another error, Augusta
r.ej home Everette to give the
Heels a 3-0 lead.
'owers was the next to score on
ngle by Holt, and after a dou-
steal m which Augusta reached
tird and Holt second, ECU pit-
ter Pam Young struck out Brux-
to end the inning and get the
irates out of a jam.
L'NC picked up their final two
ns in the last inning as Jarrell hit
booming two-run homer over
e center field fence to close out
lie scoring at 6-0.
ECU returns to action next
luesday in the Virginia Invita-
lonal Tournament in Charlot-
pville, Va.
First Game
fNC 100 020 0�6 8 0
I 000 000 0�0 0 3
Second Game
JJC 000 001 0�1 7 0
I 000 200 x�2 3 2
gh Foes
om Sherman for her perfor-
ance in singles. Although she
st, Manderfield took Peace's
umber two player into three sets
�5, 5-7, 6-2.
Russell, ECU's number one
layer, didn't have much luck in
er match, losing to North
arolina's top-ranked player, 6-0,
In the number one men's
latch, State's Clint Weathers im-
See PEACE, Page 9
nship
flayers, and Bowen says "they
elp me a whole lot
For the time being, Bowen is
ist "working with a whole lot of
cps" and not trying to push
Jong too fast, at the expense of
ler back. With hopes of healing,
Die could possibly be ready for
June's competition. But even if
Bie can't continue to compete
Vith her back problems, weightlif-
jng will still be her favorite sport
PI don't think I'll ever stop lifting
kut might stop lifting heavy
veights she says. 'Til do it just
keep me doing something
I
i
THE EAST CAROIim,an
I
MARCH 22. 1984
By VICKIBROWNELL
Preseason Softball Win-
ners Crowned
The Miller-Intramural
Preseason Softball tour-
nament was played this
past weekend. The
weather was perfect for
48 men's teams registered
in competition. Play
began on Friday and pro-
gressed to final action
Sunday afternoon. It was
an exciting finish as the
same two teams would
meet three consecutive
times in order to crown a
champion. These two
teams were the Bombers
and the Gamblers.
Their first meeting wa?
the final game in the
undefeated bracket. At
the bottom of the seventh
inning, the score was tied
at seven all. The
Gamblers were taking the
final bat, as they were the
home team. The stage
was set. With one out and
Gambler's Todd Moore
on third base, Gambler
Racon Moye hit the ball
James Eure, Kevin
Williams, Brace Raines
and Jeff Andrews led the
Bombers back into the
championship game
against the Gamblers.
Competition was a see-
ECU Intramurals
shallow into left field.
Todd attempted to score
at the same time the ball
left the fielders hand.
And the call was "safe
The Gamblers would sit
and wait for the winner
of the losers bracket.
saw battle but the
Bombers managed to
take their third con-
secutive preseason title.
Bruce Raines, Bomber
first baseman was voted
the tournament's most
valuable player.
In women's action, the
crown went to the Tyler
Enforcers. Ann Ellen was
voted the tournaments
most valuable player.
Congratulations to the
winners and a special
thanks to the Miller
Brewing Company (CO.
Tankard) for sponsoring
the tournament.
Picks Out For Softball
and Team Handball
Intramural Softball and
team handball competi-
tion began this week.
Softball action appears to
be tough as the picks are
out. The number 1 team
is the Bombers. Number
2 goes to the Gamblers
with Dirty White Boys,
TKE, and Skoal Brothers
rounding out the top five.
Handball favorites in
MVP
elude Kappa Alpha, Phi
Kappa Tau, Trimville
Bandits and Head
Hunters.
Be watching for
tinued updates.
Deep
con-
� � uiwi nanaoau iavontes ir
Peace, N.C. State Top Pirate
I ��i �� � .ij � . .
Be A Rep
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational
Services in looking for
students to assume the
representatives role on
the Advisory Council.
Representatives are need
for President, Fraternity
rep, Sorority rep, Co-ed
Residence Hall rep,
Men's Residence Hall,
Women's Residence Hall,
Club rep and an Indepen-
dent representative.
Aplication deadline is
April 2. More informa-
tion and application
forms may be picked up
in 204 Memorial gym.
Some like it thin.
Others like it thick.
Then there are pizza
lovers who love the
deep crust sensation.
