The East Carolinian, March 13, 1984







�he
(Earnlttttan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Pages
Circulation 10,000
NCATE Revisiting
Education School,
Reviewing Programs
R TIN. 4 V4�ss iiii P�lt. .I.� i . .
The recent installation of a sidewalk along 10th Street should make the voyage to class somewhat
Brewster Building and Memorial Gym easier on those all-too-frequent rainy days.
ECU NmkuMu
By TINA MARCSCHAK
Co-Nrwi Miior
After much revamping and
reorganizing, the ECU School of
Education is awaiting a revisit
from the National Council for Ac-
creditation in Teacher Education
(NCATE). The 13 - member team
is visiting ECU March 18-21 to
review the school and determine
whether or not it has met ac-
creditation standards. The School
of Education was denied ac-
creditation last March because of
administration, maintenance and
supervision problems.
Dr. Charles R. Coble, dean of
the School of Education said he
didn't think the school would
have any problem getting reac-
credited. He added, however, that
any program can be approved.
"Without a doubt they're going
to find needed improvements. If
they don't then they won't have
done their job Coble said.
The NCATE team, chaired bv
. Dennis Hinkle. professor of
Polytechnic Institute and State
University, will meet with selected
faculty members, students and
teachers. Coble said the commit-
tee members will review all the
programs, not just the ones who
failed to meet required standards.
In efforts to improve the
teacher education programs,
several multicultural education
awareness lectureworkshops
vvere given throughout the year.
"They represent a substantial step
in the right direction Coble
said. "We think the activities and
workshops we've had have been
effective He stressed, however,
that the school will continue to
work on that component.
Also implemented were three
new programs � a home
economics program, a media
supervision program and a middle
school undergraduate and
graduate program.
Although the official NCATE
report will not be released until
this summer, Coble said the
school will ultimately know the
Three Become Academic Deans
Coble, Ryan, Stevens Chosen
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
( o-N��, rdllor
Three ECU faculty members,
Charles R. Coble, Eugene Ryan,
and Charles E. Stevens were ap-
pointed to academic deanships by
the University of North Carolina
Board of Governors.
Coble, who was elevated to
dean of the School of Education,
served as acting dean of the schooi
for the past 10 months. He has a
degree in botany, a graduate
degree in science education and a
doctorate from UNC - Chapel
Hill in cirriculum and instruction.
Coble is a professor of science
education and has been a faculty
member here since 1972.
Professor and chairman of the
ECU Department of Philosophy,
Eugene Ryan, was appointed to
dean of the College of Arts and
Sciences. Ryan served as acting
dean of the school beginning in
January and has been a faculty
member since 1968. Holding a
doctorate from Pontifical
Gregorian University in Rome,
Ryan's interests include ancient
Greek philosophy and medieval
philosophy.
Stevens was promoted to dean
of the School of Music after serv-
ing as a faculty member for 24
years. During that time Stevens
Educational Research at Virginia decision next Wednesday.
,
Coble
has served as professor and chair-
man of the Keyboard faculty, ac-
ting dean and associate dean of
the School of Music, chairman of
the choral and piano teachers sec-
(

W
Ti m
Ryan
tions of the NC Music Teachers
Association and director of
graduate studies. Stevens received
his doctorate in music from UNC-
Chapel Hill.
Mankiewicz To Speak
On 'Campaign Trail'
Stevens
All three men were nxommend-
ed by separate search :ommittees
and approved by the ECU board
of trustees and administration.
By ELIZABETH BIRO
SUff Writer
The 1984 Spring Lecture-
Seminar Series, to be held March
19-21, will feature famed jour-
nalist and political analystad-
visor Frank Mankiewicz The title
of the series, "On the Electronics
Campaign Trail: the Straws, the
Primaries, and the General Elec-
tion will center on the role of
television in national elections.
Besides being a well known
writer and eminent attorney,
Mankiewicz was also press
Niewald Pleased With Outcome
secretary to the late Senator
Robert F. Kennedy and national
campaign manager for Senator
George McGovern's 1971-72
presidential campaign.
Mankiewicz has also been a col-
umnist for the Washington Post
and president of National Public
Radio.
Mankiewicz will open the series
with a lecture Monday, March 19,
8 p.m. in Wright Auditorium. The
initial lecture is entitled "The
General Role of Television and
Other Media in Politics and Na-
i i
SGA Legislature Rebuffs Vote On
Referendum For Campus PIRG
Th� sr.A i o�;ru. wi
Mankiewicz
tional Elections Faculty will be
given an opportunity to respond
to this lecture on Tues March 20,
9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. and 2
p.m. to 4 p.m. in Mendenhall
Student Center, room 224. A rap
session between students and
See JOURNALIST, page 5
The SGA Legislature Monday
refused to suspend the rules to
vote on a bill allowing a student
referendum on a Public Interest
Research Group at ECU, sending
the bill into committee and
possibly dimming the chances of
PIRG question being on the SGA
election ballot next week.
The bill will have to be brought
out of committee at next
Monday's SGA legislative
meeting if it to be enacted, accor-
ding to Student Welfare Commit-
tee Chairman David Brown,
whose committee will consider the
bill this week. Brown said two
other committees are also review-
ing the bill this week.
The SGA is holding elections
next week for 1984-85 executive
officers, and sponsors of the bill
would like to have the PIRG issue
brought to a student referendum
on the same ballot.
The bill, if passed, would allow
ECU students to vote on whether
they want a PIRG on campus,
funded by a $2-per-semester fee
that could be refunded upon re-
quest.
In other business Monday, after
hearing gubernatorial candidate
D. M. Faircloth speak, the
legislature heard a report by three
members who went to a student
government convention in Texas
last week.
A member of the Screenings
and Appointments Committee an-
nounced that vacancies are open
for SGA representatives from
Jones, Fletcher and Jarvis dor-
mitories and from off campus.
Quiet Dorm Proposal Approved
ILLY BUSH rrcol w out tkrnnu ii �. . .
By MOLLY BUSH
Slarf Writer
The Committee on Residence
life unanimously approved the
Quiet Dorm proposal for Fall
Semester 1985 last Thurs. Discus-
sion on the dorm that will be used
begins on March 22. The only
stipulation put on the proposal
was that the Quiet Dorm will be
governed by the students who live
there.
SRA President Mark Niewald
said "I'm very pleased this pro-
posal went through as well as it
did. "We proposed the quiet
dorm about five or six weeks
ago Niewald said. "It was great
to see it start out as an idea and
work its way through Niewald
praised the SRA for it's hard
work.
According to survey results,
students are interested in a quiet
dorm. Out of the 1322 surveys
that were turned in, approximate-
ly 841 agreed that it was a good
idea. That number dropped con-
m
siderably when the students were
asked if they would consider liv-
ing in the quiet dorm- only 417
said they would.
"When considering location -
we must be realistic said
Carolyn Fulghum, associate dean
and director of Residence Life.
"Students should understand the
factors when choosing which
dorm will be chosen to be the
quiet dorm Fulghum said.
Some of these factors are the
number of students the building
The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Entertainment6
Sports8
Classifieds10
� For a wrap up of the ECAC
South Basketball Tourna-
ment, see Sports, page 8.
� ECU gets a sneak preview
�f the new movie Police
Academy,tor a pre-release
screening, see Entertainment,
Page 6.
will house, the size of the
building, the accessability for the
handicapped students, and
whether or not the building is or
can be coed
"We will have a Quiet Dorm "
Fulghum said. "As to which
butlding - we are looking at the
options
The quiet dorm issue has en-
countered a great deal of opposi-
tion on campus, especially from
students in Jarvis.
Paper Sponsoring Campus Forum
For SGA Presidential Candidates
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NcwiUHar
Candidates for the position ot
SGA President will have a chance
to present their platforms and
answer questions on campus
issues at a forum to be held Tues-
day, March 20 at 2:30 p.m. on the
university Mall. The forum is be-
ing sponsored by The East Caroli-
nian.
There are currently four can-
didates for the SGA presidency:
Mark Niewald, a junior and SRA
president; Jay Brigel, a junior
marketing major is also a resident
advisor.Greg Shelnutt, a senior
sculpture major a former member
of the SGA Legislature, president
of the Scuplture Group, and a
member of several School of Art
committees; and John Rainey, a
junior, is chairman of the SGA
Appropriations Committee.
The candidates will answer a
series of questions presented by a
student panel and will also be
given a chance to inform students
of their platforms. Outgoing SGA
President Paul Naso will serve as
moderator for the forum. (Any
students who want to submit
questions for consideration by the
panel should use the form on page
three of today's issue and bring the
questions to The East Carolinian
office by Thursday, March 15.)
There are two candidates for
the position of SGA Treasurer,
Lee Lane and Georgia Mooring.
Candidates for the other two of-
fices are running uncontested.
Mike McPartland is running for
vice president and Jay Johnson
for secretary. Elections will be
held March 21.
Democratic go
the SGA Monday
orial candidate
ory, page 5.
"Laach"
Faircloth spoke to
�iro-nt
MStarSteii? "

n





THE EAST CAROLINIAN MARCH IV 1�U

Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
tine 1925
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday aw
Ing the summer.
The East Carolinian is the of
f Iclel newspaper of East Carolina
University, owned, operated and
published for and by the students
� East Carolina University.
Unless otherwise noted, unslgn
�d editorials on the opinion page
�re the newspaper's opinion,
oenerally written by the manec
Ing editor.
Subscription Rate: $30 yearly.
The East Carolinian offices are
located In the Publications
building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, NC
POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
2nd Floor, Publications building,
ECU, Greenville. N C 27834
Telephone: 757-6366. 6367. �309
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
Welcome back sisters. Hope you all
t�ad a great spring break. Don't
forget the meeting tonight at 4:30. See
ya' there.
LACROSSE
There will be a Lacrosse match this
weekend at Chapel Hill against the
UNC Lacrosse club The match will
start at 200 pm. Saturday. March 17
on the asfroturf beside Carmical
Gym So If you like watching
Lacrosse or have not seen it before,
come on out and get the excitement of
Lacrosse
PI KAPPA PHI
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity has a lot
going on within the next couple of
weeks To start out this Wed. (March
U) we have an all campuis party at
�he house starting at 10:00 Thursday
(March is) at 700 we have a pre
induction party with all of the new lit
tie sisters, then at 800 the Induction
and after we all party at the 200 WEst
Happy Hour. This Saturday is
Parents Day starting at 12:00 with a
pig pickin starting at 3:00. P.U.S.H.
aay (Play Units for the Severely Han
dicapped) Is March 31 (Sat.)
Everyone help support this cause.
Rose Ball is right around the corner
also
ECGC
The East Carolina Gay Community
will meet Monday, March 19, at 7 30
pm The meeting will be held at the
Catholic Newman Center, 953 E 10th
St.(at the bottom of College Hill). All
interested persons are cordially in-
vited to attend.
U.S. GENERAL
ACCOUNTING OFFICE
A Representative from the U.S.
General Accounting Office will be on
campus March 15, 1M4 to interview
coop students who would like to work
as GAO E valuator Accounting and
Finance majors who have completed
40 semester hours and have a 2.9 or
higher GPA should contact me Co-op
Office, 313 Rawl Bldg to arrange an
interview immediately!
BLOOD PRESSURE
Here's your chance to get a free
blood pressure screening Come on
out on Sunday, March ltth between
12:30 and 5:00 pm to Sycamore Hill
Baptist Church 226 W 8th St. We the
members of me Pre Professional
Health Alliance and the Student Na-
tional Medical Association will be
glad to serve you. Thanksl
TEAM HANDBALL
Team Handball, the fast action
Olympic sport returns to me ECU In
tramural program immediately after
spring break Registration will be
held March 12 13 with competition
beginning March 19. Fourteen In-
tramural team handball participants
have been selected for National
Sports Festival competition within
the past three years, and Leora
"Sam"jortes will represent the USA
m the 1984 Olympics. Remember to
sign up your team for team handball!
CO-OP JOBS
Currently there are cop positions
available at International Trade Ad
ministration and U.S. Dept. of
Transportation in various areas of
the US Requirements: maiors in
economics. International trade
relations, marketing, business and or
finance, criminal lustice, public ad
ministration, personnel, computer
science, and industrial policy
analysis. Undergraduates must have
a minimum overall GPA of 2.5 and a
2 9 GPA in major course of work. The
pay range is from $11,017 to S20.965
depending on education completed
and or prior Federal employment
Stop by the co op office in Rawl 313
ASAP These positions need to be fill
ed quickly.
WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service In the Bloxton House is
ottering mas on hour sessions to aid
you in developing better Interviewing
skills for us in your ob search A
film and discussion of how to inter
vlw through this service will be
shared. Each session will be held in
the Career Planning Room at 3 pm
Come on any of the following dates
March 21 and 27.
BLOODMOBILE
A bloodmobile will be held on Can
tral Campwt In umstead Dorm (lob
by). Everyone is invited to give. The
tours are between 12 4 pm.
TENNIS DOUBLES
Registration will be held March 12
for me tennis doubles tournament.
Find a partner and come on over to
Memorial gym and sign up for
doubles tennis.
SOFTBALL
TOURNAMENT
Registration begins March 12-13 for
the Preseason MMM Tournament.
Competition will be held me weekend
of March 16. Start forming your team
now.
RACQUETBAKL
DOUBLES
Registration for Intramural Co-Rec
Racquetball doubles will be held
March 19 �. Play will begin March
26.
VIDEOSHOWING
The Department of intramural-
Recreatlonal Services in co-operation
with Mr. Gattl's Pizza is showing on
video tape, me divisional Fraternity
basketball final between Kappa
Alpha and Kappa Alpha Psl. This
feature will be shown Thursday,
March 15, at 8:15 pm.
BSU
What was it like helping meet the
spiritual needs of me troops In Viet
nam? Hear former U.S. Army
Chaplain Nevln Snyder speak at
PAUSE at the Baptist Student union
on Thursday, March 15 at 7 pm.
Everyone Is welcome.
NIH
National institute of Health - a
representative from NIH. Bethesda,
MD will be on campus March 19 and
20 to interview studnts who would
like to work In a clinical setting as
Normal Volunteers, students will be
paid dally stipends. All interested
students must attend a general
maatlng �� 700 pm on Monday.
March 19 In Rawl 302 before having
interviews on the 20th Students ma
ioring in Allied Health. Nursing, and
related fields are encouraged to app
�V Contact the Coop Office, 313
�awl, for details and applications
DIETETIC
ASSOCIATION
The Student Dietetic Association
will be meeting on Tuesday, March 13
at 5:30 In room 121 (Dining Hall)
They will be featuring Angela Rich
who works with the WIC Program
(Women, infant, and Children). Rich
will explain the purpose, functions,
and special events performed by the
WIC Program which aids in main
taining the Nutritional requirements
of the mother, infant, and children of
all ages. Please come. Everyone is
Welcome.
SUMMER CO-OP
Thomas Nelson Inc. is offering ten
positions In their Summer Co-op pro
gram. Students selected are
guaranteed $200 a week Students
must be a hardworker, independent,
and willing to relocate for the sum
mer. Students will gain skills in com
munication, time and money
management, accounting,
psychology, management and
marketing. All students may apply at
313 Rawl building in the Cooperative
Education department.
SIGMA THETATAU
Sigma Theta Tau, the National
honor society of nursing, will have a
called business meeting on Monday,
March 19 at 7 pm in the School of
Nursing, rm 203. All members are
urged to attend
CLASSIFIED AM 'Nbj
You may us� tt� form at right 1 . or use a separate sheet of 1 papar if you need more lines. 1 Thr� in 11 it. � 11� '

