The East Carolinian, March 1, 1984







4
Mt
Ularnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.4V7
Thursday, March 1,1984
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Three Seek Presidency;
Filing Deadline Nears
MARK BARBER -
Members of the Kappa Alpha Psi fraternity perform one of their traditional step shows in front of the Student Supply store
Hunt Scheduled To Deliver
'Major Campaign Speech'
In Hendrix Theatre April 3
ECU Pftoto Lab
By DARRYL BROWN
Miuftag Editor
With only two days left to file,
the race for Student Government
Association president already has
more candidates than last year's
field, with three candidates
already filed for the office and at
least one other likely to file before
Friday.
John Rainey, chairman of the
SGA Legislature's Appropria-
tions Committee, has filed for the
post, along with Mark Niewald,
Student Residence Association
president and Media Board chair-
man, and junior marketing major
Jay Brigel.
The two-man race for SGA vice
president is between Sophomore
Class President Rob Poole, who is
also in Army ROTC, and SGA
legislator Mike McPartland, who
is new chairman of the
Mendenhall Major Attractions
Committee and business manager
at The East Carolinian.
Student Lee Lane and SRA
College Hill representative Jay
Johnson have filed for the
treasurer's seat. No one has yet
filed for secretary.
All the candidates are white
males.
None of the incumbent SGA ex-
ecutive officers are running for re-
election or for another office.
None of the candidates for
president is expected at this point
to be a clear favorite. Rainey, a
member of the Pi Kappa Phi
fraternity, may have strong sup-
port from the some Greek
organizations, and Niewald,
though he has polarized some
students in recent days over the
"quiet dorm" issue, may be able
to count on support from many
dormitory students. Brigel, a resi-
dent advisor in Garrett dormitory,
is considered the least known of
the three.
In the race for the vice presiden-
cy, both candidates are well
known on campus. Poole was
freshman class president and
drives a bus for the SGA Transit
System in addition to his ROTC
involvement; McPartland is a
member of the Phi Kappa Tau
fraternity in addition to his cur-
rent posts.
The election is set for March 21.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newj Editor
Gov. James B. Hunt is
scheduled to give a "major
campaign speech" at ECU on
April 3, according to Don
Hobart, a spokesman for the
Hunt committee.
Hunt will be speaking on his
foreign policy and defense
positions. The speech will be
sponsored by the ECU chapter
of Phi Kappa Phi, the national
honor society, and will be a
continuation of this year's sym-
posium, the topic of which is
"Peace and War, 1984: Power
and Moral Responsibility
"This is a precedent for us
said Fred Broadhurst of the
School of Technology and
chairman of the symposium
committee. Broadhurst said the
symposium has never expanded
in this manner before.
Plans are also being made to
have Sen. Jesse Helms,
R-N.C, speak on the same
subject. Broadhurst said this
would not coincide with the
Applications Up Across State
Hunt
Hunt speech and stressed that
the goal is not debate, but
rather a display of the can-
didates' "scholarly perspec-
tives" on the subject.
The event will take place in
Hendrix Theatre in Mendenhall
Student Center.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Newt Editor
Applications for the 1984-85
school year at ECU are running
approximately 1,000 over the
number received this time last
year, according to a report made
to the ECU Board of Trustees.
Many schoob in Noith Carolina
are enjoying the same rise in ap-
plicants.
ECU Director of Admissions
Chuck Seeley had previously at-
tributed the rise in applicants to
the public attention attained by
this year's successful football
team.
Angelo Volpe, vice chancellor
for academic affairs, said he was
very pleased and hopes the trend
Committee Seeking Student Input
will continue.
Elsewhere in North Carolina,
applications are also increasing.
According to a recent article in
The Raleigh News And Observer,
applications at N.C. State Univer-
sity are up approximately 12 per-
cent. George Dixon, associate
undergraduate admissions direc-
tor, was quoted as saying the in-
crease was due to increased
recruitment efforts and a stronger
concentration on technical pro-
grams.
Applications at Wake Forest
have increased approximately 4
percent, while Duke has been ex-
periencing a consistent increase in
the number of applicants. Jean
Scott, undergraduate admissions
director at Duke, suggested that
the increase might be a result of
students applying to a larger
number of colleges to raise their
chances of acceptance.
UNC-CH, however, has ex-
perienced a decline in the number
of applicants � from 11,900 in
1983 to 10,000 in 1984. According
to The News and Observer article,
Anthony Strickland, assistant
undergraduate admissions direc-
tor at UNC-CH, hypothesized
that the drop might be due to an
essay being added to application
requirements. While the essay will
be used mainly for placement pur-
poses, Strickland said it serves as
a deterrent to less serious
students.
Survey Planned For Fall
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
New Editor
A survey designed to discover
students' musical tastes is one of
the activities planned to increase
the quality of the concert program
at ECU.
Mike McPartland will replace
Jerry Dilsaver as head of the Ma-
jor Attractions Committee next
semester. The committee was the
subject of much debate last fall
following the financially unsuc-
cessful Charlie Daniels Band con-
cert. The concert prior to the
Daniels' engagement, featuring
Evelyn Champagne King and The
Dazz Band, also lost money.
Planning concerts which are
financially successful and which
appeal to students "is not a one-
man job McPartland said. For
this reason, he plans to select
committee members who are in-
terested in music and in workin
in the promotion of the concerts.
"I see the main function of com-
mittee members as advertisement
and promotion he said.
McPartland wants to analyze
bands, new releases and past con-
certs to determine the best selec-
tion for concerts. He stressed,
however, that all decisions will be
made by the committee, not the
chairman.
Because of ECU's locations,
there have been problems in get-
ting big bands to play here.
McPartland cited the size of
Minges as the major problem.
"Minges does not hold enough
people to bring big bands he
said.
Ficklen Stadium has been con-
sidered as an alternative location,
and concerts have been held there
in the past. The problem with this,
McPartland said, was that "3,000
people paid for the concert and
10,000 people watched it
Because of the problems of securi-
ty and weather conditions, Minges
is really the only feasible concert
location.
Competition was another pro-
blem cited by McPartland. "If
there is a big band playing in
Raleigh, people will go there in-
stead he said. In addition, the
Major Attractions Committee is
on a limited budget and thus con-
cert options available are also
limited.
McPartland said his student-
interest survey will take place ear-
Skinner Praises ECU
Political Science Dept.
McPartland
ly next fall. "I feel that if we can
get an early start and work with
the committee and administra-
tion, we can get a really good
band in Minges he said.
Students interested in applying
for positions on the Major Attrac-
tions Committee should apply
within the next two weeks at the
Student Union Board offices in
Mendenhall.
Plans for the spring concert
have not yet been finalized, but
should be sometime this week.
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Sun Writer
This week students were once
again given a chance to meet and
talk with another candidate for
chairman of the Department of
Political Science.
Dr. Richard Skinner from Old
Dominion University in Virginia
visited campus Feb. 29 and spoke
with students in the political
science study room that after-
noon.
Skinner,who is presently chair-
ing the political science depart-
ment at ODU said he felt ECU
had a healthy political science
program and a good faculty. He
went on to say he saw no need to
change the faculty or the depart-
ment. "Why recreate the world if
you think it is good said Skin-
ner. "I only want to make the
department better
Skinner emphasized the need
for personal developement among
students. He said he felt political
science students were special peo-
ple, but that he expected a great
deal fo effort from them.
Wednesday's informal meeting
did not have as much student tur-
nout as the earlier sessions. Only-
six students attended this meeting
compared to the average 15 pre-
sent at meetings held in February.
However, questioning and con-
versation among students and
Skinner was active.
Announcements2
Editorials 4
StyleZZZZe
Sportsg
Classifieds . 9
� For the sight seeing buffs,
read about the North Carolina
Zoological Park. See Style,
page 6.
� On the Feb. 21 issue of the
East Carolinian Greg Car-
raway was erroneously listed
as being arrested for DW1. We
regret the error.
� On the Feb. 2 issue of the
East Carolinian Montieth
Womble was incorrectly iden-
tified as vice president of
SOULS. Thomas Sims is the
current vice president; Worn-
ble is running for election to
the office.
Quiet Dorm Proposal
Approved By Many
By DARRYL BROWN
Thirty percent of ECU resident
students would live in an up-
perclassman dormitory with
stricter noise regulations if the
university had one, and more than
60 percent think the quiet dorm is
a good idea, a Student Residence
Association survey revealed this
week.
A survey of 5,500 students liv-
ing in all ECU residence halls was
put together by SRA President
Mark Niewald. With 1,322 of the
surveys returned, 419 students
said they would live in a residence
hall with stricter noise regula-
tions, and 841 students, or 63 per-
cent, endorsed the idea of a quiet
dorm.
Though all statistics from the
surveys haven't been tabulated,
Niewald said most of the students
interested in the dorm were
freshmen and sophomores who
will be at ECU when the dorm is
set to open in the fall of 1985.
Niewald said the response was
more favorable than he expected.
"There will be a quiet dorm on
campus; I'm confident of that
he said.
Niewald presented a
preliminary report on the survey
results to the SGA Legislature
Monday and called the early
numbers "staggering" and "sur-
prising He plans to present the
completed results to the
legislature after spring break.
The SGA Student Welfare
Committee last week voted
unanimously to recommend that
the legislature reject a resolution
supporting the quiet dorm,
See QUIET, page 5
It looka as though this exhausted girl has
STANLKY LCA�V - �CW
here" on her
m
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IS





