The East Carolinian, March 15, 1984






Mt
(Earaltntan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.$rf7
Thursday, March 15,1984
Greenville, N.C.
Termination Of Rivalry
Proposed By N. C. State
By ED NICKLAS
S��rte �W
One of the Pirates most com-
pelling football rivalries could
come to an end after 1985, but
ECU Chancellor John Howell re-
mains optimistic, saying the
recommendation to terminate
ECU's series with N.C. State has
been suggested by "only one
group that has input in the situa-
tion
The recommendation, submit-
ted by N.C. State's Athletics
Council last December, proposed
an end to competition between the
two schools when their contract
expires after the 1982 season.
Last week, N.C. State
Chancellor Bruce Poulton read
the recommendation to North
Carolina's Board of Trustees, but
a vote on the subject was not
made.
Howell, who would like to con-
tinue the series, said he recently
met with Poulton concerning the
contract. "He told me that we
would talk about it some more
Howell said.
Commenting on whether or not
he thinks the contract will be
renewed, Howell said, "That of
course will be a decision that State
will have to make, because we're
not taking the initiative to end the
series.
"All I can say now is that the
decision has not really been
made
According to Howell, the ter-
mination of the series would not
be detrimental to the ECU foot-
ball program, but rather
beneficial. "I guess it could be
construed as the beginning of our
national reputation he said.
Concerning the impact on N.C.
State, Howell said sarcastically,
"They might like to play Miami
and become as famous as we
are
In an interview published in
Tuesday's News and Observer,
the board's vice-chairman James
A. Hackey said he was in favor of
continuing the series but added
there was a strong case in support
of the discontinuation.
In the interview, Hackney said
that with eight teams now in in the
Atlantic Coast Conference, N.C.
State has lost flexability in its
scheduling.
In addition, Hackney said there
was also "pressure from the
ACC to schedule opponents
that have overall academic stan-
dards comparable to those of
ACC schools. I know that the
See CONTENDER, page 5
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Bomb Scare Leaves
Nearly 450 Students
'Out In The Cold'
MARK �ARSCK �CCU
When spring arrives, flowers bloom and frisbees fly. Can this guy
jump, or what?
Questionnaires Used To Judge Performance
Students To Evaluate Instructors
Bv STEPHEN HARDING
St�ff W rlirr
Surveys to obtain students' opi-
nion of instruction will be con-
ducted the week of March 19-24.
Questionnaires have been
distributed, one for each udent
in classes with an enrollment
larger than five. The Faculty
Senate Committee for Teaching
Effectiveness and the Office of In-
stitutional Research developed the
questionnaires.
Approximately 15 minutes of
class time will be allotted next
week for completion of the
survey. The instructor has been
requested to leave the room while
the questionnaires are being com-
pleted and to appoint a student to
distribute, collect and return the
questionnaires to a designated
place for security reasons.
After the forms are completed
they are read by machine. The
machine gives class by class sum-
maries of the percentage given of
each response to every question.
The machine also gives sum-
maries of the average response for
the division, course, and instruc-
tor. This data is used by in-
dividual departments, along with
other information, to make per-
sonnel judgments. The instructor
is also able to use this information
to evaluate his own performance.
Robert Ussery, director of the
Office of Institutional Research,
said response to the question-
naires has been very favorable.
Ussery said it is a good way "to
engage students by expressing
their opinions about the quality of
instruction in the class He add-
ed, "Who knows better than the
students what goes on in class
The Faculty Senate Committee
for Teaching Effectiveness uses
portions of the survey to select
recipients of the Robert L. Jones
Award for Teaching Excellence
and Robert and Lina Mays Award
for Teaching Excellence given by
the Alumni Association.
Most departments do use the
data from the survey and find it
useful, Ussery said. The School of
Medicine does not use this survey
but has its own survey to meet it's
specialized needs better, said Vice
Chancellor and Dean of the
School of Medicine William
Laupus.
The information gained helps
to promote excellent teaching
which is one of the main goals of
the university, Ussery said.
By JENNY MEADOR
Staff Writer
A bomb scare at 12:55 Wednes-
day morning caused the evacua-
tion of approximately 450
students from Tyler Hall.
At 12:30 a.m. Campus Security
received a warning that a bomb
had been set in Tyler and was
scheduled to go off at 1:30 a.m.
Francis Eddings, assistant direc-
tor of Security, and Carolyn
Fulghum, assistant dean and
director of Residence Life were
immediately notified as was Nan-
cy Lackey, Tyler Hall Director.
Security officers in the area ar-
rived first and quickly notified
Pam Riddle, head resident, and
Rebecca Thomas, program assis-
tant. "At 12:45 the security of-
ficers knocked on my door and
told me there was a bomb threat
Riddle said. "I then proceeded to
alert the other R.A.s about the
situation and got them to check
anything suspicious in the
hallways and bathrooms
"Security had already checked
the stairwells, but we continued
searching Riddle added.
Eddings, Fulghum, and Lackey
decided to evacuate the building
as soon as possible as a safety
precaution. "My first concern
was to remove the handicapped
students who are deaf Lackey
said. " We then decided the most
effective way to evacuate would
be to have the R.A.s go door to
door to make sure everyone was
awakened and out of building as
quickly as possible Lackey said
she was relieved that steps for
evacuating had already begun by
the time she arrived.
"There is no suspect at this
time, but the caller is believed to
be a black male Eddings said.
Although the building was search-
ed twice, nothing was found.
Public areas such as hallways,
bathrooms, closets, and the lobby
were checked for explosive
devices. "We looked for unusual
things � a shoebox in a
bathroom, or a briefcase in a
hallway where it shouldn't be.
You have to use a lot of common
sense and judgement Eddings
said.
Fulghum commented that no
improvements could be made on
how the situation was handled.
"The Tyler staff and residents are
to be commended for the way they
handled the situation. I was also
extremely pleased with the
students' response to the staff
Fulghum said. She said that the
students did not complain and
were out quickly. "I realize it was
a terrible inconvenience but I
would rather be prepared than to
take chances Fulghum said.
Eddings and Lackey also com-
mented on the "commendable"
job done by the staff and students
in cooperating. "It was surprising
that over 400 girls were able to get
out of the building in less than 15
minutes considering the weather
and that they had to get dressed
warmly too said Eddirgs.
Several students were frighten-
ed by the warning. Angie Powell
said "At first I thought they (stu-
dent staff) were kidding. It really
scared me. I just thought it was
some pervert calling to see girls go
outside, but they reallv handled it
well
Voter Registration Topic Of
UNCASG Weekend Meeting
Date For Dorm Room Registration Set,
Students To Get Applications, Contract
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Co-New Editor
Students wishing to live in
dorms for the 1984-85 school year
will be given the opportunity to
sign up March 19-23. Although
not finalized, an increase from the
current room rent of $435 to $445
per semester is expected. The two
air conditioned buildings (Jarvis
and Fleming) will cost approx-
imately $523 per semester.
Those desiring to reserve rooms
should obtain housing applica-
tions from their residence hall of-
fice. Students living off campus
can obtain applications from the
Office of Housing Operations in
Room 201, Whichard Building.
Applications should be return-
ed to the office of the preferred
residence hall. A $60 advance
room payment must be turned in
to Room 105, Spilman Building
beginning today.
Deposits for summer school
will be accepted beginning April
3, and assignments will be made
April 5 and 6.
Prior to reserving a room, the
application - contract must be fill-
ed in, signed, and stamped.
By JENND7ER JENDRASIAK
Nm Editor
Student voter registration will
be one of the topics discussed at a
meeting of the University of
North Carolina Association of
Student Governments to be held
at ECU this weekend.
The Student Government
presidents from all 16 schools in
the UNC system are scheduled to
attend, according to SGA Presi-
dent Paul Naso.
The main purpose of the
meetings is to discuss policies per-
tinent to student governments,
but several other topics will be
covered in addition to regular
policy. A workshop on running
student voter registration will be
held. The workshop is to be run
by ECU student Jay Stone, who
recently attended a national con-
ference on student voter registra-
tion. Members of the UNC-ASG
are in the process of planning a
Student Voter Registration Week
scheduled for April 2-6.
Another item on the agenda is
the formation of a coalition for a
statewide conference of student
government members. A member
of the Hunt campaign staff will
also speak.
Naso said this is the first time
the conference has been held here
and that, he said, "says a lot for
all of us
Delegates To Attend Annual Session
By ELIZABETH BIRO
SUff Writer
The ECU delegation of the
N.C. Student Legislature will at-
tend the state Annual Session
March 21-25.
The Annual Session, held each
year in the old capital building in
Raleigh, is a meeting of NCSL
delegations from across the state.
At the session each school's
delegation attempts to pass bills
which they have prepared
throughout the year.
Kirk Shelley, ECU's delegation
chairman, said that approximate-
ly 50 percent of all bills passed at
the Annual Session are turned in-
to law by the N.C. General
Assembly.
According to Shelley, 18
students will represent ECU at
this year's session. "We are one
of the top three delegations in the
state said Shelley " and I expect
ECU to do very well again this
year
One of the major bills the ECU
delegation hopes to have passed at
the annual session concerns North
Carolina's attempted murder
statute, Shelley said. Presently, he
added, if someone is convicted of
attempted murder in North
Carolina they can be given a fairly
light punishment � one similar
to that given for breaking and
entering. The ECU bill proposes a
much stiffer penalty of 20 years to
life in prison if one is convicted of
attempted murder in the first
degree, said Shelley.
Other bills being proposed by
the ECU delegation include a
mandatory course for high school
students centering on transmis-
sion of venereal disease.
Shelley also cited a bill requir-
ing a drivers test for renewal of a
N.C. drivers license. Shelley said
the present system of renewal is
unsafe. In N.C. an eye test is the
only requirement for license
renewal if a driver has no traffic
violations on his record.
This system is seen as unsafe by
the ECU NCSL, said Shelley,
because many older drivers may
lose their motor coordination over
time. The ECU delegation hopes
to make a driver retest necessary
in order to ensure safety on North
Carolina's highways.
Shelley described the Annual
Session as very interesting and
said it attracted many tourists
visiting the old capital building.
"There are many people who
come and watch the delegations at
work Shelly said.
Twenty-one other schools will
participate in this year's annual
session Shelly said. The delega-
tions take over the old capital
building forming their own
General Assembly consisting of a
house and senate, he said. Two
students from each school act as
senators and up to 16 represen-
tatives can be installed in the
house from each delegation. Shel-
ly said the daily sessions run from
8 a.m. to 11 p.m. most of the
time.
Hunt Pondering Decision On Hutchins' Case
t
mark � Aft am � �eo
Skillet an ECU housekeeping employee, enjoying a warm, sunny
afternoon.
RALEIGH N.C. (UPI) � Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr increasingly
the last hope for James W. Hut-
chins, said Wednesday he has
made no decision on whether he
will save the killer of three law en-
forcment officers from a 2 a.m.
Friday execution.
Hunt said he was continuing to
listen to opponents and sup-
porters of the death penalty.
"After I think this job has been
finished, I will make my
decision he said at his weekly
news conference. "I would not see
my announcement of my decision
going up to the last minute
Aides to Hunt said the governor
would meet later Wednesday with
Raleigh lawyer Joseph Cheshire
V, one of the lawyers seeking a
reprieve for Hutchins.
If the execution is carried out,
Hutchins would become the first
person to be executed in North
Carolina since 1961. He would die
just two days after the execution
of convicted killer James David
Autry in Huntsville, Texas.
Hutchins, 54, was convicted of
first-degree murder in the 1979
shooting deaths of two law en-
forcement officers in Rutherford
County. He also was convicted of
second-degree murder in the death
of a third officer.
The shootings occurred during
a drunken rampage that began
with an argument between Hut-
chins and his daughter over spiked
punch she had prepared for her
high school graduation party.
A three-judge panel of the 4th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals
Tuesday unanimously rejected the
latest appeal by Hutchins'
See HUTCHINS, page 3
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p
ITHE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH l3, 19M
?
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Strvmt tkt cmmpta community
Sictl923
Published every Tuesday snd
Thursday during the academic
yaer and every Wednesday Aw-
ing the summer.
The East Carolinian is the of
?�clal newspaper East Carolina
University, owned, operated and
Published for and by the students
of East Carolina University.
Unless otherwise noted, unsion
ad editorials on the opinion page
are the newspaper's opinion,
generally written by the manao
ino editor.
Subscription Rate: no yearly
The East Carolinian offices are
located in the Publications
building on the campus of ECU
Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
Ind Floor, Publications building,
ECU, Greenville, N.C. I7U4
Telephone 757-636, 6367, 6309.
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be an Important meeting
on Wed March 11 at 5:30 In room an
Mendenhall We will be discussing
the Induction of new members, and
we will also be appointing a commit
tee to nominate officers for next year.
All members art requested to attend.
If you can't attend, please contact
Connie at 757 1442. Hope to see you
thereI
1983 HOMECOMING
CANDIDATES
If you have not picked up your pic
fure that was submitted for
Homecoming '�3, please come by the
Student union Office (Rm J34).
Mendenhall Student Center, to
receive your picture
RESUME WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Place-
ment Service In the Bloxton House Is
offering one hour sessions to help you
prepare your own resume. Few
graduates get jobs without some
preparation. Many employers re
quest a resume showing your educa-
tion and experience. Sessions to help
will be held In the Career Planning
Room at 3 p m Come on any of the
following dates: March 20 and 28.
LIFE PLANNING
WORKSHOP
This workshop Is intended to pro
vide assistance to students unsure of
the direction they wish their lives to
take. The focus will be on lifestyles
for the future. Many people do not
think of themselves as having in
tiuence on their futures, but rather,
lust let the future happen Par-
ticipants in the Life Planning will
engaoe in a process of self examina
tlon of present behaviors, goal setting
and decision making. The Life Plann
mg will engage in a process of self ex
animation of present behaviors, goal
setting and decision making. The Life
Planning workshop will meet March
19. 21. 26 and 28 from 3 5 pm in 305
Wright Annex. Advance registration
is not required, but we would ap
predate advance notification of in
teresf to insure that we have ade
quate materials on hand. Please con
tact the Counseling Center in 307
Wright Annex (757-4461), for further
Information or to let us know you plan
to attend
MULHOLLAND TO SPEAK
Father Charles Mulholland, former
chaplain of ECU Newman Center,
will speak about, 'Central America
Today" this Friday at 8 pm at the
Baptist Student union on 511 E. 10th
St He has iust returned from a 10 day
trip to Central America, where he
renewed or made acquaintance with
priests and missionaries who work
daily with the Central American peo-
ple. Mulholland's own work has
focused on poor people and their pro
blems and on solutions offered them
by churches, by governments, and by
revolutionaries. Students and the
general public are Invited to attend
and ask questions.
PI KAPPA LITTLE SIS
To all of the new Pi Kappa Little
Sisters there will be a Pre Induction
party at the house tonight beginning
at 7pm. inductions will be conducted
at 8 pm. Afterwards there will be a
"Congratulations Party" at 200 West.
No one can miss this major party.
CHEMISTRY
Or. Stephen O. Williams of Ap
plachian State University will pre-
sent a seminar entitled. "Direct
Observations of Optically Forbidden
Vlbratlonal Modes The seminar
will be held on Friday, March 14, 1984
at 2:00 pm in room 201 of the
Flanagan Building. Refreshments
will be served.
HEALTH ALLIANCE
Attention members and other In-
torested personsi The meeting
scheduled for Thursday, March 15th,
at 5:30 will be at Mendenhall in Rm.
238 Instead of at the Cultural Center.
Once again we emphasize the impor-
tance of this meeting for the finalize
tlon of plans. Please be on time I
SPORT CLUB COUNCIL
The seventh meeting for the 83-84
Sport club Council will be held
Wednesday March 21, at 4 pm In Rm
I05B of Memorial Gym. Represen
tatives of active sport clubs are re
quired to attend and must submit
84 85 Budget Requests and requests
for Equipment Purchases. Persons or
groups interested In the sport club
program are Invited to attend the
meeting.
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Advanced NAUl Scuba-April 10, In
teractlng with Others April 11, Basic
Sailing April 12, Latin American