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Return to the Media Board 1mm mm�
secretary by 3 p.m. the day 1�4�
before publication.1,�
PIRATE CLUB
Applications are now being ac-
cepted from persons interested In
assisting the Pirate Club during
Athletic events, socials, membership
solicitations, and community ban
quets during the 1984 year. Contact
Charles Shavltz, Assistant Director,
at 757 6178. or go by the Pirate Club
office behind Ficklen Stadium
Deadline for applications is 4 00 pm
Friday, March 16.
MANAGEMENT
The Society for Advancement of
Management will be meeting Thurs
day. March 15 at 300 In Rawl IX. In
eluded in the meeting will be Indue
tions of new members, certificates
awarded to past members, presenta-
tion of groundwork for the rest of the
semester, and a discussion about ac
tivities for the rest of the semester.
This is the last chance to apply and
pay for membership, so make one of
your smartest college moves, and get
involved in ECU'S new exciting socie-
ty.
FALLSEMEMSTER
ROOM REGISTRATION
Students enrolled Spring Semester
1984 who plan to return to East
Carolina University Fall Semester
and who wish to be guaranteed
residence hall housing will be re-
quired to reserve rooms during the
week of March 19 23. Prior to reserv
ing a room, a student must make an
advance room payment of $60. These
payments, which must be accom-
panied by housing applications
contracts will be accepted in the
Cashier's Office, Room 105, Spllman
Bldg beginning March 15. Students
now living in residence halls should
obtain housing applications from
their residence hall office. Students
residing off campus should obtain the
applications from the Office of Hous-
ing Operations, Room 201, Whlchard
Bldg. These will be available beginn-
ing March 13.
We are the vanguard of a new
democracy. We willbe meeting at
Mendenhall (Ask receptionist for
room number, every Thursday at
8:00 p.m. For more information call
752 4935 or 757 3566.
DELTA SIGMA PHI
The Little Sisters of Delta Sigma
Phi Fraternity invite anyone In-
terested in becoming a Little Sister to
a meeting on Wednesday. March 14 at
B pm at the Delta Sigma House
located on Tenth St. Come find ou
what Little Sisterhood is all about!
SUMMER RETAIL
SALES POSITIONS
Positions are available for retail
sales jobs in the Nags Head area.
Retail sales experience preferred but
not necessary. For more Info contact
the Co-op Office in Rawl 313.
WEIGHT CLUB
Attention all weight lifters and in
terested individuals: There will be a
very important meeting on Tuesday
March 13 in 105 B Memorial Gym!
Please be prompt in your attendance
because dues and additional weight
room hours will be discussed.
CADP
There will be a meeting of the Cam-
pus Alcohol and Drug Program on
Thursday. March 15 at 5:00 pm in 210
Erwln Hall. Elections and busisness
will discussed.
BIKINI CONTEST
Ladlesl Tim to show off the results
of diet, exercise, and Florida! Com
Ing soon to me Elbo- Fame, Fortune,
and Fun!
INTRAMURAL
SOFTBALL
Registration for Intramural Soft
ball will be held March 12 13 In
Memorial Gym. Play will begin
March 19. Start forming your teams
now.
PSICHI
Deadline for Psl Chi Scholarships Is
April 2,194. The Initiation for all new
members in Psi Chi will be held on
Mar. 20 at 7.00 in 244 Mendnhall. All
members are urged to attend. Elec-
tions for officers for Psi Chi 84-85 will
be held following initiation.
Refreshments will be served.
COLLEGE REP WANTED
College Rep Wanted to distribute
"Student Rate" subscription cards at
this campus. Good income, no seidng
involved. For information send a
self addressed, stamped envelope to
Allen s. Lowrance, Director, 251
Glenwood Dr Mooresville, NC 28115
ISA
We are having a meeting on
Wednesday at 6:00 pm at Mendenhall
Student Center. Turn in your money
for the tickets by Wed , March 14th to
Hector or Mildred.
PLANNING AND ZONING
TASK FORCE
The Greenville Planning and Zoo
ing Task Force will hold Its March
meetings on Tuesday, March 13 and
Tuesday, March 27, 1984 at 1000 am
In the third floor Conference Room of
the Community Building located at
the corner of Fourth and Greene
Streets
ALA BIKE TREK
An informational meeting about the
American Lung Association Bike
Trek will be held Wed March 14 at
7:15 pm at the Lung Association of
fice, 112 S Pitt St. This 100 mile event
will be held In the Wilmington area
April 13-15. Anyone who Is interested
In participating or who would like to
know more should plan to attend or
call me office at 752 5093
EDMISTEN'84
All students interested in joining
the campus organization to elect
Rufus Edmisten as Governor In 184
please contact Betty Casey or Mecon
Moye (ECU coordinatlor at 752-0312.
ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING
A three part workshop offered to
students at NO COST by the Universi
ty Counseling Center on Thursday,
March 15. 22 and 29. All three sessions
will be conducted from 3 4 pm in 306
Wright Annex Please call Counseling
Center for registration (757-661).
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
Two Art Scholarships are available
to lunlors, art mafors only. Applica
tions are due by March 25, 1984. For
application information and forms
contact the School of Art office
SUBDIVISION REVIEW
BOARD
The Greenville Subdivision Review
Board will hold its March meetings
on Wednesday. March 14 and
Wednesday. March 28 at 2:00 p.m. In
the third floor conference room of the
Community Building located at the
corner of Fourth and Greene Streets.
AMA
The American Marketing Assocla
tion presents a Pepsi Marketing Pro-
gram, with special guest Steve Sloan,
marketing manager for Pepsi Cola.
Current advertising campaigns will
be featured with emphasis in me
"Pride fo the Carolines" campaign j
and Michael Jackson's "New Genera-
tion" advertisements. Be at
Mendenhall, room 221 at 2:00 April
13th for a program you will no forget
NOW REORGANIZING
The Greenville Chapter of the Na
tlonal Organization for women is In
the process of reorgalnlzlng There
will be a dinner meeting on March 14
at 6 00 pm at the Three Steers
Restaurant, 2725 Memorial Drive,
Greenville. Following dinner, there
will be a goal setting brainsforming
session to determine upcoming ac-
tivities for the group. For further in
formation, please contact Fran Par
rott at 825 0186
BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT
The Greenville Board of Adust-
ment will hold Its March meeting on
Thursday, March 22.194at 7:30p.m.
in the third floor Council chambers of
the Municipal Building located at me
corner of Fifth and Washington
Streets
COASTAL ECOLOGY
"A Naturalist Looks at Coastal
Ecology" is me theme of me March
12th Sierra Club Meeting. Mike Dunn,
NC State Eastern District Naturalist,
will present a slide show exploring
the rich flora and fauna indigeneous
to me NC coast. He will also talk
about the special attractions for NC
coastal parks. The meeting will be
held at 8:00 pm at the First
Presbyterian Church, 14th and Elm
Streets In Greenville and is open to
the public.
ASIS
April 10 and 11, 1984, in Charlotte,
NC The American Society for in-
dustrial Security Carolina's Security
Seminar and Exhibits The theme
"Liability in the Workplace" The
program. Small Retail Crime, Bad
Checks, Credit Card Abuse, Drug
Abuse at me Workplace, Product
Tampering, Perimeter Control and
Stress Management Fee: $75,
Students $20. For more information
call: please list person closest to your
area.
BINGO ICE CREAM
PARTY
The Department of Umversit,
Unions is sponsoring a Bingo ice
Cream Party to be held on Tuesday
March 13. 1984 at 7 00 pm in me
Mendenhall Student Center Mult.
Purpose Room All ECU students
faculty, staff, their dependents M
guests are welcome Admission ,s 50
cents Eight different Bingo games
will be played and delicious ice
cream wilt be served all in the cost of
the admission
(Silt iEaat (Earnlinian
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Students wanting to have their parents receive
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fices on the second floor of the Publications
building, across from the entrance of Joyner
Library. Rates are $30 for one year and $20 lor
six months.
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byUt Jewlery
120 E. 5th Street
759-2127 10-5 Tues.Sat,
ECU MEDIA BOARD
We Are Now Accepting Applications
For Media Heads (East Carolinian,
Photo Lab, Rebel, Buccaneer, Ebony
Herald, and WZMB Radio Station)
Apply Mon Feb. 27-Thurs Mar.
15,1984 At The Media Board
Office In The Publications Building.
GET INVOLVED
For Further Information Call 757-6009 or Come
By The Media Board Office In The Publications!
Building Behind Joyner Library.

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Comm
ByTINAMAROSCHAK it
Thi
Although the com- ment
mencement memoran- Ma
dum recently distributed Stadi
contains much vital infor- incler
mation. Commencement cerer
Committee Chairman inden
Claiborne C. Rcme said lseurrl
many of the approx- a
imately 2900 eligible pose
graduates will either "l
misread the information sea: d
or will never een receive iseu:
Europ
B DENNIS KILCOVNE
Maff � nttr
According to Dr.
Loren Campion of the
History Department, the
once-ignored European
Studies minor is being
resurrected because of
"new enthusiasm among
faculty and students "
"In tie past, theEui
pean Studies Group
mainly presented national
anc
speai
the
p;or
d:s
featuj
Kulsl
HIT
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NatK
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pear
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histo
Hunger
To Hea
B MIKE HAMER
M�ff � rtt�r
Three ECU students
are heading up Greer-
ville's 12th Annual
CROP Walk for
Humanity. The Walk will
be held on Sun March
25, at 12:30 p.m. It will
begin a: Green Springs
Park on East Fifth Street
and will wind its wa
through the city for 20
kilometers, or 12 miles.
The three students
heading up the walk are
all members of the ECU
Hunger Coalition. Joe
Hughes, a graduate stu-
dent in history, is in
charge of arrangements
for the walk. Karin
Akers, a senior in
sociology, is recruitment
Soap Box
Forum On
Nuclear
Weapons
"Nuclear Weapons:
Deterrent Securin and
Armageddon" will be the
topic of a Soap Box
Forum to be held Thurs-
day, March 15 at 11 p.m.
in front of the Student
Supply Store.
The open-mike forum
is sponsored by the
Catholic Newman Center
and all students are in-
vited to participate. Time
will be allowed for both
presentation of view-
points and for rebuttal
Topics in the past have
included the Kissinger
Commission and U.S.
Policy in Central
America. Some of the
forums have drawn a
great deal of student par-
ticipation
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MRC H II IM4
T'T
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BINGO ICE CREAM
PARTY
nenl o university
�; a 8 ngo ice
� 'Ow Tuesday.
' " 00 pm m the
�' Center Multj
� ecu students,
lepenoents ana
'omission ,j jQ
" Bmgo games
delicious Ice
� in me cost of
iltntan
RM
ents receive
ut rhe form
arolinian of-
Publication
:e of Joyner
and $20 for
'$ Singles
of Acceptable
t Relationships
If not you prefer
ie tame preferences
ing
irei contact
th Carolina. 27530
HIT
t
N
H
,)
Ext A:
3
H
Commencement Instructions Disseminated
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Ce-NewiEdHor
Although the com-
mencement memoran-
dum recently distributed
contains much vital infor-
mation, Commencement
Committee Chairman
Claiborne C. Rowe said
many of the approx-
imately 2900 eligible
graduates will either
misread the information
or will never even receive
it.
This year's commence-
ment will be held on Sat
May 5 in Ficklen
Stadium. In the event of
inclement weather, the
ceremony will be moved
indoors to Minges Col-
iseum. Rose said this was
a situation that could
pose much confusion.
"Because of limited
seating in Minges Col-
iseum, all graduates who
will participate in Com-
mencement, 1984 and
who expect to invite fami-
ly members and friends
must obtain guest invita-
tions for them Rowe
said. The deadline for
these requests is April 13.
From April 2 to April
13 "each participating
graduate will be allowed
to initially receive two
guest invitations by
presenting the completed
guest invitation request
card in the lobby of
Mendenhall, weekdays
between 2 p.m and 5 p.m.
Rowe said. Those unable
to be on campus during
this time may request that
their invitations be mail-
ed to them by returning a
self addressed, stamped
envelope and completed
request card.
During the period of
April 18 to April 27 guest
invitations not claimed
during April 2-13 will be
equally distributed to
participating graduates
who have requested addi-
tional guest invitations.
Therefore, Rowe said, it
is imperative that "all
particating graduates re-
quest the total number of
guest invitations they
would like to receive
Several other dates
contained in the
memorandum are of im-
portance to graduates
who expect to participate
in commencement. A
rehearsal is set for Sat
April 28 at 9 a.m.
"Graduates will form the
processional lines in
Minges Coliseum bet-
ween 9 a.m. and 9:30
a.m Rowe said.
Students who have
paid the graduation fee
may pick up caps and
gowns in the Student
Supply Store. Anyone
unable to do so may have
his or her cap and gown
mailed. Commencement
announcements are also
on sale in the Student
Supply Store. AH orders
for caps, gowns, and an-
nouncements should be in
the store by April 8.
Women candidates
should wear dark dresses
nad black shoes with their
academic robes. Men
should wear dark
trousers, white shirts and
dark shoes, preferably
black, with their robes.
Coats should be worn by
men receiving graduate
degrees.
Rowe said diplomas
are mailed to students at
the end of the semester in
which they complete their
graduation requirements.
Minor
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
Surf Writer
According to Dr.
Loren Campion of the
History Department, the
once-ignored European
Studies minor is being
resurrected because of
"new enthusiasm among
faculty and students
"In the past, the Euro-
pean Studies Group
mainly presented national
and world-renowned
speakers, but didn't push
the minor said Cam-
pion. One of the many
distinguished speakers
featured was Wladislaw
Kulski, one of the last
surviving representatives
of the defunct League of
Nations.
Although the Euro-
pean Studies minor in-
cludes courses from
history, political science,
language, and other
departments, it also has
its own special courses,
starting with ASEU 3000
for the fall of 1984. This
course, which is being
specially emphasized, ex-
amines the influence on
European culture of the
Romantic movement,
from its beginnings in the
19th century to the pre-
sent.
The Romantic move-
ment began to flourish in
the early 19th century and
is considered by scholars
the most fascinating and
productive intellectual-
emotional fever to grip
European civilization
since the rise of Chris-
tianity. It downgraded
the rational mind and
said that human emotions
and feelings were the best
source of truth. An ex-
traordinarily powerful
Hunger Coalition Members
To Head Up CROP Walk
By MIKE HAMER
Staff W rtler
Three ECU students
are heading up Green-
ville's 12th Annual
CROP Walk for
Humanity. The Walk will
be held on Sun March
25, at 12:30 p.m. It will
begin at Green Springs
Park on East Fifth Street
and will wind its way
through the city for 20
kilometers, or 12 miles.
The three students
heading up the walk are
all members of the ECU
Hunger Coalition. Joe
Hughes, a graduate stu-
dent in history, is in
charge of arrangements
for the walk. Karin
Akers, a senior in
sociology, is recruitment
Soap Box
Forum On
Nuclear
Weapons
"Nuclear Weapons:
Deterrent Security and
Armageddon" will be the
topic of a Soap Box
Forum to be held Thurs-
day, March 15 at 11 p.m.
in front of the Student
Supply Store.
The open-mike forum
is sponsored by the
Catholic Newman Center
and all students are in-
vited to participate. Time
will be allowed for both
presentation of view-
points and for rebuttal.
Topics in the past have
included the Kissinger
Commission and U.S.
Policy in Central
America. Some of the
forums have drawn a
great deal of student par-
ticipation.
chairperson; and Theresa
Dulski, senior in occupa-
tional therapy, is publici-
ty chairperson.
Speaking about his
reasons for becoming in-
volved in the walk,
Hughes said, "Last year I
headed up a walk in
Cary, North Carolina,
and not only did it raise
$5,000, but it also pulled
together 500 people
working together on a
project � people who
normally would not be
getting together He ad-
ded that, "there have
been two good reasons
for my becoming involv-
ed, one is to raise money
for CROP for hungry
people here and abroad,
and the other thing is
having the opportunity to
educate people to the fact
that world hunger does
actually exist. It is good
for people to know that
by walking they are ac-
tually doing something to
alleviate the problem;
they're not just talking
about it
According to Dulski,
three-fourths of the pro-
fits from this years walk
will go toward overseas
relief projects which are
funded through Church
World Service. CROP is
the name given to local
community efforts at
hunger education and
fundraising for Church
World Service. Some pro-
jects that are being fund-
ed through CROP are: an
immunization project in
Maharastra, India, that
reaches 10,000 children; a
village water resource
development in the Bul-
ing Arkhala area in Nepal
with 2,000 villagers doing
the work; and technical
consultants for
agriculture and cattle
production in the remote
Alto Beni region of
Bolivia.
One-fourth of the pro-
fits from the walk will go
to Church Ministries
United for emergency
relief funds for the
Greenville-Pitt County
area. Mrs. Liz Wilkerson,
administrator of Church
Ministries United, said
that $1,100 was raised
last year.
THE AMERICAN RED CROSS
wants you to
GIVE A GIFT OF LIFE
when:
TODAY
3-13-84
12-5pm
w
here:
In the lobby
of
UMSTEAD DORM
Sponsored by Central Campus
Snacks & Refreshments will be provided.
Buy
Sell
And
Trade
With
The
Classifieds
MENDENHALL
SNACK BAR
�������
salad Jbar
Hot sandwiches
daily specials
conveniently located
continuous service
7s 30 am- 730pm
���������
east Carolina
amiri? services
stimulant, Romanticism
unleashed a burst of
creativity from music,
poetry, and visual arts to
religion, philosophy, and
science.
Always interested in
the dark side of life and
the human mind, Roman-
ticism spawned sub-
movements that drifted
away from the more
benign concerns of its
first generations and
became involved with the
satanic and violent.
After spending several
generations of digesting
realistic literature and
philosophy, Romanticism
burst forth again in the
uproar beat of rock-n-roll
and the personalistic cults
and religions of the
1960s. "Although
Romanticism is rooted in
the past said Campion,
"it is alive and well In
fact, he says, it is so
dominant that anyone
who wants to understand
the present worlds of art,
entertainment, and even
religion and science had
better familiarize himself
with it.
ASEU 3000 is a two-
hour course being offered
this fall on Tuesday even-
ings from 6:30-9:30.
Anyone needing further
information should con-
tact Dr. Campion in
BA-320or call 757-6485.
; SGA Candidates Forum
Students wanting to suggest topics for the SGA
presidential candidates forum can use the space I
below and bring the form to The East
Carolinian offices in the Publications building
by March 15.
Advertise
��oaoooooooooooooooooooooooooooe
Interested in becoming a x
BUCCANEER BABe
Come meet the members on S
March 20th 7-9:00 at Scales Field House
For more info, call 758-2856
lOOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At Hie Campus
East Carolina University
We are now taking applications for rental of Ringgold Towers units.
If you are interested in living at the Towers this fall, vou will
need to come by the office and fill out an application.
WARD PROPERTY BROKERS
1O0 COMMERCE aTTMTCT
DRAWKM ���
OMUMVIIlK. N. C.
919 756-8410
LAUNDROMAT
Lounge
Video Games (Dragons Lair)
Large Screen "Cable" TV
32 Washers 18 Dryers
Outside Patio
Fluff & Fold Service
Dry Cleaning Pick-Up
Ample Parking
Attendant On Duty
Cold Beverages
Open 8 a.m. to Midnight, 7 Days A Week
Located Next To The Pizza Hut
2510 E. 10th Street Greenville, N.C.
752-5222
If you have to do your own laundry, do it in style at the Wash Pub
? - - ?
���?? l� 4� �? � - m �?.? f .
� - -i;