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1,1984
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
sinct 1923
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
Ing the summer
The East Carolinian Is the ot
flclal newspaper of East Carolina
University, owned, operated and
published for and by the students
of East Carolina University.
Unless otherwise noted, unslgn
ed editorials on the opinion page
art the newspaper's opinion,
generally written by the manag
Ing editor
Subscription Rate $30 yearly
The East Carolinian offices are
located In the Publications
building on the campus of ECU
Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER: Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
2nd Floor, Publications building,
ECU, Greenville, N.C. 27834
Telephone 757 6366, 6367, 6309
SUMMER CO-OP
Thomas Nelson inc. Is offering ten
positions in their Summer Co-op pro-
gram, students selected art
guaranteed S300 a week. Students
must be a hardworker, Independent,
and willing to relocate for the sum-
mer. Students will gain skills In com-
munication, time and money
management, accounting
psychology, management and
marketing. All students may apply at
313 Rawi building in the Cooperative
Education department.
: SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
The Sign Language Club is having a
-silent dinner on Thursday, March l.
We'll be meeting at the Tree House
about 6 30 Come downtown and join
-us.
EDMISTEN84
AM students interested in joining
'the campus organization to elect
Rufus Edmisten as Governor in l?84
:please contact Betty Casey or Macon
'Move (ECU coordinator) at 752 0312.
FELLOWSHIP
Come to inter Varsity Christian
-Fellowship to fellowship, sing, and
Upraise the Lord. The meetings are
held in Jenkins Auditorium on
Wednesday nights at 6:30. Everyone
is welcome!
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
� Tonight we will hear the reports
from the convention. All CR's are
urged to attend. The meeting will be
held at 5:30 p.m. in Room 221
Mendenhall We look forward to see
Ing you there!
MEMORIAL POOL
Memorial Pool will be closed for
noon hour Rec swim on Feb. 29 and
March 1 Memorial Pool will close at
5:00 p m. on March 2. Memorial Pool
will reopen following normal
schedule on March 12.
AEROBIC EXERCISE
The Department of intramural
Recreational Services Isofferlno Spr
Ing semester aerobic fitness classes.
Registration for the second and last
session will be held February 27
through March 2. Cost for students:
four dollars for one class per week,
eight dollars for two classes per
week FacultyStaff, five dollars for
classes meeting once per week, ten
dollars for classes twice per week.
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next general meeting of Gam
ma Beta Phi will be held on Thurs
day, March 1, 194 at 700 P.M. in
Jenkins Art Auditorium. Final plans
for the trip to National Convention
will be made Also tickets will be
passed out for the give-away. Please
try to attend.
PSICHI
Deadline for Psi Chi Scholarships is
April 2, 1984. The initiation for all new
members in Psi Chi will be held on
Mar 20 at 7:00 p.m. in Rm. 244
Mendenhall. All members are urged
to attend. Elections for officers tor
Psi Chi 84-85 will be held following in
illation. Refreshments will be served.
PERMANENT WAVE
Permanent wave will be aired once
again this Thursday night from 10-12
P.M join WZMB 91.3 FM as Spike
Harward brings you the best in new
wave music as well as new releases.
This weeks featured artist � The
Jam.
CADP
There will be a meeting of the Cam
pus Alcohol & Drug Program
THURSDAY, March 1st at 5:00 p.m.
in 210 Erwin Hall. Training film will
be shown. All interested people are
invited to attend.
SOFTBALL
TOURNAMENT
Registration begins March 12-13 for
the Preseason Softball Tournament.
Competition will be held the weekend
of March 16 Start forming your team
now.
ART EXHIBITION
Mendenhall Student Center and the
Art Exhibition Committee would like
to invite everyone to visit American
Drawings IV, showing till March 2 In
the Student Center. Don't miss this
unique event!
DIETETIC
The Student Dietetic Association
will be meeting on Tuesday, March 13
at 5.30 in room 121 (Dining Hall).
They will be featuring Angela Rich
who works with the WIC Program
(Women, Infant, and Children). Rich
will explain the purpose, functions,
and special events performed by me
WIC Program which aids in main-
taining the Nutritional requirements
of me mother. Infant, and children of
all ages. Please Comel Everyone Is
Welcome!
WEIGHT TRAINING
The Department of Intramural
Rf :reatlonal Services Is offering a
we.ght training class. Registration
will be held February 27 through
Mtrch 2. Cost for students, four
dollars for one class per week, eight
dollars for two classes per week
Facutt 'Staff, five dollars for one
class per week, ten dollars for two
classes per week.
PI KAPPA RUSH
The Brothers of PI Kappa Phi
Fraternity would like to Invite
everyone and especially interested
ladles out to 200 West tonight (March
1) for our little sister RUSH Happy
Hour. There will be reduced prices on
alt of your favorite beverages. So
everyone party hard one last time
before Spring Break. Come out to
party and meet the PI Kapps.
TEAM HANDBALL
Team Handball, the fast-action
Olympic sport returns to the ECU In
tramural program Immediately after
spring break. Registration will be
held March 12-13 with competition
beginning March 19. Fourteen In-
tramural team handball participants
have been selected for National
Sports Festival competition within
the past three years, and Leora
"Sam" Jones will represent the USA
In the 1984 Olympics. Remember to
sign-up your team for team
handball III
SUMMER JOBS
Can you line up your summer job
over spring break? Can It be a job
related to your major? Spring Break
might be a great time to inquire with
City Governments, Federal Agen-
cies, Companies, or areas where peo-
ple In your major work. Ask a friend
if they have read this!
Students wanting to have
their parents receive The
East Carolinian can fill out a
subcription form at The East
Carolinian offices on the se-
cond floor of the Publications
building, across from the en-
trance of Joyner Library.
Rates are $30 for one year
and $20 for six months.
Contact the Circulations
Manager at 757-6366.
TENNIS DOUBLES
Registration will be held March 12
for the tennis doubles tournament
Find a partner and come on over to
Memorial gym and sign up for
doubles tennis.
LIBERAL STUDENTS
There will not be a meeting of the
Society of United Liberal Students on
Thursday, March 1, 1984. Officer in
ductlons will take place on Thursday,
March 15, 1984.
STUDENTS WITH HART
Now is the time for a new genera
tion of leadership, if you are fed up
with the politics of nostalgia and look
ing for new solutions to the nation's
problems loin Students With Hart, we
are the vanguard of a new
democracy. We will be meeting at
103 B Meade St. Sunday March 4, 8:00
CM. For more information call
752 4935 or 757 3566.
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS
Now Is your chance to become an
umpire. The Department of
intramural Recreational Services
will hold me training clinic for in
tramural Softball officials beginning
Tuesday, March 13, 1984 at 6:00 p.m.
In room 102 of Memorial Gymnasium.
Rules, interpretations and mechanics
will be discussed. Officials will be
hired based on practical and written
tests.
VOLLEYBALL
MARATHON
Pnl Sigma Pi at ECU invites you
and your organization to team up for
the BUD LIGHTROCK 93
VOLLEYBALL MARATHON for
Easter Seals. Register today � or for
more Information, call the
VOLLEYBALL HOTLINE toll free at
1-800-662 9712. See you "In court
ACCOUNTING OFFICE
A Representative from the U.S.
General Accounting Office will be on
campus March 15, 1984 to Interview
co-op students who would like to work
as GAO Evaluator. Accounting and
Finance majors who have completed
60 semester hours and have a 2.9 or
higher GPA should contact the Co op
Office, 313 Rawl Bldg to arrange an
Interview immediately!
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Persoi.al Development
ClassesMarch 13 Survival Italian,
A New You, Money Matters, Career
Change, Dreams. Contact Continuinc
Education, Erwin Hall.
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
Two Art Scholarships are available
to Juniors; Art majors only. Due by
March 25, 1984, application info and
forms at School of Art office.
MINGESPOOL
Minges Pool will not be opened for
Rec swim on Wed. night. Feb. 29 and
Fri. night, March 2. Minges pool will
reopen following normal schedule
March 12
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ is spon
soring "Prime Time" this Thursday
at 7 p.m. In the Old Joyner Library
Room 221 Please oin us for fun,
fellowship, and Bible study We are
looking forward to meeting you.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right j
or use a separate sheet of 1
paper If you need more lines. 1
There are 33 units per line.
Each letter, punctuation mark �
and work space counts a one
unit. Capitalize and hyphenate J
words properly. Leave space �
at end of line if word doesn't fit. J
No ads will be accepted over j
the phone. We reserve the right I
to refect any ad. All ads must �
be prepaid. Enclose 75 cents ,
per line or fraction of a line
Please print legibly! Use
capital and lower case letters.
Return to the Media Board
secretary by 3 p.m. the day
before publication.
�� m
HANDBALL OFFICIALS
Would you like to be an intramural
team handball official? if so, attend
the training clinic to be held by the
Department of intramural-
Recreational Services Monday,
March 12,1984 at 6 00 pm in Room 102
of Memorial Gymnasium. Rules,
mechanics and Interpretations will be
discussed. Officials will be hired bas-
ed on practical and written tests and
experience.
HONORS PROGRAM
Any undergraduate with a 3.5 GPA
Is eligible to take courses In the
Honors Program fall 194 while space
permits. Honors seminars In women
writers. The Latin American connec-
tion, the human body, psychology,
and technology andor survival, and
Honors sections of many Introductory
level courses are listed with asterisks
in me preregistratlon schedule. Con-
tact Dr. David Sanders, 212 Ragsdale
(757-6373) for permission. Join the
reception Mon Feb. 27, 4-6 p.m ,
Ragsdale 201 Lounge.
IRS TAX FORMS
Joyner Library has received a ship-
ment of tax forms from the Internal
Revenue Service to be used In prepar
ing 1983 Federal tax returns.
The forms are at the Information
desk in the Documents Dept. and
North Carolina Collection, in the
basement of joyner Library, West
wing.
NIH
A representative from National In-
stitute of Health, Bethesda, MO will
be on campus March 19 and 20 to in-
terview students who would like to
work in a clinical setting as Normal
Volunteers. Students will be paid dai
ly stipends. All interested students
must attend a general meeting at 7:00
P.m. on Monday. March 19 In Rawl
302 before having Interviews on the
20th. students malorlng in Allied
Health, Nursing, and related fields
are encouraged to apply. Contact the
Co-op Office, 313 Rawl, for details and
applications.
INTRAMURAL
SOFTBALL
Registration for Intramural Soft
ball will be held March 12-13 In
Manorial Gym. Play will begin
March 19. Start forming your teams
now.
LIBRARY HOURS
Joyner Library hours for Spring
Break, please note that the hours
have been extended (beyond those
appearing on printed schedules,
calendars, etc.) for the following
dates:
Friday, March 2, 8 a.m. 9
p.mSaturday and Sunday, March 3
& 4 closed; Monday, March 5 � Fri
day, March 9 8 a.m. 5 p.m Satur
day, March 10, 9 a.m. 6 p.m Sun-
day. March 11, 1 p.m. 12 Midnight
IRSAQUARBICS
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services is offering an
aquarobics class Registration will be
held February 27 through March 2
Cost for students, four dollars for one
class per week, eight dollars for two
classes per week. FacultyStaff; five
dollars for classes meeting once per
week, ten dollars for classes meeting
twice per week.
PEACE MEETING
Going to be in Greenville over the
break Take this chance to check out
me Peace Committee, 6 30 Friday
nights, 610 S Elm St just east of
Austin. For information, call 758-4906
LOGO CONTEST
The Student union Special Eve
Committee Is sponsoring a Logo cor
test tor "Barefoot on me Mall " Bring
your entry to Mendenhall (room 734
by March 2 The year tfax is ��
quired on all entries If you have an.
Questions, call Bruce at 752 3065 or
John at 757-6611 (ext 213)
HONORS PHIL 1100
The Honors section (no 299) ot
PHIL 1100 was listed at an incorrec
time In the Honors correspondence �
is correctly listed In me newpaper
schedule as being taught at 10 x
MWF Students should preregis'e
tor section no 299 at 10:00 MWF
Sociolol
Attend
ByTINAMAROSCHAK
Ce-Vwi ta�J�e
Last weekend several
ECU students and faculty
members traveled to
Richmond. Va. for the
14th annual Socioloj:
Research Sympos:
The conference, which is
sponsored b the
Sociology Honor Frater-
nity, Alpha Kappa Delta,
gives selected
undergraduate stude
and faculty members the
opportunity to present
research finding to peo-
ple across the country
Kenneth R Wilson,
associate professor of
Sociology, organized
session for ECU. F
undergraduate stude-
Lisa Wilson, Be
Waters. Larry Be.
Pets Le
AvvlALjOFAMEAl
105 Airport Rd
Greenville. NC 27834
(9191758-0327
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
THURSDAY IS
LADIES NIGHT
With FREE Admission
(Lady Members Only)
Free Wine � 30c & 45CDraf t
Served in 8oz. glasses
SAT.
Combination Speciaj
Trout, Shrimp
and Deviled Crab
3rd Steve Hardy's Original
Beach Party
ALL ABC Permits
Private Club for members & guests
Tues-Sun. Happy Hour from 5-8pm
B SlEPHrN
HARDING
Staff Writer
The abandoning of
pets is �'a real problem"
in this area as well as
other places according to
Bobbie Parsons, fa
home coordinator and
president of the Humane
Society for Pitt County.
Quite often there is an in-
crease in strays found
after the school break 11
spring or summer. The
Greenville .Animal Con-
trol has had to go in
dorms in the past to get
pets students have left
A1
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
�'� Greenville Blvd.
756-3023 �24 MRS.
PLAZA SHE
?4 hour Towing Service
L-Haul Rentals
Available
ipoooocooooosooooooopooaoeninnvi inrr�r-�- 1�mmoaaaaa
TOGI
PIRATE
WALK
757-6616
NTSYOU
AT
'Kfngs
cDominion
Yogi wants you at King's Dominion for East
Carolina University Student-Faculty Day on
April 14, 1984. The Student Union Travel
Committee is sponsoring a trip to King's Dominion.
Ride all day, eat all you like, for just a small fee.
For more information,
contact the Central Ticket Office, Mendenhall
Student Center, at 757-6611, ext 266.
VM�J?������������WMM�MM
4

