The East Carolinian, February 23, 1984







Mz
(Earnliman
Serving the Last Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.4 Hi
Thursday, February 23, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages,
Circulation 10,000
SGA Welfare Committee Against Proposal
Dorm Gets Opposition
B DENNIS K1LCOYNE
�i�ff N� m�
At its regular Tuesday night
meeting, the SGA Welfare Com-
mittee voted unanimously to
recommend to the Student
Legislature that it reject a resolu-
tion supporting the establishment
of a quiet dorm on the ECU cam-
pus.
The vote came after extensive
discussion with the president and
vice president of Jams Dorm, the
dorm tentatively planned as the
quiet dorm, and a representative
of the University's Division of
Student Life.
"Our problem with the resolu-
tion is not the mere concept of a
quiet dorm said Welfare Com-
mittee Chairman David Brown,
"The complaint procedure is too
vague and subject to abuse
The resolution in question was
submitted to the Student
Legislature by the Student
Residence Association. It states
the reasons why an upperclassman
quiet dorm, scheduled for the fall
of 1985, may be necessary, but
does not mention enforcement.
Although the Welfare
Committee's vote has no official
impact, it may influence
legislators to vote against it. The
SGA. however, has no authority
on the matter, and can only make
recommendations to the SRA.
Jarvis Dorm President Wendy
Caibe charged that, although no
dorm has been officially chosen,
her dorm has been selected
without proper investigation of
other sites. "I asked for
documentation that other dorms
had been examined she said. "I
haven't seen any
SRA President Mark Niewald
denied that Jarvis has been
selected, but said that it has been
mentioned as the most likely site.
The main objection of the
Welfare Committee to the SRA
resolution was its lack of discus-
sion of enforcement. "Who
determines what is too loud?"
said Brown. "If one student has a
grudge against another, he could
keep reporting the other's name
Professors Discuss
Wartime Relations
Brown
for imaginary violations
"What constitutes quiet?" said
committee member Glenn
Maughan, who summed up the
committee's feelings. "I would
favor enforced quiet hours for
every dorm, not just one
The Residence Life Committee,
which has the final say on the
matter, is tentatively scheduled to
vote on the proposal March
This young tot discovers that the Student Supply Store Is "where it's happening" between classes.
Soviet Intervention Topic Of Lecture
Middendorf Speaks
� ECU PHofo L�b
By ED NICKLAS
SporU Milor
At Tuesday's Phi Kappa Phi
Symposium entitled "Peace and
War 1984: Power and Moral
Responsibilty two ECU English
professors provided guidelines
that U.S. government and the
mass media could follow to ensure
the protection of constitutional
rights in wartime, and contended
history shows that, with the ex-
ception of the Vietnam era, the
government has not disinformed
the public, although it "has made
some concerted and extensive ef-
forts" to increase public support.
In the presentation, "Power
and Responsbility of American
News Media in Times of
Conflict Dr. Kim Smith, an
assistant English professor,
argued that statements concerning
the impact of the media, and
television in particular, over-
simplify the process of com-
munication.
"Those of us who study public
opinion know that very seldom do
people simply sit down and watch
television or read newpaper ar-
ticles and immediately, in a
stimulus-response manner,
change their attitudes and
behavior, whether it is in regard to
involvement in a conflict in Viet-
nam or any public issue for that
matter he said. "The process as
we understand it now is probably
much more complicated than
that
"Media coverage of opposi-
tion, especially in the Vietnam
War, had the main effect, it seems
to me, of encouraging open ex-
pression by those opposing the
war
Smith further noted that media
coverage during the Vietnam
War, including "prominent
Americans" as well as "radicals
was instrumental in influencing
public opinion. People such as
Mike Mansfield and Robert Ken-
nedy "led people to rethink their
ideas about Vietnam, seek out
more information and talk to
Other people about their
feelings he said.
According to Dr. Jeanne
Scafella, also an assistant English
professor, recent U.S. military in-
volvement has raised questions
about the media and their flex-
ibility in times of conflict.
"Placed within these perspec-
tives (of historical evidence) the
exclusion of correspondents from
an area of military operations as
limited as Grenada would not
seem catastrophic she said.
"But when we further consider
the axioms of recent legal and
political restrictions and limita-
tions, to the mass media activities,
in particular under the Reagan
and Nixon administrations and
the current Supreme Court, the
cause for alarm is triggered
Scafella presented certain ob-
jectives that the media and
government could adhere to with
the protection of guaranteed con-
stitutional rights in time of war.
First, she said, the Defense
Department could set "ground
rules" for the media to follow in
covering military operations,
therefore guarding vital military-
interests. In addition, the Defense
Department could also include
representatives from a
"predesignated pool" of major
news organizations in the military
operations and "lift embargo
coverage as soon as possible
"Such an arrangement would
surely provide greater coopera-
tion Scafella said
Smith and Scafella traced the
history of government and media
relations from the revolutionarv
war to the Vietnam War, and in
doing so emphasized the demise in
public support of governmental
actions as a result of greater
media criticism and ineffective
governmental restrictions
While the Committee on Public
Information, instituted during
World War I, and the Office of
War Information, established
after Pearl Harbor, set stringent
regulations and swayed public
opinion through the use of "pro-
paganda the government was
far less successful in gaining
public support thereafter, the
speakers said.
See SYMPOSIUM, Page 3
B DARRYL BROWN
M�n�fl�l Ml (or
A resurgence of Soviet military
and political intervention in the
Caribbean and Central America
currentlv poses the most serious
threat to the Western Hemisphere
since the Cuban Missile Crisis, a
Reagan administration official
said Tuesday night at ECU.
U.S. Ambassador to the
Organization of American States
William Middendorf II told an
audience of about 100 students
and faculty that communism,
especially in Nicaragua and Cuba,
threatens human rights, political
stability and U.S. security.
"Nicaragua is rapidly becoming
a repressive, one-party state and is
playing a major role as interven-
tionists throughout Central
America Middendorf said.
"The aim of Nicaraguan leaders
seems to be forceful intimidation
of neighboring countries through
their own huge militarv
build-up
Middendorf repeatedly em-
phasized the Soviet Union's direct
involvement with Cuba and
Nicaragua, noting Soviet aid to
Cuba amounts to $4 billion an-
nually.
"Cuba has long provided the
cannon fodder for Soviet ambi-
tions in Africa, Grenada and
elsewhere he said, adding the
Soviets are "a very determined,
potential enemy (with) their prox-
ies � Cuba and Nicaragua
Throughout his 40-minute
speech which was the keynote ad-
dress of the ECU Phi Kappa Phi
Symposium, Middendorf follow-
ed closely the Reagan administra-
tion policy for Central America
and the Caribbean. He praised the
U.S. invasion of Grenada as
halting "a major Soviet-Cuban
colony" designed to "export ter-
ror and undermine democracy" in
the region.