Stye lEaat (Hutalinxun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, gmmhwt
Darryl Brown. ��� ��,
Jennifer Jendrasiak. mm a j.t. Pietrzak. ����, o,��
Tina Maroschak. cm. �o, Mike McPartland,
Ed Nicklas. sport Bdi,or Tom Norton, o���i m.
Gordon Ipock. m. a� Kathy Fuerst. Pro m�.
Mark Barker. o�w Mmv Mike Mayo, �� .��"�
March 13, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
PIRG Vote
SGA Should Permit Referendum
Both sides were at fault in Mon-
day's SGA meeting during the
debate over whether to allow a stu-
dent referendum on the establish-
ment of a Public Interest Research
Group at ECU. There were
technicalities and mumbled name
calling, but the issue itself is pretty
clear-cut: the referendum should
pass.
PIRG organizer Jay Stone
presented a bill to the legislature,
asking that they allow all ECU
students to vote next week on
whether or not they would like to
see a PIRG established at ECU,
and funded by an $2-per-semester
increase in student fees, which
could be refunded upon request.
The question is to be posed to
students on the SGA ballot next
week during executive officer elec-
tions.
The trouble was, Stone waited
until last night to present the bill,
when it could have been presented
any time this year. As a result, the
bill could not take time to go
through committee, but instead its
sponsor, legislator Glenn
Maughan, had to ask for a suspen-
sion of the legislature's rules to
have the bill voted on immediately.
The legislators voted not to sus-
pend the rules, thus the bill went to
committee, and cannot be acted
upon until next Monday � a tight
squeeze should it be approved for
the Wednesday ballot.
Suspension of the rules is no big
deal; it happens more weeks than
not in the legislature. Business is
routinely passed in that way. Trou-
ble came when some legislators
thought Stone had purposely
waited until the last minute to try to
ram the bill through before anyone
had a chance to really examine it.
Legislator Dennis Kilcoyne called it
"the most sneaky, underhanded
thing I've ever seen" in three years
of legislative experience. That was
hyperbole, but his point was taken.
Stone could have (and should
have for such an important issue)
prepared the bill sooner and
presented it in ample time. His
PIRG committee is disorganized
and understaffed to be sure, but
this was something they should
have given priority, for now the bill
is in jeopardy of not passing
because of a technicality and time
limits. They've had a year to get
ready, and Stone knew there would
be some opposition to the effort; he
shouldn't have given his opponents
extra ammo.
Still, there is a difference in slow
or disorganized preparation and a
"sneaky, underhanded" motive.
Stone spent a lot of time, and a
considerable amount of his own
money, preparing detailed packets
explaining PIRG and its funding
method, and handed them out to
the legislators. Such an effort to
make the issue clear doesn't seem
like he was trying to sneak anything
through.
Too, for those who claim Stone
was trying rush the issue before
anyone understood it, the
legislature's delay adds more to
that problem than Stone's efforts.
Because the bill must wait a week
and be approved only two days
before it goes to the student body,
students will have little time to ex-
amine the issue. If it had been ok'd
last night, there would have been
ten days to make information
available to students.
But, all nitpicking and name call-
ing aside, the legislature should re-
quire little debate on the issue. The
bill is a chance for students
themselves to voice their opinion
on an issue, and the legislature has
no business denying that.
Representative democracy is no
substitute for direct democracy.
Students opposing the referendum
are opposing PIRG, for they fear it
will be approved by students. But
are they really representing their
constituents when they claim to
speak for students, but won't let
students speak for themselves? In
fact, a legislator with his priorities
in the right place would welcome
finding out how constituents feel,
for then he can represent them, as
he was elected to do, not hide from
the majority opinion to pursue his
own political goals.
Again, it's cut and dried, clear
and simple: let the people vote
directly, expressing their opinion.
The resolution is non-binding
anyway � it just shows students'
feelings on the issue. Legislators
not interested in that are not
representing students, and
shouldn't be legislating for them.
How Khomeini Could
Re-Elect Ron Reagan
By DARRYL BROWN
There's a good argument that farfetched
hypotheticals are a waste of printer's ink,
but let's consider one anyway. You never
know.
What if: Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini,
follows through on his threat to block the
flow of oil through the Persian Gulf at the
Strait of Hormuz, cutting off the West's
vital supply of petroleum.
Then: Reagan will be re-elected.
The conclusion is a fairly simple one to
make. There is no way the United States
will tolerate an Iranian blockade in the
Persian Gulf, assuming for the moment
they can pull off an effective one. A U.S.
Naval task force already is stationed near
by in the Arabian Sea, and you can be sure
Reagan will send it in to break up the Ira-
nian stone wall.
The hitch is this: if Reagan could pull
off an effective, decisive victory (which
couldn't help but be reminiscent of
Grenada) there would be another ground-
swell of patriotic support for the
Republican incumbent, with the presiden-
tial election just around the corner.
Nothing speaks so well as success, and the
ariinsnisfTation could block out the press
for a couple of days to make things
look even better.
And this would be no simple Grenada
victory, whipping some little Caribbean
island the size of Raleigh where the
Cubans are building an airport. No, this
. would be sweet revenge, a gallant touche
against that same loathsome rival who
brought America to its knees in 1980. That
same Ayatollah who held America hostage
would be whipped, sent home with his tail
betwenn his legs, when he tried another
stunt against the red, white and blue.
Oh, the irony it would be, the inevitable
comparison. Picture Democrat Jimmy
Carter, impotent for 444 days against the
Iranian God-King, his only rescue attempt
a resounding failure in the dark, windy
desert � not even able to confront the
enemy. Four years later, the Ayatollah
tries to pull it off again against the swag-
gering, blustering California cowboy and
is stopped cold, his ships limping back to
port like Argentine vessels after two weeks
at sea with the British. It's a scenario sweet
enough to make a conservative's eyes
water. Reagan, riding high on a crest of
patriotic success right into Nov. 6!
America is back, and standing tall!
Forget it. It'll never happen. Go back to
sleep.
H� PROMJSEPME WE AMKAAPORSHP
TO THE COURT OF 51 JAME3,m
Candidates Do Can-Can
By DARRYL BROWN
Those of us in the media have had a
humbling (and humiliating) experience
in the last week or two with the ever
changing events of presidential politics.
Who would have thought we would see a
candidate who is almost a political
unknown come up from no where and
threaten the big shots with "new ideas"?
But that is precisely what has happen-
ed. What once seemed like a two-man
race with a few also-rans thrown in for
good measure has been turned upside
down, along with all our predictions.
Just a month ago, no one in this crazy
business of political journalism would
have thought the well-oiled political
organization of John Rainey could be
stopped in his bid for the presidency.
And the close second, and only real
threat, had to be Mark Niewald, presi-
dent of the RSA (Right Stuff Associa-
tion).
It looked flawless for Rainey. As the
only Greek running, he had the endorse-
ment of the AFL-GIO (Alpha Fly
Lamba-Gamma Iota Omega) and a
claim to the most experience, since he is
chairman of the Legislature's most
powerful committee, appropriations.
His slogan summed it up: "I have
enough fire in the belly. I am ready to be
president
In recent days he had even stopped at-
tacking other candidates and addressed
the incumbent Naso himself, saying that
-Campus Forum
when elected he would do away with
"voodoo decor a reference to Naso's
neo-Italian furnishings in the SGA of-
fices.
And Niewald was running strong too.
Seen around campus lately wearing a lot
of red, white and blue, he repeatedly
blasted Rainey as "the candidate of
special interests" and claimed only he
himself had shown courage and "laid
my life on the line for this campus" over
the quiet dorm issue.
Then of course there is the darkhorse
candidacy of Jay Brigel. He is by all
counts one of the best orators of our
time, but never even having held elected
office on campus, most people take his
candidacy as a drive to raise voter par-
ticipation among party animals.
(Remember that ringing line, "There's a
party train a comin but you got to
register to ride)
Then out of no where came Greg
Shelnutt. Making a call for "a new
generation of leadership Shelnutt's
underfinanced campaign run by a ragg-
ed crew from the art school seemed to be
going no where until the Jarvis dorm
caucus, where he scored a strong second
place showing, and the Fleming Hall
primary, where he pulled off a major
upset over Rainey.
Shelnutt first gathered real attention
in the presidential debate, where he
challenged Rainey to "name one time he
had disagreed with organized Greeks
Rainey's overly cautious, front-runner
style continued, and he evaded the ques-
tion, causing many voters to think he
was just the candidate of special in-
terests, in the pocket of big frats.
There is a question, too, of whether
AFL-GIO chief Glenn Conway can keep
the rank and file in line to vote for
Rainey. Shelnutt, with "Big Mo
momentum, behind him, seems to be
gathering strong support where once
Rainey seemed a shoo-in. "I like nis
beard said one sorority member about
Shelnutt. "I think if Kennedy had had a
beard, that's what it would have looked
like
The big test, of course, comes on what
is being called "Super Tuesday lhe
day all College Hill dormitories hold
primaries or caucuses. It's a battle of
Shelnutt's momentum versus Rainey's
organization, plus a last ditch effort by
the Niewald campaign to convince
voters he has "the right stuff to be
president. Brigel, too, is expected to do
well in areas such as Belk, which have a
high percentage of voting-age partiers.
The SGA Legislature, throughout the
whole event, has been rather quiet, giv-
ing an almost de facto endorsement to
its favorite son, Rainey. Speaker of tie
Legislature Kirk Shelley is obviously
pulling for his old crony to win the elec-
tion, for then he can graduate to that job
he has always secretly dreamed of, the
ambassadorship to Ireland.
Helms9 Record Easy To Knock
I was very surprised when Mr. Ipock
wrote that he's never heard an ar-
ticulate attack against Senator Helms
("Don't attack Sen. Jesse Helms
Feb. 28). Has he ever seen Sen. Helms'
voting record on environmental issues?
Sen. Helms is a walking environmen-
tal disaster! According to a 1982
League of Conservation Voters study,
Jesse was the only senator to vote anti-
environment each time on their list of
the fifteen most critical conservation
bills for 1982 (their 1983 study is soon
to be released).
These issues included bills pertaining
to soil conservation, mine safety, oil
and gas drilling in wilderness areas,
EPA research funding, hazardous
waste regulation, states rights to
regulate pesticides, water conservation,
coastal barrier protection, etc. As I'm
writing this, I'm afraid he's going to
ammend a vitally important N.C.
wilderness bill that was overwhelmingly
passed by the House of Represen-
tatives. (I hope I'm wrong!)
I appreciate Mr. Ipock's point of
view, but please don't nominate Jesse
Helms for sainthood until you look fur-
ther at his disasterous voting record on
environmental issues.
John Anema
Greenville
Mick's Enlightenment
Greatness does not often descend
upon a city the size of Greenville, which
is yet another reason that Mick LaSalle
stands out as just what ECU needed �
a secular deity.
As a film reviewer, Mick is infinitely
qualified by virtue of his outspoken
nature and sheer knowledge on the sub-
ject of films. His sheer knowledge on
the subject of women has been scream-
ingly apparent since his debut article on
An Officer and a Gentleman. Mick has
personality, which he combines charm-
ingly with wit in a way that certainly ap-
peals to the student masses.
Except, of course, for Barbara
Dobyns, who should probably take her
literal-minded, humorless ideals
straight to the National Organization
for Women. There, perhaps, she will
find comfort in the presence of others
who cannot handle the notion of men
being Men, as opposed to domesticated
wimps.
Kim Albin
Alumnus
English
Tobacco Facts Needed
I had an intelligent young man come
to visit this weekend. One could say
that he was a representative of the
tobacco industry. He said that his fami-
ly had made it big in tobacco.
He seemed to think that there was no
proof that tobacco caused cancer.
However, I have read that the heat
from the tobacco smoke breaks down
the lining of the protective covering of
the lung, thus making it easier for
foreign organisms to enter the lung.
However, we laymen could find out
what causes the death of our people if
we could get the state legislature to pass
a law making the death certificate more
detailed.
A more detailed death certificate
would also help the pharmaceutical
(companies) tell if some of their drugs
might be death traps instead of benefits
to mankind. I know of one drug com-
monly given for mental illness. The on-
ly thing is I have learned of at least
three persons who have shot themselves
while on this medication.
I wonder if this medication might br-
ing a person down out of the world of
unreality too fast? The first indication
that the medical profession had that
tobacco might be harmful to a person's
health was when they had a look at the
statistics on the death rate of WW I
soldiers.
Just because the tobacco industry
earns billions from selling cigarettes
gives them no more right to poison the
world than the fact that wars provide
jobs, thus giving the munitions industry
a license to kill off our young people.
A lot of money provided to the
military could be put into research (of)
new goods and processes which would
also provide new jobs. Right now
tomatoes are quite high priced, but I
have an idea for cutting the cost of
heating a green house that I think is
quite practical. I wonder if some day
science won't develop a process so that
trees can be slowed from blooming in
the early spring? Thus the price of fruit
won't go sky high because of frost
damage.
I wonder what makes people want to
be creative and inventive? Time
magazine thinks that men invent
because they are greedy. Mankind can
be quite inventive when they want to
use their invention to kill their fellow
man. Thus the air plane went from a
glorified kite in 1903 to a vehicle of
death in just a few short years.
I wonder if any school or university
has ever taught a course in the study of
patents and how to get a patent? The
fact that some patents sound crazy and
impractical doesn't mean that all inven-
tors are crazy.
I once had a dentist who was also a
pilot in WW II. He told me that he had
an idea that he went all the way to
Washington with and paid all the fees
necessary in order to do a patent search.
Sure enough, someone else had already
patented Doc's idea. But in this day and
age of computers, copiers, etc I see no
reason why patent research should be
costly or time consuming.
BUI J. Bloomer
Charlotte, N.C.
Forum Rules
TheEast
expressing ait
drop them by
South
Library
Thomas letters
of view. Mail or
off � the Old
�cross from
m i niKum'
Trespas
HARD!V,B S"P"EN
staff � nit
Crimes for the week
preceeding Spnng Break
WCT slightly above nor-
mal while crime during
spring break was down
There were no crimes
reported on March 9.
Many incidents were
caused b non-students
on campus There were
also a tew reports of van-
dalism to vehicles.
Alcohol related crimes
were near normal. One
student a as assaulted by
a thrown beer gj
Another student was ar-
rested for allowing
meone else to drive wl
impared The rep
from the ECL Police
Department's Daily Or-
fense and Arrest Log for
Feb. r thru March 11
are:
Feb. 27, 1:10 a.m. �
Jefferv L. Merrill of
40B Scott Hall and
Robert T. Finer of 407-A
Scott Hal! were found in
possession of stolen pro-
perty; 12:45 p.m � Eric
O. Stevens had his ID
card confiscated tor in-
terfering with an officer;
5 p m. � A female stu-
dent reported receiving
obscene
S 5 p.m
P
ver.
Bel Ha
p.m. -
env
;
Me
Center.
of (
summons
repc
goic J
286
Fee
Grc
fou-
Drama.
Bu
report (
car pan
Hali I
plaii
side
152
p.m �
nor
Re.
Building!
ma
Feb. :
The
Journa
Continued From Page 1
Mankiewicz will be
held Wed March 21 in
the main lobby of
Mendenhall, 11 to 12
a.m. The series will close
Wednesday nigh: with a
lecture by Mankiewicz on
"The Particular Uses of
Television and Other
Media in the General
Elec
in tt -
The
anc
T
Seminar
Chance
A: airs
The -
enla
bev
Former C