Dance April 20, Continental Dance-
April 20 Contact Division of Continu
Ing Education, Erwln Halt
BIOLOGY CLUB
This is Itl Dean DH Hayek
Associate Dean for Student Affairs at
the East Carolina School of Medicine
will speak at the March 24th Biology
Club meeting. His presentation will
mark the last of the three part pro-
gressive Medical School entrance
series for Health Professions Month
So If you've missed parts 1 and 2
don't make the mistake of missing
part 3. There will be a brief social
beginning at 7 pm In BN 102 followed
by Dean Hayek 1
PEACE MEETING
Peace meeting Friday night for a
pot luck meal at 6:30 with Father
Charles Mulholland, formerly of
Greenville, but now In Carey. The
place for supper is 410 S Elm St
Telephone 758 4904
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House is
offering these one hour sessions to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your job search. A
film and discussion of how to inter
view through this service will be
snared. Each session will be held in
the Career Planning Room at 3 pm
Come on any of the following dates
March 21 and 27
YOOOHOOOII
The SRA Mardi Gras Party pic
tures are back I Come check them out
and place an order Stop by the SRA
office In Mendenhall. Office hours for
photos will be on Monday from 10-12
and 5 8pm and on Tuesday and Thurs
day from 12 5 Hope to see you there
cause all of the pictures are great
LACROSSE
There will be a Lacrosse match this
weekend at Chapel Hill against the
UNC Lacrosse club. The match will
start at 2 00 pm, Saturday, March 17
on the astroturf beside Carmical
Gym. So If you like watching
Lacrosse or have not seen it before,
come on out and get the excitement of
Lacrosse
CADP
There will be a meeting of the Cam
pus Alcohol and Drug Program on
Thursday, March 15 at 5:00 pm in 210
Erwin Hail. Elections and busisness
will discussed.
AS PA
The American Society for Person
nel Administration will hold a
meeting on wed March 21 at 3 pm in
Rawl Building Rm 204. All members
are encouraged to pick up their
membership cards. Old business will
be discussed and election of new of
ficers will also be mentioned. If you
are an upcoming junior or senior,
why not consider being part of
ASPA's executive office. It's a great
experience!
STUDENTS WITH HART
Now is the time for a new genera
'ion of leadership if you art fed up
with the politics of nostalgia and look
ing for new solutions to the nation's
problems join students with Hart. We
are the vanguard of a new
democracy. We will be meeting at
Mendenhall, every Thursday at 8 pm
iask receptionist for room number)
POETRY READING
There will be a poetry reading on
Sunday, March 18th at 3 pm at Wilcar
Executive Center at 223 West 10th St.
Reading from their own work will be
Hal j. Daniel, Patrick Blzzaro, Den
nls Keough, ai Maglnnes, Victor
Parker, BUI Shepherd and Sam Silva.
The reading is open to the public and
admission is free.
REP WANTED
The department of Intramural Rec
Services is looking for Interested
students to assume the role of Ad
visory Council Representatives. A
representative from each particlpa
tion division is needed (President,
Fraternity, Sorority, Residence,
men, women, co-ed independents
and Clubs) Applications deadline is
April 2, and they may be picked up In
Memorial Gym room 204.
LAW SOCIETY
Local attorney Milton Williamson
will be the guest speaker. The topic of
his discussion will be "Courtroom
Procedures" Members should plan
to attend and others Interested are
more than welcome. The meeting will
be held in Mendenhall room 241.
STUDENTTEACHING
PHYSICALS
Student Teaching physicals for Fail
Semester, 1984 student teachers
should be scheduled at the Student
Health Center during March 14 May
1, 1984. Physical examinations will be
given on Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday mornings from 7:45 am to
10:50 am during this period. Call Ms.
Margaret Dlxon at the Student Health
Center (7574317) to make your ap
pointment. No physical examinations
will be scheduled for Fall Semester,
1984 student teachers after May
1,1984. We urge you to make your ap
pointment immediately.
CHAIRPERSON NEEDED
Applications art now being ac-
cepted for the position of the 194 Stu
dent Homecoming Committee
Chairperson. Applications can be
picked up either at the Mendenhall
Student Center Information Center or
the Alumni Center. The deadline for
applying for this position is Friday
April 13, 1984
OFFICIALS
This Is your last chance to officiate
an intramural sport. The Department
of intramural Recreational Services
will hold the training clinic for Co-
Rec Volleyball Officials Monday,
March 19, 1984 at 4 pm in Rm 102
Memorial Gym. Rules, Interpreta
tlons and mechanics will discussed.
Officials will be hired based on prac
tlcal and written tests. Co Rec
Volleyball Officials Clinic, Mon
March 19, 4 pm, Rm 102, Mem Gym.
VOLLEYBALL
Registration for Co-Rec Volleyball
will begin on Monday, March 19. Sign
up In Memorial Gym Room 204.
SIGMA THETA TAU
Sigma Theta Tau, the National
honor socle'y of nursing, will have a
called business meeting on Monday,
March 19 at 7 pm. in the School of
Nursing, rm 203. All members are
urged to attend.
SUMMER CO-OP
Thomas Nelson inc. Is offering ten
positions In their Summer Co op pro-
gram. Students selected art
guaranteed $200 a week. Students
must be a hardworker, independent
and willing to relocate for the sum
mer. Students will gain skills In com
munication, time and money
management, accounting,
psychology, management and
marketing. All students may apply at
313 Rawl building In the Cooperative
Education department.
SUMMER RETAIL
SALES POSITIONS
Positions are available for retail
sales lobs in the Nags Head area.
Retail sales experience preferred but
not necessary. For more info contact
the Co-op Office in Rawl 313
KOCHANSKI CONCERT
Wladlmlr Kochanakl, the "People's
Pianist will be performing in
Wright auditorium Monday evening
March 24th at 8 pm Kochanakl com
bines solid musicianship with subtle
showmanship which always results In
tremendous popular response. He
breaks with tradition by speaking to
the audience during the concert His
programming, too, is unconventional,
embracing the wide range of periods
from Baroque to modern, and of
styles from classical to popular and
folk. Tickets are on sale at the Cen
tral Ticket office at 83 for students
�nd 84 for the public. If available,
tickets will also be sold at the door
HANG GLIDING
The Outdoor Rec Center Is offering
a Hang Gliding Trip to Nags Head,
NC to fly off Jockey's Ridge The trip
Is set for March M. Registration
deadline Is March 14 For more info
call 757 4911 or come by Memorial
gym room 113.
BLOOD PRESSURE
Here's your chance to get a free
blood pressure screening 1 Come on
out on Sunday, March 18th between
12:30 and 5:00 pm to Sycamore Hill
Baptist Church 224 W. $th St. We the
members of the Pre-Professional
Health Alliance and the Student Na-
tional Medical Association will
glad to serve you Thanks I
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service In the Bloxton House is
offering one hour sessions to help you
prepare your own resume Few
graduates get jobs without some
preparation. Many employers re
quest e resume showing your educa
tlon and experience Sessions to help
will be held in the Career Planning
Room at 3 pm Come on any of the
following dates March 20 and 28
ACCOUNTING SOCIETY
The Accounting Society will meet
on Monday, March 19, 1984 )n Room
212 Mendenhall Or Furney James
from the Career Planning anq Place
ment Center will on me subject of fin
ding a job
PI KAPPA PHI
Parents day is this Saturdy. March
W at the house All of the festivities
start at 12 noon with the Pig Pkkln at
3 pm Also there will be a clean up at 3
pm this Friday Everyone needs to be
there PUSH day (Play Units for the
Severely Handicapped) Is Saturday,
March 31 Everyone should help sup
Port this worthy cause Remember
Brothers, Rose Ball is right around
the corner Prepare yourself! Also
there will be a Formal Brotherhood
this Sunday at the house ar 7 pm
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service in me Bloxton House is
offering these one hour sessions to aid
you in developing better interviewing
skills for use in your job search a
film and discussion of how to inter
view through this service will be
shared Each session will be neld in
m� Career Planning Room a' 3 pm
Come on en, of the following dates
March 21 and 27
HOMECOMING CON!t 1
The ECU Homecoming Steering
Committee is running a contest If
you name the theme of the 1984
Homecoming, you will win a prize of
$25 Entry forms can be picked up a'
either the Mendenhall Student Center
Information Center or the Alumni
Center All Homecoming theme sug
gestions will become trie property of
the Homecoming Steering Commit
tee, and they reserve the right to re
iect any or all entries Entries must
be turned in to the Student union Of
fice, Rm 234 Mendenhall. by 5 pm.
Friday. April 13. 1984 Get involved
and win!
be
CO-OP JOBS
Currently there are co-op positions
available at International Trade Ad
ministration and u.S Dept. of
Transportation in various areas of
the U.S. Requirements: maors in
economics. International trade
relations, marketing, business and or
finance, criminal justice, public ad
ministration, personnel, computer
science, and Industrial policy
analysis Undergraduates must have
a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a
2.9 GPA In maor course of work. The
pay range is from $11,017 to $20,945
depending on education completed
and or prior Federal employment.
Stop by the co op office In Rawl 313
ASAP These positions need to be fill
ed quickly
BSU
What was it like helping meet the
spiritual needs of the troops in Viet
nam? Hear former U.S. Army
Chaplain Nevin Snyder speak at
PAUSE at the Baptist Student union
on Thursday. March 15 at 7 pm
Everyone Is welcome.
FELLOWSHIP
inter-Varslty Christian Fellowship
meets at 430 on Wednesday nights in
Jenkins Auditorium From now until
April 4, we will be conducting an ex
position on 11 Timothy. Come out and
worship with us.
HAPPY HOUR
Celebrate St Patrick's Day
the Chi O's at the Treehouse
March 17, 4 7 pm
with
Sat
NAACPCHAPTER
The ECU NAACP Chapter will
meet Thursday, March 15, at 4 pm
The meeting will be held n Rm 248 in
Mendenhall All members and in
terested persons are cordially invited
to attend
LIBERAL STUDENTS
The Society of united Liberal
Students will be meeting March 15.
1984. in the Muiti Purpose Room at
Mendenhall at 7 pm There will be
SGA presidential candidates present
and the SOULS induction ceremony
will held Refreshments will be serv
ed
ST. PAT'S DANCE
That's right � there will be a dance
at the Cultural Center Saturday.
March 17th, from 10 00 til 2 00 Part
of the proceeds will be donated to the
Research for Sickle cell Anemia So
come on out ana navt a little fun
while benef itting others
PSICHI
Deadline tor Pv Chi Scholar Ma ,
April 2. 1984 The initiation for an ne�
members m Psi Chi w.11 be heio or
March 20 at 7 pm in B m
244 Mendenhall All members j
urged to attend Elections tor oM.cers
for Psi Ch, 84 85 will be held todowng
initiation Refreshments will be s'�
ed
SGA REPRESENTATIVE
One SGA Dar Represent' ve a-�j
three dorm representatives �o-
Jones. Fletcher and jarvis Dof-s
Applications available a' me SGA o
fice in Mendenhall Deadline tor'u
ing in applications is Fr,aa� Marc
14
COLLEGF REPUBLICAN
The CR's will meet ton.gnt a 5 X
in the Mendenhall Mult, purpose
room All members and prospec .e
members art urged to attend
BIKINI CONTEST
Sponsored t, Ph, S'gma P. and �v
Hear' Fund Come show ot
Florida tan! March 20 at the Elbe
fame and fortune guaranteed1
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next general meeting of Ga
ma Beta Ph, w.ll be help on Tr
day. March ,5. at 7pm,n the je. -
Art Aoo.toriom Please try to attenc
NIH
A representative from s
Bethesda. VD will be on cac j
March 19 20 t0 interview s'uoe"
who would like to work m a c - :�
setting as Normal Voign
Students will be paid daily stipends
All interested students must attenc a
general meeting at 7 pm on Monca,
March 19 to Rawl 302 before tg,
interviews on the 20th Students ma
ioring in Allied Health. Nursing ano
-�elated fields are encouraged 'c az
ly Contact me Co op office. 313 Ra�
for details ano applications
�5
ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING
A three part workshop offered to
students at NO COST by the Universl
ty Counseling Center on Thursday,
March 15, 22 and 29 All three sessions
will be conducted from 3 4 pm in 304
Wright Annex Please call Counseling
Center for registration (757 4441).
CONTEMPORARY
GOSPEL
Tune in to WZMB every Sunday
morning for the Contempory Gospel
show You'll ttar the latest sounds
from music artists like Sandi Patti
Petra, Second Chapter of Acts, etc If
you've never heard any contem
porary Christian music, you're In for
a treat so turn us on from 4 10 am
Sunday. WZMB 91 3 FM
MANAGEMENT
The Society for Advancement of
Management will be meeting Thurs
day, March 15 at 300 in Rawl 130. In
eluded in the meeting will be induc-
tions of new members, certificates
awarded to past members, present
tion of groundwork for the rest of the
semester, and a discussion about ac
tivities for the rest of the semester
This is the last chance to apply and
pay for membership, so make one of
your smartest college moves, and get
involved in ECU'S new exciting socie
ty
RACQUETBALL
DOUBLES
Registration will be held Monday.
March 19-20 for racquetball doubles.
Sign up In Memorial Gym room 204.
TRUE VICTORY
If you really want to know what
true victory is all about, then be at
Jenkins Aud. (Art Bldg.) March
14,17,18 at 7 pm. Come out expecting
to receive the best and you'll be sure
to get if. You'll be glad you did
CO-OP
Cooperative Education is a pro
gram which helps students gain
valuable experience related to their
career goals through alternating
periods of academic study with
periods of off campus employment.
The Co-op Office, located in 313 Rawl,
currently has job openings for sum
mtr and fall '84. interested students
should stop by today to get more in
formation, to complete the necessary
forms, and to sign up for interviews.
SIGN LANGUAGE
ECU sign language club is having a
silent dinner at Marathon Restaurant
Thursday night (tonight) at 4 30.
Please come join us.
WHITEWATER RAFTING
The Outdoor Rec Center is offering
a Whitewater rafting trip to Hot Spr
Ings, NC on April 4-8 Registration
deadline is March 24. For more Info
call 757 4911 or come by Memorial
Gym room 113.
VITA PROGRAM
The Accounting Society will assist
persons with income tax preparation
in the Mendenhall Booth on Mondays
from 4:00 to 5:00 pm
NCSL
Important last meeting before ses
sion. it is imperative for all members
to attend Congratulations to the new
officers for 1984 85
FALLSEMEMSTER
ROOM REGISTRATION
Students enrolled Spring Semester
1984 who plan to return to East
Carolina University Fall Semester
and who wisi to be guaranteed
residence hall housing wilt be re
quired to reserve rooms during the
week of March 19 23 Prior to reserv
ing a room, a student must make an
advance room payment of $40 These
payments, which must be accom
panied by housing applications
contracts will be accepted in the
Cashier's Office, Room 105. Spllman
Bldg beginning March 15 Students
now living in residence halls should
obtain housing applications from
their residence hall office Students
residing off campus should obtain the
applications from the Office of Hous
ing Operations. Room 201. Whichard
Bldg. These will be available beginn
ing fAarch 13.
We are the vanguard of a new
democracy We willbe meeting at
Mendenhall. (Ask receptionist for
room number, every Thursday at
8:00 p m For more information call
752 4935 Or 757 3544
SIGMA THETA TAU
Sigma Theta Tau. the Ne'iona!
honor society of nursing, will have a
called business meeting on Monday
March 19 at 7 pm ,n the School of Nur
sing, Rm 203 All members are urged
to attend
POETRY FORUM
ECU Poetry Forum will meet on
Thursday a' 8 pm m Mendenhall
room 248 Those attending should br
ing 4 copies of each poem to be
discussed Meeting open to
�servers
OUTDOOR ADVENTURE
The Outdoor Rec Center ,s offe' m
a Backpacking tr,p t0 ua ,
National Forest on March ;j
Registration deadline .s Will
For more mfo call 757 4911 or come - ,
Memorial gym room 113
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusad? for Christ ,s soon
soring "Prime Time' this Thyrsoa.
at 7 pm in the old Joyner L 3-a
Room 221 Please join us for
fellowship, and Bible study we a'e
looking forward to meeting
Interested in becoming a J
buccaneer babe!
Come meet the members on
March 20th 7-9:00 at Scales FieJd H
F
touse
more Wo. call 758-2856
xsoGooooocooeeoooooooooocy
COLOR ME SPRING
FASHION SHOW
Carolina East Mall and Carolina East Centre will present the newest
Spring and Easter Fashions in Center Court, Friday at 7pm and
Saturday at 2pm. Enjoy one stop shopping with over 70 stores and
services to serve you at trie place to be
264 By Pass on Hwy II, Greenville
CAROLINA CAST C�HTR�
Adjacent tu Carafcm Em Mat
CASSETTES
SAVE UP TO $5.00
Top Artists! Major Labels"
Many More! Classics Included!
�� f�r Best Selection.
Student Supply Store
Wright Building
East Carolina University
Greenville, NC 27834
Get Tour Favorites at Bis Discounts!
March 19 - March 23, 4M
Stude
fCPS) � Student govern
me�s generally spend
-n Si5,000 to $200,000
a ear to run themselves,
and hile most public
coUeges pav their student
oncers some kind of
salary, most private col-
leges do not, a new study
campus government's
Points out.
The study, by the
American Association of
Ji"7Jfsit Students
(AALS), found much
diversity jn the wavs
students govern
themselves at the 33 "ma-
jor research universities"
it polled.
Hutc
Continued From Page I
law'ers- A three- dl
Paragraph order said the c
appeal was "without
merit
Hutchins' lawyers were
challenging the constitu-
tionality of a North
Carolina law aliov.
death penalty opponer
:
Come Smu
Join E.C
KING'S D
Prices per person in
Bus
Admission
Lunch
1 ou
For more inti
jg
STjoer-
OUTDCN
OLTC
EQUIPMENT
Backpacks
Flashlights
Folding Grill
Cook Sets-( I persoi
Cook Sets-(group)
Camp Stoves
Backpack Stoves
Canoes- (car-carrier
Car Carriers
Ground Cloths
Sleeping Bags
Lifejackets
Tent-(2 person)
Tent-(3 person'�
Tandem Bicvcle
Water Bottles
wet Bags(canoes
Foam Pads(Backp
Camp Lantern
Trip
BACKPACKING:
National Forest. Great
and beginning backpa
equipment, travel & k
HANGGUEHNG:
to explore the French
WHITEWATER
Head NC to fly off
HORSEBACK
J�m Stiblei in