He also repeatedly blasted the
Sandinista regime in Nicaragua,
saying they had increased human
rights violations, persecuted In-
dian citizens, harassed indepen-
dent political parties, nearly ex-
tinguished freedom of the press
and attacked freedom of religion.
Middendorf was cautious over
the Sandinista's promise for open
elections next year. "We must
question how free and fair these
elections will be he said, predic-
ting their purpose would be to on-
ly reaffirm the current govern-
ment and deny opportunity to op-
posing parties.
Wester To Head Center
By Ol IDA HORTON
Staff Wrlwr
Middendorf
Middendorf stressed the
Reagan administration's four-
point program for aiding the
region, saying the U.S. supports
democratic governments, aids in
economic development,
enocourages dialogue and negota-
tion for political solutions and
"seeks to provide a security shield
through military assistance and
cooperation
Middendorf said "over three
out of four dollars going to the
region is economic, not military
SGA Election
Date Planned
For March 21
Bv JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nrwt Mitor
SGA elections are scheduled
for March 21 and students
planning to run for executive
offices will be required to file at
the Student government offices
in 228 Mendenhall between
Feb. 27 and March 2.
In order to run for president,
yice president or treasurer, a
student must have completed at
least 48 semester hours, must
nave a 2.0 grade point average,
be in good standing with the
university and have attended
ECU for two consecutive
jcmesters.
Candidates for the office of
SGA secretary must have com-
pleted 16 hours, be in good
standing with the university
and have a 2.0 grade point
average.
SGA Vice President Lindsey
Williams was selected by the
executive committee as elec-
tions chair-
man, subject
to approval by
the SGA
Legislature on
Monday.
Campaigning
cannot begin
until after the
candidates'
meeting,
which will be
held on March
12, she said.
There will be 20 polling
precincts on campus. "We are
in great need of student
organizations to volunteer to
man the precincts
Williams
she said.
ECU's Computing Center is
under new leadership. Larry
Wester was chosen fo succeed
Glenn Crowe as Director of Com-
puting and Information Systems.
Wester said one of his
challenges as director will be to
help the Computing Center
become more visible. "I'm going
to try to make not only students
but the community aware of what
we do Wester said.
Wester said being visible will
challenge people to ask more
questions and in the process pro-
bably gain some knowledge about
computers. In an effort to ac-
complish this, Wester hopes to
have tours through the Com-
puting Center for students and ad-
ministration. "We need to in-
troduce almost everyone to com-
puters he said.
According to Wester, com-
puters should be minimally in-
troduced to everyone including
primary, secondary, and universi-
ty students, so they can better
function in an economy based on
information and information ex-
change.
In addition to providing data
processing support. Wester said
the Computing Center should
provide students with an
awareness of the information age
and what will be facing them in
the business world.
Wester's previous experience
was primarily at the university
level. His former job as assistant
director of the computer center at
the Medical College of Wisconsin
corresponds to his work with
ECU's Medical School.
Wester said he realizes the need
for expansion in the Computing
Center. "We need personal com-
puters and more terminals that ac-
cess the main frame Wester
said.
Reagan Education Budget Revealed
On The Inside
(CPS)�In its new higher
education budget unveiled on
February 1st, the Reagan ad-
ministration proposes:
�Raising funding of the
Guaranteed Student Loan pro-
gram by $586 million.
�To require all students who ap-
ply for a GSL to complete a
"needs test" to determine how
much of a loan they can get. Now
only students from families earn-
ing more than $30,000 have to
take the needs test.
�To keep Pell Grant funding at
about $2.8 billion, the same as
this year, and raise the maximum
grant a student can get from the
current $1900 to $3000.
�To make students pay their
schools up to $500 or 40 percent
of their college cost in order to
qualify for a Pell Grant.
�To allow students to use money
from their College Work-Study
jobs or other federal loans to
make their Pell Grant down
payments.
�To increase funding for the
College Work-Study program by
an advertised 53 percent, although
at least $60 million of the increase
would come from colleges, not the
federal budget.
�To let colleges distribute up to
half their College Work-Study
funds as grants, and allocate up to
$100,000 of the money to
cooperative education and intern-
ship programs with businesses.
�To eliminate new funding of the
National Direct Student Loan
(NDSL) program, which provides
low-interest loans to students.
�To raise the NDSL interest rate
to eight percent, from the current
five percent.
�To eliminate all federal funding
of the Supplemental Education
Opportunity Grant program and
the State Student Incentive Grant
program, which help pay for state
need-based grant programs.
�To create a variation of an in-
dividual education account, into
which families can deposit up to
$1000 a year toward education
costs, deduct the money from
their taxes, and then earn tax-free
interest.
The president formally submit-
ted the budget, which covers the
fiscal year stretching from Oc-
tober 1, 1984 through September
30, 1985, to Congress last week.
Congress will debate the pro-
posals. It approves, disapproves
or amends them.
If the House and Senate
disagree over specific budget
items, they will form a conference
committee to work out the dif-
ferences.
Announcements 2
Editorials4
Style6
Sports�
Classifieds10
� The Lady Pirates basketball
team played their best game of
the season Tuesday night and
defeated Richmond 51-41. For
further details see Sports, page
8.
� The East Carolina Dance
Theatre will perform modern,
ballet and jazi dance pro-
grams beginning this weekend.
See Style, page 6.
� ECU Associate English
Professor Jim Holte talks
about problems of im-
migrants. See Style, page 6.
t
"�;�m�'H�v
i





V
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 23, 1984
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving imt campus community
sine 1923
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur-
ing the summer.
The East Carolinian Is the of
flclal newspaper of East Carolina
University, owned, operated and
published for and by the students
of East Carolina University
Unless otherwise noted, unslgn
ed editorials on the opinion page
are the newspaper's opinion,
generally written by the manag
Ing editor
Subscription Rate $30 yearly.
The East Carolinian offices are
located in the Publications
building on the campus of ECU,
Greenville, NX.
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
2nd Floor, Publications building,
ECU, Greenville, N.C 27(34.