Dr. A.D. Frank, ECU
professor emeritus
history, who died Satur-
day at his retirement
home near Nashville.
Tenn coached East
Carolina's first worn,
basketball team to a
perfect record in its in-
augural season, 1933
Professor Frank, who
was a member and chair-
man of the ECTC athletic
committee. had
volunteered to coach
women's basketball
team. "The Ramble-
when President Ro
Wright gave perrn.ssjor.
dow
AssOQaJ

j
j
prer
cc -
iege
Echo.
pub
rjiard H
changes
e 1
to a
421 Greenv IteBtvd
Phone 756-0825
2Forl
Special
(Pizza ON)
Offer GoodTtv
Not Good With Any Other Specials
Buy One Pizza at Reco ar Pnce
Anc Get Another of Same . atue
Of Less FREE PCUl
DRAF
Tue. Mar. 13,
Adm $1.50
lOtDral
Coi
f t-i i �
!
Mj as
t-t;�V.





?
3tt?e Eaat (Eawlfcriatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. cw.w�ar
Darryl Brown, ��,�o,
Jennifer Jendrasiak. mm &, j.t. Pietrzak. nao, oa
Tina Maroschak, co-nt mu� Mike McPartland,
Ed Nicklas. spcns uitor Tom Norton, o, m
Gordon Ipock, ��, E,or Kathy Fuerst. mm�
Mark Barker, 0� m Mike Mayo, 7cw &����
March 13, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
PIRG Vote
SGA Should Permit Referendum
Both sides were at fault in Mon-
day's SGA meeting during the
debate over whether to allow a stu-
dent referendum on the establish-
ment of a Public Interest Research
Group at ECU. There were
technicalities and mumbled name
calling, but the issue itself is pretty
clear-cut: the referendum should
pass.
PIRG organizer Jay Stone
presented a bill to the legislature,
asking that they allow all ECU
students to vote next week on
whether or not they would like to
see a PIRG established at ECU,
and funded by an $2-per-semester
increase in student fees, which
could be refunded upon request.
The question is to be posed to
students on the SGA ballot next
week during executive officer elec-
tions.
The trouble was, Stone waited
until last night to present the bill,
when it could have been presented
any time this year. As a result, the
bill could not take time to go
through committee, but instead its
sponsor, legislator Glenn
Maughan, had to ask for a suspen-
sion of the legislature's rules to
have the bill voted on immediately.
The legislators voted not to sus-
pend the rules, thus the bill went to
committee, and cannot be acted
upon until next Monday � a tight
squeeze should it be approved for
the Wednesday ballot.
Suspension of the rules is no big
deal; it happens more weeks than
not in the legislature. Business is
routinely passed in that way. Trou-
ble came when some legislators
thought Stone had purposely
waited until the last minute to try to
ram the bill through before anyone
had a chance to really examine it.
Legislator Dennis Kilcoyne called it
"the most sneaky, underhanded
thing I've ever seen" in three years
of legislative experience. That was
hyperbole, but his point was taken.
Stone could have (and should
have for such an important issue)
prepared the bill sooner and
presented it in ample time. His
PIRG committee is disorganized
and understaffed to be sure, but
this was something they should
have given priority, for now the bill
is in jeopardy of not passing
because of a technicality and time
limits. They've had a year to get
ready, and Stone knew there would
be some opposition to the effort; he
shouldn't have given his opponents
extra ammo.
Still, there is a difference in slow
or disorganized preparation and a
"sneaky, underhanded" motive.
Stone spent a lot of time, and a
considerable amount of his own
money, preparing detailed packets
explaining PIRG and its funding
method, and handed them out to
the legislators. Such an effort to
make the issue clear doesn't seem
like he was trying to sneak anything
through.
Too, for those who claim Stone
was trying rush the issue before
anyone understood it, the
legislature's delay adds more to
that problem than Stone's efforts.
Because the bill must wait a week
and be approved only two days
before it goes to the student body,
students will have little time to ex-
amine the issue. If it had been ok'd
last night, there would have been
ten days to make information
available to students.
But, all nitpicking and name call-
ing aside, the legislature should re-
quire little debate on the issue. The
bill is a chance for students
themselves to voice their opinion
on an issue, and the legislature has
no business denying that.
Representative democracy is no
substitute for direct democracy.
Students opposing the referendum
are opposing PIRG, for they fear it
will be approved by students. But
are they really representing their
constituents when they claim to
speak for students, but won't let
students speak for themselves? In
fact, a legislator with his priorities
in the right place would welcome
finding out how constituents feel,
for then he can represent them, as
he was elected to do, not hide from
the majority opinion to pursue his
own political goals.
Again, it's cut and dried, clear
and simple: let the people vote
directly, expressing their opinion.
The resolution is non-binding
anyway � it just shows students'
feelings on the issue. Legislators
not interested in that are not
representing students, and
shouldn't be legislating for them.
How Khomeini Could
Re-Elect Ron Reagan
By DARRYL BROWN
There's a good argument that farfetched
hypotheticals are a waste of printer's ink,
but let's consider one anyway. You never
know.
What if: Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini,
follows through on his threat to block the
flow of oil through the Persian Gulf at the
Strait of Hormuz, cutting off the West's
vital supply of petroleum.
Then: Reagan will be re-elected.
The conclusion is a fairly simple one to
make. There is no way the United States
will tolerate an Iranian blockade in the
Persian Gulf, assuming for the moment
they can pull off an effective one. A U.S.
Naval task force already is stationed near
by in the Arabian Sea, and you can be sure
Reagan will send it in to break up the Ira-
nian stone wall.
The hitch is this: if Reagan could pull
off an effective, decisive victory (which
couldn't help but be reminiscent of
Grenada) there would be another ground-
swell of patriotic support for the
Republican incumbent, with the presiden-
tial election just around the corner.
Nothing speaks so well as success, and the
administration could block out the press
again for a couple of days to make things
look even better.
And this would be no simple Grenada
victory, whipping some little Caribbean
island the size of Raleigh where the
Cubans are building an airport. No, this
. would be sweet revenge, a gallant touche
against that same loathsome rival who
brought America to its knees in 1980. That
same Ayatollah who held America hostage
would be whipped, sent home with his tail
betwenn his legs, when he tried another
stunt against the red, white and blue.
Oh, the irony it would be, the inevitable
comparison. Picture Democrat Jimmy
Carter, impotent for 444 days against the
Iranian God-King, his only rescue attempt
a resounding failure in the dark, windy
desert � not even able to confront the
enemy. Four years later, the Ayatollah
tries to pull it off again against the swag-
gering, blustering California cowboy and
is stopped cold, his ships limping back to
port like Argentine vessels after two weeks
at sea with the British. It's a scenario sweet
enough to make a conservative's eyes
water. Reagan, riding high on a crest of
patriotic success right into Nov. 6!
America is back, and standing tall!
Forget it. It'll never happen. Go back to
sleep.
HHI!WLE PROMISEPMi THE AMBA5SAP0RSHP
TO THE CQURTQF 51 JAMES.TPQ
Candidates Do Can-Can
By DARRYL BROWN
Those of us in the media have had a
humbling (and humiliating) experience
in the last week or two with the ever
changing events of presidential politics.
. Who would have thought we would see a
candidate who is almost a political
unknown come up from no where and
threaten the big shots with "new ideas"?
But that is precisely what has happen-
ed. What once seemed like a two-man
race with a few also-rans thrown in for
good measure has been turned upside
down, along with all our predictions.
Just a month ago, no one in this crazy
business of political journalism would
have thought the well-oiled political
organization of John Rainey could be
stopped in his bid for the presidency.
And the close second, and only real
threat, had to be Mark Niewald, presi-
dent of the RSA (Right Stuff Associa-
tion).
It looked flawless for Rainey. As the
only Greek running, he had the endorse-
ment of the AFL-GIO (Alpha Fly
Lamba-Gamma Iota Omega) and a
claim to the most experience, since he is
chairman of the Legislature's most
powerful committee, appropriations.
His slogan summed it up: "I have
enough fire in the belly. I am ready to be
president
In recent days he had even stopped at-
tacking other candidates and addressed
the incumbent Naso himself, saying that
-Campus Forum
when elected he would do away with
"voodoo decor a reference to Naso's
neo-Italian furnishings in the SGA of-
fices.
And Niewald was running strong too.
Seen around campus lately wearing a lot
of red, white and blue, he repeatedly
blasted Rainey as "the candidate of
special interests" and claimed only he
himself had shown courage and "laid
my life on the line for this campus" over
the quiet dorm issue.
Then of course there is the darkhorse
candidacy of Jay Bngel. He is by all
counts one of the best orators of our
time, but never even having held elected
office on campus, most people take his
candidacy as a drive to raise voter par-
ticipation among party animals.
(Remember that ringing line, "There's a
party train a comin, but you got to
register to ride)
Then out of no where came Greg
Shelnutt. Making a call for "a new
generation of leadership Shelnutts
underfinanced campaign run by a ragg-
ed crew from the art school seemed to be
going no where until the Jams dorm
caucus, where he scored a strong second
place showing, and the Fleming Hall
primary, where he pulled off a major
upset over Rainey.
Shelnutt first gathered real attention
in the presidential debate, where he
challenged Rainey to "name one time he
had disagreed with organized Greeks
Rainey's overly cautious, front-runner
style continued, and he evaded the ques-
tion, causing many voters to think he
was just the candidate of special in-
terests, in the pocket of big frats.
There is a question, too, of whether
AFL-GIO chief Glenn Conway can keep
the rank and file in line to vote for
Rainey. Shelnutt, with "Big Mo
momentum, behind him, seems to be
gathering strong support where once
Rainey seemed a shoo-in. "I like his
beard said one sorority member about
Shelnutt. "I think if Kennedy had had a
beard, that's what it would have looked
like
The big test, of course, comes on what
is being called "Super Tuesday the
day all College Hill dormitories hold
primaries or caucuses. It's a battle of
Shelnutt's momentum versus Rainey's
organization, plus a last ditch effort oy
the Niewald campaign to convince
voters he has "the right stuff to "be
president. Brigel, too, is expected to do
well in areas such as Belk, which have a
high percentage of voting-age partien
The SGA Legislature, throughout the
whole event, has been rather quiet, giv-
ing an almost de facto endorsement to
its favorite son, Rainey. Speaker of the
Legislature Kirk Shelley is obviously
pulling for his old crony to win the elec-
tion, for then he can graduate to that job
he has always secretly dreamed of, the
ambassadorship to Ireland.
Helms' Record Easy To Knock
I was very surprised when Mr. Ipock
wrote that he's never heard an ar-
ticulate attack against Senator Helms
("Don't attack Sen. Jesse Helms
Feb. 28). Has he ever seen Sen. Helms
voting record on environmental issues?
Sen. Helms is a walking environmen-
tal disaster! According to a 1982
League of Conservation Voters study,
Jesse was the only senator to vote anti-
environment each time on their list of
the fifteen most critical conservation
bills for 1982 (their 1983 study is soon
to be released).
These issues included bills pertaining
to soil conservation, mine safety, oil
and gas drilling in wilderness areas,
EPA research funding, hazardous
waste regulation, states rights to
regulate pesticides, water conservation,
coastal barrier protection, etc. As I'm
writing this, I'm afraid he's going to
ammend a vitally important N.C.
wilderness bill that was overwhelmingly
passed by the House of Represen-
tatives. (I hope I'm wrong!)
I appreciate Mr. Ipock's point of
view, but please don't nominate Jesse
Helms for sainthood until you look fur-
ther at his disasterous voting record on
environmental Issues.
John Anema
Greenville
Mick's Enlightenment
Greatness does not often descend
upon a city the size of Greenville, which
is yet another reason that Mick LaSalle
stands out as just what ECU needed �
a secular deity.
As a film reviewer, Mick is infinitely
qualified by virtue of his outspoken
nature and sheer knowledge on the sub-
ject of films. His sheer knowledge on
the subject of women has been scream-
ingly apparent since his debut article on
An Officer and a Gentleman. Mick has
personality, which he combines charm-
ingly with wit in a way that certainly ap-
peals to the student masses.
Except, of course, for Barbara
Dobyns, who should probably take her
literal-minded, humorless ideals
straight to the National Organization
for Women. There, perhaps, she will
find comfort in the presence of others
who cannot handle the notion of men
being Men, as opposed to domesticated
wimps.
Kim Albin
Alumnus
English
Tobacco Facts Needed
I had an intelligent young man come
to visit this weekend. One could say
that he was a representative of the
tobacco industry. He said that his fami-
ly had made it big in tobacco.
He seemed to think that there was no
proof that tobacco caused cancer.
However, I have read that the heat
from the tobacco smoke breaks down
the lining of the protective covering of
the lung, thus making it easier for
foreign organisms to enter the lung.
However, we laymen could find out
what causes the death of our people if
we could get the state legislature to pass
a law making the death certificate more
detailed.
A more detailed death certificate
would also help the pharmaceutical
(companies) tell if some of their drugs
might be death traps instead of benefits
to mankind. I know of one drug com-
monly given for mental illness. The on-
ly thing is I have learned of at least
three persons who have shot themselves
while on this medication.
I wonder if this medication might br-
i g a person down out of the world of
unreality too fast? The first indication
that the medical profession had that
tobacco might be harmful to a person's
health was when they had a look at the
statistics on the death rate of WW I
soldiers.
Just because the tobacco industry
earns billions from selling cigarettes
gives them no more right to poison the
world than the fact that wars provide
jobs, thus giving the munitions industry
a license to kill off our young people.
A lot of money provided to the
military could be put into research (of)
new goods and processes which would
also provide new jobs. Right now
tomatoes are quite high priced, but I
have an idea for cutting the cost of
heating a green house that I think is
quite practical. I wonder if some day
science won't develop a process so that
trees can be slowed from blooming in
the early spring? Thus the price of fruit
won't go sky high because of frost
damage.
I wonder what makes people want to
be creative and inventive? Time
magazine thinks that men invent
because they are greedy. Mankind can
be quite inventive when they want to
use their invention to kill their fellow
man. Thus the air plane went from a
glorified kite in 1903 to a vehicle of
death in just a few short years.
I wonder if any school or university
has ever taught a course in the study of
patents and how to get a patent? The
fact that some patents sound crazy and
impractical doesn't mean that all inven-
tors are crazy.
I once had a dentist who was also a
pilot in WW II. He told me that he had
an idea that he went all the way to
Washington with and paid all the fees
necessary in order to do a patent search.
Sure enough, someone else had already
patented Doc's idea. But in this day and
age of computers, copiers, etc I see no
reason why patent research should be
costly or time consuming.
Bill J. Bloomer
Charlotte, N.C.
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing ail points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, .cross from Joy�
Library. "
Trespas
HARDIV STEPHEN
Crimes for the week
preceeding Spring Break
ere slightly above nor-
mal while crime during
spring break was down.
There were no crimes
reported on March 9.
Many incidents were
caused b non-students
on campus. There were
also a lew reports of van-
dalism to vehicles.
Alcohol related crimes
ere near normal. One
student was assaulted by
a thrown beer glass.
Another student was ar-
rested tor allowing so-
meone else to drive while
impared. The rep.
from the ECU Police
Department' Dailv Of-
fense and Arrest Log for
Feb. 27 thru March 11
are:
Feb. 27, 1:10 a.m. �
Jefferv L. Merrill of
�0-B Scott Hall and
Robert T. Piner of 40A
Scott Hall were found in
possession of stolen pro-
perty 12:45 p.m. � Eric
O. Stevens had his ID
card confiscated for in-
terfering with an officer;
5 p.m. � A female stu-
dent reported receiving
Journa
Continued From Page 1
Mankiewic will be
held Wed March 21 in
the main lobby of
MendenhaL, 11 to 12
a.m. The series will close
Wednesday night with a
lecture by Mankiewicz on
"The Particular Uses of
Television and Other
Media in the General
Elec
in w -
The ent
and opei
The
Seminar
sponson
Chancel i
X1TS
The sq
enlarge
bevend
Former C
ECt Nr��
Dr. A.D. Frank. ECU
professor emeritus of
history, who died Satur-
day at Jus retirement
home near Nashville.
Tenn coachec East
Carolina's first women's
basketball team to a
perfect record in its" in-
augural season, 1933.
Professor Frank, who
was a member and chair-
man of the ECTC athletic
committee. had
volunteered to coach the
women's basketball
team, "The Ramblers
when President Robert
Wright gave permission
for its o
den; �
W a m e 1
Associa;
tear
cerr.
disp I
act
A
ece m
Echo. Dj
coui 1
change
vea:
to a one'
421 Greenville Bivcs
Phone 750825
2 For 1
Special
(Pizza Only)
Offer Good Thru v.
Not Gooa With Any Othe Specials
Buy One zza at Reoc.ar Price
And Get Another o Same Value
OrLesaFREE ECU I
DRAF
Tue. Mar. 13,
Adm $1.50
lOtDra
Coi
3 . � -t -�- ��- .? T' .
m m wnimmlmim m �i"n�i�'
i mmnwH'i ,i � in i tnm
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to
k �
X.VH SjS�,