They call for, "Extra Thick
All you have to do is
call Domino's Pizza and,
in 30 minutes or less,
we'll deliver a hot,
delicious pizza to your
door It's guaranteed1
Order your pizza with
any combination of a
dozen delicious top-
pings
But this time, ask for
Extrm Thick Cntmt An
experience of deeper
proportions
Call the Domino's Pizza
serving you.
Onvefs carry under $20
Limited delivery areas
'1984 CominosPma inc
Continued From Page 8
proved his record to 7-2
on the year, by
demolishing Paul Owen
6-2, 6-1.
The Wolfpack had no
trouble with the Pirates,
as not one match was ex-
tended beyond two sets.
ECU's only respectable
showing came when the
number two doubles team
of David Creech and
Barry Moran extended
Stanford-Mavor into a
tie-breaker, but they
eventually lost 7-6, 6-4.
When contacted by
phone, assistant coach
Keith Zengal, who travels
with the men, was reluc-
tant to talk about his
team's performance.
"There's not much to
say he said, "we just
got beat
DOMINO'S
PIZZA
DELIVERS
Women's Results
Hodges (P) d. Russell
6-0, 6-1; Bales (P) d.
Manderfield 7-5, 5-7, 6-2;
Barton (P) d. Wallace
6-1, 6-0; Yancey (P) d.
Bunting 6-0, 6-1; McLean
(P) d. Meyers 6-1, 6-3;
Brickies (P) d. Zaloudek
E.C.U. CHEERLEADERS
'Simply the BestNo Brag, Just Fact
Cheerleader Tryouts
1st Meeting! March 26, 1984
5:30 pm
Minges Coliseum
Don't Miss Out on you chance to be part of the award
winning squad!
Nati�nal Cneerleading Association Most Spirited Squad 1983-1984 1
National Recognition by the Universal Cheerleading Association
Supenor Ranking in the Ford College Cheerleading Competition
1983-1984
Men's Results
Weathers (NCS) d
Owen 6-2, 6-1; Stanford
(NCS) d. Creech 6-4, 6-1-
Cirvello (NCS) d. Treble
6-3, 6-1; Blankinship
(NCS)d. Lloyd 6-0, 6-1;
Mavor (NCS) d. Bagley
6-3, 6-1.
MillerECU Intramural
Pre-season Softball Winners
Women
$S&
.H'JIL8$25.95
Volleyball Sets$29 95
.�22Lif2 $5295
Metal Horseshoe Sets$25.95
.iff" �art?$7.95
IndoorOutdoor Horseshoe Sets$15.95
'Soccer Trainers $4 95
; Batting Tees .$13.95
Fielder s Choice (Pltchback)$19.95
Also
'Billiard Supplies, Dart Supplies, & Table
Tennis Supplies
ISrcEeH' A Wy T� Weeke�d
SPORTING GOODS
BONDS
218 ARLINGTON BLVD.
756-6001
H.L. HODGES CO.
110 E. FIFTH ST.
752-4156
a � �
.
m-rw






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 22. 1984
'
?
Candidates Have To Appeal To Southerners
(UPI) � The Democratic
presidential nominee will
have to appeal to
Southern leaders and
voters if he is to defeat
President Reagan in
November, Georgia
Democratic Party Chair-
man Bert Lance said.
Lance and Democratic
party chairmen from 10
other Southern states met
Wednesday in a closed-
door session � one of
their sporadic meetings to
discuss party politics.
The nominee, whether
it's Gary Hart or Walter
Mondale, "will have to
have a relationship with
the Southern leaders,
governors and party
chairs that will enable
him to realize and
acknowledge the impor-
tance of the South
Lance said.
The party chairman,
who had served as budget
director under President
Carter, said all parts of
the country are important
but the South's
"cohesiveness" makes it
especially significant.
"A candidate cannot
win without the South.
By its vote, by its
philosophy, it becomes
important in the process
of electing a president
Lance said.
The leaders seemed to
agree that Gary Hart will
have to work hard to win
the South if he gains the
party's nomination.
"Hart is obviously not
known as well in the
South as (Walter) Mon-
dale Lance said. "He's
going to have to pay at-
tention to the South and
the South's political
leaders, which he hasn't
done yet
Texas chairman Robert
Slagle said, "All of us
Classifieds
SALE
POR SALE: Nursing Uniforms, in-
cludes lab coats, siits: J, 7, f
757-3431. 7SOO10 ator 5.