Telephone: 757 6366, 6367, 6309
GENERAL COLLEGE
General College students pre
registering with the occupational
therapy dept. must do so by appoint-
ment with their advisor in the occupa
tlonai therapy dept office during the
two weeks: Feb. 20th through Mar
2nd. Please see the notice on the oc
cupational therapy buiiletln board
and sign up as soon as possible Come
with trial class schedule prepared
HANDBALL OFFICIALS
would you like to be an Intramural
team handball official If so. attend
the training clinic to be held by the
Department of intramural
Recreational Services Monday
March J.9U at 600 p.m. in Room
102 of Memorial Gymnasium Rules,
mechanics and Interpretations will be
discussed. Officials will be hired
bassed on practical and written tests
and experience.
IRS AQUARBICS
The Department of intramural-
Recreation Services Is offering an
aquaroblcs class. Registration will be
held February 27 through March 2.
Cost for students; four dollars for one
class per week, eight dollars for two
classes per week. FacultyStaff; five
dollars for classes meeting once per
week, ten dollars for classes meeting
twice per week.
WEIGHT TRAINING
The Department of intramural-
Recreational Services Is offering a
weight training class. Registration
will be held February 27 through
March 2. Cost for students, four
dollars for one class per week, eight
dollars tor two classes per week.
FacultyStaff, five dollars for one
class per week, ten dollars for two
classes per week.
LOGO CONTEST
The Student union Special Events
Committee Is sponsoring a Logo con-
test for "Barefoot on the Mall " Bring
your entry to Mendenhall (room 234)
by March 2. The year 1984 is re
quired on all entries, if you have any
questions, call Bruce at 752-3065 or
John at 757 6611 lext. 213).
SWIMMERS NEEDED
Volunteer swimmers are needed to
help with mentally and physically
abused children. Swimmers are need
ed every Friday from 1:30-2 30 p.m
at Memorial swimming pool. Ask for
Toney Banks when helping with this
worthy cause.
DELTA SIGMA THETA
Come party with Delta Sigma
Theta February 24, Friday night at
the Cultural Center from 10:00 until
Price: 75 cents students, $1.00 non
students.
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ is spon-
soring "Prime Time" this Thursday
at 7 p.m. In the Old Joyner Library
Room 221. Please loin us for fun,
fellowship, and Bible study. We are
looking forward to meeting you.
SAB MEETING
There will be a meeting of the Stu
dent Athletic Board on Monday, Feb.
27, 19�4 in the Multipurpose Room of
Mendenhall Student Center. All
members are asked to attend. Of-
ficers should meet at 5:00 and all
others at 5:15.
LITTLE SIS RUSH
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity would like
to announce Its little sister rush for
this semester. It will be held at 200
West tonight (Thur Feb. 23) from
9:00-1:00 p.m. All interested ladles
are Invited to come out and meet the
Pi Kapps.
SIGN LANGUAGE CLUB
The Sign Language Club is having a
meeting on Monday night at 6:30 p.m
in Mendenhall 242 We'll be discuss
Ing the retreat weekend and other up-
coming events.
AEROBIC EXERCISE
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services Is offering Spr
Ing semester aerobic fitness classes.
Registration for the second and last
session will be held February 27
through March 2. Cost for students:
four dollars for one class per week,
eight dollars for two classes per
week. FacultyStaff, five dollars for
classes meeting once per week, ten
dollars for classes twice per week.
MCAT APPLICATIONS
The Medical College Admission
Test applications have arrived in the
ECU Testing Center. They may be
pick up In Speight Building, Room
105
PSICHI
All those who were Initiated in Psl
Chi in Fall �3, Certificates & Initia
tion Cards can be picked up in the Psl
Chi Library nowl Deadline for
membership In Psl Chi for Spring S4
is Mar. 211 initiation for these new
members will be Mar. 10 at 7:00 In
Rm. 244 Mendenhall. All members
are urged to attendl Elections for Psl
Chi officers for U-U school year will
be held after the initiation Ceremony.
Also, info I applications for the Wray
I Prewett Scholarships are In Psl Chi
Library.
FASHION MODELS
The Advanced Photography class
at the School of Art Is Screening
Models on Monday, Feb. 27 and Tues-
day Feb. 28 at the Student Supply
Store from 11 00 to 2:00.
SURFING CLUB
There will be a mandatory meeting
Thursday, Feb. 23 at Mendenhall In
Room 248. This is an important
meeting and everyone needs to at-
tend. Anyone else who is Interested
please attend. We want to have a Keg
Party Soon 11
ECUHILLEL
ECU Hlllel Is hosting a party Fri-
day, February 25th at 8:00 p.m. The
party will be at Fred Lorber's.
located at 2401 E. 3rd St Apt. A Your
favorite beverage will be served. For
more information or for directions
call Lorl Gelger at 758-8580.
FELLOWSHIP
Come to Jenkins Auditorium on
Wednesday nights at 630 to meet
with inter Varsity Christian
Fellowship. You can sing, fellowship,
and praise the Lord.
CHAIRPERSON NEEDED
Applications for elections chairper
son are now being accepted. File In
Mendenhall 228.
DEPT. OF CHEMISTRY
Dr. Robert O. Hutchlns, Drexel
University, will present a seminar en-
titled "Selective Reductions with
Modified Hydride Reagents" Friday.
February 24, 1984 at 2:00 P.M.
Flanagan Building Room 201.
Refreshments will be served In Room
204.
HONORS PROGRAM
Any undergraduate with a 3.5 GPA
is eligible to take courses In the
Honors Program fall 1984 while space
permits. Honors seminars In women
writers. The Latin American connec-
tion, the human body, psychology,
and technology andor survival, and
Honors sections of many Introductory
level courses are listed with asterisks
in the prereglstratlon schedule. Con-
tact Dr. David Sanders, 212 Ragsdale
(757 6373) tor permission, join the
reception Mon Feb. 27, 4-6 p.m
Ragsdale 201 Lounge.
COLLEOE REPUBLICANS
Are you concerned about the
government and the way If s run? if
you are, loin the College Republicans.
Our next meeting Is tonight at 5:30 in
room 221 Mendenhall. Tonight we will
finalize plans for the convention, and
there will be a debate on the
Democratic candidates for Presi-
dent.
DEFENSE CLASS
The Department of Intramural
Recreatioan Services Is offering a
personal defense class. Registration
will be held February 27 through
March 2. Cost for students; tour
dollars, cost for FacultyStaff, five
dollars.
SOFTBALL OFFICIALS
Now Is your chance to become an
umpire. The Department of
Intramural Recreational Services
will hold the training clinic for fn
tramural softball officials beginning
Tuesday, March 13, 1984 at 6:00 p.m
In room 102 of Memorial Gymnasium.
Rules, interpretations and mechanics
will be discussed. Officials will be
hired based on practical and written
tests.