OFFEEHOUSE
AUDITIONS
MARCH 1
HENDRIX THEATRE
ALL ACTS
INVITED
TO AUDITION CALL 757-6611
selected acts will be
paid to perform
public welcome
Your BSN
means you '
med ij
rSSSSSSSSSSA
� Brand new, very spacious living
� Totally Furnished and Accessorized
(Linfens, Cookware, Designer Furniture,
Appliances)
� Large Private Pool (With Lounge Chairs)
� Beautiful Clubhouse (Laundry & Rec. Facilities)
� tS'SaSffii1 25 Cua,mxpus (Clfy and University
Bus Service Available)
� And, lots of social activities & parties planned
throughout the year.
� Financing Available
Kingston Place � 3101 S.Evim Street � Greenville, NC 27834 � 756)285
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH t. 1984




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756-0285
Sociology Faculty, Students
Attend Research Symposium
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Co-Newt Editor
Last weekend several
ECU students and faculty
members traveled to
Richmond, Va. for the
14th annual Sociological
Research Symposium.
The conference, which is
sponsored by the
Sociology Honor Frater-
nity, Alpha Kappa Delta,
gives selected
undergraduate students
and faculty members the
opportunity to present
research findings to peo-
ple across the country.
Kenneth R. Wilson,
associate professor of
Sociology, organized the
session for ECU. Five
undergraduate students,
Lisa Wilson, Beryl
Waters, Larrv Bellis,
Lauren Olive, and Robert
Lucas attended the event.
L. Wilson presented in-
formation on a study
about how rules in co-ed
dorms were developed
and adhered to. Wilson
found that most students
know which rules they
have to abide by and
which ones they can
"slide by" on.
Waters studied older
college students,
specifically the problems
that mothers face. She
found that the students
support each other,
however there is little
organized support for
them. Both Waters and
Wilson are students in the
Sociology symbolic in-
teraction class.
Two students in the In-
troduction to Ethnology
class, Bellis and Olive,
studied a psychiatric
ward. The two interacted
with the patients, studied
the rules they followed,
and the ways the patients
interacted with each
other.
Lucas presented
research on a trip he took
last summer to Temascal,
Mexico. While there
Lucas studied the
fishermen who made
their living in the small,
rural area.
Buford Rhea, associate
professor of
Sociology,worked with
graduate student Robert
Matthews on a study of,
the social organizations
of hospitals.
Patient satisfaction in
nursing homes was
studied by Associate Pro-
Pets Left During Vacations
By STEPHEN
HARDING
Staff W ritn
The abandoning of
pets is "a real problem"
in this area as well as
other places according to
Bobbie Parsons, foster
home coordinator and
president of the Humane
Society for Pitt County.
Quite often there is an in-
crease in strays found
after the school breaks, at
spring or summer. The
Greenville .Animal Con-
trol has had to go in
dorms in the past to get
pets students have left
behind.
Sometimes students
return their pets to the
Humane Society when
they find their apartment
does not allow pets or
they get too hard to han-
dle in a dorm room
without being caught.
When the Humane
Society finds a stray
animal they keep it for
two weeks and try to find
the owner. After that
period of time, the
animal is put up for
adoption. The Humane
Society has a limit on the
number of pets they can
take. After that limit is
reached, the animals have
to be sent to the city
pound.
The Humane Society
never destroys an animal.
They keep pets as long as
necessary. For older
animals and non pure
breeds, this can be a long
time.
Greenville Animal
Control will hold an
animal for three days and
try to find the owner. If
the owner is not found,
the pet is put up for adop-
tion for up to seven days.
After that the animal
must be disposed of.
The Humane Society is
a strictly volunteer opera-
tion. Their money comes
from donations by area
residents, businesses, and
organizations. They also
have memberships at
$3.50 for singles and $5
for families. They ask for
donations of $25 for
spayed females dogs and
$10 for adult male dogs
and puppies. They ask
for any donation a person
cares to make for cats.
The Greenville Animal
Control changes $2 for
cats and $10 for pick up
and $2 a day for a food
on a pet when an owner
picks it up
Register To
Vote
During
Spring Break
PART-TIME SOCCER CO ACHES �
Youth Soccer Coaches work part-time, 10-20 hours
weplilv. rwoinnino Vlarrh 1Q until Via VIn �,�l k.




Youth Soccer Coaches work part-rime, 10-20 hours
weekly, beginning March 19 until May 3. Hours normal-
ly 3:30-6:30p.m. Monday-Thursday. Salary rate $3.30
hour.
Applications will be accepted through Monday,
March 19. at the Personnel Office. City of Greenville,
corner of. West Fifth and Washington Streets.


YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, it also
means you're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities,
P.O. Box 7713, Burbank,CA 91510.
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
.Yi
:
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Your Adult Entertainment Center
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a ik
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LADIES LOCK OUT
8:30- 10:00
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Friday Nite
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Doors Open 8:30
Happy Hour Til 9:30
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Papa Katz IS A Private Club
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W� Have AN ABC Permits
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N
N
I
Honor Board Action
Defendant
Charge
Plea
Decision
fessor of Sociology Avtar
Singh and graduate stu-
dent Nickie Nichols.
James P. Mitchell,
associate professor of
Sociology, presented
research on aging. He
discussed an interactional
view of aging and moder-
nization at a gerntology
session.
Associate Professor of
Anthropology Michael
Orbach acted as discus-
sant for the
undergraduate session,
entitled Undergraduate
Fieldwork in the Social
Sciences. Orbach reem-
phasized the sessions and
summarized the themes.
Approximately 150 to
200 people, a majority of
which were from N.C.
and Va attended the
conference.
Freshman
Vandalism
Public Intoxication
Guilty
Restitution
Probation for rest of
semester
Fine � $25
Written reprimand
Drug and alcohol
workshop
Last week
Freshman
Freshman
Freshman
Stealing
Stealing
Violation of city or-
dinances
Guilty
Guilty
Guilty both charges
Probation for one year
Written reprimand
Voluntary work � 40
hours
Probation for one year
Voluntary work � 15
hours
Fine � $100
Wrinen reprimand
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good furniture, china & crystal, typewriters, etc.
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atije lEaat (Eawlitifan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher. &����,
Darryl Brown, ����,���
Jennifer Jendrasiak, �� j.t. Pietrzak, ft�ar�Mrf�mw
Tina Maroschak. g� &- Mike McPartland, �
Ed Nicklas. Sfwo t&io, Tom Norton. o�u ���
Gordon I pock. f�t Kathy Fuerst, i m
Mark Barker. c�rvic,o-wjiw Mike Mayo. wwm�
March 1. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Absentee Ballots
Students Have Three Options
Students have a special problem
at election time, especially in Pitt
County. Since students are rarely
able to register to vote in Green-
ville, as well as in some other col-
lege towns across the country they
must either drive to their
hometown on election day or vote
by absentee ballot. For most
students, the second option is
easier, but students need to act now
to obtain an absentee ballot.
For the many students who can
go to their hometowns during the
semester, the easiest way is to stop
by the County Elections Office and
apply for an absentee ballot. The
ballot must be applied for by the
Thursday prior to North Carolina's
May 9 primary in most areas (and
that Thursday is during the heat of
final exams at ECU).
For those students who are not
returning home, a close relative can
apply for the absentee ballot and
have it sent to the student. Also,
students can request the ballot by
mail any time before the Thursday
prior to the election. In short, with
three options, students should have
no reason for not voting this May
and November.
Candidates such as Raleigh W.
jBynum, a candidate for Mecklen-
burg County commissioner, are
making an effort to inform
students on absentee balloting.
County Election Offices are also
helpful. And if students are to have
a right to complain about election
laws and to work for change, mak-
ing it easier for them to vote in their
college towns, they must first prove
they want to vote. Absentee ballots
are the best option for most ECU
students in this election year, and
come May and November, a flood
of out-of-town mail should hit
Greenville post offices, headed for
students' hometowns.
It's Simple
A simple suggestion on how to
make life at ECU a little more
simple:
It would be very helpful for
many students if the the powers
that be in the administration would
notify students on their report
cards each semester of the deadline
for the change-of-grade process.
Unless this date is buried deep
within the university catalog
somewhere, it seems no where to be
found. Yet the administration is
recalcitrant in changing or remov-
ing incorrect grades after a certain
deadline. The date needs to be as
well publicized as, say, the last day
to drop a course.
�v �wrrsiG?Ti &.
mtdr
A Viable Candidate
Hart Wins On Clear, New Ideas
r- Campus Forum
By JAY STONE
The complexion of the struggle for the
Democratic Presidential nomination was
profoundly altered by the New Hamp-
shire primary Tuesday. It was predicted
up until a day before the primary that if
Sen. Gary Han of Colorado succeeded
in pulling within 10 percentage points of
Mondale, the results of the New Hamp-
shire vote could be considered a victory
for him and a serious blow to Mondale's
credibility as the party's front runner.
Now, in the aftermath, analysts are
stunned by the fact that Hart defeated
Mondale by more than 10 percent of the
vote. People are trying to figure out
what Hart's upset victory means.
Many interpret the New Hampshire
vote more as a vote against Mondale
than one for Hart. They maintain that
Hart's reliance upon campaign themes
which emphasize he is the candidate of
the new generation who has new ideas is
merely empty rhetoric devoid of
substance. They accuse Hart of not ad-
dressing the issues.
Yet, as Hart himself told CBS cor-
respondent Dan Rather in an interview
after the primary results were tabulated,
he has, in fact, addressed the issues more
thoroughly than any candidate in the
race.
Both in his book A New Democracy
and in the volumes of position papers
that he has released during his tenure on
the Senate Armed Services Committee,
the Senate Budget Committee, and the
Senate Environment and Public Works
Committee, Hart has addressed the ma-
jor political issues of the day with clarity
and depth. Some of the proposals which
Hart has made in relation to the
economy include:
� promoting new assistance for en-
trepreneurial small businesses by
restructuring federal regulations to pro-
mote easier access to captial, as well as
setting up government agencies to pro-
vide them with technical assistance;
� using more pension funds �
America's largest pool of captial �
more creatively to provide venture
capital and investments in needed areas
such as affordable housing;
� increasing federal investments in
basic research and development to main-
tain the United State's world leadership.
In the area of the environment Hart
has consistently proven himself as a
champion of the national effort to pro-
tect the nation's air, water and
wildlands. As chairman of the National
Commission on Air Quality, he helped
produce the first official recommenda-
tions for controlling acid rain and has
led the Senate forces trying to preserve
and strengthen the Clean Air Act. He
has also sponsored legislation to pro-
hibit landfill disposal of especially
hazardous wastes.
In the area of defense, Hart has gain-
ed a reputation as the nation's foremost
advocate of military reform. He ad-
vocates changing the kinds of weapons
that he contends cost too much and
don't work well in combat. Instead he
feels that we need to buy simpler, more
effective weapons in larger quantities.
"More spending on a military that
doesn't work Hart says, "just buys a
bigger military that doesn't work
In addition, he believes we need to
reform the kind of people we promote.
According to Hart, we now promote
military' managers and bureaucrats,
when we need strong leaders and im-
aginative tacticians in key command
positions. Hart also endorses a mutually
verifiable bilateral nuclear freeze on all
nuclear weapons, as well as strong non-
proliferation measures to prevent the
further spread of nuclear weapons.
Overall, Hart believes that by adopting
the measures he recommends the defense
budget can be cut by $100 billion over
the next five years while yielding a
stronger military.
This is merely the most cursory
description of Hart's stand on the issues.
He spells out his positions in far greater
detail in his book and papers.
Gary Hart is not a typical politician.
He grew up in Ottawa, Kansas where his
father was a railroad worker who never
earned more than $100 a week. Both of
his parents grew up poor and neither
graduated from high school. Hart,
paradoxically, attended Yale Divinity
School and earned an L.L.B. degree
from the Yale Law School. His is a
ready-made success story ripe for being
exploited as a campaign trail narrative.
Yet, Hart refuses to attempt to make
political hay out of his life story. Says
he: "Any time a candidate talks about
himself I get turned off. It's old-style
politics. It's commercializing your per-
sonal life He adds: "There's a point
beyond which you can sacrifice your in-
dividuality for ambition. 1 don't have to
sell myself. I have to sell the need to
change generations of leadership
This commitment to personal integrity
carries over into other aspects of Han's
campaign as well. For instance, he has
refused to accept any contributions from
political action committees, and he will
not accept contributions from am
source which exceed $1,000. His is truly
a grass roots campaign.
Gary Hart still faces an uphill battle to
win his party's nomination. Yet,
ironically, he may be the only candidate
within the Democratic Party who stands
a real chance of defeating Reagan in
November. For Hart, like Reagan,
comes from the west and he would be
able to challenge the president on his
home ground. In addition, he offers a
clear alternative to the hackneyed
politics of traditional liberalism and the
conservative politics embraced by the
Reagan administration. He is a man pas-
sionately committed to America's tradi-
tional values but impatient with yester-
day's politics.