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Student Gov't Officers Generally Not Paid
iCPS � Student envrn- "The thine that reallv r�ffi�.rr �i ,
PS) � Student govern-
Jts generally spend
� -n $15,000 to $200,000
a year to run themselves,
and while most public
colleges pav their student
officers some kind of
salary, most private col-
leges do not. a new studv
�r campus governments
Points out.
The study, bv the
American Association of
.L.nA1Versitv Students
(AALS), found much
diversity in the ways
students govern
themselves at the 33 "ma-
jor research universities"
it polled.
"The thing that really
caught my eye" among
the results, says Brad
Torgan, who edited the
final report for the
AAUS, "was the com-
pensation issue
Seventeen of the 27
schools answering the
salary question compen-
sated their student of-
ficers.
The University of Col-
orado, for example, pays
some of its officers $400 a
month. Brigham Young
pays $225 a month, plus
some tuition vouchers
worth about $50.
At Indiana, the two top
officers split $5000. One
University of Minnesota
officer makes $2000 a
year.
Generally, Torgan
found that "the larger
and more centralized the
student government is ,
the more likely it is to
compensate its officers
The survey also reveal-
ed how widespread stu-
dent apathy about cam-
pus governance is.
Asked to estimate cam-
pus voter turnout foi
assembly elections,
Michigan State officers
reported only three per-
cent of the students
voted.
Berkeley estimates four
percent, while only five
percent of the student
body turns out for
assembly elections at
Arizona State and Min-
nesota.
But three-quarters of
Duke's students and
more than half of
Southern Methodist's
students vote in assembly
elections.
The survey found voter
turnout tends to be higher
on private college cam-
puses.
Torgan says it is dif-
ficult to make decent
judgements of just rum
effective certain student
governments are in pro-
tecting and promoting
student interests, but
noted "the numbers of
student services and types
of services" might be a
good gauge.
By that measure.
Berkeley's student
government controls an
$11 million budget that
includes running the cam-
Pus bookstore.
Colorado's $8 million
budget includes the runn-
ing of the campus health
center.
The average student
government, however
spends $15,000 to
$200,000 to run itself,
Torgan points out.
Some are bigger than
others, however. Arizona
State's government
spends some $408,000
while employing 112 full-
and part-time staffers.
On the other end of the
scale, New York Univer-
sity splits $3500 among its
30 staffers.
( ampus officers also
have mixed emotions
about the student press.
Half the respondents
said the relationship with
students papers changed
all the time, while "the
rest were split about even-
ly between those having
good relations and those
whose are bad horrible
the report said.
Student officers cited
candidate endorsements.
Correction
vicious editorials
"inarticulate reporting
as the major irritants in
their relationships with
the papers
Interestinglv
enough the rep
adds, "few stud
governments were willing
to admit or hypothc
they could be as much
blame as the paper, I
anv strain
andidalTor sr a �f Easl Car�,ln'an Lee ' a
Measurer w,r? FT Ja J�hnS�n' a candldate for S A
treasurer, were m.stakenlv identify Wg regret the eiTOf
Hutchins Fate Uncertain
JiJimiiniimni
Continued From Page 1
lawvers. A ,u
a three-
Paragraph order said the
appeal was "without
merit
Hutchins' lawyers were
challenging the constitu-
tionality of a North
Carolina law allowing
death penalty opponents
to be excluded from serv-
ing on juries in death
penalty cases. A U.S.
district judge and North
Carolina Supreme Court
rejected the same appeal
earlier.
Defense attorneys said
last week they had no
hope the U.S. Supreme
Court would save their
client if the 4th Circuit
court refused to block the Although he supports
execunon- the death penalty. Hunt
would not rule out the
Hunt said he feels all Possibility of blocking the
the legal issues in Hut- execution.
chins' case have been
resolved by the courts
and moral ones "certain-
ly are the issues remain-
ing He said he has
received no request from
Hutchins' lawvers to
spare his life.
"There's always a deci-
sion to be made he
said. "You're always
reviewing the case
As governor, Hunt has
the power to commute
pvjwcr 10 commute
death sentences or issue
pardons.
Hutchins was schedul-
ed to die Jan. 13 but the
execution was blocked
when a member of the 4th
Circuit court issued a
stay. The U.S. Supreme
Court lifted the stay 17
hours later, but Hutchins
received a 60-day delay
because of a technicality
in North Carolina law.
Come Smurf Around
Join E.C.U. At
KING'S DOMINION
Prices per person include:
Bus $14.00
Admission 6.75
Lunch 4.75
$25.50
v(
- o
Have Smurfantastic fun this year-
Papa Smurf "and the Smurf
You may purchase any one or all of the tickets.
r or more information contact u . , 110 ,
p Mendenhall btudent Center
iSmm Central Ticket Offe
mm 757-6611, ext. 266
��g�r,W�,JIJ,
Advertise
With The
Carol inia