JEWISH STUDENTS
Friday night Services are held
weekly at temple Bayt Shalom
located on the corner of 14th St. and
Osceola, a block from the Intersection
of 264 bypass and 14th St. For more
Information or If transportation Is
needed please call Fred at 752-0780 or
Dr. Resnlk 756 5640.
ATTENTION
The Gamma Beta Phi National
Honor Society will be holding orienta-
tion sessions on Tuesday, Feb. 28 and
Wednesday, Feb. 29 at 6 30 p.m. In
the Mendenhall Multipurpose room.
Membership requirements Include a
Grade Point Average of above a 3.0.
All Interested persons are Invited to
attend. We look forward to seeing you
there.
ART EXHIBITION
Mendenhall Student Center and the
Art Exhibition Committee would like
to Invite everyone to visit American
Drawings IV, showing till March 2 In
the Student Center. Don't miss this
unique event!
PRE-MEDDENT
On Monday, Feb. 27, In BN 102, at 7
p.m the Biology Club will kick off Its
annual Health Professionals Month
with a tew third and fourth year Med
students. This will be your chance to
find out as much as possible from
some very reliable sources! I So,
come on to the meeting with plenty of
questions and enthusiasm.
Refreshments will also be served.
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
If you like to party, be sure to come
party with the Kappa Alpha Psl
Fraternity, Inc. at the Cultural
Center Saturday night, Feb. 25 from
10:00 p.m. - 2:00 a.m. Admission Is 75
cents. See you therel
CIRCLE K
Circle K: ECU'S coed service
organization I The Circle K Club in-
vites you to come out and loin us
every Tuesday this semester at 7
p.m. In Mendenhall. Room 221. Bring
your Ideas for protects. Hope to se
you therel
WEIGHT CLUB
Attention ECU students and faculty
� there will be an organizational
meeting of the ECU Intramural
Weight Club on Tuesday, February
28, In Room 102 Memorial Gym. The
meeting will last from 7 until 8 p.m.
All Interested individuals should at-
tend because elections will be held.
NEEDED
Figure drawing models for beginn-
ing and advanced scheduled classes
in the school of art. Draped - 3.35 and
undraped - 5.02. Please contact Wes
Crawley at 757-6264.
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ is spon-
soring "Prime Time" this Thursday
at 7 p.m. In the Old Joyner Library
Room 221. Please loin us for fun,
fellowship, and Bible study. We are
looking forward to meeting you.
BAGEL BRUNCH
ECU Hlllel brings back the Bagel
Brunch, come to enjoy fresh Bagels
Lox, cream cheese and all the extras.
The place to munch is Mendenhall's
Coffeehouse from 1:30-3:00 on Sunday
Feb. 26. Cost for you; student $3.
Hlllel members $1.50, public $4 and
small people S2 Be there, SHALOM!
ISA DINNER
Attention Members of the ISA!
Tickets for the International Dinner
will be available at the International
House from 5:00 p.m. onward. We are
also having a Pot Luck Dinner at 6:30
p.m. So don't forget to bring
something to eat! See ya there
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Personal Development Classes,
March 13 Survival Italian, A New
You, Money matters. Career Change,
Dreams. Contact Continuing Educa-
tion, Erwin Hall
CPR
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring CPR classes to
begin this week. There are two
separate classes being held. The first
class meets on Tuesday evenings
beginning February 21. 1984 from
7:30 -10:30 p.m. The second class will
run on Thursday evenings during the
same time slot. Any ECU student or
Mendenhall student center member
should sign-up immediately at the
Central ticket office in Mendenhall
between 10 4 Monday through Fri-
day. The classes will run for five
weeks. There is no charge, but the
book costs $1.00. Registration is
limited. For further Information call
?he Central Ticket Office at 757 6611
ext. 266.
We Sell Bargains
IN
USED FURNITURE
USED STEREO
USEDT.Vs
USED DORM REFRIG
USED HEATERS
Check With Us Before
You Buy Anything
VV 0f (CIV SALES CO �ajC ,w
400 EVANS, "on the corner"
Downtown Greenville
752-3866
y:w
COMING SOON
Look for
.MOVIE
j7iI in i
in an
upcoming
issue
of your
college
t
CLASSIFIED ADS j NaM
U nay ut trie form at right
of use a separate sheet of
paper if you need more lines
There are 33 units per line
Each tetter, punctuation mark
and work space counts as one
unit Capitalize and hyphenate
wo'o properly. Leave space
at end of line if word doesn't fit.
No ads will be accepted over
the phone We reserve the right
to rejec any ad. All ads must
be prepaid. Enclose 75 cents
pe une or fraction of a line.
Peasa print legibly! Use
capital and lower case letters.
Return to the Media Board
secretary by 3 p.m. the day
before publication
dtySUte.
No. Uses.
.all p� l�S.
-����� �� � i � ii i
t i , .� �. � � � -� � � � -� � � � �
.� �. � � � � � ��� � � �� f ' � � � � � � �
� � �. � � � � � � � � � � � t �.
1-
, - mmm mmm � � � � � � � �� � "�" p"H �
1 . 1, 1,� ����.�� � � I � � � � � �- � ��
� ��� �� M � �� � �" �� " � �
.�.��� - -
4444444444444-
, LJ LJ liiiiiiii fc i 1 J, i
NUCLEAR ARMAMENT
The Eastern North Carolina
Chapter of Physicians for Social
Responsibility will present a pro-
gram, "Nuclear Armament, Nuclear
Disarmament on Thursday,
February 23, 7:30 p.m In the Brody
Building Auditorium. Spelcal guest
speaker is Howard A.I. Sugg, PH.D
retired USN Commander and Ad-
junct Professor of Political Science,
East Carolina University.
IRS TAX FORMS
Joyner Library has received a ship-
ment of tax forms from the internal
Revenue Service to be used in prepar
ing 1983 Federal tax returns.
The forms are at the Information
desk In the Documents Dept. and
North Carolina Collection, In the
basement of Joyner Library, West
wing.
SELF-DEFENSE
The Department of University
Unions Is sponsoring Self Defense
classes beginning this week. The
classes will be held on Wednesday
evenings beginning February 22, 1984
and will last for 8 weeks. Any ECU
student or Mendenhall student center
member wishing to enroll should
sign up Immediately at the Central
Ticket Office In Mendenhall between
10 - 4 Monday through Friday.
Registration Is limited. For further
information, call the Crafts and
Recreation Office at 757 6611 ext. 260
or the Central Ticket Office at 266.