U.SSoviet Differences Call For Firm, Fair Approach
One thing that must be addressed
when discussing the state of world af-
fairs is the fundamental idealogical dif-
ferences between the U.S. and
U.S.S.R the two major superpowers
facing and confronting one another in
this complex nuclear world. Every day I
hear more and more about arms build-
ups, increasing hostilities all around the
world, the breaking down of strategic
arms talks, and tensions that are moun-
ting to the breaking point on both sides.
Now that Russia has a new president,
I hear all this grumbling (mostly from
Democrats) that we should jump to ease
the tension between us, that Reagan
should have gone to Andropov's
funeral, and that we should put forth a
stronger effort to "send a message" to
the new Soviet government designed to
thaw out our relationship a bit.
Bending over backwards to appease
the new government would be about as
helpful to the world situation now as
Reagan's volatile rhetoric was a while
back when he called the Soviet regime
an "evil empire" that will stop at
nothing to achieve their goals. He
wasn't totally wrong with his harsh
statements, and the Russian govern-
ment has never denied that their
ultimate goal is to spread communism
throughout the entire world, but I am
glad that he has toned down his rhetoric
somewhat. Carter's "slap'em on the
wrist" policies portrayed us to the
world as a giant weakling country that
could be pushed around. Russia took
advantage of our posture by invading
Afghanastan, and who can forget the
444 day Iranian hostage crisis?
The pendulum seems to have swung
in the opposite direction when Reagan
was elected, and his aggressive attitude
may have payed off in some ways but it
has been detrimental in others. One
thing that is obvious to me, no matter
which administration is in office, is the
apparent frustration and futility in
dealing with the actions of the iron cur-
tain. America and Russia obviously
have totally separate and conflicting
goals in this world, and nothing will
ever be achieved if both sides insist on
submitting proposals to each other that
everyone knows neither will ever ac-
cept. All the while, the risk of a head-on
collision between us appears to be get-
ting ever closer.
It doesn't seem to matter which in-
dividual is the head of the Russian
government because their system is run
by a collective group of men known as
the Politburo.Their president is little
more than a figurehead and their
policies are shaped by no one person. It
seems that all America can do, short of
war, is to take a firm stance in what we
believe in and try to remove all the
political games that we are playing just
because they are playing them. The
Soviet government mind simply does
not work like ours, and if we ever want
to accomplish anything constructive
then we must come to grips with the real
problems of the world, instead of laying
everything at the doorstep of those
Russian troublemakers One of our
key goals should be to gain the trust and
confidence of the world by exhibiting
genuine concern for trying to help solve
the major problems, and not by sending
millions of dollars to terrorist govern-
ments just because they claim that they
are anti-communist. Once we
demonstrate to the world the true
nature of communism, maybe we can
prevent those troubled countries that
are teetering on the fence from falling
to communist regimes. If we can do
that, I feel that we are on the way to a
more peaceful and productive world.
Mike Highsmith
Graduate
School of Business
Pragmatic Approach
I appreciated Patrick O'Neill's letter
to Campus Forum, Feb. 23. No doubt,
O'Neill is largely accurate in his view of
our collective preoccupation with our
day-to-day activities of making a living,
or getting an "education to neglect of
his concern about nuclear war.
In Postman and Wdngartner's book,
Teaching as a Subversive Activity, it is
said that "We have no common world,
and communication is possible only to
the extent that two perceivers have
similar purposes, assumptions and ex-
periences. The process of becoming an
effective social being is contingent upon
seeing the other's point of view
I agree with O'Neill that all of us
ought to be concerned about the
likelihood of nuclear war, massive
destruction, etc. I suspect that most
Americans are concerned on this score.
But most Americans don't see
picketing, getting arrested and higly
publicized as their cup of tea. Nor do I
see effective protest as limited to those
particular tactics. Sometimes those tac-
tics work; sometimes they do, indeed,
tend to invalidate one's argument and
cause.
Many tools are available, I think, but
in most instances they need to be ap-
plied directly to the decision-makers.
The choice of tools (or weapons) should
be based on a careful consideration of
the decision-maker one wishes to in-
fluence (or incapacitate).
I think Sen. Helms, for example,
would do no more than smile, quite
righteously, if I and half a dozen other
"liberal" faculty persons got arrested
in connection with an anti-nuclear pro-
test in Greenville. However, if several
car loads of us visited his office, by ap-
pointment and simultaneously, he
might at least pause to wonder what this
means regarding his race for re-
election. If we were so naive as to de-
nounce all expenditures for defense, he
would properly ignore us. If, on the
other hand, we insisted on a strong con-
ventional capability and a diversion of
funds from proposed new nuclear
weaponry to accomplish this, he might
at least listen. There's no guarantee, but
it might lead to a discussion of the mat-
ter.
The extreme right-wing persons have
no more obligation to listen, or to com-
promise and negotiate, than do we so-
called liberals. Also, if I and others
could stop stereotyping conservatives,
liberals, war-mongers, peaceniks, etc. it
would help. I need to try to believe that
my philosophical or political antagonist
has some sincerity, some ability to
negotiate and reason with me. Other-
wise, I'm left with about two choices. I
can just give up, or I can set out to
destroy the antagonist. That reminds
me a little of the present foreign policy
dilemma of our nation.
W. Carlton Byrd, Sr.
Professor of CommunityHealth
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
Volleyh
To Aid
By TINA MAROSCHAK
"The Phi Sigma Pi Honor
Fraternity, Bud Light and
Rock 93 are sponsoring
the 1984 Easter SeaN
Volleyball Marathon at
Minges Coliseum on
March 31 and April
The event, which is
part of the United State's
'Handicapped
Awareness Week' is be
ing held to raise mone
for Easter Seals, an
organization which pro-
vides services to physical-
lj nl
and
Seai
func
chas
clinij
cams
M
or
cai
are
ting
tribi
tear
the
mm
College L
About Ed
ICPS) - "We're still
waiting in the wings to see
what will happen says
Nancy Raley of the Ac-
tion Committee for
Higher Education, which
is supposed to coordinate
public efforts to fight for
education budgets in
Congress.
College lobbyists, adds
Dallas Martin of the na-
tional association of stu-
dent aid counselors,
aren't planning anything
special to fight the latest
round of proposed stu-
dent aid cuts.
Indeed, college lob-
byists in general seem to
have greeted the most re-
cent aid proposals �
released in President
Reagan's February 1st
budget message � with a
low-keyed, laid-back
response that contrasts
vividly with the clarion
calls to action and
mobilization efforts of
the last two years.
The crisis calls are no
longer necessary, they
say, because they're con-
fident Congress won't
diminish education fun-
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Continued From Page 1
although that bill
hasn't come before the
fuli house yet.
A location for the quiet
dormitory has not been
selected yet. Niewald
said, and probably won't
be r'or two or three weeks
�.v. �k.� .My,vw.�v.?
He
thin
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of 11
wii:
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local
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now!
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HI
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INCUDES:
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SPECIAL KID'S PR1I
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-� - �mT't'f-
14. V-
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1, 1984
OF THE
5 STILL
CENTRAL
1(3 WINNER,
WIRE
t
Ideas
w
f his life story. Says
a candidate talks about
jrned off. It's old-style
r.eraalizing your per-
adds: "There's a point
can sacrifice your in-
ambition. I don't have to
have to sell the need to
' - ol leadership
; merit to personal integrity
lto other aspects of Hart's
I. For instance, he has
any contributions from
ommittees, and he will
n- from am
eeci SI.000. His is truly
tmpa jp
ices an uphill battle to
tj - nomination. Yet,
e :he only candidate
Part who stands
defeating Reagan in
Han. like Reagan,
the west and he would be
:nge the president on his
In addition, he offers a
itive to the hackneyed
khnonal liberalism and the
3litics embraced by the
ttration. He is a man pas-
tted to America's tradi-
lmpatient with yester-
of
oach
lditures for defense, he
ignore us. If, on the
Insisted on a strong con-
ility and a diversion of
proposed new nuclear
Icomplish this, he might
here's no guarantee, but
a discussion of the mat-
Inght-wing persons have
tion to listen, or to com-
gotiate. than do we so-
Also. if I and others
�eotypmg conservatives,
ngers, peaceniks, etc. it
to try to believe that
or political antagonist
fcerity, some ability to
reason with me. Other-
rith about two choices. I
ip, or I can set out to
Itagonist. That reminds
jie present foreign policy
nation.
W. Carlton Byrd, Sr.
r of CommunityJHealth
im Rules
tlinian welcomes letters
nnts of view. Mail or
our office in the Old
pg, across from Joyner
)
Volleyball Marathon
To Aid Handicapped
" TIN5US2?CHAK y handicapped children
and adults in N.C. Easter
The Phi Sigma Pi Honor Seals will also use the
Fraternity, Bud Light and funds for equipment pur-
Rock 93 are sponsoring chases and loans, speech
the 1984 Easter Seals
Volleyball Marathon at
Minges Coliseum on
March 31 and April.
The event, which is
part of the United State's
Handicapped
Awareness Week is be-
ing held to raise money
for Easter Seals, an
organization which pro-
vides services to physical-
clinics, and residential
camping.
Any men's, women's
or coed volleyball team
can participate. Players
are responsible for get-
ting sponsors to con-
tribute money for their
teams' participation in
the marathon. A
minumum donation of
$75 per team is required
to enter the event and be
eligible for prizes.
Each team will play
three 30-minute games
against teams of similar
ability during a two-hour
period.
Prizes will be given
throughout the
marathon, two for the
top fundraising team and
the individual fundraiser.
A $10 pre-registration fee
for each team is due on
March 1.
Student Opinion
College Lobbyists Calm
About Education Budgets
Spring Break Plans
By THERESA DULSKI
Staff Writer
Students were asked what plans they
have for Spring break.
Glenda Walton, Childhood
Development and Family Relations,
Junior � "I'm going home to
Gatesville. I plan to relax and study a
little bit. I also plan to visit some high
school friends
Tammy Epps, Business, Sophomore
� "I'm going home to Charlotte. I
plan to study. I have four tests on
Wednesday when I get back. I plan to
go to Dixie
Mark Belcher, Commercial Art,
Sophomore � "I plan to go home, go
to sleep, be merry, and play a lot of
golf. I might be in Charlotte. I'm going
to watch the ACC Tournament
Betsy Easterly, Commercial Art,
Sophomore � "I plan to go home to
Buffalo and find a job. I plan to pound
the pavement with my portfolio
Walton
Epps
r�$l
�04 -
Belcher
Easterly
A legal
career
in three
short
months
Get right into law with intensive preparation
approved by the American Bar Association
After completing the three-month program, you
can take your place as a legal assistant It's
one of the fastest growing careers of the 80s
� Bachelor s degree or attorney sponsorship required
� Day and Evening classes available
� Employment assistance
� Classes conducted in Atlanta
Meet us on Campus
Monday. March 19. 1984
Placement Office
9:00-5:00
(404) 266-1060
44
z-v
Coii9
Phon Di
Evening
The National Center for
Paralegal Training
3414 Peachtree Road. N E . Atlanta. GA 30326
(CPS) � "We're still
waiting in the wings to see
what will happen says
Nancy Raley of the Ac-
tion Committee for
Higher Education, which
is supposed to coordinate
public efforts to fight for
education budgets in
Congress.
College lobbyists, adds
Dallas Martin of the na-
tional association of stu-
dent aid counselors,
aren't planning anything
special to fight the latest
round of proposed stu-
dent aid cuts.
Indeed, college lob-
byists in general seem to
have greeted the most re-
cent aid proposals �
released in President
Reagan's February 1st
budget message � with a
low-keyed, laid-back
response that contrasts
vividly with the clarion
calls to action and
mobilization efforts of
the last two years.
The crisis calls are no
longer necessary, they
say, because they're con-
fident Congress won't
dimmish education fun-
ding during an election
year.
A few Washington
observers, however,
worry the lobbyists have
a "false sense of
security and recall the
last time they displayed
such confidence � in
1981 � Congress cut the
federal education budget
by a hefty 12 percent.
In 1982 and 1983, the
lobbyists beat back more
dramatic budget cuts by
sending a constant stream
of alarmed press releases
out of Washington and
flying a constant stream
of mobilized, well-briefed
college presidents into
Washington to tell Con-
gress how more cuts
would affect their cam-
puses.
This year, "it's possi-
ble that if there's a
reason, we'll have a new
conference" later in the
budget process, Raley
says
"Our strategy says
Charles Saunders,
governmental affairs
director for the American
Council on Education
(ACE) and a leading
force in organizing op-
position to the Reagan
college budgets of the
past, "is to lobby our
constituencies to work to
oppose the cuts by telling
their representatives in
Congress what the budget
will do to their
programs
Peter Rogoff of the
Coalition of Independent
College and University
Students (called COR-
PUS) adds that most col-
lege groups in
Washington will work
together to make unified
counterproposals to Con-
gress this time.
And the Action Com-
mittee, organized in late
1981 just after Congress
made its first big aid cuts,
"still has a hotline and we
still meet weekly Raley -
points out.
The plans are less ag-
gressive than in the past,
she concedes. "Maybe
it's because the cuts pro-
posed, at least on the face
of it, aren't as drastic
Plaza
cinema
756-00881
A New Movie
I
upumfir
About A New Generation
SHOWS WEEKDAYS 3:00-7.10-9:00
SAT. & SUN. 3:30 - 5:20 - 7:10 - 9:00
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Not just for Spanish majors only, but for everyone: beginners, "in between'
students, and advanced. Put some excitement into your college career
BEGINNER OR ADVANCED - Cost is about the
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permanent address bekm
your permanent street adrtress
Live with a Spanish family, attend classes
four hours a day, four days a week, four
months Earn 16 hrs of credit (equivalent to 4
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enhanced by opportunities not available in a
US classroom Standardized tests show our
students' language skills superior to students
completing two year programs in US
Advanced courses also
Hurry, it takes a lot of time to make all ar-
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SPRING SEMESTER � Feb 1 - June 1
FALL SEMESTER - Sept 10 -Dec 22
each year
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For full information � send coupon to
SEMESTER IN SPAIN
2442 E Collier SE , F-3
Grand Rapids. Michigan 49506
(A Program of Trinity Christian College)
ilH-lilllthllhlH:iIHriHnilfrli:Mhl.MliilMll-il �ff
aft-aa-a-a-v Copyright 1983 Jg ,terns and Prices 4nv.x�Ti�n irtu omirv Tt T
Quiet Dorm Receives Support
Continues From Page 1
although that bill
hasn't come before the
full house yet.
A location for the quiet
dormitory has not been
selected yet, Niewald
said, and probably won't
be for two or three weeks.
He added that he doesn't
think Jarvis Hall is the
right facility now in light
of the survey results. "I
will not recommend Jar-
vis (as the quiet dorm
location) he said. "Jar-
vis would be too small
now
Dozens of students
from Jarvis, which is the
smallest dormitory on
campus with 16
residents, has protested i
recent weeks the proposal
that the dorm be con-
verted to the quiet dor-
mitory.
WS3iS
ADVERTISED ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is re-
quired to be t-eadiiv available for
sale in each Kroger sav-on. except
as specifically noted in this ad if we
do run out of an Item we will offer
you your choice of a comparable
Item when available, ref letting the
same savings or a ralncneck which
win entitle you to purchase the
advertised item at the advertised
price within 30 days Limit one
manufacturer s coupon per Item
?
OPEN 24 Hrs. Everyday
600 Greenville Bfvd. - Greenville
r
kRoger
GRtfE
ssyyArssssssysVsssssswssx
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uaroe
3
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oo
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srtoin Tip
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c THE SEA
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CHEF BOY AR DEE
MINI, CHICKEN OR
6.5 OZ.
can
'U
PEPSV
EREE.
EVERY FRIDAY
5 PM � 9 PM
ONLY
12
SN
?AK
INCLUDES:
A variety of Fillets,
including Lousiana-
Style Fish Fillets, Hush
Puppies, French Fries,
a choice of Hot Vegetables
and our own Famous Seafood Chowder.
With AJI-You-Can-Eal
Salad Bar $5.49.
H
cola
Ravioli
I 15 02.
Can
010 H
00c