k
u
4
il
DON'T MISS THE FINALS!
7:30 TONIGHT
MINGES COLL.
Admission $2.00
mnmmmmn
Backpacks
Flashlights
Folding Grill
Cook Sets-( 1 person)
Cook Sets-(group)
Camp Stoves
Backpack Stoves
Canoes- (car-carriers, life-jackets, paddles)
Car Carriers
Ground Cloths
Sleeping Bags
Lifejackets
Tent-(2 person)
Tent-(3 person)
Tandem Bicycle
Water Bottles
w et Bags(canoes)
Foam Pads (Backpacking)
Camp Lantern
Resource Information
Relevant to State, National and private recreation areas
including hiking backpacking, camping, canoeing routes
and water ways is provided through the center free of charge.
Trip
ADVENTURE TRIPS
Registration
BACKPACKING: A trip to the Uwharrie
National Forest. Great Opportunity for advanced
and beginning backpackers. Cost is 27.00 for all
equipment, travel & food.
HANGGUDING: A trip to Hot Springs NC
o explore the French Broad River. Cost is 45.00.
WHITEWATER RAFTING: A trip to Nags
Head NC to fly off Jockey's Ridge. Cost is 45.00.
HORSEBACK RIDING: An hour of riding at
Jarman Stables in Greenville, NC.
deadline
March 16
Trip Date
March 16
for a 20
. 28 full-color poste. of m,s ad send $6 00 check or money order payable to Anheus. 1�h inc Dm � n n
Oftece.mres December 31 lW�W.�wwlMd,m� �s, .�SV�
Buscn Place SI Louis M0 63H8
� wanoaiaa m � � . :vj)5
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�he Eaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, ow���,�,
Darryl Brown, .��.��,�-
Jennifer Jendrasiak. �. �. j.t. pIETrzak. ���
Tina Maroschak. c,n, Mike McPartland. ���, a
Ed Nicklas, s� E,or tom Norton. c�, m
Gordon Ipock. �,� Kathy Fuerst. Pro,� MQnagtr
Mark Barker. o�,�� ���,� mike Mayo. r�cn s�
March 15, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
ECU-State
Football Rivalry Should Continue
Yea, I'll bet they'd rather play the
Gamecocks.
The N.C. State Athletics Council
has recommended that the
Wolfpack drop ECU from its foot-
ball schedule when the present con-
tract runs out in 1985. They list
several reasons for the recommen-
dation, including a crowded
schedule, the desire the preserve
their long-standing rivalry with the
University of South Carolina, and
pressure to play schools of the same
"academic level
First of all, academics have about
as much to do with collegiate foot-
ball as debutante etiquette.
However, N.C. State Board of
Trustees Vice Chairman James A.
Hackne y said State is under
pressure to play schools academical-
ly comparable with the ACC, and
he cited the conference's SAT score
averages as ranging from 1,020 to
1,200. Well, according to the latest
figures, State's scores aren't mingl-
ed somewhere there in the middle.
State's average SAT is 1,020.
But academics is a lame excuse; it
goes without saying that players on
either team don't come close to
those publicized SAT averages.
Scheduling is more valid reason. In
the standard 11-game season, State
is committed to seven ACC teams,
and various contracts with Pitt-
sburgh, Penn State, Furman. Also,
they have had a rivalry with USC
since 1900.
But football, the game itself, is
what really matters, and there
should continue to be room in the
State schedule for ECU. The Pirates
have never failed to bring a capacity
crowd to Raleigh, and neither has
the match-up lacked a stiff fight.
Lest anyone forget, ECU defeated
State 22-16 last year, lost to No. 1
Miami in the last minute 12-7, and
ended up in the final top 20. Neither
State nor any other ACC team
could say the same last year. Neither
could the UNC Gamecocks. With a
record like last year's 5-6, they can't
even see the top 20 from Columbia.
Get serious, Raleigh, for en-
thusiastic crowds and an uphill bat-
tle, you can't do better than the
Pirates. But the Pirates plan to stay
in the top 20, whether they get to
beat State on the way or not.
Reagan Sure Can Make
Things Seem Real Clear
By GORDON IPOCK
Why was I born so simple? I tend to see
things pretty clear cut, like something is
usually right or wrong, black or white, or
good or evil. But all my trendy friends
laugh at such simplemindedness.
"Ain't no black and white they say.
"Just a complex gray But like Jesse
Helms, I guess I'm just an old logger head
who buys Ronald Reagan's notions about
the Soviet Union being an evil empire.
Why just last week I was reading a long
story in the Charlotte Observer called "No
Peace For Vietnam The article said:
"America's policy of denying aid to Viet-
nam has helped push the country reluc-
tantly into the orbit of the Soviet Union
It called our no-aid policy "vengeful and
short-sighted" and suggested that if we'd
wise up we could "wean Hanoi away from
the Kremlin
I scratched my head. I'd always thought
the North Vietnamese communists was
sure 'nuff in the Soviet orbit. The article
says Ho Chi Minh started the Indochina
Communist Party in 1930 under Stalin's
orders. But maybe it was the CIA, not the
Soviets, who was supplying the Viet Cong
during its war of popular liberation
against the "corrupt Thieu regime Well,
whatever, the article went on to say those
Vietnamese was now some of the poorest
people on earth, barely making $160 a year
each.
"Well shux I said. "America already
owes so much money to David Rockefeller
that borrowing a billion or two more to
patch things up with the commies in Hanoi
wouldn't be missed. It might help detente
too. And we did make those good com-
mies suffer with our war of imperialist ag-
gression. Give'em the money
"Atta boy said my trendy friends,
slapping me on the back. "Now you're
thinking And I'd thought them Vietnam
commies was the bad guys.
But you know, simple fool that I am, I'd
applied the same logic to Central America.
I remember right after those Marxists (are
they any kin to a communist?) took over
Nicaragua, all the liberals in the media and
Congress was shouting that if we'd
give'em $174 million, we could keep them
out of the SovietCuban orbit too. Several
North Carolina Congressmen voted to
send the money pronto.
But I listened to fellow lunkhead Jesse
Helms. Why, he said those Marxists was
already sided up with Castro, and they'd
just take that money and buy guns with it,
even though Vice-President Mondale
declared they'd do no such thing. Pea
brain that I am, I listened to Jesse.
Jesse said those Marxists was determin-
ed to take over all of Central America,
that they was smuggling guns to their
brother guerrillas in El Salvador. He said
something about a "domino theory
same kinda game them North Vietnamese
was playing.
"How utterly gauche said the trendy
liberals.
But that article in the Observer did say
one of the reasons those Vietnamese com-
mies was so poor was becuase after they'd
liberated South Vietnam they got busy
liberating Cambodia and Laos too and it
was costing them a lot of money. And then
I read where some of them Sandinistas had
said they intended to liberate all of Central
America and Mexico, just like them Viet-
namese was doing in Southeast Asia.
But then former U.S. Ambassador to El
Salvador Robert White came to ECU and
he said that was crazy. He said them peo-
ple was just riled up 'cause they was tired
of being poor. But then I read where the
group that was sponsoring White's lecture
tour was made up of left-wing radicals,
former members of the SDS, the
Weathermen and members of far-left
think tanks like the Institute For Policy
Studies who the FBI thinks is a communist
front organization controlled by the KGB.
"There you go thinking in terms of
black and white hooted my trendy
friends. They slapped their knees and had
a good old laugh.
But I still don't seem to be learning too
fast. Why, just yesterday I was reading an
article in the New Republic by associate
editor Jefferson Morely. He said the only
solution to El Salvador was a coalition
government that included the communists.
He said if Roberto D'Abuissan was
elected, terrible things might happen,
maybe even civil war.
But I thought they already had a civil
war and a coalition government was how
the communists took over Russia in the
first place and then Poland and the rest of
Eastern Europe later. And I wonder why
most of the U.S. media and Congress is
against D'Abuissan anyway. He says he's
for free enterprise and giving the land
directly to the peasants instead of putting
'em on state-owned collective farms like
the moderates want. He says he's against
the communists and will whup'em. He
says the same things to the people down
there that Reagan says to the people up
here and all the people say, "Yeah, yeah,
yeah But all the media keeps printing
stories about D'Abuissan being linked to
death squads but when Jesse Helms says,
"Oh, yeah Where's the beef?" nobody
has any proof, and if there was 7,000 com-
mies raping, killing and looting Pitt Coun-
ty I reckon me and a lot more folks would
break our shotguns out and do some right-
wing death squadin' ourselves and
and and
andguess I'm too dumb to unders-
tand gray Black and white makes a heap
more sense.
���
Press, Gov't Need One Another
To Restore, Improve Public Trust
By GREG RIDEOUT
Public opinion polls can be counted
on to show two things: people don't like
Washington, and they don't like the
press. Simply put, most of the masses
believe that one cheats and lies and the
other lies and cheats. Now, of course,
Mr. and Mrs. Everyday American don't
believe this happens all the time � he
doesn't even think his own congressman
is in on it but chicanery goes on enough,
he thinks, to say he distrusts both,
especially during major events.
Ironically, these two institutions have
a great deal to do with each other's im-
age. The press has exposed governmen-
tal corruption and deception during elec-
tions and wars, and each time of-
ficialdom calls the press's fair play foul
play � a cry sometimes deserving. The
public is caught in the middle of this baf-
fle; they are the ones being hurt.
The give and take between press and
government should be respectful, not
sadistic. Many a time a reporter has been
overheard to say, "I'm going to get
him That attitude has led numerous
frustrated govermental spokesmen to
demand "whose side" the press is on.
The press, of course, is on the public's
side, and the public in a democracy is the
government, so theoretically we're on
that proverbial "same side But the
outcome from this circular argument is
damage � damage to the trust both in-
stitutions must have from the citizenry.
Underlying the public's mistrust of
government and press is our people's
disdain for authority, a trait living on
from colonial times. One bad apple, to
us, does spoil the whole barrel.
Americans are saying they have spotted
deception in society and they don't like
it, but are willing to live with it. This is a
sad comment. All elected officials
deserve a chance to gain our confidence.
If man is to govern himself, he must
trust officials, and he must be able to
believe the press whose watches of-
ficialdom for us.
View Point
r- Campus Forum
We seem to not understand this. In
fact, we are conciously choosing leaders
who claim no links to the "establish-
ment Carter and Reagan were elected
because they weren't Nixon or Carter.
The trend seems to be continuing with
the Hart candidacy surge. He is new and
bright and claims not to be "one of
them Although he professes to like
government, his appeal is that he isn't
"government
This anti-government sentiment was
fueled by a press gassed by the govern-
ment. The buck must stop somewhere,
as Truman used to say, and that buck in-
evitably lands on the government's
doorstep. The press, you see, is so hated
because it tells us our government is
wrong or deceitful. They aren't trusted
because they have journalistic ancestors
who sensationalized and present day
cousins who still do.
If people started listening to what they
were saying and stop giving officiaJdom
the benefit of the doubt, maybe we
would all straighten up and fly straight.
But for now, as evidenced by the
justification that "everyone does it" and
the admonishment "I wish the damn
press would keep its nose out our in-
stitutions are leading downward; our
people are heading downward.
It's a shame, you see. If we only
believed, we would know we have a
USIA director who lied about taping his
telephone conversations, a CIA director
who refused to stop spending his morn-
ings trading millions of dollars on the
stock market, an attorney general who
had tax shelter problems and had to
return $50,000 in questionable seveance
pay, a deputy secretary of defense who
resigned to fight charges of insider stock
trading, a former secretary of the in-
terior who sold public mineral reserves
below market value to companies receiv-
ing secret information on the govern-
ment's plans for them, EPA ad
ministrators who pass along details of
investigations to companies being in-
vestigated, and last, but not least, a
president whose ranch stables are clean-
ed by a man being paid $58,500 bv the
Commerce Department.
But no one listens. Maybe it's because
they always bear it and are tired of it all.
Oh weU.
Mick Leaves No Room For Guessin
But Supporter Needs Latin Lesson
It was good to look at the Campus
Forum and finally read a pro-Mick
Lasalle letter. Kim Albin was absolute-
ly correct in saying that LaSalle's wit
"appeals to the student masses Most
people only pick up The East Caroli-
nian to read LaSalle's column. (When
they can't find the little hat, they throw
the paper away).
Mick's credentials as a film critic
and columnist are at this point beyond
despute. A columnist who can back up
his or her humor with genuine insight is
one who has proven his or her talent.
The editors of The East Carolinian
should be commended for retaining
their finest writer despite the often
hostile criticism of a handful of hyper-
sensitive individuals.
Jonathan Greif
Sophomore
Biology
I suggest that any female who glories
in her femininity that the degree in-
dicated by Kim Albin's defense of
Mick LaSalle's knowledge of
women(?) and subsequent attack on
Barbara Dobyns and the National
Organization for Women (Campus
Forum, March 11) should properly
sign herself "alumna the feminine
form, rather than "alumnus the
masculine form.
Reactionaries in general, and anti-
feminists in particular, can be gratified
that the Latin language � dead on the
tongue, but alive in tradition, has not
yet been purged of sexist gender
distinctions! Until someone rewrites
the rules of Latin grammar, "alumna"
means a female graduate; "alumnus"
is reserved only for males � including
"domesticated wimps
Franceine Perry Rees
Alumna
Student Vote Urged
The recent editorial concerning a bill
being considered by the SGA which
would give students an opportunity to
vote on the establishment of a Public
Interest Research Group (PIRG) at
East Carolina University was well-
stated. The SGA obviously should put
the matter of establishing a PIRG
squarely before the student body.
Arguments by opponents of the PIRG
effort maintaining that students will
not have enough time to become suffi-
ciently educated regarding the pros and
cons of a PIRG to make an informed
decision on the referendum are
fallacious.
To begin with, much public outreach
regarding PIRG was done last semester
and last spring. Back issues of The East
Carolinian are testament to this fact as
their pages are filled with articles,
editorials and student forum letters �
all focusing on the PIRG issue. In ad-
dition, presidential candidates for SGA
were prohibited from even beginning
to campaign on the issues until Tues-
day night at 8 p.m. Candidates for the
legislature face similar restrictions. The
arguments against holding the PIRG
referendum are, therefore, doubly
ironic in light of the fact that those
who are elected to serve in the SGA
control over $140,000 in student fees
and spend less time informing students
regarding their stand on issues than
will be spent educating students about
the PIRG issue.
Moreover, these fees are non-
refundable and legislators have the
power to recommend activity fee in-
creases without ever consulting the stu-
dent body in a referendum. This is not
at all an attempt to say that SGA
representatives do not have a legitimate
mandate to make decisions on behalf
of the student body. I simply wish to
submit that a mandate in favor of
PIRG on Wednesday would be no less
legitimate. Also, as Darryl Brown
wrote, direct democracy is almost
always preferable to representative
democracy.
In conclusion, a student-run, non-
partisan research and advocacy
organization would be a valuable addi-
tion to the ECU campus, it would be
the first one on the campus of a public
university in the state, though PIRGs
already exist at private schools such us
Elon, Duke and Guilford College
States like New York and
Massachusetts have strong and
widespread PIRG organizations with
dynamic and active voices to represent
the student and consumer interest.
That is why these states have some of
the most progressive laws in the coun-
try pertaining to voter registration sor
Students, truth in testing, toxic
chemical contamination and utilities
reform, to name a few. Establishing a
PIRG at ECU would be a first stq5
toward giving the students of North
Carolina such a voice.
Rick Brown
Senior
HistoryEnglish
Forum Rules
For purposes of verification, alt let
ters must include the name, major ami
'�l1 �. PhojuZumto-
2! rmitedto.two typewritten pages
double-spaced or neatly printedAf
��mardbbei aopersona
attacks wUI be permitted. penona
t
urn 9 Ml I1
���:�� r
College Gl
(CPS) Top
caliber" college grads ap-
parently have turned
down enough low-level
and middle-level manage-
ment job offers recently
to cause some employers
to worry about a "mid-
management vacuum"
during the next fev years,
a employment consulting
firm says.
In "an informal phone
study of 50 of our cor-
porate clients Goodrich
and Sherwood Co a
New York consulting
firm, found the corpora-
tions are having trouble
convincing some
graduating seniors to ac-
cept jobs that may take
them to factories in non-
metropolitan areas, may
leave them with "too may
Contender
May End
Contests
Continued From Page 1
average SAT scores at the
ACC schools range from
1,020 to 1,200. I have no
knowledge of where Has:
Carolina stands
Howell said the argu-
ment for schedule flex-
ability was a "much more
viable reason but regar-
ding academic standards
as being a criteria in the
continuation of the
series, he asked, "Who is
participating in these
football contests, the stu-
dent body generally or
the football players'1"
"It is one of the best
competitions in the
state Howell said
"And I would regret ii
(the end of the series) for
that reason
bosse �"
that tnrcJ
with "tav
explains
Goodric I
Sherwooc I
tions con:
"Most
Gow say:
at the tor
up a llttl
Gow
clients
describes
500 I
finding
salaries al
grads
in geograj
the
or golf
The
not
to
manager
Defenj
Fres!
SGI
ptatt
be n
iMi
SGA
?4
��

tions
Are
March
21

5-9 PM
Thurs.& Fri.
� ALL YOU CAN EAT
Buffet To All Tne Ft
� Fillets Breaded n Sec
Help Yourself to 1 oj
� SERVED WITH .
SEAFOOD CHOWC
FRENCH FRIES
2 VEGETABLES
HUSHPUPPIES
itn out 5 I
1
IMMiiiiMnrrT





T5 REALLY
"V
�t�.�m�.W�, lU
F?
ther
Trust
present day
tening to what they
t ing officialdom
ibt, maybe we
ind fly straight.
as eudenced by the
-one does it" and
"I wish the damn
- out our in-
y . wnward; our
ard.
If we only
�f have a
ibout taping his
a CIA director
pending his morn-
" f dollars on the
rev general who
I ens and had to
able severance
tr of defense who
r.arges of insider stock
. retary of the in-
c mineral reserves
o companies receiv-
mation on the govern-
hem. EPA ad-
aiong details of
anies being in-
bul not least, a
babies are clean-
: S58.500 by the
Ipartmer H
Maybe it's because
it and are tired of it all.
'ssin
on
nor have a legitimate
ike decisions on behalf
Itodv I simply wish to
mandate in favor of
lesday would be no less
so, as Darryl Brown
democracy is almost
hie to representative
a student-run, non-
larch and advocacy
uld be a valuable addi-
campus. it would be
the campus of a public
ke state, though PIRGs
private schools such as
knd Guilford College.
New York and
have strong and
IG organizations with
btive voices to represent
I consumer interest.
ese states have some of
esive laws in the coun
lo voter registration s. .
ill in testing, toxic
lination and utilities
fce a few. Establishing a
I would be a first step
the students of North
voice.
Rick Brown
Senior
HistoryEnglish
i m Rules
of verification, all let-
ie the name, major and
address, phone nupiber
V the author(s). Letters
Uwo typewritten pages,
or neatly printed All
Flfo editing for brevi-
M libel, and no personal
L' permitted.
J
College Graduates Rejecting Jobs
vm
JCPS) "Top
caliber" college grads ap-
parently have turned
down enough low-level
and middle-level manage-
ment job offers recently
to cause some employers
to worry about a "mid-
management vacuum"
during the next few years,
a employment consulting
firm says.
In "an informal phone
study of 50 of our cor-
porate clients Goodrich
and Sherwood Co a
New York consulting
firm, found the corpora-
tions are having trouble
convincing some
graduating seniors to ac-
cept jobs that may take
them to factories in non-
metropolitan areas, may
leave them with "too may
Contender
May End
Contests
Continued From Page 1
average SAT scores at the
ACC schools range from
1,020 to 1,200. I have no
knowledge of where East
Carolina stands
Howell said the argu-
ment for schedule flex-
ability was a "much more
viable reason but regar-
ding academic standards
as being a criteria in the
continuation of the
series, he asked, "Who is
participating in these
football contests, the stu-
dent body generally or
the football players?"
"It is one of the best
competitions in the
state Howell said.
"And I would regret it
(the end of the series) for
that reason
bosses" over them, or
that threaten to conflict
with "favored lifestyles
explains Jack Gow,
Goodrich and
Sherwood's public rela-
tions consultant.
"Most of these guys
Gow says, "want to start
at the top. and then work
up a little higher
Gow says his firm's
clients � which he
describes as "all Fortune
500 companies" � are
finding even higher
salaries aren't luring top
grads to jobs "at plants
in geographic areas where
they can't go sailboating
or golfing of skiing
The only companies
not "finding it difficult
to take these mid-
management jobs that are
now opening again,
Gow points out, are some
high-tech industries.
"High tech is the
glamour industry now
he explains, "like plastics
was 20 years ago
Despite companies'
complaints, other of-
ficials who help place
students in jobs after
graduation haven't notic
ed students turning down
many job offers.
"I'm not r'areof that
happening says Linda
Placement l C�"T C�U,d beVhal " happen
21 d Counci1' ,n� a"d people jusi
Bethlehem, Pa associa- haven started EumbUn.
t.on of campus placemen, about .t " she sav
officers from around the
country.
"It could be that it's
no' happening, or it
Read The Classifieds
ATTIC
Life Planning Series Set
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Co-Ncwi Edllor
"Life Planning" will
be the topic of four
workshops sponsored by
the ECU Counseling
Center on March
19,21,26 and 28.
Steven H. Deters, ECU
assistant professor and
counselor said the pur-
pose of the workshops is
to help students identify
and clarify the values
they believe in. "There's
no intent to influence the
values they believe in
Deters said. "The intent
is to examine values and
present behaviors in
regard to where they'd
like to be in the Future
The workshops will
consist of brief lectures,
group discussions and
group activities and will
include such topics as
'How People Make
Decisions "Setting
Goals and "Outlining
ways to Reach Goals "
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Voluntary work � 40 hours
Fine � $100
Written Reprimand
SGA Mm�m platforms �
C&tfmim q0& by S p.m. Ml
ptatfotms will be accept 75fe
UJirHOMDHFjNAl PERFORMANCE)
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I





THE EAST C AROl INJAN
How
Style
MARCH 15. 1�4
or
What To Do While Your Stalks Are Still Stiff
By BRIAN RANGELEY
SUffWrtlw
Remember that big batch of beef stew you made
before spring break? Everyone loved its tender tips of
beef and big chunks of potatoes, carrots and celery.
It you check your refrigerator, down there in the
crisper section between the green meat and the brown
lettuce, you'll probably find the remainder of that
bunch of clerey; the stew only needed three stalks.
Nonce how when you pick it up the stalks hang
flacidly downward like branches on a willow tree.
One solution to the problem of leftover celery is to
continue cooking it into thinngs. You can brew up
more soups and stews; of course, you may grow
wear) of food that floats and crave something sta-
tionary, like a hamburger or fried chicken. But you
just don't uant to throw away another 50 cents worth
of celerj.
So the question of how to eat those undevoured
stalks remains unanswered. I set out to discover how
others eat celery, in spite of my own dislike of the
European herb. I found a group of ECU students
ting in Slay Dorm on a cool Sunday afternoon,
and I asked them how they liked their celery. Becky
Thompson and sister Jenny offered the most unusual
answers oi the group.
" ou put it in your bread and it will keep fresh
said Becky "But when I eat it, I wash it and leave it
wet so the salt will stick. Or you could stuff it She
turned toward Jenny. "What is it, creamed cheese
stuffing, crushed walnuts, black olives or
pimentos?'
"Yeah aid Jenny "Or you can smoke it
ke it? ' asked Smoking celery was a new
e i tried to imagine someone lighting up a
stalk with a Bic butane.
"Sure said Jenny. "You dry the stalks, then cut
of! the leafy part
"Roll it up like a cigarette?" I asked,
�eah said Becky. "You can make tea with it
too
"I wonder if you can get high off it said Jenny's
boyfriend Doug.
"1 don't know Jenny said. "The Indians do it
"Oh. Well, then you can get high
I decided to move on to someone else. Thomas
Cormier was delighted to have the chance to offer his
knowledge.
"You can do all kinds of things with celery he
said. "You can eat it with Cheeze Whiz, you can eat
it with peanut butter, or pimento cheese, or any kind
of spread � except a breadspread, I don't like it on a
bedspread � or you can eat it marinated in vinegar,
you know, pickled
Since I despise pickled things of any sort, I directed
my attention toward Pam Wofford who was lying
face down at the foot of the bed. She had been silent
throughout the entire discussion and looked decided-
ly bored. I wanted to get her involved, so I asked her,
"How do you eat your celery, Pam?"
She directed her blue eyes at my browns. "I don't
eat celery she said with slow certainty.
Clear enough.
Susan Barker decided to offer her suggestion.
"You can boil it she said. "I don't know why, but
you can if you wanted to
Thomas continued. "You can break one end of it
in you hand and pull it back, and it pulls all that str-
ingy stuff off of it. Then you eat it
Other suggestions included chopping the celery in-
to salads, potato salad, spaghetti sauce, turkey dress-
ing and even tuna fish.
However, throughout my inquiries, I discovered
that a lot of people really do eat those tough fibrous
stalks of natural dental floss raw and unseasoned.
Those who like plain old celery seem to be more cer-
tain about their method of consumption.
"First I cut the ends off said Lissa Gebo. "Both
ends. Then I wash it. Then 1 take it in my left hand
she made a fist with her left hand to show me how,
"and chow down
"Usually raw said Tom Walters, when I asked
him how he ate his celery. "Plain raw
"Do you ever salt it, or put peanut "
"Nope said Tom, shaking his head. "Plain
raw
Gradually I became curious about the alue of
eating celery. 1 mean, why bother? So I called ECU's
home economics department and talked with Dr.
Mick Twists A Feminist's Tale
Consumed
See HOW, Page 8
P$tb
Beware of
the learned
process of
un-thinking.
By GORDON IPOCK
Fastens UMar
What is education?
Oh, I'm not referring to that
much hashed argument concern-
ing the liberal versus technical
education. I pose a question that
is fundmentally deeper than that.
What is education?
A proper education teaches
one, if one doesn't possess the
ability innately, to think. Yes, an
educated man should be able to
think, whether he has a degree in
computer science or French � or
even if he has no degree at all �
an educated man must surely be
able to think.
Conservative's
Commentary
a view from the right.
�y MUK ftARtll
The sun shined and all that. It
as a da v.
Shlep stood at an airport. Pick
c He looked around, partly to
see the sights, partly because he
Sick Fickshun
By Mick LaSalle
figured looking out-of-place look-
ed cute. Conveniently, as if he
were some character in a bad
short story, he thought to himself,
"Today is the day I conquer my
last fear
You see, a year before, Shlep
had been afraid of everything:
subways, bad neighborhoods,
even girls. Then one day he took
the subway through a hostile area
and asked every girl out on the
train. From then on, it was just a
matter of time before Shlep took
flight lessons.
A hundred feet away, Shlep saw
the figure of a woman. Not only
that, he saw the woman too. She
was one of those perky-unperky
average-sized little girls with the
wholesomeness of happy-
America, but America in modern
times. She glistened, the way a
flower does when you dip it in
semen.
"Uh, uh, are you the flight in-
structor?" Shlep asked.
She gave him an indulgent
smile. "I'm Trish she said, with
that kind of confident, aggressive
attitude that, were she ugly or a
guy, Shlep might have wanted to
punch her. "I deal in planes.
You're not chained to the ground
anymore, Shlep. Look at the
sky
She looked to the sky. He look-
ed at her breasts.
"I wanna conquer my last
fear said Shlep.
And Trish laughed her ass off.
"You don't conquer fear. You sit
on it
Once they got airborne and out
of the traffic pattern, Trish trim-
med the plane for level flight and
told Shlep to take the wheel.
"Are you sure?" Shlep asked.
Trish smiled playfully, "Hey,
who's the paranoid schizophrenic
here � me or you?"
She walked behind him.
"Where are you going?"
"Don't you worry she
answered. "Just remember, if any
of those big planes think they can
cut you off, you have the right of
way And with that, she walked
through the black curtains that
concealed the rear three fourths of
the plane.
When she returned a minute
later, she was drinking cham-
pagne from a bottle.
"Want some?"
"Are you sure it's okay to do
that up here
She laughed. "Of course, dum-
bass
His hand slipped, and the plane
made an unexpected move, a left
bank. Trish fell. Her face landed
in his lap. She looked up and
started unzipping her jumpsuit.
"Look at me she said.
Shlep tried to be cool. "But
what about my lesson he said.
Then he passed out.
He woke up on a waterbed.
Blacklight posters of Lizzie
Borden, Charles Manson, Adolph
Hitler, and a bunch of old ladies
smoking joints were pasted to the
overhead. Shlep slouched up and
saw Trish. She crawled up the
sheets, took his hand and pressed
it to her stomach. The hand
wouldn't go through.
The room stunk of incense. But
the girl not only was she like
some kind of perfection in herself,
she offered the chance of a
merger.
"Merger me, merger me she
said in Shlep's ear. But consider-
ing the longing of pressing
mouths, and pressing tummies,
and pressing breasts, it was a
meager merger. But hey, what do
you want?
Half a minute later, Shlep stop-
ped moving, wondering what hit
him. Trish's eyes opened and she
See CONSUMED, page 8
Artists Series Costs
Big-Time Bucks