CRAFT WORKSHOPS
The Department of University
Unions is offering the following
workshops tnis semester in the
Mendenhall Student Center Crafts
Center. All ECU students, faculty,
staff, and their dependents who are 18
years of age or older are eligible to
register. Sign-up for pottery, weav
Ing, jewelry, photography, or
darkroom techniques In the Crafts
Center on the bottom floor of
Mendenhall Student Center this
week. Registration Is limited For
further information call the Crafts
and Recreation Office at 757 6611 ext.
260 (After 5 p.m call the Crafts
Center at 271.
FLATBALL PHANATICKS
Wake-up all you Plastic Flatbed
Phanaticks and play team ultimate
Frisbee every Tues Thurs. and Sun.
at bottom of Hill 3:15 p.m. ultimate
time. Be there or be oblong I
Members are encouraged to pay
membership dues (S10) In order to
reserve your new team jersey wMch
have already arrived. Anyone else In-
terested In sporting a new ECU
Frisbee Club T-shirt come on down to
the field or contact Rick at 758 7243
(shirts come In blue and yellow
(At or XL; 87. each). Any persons
interested in playing ultimate are
cordially welcomed to come out and
play. The Ultimate I rates are getting
ready to am In Gainesville, Fla. in
the Frostbreaker Ultimate Bowl II on
March 10 Si 11. Don't be slack, (am
with the irates this Sprlngi
LIBRARY HOURS
Joyner Library hours for Spring
Break, please note that the hour
have bee" extended (beyond tioe
appearing on printed schedules,
calendars, etcfor the following
dates
Friday, March 2, 8 am 9
p.mSaturday and Sunday. March 3
S. 4 closed; Monday, March 5 � Fri
day, March 9 8 am 5 p.m , Satur
day, March 10, 9 a.m. 6 p.m Surv
day, March 11, 1 p.m. 12 Midnight
NIH
A representative from National in-
stitute of Health. Bethesda, MD will
be on campus March 19 and 20 to in
terview students who would like to
work In a clinical setting as Normal
volunteers. Students will be paid del
ly stipends. All Interested students
must attend a general meeting at 7 00
p.m. on Monday, March 19 in Raw!
302 before having interviews on me
20th. Students maioring in Allied
Health, Nursing, and related fields
are encouraged to apply Contact the
Co op Office, 313 Rawl, for details and
applications.
PREREGISTRATION
General College students rou
contact their advisers prior to
February 20, 1984 to schedule �r ip.
pointment for preregistration for ,
summer and fall terms
RA DANCE
The SRA presents the Jnc Afluit
Semi formal Dance A "Marai GrM
Party" at the Holiday inn mo .oom�
Feb 25 from 7pm until v,c-
Free beverages and hors aoeurv�
will be served Buy your ticket frf
any House Council Officer Buses.
run sloping at MSC 10 pas' oc'
Financial Aid 20 pas and College H
40 past hour
LIBERAL STUDENTS
The Society of United i.ora
Students is now accepting �cc :a
tions for officers Deadil-ie tor juB
mission is Friday, February 24, 19t4
Any interested students shouia com
plete tne application on page of The
EAST CAROLINIAN and subm.t H
Room 239 Mendenhall Student c�r.
or at Thursday's meeting
Reproductive Health Care
Underslanding non judgmental care that
includes aboruon for women of all ages
Counseling for both partners is available
Special Services and rates for students.
Cal 761 5550 days, evenings, and weekends.
NEVER IN A BLUE MOON?
99
Fresh
14 lb.
Hamburger
Only At The Blue Moon! v
205 E. 5th St.
(Across from Apple Records)
By the way, we sti 11 have
SUBS99C Anytime f
I��i
SRA
presents a
Mardi Gras Party
February 25,1984
7:00-12:00
HOLIDOME, HOLIDAY INN
Drinks and Hors d'oeuvres Will Be Served
Tickets Must Be Purchased In Advance
Throush Your Residence Hall
Must Present Valid ECU ID and SRA Card
New Rd
The city of Greenville Greenville
will become the site of a Home on a
new Ronald McDonald owned by
House, a home-away- said Dr.
from-home for the Holbrookj
families of children in cancer sp
eastern North Carolina School of
undergoing hospital Pitt Coun
treatment for serious il- Commissioi
lnesses, according to of- a recent mi
ficials of the McDonald's the land fid
Corporation and the East a cost of
Carolina University year.
School of Medicine. The fil
Bill Freelove, local McDonald
McDonald's described
owner operator, an- That Love I
nounced at a February 16 establish!
news conference that the Philadelpi
McDonald's restaurants There are
of North Carolina will 50 Houses
contribute S200.000 near mai1
toward construction of centers tl
the House. United S
Plans are to build the several ot,
house off Move All togethj
Boulevard near the tional new
Puzzle Answei
spA
TiN
-2j'
pEjW
�'
THURSDAY
LADIES MG1
With FREE Admission
(Lady Members Only)
Free Wine 30c &.
Served in 8oz. glass
SAT25th The Big "E
Eddy
3rd Steve Hardy's
Beach Parry
SUN. Feb26 8pm-lam
ALL ABC Permits K.4 H
Private Club for members
Tues Sun. Happy Hourfror
Tickets Will Not Be Sold At The Door
SINGLE $3.00
DOUBLE $5.00
SEAAI-FORMAL DRESS
. BUSES WILL BE RUNNING ON THE HOUR
STOPPING AT WEST, CENTRAL AND COLLEGE HILL LOCATIONS.
NEW DELI
fRoreus
LADIES
� No -f� MM
miio NK.HI 5�

rV
STfcAJC HOUSE
AAon & Tues
Nite
12 chopped
sirloin &
Salad Bar
$3.99
m
3
&
too�
1�MiTr'nTTTHnTinrnrnnnHHrrHn i iiiiiiinniinniHjunuuuuuurioQuijij
Fri & Sat
Nite
Now Featuril
yourself pott
with
n
�m mf ��





THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 23, MM
�h
t t r
PREREGISTRATION
� Co.iW �twj.nt, should
r �1v,�er� pri0(. ,
try M m to schedule an ,�.
-�-�? tor orerefl.jtr.tlon for th.
'�� ara (ail terms
�RA DANCE
- a nrnmn m� 2rKl Ariua
-a Dance A "Mardl Gras
MM Holiday inn Molidome
'W until Midnlte'
averages ana hors doeurves
se-vec Buy your tickets from
�ouse Council Officer Buses will
B �' MSC 10 past hour
l a a 20 past and College Hill
, lour
LIBERAL STUDENTS
rhe toctety of united Liberal
Mi s oow acceptino applica-
-vs tor oH.cers Deadline for sub
U v s Fr,day February 24, 194
crested students should com
1 " application on page of THE
CAftOOMIAM and submit it to
� Of vervdenhall Stuoent Center
� ' M��s meeting.