an
cautious, front-runner
he evaded the ques-
voters to think he
late of special in-
big frats.
too, of whether
n Conway can keep
:ie in line to vote for
i th 'Big Mo
�hind him. seems to be
- .rr Ml where once
"I like his
nember about
Bni � Kennedy had had a
it would have looked
i ' course, :omes on what
Super Tuesday the
i Hill dormitories hold
ises. It's a battle of
entum versus Rainey's
a last ditch effort by
campaign to convince
the right stuff to be
let, too, is expected to do
Vh as Belk, which have a
k of voting-age partiers.
Krislature. throughout the
a- been rather quiet, giv-
�acto endorsement to
Rainey Speaker of the
ik Shelley is obviously
jold crony to win the elec-
e can graduate to that job
secretly dreamed of, the
Ir to Ireland.
ock
the munitions industry
! off our young people,
jioney provided to the
put into research (of)
processes which would
Inew jobs. Right now
juite high priced, but I
Jfor cutting the cost of
In house that I think is
I wonder if some day
jlevelop a process so that
owed from blooming in
.? Thus the price of fruit
nigh because of frost
lat makes people want to
and inventive? Time
iks that men invent
re g cedy. Mankind can
tive when they want to
mon to kill their fellow
air plane went from a
in 1903 to a vehicle of
few short years.
any school or university
a course in the study of
)w to get a patent? The
patents sound crazy and
sn't mean that all inven-
dentist who was also a
He told me that he had
e went all the way to
ith and paid all the fees
Ider to do a patent search.
pomeone else had already
idea. But in this day and
trs, ropiers, etc I see no
itent research should be
consuming.
Bill J. Bloomer
Charlotte, N.C.
im Rules
Yoilman welcomes letters
points of view. Mail or
our office in the Old
ftg, across from Joyner
Trespassers
JHEEASTCAROLIMAN MARCH 13. 194 5
HARDINC STEPHEN obscene teiephone ca�s.
5:45 p.m. - A report of
wmmwmm
Crimes for the week
preceeding Spring Break
were slightly above nor-
mal while crime during
spring break was down
There were no crimes
reported on March 9.
Many incidents were
caused by non-students
on campus. There were
also a few reports of van-
dalism to vehicles
Alcohol related crimes
were near normal. One
student was assaulted by
a thrown beer glass.
Another student was ar-
rested for allowing so-
meone else to drive while
impared. The reports
from the ECU Police
Department's Daily Of-
fense and Arrest Log for
Feb. 27 thru March 11
are:
Feb. 27, 1:10 a.m. -
Jeffery L. Merritt of
407-B Scott Hall and
Robert T. Piner of 407-A
Scott Hall were found in
possession of stolen pro-
perty; 12:45 p.m. � Eric
O. Stevens had his ID
card confiscated for in-
terfering with an officer;
5 p.m. � A female stu-
dent reported receiving
possible vandalizing to a
vending machine in the
Belk Hall canteen; 8:45
curfew door of Cotten
Hall; Russell Edward
Manning of Washington,
NC was arrested for
DWI; 1.35 a.m. - a
east side of Green Hall
was found removed; 9
a.m. � Person(s)
unknown were found to
P.m. - A report of the ApVcXput Tnoom ������
larceny of a gameboard 331 of AusSn; 9:24� ttSttSfj
o7AnrveePOmMthe,arCCny Um$tCad H" a.m
of five IBM computer - A curfew door was
disks and notebook found vandalized? 709
holder from room 119 of
Rawl;
Crime
tabletop from
Mendenhall Student
Center; 9:30 p.m. �
William Thomas Mason
of 6C Pirate's Landing
was served three criminal
summons for worthless
checks; 10:45 p.m. � A
report of the larceny of a
gold bracelet from room
286 Aycock Hall.
Feb. 28, 10:30 a.m. �
Richard Earl Finch of
Greenville, NC was
found wandering through
Drama, Speight, Nurs-
ing, and Austin
Buildings; 6.12 p.m. � A
report of vandalism to a
car parked in the metered
zone next to Clement
Hall; 10:50 p.m.� Com-
plaint of loud noise out-
side the window of room
152 Fleming Hall; 11:35
p.m. � The lock on the
north double doors of the
Recital Hall in the Music
Building was reported
malfunctioning.
Feb. 29, 2:30 a.m. �
The ventilator grill on the
3:30 p.m. � A
report of the larceny of a
watch and $10 cash from
a locker in Memorial
Gym; 4:30 p.m. � A ven-
ding machine was
reported unsecured and
items stolen; 5:53 p.m. �
A report of the larceny of
a jacket from the closet
of room 309 of Umstead
Hall; 6:02 p.m. � A
report of a possible fight
a.m. � Glen A. Geist of
230-A Belk Hall and
several football players
were reported causing a
report of vandalism to a
vehicle north of Minges
Coliseum; 12 noon � A
report of the larceny to
two slide projector
remote controls from
room 2N-86 of the Brody
Building; 5:15 p.m. �
George Green of Green-
ville, NC was arrested for
Daniels, Michael G.
Anderson, and Randy J.
Norris, all of Farmville
were banned from cam-
pus for suspicious activi-
ty.
March 4, 12:03 a.m. �
Christopher A. King of
Kinston, NC was banned
from
floor of Belk Hall; 9:40 Hopkins, last
a.m. � A report of the White Hall-
larceny of the hubcaps
from a car in the 14th and
Elm Street freshman
parking lot; 3 p.m. � A
report of the larceny of
the hubcaps from another
car in the 14th and Elm
v campus for
trespassing southeast of suspicious activity 450
White Hall; 11 p.m. - p.m. - Jimmy Earl
The Greenville Police Speight of Greenville was 2 5a" Ha wa
Department reauest arrtPH f�r . reported malfunctioning.
.eques. a.res.ed for trespassing March 6, 4:10 a m -A
and entering and larceny
of several lockers in the
mens locker room at
Memorial Gym; 7:30
p.m. � A report of van-
dalism to the window
glass in the stairwell bet-
ween first and second
floors of Garrett dorm;
11:30 p.m. � The
southwest curfew door in
Flanagan Hall was
floor of u, Hal 40 Hopkins" taWEj ZSrSSSSr of vandaJ,sm ,� a
- .7 ���- �" ��a in me jnn and Him
ou.s,de Memorial Gyn Street freshman parkin�
6.15 � The glass from lot
the fire alarm box near
the Jones Hall basement
was found broken out;
10:07 p.m. � Cynthia
Wright of 309 Tyler Hall
and Dwayne Stover,
USMC, were reported
having a domestic dispute
which was settled among
themselves.
March 1, 12:05 a.m. �
A report of a suspicious
person at the southeast
March 2, 1 a.m.
seen near
The blue
light phone northeast of
Tyler dorn was reported
malfunctioning.
March 3, 1:15 a.m. �
John V. Caggiano, Brian
E. Morrill, David F.
Wagner, and Tracy P
Duval all of Camp Le-
juene were banned from
campus for suspicious ac
being forbidden to come
on campus; James Earl
Smith of Greenville was
banned from campus;
11:20 p.m. � Rachel
Emily Pope of Raleigh,
NC was arrested for a
stop sign violation.
March 5, 2:20 a.m. � A
ronnr( - j ' iuuuu unauinon;
report of damage to a car Minges Coliseum;
Tp�dA u�a, d T , wu"l'U! Ior suspicious ac-
Snow HH1 Vwkman �f !vity near �� Hall;
miow Hill, NC was ar- 11:19 p.m. - Charles t!
rested for DWI; 1:57
a.m. � Barbara Partin of
823 Tyler reported being
assulted by a glass of beer
thrown by John L. Mark
McDonald of 141
Aycock; 2 a.m. � A
Walston, Randy K
east of College Hill
Drive. 1:30 p.m. � A
report to vandalism to a
vehicle on Campus Drive;
A report of the breaking
stop sign and post nor-
thwest of Messick
Theatre Arts Center; 5:30
p.m. � A report of the
glass broken out of a win-
dow at the Aycock Hall
Canteen; 6:00 p.m. �
Four black males were
found unauthorized in
10:11
p.m. � The alarm in the
Student Supply Store was
reported activated.
March 7, 2:50 a.m. �
The padlock was reported
missing from the cour-
tyard gate of Garrett
Hall; 5:00 p.m. �
Charles Blackwell of 386
Aycock Hall was
reported acting in a
suspicious manner north
of Aycock HaJl; 6:15
p.m. � A report that Of-
fice A-20 at Minges Col-
iseum was unsecured;
8:30 p.m. � Randolph
Powers was seen entering
Graham Building
through a window.
March 8, 1:30 a.m. �
Pamela Peede Tvson of
WUhanston, NC was ar-
rested for DWI; Robert
Scott Rollins of Green-
ville was arrested for
allowing a DWI; 10:53
p.m. � A report that Of-
fice A-20 at Minges Col-
iseum was unsecured;
11:30 p.m. � The door
to the Mendenhall
Cafeteria was reported
unsecured.
'Lauch' Faircloth Speaks To SGA
report of a
room 141
Hall; 10:08
Journalist Lectures
CnntinnaA r�n Tt� Flf�rtirn of IQfil" �? a.nn j
beer keg in
of Aycock
a.m. � A
By DARRYL BROWN
Maaagiag E4Hor
Continued From Page 1
Mankiewicz will be
held Wed March 21 in
the main lobby of
Mendenhall, 11 to 12
a.m. The series will close
Wednesday night with a
lecture by Mankiewicz on
"The Particular Uses of
Television and Other
Media in the General
Election of 1984" at 8:00
in Wright Auditorium.
The entire series is free
and open to the public.
The Spring Lecture-
Seminar Series at ECU is
sponsored by the Vice
Chancellor for Academic
Affairs Angelo Volpe.
The series attempt to
enlarge students' views
beyond the classroom
and are primarily for
students, said Dr. John
Ebbs, English professor
andchairman of the
Series Arrangement
Committee.
Since this is an election
year, said Ebbs, we
wanted someone who had
been involved with elec-
tions and could speak
about them. Ebbs ex-
pressed his hope that
every student take advan-
tage of this opportunity
to expand their
knowledge on this sub-
ject, and in a way were
obligated to do so if they
had any intention of
voting in 1984.
On a platform of jobs, educa-
tion improvements and the con-
tainment of state government,
?"?? �� Commerce Secretary business
D. M. Lauch" Faircloth spoke
to the SGA Legislature Monday
night during a campaign swing
through Eastern North Carolina.
Faircloth, a Democratic can-
didate for governor, emphasized
his record as commerce secretary
under Gov. James B. Hunt Jr
saying he brought 180,000 new
jobs to the state while in office.
"The most important thing fac-
ing you today is jobs
Faircloth told the student govern-
ment in his 30-minute talk. He
claimed that according to national
rankings, North Carolina is first
or second in the entire nation as a
place to live and a place to do
He said high technology in-
dustries offer the state many "good
jobs for citizens, refuting claims
that they provide only a few
highly technical positions in the
Research Triangle Park.
Faircloth also called for im-
provements in public education
based on pay hikes for teachers
which he said could be provided
through growth in state revenues
He claimed the state's revenue is
� �� �ia:anjuii, aouui mem. t
Former Coach Dies
growing at a rate of 10.5 percent a
year, and the General Assembly
will have $260 million in addi-
tional revenue with which to in-
crease teacher salaries in June.
Stressing an issue not heard
much in gubernatorial campaign
Faircloth said "we've got to stop
the growth of state government.
He said expanding government
programs are making North
Carolinians "spread our-elves so
thin that we cannot meet' existing
obligations to citizens.
"When I leave office as eover-
nor, there will be no more" state
employees than there were the da
I got there Faircloth said
i Sew Brd-
Dr. A.D. Frank, ECU
professor emeritus of
history, who died Satur-
day at his retirement
home near Nashville.
Tenn coached East
Carolina's first women's
basketball team to a
perfect record in its in-
augural season, 1933.
Professor Frank, who
was a member and chair-
man of the ECTC athletic
committee, had
volunteered to coach the
women's basketball
team, "The Ramblers
when President Robert
Wright gave permission
for its organization.
A year earlier, Presi-
dent Wright had turned
down a request by the
Women's Athletic
Association to form a
team because of his con-
cern that it might appear
unseemly for a public
display of such boisterous
activity by college girls
preparing to be teachers.
According to the col-
lege newspaper,Teco
Echo, Dr. Wright said he
could not permit it "until
public sentiment in
regard to such activities
"The Ramblers"
coached by Frank
defeated teams from
Chowan and Wingate
Colleges and the YWCA
team from Rocky Mount,
and posted a perfect 6-0
season record.
President Wright was
so impressed that a week
before his death he pro-
mised continuing support
for the women's inter-
collegiate athletic pro-
gram at East Carolina.
He also announced at
chapel that day that
henceforth women
-ant Ml To Mn
ftcut Tiinj lit
�urn i? i�4
chan �� th- f�7i � ucut;crorin women
changes. The following students would no loneer
' oweverhf agreed be required to wear nfts
to a one year trial season, when going downwn
421 Greenville Blvd
Phone 756-0825
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n