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$7.
�L�&

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CHABL.S
BLANC
OR
FV
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SPECIAL KIDS PRICES, TOO!
MONEYS
o
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205 Greenvilk Blvd.
ti
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IS






THE EAST CAROLINJAN
style
MARCH 1.1984 Page 6
Alcoholic A A
Hot

These peaceful riticulated giraffes occupy a habitat with zebras and ostriches at the North Carolina Zoo
All photograph! by
GARY PATTERSON
It's Happening A t The North Carolina Zoo
By GARY PATTERSON
Staff rtlr
With the arrival of spring
break, sightseers are set to
iourney to New York, skiers to
Snowshoe and sunbathers to
Florida's beaches. But if you find
yourself state-bound this spring
break, a world of adventure
awaits you at the North Carolina
Zoological Park.
Located in Asheboro, the Zoo
is three-and-one-half hours drive
from Greenville via U.S. Highway
M West. The location is ideal for
a one-day getaway from ECU's
academic grindstone.
The North Carolina Zoo is
unlike any other zoo planned or
built in the world. When com-
pleted in the 1990s, it will be the
world's largest natural habitat
zoological park. Instead of tradi-
tional cage enclosures, the Zoo
utilizes rock and water barriers
that compliment the natural sur-
roundings. The terrain closely
resembles the animals' natural en-
vironments.
The 300-acre African section
was the First phase of the Zoo to
open, three years ago. Construc-
tion on the North American park
will begin this summer. In addi-
tion to the African and North
American parks, Australian,
European, Asian and South
American parks will also rise out
of the North Carolina forests and
plains this decade.
The Zoo is funded by state
revenues and public and private
donations. All of us have helped
the Zoo grow with our tax dollars.
This type of funding has kept the
adult ticket price at $3. A shuttle
service around the Zoo and park-
ing lots is available for $1 per per-
son. The Zoo is equipped for han-
dicapped visitors, and gift and
snack shops are located on the
of females and young baboons.
When a baby becomes restless, the
mother disciplines him by holding
his tail until he calms down.
The highlight of the African
section is the R.J. Reynolds
Forest Aviary. This multi million
dollar tropical ecosystem houses a
variety of exotic birds and plants.
The ornamental section in-
cludes such African plants as the
i
v � � �� � �-�. � � .i 1 M
A world of adventure awaits you at
the North Carolina Zoological Park.
grounds along with a picnic area.
A scenic trail winds its way
through the various exhibits in the
Zoo. Along this trail you'll find
the lion area, home for a pride of
six lions. The big cats snooze most
of the day but are usually active
in the mornings and late after-
noons.
Next door is the Chimpanzee
compound. Their animated antics
provide constant entertainment.
They are the showmen of the Zoo
with comical behavior that will re-
mind you of someone you know.
Distantly related to the chim-
panzees, the baboons are their
neighbors next door. One snow-
white male dominates the family
papyrus, sago plam, bird of
paradise and birdsnest fern. From
South America comes the diffen-
bachia, banana and fetismania.
Other tropical specimen include
the lady palm from China,
Hawaii's schefflera and the weep-
ing Fig from Java.
To provide a comfortable
climate for the plants and birds,
the 18,000 square foot aviary has
an environmental control system
that keeps the temperature bet-
ween 60 and 95 degrees with 80
percent relative humidity. Cons-
tant monitoring by Zoo staff
keeps this fragile ecosystem in
perfect balance.
The large bird collection was
obtained from around the world
relaxes white watching her yoang cnbt.
The ostrich is curious about his
human observers.
by the North Carolina Zoological
Society. The exhibit includes
Chilean flamingos, snowy egrets,
red-crested touracos, mandarin
ducks, tanagers and the Brazilian
cardinal.
Just a short walk from the
Forest Aviary is the construction
site for the African Pavilion.
Opening later this summer, the
facility will house over 200
animals in a re-creation of the
African tropical forest, savanna
and lowland marsh. Monkeys,
gorrilas, snakes, crocodiles and a
host of smaller animals will live
under the pavilion.
Terrace walkways will carry
you through the upper forest
canopy enabling you to observe
creatures who spend their entire
lives in the tree tops.
Adjacent to the pavilion is the
African Plains section. Here live
the antelope, rhinoceros and
elephant. The African elephants
are active and amusing. Though
some weigh 5,200 pounds, they
can romp and play like children.
Rounding out the African sec-
tion is the Zoe exhibit which con-
tains zebra, ostrich and giraffe
habitat. Zoe was the original ex-
hibit the Zoo began with over
three years ago. The animals were
placed here because of their
passive behavior toward each
other. Though the ostrich is ag-
gressive toward his own kind (ex-
cept during the mating season) he
will not challenge zebra or giraffe
for territory.
Zoe is the end of the trail, yet
you will discover more about the
animals if you give them a second
look. Take the time to observe
each one in its own beauty.
By JENNY L. MEADOR
mmwmm
Today's weather is
It's anybody's guess
you enjoying the cold, the
rain, the sleet? Green-
ville's unusual weather
becomes the usual as the
temperatures and condi-
tions change hour bv
hour. Many of us choose
to deal with the cold by
remembering the last two
weeks we spent playing
tennis or lying m
bathing suits under a
75-degree sun.
But day dreaming cai
beat the cold for long.
More effective methods
are needed, such
bundling, burning, cuddl-
ing and � drinking. And
when
and
drmkj
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not tj
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SEME M CASSIS �l� ��
BABETTC COGSAC �-
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BNGSTOW W1
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drink, like this Irish coffe A
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Though weighing up to 5200 pounds, elephants will tussle like
children.
Take Plenty Of Film