Slue Moon!
5th si.
Apple Records)
we still have

rty
14
yiNN
Be Served
Advance
Hall
SRA Card
he Door
LOCATIONS
New Ronald McDonald House Announced
The city of Greenville
will become the site of a
new Ronald McDonald
House, a home-away-
from-home for the
families of children in
eastern North Carolina
undergoing hospital
treatment for serious il-
lnesses, according to of-
ficials of the McDonald's
Corporation and the East
Carolina University
School of Medicine.
Bill Freelove, local
McDonald's
owneroperator, an-
nounced at a February 16
news conference that the
McDonald's restaurants
of North Carolina will
contribute $200,000
toward construction of
the House.
Plans are to build the
house off Moye
Boulevard near the
Greenville Villa Nursing
Home on a two-acre tract
owned by the county,
said Dr. C. Tate
Holbrook, pediatric
cancer specialist at the
School of Medicine. The
Pitt County Board of
Commissioners agreed in
a recent meeting to lease
the land for the House at
a cost of one dollar per
year.
The first Ronald
McDonald � frequer ly
described as "The House
That Love Built" � was
established in
Philadelphia in 1974.
There are now more than
50 Houses in operation
near major medical
centers throughout the
United States and in
several other countries.
All together, the interna-
tional network of locally
Puzzle Answer
sPAHE L1 PLANE
T1NjS ER1VERS
O PNO1 RALEEVEN
EjWOT1CIsE
1�RDERED1IrIaN A M E
M O T "e1 NElADAM L 1 A
"51SAPEM U
T1RE1 TfUJN
a rD1LATEl Si
HIAlbN1CEEJKE A
ARG0CATERE
.EETLEO RMELET
SSEss'OPS
owned and operated
Houses serves more than
200,000 people a year.
Named for the
restaurant chain's
spokesperson, Ronald
McDonald, the Houses
provide convenient, inex-
pensive lodging for
parents who have to
travel long distances to be
near their hospitalized
children and for children
receiving outpatient
therapy. The Houses are
a place where families can
eat, sleep, relax and draw
emotional support from
each other.
"Until now, eastern
North Carolina has lack-
ed a facility like the
Ronald McDonald
House, so it gives me
great pleasure to be part
of its establishment
here expressed Bruce
Wunner, vice president
and regional manager of
McDonald's Corpora-
tion.
He added, "support
for the House will be
ongoing, with participa-
tion from franchisee-
owned and company-
owned McDonald's
restaurants across the
state, as well as from the
ECU School of Medicine,
Pitt Memorial Hospital
and area citizens
Holbrook said, "The
Ronald McDonald House
provides the sick child's
family a place to stay
with the warm, comfor-
ting atmosphere of a
home instead of a motel
room or a hospital room.
For a modest fee, which
is used to offset some
operational costs, family
members are provided a
bedroom, access to a
community kitchen, a
family room and other
areas of mutual enjoy-
ment. The guest fee can
be reduced or waived in
hardship cases
The Ronald McDonald
House of Greenville will
be managed by a full-
time, live-in House
manager. Operations will
be overseen by a private,
non-profit corporation to
be called Children's Ser-
vices of Eastern Carolina,
Inc The corporation's
board of directors will be
made up by equal
numbers of parents,
medical center represen-
tatives and McDonald's
officials.
Since the cost of a
Ronald McDonald House
is estimated to be as high
as $500,000, Holbrook
said additional funds will
be needed from sources in
the region. He expects the
strongest local fundrais-
ing efforts will come
from the parents and
friends of children who
have undergone extended
medical treatment. These
people have a special
understanding of what an
asset the House will be to
eastern North Carolina,
Holbrook said.
The volunteer group,
which now numbers more
than 75 members, is lead
by Mrs. Mary Ann Harris
of Tarboro. They have
applied for a $25,000
grant from the Ray A.
Kroc Children's Fund,
which was established by
Kroc, the McDonald's
founder, to help establish
the Ronald McDonald
House program.
"We're convinced
said Holbrook, "that our
volunteer group will work
to make the Ronald
McDonald House of
Greenville a reality
The expansion in re-
cent years of pediatric
services at the ECU
School of Medicine and
Pitt Memorial Hospital
has made Greenville an
ideal location for a
Ronald McDonald
House, said Holbrook.
Hospital capabilities have
grown with the addition
of a pediatric intensive
care unit and the enlarge-
ment of the pediatrics
ward and the neonatal in-
tensive care unit.
Symposium Held
Continued From Page 1
Quoting famous Viet-
nam correspondent
David Halberstarn, she
said: "A reporter must
believe, if nothing else,
that the United States can
never survive in time of
crisis be playing ostrich
Smith noted the dif-
ference in public opinion
support before and after
each war, which he feels
was largely attributed to
media disenchantment.
Opening March 1st
FABRICATE too
Just in time for Spring Break
Head to the beach In something dlfferent-
Csian Cutworks shorts & camisoles
Undresses Hand painted T-shirts,
Tdresses & sock!
10-5:30 AAon-Sat
116 E. 5th St.
Next to Book Barn 757-3944
iNSOUDATED
HEATRES
4.jv BARBRA
"5W STREISAND
o YENTL
jP��3V A rUm �ith mus
m
ADULTS $2.00 TIL 5:30 � c.HJ�llo)
BUCCANEER MOVIES
75� 3307 GfMn�llh Squiti Shopping Cantar
0
GREAT ADVENTURE
343 "In Search of
JJ A Golden Sky"
LA�� Rated- PG-
MMGWEEK!
DUDUY MOOftf
�NASHSSJA
KJNSKJ
llnl.ulhfuffu
W 351
LATE SHOW
FRISAT.
Open-ll:00PAA
Starts-11:30PAA
No Passes
No Discounts
THURSDAY IS
LADIES NIGHT
With FREE Admission
(Lady Members Only)
Free Wine � 304 & 45�Draft
Served in 8oz. glasses
SAT25th The Big "E"
Eddy Hemingway
3rd Steve Hardy's Original
Beach Party
SUN. Feb 26 8pm-lam
a l l a bc Perm its 4 Happy Hour
Private Club for members & guests.