THE EAST CAROIINIAN
Entertainment
MA.K( H i y4 k4f �
Warner Brothers Pre-Releases Film
Campus selected
for special
screening of
"Police Academy
before film's
commercial
release.
Warner Brothers has selected
the ECU campus for a pre-release
screening of the movie Police
Academy. This lively farce will be
shown Sunday, March 18 at 8
p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
The premise of Police Academy
is established at the outset of the
film. The lady mayor of a promi-
nent American city decides to
abandon all restrictions when it
comes to eligibility for joining the
police department. No longer are
there to be any special re-
quirements with regard to age,
sex, race, weight, height or educa-
tional background. As a result,
the floodgates are opened to a
flock of recruits whose motives
for enrolling are as questionable
as their fitness for the job. It is a
policy which elicits contempt and
disgust from the established force,
particularly those police officers
assigned as instructors to whip the
recruits into shape.
Police Academy concerns itself
particularly with the struggles of
Carey Mahoney (Steve Gut-
tenberg), a parking lot attendant
whose retaliatory treatment of an
obstreperous customer results in
his facing prison.
Fortunately, because
Mahoney's father was a
policeman, he is provided with an
alternative � go to the Police
Academy and become a cop
himself.
Carey does so grudgingly.
Knowing he can't quit the
Academy without landing behind
bars, he is determined to get
himself kicked out.
The police brass, however, led
by mealy-mouthed Commandent
Lassard (George Gaynes), deter-
mines not to overtly offend
Madam Mayor by the expulsion
Bubba Smith is all business behind the wheel of a police cruiser.
of a single candidate. Lassard slv-
ly suggests to instructor Harris
(G.W. Baily) and Callahan, a lady
sergeant (Leslie Easterbrook),
that they put the screws to the new
recruits and provoke them into
quiting.
Carey is, of course, unaware
that this is the modus operandi of
his instructors which leads him in-
to a double bind: the more he acts
up in an effort to be given the
heave-ho, the more pressure is ex-
erted to get him to walk out on his
own, an act which would lead to
his incarceration.
Although there are several
dropouts during the training
period, other recruits also show
surprising stamina in the face of
the rigors forced on them bv Har-
ris and Callahan.
Those who stay include:
� Karen Thompson (Kim Cat-
trail), the attractive daughter of a
wealthy socialite who, bored with
the postures and posings of the
rich, wants to find a little action
among real people, her presence
providing Carey with a bright spot
in the intolerable existence he is
forced to tolerate.
� Moses Hightower (Bubba
Smith), a gentle giant of a man
who, having decided life as a
florist smells, seeks in police work
a career more in keeping with his
massive frame, if not his sensitive
nature.
� Dr. Monsignor Larvelle Jones
(Michael Winslow) who displays
an uncanny taJent for using his
voice to mimic mechanical noises
r
I
Sergeant Callahan gives a recruit a smiple lesson in
self defense.
ST���ZT' ,on"w f"ukockey nnd ��- - � ���� n�i
of every variety, making him a
human sound effects system with
unpredictable and hilarious
results.
� Leslie Barbara (Donovon
Scott) who joined the police force
to avenge a gang attack on the
drive-up photo booth at which he
was employed before said gang
chucked the booth in the river
with the luckless Barbara still in-
side.
Jorge Martin (Andrew
Rubin), a Latino lover who scores
so often he has stopped keeping
score and whose amorous antics
know no limits, not even the
women's barricks.
Douglas Fackler (Bruce
Maher) who feels he can over-
come all obstacles if he can only
peel his wife off the hood of his
car.
Laverne Hooks (Marion
Ramsey) who has a timidity pro-
blem that keeps her speaking
barely above a whisper.
Eugene Tackleberry (David
Graf) who believes that maybe a
man can be too rich or too thin.
but he can never be too paranoid.
Both in the writing and in the
performance, director Hugh
Wilson worked toward the kind of
sharply delineated characteriza-
tions that had been his hallmark
on the highly successful "WKRP
In Cincinnati" television series.
The spectacular stunt work seen
in Police Academy is credited to a
team under the guidance of Joe
Dunne, whose skill delighted au-
diences in six Pink Panther pro-
ductions and who achieves two
firsts in this film. One involves a
horse's rear quarters and the other
a two-wheeled parking job of a
Trans-Am, both moving viola-
tions extraordinaire.
This special pre-release screen-
ing is, of course, free for all ECU
students.
Kagemusha' Wednesday Film,
'Holy Grail' Set For Weekend
By GORDON IPOCK
imam Editor
This should be an enjoyable
week for movie goers. Two superb
films ar�- slated for Hendrix:
Kagemusha and Monty Python
and the Holy Grail.
Pianist Anton Kuerti
?
On Tuesday, March 13 at 8 p.m Hendrix
Theatre will come alive with the music of pianist
Anton Kuerti.
With the release of his complete Beethoven
Sonatas on ColumbiaOdyssey, Kuerti's status as
one of the most extraordinarily creative per-
formers in music today" (Toronto Star) has again
been reaffirmed. But Kuerti is not just a
"Beethoven specialist his repertoire includes 35
concerti by 12 composers, and his recordings of
Chopin, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Scriabin and
others have been called "unsurpassable indeed" bv
High Fidelity. y
Born in Vienna, Kuerti soon emigrated to the
United States and studied with such eminent musi-
cians as Arthur Loeser, Mieczyslaw Horszowski
and Rudolf Serkin. He was just 11 when he played
his first important concert, the Grieg Concerto
with Arthur Fiedler. He shot to prominence a few
years later when he won the famous Leventritt
Award. Since then he has toured 25 countries and
performed with most of North America's most
famous conductors and orchestras including Azell
and the Cleveland Orchestra, Ormandy and the
Philadelphia Orchestra, Steinberg and the Pitt-
sburg Orchestra, the New York Philharmonic and
the orchestras of San Francisco, St. Louis, Denver
and Honolulu. He has given recitals and music per-
formances from coast to coast and is heard regular-
ly on CBS radio and television (in Canada) not on-
ly as a pianist, but also as a commentator, conduc-
tor and composer.
Tickets are available at the Central Ticket Of-
fice, Mendenhall Student Center. Prices are $2 50
for ECU students, $3.50 for youth age 14 and
under and $7.50 for ECU faculty and staff and the
public. All tickets are $7.50 at the door.
Wednesday evening's film,
Kagemusha, is a tale set in mid-
16th century Japan. Three com-
peting warlords battle for
domination and in the process lay
waste to much of the countryside.
Shingen Takeda, the strongest
warlord, is killed by a sniper's
bullet. His followers discover
Kagemusha, a petty thief who is
about to be crucified. Kagemusha
bears a striking resemblence to the
fallen warlord, and Takeda's
followers devise a plan to salvage
their positions. They spare
Kagemusha and place him upon
the throne as a surrogate, fearing
attack from their enemies if they
discover their warlord's death.
The name Kagemusha
translates into "shadow of the
warrior and much of the film
centers around Kagemusha's
evolution into a real leader.
Gradually he grows in strength
and grandeur until he is no longer
impersonating the fallen warlord
� he becomes a warlord in his
own right.
There is also the sub-plot of
Takeda's son who struggles to
claim the throne of his father, the
throne that the former thief
Kagemusha now sits upon and the
son feels belongs to him. At first,
this makes for a complex plot that
is difficult to follow with the
Japanese subtitles. Actor Tatsuya
Nakadai plays both the warlord
Takeda and Kagemusha, so it
make take a few minutes for the
viewer to sort things out.
But even if one ignores the plot
and the subtitles, Kagemusha is
still a rich film. The panoramic
battle scenes where masses of war-
ring foot soldiers and horsemen
clash are spectacular, and the
shots of Japanese court life are a
feast for the eyes as well. There
are 160 minutes of visual splendor
in this epic tale of survival.
The legendary Japanese film
maker Akira Kurosawa Severn
Samuri) directed Kagemusha. He
completed the film in 1980 at age
70, and it shared the Grand Prize
at the Cannes Film Festival that
year with All That Jazz. Savs the
New York Times: "There is beau-
ty in Kagemusha, but it is imper-
sonal, distant and ghostly. The
old master has never been more
rigorous
Coming on the heels of this
serious Japanese drama is a
lunatic British comedy. Monty
Python and the Holy Grail is Hen-
drix Theatre's feature film this
weekend. The film is irreverent
British comedy at its best by the
unpredictable comedy troupe of
Monty Python's Flying Circus.
This collection of non-stop gags
was written by the group and
directed by members Terry
Gilliam and Terry Jones.
It is a farcical takeoff on the
tales of King Arthur, particularly
the segment dealing with the quest
for the holy grail. Nothing is safe
from parody in this film, and the
gags are constant. For example, in
order to get into the enemy's cas-
tle, Arthur's men build a Trojan
rabbit. When the plan proves a
flop, Arthur doesn't yell retreat,
he calls out, "Run away Back
in the comfort of Camelot, rather
than singing of his victories, Ar-
thur's minstrel sings of his most
humiliating defeats. And we are
constantly hit over the head with
such odd-ball phrases as "The
Holy Hand Grenade of Antioch
Monty Python and the Holy
Grail should have you rolling out
of your seat with laughter.
Lincoln
Virtuoso
A juxtaposition of the
world's finest musical
personalities whose whole
is greater than the sum of
its parts is coming to East
Carolina Universit) m the
form of the Chamber
Music Society of Lincoln
Center The performance
will be held Mondav
March 19 at 8 p.rr.
Hendrix Theatre
"The musical succt
story of the generation,
according to the
York Times esteemed
Harold Schonberg, is the
Chamber Music Soaet)
of Lincoln Center which
Ha.
ore;
VA&i
no
Their dress b formal, but
Theatre.
Fletcher
By GORDON IPOCK
The upcoming wee,
promises to be a :
for music lovers
friends of the Schoc
Music. Three mus
performances
scheduled in the A
Fletcher Recital Hall.
Chamber Music
On Wednesdav. Mar.
14 at 8:15 p.m. a faculty
chamber music recital is
scheduled. Ante
Dalapas, soprano, is the
vocalist. She will be
cd by fellow facu
members David Haw
on oboe. Bnan
Schweickhardt on
Ms
Lied
Frank Hoi
Dance Co
Comes To
With Kagemusha director Kurosawa
back to feudal Japan.
takes us oo an exotic adveatare
The Frank Holder
Dance Company has been
making waves around the
world as one of the hot
test young dance com-
panies in .America. The
Greensboro-based troupe
of seven dancers will
retrun to ECU this Thurs-
day, March 15 for an 8:15
evening performance at
McGinnis Theatre.
The companv was
founded in 1973 by
dancer and
choreographer Frank
Holder. Now in its 10th
season, the company con-
tinues to make dance
more accessible to
children and adults
throughout the country.
To make certain that all
�f their audiences get
something of value and
tertainment from the
company's public and in-
jchool performances, its
repertoire is varied, rang-
lnS from classical to
�hstract and from comic
to lyric.
Th
Dare
much
dan.
work
yooaa
has a
abou;
only
their
each
with
and
win!
light
Holdi
danci
audiej
herak
a
deligl
Ticl
concei
Centrl
Men,
Cenu
$5,001
$7.fJ0
and
ECU
the pi
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mr. a rity cops? Find
to a
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au-
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lves a
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b of a
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Circus.
r gags
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and the
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: gs of his most
And we are
the head with
phrases as "The
irenade of Antioch
thon and the Holy
hae you rolling out
laughter.
Iibii
11-Jn.il
v- .itul IkSt 1- h v � K i �
1M HI A.MRAM K.WXa,
NAKKIOR
es us on an exotic adventure
Lincoln Center's Troupe Of Eleven
Virtuoso Musicians Plays Hendrix
A juxtaposition of th�� ��t;� . �
A juxtaposition of the
world's finest musical
personalities whose whole
is greater than the sum of
its parts is coming to East
Carolina University in the
form of the Chamber
Music Society of Lincoln
Center. The performance
will be held Monday,
March 19 at 8 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre.
"The musical success
story of the generation
according to the New
York Times esteemed
Harold Schonberg, is the
Chamber Music Society
of Lincoln Center which
continues to sell out
season after season at
New York's Alice Tully
Hall, of which it is the of-
ficial performing
organization. Since 1972
the Society has also been
presenting annual
subscription series in the
great concert hall of
Washington's Kennedy
Center, and its tours and
recordings have brought
it an enthusiastic au-
dience in the hundreds of
thousands. The Society,
under the artistic direc-
tion of Charles
Wadsworth. is unconven-
tional and arresting in its
programing.
It blends beloved
masterworks with sur-
prising rarities from the
past and challenging con-
temporary compositions
for a wide variety of in-
strumental and vocal
groupings. This lures a
brand-new audience to
experience new fascina-
tion in music performed
with superlative skill.
Basic to the Society's
success has been the br-
inging together from all
narts of the world stronc
musical personalities
whose combination and
interaction generate real
excitement. Thus the
Society maintains a per-
manent personnel of 11
distinguished virtuosi,
and each possesses a
special reputation in the
chamber repertoire to
perform together in con-
stantly varying combina-
tions. Performing in
Greenville with the Socie-
ty are: James Buswell,
violin; Gervase de Peyer,
clarinet; Lee Luvisi,
niano: Scott Nickering,
guest violinist; Leslie Par
nas, cello and Paula
Robinson, flute.
Tickets for the concert
are on sale at the Central
Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student
Center. Prices are $2.50
for ECU students, $3.50
for youth age 14 and
under, and $7.50 for
ECU faculty and staff
and the public. All tickets
at the door will be $7.50.
The concert is the last
of the 1983-84 East
Carolina University
Unions' Artists Series.
TJ- . for ��, ,Mr ��, hM - bounds T�e � Musjc � - � �omts - �
By GORDON IPOCK
fnlvn Editor
The upcoming week
promises to be a full one
for music lovers and
friends of the School of
Music. Three musical
performances are
scheduled in the A.J.
Fletcher Recital Hall.
Chamber Music
Music
On Wednesday, March
14 at 8:15 p.m. a faculty
chamber music recital is
scheduled. Antonia
Dalapas, soprano, is the
vocalist. She will be join-
ed by fellow faculty
members David Hawkins
on oboe, Brian
Schweickhardt on
clarinet, Kim Peoria on
bassoon, Charles Stevens
and Timothy Hoekman
on piano, and graduate
student Kelly Via on
flute.
The first half of the
program will be compris-
ed of performances by
flute, oboe, clarinet
piano and basssoon in
varying combinations to
music by Camille Saint-
Saens and Jean Francaix.
Following intermission
Ms. Dalapas will be ac-
compamied by
Schweickhardt and
Stevens (clarinet and
piano) in a series of six
songs by Ludwig Sphor
from his Sechs Deutsche
Lieder, Opus 103. The
evening will conclude
with Hawkins, Peoria
and Hoekman perfoming
a Francis Poulenc work,
"Trio for Oboe, Bassoon
and Piano
their program with "Fan-
tasia a Due" by Alfred
Reed.
Guest Vocalists
Tuba And Piano
Frank Holder
Dance Company
Conies To ECU
On Sunday, March 18
at 4 p.m. another facultv
recital is scheduled at
A.J. Flethcer Recital
Hall. David Lewis on
tuba and Janice
McLaughlin on piano will
perform Florian
Mueller's "Concert
Music for Bass Tuba
Alec Wilder's "Suite No.
4 for Tuba and Piano In
Four Movements
Robert Jager's "Reflec-
tions and "Sonata for
Tuba and Piano" by Ar-
thur Frackenpohl. After
intermission the two ECU
faculty members will con-
tinue with Vincent Per-
sichetti's "Parable XXII
for Solo Tuba, Opus
147" and will conclude
Following the Sunday
afternoon recital bv the
two ECU faculty
members, an evening per-
fomance at 8:15 featuring
two visiting faculty
members from Roanoke
College in Salem,
Virginia is scheduled at
Fletcher. Penny Dee
Johnson, soprano, and
Steven L. Stolen, tenor,
will sing as soloists and
together in a broad pro-
gram of music by such
composers as G.F.
Handel, C. Debussy, G.
Verdi, F. Schubert, R.
Wright and C. Montever-
di among others. Their
vocal performances will
include songs in English,
Italian and French.
Miss Johnson and Mr.
Stolen hold degrees in
music from Simpson Col-
lege and the University of
Michigan and have been
active in recital, opera
and concert in varius
parts of the United
States. Both have won
contests sponsored by the
National Association of
Teachers of Singing and
National Federation of
Music Clubs. Miss
Johnson was recently a
winner of the district and
regional semi-final levels
of the Metropolitan
Opera Auditions. Both
have performed with the
Des Moines Opera,
Mississippi Opera
Festival of the South,
OMNILansing Lyric
Opera and others.
Pianist Timothy
Hoekman, an ECU facul-
ty member, will accom-
pany the two guest
vocalists.
Any parking tickets
received during concerts
may be submitted to the
Dean of the School of
Music for handling.
I
, , mtOUwtAN mak. H 13. mi 7
advertised
lf, k . 'd!�i'd ��"� '�qu.red to b read
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The Frank Holder
Dance Company has been
making waves around the
world as one of the hot-
test young dance com-
panies in America. The
Greensboro-based troupe
of seven dancers will
retrun to ECU this Thurs-
day, March 15 for an 8:15
evening performance at
McGinnis Theatre.
The company was
founded in 1973 by
dancer and
chore,gapher Frank
Holder. Now in its 10th
season, the company con-
tinues to make dance
more accessible to
children and adults
throughout the country.
To make certain that all
of their audiences get
something of value and
entertainment from the
company's public and in-
school performances, its
repertoire is varied, rang-
,ng from classical to
abstract and from comic
r
The Frank Holder
Dance Company is as
much a dance theatre as a
dance company. Every
work presented by this
young, exuberant troupe
has an element of drama
about it. The dancers not
only create moods with
their movements, but
each piece is enhanced
with creative costuming
and lighting. The intert-
wining of movement,
light and costumes are
Holder's way of making
dance accessible for all
audiences. Critics have
heralded the company as
a "visual and artistic
delight
Tickets for the dance
concert are on sale at the
Central Ticket Office in
Mendenhall Student
Center. Ticket prices are
$5.00 for ECU students,
$7.00 for youth age 14
and under and $10.00 for
ECU faculty, staff and
the public. All tickets will
be $10.00 at the door.
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'h
L
n