Top American In Moscow
STLTiSlrVSJL ?Tr i! ! 1982 ���"�ky Competition in M��cow, Stephanie
Chase will perform at ECU A J. ITetcher Auditorium on April 2. Make plans now not to miss her.
By GORDON IPOCK
FniiraUliof
"You get what you pay for
states an old maxim. Usually
that's true, but it is possible to pay
for something � something very
fine � and not get it. The Artists
Series is a good example.
Each school year the ECU Ar-
tists Series Committee brings
some of the finest talent available
to campus, superb performances
that you may choose to hear or
not hear. Perhaps its a famed
pianist, an orchestra or a jazz
band, and if you don't go to the
performance, you rationalize,
"That's O.K. No money out of
my pocket
Wrong.
Internationally famous per-
formers don't visit ECU as charity
acts. It costs big bucks to bring
them here. And whether you see
the show or not, you help foot the
bill with money from your activity
fees. What kind of big bucks are
we talking about? Let's take a
look.
The 1984-85 Artists Series:
Tokyo String Quartet, $6,500;
pianist Janina Fialkowska,
$3,500; Vienna Choir Boys,
$9,000; Rotterdam Philharmonic
Orchestra, $25,000; soprano Mar-
vis Martin, $4,000; total: $48,000.
Forty-eight grand for an artists
series. And where does the money
come from?
According to Rudolph Alex-
ander, associate dean and director
of university unions, anticipated
revenue from ticket sales to the
Artists Series will only total
$22,000 leaving a deficit of more
than $25,000 � the largest deficit
ever projected for a season.
See ARTISTS, page �
What is thinking?
When you distill it to its
essence, thinking is the process of
making decisions. We accumulate
evidence which we weigh and sift
in our brains, and then we make a
decision about, or on, that
evidence. It could be a trivial deci-
sion, deciding whether we want a
Coke or a Dr. Pepper. We recall
the previous times we drank these
soft drinks, and depending on
which soda had generally proven
more refreshing or tasty, we make
a decision. And during the course
of each day, we make hundreds of
minor decisions, constantly think-
ing. But occasionaly we must
make important decisions, and
this is when a good education can
be an asset.
Unfortunately, I see increasing
evidence, at least on fins campus,
that the process of making deci-
sions is exactly what we're taught
not to do. Yes, I actually mean to
say that a college education
prepares us not to think.
Had you rather be fair or right?
Just answer the question. Which
is more important to you, to be
fair or right? (Answer this ques-
tion before reading on.)
I've asked that question to
many fellow students, and rarelv
do any of them say, "Oh, I'd
much rather be right Fair is the
standard reply. The reason is that
in our educational process, and in
today's society in general (par-
ticularly from within the media),
fairness and equality are strongly
emphasized. Today, America
(well much of the older generation
isn't infected, but younger people
suffer acutely) is obcessed with
being fair. Whether its affirmitive
action laws, ERA, abortion, gay
rights or nuclear arms, fairness
seems to be the overriding factor
for making a decision on all these
weighty issues.
But what is right? Whether it is
based on morals, ethics or na-
tional self-interests, shouldn't the
right decision be more important
than the fair decision.
The problem with fairness is
that the concept has nothing to do
with decision making at all.
Webster's Dictionary says: "fair,
the general word, implies the
treating of both or all sides alike,
without reference to one's own
feelings or interests Treating
both sides alike in effect means to
deliberately and conciously ignore
farts and reality, and to not make
a decision based on empirical
evidence. If we were going to be
fair, we would buy both a Coke
and a Dr. Pepper and would ig-
nore our own "feelings or in-
terests" in the matter. We would
deliberately not think.
To show how far this perverse
un-thinking has gone, when the
discussion of nuclear weapons (a
very serious topic) comes up I
have asked fdlow students this
question: "At this late stage it ap-
pears virtually impossible, but if
if it were possible for the United
States to ever again have strategic
nuclear superiority over the Soviet
thoS v �uld you Wove of
that? You would be surprised
how many students sav "No �
"Why?" I ask. Y
"Becuase it wouldn't be fair "
they say. �
It matters not what is at stake
the fact that one system is tyranny
��J oue a freedom m �
totalitarian state based on atheism
and the other a dmocratic repubfic
See HAD, pa-e 8
FAl
AAA iv H
105 A roos' -
99 -SB 32
Reproductive H
rhefi
Cf1
tMIV
IK
-
Spe;i� Scv ?�
-
ONSOUDAUD
THtATRfS
ADULTS
LAST DAY!
"In Search oi
A Golden Sh'
1:10-3.10-5:10-7:10-5
HA
2:00-4:30
HELD OVE1
Only o hord-n
Only q hero hos
w
fLATE SHOW
FRI - SAT
OPEN -11:00q
STARTS-11:
ADULTS ONI)
NO PASSES
NO DISCOUN
RATED X-
�MmplfW��n� "MP'fumfwgyH
�"�i i nm





THF f-ASIAK�� IMAN
MARCH IS. 19M
ware of
e learned
ocess of
-thinking.
B GORDON IPOCK
Ftacara Mlior
;vu: is education?
I'm not referring to that
hashed argument concern-
W liberal versus technical
iration. 1 pose a question that
jndmentally deeper than that.
rhal is education?
proper education teaches
f one doesn't possess the
innately, to think. Yes, an
:ed man should be able to
whether he has a degree in
:t,r science or French � or
' he has no degree at all �
jcat
rH
man must surelv be
nservative's
nmentary
� iew from the right.
it tunkmg?
list to its
� s the process of
J ns We accumulate
ence which e weigh and sift
drains, and then we make a
I nt, or on, that
lence. I: could be a trivia deci-
:iding whether e want a
a Dr. Pepper We recall
us times we drank these
drinks, and depending on
th soda had generally proven
refreshing or tasty, we make
n. And during the course
da � we make hundreds of
ns. constantly think-
xasionaiy we must
rtant decisions, and
- en a good education can
ately, 1 see increasing
at least on this campus,
process making deci-
I 5 exact) u : we're taught
I Yes, I dually mean to
a college education
think.
! a be fair or right?
ansi� question. Which
ore important to you, to be
- J (Answer this ques-
before reading on.)
I d that question to
students, and rarely
m say. "Oh, I'd
h rather be right Fair is the
lard reply. The reason is that
ur educational process, and in
's society in general (par-
larl from within the media),
jness and equality are strongly
hasized. Today, America
JU much of the older generation
It infected, but younger people
er acutely) is obcessed with
lg fair. Whether its affirmitive
Ion laws, ERA, abortion, gay
Vs or nuclear arms, fairness
3 be the overriding factor
making a decision on all these
?hfy issues.
fut what is right0 Whether it is
cd on morals, ethics or na-
kal self-interests, shouldn't the
decision be more important
" the fair decision.
ie problem with fairness is
the concept has nothing to do
decision making at all.
jster's Dictionary says: "fair,
general word, implies the
ting of both or all sides alike,
Tout reference to one's own
lings or interests Treating
In sides alike in effect means to
Iberately and conciously ignore
p and reality, and to not make
lecision based on empirical
ience. If we were going to be
we would buy both a Coke
a Dr. Pepper and would ig-
le our own "feelings or in-
Jsts" in the matter. We would
Iberately not think.
To show how far this perverse
thinking has gone, when the
tussion of nuclear weapons (a
serious topic) comes up, I
le asked fellow students this
stion: "At this late stage it ap-
rs virtually impossible, but ,
were possible for the United
kes to ever again have strategic
Wear superiority over the Soviet
Ion, would you approve of
You would be surprised
many students say "No "
Why?" I ask.
Becuase it wouldn't be fair
say.
matters not what is at stake:
Ifact that one system is tyranny
one is freedom, one a
Jitarian state based on atheism
the other a dmocrat ic republic
See HAD. page 8
!
1 OS A HPORT Rd
GHEtM ut NC 27834
i9'9i758-0327
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
Poet Brendan Galvin
I
Photo by KEITH OALVIN
Combination Special
1 rout. Shrimp
and Deviled Crab
Reproductive Health Care
jU( fltMIM,
CINtfR
' � . - a �����
"� Ah. UtKXI � � 1 .
I ounse �- � ��� . � t
Special ServKes and rates for students
' a� 76 I ss V) da�s evf ninus and weekends.
S
s
i
The
Society of United Liberal Students
is now accepting submissions for
contestants in its annual;
Miss S.O.U.L.S. Pagent
Name:
Address:
Ph
one
Deadline for submissions will be
March 22, 1984.
Please return submissions to room 239
Mendenhall Student Center.
Poetry Forum Hosts Galvin
By GORDON IPOCK
Fealam bailor
Distinguished poet
Brendan Galvin will visit
ECU for two days this
coming week. On Mon-
day, March 19, Mr.
Galvin will give a reading
of selected poems in
Jenkins Auditorium. The
reading is scheduled to
begin at 4 p.m.
The following day,
Tuesday, March 20,
Galvin will attend a
poetry workshop at 10:30
a.m. in room 221 in
Mendenhall Student
Center. Persons wishing
to have their work criti-
qued by Mr. Galvin
should bring 15 copies of
each poem. The
workshop is open to
observers and anyone
who has questions for
Mr. Galvin.
A native of New
England, Galvin was
educated in Northeastern
schools and earned a
Ph.D. in English from
the University of
Massachusetts in 1970.
Since that time he has
taught writing and
literature at Central Con-
necticut State University
and has worked steadily
as a writer of poetry and
prose. He has had five
books of poetry publish-
ed within the past dozen
years. His 1980 collection
Atlantic Fly way was a
Pulitzer Prize nominee.
Concerning it. Booklist
said: "Because he is so
good at what he does, it is
impossible to call him
average or even
mainstream. In Galvin's
hands the familiar
elements of metaphor
and the free-verse line are
welded into poems that
are tensile, clean and
energetic. Nothing is
bland here; the narrator
is never jaded or blase
This is a very fine book
Galvin's most recent
book of poetry, a 1983
release, is Winter
Oysters.
Besides collected
works, Galvin has fre-
quently published poems
in major periodicals in-
cluding, The New
Yorker, Poetry, Atlantic,
American Review, New
Tar River Poetry,
Georgia Review, New
England Review and
Southern Review; he has
had anthologies publish-
ed in The Poet's Choice,
Leaving the Bough, Best
Poems of 1974, Writing
Poems and many others.
In addition to his
poetry, Galvin has also
published fictional prose
and criticisms and has a
film documentary to his
credit, Massachusetts
Story. It examines off-
shore drilling on Georges
Bank, has been televised
and received three Emmy
nominations.
When not teaching
English at Central Con
necticut Universitv.
Galvin lives on Cape Cod
where he grew up. His
visit to East Carolina is
sponsored by the Poetry
Forum and the ECU
Department of English.
TARHEEL II
Will Present
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Open At 6:00pm
Country & Country Rock
Malt Beverages $1.00
Admission: $3.00 Single
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ONSOLIDATED
HIAfRES
.ADULTS $2.00 TIL 5:30 � ISSis
PAPA KATZ
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Presents
SAT. March 17th
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Ladies members FREE
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JAMES STEWART
in ALFRED HITCHCOCK'S
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i
GRACE KELLY. WENDELL COREY
THELMA RITTER with Raymond burr
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i