Tues-Sun. Happy Hour from 5-8pm
MARILYN
CHAMBERS
JOHN C HOLMES
EAST CAROLINA
DANCE THEATRE
HURSDAY 23
NEW DELI
The East Carolina Playhouse
McGinnis Theatre
February 24,25,27-29 ECU Students: $2.50
8:15 P.M. General Public: $4.00
Call 757-6390
ELECTIONS
The Society Of United
Liberal Students
Now Accepting Submission For The
Posts of President, Vice-president,
Secretary, and Treasurer. Please
Submit The Form Below To Room
239 In Mendenhall Student Center
by Friday, February 24,1984.
N a me:
Address:
Telephone No
Position Desired:
Classification:
Qualifications:
iiiiniiiiiiimmiHHmiiii
STEAK HOUSE
2 Locations
2903 E. 10th St.
500 W. Greenville Blvd.
Mon & Tues
Nite
12 chopped
sirloin &
Salad Bar
$3.99
Wed & Thurs
Nite
3 Beef Tips
& Salad Bar
$3.99
c -o o l8ozsiriom
iASat & Salad Bar
Nlte
Now Featuring Fix it
yourself potato bar
Free with meal.
NO
WOi
SWR0P00D
Don) settle for pre-
cooked, warmed over,
shnhpacked burgers
You huie u fresh alternative
at.Subua) (iarden fresh lettuce,
tomatoes, onions and all the "hxm s are fm
Choice slued meats and cheeses. xt-hot meal-
holts and sausage, andfreshhbalntfoot-lonfi
rolls And every sanduKh or salad a' Subway is
made to mruder. not made madiance
E. 5th St.
751-7979
�SUBPI�
�JlniM
E. 5th St.
7�-7P79
j A CRUELTY - A CRIME
I $200 Maximum Fine for Abandoning An Animal
in North Carolina j
1 DONT ABANDON YOUR ANIMAL! I
I DOMESTICATED ANIMALS DEPEND UPON 1
PEOPLE FOR THEIR SURVIVAL.
ABANDONED ANIMALS: j
Starve, die from parasite infestation
Are trapped, poisoned, & Shot 1
Kill livestock and wildlife I
Cannot find adequate food and shelter on their own �
Are seldom taken in by concerned people �
IF YOU MUST GIVE UP YOUR ANIMAL, CALL: I
PITT COUNTY HUMANE SOCIETY 8:00-5:00
756-1268 or 752-9922
City Pound-752-3342 8:00-5:00 �
County Pound - 752-4141 8:00-5:00
PREPARED BY THE NORTH CAROLINA HUMANE FEDERATION, INC
P.O. BOX 892, CHAPEL HU�.�.�.
HINIi
� � wrtnlHIfW?
k
,�. � � ��
H f"
f 11fS9?
is
��?'





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23. 1984
llffi

Stye �aat (Earaltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, G�w�M��r
Darryl Brown, ��,�,&��
Jennifer Jendrasiak. mm mm, J.T. Pietrzak. d, aA,
Tina Maroschak. c�n�� e, Mike McPartland. ���, si
Ed Nicklas. 50 Ed,lor Tom Norton, o ��,��
Gordon Ipock. m. sro, Kathy Fuerst. ��, m.
Mark Barker, ow, w, mike Mayo. r�rhki �
February 23, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Desegregation
System Still Has Obligations
The University of North
Carolina system must prove that it
deserves the protection the U.S.
Supreme Court gave it Tuesday by
ruling that opponents cannot
challenge the its desegregation
plan in further court actions.
The high court's ruling will allow
North Carolina to concentrate on
its desegregation efforts and prove
it does not need constant prodding
from the Department of Education
or private groups. But the state
must live up to that trust.
So far, the UNC system is not
quite up to the standards agreed
upon in the 1981 decision. Blacks
compose 8.1 percent of the student
bodies at the state's 11
predominately white campuses,
and the agreement was for the
system to have an enrollment of 9
percent by now. "The fulfillment
of all these commitments will be a
major undertaking, and we intend
to meet that goal said UNC
President William Friday. But the
system still has a way to go.
Granted, it is difficult to raise
minority enrollment significantly in
a short length of time without occa-
sionally lowering admission stan-
dards. For reasons of past social
and economic deprivation,
minorities often score lower on
such measures as the high school
competency test. But injustices of
the past must be compensated for
now with affirmative actions
toward insuring opportunities for
minorities.
UNC is making many deliberate
efforts to increase minority enroll-
ment, and everyone in North
Carolina's educational system must
work to see that those efforts suc-
ceed.
Democrats' Gender Trap
B� (W Mtiion of The New RcpaMk
In this golden age of the gender gap,
�vomen are being shamelessly wooed. The
�ice presidency � which has been various-
ly likened to a pitcher of warm spit, a
;pare tire on the automobile of govern-
ment, a cataleptic state, and a kind of
disgrace � is one prize the Democrats
nave been dangling with much fanfare.
nd with much encouragement from
omen themselves.
"Don't call me baby, call me vice presi-
dent chanted hundreds of conven-
:ioneers at the annual convention of the
National Organization for Women in Oc-
:ober. Their leader, Judy Goldsmith, was
just as insistent: "1984 may not be the year
for America's first woman president she
proclaimed, "But there is no reason why
we shouldn't reasonably look for a vice
presidential candidate in 1984
In fact, however, there are plenty of
good reasons why the Democratic nominee
probably won't pick a woman vice presi-
dent com July. All the noise over the no-
tion of a second lady, from the candidates
and women alike, involves more sym-
bolism (and cynicism) than substance.
Despite the dubious reputation the vice
presidency has earned, the qualifications
for occupying the office are still high and
well established: They are, or at least
ought to be, the same as the qualifications
for the presidency.
Women have made striking gains in
politics recently; the number of women in
elective office nearly tripled between 1975
and 1981. Yet the Democrats have no
woman senators, and the sole Democratic
woman governor, Martha Layen Collins
of Kentucky, was elected only last
November.
The party does have a number of ac-
complished and respected women in its
delegation to the House of Representatives
� people like Geraldine Ferraro and
Patricia Schroeder. And there is surely
nothing wrong with adding sex to the list
of irrelevant considerations (region,
religion, etc.) which always weigh in the
choice.
A ticket-balancing formula like, "We
need a moderate urban Catholic governor
fro the West is hardly made worse by the
addition of "female It should help, not
hurt, a prospective vice presidential can-
didate to be of the opposite sex from the
presidential nominee. But this year the
Democrats would be reaching. If a woman
is nominated this time, her sex will have
counted too heavily.