GIBSON "Firabrand" Los Paul �
str.hard caso. Call 355 3521 anytime
'till midnight. Excellent condition.
FOR
�M.
SALE: Cinnamon Tarantula.
Call 7S2-0713. Ask tor Julie.
FOR SALE: Clarinet. Excellent
COWd Call Lori 752-4315. I7S.0O.
FOR SALE: Double cabinet utility
drawer, work-top. S30 or best otter
Rust colored sofa: $2� or best otter
Small linoleum stainless steel table
and two chairs. Perfect for small
apartment, sis. Call 752-0341
MISC.
PERSONAL
CKACKMi Unrtaa. Sirprlse Sir
�rta. mmmm I 4 tat 1 wit u a
HPT eaMoaalBaJy? Ma)pa) lajMM�OCrOW It
NNa w tats m la � inter and good
time � kjaj take Mm times you've
ihered w- mel �)�I Lava ya Emp-
ty
TO JAY AND JAY: who needs the
SOAT We love you anyway. To the
Conaross all the way. We love you, all
your campaign workers.
THE HESSMAN AND The Cmdeman
are having a party Friday night at
tttair pad to celebrate their birthday
If you know them then show up to par-
ty your pants off. I mean pants off.
Hesman.
PROFESSIONAL Typing service; all
typing needs. 71$ iU or 7S�-tI41.
BABYSITTING A Housekeeping
Monday through Friday, 3-5.30 p.m.
Call 7S4-440Q after � p.m.
ENDING THAT relationship? Want
to know when is the bast timef NCSL
biorythems may hold the answer)
Find out Wed, in me Student Store.
BARBECUE Supper Benefit Station
House Fire Department, March X. 11
am 7 pm. Hi-way 11 and 13 North 134
per plate. Contact Stuart Beam at
732 �4f5 for tickets.
WHEN A FRIEND has stereo system
problems, tell them that the audio
technicians at the TECH SHOP don't
charge for repair estimates. Call us
at 757 "Nineteen Eighty The TECH
SHOP.
LOCAL CHURCH would like parson
to keep church nursery 10:45-13 noon
each Sunday. Could possibly be divid-
ed with another person. U each Sun-
day. Send resume to Nursery Helper,
30f Prince Rd Greenville, NC 37034.
AUTO ACCIDENTS Specialiiing in
personal inury litigation. J. David
Duffus, Jr Attorney, NCNB
Building, Greanville, North Carolina,
750-4200
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Tan cobra-skin wallet. Great
sentimental value. Reward offered
Call 754-3444 after 5:00 p.m.
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED: S!31.Somo.
plus half utilities. Eastbrook Apts.
Call Robert at 7S0-47W.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed.
Stratford Arms Apts. Call Karen at
754-3744.
HISPANIC
73
ROOMMATE wanted
ROOMMATE WANTED: large 3
bedroom house, fireplace, central
AC, hilly carpeted, partially furnish-
ed; located corner of 1st and Elm.
tl 35.00 a month. Call John 750 5353
MALE ROOMMATE wanted.
Georgetown Apts. W rant and Ut.
7sa-04to.
I WANT To
750474.
buy a typewriter.
GET IT
At The Blue Moon Cafe
Subs & Fresh Burgers
99CAnytime
HappyHour
Daily
3 to 10pm
If You Would Like Happv Hour For Your
Sorority or Fraternity Contact Us At
205 E. 5th St.
2efi
A vALj. (jf a MEAL
10S Airport Rd
Greenville. NC 27834
(919)758-0327
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
Combination Special
Trout, Shrimp
and Deviled Crab
!
COOOOooOOOc.
Tri-State
Auto Body
Expert body repairs, paint
jobs, frame straightening, and
24 hour towing.
107 Discount to all ECU
Students.
(Bring in Ad)
(over the bridge)
1512 N. Greene St.
Day 758-0778
Night 756-4775
756-8604
24 k
COOOBOOC
believe if Hart's the
nominee, he's going to
have to spend a lot of
time in the South. It's not
just the people � none of
our elected officials know
him either
Slagle, who is commit-
ted to Mondale, said
chairmen at the meeting
seemed to think Mondale
is more likely to be the
Democratic nominee.