1
By GARY PATTERSON
StrfrWrttar
Places like the North Carolina
Zoo must make thj shareholders
of Eastman Kodak smile. You'll
hardly see a person there who isn't
carrying a camera of some type.
But at the Zoo there are special
circumstances photographers will
encounter. A little planning
before you get there will make
your picture taking more suc-
cessful.
First, bring plenty of film! One
roll won't be enough, and the
price of film sold at the Zoo is, of
course, high.
If you have an instamatic or
disk camera, use your flash for
shots in the shade. This includes
the Aviary as most of the birds
will be perched in the shadows. By
using your flash, you will shoot
more colorful and detailed pic-
tures. Without a flash the animals
may get lost in the dark
background.
35mm photographers may also
use a flash in the Aviary or use
1,000-speed films. The 1,000 is
great for snapshots; however, if
you anticipate enlargements, use a
slower film with a flash.
If you can borrow a telephoto
or zoom lens, by all means do.
This will get you out there with
the animals and cut out excessive
background that can waste picture
frame. A 135mm lens works well
on most animals, especially in the
Aviary. However, a 200mm or
longer lens will produce tight and
exciting framing of lions, baboons
and chimpanzees.
The photos in this section were
all taken with a 135mm lens ex-
cept the chimpanzees (300mm)
and lions (600mm).
�at; �� m m ��
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I
V
u4
�,
-�-
ll photographs bv
.ARY PATTERSON
Zoo
Alcoholic Anttfrttu
Hot Drinks Beat Winter
By JENNY L.MEADOR
M�ff �rtt�
Today's weather is ?
It's anybody's guess. Are
you enjoying the cold, the
rain, the sleet? Green-
ville's unusual weather
becomes the usual as the
temperatures and condi-
tions change hour by
hour. Many of us choose
to deal with the cold by
remembering the last two
weeks we spent playing
tennis or lying in our
bathing suits under a
75-degree sun.
But day dreaming can't
beat the cold for long
More effective methods
are needed, such as
bundling, burning, cuddl-
ing and � drinking. And
when it comes to unique
and interesting ways of
drinking, Darryl's on
10th Street has more
angles than a Rubik's
Cube. Their latest menu,
not two months old, in-
cludes a variety of after-
dinner dessert drinks.
Although some view
alcohol as the only
human antifreeze, coffee
is another body heater,
and a combination of li-
queurs and coffee is
amazingly delicious, and
effective.
The coffee dessert
drinks aren't popular
during the summer, but
each winter evening at
Darryl's a large number
of coffee drinks are
ordered, most often the
Irish coffee made with
Irish whiskey and kalua.
Three other coffee drinks
on the menu are the Mex-
ican, made with Tia
Maria and kalua; the
Jc aaican, the manager's
favorite, is made with Tia
Maria and Myers Dark
Rum, and the cafe gates
is made with Tia Maria,
Grand Marnier and
creme de cacao.
The Darryl's franchise
formulates the dessert
drinks on the menu, but
two of the local Darryl's
originals include amaret-
to coffee and Dutch cof-
fee. The amaretto coffee
is simply a mixture of
amaretto liqueur and cof-
fee while the Dutch cof-
fee is a mixture of Chris-
tian Brothers' Brandy
and coffee. The customer
can anticipate "times like
these but better when
he sees the drink served in
an Irish mug, doused
with whipped cream and
a cherry on top. Most
students aren't familiar
with these drinks; they're
popular with "older"
customers.
Two other types of
dessert drinks are cordials
and ice cream drinks.
Cordials are call brand li-
queurs such as Baily's
Creme, B & B, Tia Maria
and Cointeau.
"These are all warm
drinks served in brandy
snifters; they are
aromatic drinks says
Darryl's manager Jack
Clowar. "The snifters are
large at the bottom and
narrow at the top
"The dessert drinks sell
quickly and will warm
you up adds co-
manager Will O'Neal.
But despite the popularity
of the cold-weather
drinks, O'Neal says,
"The sales of ice cream
drinks and the frozen
drinks (daiquiris) haven't
declined, and Courvoisier
is the most popular of the
cordials
Of the ice cream
drinks, the pina colada
and the White Russian
top the list. The weather
actually induces would-be
customers to become ac-
tual customers.
"On rainy days,
believe it or not, we're
crowded. It always is
says Clowar.
"And even the ice
cream drinks go says
O'Neal.
But in the summer Dar-
ryl's can hardly keep
enough ice cream mix in
store.
"On weekends people
go crazy says Clowar.
"We don't have enough
blenders to keep going
when they come in.
That's just the way it is
So if you're having
problems shivering
through the last of the
winter cold, perhaps Dar-
ryl's has just the de-
winterizing magic to help
you make it into spring.
Itti ntt44
TARHEEL D
Will Present
Silver Wings
Open At 6:00pm
Country & Country Rock
Malt Beverages $1.00
Admission: $3.00 Single
5.00 Couple
iJOldTar Road Winterviile, NC
u L v " ironies.
I ii
rirates Landing
ote,�onaliy Manog iy
nemco
east,
inc.
13
All new, fully carpeted private rooms,
available immediately. Refrigerator, bed,
and desk furnished. Sun deck, Gazebo
laundry facilities, and kitchen area in-
C,uded' RemcoEa.t
758-60fi 1
@BSBUH@gaBHBH
elephants will tussle like
f Film
ound that can vaste picture
A 135mm lens works well
1st animaJs, especially in the
7; However, a 200mm or
J 'ens will produce tight and
Ig framing of lions, baboons
Vmpanzees.
photos in this section were
Jen with a 135mm lens ex-
l chimpanzees (300mm)
ns (600mm).
&k,
s
tv