THE EAST t AROI INIAN
Sports
MARCH 13 1VM Pa�t H
ECAC SOUTH BASKETBALL
Spiders, Newman
Cruise To NCAA
By ED MCKLAS
SporU t lr
TOP SECRET: Richmond for-
ward John Newman. Averaged
21.4 points this season. ECAC
South tournament most valuable
player. Conference player of the
vear. Rebounds and passes well.
Good court sense. Only a
Nophomore. Susceptable to in-
creased media coverage in the up-
coming NCAA tournament.
John Newman was fabi� us.
He shot bottom-of-the-net
jumpers with no effort. He
followed the few shots he missed,
leaping over everyone for the re-
bound. He took an 'alley oop'
pass and ignited the crowd with a
vicious slam. He did everything,
including a game-high 25 points in
the Spiders surprisingly easy 74-55
championship victory over
favored Navy Saturday night,
before 2,750 fans at' James
Madison University Convocation
Center.
This ECAC South tournament
championship game, which deter-
mines a bid to the NCAA
playoffs, was supposed to have
been won by a much taller and
stronger Navy ballclub, one that
had beaten host and defending
champion James Madison the
previous night.
But Richmond used superb
shooting (64 percent) and passing,
and a "fronting" defense to con-
tain Navy's front line of all-
(onference Vernon Butler, rookie-
'f-fhe-year David Robinson and
all-tournament Cliff Maurer, in
defeating the Middies.
In addition, Richmond's role
players performed to perfection.
Five-foot eight, all-tournament
point guard Greg Beckwith scored
a career-high 14 points, on six of
seven shooting, mostly on shots
from 25 feet out. All-tournament
center Bill Five, only 6-8, had 13
points and five rebounds, and
guard Kelvin Johnson added 12
points.
"It was a little easier than 1
thought it would be said Spider
on Beckwith's
Tarrant said,
come in small
coach Dick Tarrant, who shared
ECAC South coach of the year
honors with George Mason's Joe
Harrington. However, Tarrant
said, "We've had more success
against their size than other
teams
Commenting
performance,
"Good things
packages
"Beckwith just killed us early
with his shooting Evans added.
"We tried everything and
everything went the wrong way
Evans said. "We got beat bv a
very good team
Navy took an early 2-0 lead
� hen Butler took the opening tip-
off and slammed a basket for the
Middies.
With six minutes gone, Rich-
mond held a relatively narrow
12-6 lead. But the Spiders took a
ten point advantage, 22-12,
helped by three Beckwith top of
the key set shots, and were able to
hold onto the same margin bv
halftime, leading 34-24.
Richmonu continued its hot
shooting in the second half, and
Navy called a timeout following a
jumpshot by Newman with 17:26
left in the game that gave the
Spiders a commanding 42-26 lead.
A 20-foot jumper by Rob Ro-
maine, Navy's second-leading
scorer during the regular season,
brought the Middies within 12,
44-32, but Maurer picked up his
fourth foul with 14:19 left, and
the Spiders increased their lead to
as many as 20 points.
Maurer had 16 points, seven of
10 from the floor, and pulled
down eight rebounds. Romaine
had 15 points and Kyior Whitaker
added 10. Butler, Navy's leading
scorer and rebounder, had only
four points and one rebound for
Navy, now 24-8.
"I would think we should (get
into post season play) said
Evans.
Richmond, which was 4-22 six
years ago, will be competing in the
NCAA playoffs for the first time
in the school's history.
Rodriguez Leads
Pirates To Victory
. .
MARK IMIEI -CCU
Tournament MVP John Newman slams on Vernon Butler.
Lab
MARK BARSCR � CCU Pttete Lab
Richmond's Dick Tarrant was co-coach of the year in the ECAC.
By RANDY MEWS
Annual Sport Kdiior
The ECU women's basketball
team won the first ever ECAC-
South tournament championship
March 4, defeating Richmond
54-39.
"The girls did a tremendous
job Pirate Coach Cathy An-
druzzi said. "We knew the tour-
nament would be tough, and we
went in and worked hard
Jody Rodriguez came off the
bench to lead ECU with a team-
high 17 points, and also sparked
the defensive effort with eight
steals. "Jody helped on defense,
she created offense and she forced
turnovers Andruzzi said.
Ahead 26-25 at half, the Pirates
were unable to pull away until
they managed to score seven
straight points, giving them a
41-31 lead with 8:21 left in the
game.
The Spiders broke the drv spell
with a Betsy McCormick layup 20
seconds later, but could get no
closer than eight as ECU's defense
stiffened. "We pressured them
from start to finish Andruzzi
said of her team's defensive ef-
fort. We didn't think they had the
stuff to take two hard games
back-to-back. We tired them
out
Most of the Pirates' defensive
game plan was centered around
ECAC player o( the year Karen
Eisner. In the second half ECU
played a zone behind Eisner and
then sagged back in front when
the ball came to her side.
"It worked very well Andruz-
zi said. "We kept the ball away
from her and also boxed out well
and did a better job of controlling
the boards
For the game, the Pirates were
outrebounded 35-29, but tur-
novers were the decisive factor as
ECU had 13 compared to 28 for
Richmond.
The Pirates got off to a slow
start in the contest, falling to a
12-6 deficit on a Jackie Isreal
jumper with 8:55 left in the first
half. But an ECU rally tied it at
12, and after an exchange of eight
baskets, the Pirates moved in
front for good on a Rodriguez
jumper, making it 22-20.
The Spiders cut the lead to one
on three occasions, but were never
able to regain the lead as they
trailed 26-25 at the break.
In addition to Rodriguez' 17
points, Sylvia Bragg added 16
points and eight rebounds for the
Lady Pirates. Eisner was the only
Spider in double figures with 15,
but was held to just four points in
the second half when the Pirate
zone focused on her.
In ECU's semi-final game, the
Pirates routed George Mason
68-41.
The Lady Patriots jurned out to
a quick 6-2 lead in the early going,
but once Bragg put the Pirates up
11-10 on a free throw at the 13:24
mark, the rout was on.
Anita Anderson pumped in
three straight baskets to make it
17-10, and although GMU closed
the gap to 19-16, the Pirates
outscored the Patriots 17-5 over
the final eight minutes cf the half
to take 36-21 lead at the break.
"The key for us was the tur-
novers Andruzzi said. "We lost
the last time (58-54 at GMU)
because of too many turnovers.
We were sloppy and look bad
shots, and on defense we allowed
them to do what they wanted
The Patriots committed 24 tur-
novers compared to 16 :or ECU.
but the most telling statistic was
GMU's 30 percent shooting per-
formance from the field
Andruzzi said her team took
care of the ball in this meeting
with George Mason and was able
to force them out of their offense.
"We pushed them out and made
people handle the ball they didn't
want handling it
The Patriots managed io cut the
lead back to 11 at the outset of the
See WOMEN, Page 10
Pirates lose In First Round, 47-32-
Strong Defense Not Enough
By ED MCKLAS
Sports Editor
At a press conference the day
before the ECAC South tourna-
ment, ECU coach Charlie Har-
rison conveyed his optimism.
"We might have had the best
practices in the last two weeks
than all year he said.
The following day, the Pirates
performed in accordance with
Harrison's expectations � defen-
sively. But when it came down to
the object of the game, putting the
ball in the basket, the Pirates ex-
ecuted disasterously. The result: a
47-32 loss to William and Mary in
the first round before 1,500 most-
ly non-partisan fans at James
Madison University Convocation
Center.
"It's been the story of our team
in the second half said Har-
rison, whose team trailed only
21-17 at the break. "They play
with a purpose and sometimes it
just doesn't go right.
"I can't say enough for our
kids. I would say that since Oct.
15, we have had no more than
four practices that were without
effort
The Cinderella setting was pre-
sent, but the Pirates couldn't
capitalize. ECU took 12 more
shots and outrebounded the In-
dians in the game, and William
and Mary shot only 31.2 percent
in the second half. But the
Pirates' 21.2 percent shooting in
the same period was an albatross.
"As I told our kids, I thought
we had a pretty tough
assignment said William and
Mary coach Barry Parkhill. "I
think the kids handled everything
well.
"We came out in the second
half and didn't shoot well, but we
hung in there. More than
anything, we're just happy to
keep on playing.
"I don't think there is any team
that plays harder (than ECU).
They're quicker than we are. East
Carolina has given us a tough time
both times they've played us (this
year)
Guard Curt Vanderhorst, who
scored 29 points the last time the
two teams met on Feb. 11, led the
Pirates with 14, although he con-
nected on only seven of 24 shots
from the field. Senior Tony
Robinson, playing his final game,
was next with six points.
Kevin Richardson and Herb
Harris led a balanced Indian scor-
ing attack, each pumping in 10
points. Gary Bland, Keith
Cieplicki and Tony Traver all had
six.
The Pirates jumped out to an
early 9-6 lead on a 25-foot shot by
Vanderhorst, but it was a short
advantage as the Indians
outscored the Pirates 13-2 over
the next six minutes to take 19-11
lead with 6:14 left in the half.
ECU fought back though, and
?
North
By ED NICKLAS
BjMbJMBM
Ah! Harrisonburg, Va located
in the valley of the Blue Ridge
Mountains � clean air, pictures-
que scenery, good-tasting water.
Ah! ECAC South basketball tour-
nament � entertaining, enlighten-
ing, much more interesting than
the typical ACC post season play.
Ech! One James Madison student
11 met at a party the night ECU lost
I � smug, ignorant, but never-
theless entertaining.
The party was last Thursday
i night, a bitter cold evening. It
j snowed that day, leaving the
� houses covered with a beautiful
: border. ECU photographers
Mark Barber, Neil Johnson, Mike
j Smith and I scurried to the in-
came within four points on a
Vanderhorst 15-foot jumper with
four seconds left.
ECU center Jack Turnbill
scored the first basket of the se-
cond half, and the Pirates were
only down by two points, 21-19
with 17:32 left.
But William and Mary kept in-
ching away as the Pirates could
not connect on their shots, pulling
out 31-23 lead with 7:13 left.
With 6:53 to in the game, it ap-
peared the Pirates would make a
run of it. Robinson drove to the
basket, was fouled, and the ball
fell through, cutting the Indian
lead to 31-26.
Seconds later Vanderhorst stole
a pass, and the Pirates set up their
offense, hoping to cut the lead to
three. ECU missed a shot attempt,
and turned ice cold in the waning
minutes, only to let the Indians
run away from a close contest.
Guard Curt Vanderhorst led
MARK UUn tco � lm
ECU with 14 points.
viting house where the festivities
were being held, anxious to meet
the hosts � the JMU and ECU
cheerleaders.
The change in temperature was
swift, as the greeting room was
filled with sweating students, dan-
cing splendidly.
Not to waste time, however, we
moved along to the kitchen and
quickly to the keg of brewskies.
So it was Neil, Mike and 1,
chugging, sipping, scanning the
crowd, hoping to notice someone
familiar. Most of the people in the
kitchen were from JMU and were
excited with their team's opening
round victory earlier in the even-
ing.
Then, a recognizable figure
walked in the room. The tall,
King Duke s Court
plump, red-haired fellow � a
baby Huey looking gent � with a
grin largely attributed to his in-
ability to hold alcohol, started
walking our way. I turned to Neil
and said, "Hey, look who's com-
ing over here. This is the guy we
'cleaned up' on in the media
basketball game yesterday
"Oh really Neil said. "He
looks like he would be
"How you fellas doing?" the
red-haired Duke asked.
"Oh, pretty good Mike
answered.
"Hey, it's too bad ECTC lost
tonight Duke belched.
I looked over at Neil and Mike
then back to Duke. "Huh?" I
said.
"BCTC Duke laughed.
"East Carolina Teacher's Col-
lege
I grinned, thinking how pitiful-
ly inept this fellow was in the
humor department. I decided to
grab another brewsky, still listen-
ing as I walked away.
"Yeah, I heard if you don't get
accepted anywhere else, you go to
ECTC Duke chuckled.
"Man, who is this guy?" Mike
said, pointing at Duke.
"I don't know, but he's giving
JMU a bad name Neil added.
Duke kept on going.
"Eee say teee say Duke
drawled out of the side of his
mouth. "If ya cain't git in
ainywhar ailse, go ta eee say teee
say
Suddenly, Mark came into the
kitchen, ready for another beer
He heard Duke.
"Hey, what's he talking abouf
Mark asked.
�;ECTC Duke answered.
"Man, I don't want to hear
that Mark snapped, pointing
his finger at Duke's chest. "If I
hear ECTC one more time, I'm
going to kick your tail. It'sE-C-
U, not ECTC
"Uh well err uh well
I'm Duke stammered.
"Well what?" asked Mark,
who was half the size of Duke.
Duke looked scared, his face
color matching his hair, and back-
ed off a few steps, trying to
�weasel' his way out of the mess
he created.
Finally, I stepped in. "Hev
youve been cracking on our
Sk ��1kS hear something bad
about JMU I said.
"Oh yeah Duke laughed ner-
vously. "Did you know we have
no doctoral programs. And, uh
oh yeah. Our football team was
really awful this year
He went on and on, anc I BOt
bored and proceeded to the
bathroom laughing. Duke ha
dug his own grave.
Perhaps Mark summarized the
situation best when �2�5
ater. "It just goes to showhal
large size does not tmZSl
makeJor a large mentalkT
��� i
EC
Swimmers PI
B SCOTT POWERS
sport � ruer
The ECU men's s
ming team
Eastern Intercolleg
Swimming and D
C h a m p i o nsh : p -
weekend and came a
with an impresse s�
place finish.
Pittsburgh succes
defended its champ
ship, amassing
points. ECU easil
distanced Mai
University for
place with 644 -
compared to MU's -
Individua' winners I
the Piraies were
Larranaga in th
yard freest vie with a
of 15:48.06, Steve H
in the 100 ard buttei