Lance, however, said he
thinks most of the leaders
are unsure.
"They will be a lot
more certain after New
York Lance said.
Slagle he believes a
brokered convention is
unlikely, but "if that
happened, we sure better
talk" about who to sup-
port. Both he and Lance
said the group did not
discuss who they would
favor in such an instance.
Lance said no specific
strategy to nominate a
Democratic candidate
was outlined at the
meeting.
He said the chairmen
seemed pleased with the
way the nomination pro-
cess is going.
"The debate (among
the presidential
nominees) is healthy for
the Democratic Party
Lance said. "It's good
for the candidates to get
that sort of experience
now, because the
nominee will have to meet
Reagan later
Lance, who asked the
chairmen to get together
in Atlanta, said they may
meet again in mid-May.
Eleven of 13 party
chairmen in the South at-
tended the session.
Lilburn W. Carlisle of
Arkansas and Joe
Prather of Kentucky were
unable to attend the
meeting.
Besides Lance and
Slagle, th ise attending
the meeting included:
James Knight, Alabama;
Danny Cupit, Mississip-
pi; Richard Lodge, Ten-
nessee; William Jennings
Bryan Dorn, South
Carolina; Alan Diamons-
tein, Virginia; David
Price, North Carolina;
Charles Whitehead,
Florida; Jesse Bankston,
Louisiana; and Joseph R.
Goodwin, West Virginia.
NATO Has Less Strength. More Mobility
N.C. fUPn � NATO rli.rf rnnkJl- �U�. r, . � ' V
N.C. (UPI) - NATO
forces are disadvantaged
in troop strength and
weapons, but their
mobility would allow
them to turn back a
Soviet invasion of Cen-
tral Europe without using
nuclear weapons, a new
book by military experts
says.
The book's three
authors � two of them
retired German officers
who fought the Russians
during World War II �
say NATO's superiority
lies in its ability to con-
duct mobile combat
operations against rigidly
controlled Soviet forces
best organized for
ponderous, set battles.
However, the book
says NATO must increase
its mechanized forces.
"NATO Under At-
tack: Why the Western
Alliance can fight out-
numbered and win in
Central Europe without
nuclear weapons was
written by Dr. Russell
H.S. Stolfi, a professor
of national security af-
fairs at the U.S. Naval
Postgraduate school;
retired Maj. Gen.
Frederick W. von Mellen-
thin; and retired Col.
Erich Sobik, a former
NATO intelligence of-
ficer.
Von Mellenthin and
Sobik fought Soviet
troops during World War
II on the Eastern Front.
Most analyses of War-
saw Pact strength are too
"mathematical in
nature" and place undue
importance on numbers
ofrnenand weapons,
yifi J, JUSt analvses overlook the NATO could turn to
published by Duke Soviet Army's historical tlefield
University Press. Such weaknesses, which
ffttttlltnimi
advantages,
authors say.
bat-
the
t
HAPPY HOUR
Thursday, March 22
TREEHOUSE
9- 12pm
$2.00
$ 1.00 Admission PITCHERS
I
n 1886, following a shipwreck ofFthe west coast of Africa, an infant
child became part of a family of apes who raised and protected him.
As he grew, he learned the laws of the jungle and eventually claimed
the title, Lord of the Apes.
Yet, years later, when he was returned to civilization, he would remain
uncertain as to which laws he should obey those of man.
or those of the jungle.
Now, the director of "Chariots of Fire" captures this epic adventure
of a man caught between two different worlds.
-
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v


si-
8f���iiR�SKSsS-�R -
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� �
THE LEGEND OF
Lord of the Apes
A HUGH
HU�1LM Starn"8 RAI PH RICHARDSON � IAN HOLM JAMES FOX and mtroducing CHRISTOPHFR LAMRFRx
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Screenplay by P. H VAZAK and MICHAEL AUSTIN Based on the story "TARZAN OF THE APES" by EDGAR R1C E BURROUGHS
SMOTN.unNaa�siE0ttft1 qCg��? Directed by HUGH HUDSON i�zan. ���
PGimBrm aJPMP suGgsrto
IARAN lr.Kk-m.irli IAKAN
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OMWaajaW
A WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY CJ
At theaters everywhere Friday, March 30.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 22, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 22, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.330
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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