ip
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH! jm
Ah, Politics!
��?� by Oary Fttfru
runner Waller Monunle�u Z.Z kP T Jor UDS�' � ��
p .he ggg�s.srTsar a, Gny Hm N
421 Greenville Blvd
Phone 756-0825
2Forl
Special
(Pizza Only)
Offer Good Thru Mar. 31. 1984
Not Good With Any Other Specials
Buy One Pizza at Reoular Price
And Get Another of Same Value
Or Less FREE
LASAGNE
JUST $1.99
- TO GO $2.29 -
with this coupon
(REG. PRICE $3.35)
(Not good with other Lasagne Specials)
.EXPIRES MARCH 31.19S4
SMALL SPAGHETTI PEPPI
JUST $1.99
� TO GO $2.29 �
with this coupon
(REG. PRICE $3.25)
(Not good with other Spaghetti
Peppi specials)
STYR0F00D
I km1 settle tor pre-
omtted uarmedmer
�Aro-pik-kvd burifen
)'hi hare afreshalternator
atSubua Harden fresh lettua
nixnsandallthe'fums
(hme ed meats and cheeses, xn ton
MB and sausage, andfreshls hake,IfnoNow
raft And aery- mbirhor'sabda- Sabuma
"w !� H w Jer no, made m adt anee
208
E. 5th St.
758-7979
�SUB(U(f
20
E. 5th Si
758-7979
Ns-nj.
MAKE TRACKS FOff THE
BEST EATlfTALL AROUND!
The nexttime you stop byforthe Best Eatin'K bring
along this money-savin' coupon. '
'sTdklUamcwfTm
OMHBtJUICE$1.29
nmmmmam this coupon before ordering On. coupon par customer, per
vim pImm Customs must pay any sales tax due This coupon not ooodTn
combinetKn with any other offers Offer good during regular breeWesthours
only at participating Hardees Restaurants � � . "
through May 31. 1984 ��1
'UNUI IDAII (J
Tm uwf
.ADULTS S2.00 TIL 5;30 � �,�
BUCCANEER MOVIES
rfoHJ1 WVAnStuLLY "SffHOF
Ifo LAST DAY YOURS L AJ?�5W�
9:30
MAX ONLY
DCIDLEY IOORE
NASTASSJA
KJNSKI
1:00
3:00:
I
I only at participating Hardaa s Rastaurantt a � . . I
� through May 31. 1984 �-�� 1 r �
(963 Hardees Food Systems lnc 1 VABICnflaMnMBV I
5:30 � 7:30 � 9:30
Pray for them.
They have
unleashed
I
I
I
rmat mum softum $1.79
Ptaasa praaant this coupon before ordering One coupon par customer par
viM. please Customer must pay any sales tax due This eoupon not good m
combinetion with any other offers Offer good after 1030 AM only at
participating Hardee's Restaurant through
May 31 1984
Iff male chimpanzee.
1963 Hardees Food Systems lnc
naCnjgET
SiiiBaenHeiiwitHis
- - -
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?
THE fcAST CAROt INIAN
Sports
MARCH 1, I9M
Page 8
Minges Site-Seeing Tourney
By RANDY MEWS
Hatmmi �� �aw
ECU will host the first-ever
ECAC-South women's basketball
tournament beginning Friday
afternoon in Minges Coliseum.
The Lady Pirates finished the
regular season in second place in
the ECAC, and will meet third
seeded George Mason Saturday at
1:00 p.m.
ECU, GMU and number one
seed Richmond all received byes
into the semi-final round, with
William & Mary and James
Madison playing on Friday at 7:30
p.m. to determine the number
four position.
George Mason and ECU have
met twice during the season, with
the Pirates winning at home
68-50, then losing 58-54 in Fair-
fax, Va.
Jeanne Daunoras averaged 18
points and 10 rebounds in the two
games, and looks to be the main
threat confronting the Pirates on
Saturday.
Richmond enters the tourna-
ment as regular season champion
and the only team with a winning
record, losing its only league game
to ECU, 51-41, in Minges.
"We're very excited about
hosting the tournament Pirate
head coach Cathy Andruzzi said.
"It's a field in which teams have
beaten each other, and whoever
comes in and plays well will take
it
Although the tournament
champion will not receive an
automatic NCAA bid, Andruzzi
feels the event serves a purpose.
"This is the first time all the
coaches and athletic directors will
be in one place at the same time,
and will give us a chance to talk
things over so we can develop the
ECAC into a stronger
conference
14 G Delphine Mabry, So, 5-4,
10.6 ppg, 4.0 rpg
12 G Jody Rodriguez, Fr, 5-9,
4-8 ppg, 2.2 rpg
30 C Darlene Hedges, Sr, 6-2,
5-4 pg, 4.5 rpg
25 F Sylvia Bragg, So, 5-9, 13.3
ppg, 4.7 rpg
34 F Annette Phillips, Jr, 5-10,
68 ppg, 5.8 rpg
Team Averages:
56.5 ppg
38.6 rpg
39.0 FG pet.
EAST CAROLINA
Record: 11-16 (3-2 ECAC-South)
Probable Starters:
2 East Carolina
Saturday 1:00 p.m.
3 George Mason
1 Richmond
Finals
Sunday 2:00 p.m.
4William & Mary
Friday 7:30 p.m.
5 James Madison
J
Saturday 3:00 p.m.
RICHMOND
Record: 16-9 (4-1 ECAC-South)
Series Record: ECU leads 1-0
Probable Starters:
33 G Margaret Sears, Fr, 5-10,
5.8 ppg, 3.1 rpg
44 G Jackie Isreal, Jr, 5-6, 9.7
ppg, 4.3 rpg
50 C Karen Eisner, Jr, 6-2, 23.8
ppg, 12.7 rpg
23 F Besty McCormick, Sr, 6-1,
10.5 ppg, 9.6 rpg
21 F Brook Browning, So, 6-9,
3.9 ppg, 3.5 rpg
45.4 rpg
40.7 FG pet.
GEORGE MASON
Record: 12-14 (3-3 ECAC-South)
Series Record: ECU leads 3-1
Probable Starters:
34 G Bobbie Pugh, Jr, 5-7, 13.1
ppg, 2.8 rpg
15 G Linda Jones, Jr, 5-6, 10.9
ppg, 4.0 rpg
20 C Patty Amidon, Sr, 6-0, 4.4
ppg, 4.2 rpg
33 F Valerie Douglas, Jr, 5-11,
12.1 ppg, 8.3 rpg
12 F Jeanne Daunoras, Sr, 6-2,
21.3 ppg, 8.8 rpg
15 G Debbie Taylor, So, 5-6
5.5 ppg, 1.8 rpg
52 C Betsy Becker, Sr, 6-2, 7.9
ppg, 6.9 rpg
22 F Janet Hanrahan, Sr, 5-11,
6.7 ppg, 5.0 rpg
34 F Sandy DiSilvio, Sr, 5-9,
7.9 ppg, 4.1 rpg
Team Averages:
55.8 ppg
38.2 rpg
39.5 Percent FG
Team Averages:
69.4 ppg
41.7 rpg
35.7 FG pet.
Team Averages:
66.7 ppg
WILLIAM & MARY
Record: 9-17 (2-2 ECAC-South)
Series Record: ECU leads 3-1
Probable Starters:
42 G Vicki Lutz, Fr, 5-3, 7.3
ppg, 3.7 rpg
JAMES MADISON
Record: 12-14 (1-5 ECAC-South)
Series Record: ECU leads 8-2
Probable Starters:
12 G Sue Manelski, Jr, 5-6, 12.9
ppg, 3.9 rpg
21 G Flo Jackson, Fr, 5-6, 7.3
ppg, 2.5 rpg
33 C Julie Franken, Fr, 6-0, 9.6
ppg, 6.6 rpg
40 F Michele James, Jr, 6-0.
10.1 ppg, 8.8 rpg
34 F Betsy Witman, Fr, 5-11,
9.8 ppg, 5.7 rpg
Team Averages:
37.1 ppg
37.1 rpr
44.4 Percent FC
Murry A New Face
Assistant Coach Brings Impressive Record
B SCOTT POWERS
Spam Writer
The Pirate football team will
have a lot of new faces on the
sidelines next year, but the one
who may make the biggest con-
tribution isn't a player.
He's Don Murry, the new of-
fensive coordinator for the
Pirates. He's replacing the
departed Art Baker, and he's no
stranger to the East Carolina foot-
ball program, having coached
against the Pirates as well as with
head coach Ed Emory.
Murry was the offensive coor-
dinator for the University of
Southwestern Louisiana last year.
USL gave the Pirates quite a scare
with a strong second half com-
eback before finally falling to the
Pirates 21-19.
In his 18-year coaching career,
Murry has been at several schools
including Clemson, Oregon State,
Wyoming, and Citadel. At Clem-
son, he served on the same staff as
Emory. When Emorv became
head coach at ECU in 1980, he of-
fered the job of offensive coor-
dinator to Murry.
When asked why he decided to
come to ECU, Murry says, "I've
worked with coach Emory before,
and I saw this as a good oppor-
tunity, as well as a good com-
munity to live in
Murry, in addition to others,
sees ECU's football program as
being on the rise, with tougher
schedules and media poll atten-
tion as major reasons why.
As far as offensive strategy is
concerned, Murry says, "I
basically plan to use the same of-
fensive strategy with an emphasis
on the option, but we may expand
in some areas
Even though the Pirates lost
some key players on offense,
Murry has confidence in the
players who will fill in. "The
schedule this year puts us in a very
competitive situation, but we have
a good talent level. I anticipate
that we'll have continued success
with the program says Murry.
"Quarterback will be the key
position, and a lot of what we will
do will depend on the quarterback
situation says Murry. The
Pirates will have to replace Kevin
Ingram, who was a talented run-
ner as well as an efficient passer.
The Pirates have recruited five
quarterbacks to compete, but only
one, Junior College transfer Rob-
bie Bartlett, has any college play-
ing experience.
Don Murry seems glad to be at
ECU, just as the Pirates are glad
to have him. Chances are that the
relationship will be rewarding to
both.
Fastballs,
Frigidity
In Forcast
By ED MCKLAS
It will be so cold Winfred
Johnson might be throwing
iceballs, but he will nevertheless
be throwing, as ECU opens its
1984 baseball season today
against Atlantic Christian College
in a doubleheader at the Pirates'
Harrington Field.
The sophomore Johnson, 7-1
last year, will be the starting pit-
cher in the first game, which will
get under way at 1:00 p.m.
Six-foot five, 190 pound
freshman Mike Christopher will
take the mound for the second
game.
The Pirates will begin the
season aiming to improve from
last year's 21-17-1 record. In do-
ing so, ECU will be playing four
freshmen in the nine starting posi-
tions. Christopher, Jim Riley (Q,
Jeff Ginn (IB) and Steve Sides
(2B) will be wearing Pirate
uniforms for the first time.
Sophomore shortstop Greg
Hardison, a junior college
transfer whom head coach Hal
Baird says has been
"outstanding and senior third
baseman David Wells round out
the infield.
Senior Todd Evans (LF), juinor
Ricky Nichols (CF) and senior
Mike Williams (RF) provide
leadership in the outfield.
Senior catcher Jabo Fulghum
will be Christopher's backstop in
the second game.
"Atlantic Christian had one of
the better clubs last year says
Baird. "They beat Duke Sunday.
They're going to be good
"Our defense has been pretty
consistent adds Baird, who is
fTAMLBV LIARY � iCU rUM La
It Was Warmer Last Year
Star pitcher Bob Davidson will rest tomorrow
however still unsure about his
team's hitting.
"It's been up and down says
Baird, who has seen his team hit
well in pre-season games but in-
consistently in practice.
Baird says his pitching has also
been "up and down but he is
confident that they will produce
during the season.
Former East Carolina baseball
star Butch Davis has been selected
by The Sporting News as the top
rookie prospect in the American
League West. Davis, an outfielder
with the Kansas City Royals,
played at East Carolina from
1978-80 and still holds the record
for home runs, with 26.
i i
Don Murry relaxes in his new Scales Fieldhouse office.
Pirates From Slow to Fast;
Stealing, Bunting New Fad
By DON GROSS
Sporti Wrttar
When the Lady Pirates take the
diamond March 5 against South
Carolina, they'll be playing a
whole new game.
Instead of playing slow pitch
softball, as they have for the last
five years, the women will be play-
ing fast pitch. Although the
Pirates have traditionally been
successful, Coach Manahan says
that this team is virtually
untested. "We started planning
for the switch last year by bring-
ing in players who have a
background in fastpitch ex-
plains Manahan.
In their season opener against
the Lady Gamecocks, the women
will be put to a stringent test. The
Gamecocks finished fourth last
year in the NCAA Fastpitch Na-
tionals. "We have a challenging
season ahead says Manahan.
Other tough teams on the
schedule include Penn State and
George Mason, which was ranked
sixth in Division I and finished se-
cond last year in the region behind
South Carolina.
The tough schedule doesn't
daunt Manahan and her team,
though. "We are excited and we
are looking forward to playing
she says.
Manahan says that the girls
have worked as hard, if not
harder, than any team she has
coached before. She adds that
they still have a lot to learn and
part of their success will be deter-
mined on their willingness to
learn.
The change from slow pitch to
fast pitch comes at an opportune
time. Six seniors graduated last
year, including three All-
Americas. "That means that we
don't have a lot of people who
have to sit on the bench because
of the change says Manahan.
"Right now we don't have the
stars that we've had in past
years says Manahan, "but I am
excited about the leadership that's
starting to emerge in some of our
upperclassmen Shortstop
Tamara Franks and left fielder
Melody Ham are the only two
returning starters from last years
squad.
The women will use a three-
pitcher rotation on the mound.
Stacey Boyette, Pam Young and
Robin Graves will be doing the
hurling.
Since fast pitch allows for steal-
ing and bunting, the catcher posi-
tion becomes very important.
Suzanne Martin and Lisa Zmuda
will be doing the plate work.
In the infield, Robin Graves
and Dawn Langley will handle
first base, while Carla Alphin will
take second and Sandy Kee will
anchor third. Franks will be at
short-stop.
In the outfield, leftfielder
Melody Ham will be the only
clear-cut starter. Center and right
are open. Bonnie Smith, Wendy
Ozment, Leslie Bunn, Angie
Humphrey and Zmuda are all
likely to see action.
Manahan has a lot of con-
fidence in her players. "We have
a lot of enthusiasm, intelligence
and good team spirit she says.
Ten Members Of Track Team To
Compete In IC4A Championships
Ten members of the East
Carolina University men's track
team will compete in the 63rd An-
nual IC4A Indoor Track and
Field Championships March 4th
in Princeton, New Jersey.
Running in the 55 meter dash
will be sophomores Erskine
Evans, Nathan McCorkle and
Henry Williams. The Pirate
sprinters are ranked fourth, fifth
and sixth in the event.
Sophomore Craig White will go
in the 55 meter high hurdles. In
the 1983 meet, White placed third.
East Carolina's mile relay team,
ranked seventh, is composed of
sophomores Eddie Bradley, Willie
Fuller, Ruben Pierce and
freshman Phillip Estes. Pierce
also qualified for the 400 meters
but will concentrate on the relay.
In the long jump, second-year
man Chris Brooks returns as the
defending champion, but is
presently ranked fifth, trailing
teammate Maurice Monk.
With over 100 teams par-
ticipating, the IC4A meet is the
largest in the country after the
NCAA Nationals.
Richard
B MONYCOOK
Kevin Richards is look-
ing toward two upcoming
events One is this
weekend's Eastern Inter-
collegiate Swimming
Championships. The
other is the end of his col-
lege swimming career.
Richards, the only
senior on this yea
squad, has come far since
entering East Carolina
from nearb Rose High
School in Greenville He
has set varsity records in
the 100 Backstoke and
the 200 Butterfly � both
at the Easterns meet.
r
Answers To
Tuesday's
Trivia Quiz
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Oebbie Taylor, So, 5-6,
1.8 rpg
pctsy Becker, Sr. 6-2, 7.9
rpg
anet Hanrahan. Sr, 5-11,
5.0 rpg
Sandy DiSilvio, Sr, 5-9,
I 4.1 rpg
herages:
55.8 ppg
38.2 rpg
39.5 Percent FG
AMES MADISON
2-14 (l-5ECAC-South)
It ECU leads 8-2
e Starters:
e Manelski, Jr, 5-6, 12.9
rpg
1 Jackson, Fr, 5-6, 7.3
"Pg
.lie Franken, Fr, 6-0, 9.6
rpg
�lichele James, Jr, 6-0,
8.8 rpg
.j: VVitman, Fr, 5-11,
' 'Pg
I axes:
37.1 ppg
37.1 rpp
44.4 Percent FC
m
�� EAST CAROt �G1
0L1NA:

MA�K ���!� tCU ��� LAD
Fast;
Fad
ing starters from last years
women will use a three-
ir rotation on the mound.
Boyette, Pam Young and
Graves will be doing the
g
te fast pitch allows for steal-
Id bunting, the catcher posi-
�jecomes very important.
le Martin and Lisa Zmuda
i doing the plate work,
(the infield, Robin Graves
)awn Langley will handle
ase, while Carla Alphin will
lecond and Sandy Kee will
T third. Franks will be at
stop.
I the outfield, leftfielder
jy Ham will be the only
Jut starter. Center and right
en. Bonnie Smith, Wendy
it, Leslie Bunn, Angie
Ihrey and Zmuda are all
to see action.
pahan has a lot of con-
! in her players. "We have
)f enthusiasm, intelligence
od team spirit she says.
earn To
ionships
11 concentrate on the relay,
he long jump, second-year
Hiris Brooks returns as the
ding champion, but is
Itly ranked fifth, trailing
�ate Maurice Monk.
over 100 teams par-
ing, the IC4A meet is the
in the country after the
Nationals.
Richards Looks
By MONY COOK
Spar laferaattea
Kevin Richards is look-
ing toward two upcoming
events. One is this
weekend's Eastern Inter-
collegiate Swimming
Championships. The
other is the end of his col-
lege swimming career.
Richards, the only
senior on this year's
squad, has come far since
entering East Carolina
from nearby Rose High
School in Greenville. He
has set varsity records in
the 100 Backstoke and
the 200 Butterfly � both
at the Easterns meet.
But the best may yet be
coming. "Kevin should
break records in the 100
Fly, the 200 Fly and the
100 Back this weekend
says coach Rick Kobe.
"This is the first year that
he has shown that he can
reach his potential. I look
for him to win at least
one, if not a couple, of
events in this meet. He
has a tremendous shot at
qualifying for Nationals
in the 100 Fly and 100
Back
Richards has been
through a transition.
When he first entered
ECU, Ray Scharf was at.
the helm of the Pirate
swimmers. He is ending
his career under Rick
Kobe.
Weekend
THE EAST CAROUN1AN MARCH 1. 19M
Answers To
Tuesday's
Trivia Quiz
1 Dr PAT SHERMAN is the present
men's and women's tennis coach
2 SAM JONES is the former Lady
Pirate standout who will mo� hkelv
be selected for the 1984 U.S. Olympic
handball team
3 MARK SPITZ is the former gold
medai winner who holds a record at
Minges Pool
4 ALAN SMITH was the Pirate soc-
cer player featured in Sports Il-
lustrated faces in the crowd section
i The PIRATE CLUB is the
nickname for the ECU Educational
Foundation
6 MEN'S TRACK is the ECU NCAA
sport that has had the most AII-
America's
- CROSS COUNTRY was the new
ECU sport initiated this fall
8 WOMEN'S SWIMMING is the on
ly sport at ECU which is Division II
9 OLIVER MACK is the former ECU
men's basketball player who played in
the NBA.
10 The ECU SOFTBALL TEAM
finished the 1981 regular season rank-
ed number one in the country.
11 DEBBIE FREEMAN was the first
ECU all-state volleyball player.
12 TERRY LONG was ECU's only
first team All-America.
13. CATHERIN BOLTON is the cur-
rent member of Phvsical Education
faculty that served as a former ECU
head coach in women's basketball,
volleyball, field hockey, gymnastics,
tennis and golf
14 RAY MARTINEZ was the former
ECU swimming coach who lead his
teams to win the NAIA national
championships in 1957 and 1959.
15. KATHY RILEY received the
Brodenck Award for being the most
outstanding softball player in the
country in 1981.
16. MARY DENKLER was ECU's
flm recipient of an NCAA post
graduate scholarship
17. ZACK VALENTINE is the former
ECU great who wears a Super Bowl
ring
"This is one of
the top years we
have had, so we
have a realistic
chance
-Ceviinjjchards
Of the switch, Kevin
says, "Although it wasn't
that difficult, it's like two
different generations
from when coach Scharf
coached and when Rick
took over. There aren't
that many swimmers that
went through the
coaching change
The Urban and
Regional Planning major
feels he could have done
better during his four
years here. "I haven't
done as well as I hoped I
could, and I wish that I
had worked harder
overall Kevin explains.
"I've enjoyed it pretty
much. I would only
year I
realistic
Carolina. This
think I have a
shot at it
Richards will get a
chance to close out his
career where it began,
since the Easterns Cham-
pionships will be held at
Minges Natatorium. A
four-year veteran,
Richards feels that being
the host of the vent has
will be better for the to worry about missing ington in the battle
team, but the pool isn't as anything for a couple
more weeks.
fast
Richards will be stay-
ing on another year at
East Carolina to obtain
his degree.
He has mixed feelings
on leaving swimming.
"I've had a lot of time to
get to know everyone well
over the last four years
ftE-ISL? "�-V-5 KSSTOZi,
but leave everything else
the same
About this weekend, he
says, "I hope to make the
top three in my events
and to qualify for Na-
tionals. That's been my
goal since I came to East
vantages.
"Three of the top four
teams last year aren't
coming Richards says.
"This is one of the top
years that we (ECU) have
had, so we have a realistic
chance. Being at home
free time but I'm not sure
what I'll do with it.
Overall, I'll miss swimm-
ing, except for getting up
for 5:30 (a.m.) practice
If Richards meets his
goal and qualified for
Nationals, he won't have
On March 1-3, East
Carolina's Minges
Natatorium will be the
site of the 10th Annual
Eastern Intercollegiate
Men's Swimming and
Diving Championships.
Twelve teams will par-
ticipate in the meet, one
of the most prestigious in dividual medley" and Bli-
the East. Six-time cham- ly Noe of Marshall in the
pion Pittsburgh is the butterfly,
favorite, with Cleveland This is the first time the
State, Syracuse, East meet has been held
Carolina and UNC Wilm- East Carolina
for
top spots. Also com-
peting are St. Bonaven-
ture, St. John's, George
Washington, Marshall,
Maine, Rutgers and
Villanova.
Outstanding in-
dividuals include Pitt-
sburgh's Ed Bcrgan, 1983
double winner in the 100
and 200 backstroke, John
Kopcienski and Tom
Hook of St. Bona venture
the free style and in-
m
flj f � ixauonais, ne won't have Carolina and UNC Wilm- East Carolina
B��wn Cow Glenn Favored In Wrestling Tourney
BROWNEII ?i8�VKPPha.P81 vision. Catch all this Thursdav8:00 Fraternitv �-i �� . P . "
at
Basketball
Finale
After approximately 85
men's tournament teams,
only one will reign as the
basketball
champion.
Residence Hall division,
Slakers, Aycock Run-
ners, King and Scott
Sultans of Sweat still re-
main as final action is
scheduled for tonight. In
the Fraternity division,
Kappa Alpha, Kappa
Sigma, Kappa Alpha Psi
and Pi Kappa Phi are fac-
ing semi-final action. In
Dribbles to the Men's Independent
division, the favorites in-
clude Enforcers, Clique Thursday 5:00 Men's
division. Catch all this
final divisional action
tonight beginning at 5:00
p.m. in Memorial Gym:
and Streak of Lightning
In women's action, the
Heartbreakers and
All-Campus Thriller still appear to be
the Men's the poll's picks in the in-
dependent division. In
the sorority division,
Residence Hall divisional
final and Women's
Residence Hall divisional
final
Thursday 8:00 Fraternity
B divisional final
Grapplers Wrestle On
After two nights of
complete wrestling action
a few grapplers still re-
main in the Intramural-
Domino's Pizza Wrestl-
ing Tournament. A few
favorites include Chris-
tian Riddle, Robbie
Final action is slated
for tonight beginning at
8:00 pm in Memorial
Gym Dance room. Come
on out and watch these
wrestlers make all the
moves.
Spring Break
Hours
Facility
Classifieds
Thursday 6:00 Women's
Independent divisional u luu.c � inn.
final action sees Alpha final and Men's Indepen- Lanham Perc Edwarts
Delta Pi facing Alpha Phi dent divisional final ctriIKratz AndT Grot'
for that divisional title. mmLZZw r�ss
Unstead Jockettes and Thursday 7:00 Fraternity kand p'aulown
Jones are favorites in the A divisional final and Si? Si.
Women's Residence Hall sorority final
Minges pool will be
open for recreational
swimming on Friday
night, March 2.
Memorial pool will be
closed for noon hours
recreational swim on
March 1 and will dose at tramural Softball, "I �
5:00 pm on March 2. Handball, Tennis
Registration will begin Doubles and Preseason
�l?.MyfhA2 for In- Softball Tournament.
��oono�qoo����eooooooooooewB
Tri-State Auto Body j
Expert body repairs, paint o
jobs, frame straightening, and l
24 hour towing.
10 Discount to all ECU
Reproductive Health Care
MISC.
WHEN A FRIEND has Stereo lystem
problems, tell them mat ttie audio
technicians at fha TECH SHOP don't
charge for repair estimates. Call us
at 757 "Nineteen Eighty" The TECH
SHOP.
AUTO ACCIDENTS Specialising in
personal Injury litigation. J. David
Duffus, Jr Attorney, NCNB
RulMing, Greenville, North Carolina,
ggjga
IF ANYONE SAW a red Honda get hit
in the parking lot between Garret and
the Art Building on ijo please call
MMWjj or 7S2-SS5S.
LOCAL CHURCH would Ilka person
to keep church nursery 19:45H noon
each Sunday. Could possibly be divid-
ed with another person. M each Sun-
day. Send resume to: Nursery
Helper, 10 Prince Rd Greenv.lie.
NC 1793.
CALLING ALL GOOD STUDENTS
(DramafllmTV students. In par-
ticular) to come to the aid of
NEWPORT PACIFICA, a young and
ambitious motion picture studio who
needs you NOWIII
Your response could put til In your
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to a future career in your Hew with
our studio, write NEWPORT
PACIFICA, FOB 11WS, Costa Mese.
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and 5M Sat Fab. Ittft. Call 7S2-2U0
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I WANT TO BE RICH. Will
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LOST AND
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�"BMALt ROOMMATE wanted:
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FEMALE ROOMMATE Needed for
summer school Apt. near Allied
Htth. Srimo. Call Janet 754-7451
LIFE GUARDS, Summer 1,4,
Coastal and Sea Positions. Certificate
or experience required Send resume
�: Medical Support Group, Dept
E-C, Rt. S, Box IBS. Mt. Olive. N.C
Uits. Eouel Oppsrtunlfy Employer.
Understanding non judgmental care thai
includes abortion for women of all ages
Counseling for both partners ,s available
Special Services and rates for students.
CaH 781 5550 days, evenings, and weekends.
(Bring in Ad)
Students, jj
24 k

Towmc
�corvica:
(over the bridge)
1512 N.Greene St.
Day 758-0778
Night 756-4775
756-8604
tmmmmmmmomaoomamaoooouoj
RIDES
mmmmtmtmmmmmmmmm
REWARD I Lost rust colored vetcro
wallet. Thought to be lost on the Hill
by basketball courts between J:M
�ID� NEEDED: to and from
�oautortMltlesi Mood aroa, S. c. over
�pr��B break Will pay half of gas.
Contact joe at tot Slay, 7�-04tS
gfrttg Break T-Shirts
variousprinted'designs at long sleeve kjskkm'shtts.
perfect ffrfyrttfmatter, fyt one before if�'leave
so evenpie willqtow ifou're front East Qwlba!
mmmmmmmmmmmmmm
HXHODOBCQ

-r �j.iririV -rl
.Tr-r-g


�����aiintm1
Weight Training
ORK Equipment
mfT�KD�&&
MYRTLE BEACH
PLATES
-Olympic - $.80lb.
-Standard - .75lb.
-CAST IRON
JARS (All Types)
"Featuring"
-Olympic Curl Bars-$79.95
-Standard Curl Bars - 29.95
SETS (Includes Rarl
HO lb. (Standard)-$79.95
-310 lb. (Olympic)-$399.95
ALSO - Health Shoes (For men & women), Collars, Dumbed Sets
& Misc. Equipment.
Students (ECU & Pitt Community) Receive a 10lDiscount As
Always wValid I.D.
PUMBELLS - $.80lb.
CAST IRON (MOOIbs)
Wednesday, March 7
GRAND OPENING
SPECIALS ALL NIGHT LONG
Thursday, March 8
COLLEGE NIGHT
$1.00 ADMISSION WITH COLLEGE I.D.
2 FOR 1 BEER AND WINE ALL NIGHT
Friday, March 9 & Sat March 10
$1.00 ADMISSION WITH COLLEGE I.D.
HAPPY HOUR 7-9 P.M.
COUPON
COUPON
MYRTLE BEACH
SSD00R F0R FREE BEER CERTIFICATE
I
I�
!

m �. 4fr�,j�





10
X"E EAST CAROLINIAN
MARCH 1, 1984
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
NEW STORE HOURS:
MonSat: 8 a.m. til 10p.m.
Sunday: 9a.m. til 9p.m.
S Lb. Pack Or More
w
Lb.
4-8 Lbs. Average
Smoked
Picnics
Lb.
Holly Farms - Grada A Chicken
nony rarms - Grade A Chicken QMrt
Thighs & Red Ripe
Drumsticks
Strawberries
3 Liter Paisano Chablis Burgundy, V. Rose
Rhine Pb. Chablis, It. Chianti, Sangria
Carlo
Rossi
Pk� of 12- 12 0. Cans Reg. R Lt.
Budtveiser
Pba. of 12 12 Oi. Cans
Miller Lite
Pk9. oH-12 0. CinsRag. &U.
Pabst
Save Over 70 On
Vour Choice - Mug,
Bowl Or Plate"
Ptptt-Frtttttf hpti-FrM
The colorful new concept for indoor and
outdoor living in 8 fashion colors.
p.llilltjljj" ��lljMj
A 1

rf)ilill phip "i
S 0 - Castlehorry
H& Puxekote Kec�Mouj'
Regularly $3.95 Each
Lite Line
Cruncky
fJCttrlso M.09
Lite line
Naeko Cheese
SiChito, M.09
Lite Line
Puffed
Ckeese Curls (h m
Wise Regalar ' Vh.teHoi'SE
Potato Chips 00.
Wis.BBQ 70r "
Potato Cki�
4so�. M.OQ
Naif Ballon - White Hease
WWraj M.6?
V V
1
' i
?
Mtff fallen � ?$? Off
wp i�r Nf �i.st
" ifc4
�� 92 Sheets - Large
�kf Ptf en
si aV
6800 EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
�fcfPfcfBT
�i� .� �� � � .a T n
'
i





Title
The East Carolinian, March 1, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
March 01, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.325
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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