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH IS. 1984

k
i

Had You Rather Be Fair Or Right?
Continued Frnm Pan � i -
Continued From Page 6 noring one's own "feel
that protects religious ings or interests" as
freedom, the fact that Webster's says. Students
one murdered 50 million are taught that it is noble
of its own people and to go on some altruistic
states its ultimate goal as guilt trip, that it is far
world conquest. These better to deny self for the
educated people will good of the common
deliberately make no whole. They would rather
distinction between good have the enemy holding a
and evil for the sake of gun to their head than
being fair. vice versa. It is more no-
Refusing to distinguish ble for the Soviets to have
between right and wrong overwhelming superiority
is the first flaw of than for America to be
fairness. The second is ig- guilty of such a sin.
Indeed, the entire con
cept of socialism and
communism is based on
altruism, being fair, de-
nying self for the
"welfare" of others. I
also frequently hear
students saying nice
things about both these
economic systems. They
are taught the fair,
altruistic merits of these
Considering our
specious method of
reasoning, is there any
wonder that the free West
steadily retreats, due to a
crisis of will, before the
advancing world Marxist
revolution. Is there any
wonder that liberally
educated students (par-
ticularly journalists) find
therefore better � than
the traditional values of a
man like President
Reagan.
Their education
teaches them not to
think.
note: Rather than wrong-
ly incur the wrath of
critics, I wish to em-
phasize that I do consider
Artists Series Costs
the altruistic economics
systems in college and are and politics of appease- fairness a virtue but only
made to feel guilt about ment of men like Gary when common 'sense and
capitalism, about acting Hart and Walter Mon- courtesy require it and
in their own self-interests, dale much fairer - and circumstances allow it
Consumed By A Flight Of Fearing
Continued From Page 6
"Even if we sell every
ticket for every seat in
Wright Auditorium we
will still not operate in the
black he said.
As in the past, the
deficit will have to be
subsidized by money
from student activity
fees.
"But we have found
that people want to see
these big attractions
said Alexander, "and the
Committee is working to
bring them. The Artist
Series is the major fine
arts series anywhere in
eastern North Carolina.
You'd have to go to
Raleigh or Richmond to
find anything com-
parable
Alexander also pointed
out the relative bargain
that students especially
get from the Artist Scries.
"For most any of the
attractions we're bringing
coin Center, for a good
seat you could expect to
pay $15 to $20. Here, a
whole season ticket costs
a student only $12.50
he said.
Obviously, with the up-
coming 84-85 year the
finest ever � highlighted
by the Rotterdam
Philharmonic Orchestra
� students should think
twice before ignoring the
Artists Series. They might
this year, if you saw them as well get what they pay
in New York, at say Lin- for.
�W
'jw.wwtw�.yi
Continued From Page 6
stared at him coldly,
nose to nose.
"Did you have an
organism?" asked Shlep.
She didn't answer. She
detatched herself and
stood up. As she did, a
few drops leaked from
her. There was no magic
after all. She was a recep-
ticle. She put on her
jumpsuit.
After a pause, she said,
"I always promised
myself when the day
came that I would be
wrong, I wouldn't be
wrong for long
She fidgeted with her
parachute bag, and Shlep
panicked. He leaped up,
holding a black bedsheet
over his member. She put
the bag on.
And she jumped out
the window.
Shlep ran to the con-
trols. The plane was on
How To Eat Celery
Before Stalks Wilt
auto-pilot. The other
controls read automatic
kamikazi pilot, automatic
ejector seat pilot and
non-automatic pilot. The
fuel guage read almost
empty. Let's be honest:
Things looked bad.
Shlep switched on non-
automatic pilot and im-
mediately the plane flip-
ped upside down. He
switched back to auto-
pilot, and the plane
righted itself. He ambled
back to the waterbed and
Continued From Page 6
Evelyn Settle, a
nutrition instructor. I
found that celery is a
member of the carrot
family, and as such, is
high in protein.
"Almost any other
food has more vitamins
and minerals than
celery said Dr. Settle,
"but if you want a good
food, it is high in fiber
and very low in calories
In celery, what isn't
ber is mostly water.
That's what makes it low-
calorie (3-5 per stalk).
You can actually burn off
more calories than you
consume just by chewing
up a stalk of celery.
Jim Holte, an instruc-
tor in ECU'S English
department, disagreed
with Dr. Settle's com-
ment about celery's
worth. "The only thing
celery is good for is a
bloody Mary he said.
He seemed to know what
he was talking about.
I guess everybody has
his or her own preference
for the proper garnish fur
celery. For whatever
reason, no matter how
you prepare it, I prefer to
think that eating raw
celery probably gives
cancer to laboratory rats.
I'll let my leftovers go
limp.
started screaming.
Then he got bored. So,
late in life, Shlep took up
writing. This is what he
wrote: "It's worth it.
Conquering fear is like
conquering fear � just
like it. Ha! I'm gonna put
this in my mouth now
And he did. Apparent-
ly.
Epilogue: Dental
records and literature are
as close as we come to im-
mortality.
Vote
Mark Niewald
SG A President
March 21 st
��tttnrt�mM�mm'��tHl�fwm�������,�v
St. Patricks Day
Celebration
IN CONCERT
BERTIE HIGGINS
National Recording Star
of THE HITS
"KEY LARGO'1
"Just Another Day in Paradise "
"Down At The Blue Moon "
and many morel
plus Special Appearance by "Living Color"
ONE SHOW ONLY
This Saturday March 1 7, 1984
Doors Open 7:30 Show 9:00
Admission $6.00 (with1.00 discount ECU ID)
THE GREENLEAF
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Across From Airport
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757-3107
Clothing Warehouse
Attention
We have Mini skirts
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Winfred Johnson pij
Shot Clock i
Bv ED Nl( kl AS
?ort� E4Hor
With the league tournan
ed, ECAC South officials
vestigate the possibility of imrl
shot clock for next season
Several ECAC South co j
already expressed their viewpo
matter. Co-coach of the year.
rant of Richmond, is optimist
implementation will occur
think we will see a shot clock!
"The question will be when
off
Tarrant made the point thai
games in which a team has the
closing minutes, it will go into
fensc, turning the game into a
shooting contest. A shot de-
force the the leading team to ta
to the basket, thereby enablin.
to progress quicker, and hopel
� more exciting. "If I'm a fal
want to see them shoot free thf
says.
William and Mary coach Bar:
would rather not see a shot cl
it. "I myself would not vote
�ays. "It's not necessary. It's (1
too popular to change
While Parkhill and Tarrant a
on the issue, James MadiJ
Campanelli is basically opt
ertheless would like to see a
Pscd in certain circumstanc
fver been a proponent of
�ock Campanelli says. H
II WlMlllli
w�.
,Ul 1,1 I I
� mi ��!�
�m ���i mi � mt





I
Costs
trust
It ne
in
li.ia.
to
to
m-
red
din
I i
n-
coln Center, for a good
seat you could expect to
pay $15 to $20. Here, a
uhole season ticket costs
a student only $12.50
he said.
Obviously, with the up-
coming 84-85 year the
finest ever � highlighted
by the Rotterdam
Philharmonic Orchestra
� students should think
twice before ignoring the
Artists Series. They might
as well get what thev pay
for.
THE EAST C AROl INI AN
Sports
VA�M������l�.��j�����t�l,
iec&
or your
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19
�eenviiie "56 ?03i