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r
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 13. 1944
eads
ictory
i 55 left in the first
C rail) tied it at
exchange of eight
he Pirates moed in
good on a Rodriguez
� . 22-20.
;ut the lead to one
5, but vere never
the lead as they
25 ai the break.
1 Rodriguez' 17
Bragg added 16
rids for the
es. Eisner was the only
gures with 15,
. d usl four points in
a : when the Pirate
ler.
- semi-final game, the
ted George Mason
Patriots jumed out to
6-2 lead in the early going,
. Bragg put the Pirates up
a free throw at the 13:24
he rout wa on.
I Anderson pumped in
: baskets to make it
although GMU closed
-16, the Pirates
red the Patriots 17-5 over
it minutes of the half
36-21 iead at the break.
e key for us was the tur-
Andruzzi said. "We lost
time (58-54 at GMU)
too many turnovers.
: sloppy and took bad
n defense we allowed
what they wanted
. mmitted 24 tur-
pared to 16 for ECU.
most telling statistic was
percent shooting per-
ice from the field.
Iruzzi said her team took
If the ball in this meeting
Korge Mason and was able
e them out of their offense.
)ushed them out and made
dandle the ball they didn't
landling it
Patriots managed to cut the
:k to 11 at the outset of the
WOMEN, Page 10
? �
Wm mT
r

1
�MARK CA��E � 1CU nwn u�
CCU with 14 points.
Court
bated.
ally. I stepped in. "Hey,
Je been cracking on our
bl, let's hear something bad
1 JMU 1 said.
Jfa yeah Duke laughed ner-
y. "Did you know we have
ctoral programs. And, uh
eah. Our football team was
awful this year
went on and on, and I got
I and proceeded to the
loom laughing. Duke had
Sis own grave.
rhaps Mark summarized the
ion best when we talked
"It just goes to show that
size does not necessarily
for a large mentality
EC A C Excitement
TS�?! Place Second, Finish Successful Season
By SCOTT POWERS
Sports W rtltf
The ECU men's swim-
ming team hosted the
Eastern Intercollegiate
Swimming and Diving
Championships last
weekend and came away
with an impressive second
place finish.
Pittsburgh successfully
defended its champion-
ship, amassing 861
points. ECU easily out-
distanced Marshall
University for second
place with 644 points
compared to MU's 461.
Individual winners for
the Pirates were Chema
Larranaga in the 1650
yard freestyle with a time
of 15:48.08, Steve Hollett
in the 100 yard butterfly
at 51.17, Kevin Richards
in the 200 butterfly at
1:53.46, and Stan
Williams, who was a dou-
ble winner for the
Pirates. Williams won the
50 and 100 yard freestyle
events in times of 21.09
and 46.37 respectively.
The Pirates completed
a sweep of the 100 yard
freestyle, with Chris Pit-
telli and Steve Hollett
capturing second and
third with times of 46.62
and 46.85.
The Pirates had
numerous second place
finishers, including
Richards in the 100 yard
butterfly, Pittelli in the
200 freestyle, Uarranga in
the 500 freestyle and
Stratton Smith in the
1650 freestyle
The 400 yard freestyle
relay team also captured
second place with a time
of 3:04.06.
Other tc finishers for
the Pirates were Scott
Eagle, who finished
fourth in the one meter
diving, Pittelli, who
finished third in the 200
yard individual dedley,
and Smith, who finished
fourth in the 400 yard in-
dividual medley.
The women's team
competed in the NCAA
Division II Champion-
ships at Hampstead, NY
last weekend. Several'
swimmers had strong
finishes for the Pirates.
Caycee Poust finished
eleventh in the 100 yard
backstroke, earning All-
America honors.
Other top finishers for
the Pirates were Jessica
Feinberg, who finished
13th in the 100 yard
breaststroke, and Rene
Seech, who finished 20th
in the one meter diving
events.
The 200 and 400 meter
medley relay teams both
finished 18th for the
Pirates.
Both teams have com-
pleted their seasons, the
men finishing at 10-4
while the women finished
at 9-5.
t
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Special Services and rates for students.
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10
IHJiAgLCAltOLINlAN MA.rn, � ��
'
�-gfea
?
.
�wc$ SpiY
By RANDY MEWS
�I SfKWti fAHoi
The ECU men's
baseball team split a
double-header with Fair-
field University at Harr-
ington Field yesterday
afternoon, dropping the
first contest 6-4, then tak-
ing the second, 5-2.
Pitcher Bob Davidson
took the loss for the
Pirates in the first game
in which Fairfiled scored
five unearned runs.
Fairfield did all the
damage in the second inn-
ing, crossing the plate
five times. The Stags were
only credited with one hit
in the inning as the
Pirates committed four
errors and Davidson
threw a wild pitch.
ECU got on the
scoreboard in the third
inning when Greg Har-
dison hit a triple, and
then was singled in by
Todd Evans, making the
score 5-1.
The Stags picked up
another unearned run in
the fifth, and Mike
Williams doubled home
David Wells in the sixth
for the Pirates, setting the
stage for the seventh inn-
ing.
Evans got things
started off with a single,
and then advanced to se-
cond base when Winfred
Johnson was walked.
Wells was next up, and
doubled in Evans. Mark
Shank, who was inserted
to run for Johnson, ad-
vanced to third on the
play. Shank then scored
on the ensuing play when
Williams sacrificed to the
outfield, closing the
Pirates to within two runs
at 6-4.
With Wells on third,
Mike Sullivan and Chris
Bradberry were walked,
loading the bases for
Mark Cockrell. With the
count full and all the run-
ners going, Cockrell flied
out to left, ending the
Pirates chances at vic-
tory.
The Pirates outhit Fair-
field 7-4 for the game,
but were plagued by bad
fielding as they commit-
ted five errors compared
to one for the Stags.
The Pirates were vic-
torious in the second
game as Wells was
responsible for all the
scoring, knocking in all
five of ECU's runs in two
trips to the plate.
With two out in the
first inning, Evans singl-
ed, Johnson walked, and
then Wells blasted a
homer to give the Pirates
a quick 3-0 lead.
The Stags picked up
runs in the fourth and
sixth innings respectively,
and then after a Johnson
double in the bottom of
the sixth, Wells ham-
mered his second homer
of the game to close out
the scoring at 5-2.
Chubby Butler picked
up the win for the
Pirates, as Jim Peterson
was credited with the save
after coming on in relief
in the sixth inning.
ECU now stands at 5-3
on the year, and will play
Fairfield again at 3:00
p.m. today on Harr-
ington Field.
. .
-X
r-W kk n i , . STANLEY LEAHY - ECU Pfcoto Lab
mnSuJup the win ln ECUs second gtme of the" " " '
Classifieds
SALE
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SMve gMIM �
ROOMS AVAILABLE � We are now
receiving applications for rooms tor
the summer and next fall. Applica-
tions may be picked up at the
Methodist Student Center, sot East
Fifth Street. For more information
call: 7M-MM.
SPRING BREAK M was made for
Chester, k-man. j.t. and Beers to the
farthest point south in a Wagoneer
Our buffet bar to help us steer, diving
in water clearer than clear. There
were no twinkie losers but many
tubers. We Mid we must with eyes of
lust, we said we shall with European
gals The west key of life with our
cards at THE TOP. Our Michigan bar
maid wouldn't let us stop, as JIM
BEAN was knocked out in the th
shot. Back to the FORT we did
return, for wet T shirts and to finish
our burns Now k-man A j.t. owe
Chester big bucks, but every once in a
while you've got to say what the �I
Sleeping sometimes gave us cramps,
but tor our last SPRING BREAK we
were the CHAMPS.
THANK � GOODNESS the Wash Pub
is now open on E. 10th St. next to the
Piiza Hut.
DIRTY CLOTHES - WASH PUB
thru exercise toward a positive "a7-
tltude about themselves. Call
Theresa at 7M-7M4 at THE BODY
SHOPPE.
PART-TIME EXERCISE instructor
individual with positive attitude POS.T.ON OeTri- &� �?�"�? I"
lip motivate others gram .c T,0M' East Fifth Street. Green
abut herself to help motivate onr, ,r.m assistant ,V � vlH NX
Watch Yourself at Mr. Gattis.
Methodist Student Center
Preference is given to graduate
students, married without children.
Apply by letter to: Wesley Founda-
PERSONAL
WANTED
RESEARCH PAPERS
tOLL-FREE HOTLINE
800-621 -5745
IN ILLINOIS CALL 312-922-0300
AUTHORS'RESEARCH. ROOM 600
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Instant
Replay.
PART-TIME SOCCER COACHES I
Youth Soccer Coaches work part-time. 10-20 hours
weekly, beginning March 19 until May 3. Hours normal-
ly 3:30-6:30p.m. Monday-Thursday. Salary rate $3.30
hour.
Applications will be accepted through Monday,
March 19, at the Personnel Office. City of Greenville,
corner of West Fifth and Washington Streets.
At Mr. Garti's your big event can"
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can see it all again on our big screen TV while you enjoy
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For an instant replay, see your neighborhood Mr. Garti's.
ECU Dumps GW
By MEG MOREADITH
Spona wniif
The ECU men's tennis
team defeated George
Washington University
Sunday afternoon 6-3.
"They did an excellent
job head coach Pat
Sherman said. "This was
a great win considering
GWU is a good team
Assistant coach Zengel
was also pleased with the
team's play, and thought
the top three players did
especially well. "The
matches started out slow
because of the cold
weather, but after the
players warmed-up, the
matches were tough
The Pirates now stand
at 2-0 on the spring
season, and will be in ac-
tion today at 3:00 p.m.
on the varsity courts next
to Minges Coliseum.
Results
Paul Owen (ECU) d.
Troy Marguglio 6-3, 6-3;
David Creech (ECU) d.
Barry Horowitz 6-2, 6-3;
Galen Treble (ECU) d.
John McConnin 6-4, 6-4;
Todd Long (GWU) d.
Greg Loyd 6-2, 6-2;
Adam Cohen (GWU) d.
Davis Bagley 6-4, 6-3;
Dan Rosner (GWU) d.
David Turner 4-6, 7-6,
6-3.
Owen-Treble (ECU) d.
Marguglio-Long 6-3, 6-1;
Creech-Moran (ECU) d.
Horowitz-Cohen 6-1,6-1;
Bagley-Willis (ECU) d.
McConnin-Gomer 6-4,
3-6, 7-6.
Women Take Tournament
ITTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTTT
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March 21 st
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Monday, March 19. 1984
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(404 266-1060
IT
C�y
dm)
Continued From Page 8
second half, but ECU
responded with eight
unanswered points to put
the game out of reach at
44-25.
"I was absolutely
pleased with our perfor-
mance Andruzzi said.
This is a game in which
we played as well offen-
TaaaaaaWBE
sively as defensively.
In the other semi-final
game, Eisner poured in
21 points to lead Rich-
mond to a 67-56 victory
over James Madison.
The Spiders jumped on
Mason early, extending
their lead to 27-15 mid-
way through the first
half. GMU was patient,
however, and was able to
cut the score to 35-28 at
the break.
Richmond was able to
extend their lead to 51-38
with 10:44 left in the
game, but another GMU
rally narrowed it to 60-54
in the final minutes.
Mason had the oppor-
tunity to cut it to four on
five different occasions,
but couldn't convert as
Richmond coasted to vic-
torv.
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Title
The East Carolinian, March 13, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 13, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.327
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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