MARCH 13, 19M Pa9
Still Life
MAK BARBER - ECU Photo Lab
Two ferocious TKE boxer, k, . brealher whje . �
Pirate Golfers Ready
To Rebound In S. C.
By GENE WILLIAMS
Spans Writer
pJES?. lh? majority of ECU spent spring break
�2 �� � the 1984 edition of the Se Golf
to. was busy competing against the best clubs inhe
Patatfmri break' lhe Pirat� competed in the
potS suS �1CFm " Carolina against perennia!
SSTmS w.t cUrman' C,emson and nationally ac-
claimed Wake Forest. According to Director of
SSff Hdmick' Wake Forest 'oTw the
rest of the field away" with a three day total of 841
nemTnf�rUr f�T the '�"��i '
-lemson finished m second place with 852 ann
baUcrkm,anntne,rnd ?2 Jhe "rates we'
back in the pack with a three-day score of 900
by ,SS�,f ?hU ' n0t makC a �-owing
Chris Ca Cr S 5 bdght Sp0t for them '
wms czaja. Czaja finished in the top 25 of 90
golfers competing. Czaja's rounds were 70 73 and 7?
for a three-day total of 220
tremeWdi?o "e,mi,ck. "The competition was ex-
tremely tough and Wake (Forest �i9u1j
zttr0-even for - � � "IM
5K L" set two COurse records of 65 and 64 anrl
stiU finished second to the Demon Deacons '
The Pirate hnksters will not have time to analvre
prepareTor ZTJ 52 �5r2S
w3" Th n l tournaments in the upcoming
weeks. They will be sending Czaia Mike Rr J �
Mark Arcelesi, Mike SSawlo
compete ,n South Carolina next week
CnZlett�r acthe t0urnament will'include South
Carolina, N.C. State, Wake Forest, UNC-Chaoel
ECuTseZSSeeCIernSOn and Furman" StatisficX
ECU is the weakest team in the field, but Helmick
da?ds "wer;to fmf,ast- "wei ?�
one sen.S? l.hreC " �"C SB and
Indeed, the Pirates are young and inexperienced
kbit �- r-
While not setting records early ihis season
He murk expects great things from the squad as?he
season progresses. "You're not goiig to beat
powerhouses playing three freshman' he satf
According to Helmick, the freshman have talent
cuhivatf nCedS P,3ying time and -Perienceeto
SWitoStS.season rJn
near thwr aaV e Season ,vlnds down
v -h I near tne NCAA tournament
Johnson Pitches Pirates To First ECAC Win
Bti J -i3BBr' TfrBPMHsP9 b randy mews ���
wn, j�BIUO11 p�ched Bl5 �S53S7�
SViOi Cocr Needed In EC A C
By RANDY MEWS
AMtaUai Sport. Editor
Winfred Johnson pitched his
second straight complete game of
the season for the Pirates yester-
day afternoon, as the ECU
baseball team pounded out an 8-3
victory over George Mason at
Harrington Field.
The game was ECU's first
8UJ,C�,ntest' and Pira head
coach Hal Baird was pleased with
the win. "It's good to get a vic-
tory in our first conference
game, he said. "We've had a
tew ups and downs so far, but
J. hopefully we can use this game as
a springboard to get us going "
Mason got on the board first, as
thf SlSX naiIed a fastbaJ1 over
the left field fence for a solo home
run.
ECU came right back in the
bottom of the third on a Greg
Hardison single followed by a
powerful Todd Evans homer giv-
ing the Pirates a 2-1 lead
The Pirates extended their lead
by a run in the fourth when Mark
Shank doubled in Mike Williams
from first. Williams had reached
base on a fielder's choice earlier in
the inning.
Mason threatened the Pirate's
lead in the top of the sixth after
singles by Mark Clark, Kevin
Burke and Hart loaded the bases
with no outs. But after Barry
Durham hit into a double play to
score Clark and close the score to
3-2, the Patriots couldn't muster
another run as Bobby Sowell
grounded out to end the inning.
ECU left no doubt in anyone's
mind who the game belonged to
on its next trip to the plate, as the
Pirtes scored four runs on four
hits to put the game out of reach
in the last half of the sixth.
Chris Bradberry, who Baird
said had an outstanding day at the
Plate, led off the inning with a
shot that almost cleared the trees
behind the left field fence.
By ED NICKLAS
Sports Editor
With the league tournament now end-
ed, ECAC South officials will further in-
vestigate the possibility of implementing a
shot clock for next season
Several ECAC South coaches have
already expressed their viewpoint on the
matter. Co-coach of the year, Dick Tar-
rant of Richmond, is optimistic that the
implementation will occur. "Next year I
think we will see a shot clock he says.
The question will be when it will go
Tarrant made the point that in many
games m which a team has the lead in the
closing minutes, it will go into a stall of-
fense, turning the game into a free throw
shooting contest. A shot clock would
l.�.Cif l5e the Ieaiing team to take the ball
Jto the basket, thereby enabling the game
0 progress quicker, and hopefully make
� more exciting. "If I'm a fan, I don't
want to see them shoot free throws he
iys.
William and Mary coach Barry Parkhill
JWd rather not see a shot clock install-
a- I myself would not vote for it he
ays. "Ifs not necessary. It's (the game)
F�� Popular to change
While Parkhill and Tarrant are polariz-
1 on the issue, James Madison coach
ftLOu Campanelli is basically opposed, but
aevertheless would like to see a shot clock
jased m certain circumstances. "I've
CCif�becn a proponent of the shot
pock. Campanelli says. However, he
ECAC SOUTH
Commentary
says, "A 45 second clock has some merit
country. e t0 SCC U C�nSiStCnt "� o��
JLTrArf00point totaJs Prod�c-
ed by ECAC South teams this season the
shot clock might be a shot in them for a
conference that sent just one tJam to
Mrr d?? Seafon play �d non� to the
NAARlKh!m0nd' the dub th � the
NCAA bid, was relegated to playing
Rider m the preliminary round
th?lrHri89StsJamytd this season in
tZiS�Uth' there were !8 �n which
both teams scored below 70 points Onlv
h! Tems- wouId certainly speed up
nfn a ?' �3? the mm frominj
o L �ree hrow c�ntest with six minutel
?ng?mmJheTmoTC' U wouJd still presem
2Z�rtamand strate8ic clement �
basketball - "keep away" baU
theav itT1C 2y l.hc is rinc
tne way it is - don't touch. But averaae
home game attendence is not that high
dtC?rnmenUltion WOuId certanUyiK
hurt. In fact, it might help
Mike Williams and Shank
fol owed with singles, and then
Williams scored on a fielder's
choice in which batter Jim Riley
was thrown out at first, while
bnank advanced to second.
Steve Sides, who was two for
four with a home run and two
RBI s, was walked on the next
Pirate at bat, and then Hardison
singled to load the bases.
Evans was next up, and lined a
shot off the glove of Mason's se-
cond baseman. The Patriots were
charged with an error, as Shank
crossed the plate to give ECU a
6-2 lead.
Johnson, who also serves as a
designated hitter when not pit-
ching gave the Pirates their final
run of the inning when he sacrific-
Shank t0 Ieftfield' scorin�
Franz Furstell came on in relief
of GMU starter Les Wright in the
seventh, but neither team was able
to pick up a run during the inning
Mason got their final run of the
game on a Jeff Bowers home run
to lead off the eighth, but
Johnson retired the next three bat-
ters to put away any thought of a
comeback.
Sides added a security run in the
bottom half of the inning with the
fifth home run of the game. Har-
dison, who had the best day of-
fensively, going three for four and
scoring a run, followed with a
single, but Evans hit into a double
play to end the inning.
The Patriots were unable to get
on base in the final nning as
Johnson was impressive on the
mound, retiring three straight bat-
ters, the final by strikeout.
ECU improves to 6-3 overall
and 1-0 in the conference, and will
close out its homestand against
GMU today at 3 p.m. on Harr-
ington Field.
123456789RH E
GMU01000101C 383
ECU 00210401x 8142
Pirates Get Revenge;
EC Skiers Chill FSU
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
i � �
I
kii? l beat thcm Pmmm State) on the foot-
ball field, but we beat them on the sloies � said7o
Saunders of the ECU physical educationTepaZent
referring to last week's skiing victory during ECU's
biannual trip to Snowshoe WVa
�iv�ICrSJ.r�m-ECy captured � bronze and two
RacS r m thC "STAK V��� Standa
broe NTADmpared t0 Horid Stc's for
Wood Steve Wyatt, and Brian and BrendanlvforS,
xs5SSSSSS3e
Sludents (.tang the course for credit �e reauirt
o take ski lessons every morning, butL"re?dS
the nftemoon. They n�y � jgfZl"?
dn,o0t. uWDuUd Dtay Boom whoop It ,p . u� ,oci�l Ufe while it &XSoend ?�? "?
own wine and cheese party. Ww their
;
� � mwm r�ATTi
Vizzy Dean Proteges
�akv PArraRiON - icu m�ta u
MMMBMBiW�illi "����
���Wil I! � jliiaij
m� -
h
iM.
Liii3.HJ6sBjaii





1
ATTENTION
Have You Had Your Portrait
Taken
1984 Buccaneer?
If not here is
one last opportunity.
Varden Studios
agreed
return to ECU
for one more week March 19-23 to take
Underclass, Senior and Graduate student portraits.
If response from YQU the students is favorable
they will stay the following week as well.
So make your appointments NOW on
the sign up sheet outside the Buccaneer
Office on the second floor of the
Old South Building.
Sittings are from 9-12am, J-5pm.
There is no sitting fee!
Notice
Feature writers needed for 1984 Buccaneer! If interested please
contact the Media Board Secretary at 757-6009.

?
Moo,
By VICKIE BROWNE11
tt l twutnh
Outdoor Recreation
Opportunities
The IRS Outdoor Re.
Center is offering seera
outdoor adventures fo-
students, faculty anc
staff. One admnure is a
backpacking trip to
Uwharrie National Fore
on March 23. Cost ft
trip is $27 which include
equipment, travel
food. Registration
deadline is March 16.
A second ade-
will be a hanggliding tri
to Nags Head, N.C.tof
off Jockey's Ridge, a 1
story sand dune. The
is set for March 31 (
for the trip is $45
includes basu school a
transportation. Reseda
tions must be made
Friday, March 16.
David Creech backhand
day.
21 Greenville B
Phone 756-0825
2Forl
(Pizza Onu
Offer Good Triru j
Not Goad MWi Any Othe'
Buy One Ptzza at Recc
nd Get Another of SaiJ
Or Less FREE
I
I

The next tir
ak
VISA 0��S. CuSIQ
combination wttti at
oo�y at pamcwatj
througMWtav 31 IS
rtSft &!��. Ct,
2omotnator witn
aartacvatmg
May31.ia�
:i983 Banjoes i

�'�� fH���� t�vT-
tm





r
STCAMOLMIAN MAKCH I I9S4
11
If
cu
traits
le
Moo, Paw ora Cow' Glenn Takes Title
By VICKIE BROWNELL A third outdoor adven- � � -� �J�a7t tJJ "
By VICKIE BROWNELL
ECU iMnaarab
Outdoor Recreation
Opportunities
The IRS Outdoor Rec
Center is offering several
outdoor adventures for
students, faculty and
staff. One adventure is a
backpacking trip to the
Uwharrie National Forest
on March 23. Cost for the
trip is $27 which includes
equipment, travel and
food. Registration
deadline is March 16.
A second adventure
will be a hanggliding trip
to Nags Head, N.C. to fly
off Jockey's Ridge, a 13
story sand dune. The trip
is set for March 31. Cost
for the trip is $45 which
includes basic school and
transportation. Reserva-
tions must be made by
Friday, March 16.
A third outdoor adven- great outdoors
ture will be a Whitewater ouiao��-
�ThSr 1o t0 V0t Sr AC�mpus Basketball
ings, NC to explore the Winners Crowned
French Broad River on
April 6-8. Cost for the In the men's basketball
ECU
trip is $45 which includes
river trip, registration,
transportation and lodg-
ing. Registration deadline
is March 26.
Come on by the IRS
Outdoor Rec Center in
Memorial Gym room 113
and take advantage of the
final last night, it was Cli-
que over Scott Sultans of
Sweat to take the All-
Campus basketball
throne. Action was fierce
as both teams showed im-
pressive basketball talent.
Final score Slique 43,
Scott 39.
In women's action the
independents lost a real
hertbreaker. The
Cinderella team, Jones,
managed to upset the
defending champs and
poll favorite the Heart-
breakers to take the
women's crown. The
game was a see-saw battle
as both teams exhibited
great playing desire. Final
score Jones 28, Heart-
breakers 27.
Video Showing
The Department of
Intramural-Recreational
Services has combined ef-
forts with Mr. Gatti's
Pizza to bring you the
latest in electronic
technology.
The Fraternity divi-
sional basketball final
between Kappa Alpha
and Kappa Alpha Psi has
been video taped. Review
or preview this game on
Thursday, March 15 at
�:15 pm at Mr. Gatti's.
Come on out and watch
this intramural first.
Wrestling
Crowned
Winners
Just before spring
break, intramural
wrestlers completed their
season and champions
were crowned. Winners
included; Paul "Brown
Cow" Glenn, Jeff For-
res, Dave Terry, Randy
Tyler, Chris Sanns, Terry
Redmond, Robbie Rice,
Mike Schneider, David
Plum. Overall team win-
ners included Kappa
Niewald
Sigma in the fraternity
division, Garrett in the
residence hall division
and Low Riders in the in-
dependent division.
Co-Reckers Set To
Finish
The final action in in-
tramural co-rec bowling
and co-rec roller hockey
are slated to be held
Thursday night. In bowl-
ing action, several teams
appear to be strong
favorites. This final game
will be held at
Mendenhall Student
Center beginning at 7 pm
Co-rec Roller Hockey
final action is scheduled
to begin at 8:30 pm at
Skateworld. Favorites in-
clude H Loco Flyers,
RoOa DooMe and Mack
Carpet Ride.
11
MISS OUT!
Saturday, March 17, 1984
om 11:00AM Unitl 4:00P
At
$nnnr�,uunnrI Juuuujuouuooeoc
I Tri-State J
Auto Body
m
Expert body repairs, paint
jobs, frame straightening, and
24 hour towing.
10 Discount to all ECU
Students.
(Bring in Ad)
(over the bridge)
1512 N.Greene St.
Day 758-0778
Night 756-4775
756-8604
24 h
TOWWC
KKVICE
������B u B uu.o.Ajvoooooaooi
Buy One Foot-Long Sub
Sandwich And Get One of
Equal or Comparable Value
FREE!
208
E. 5th St.
75S-7979
E. 51k Si
Limit One Per Customer Per Visit
. Bam!
David cTech-btcthimfs t�b3 ioTne PiTate-HosTTo bid Dominion7.
day.
Old Dominion yester-
, - Jt -�-
The new police recruits.
Call them slobs.�-j
Call them jerks.
Call them gross.
Just don't call them
i when you're in trouble.
i
MAKETRACKSF0RTHE
EATNALL AROUND!
The next time you stop by forthe Best Eatin" bring
along this money-savin'coupon. '
, 'sTeTk!TeamculfTiiD
p 0RMME JUICE $1.29
I Please present this coupon before ordering One coupon per customer oar
� visit, please Customer must pay any sales tax due This coupon not 000dm
� combination with any other offers Offer good during regular breakf esthours
only at participating Hardeo's Restaurants
through May 31. 1984
VlacrJeer
i
i
i
he i33 Hardees Food Systems inc wOKORBmS. I
, lleSrmTsmjmMoSLul
I
I
I
I
mat mum ten mm $1.79
Please present this coupon before ordering One coupon par customer �
visit please Customer must pay any sales tax due This ooupon not ooodin �
combination with any other offers Offer good after 10:30 AM asset is 1
participating Herdee's Restaurants through ' "
May 31. 1904. ft B .
c 1983 Hardees Food Systems Inc ' � "
nacrJeer
What an Institution!
AtADOCOJMJANysaiASE
� ir
HENDRK THEATRE
EHfftRt
"�4iir�a�tus�jM iii iiii m if
mm.
e immmfi i lit- �� - - � - sai-
-��-��
'





12

M A K (. H '
Pirate Netters Fall To Old Domi
H Mh ; MOKI MM j
ht K I
( 11) I
! CUV
R
Van
Numbei six. David d Da
as the onh 7 5; Da
a a in in singles, (ialei
� ating Bob Shellhouse Mia
match, -6, (ODl d
2 1
( in i the season, and will be
Satur-
� a' 1 00 p in against
l iUII ts
Results:
ir Cuppei null
1 d Paul Owen 6-4.
Rainey
for SGA President
March21st
Classifieds
fer
MILLER PRE-SEASON
SOFTBALL PICKS
1 � BOMBERS
2. DIRTY WHITE BO
3. GAMBLERS
4. SCOTT SUNDE II
5. LAMDA CHI ALPI
Co-sponsored bj.(). rankard (
Miller Brewingo.
IK
MIM
� . rime
- s -
�Ht�p .our . .
�len la �
' ' s ' fcU
Finite shortsto, G R Ha pares I(, pu he ,ag o� M -nVoti
STAMfY lf��r ECU F L.O
g
ahe izast (Taruitnu
W Will)
PLRSONI





Title
The East Carolinian, March 15, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 15, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.328
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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