Fortunately, the field of plausible pro-
spects is almost certain to keep on widen -
ing quickly in the years ahead. Indeed, the
Republicans already have several women
with at least the right paper credentials �
Paula Hawkins and Nancy Kasselbaum in
the Senate; Margaret Heckler, Elizabeth
Dole and (a nominal Democrat) Jeane
Kirkpatrick in the Cabinet. The steady
progress of women toward positions of
leadership is hardly likely to be helped,
and could even be hindered, by the selec-
tion of a less than clearly qualified woman
vice president now.
s it is, nowever, when the Democratic
nominee sizes up his position in July, the
practical arguments for balancing the
ticket in more familiar ways are likely to
prevail over the symbolic case for bestow-
ing the vice presidency on a woman.
But there are more important reasons for
the Democrats to drop the femagoguery.
What's at issue is their version of women's
increasingly active role in politics. If
there's anything the gender gap should
have made clear, but in fact seems to have
obscured, it's that women don't need more
token gestures.
If women's claims to a place on the
ticket are to be credible and constructive,
they should start by running for president,
not by angling for an unlikely offer of the
vice presidency. However grueling and
often fatuous the long campaign can be, it
may be the best way for a women can-
didate to establish her qualifications for
national leadership.
Instead of waiting and chanting, women
would be gaining exposure and building
support. Above all, a bid for the presiden-
cy would prove that women's participation
in politics cannot be summed up by the
confining rhetoric of a special gender
cause.
r- Campus Forum
WNTER1HERE& AM EPB W MM SOUP�.
Vicarious Vives Of Campaign Beat
By GREG RIDEOUT
Just a thought:
What I would most like to be doing
right this instant is reporting, not or-
dinary, murder-and-city-council-
meeting reporting, but Ail-American
campaign chasing. It's probably the on-
ly time of year you'd catch me saying,
"Hey guys, wanna go to Iowa or
something? Huh?" But, alas, no one
wanted to go. And I had to tell the
"Times" no, and, because of prior com-
mitments (nice phrase, eh) I couldn't
cave in to Ben Bradlee's pleas for my
help.
So, instead, here's my contribution to
campaign journalism. I'm, of course,
not able to be out there to catch each
candidate's latest gaffe, and I'm unable
to add each new promise to the list of
broken ones in my notebook. However,
I'm priviledged enough to get a few
second-hand facts from a couple of my
buddies � I'm sure you know them.
There's Dan, Peter somebody, and, my
main buddy, Walter Lippshitz of the
"New York Pest
They're helping me do what I call
tangential reporting. Of course you
don't get a lot of "real" facts this way,
nor are you in on the late-breaking
scoops. I don't mind 'cause I'd rather
make'em up anyway �even if I was
there. Most reporters are doing the
same, they just don't know it. And, un-
fortunately, it is causing the American
public to miss the big story.
Case in point. Edwin L. Noman told
us the other night on the news that the
big story was "everyone's ganging up on
old Walter Mondale. That ain't fair
Wrong, grammatical breath, but the big
story wasn't that at all. So you better go
crawl, hopefully, under a giant period
until 1988. Folks, the "real" story was
ex-VP Mondale telling everyone that
grown-up astronaut John Glenn really
didn't orbit the Earth 22 years ago.
Everyone missed it. Even Dan. I got it.
Lucky, I guess.
VievPoint
Listen: You see, the others, too hung
over from all the all-night press parties
(the only reason "real" reporters go on
campaign trips anyways), forgot to go to
Mondale's combination pajama party
and fundraiser at the Holiday Inn in Des
Moines Mo ever alert, sat at my desk at
the OI' EC and vicariously attended via
my good buddy Herbie Stimson, the
night manager at the World's Innkeeper.
"Hey Herbie it's me, Greg, I yelled
across the plains. "How's the wife and
kids?"
"Click said Herbie, He was so ex-
cited to hear from me, but somehow the
phone kinda' went dead (I reminded
myself to mention this to Cliff Robert-
son). But, anyway, with my contact
firmly established, I got a beat on the
story.
It seems Mondale, dressed in Bugs
Bunny jamies for the occasion, told the
people at his $l,500-per plate affair that
Glenn had goofed. Turns out that right
before the historic mission, Glenn thre
up his right stuff that he ate for
breakfast and was replaced by Bonzo.
Well this was the first scoop I'd never
get, so I made it up right away and sent
it over the wire. It was top story this
morning � sorry Edwin. Some people
are even talking Pulitzer; or was that
howitzer, well, something like that.
So, you see, even though I'm not bat-
tling it out in the trenches with the rest
of the boys, I'm still clouding my share
of reality for the American public.
Hey, now that Iowa's over, I'm roll-
ing up to New Hampshire � you guys
wanna' come? Gary Han won't "win"
this one. My money's on George
McGovern. Hear he's holding a com-
bination peace rally, ski marathon and
fish fry. Should be interesting. Everyone
is going to dress up as someone famous.
I hope to go as George Washington, if I
can find a suit. Seems the last eight
white-powdered wigs have been snatch-
ed up. And none of those were authen-
tic. Some guy from Washington's
already ordered it. Oh, well.
Watch out for all those elephants and
jackasses.
YOU m "TO ASK TO SIT N 7W� SMOKING SECTION
University Community Not Confronting Nuclear War
"Our problems stem from our accep-
tance of this filthy rotten system
� Dorothy Day
If there was a nuclear war tomorrow
and you survived, would you be able to
honestly say that you had done all you
could to prevent it? Is the prevention of
nuclear war a pipe dream? Is it too late?
I suspect most of you answered "no"
to the first and "yes" to the other two.
Despite the intense faith most
Americans have in this "free" system
of government we've got, most perceive
this same government as hopelessly
unable to stop the arms race.
Last year dozens of our represen-
tatives voted for a nuclear freeze resolu-
tion and then turned right around and
supported the MX missile or some other
nuclear project. The inconsistency of
our leaders on this issue only serves to
increase our lack of hope. Despite its
obvious advantages over a communist
system, the democraticelectoral pro-
cess moves very slowly and often in
circles. It takes the courageous and
dedicated efforts of all of us to make
our system of government be responsive
to our collective wills.
I'm not convinced that nuclear war
will be prevented, but I'm totally con-
vinced that it can be prevented if we
decide to work toward that goal.
Personally I find it quite hard to
believe that most students are, on the
one hand, vigorously preparing for
their vocational futures, while at the
same time they are devoting zero energy
to making sure they have a safe world
to graduate into.
Faculty members are also being delin-
quent in their responsibilities. (I suspect
ECU's instructors are like most others.)
They exhibit a total dedication to multi-
ple choice learning which is devoid of
thinking or leadership. They are not
preparing their students for the real
world.
If memorization is your strength, try
out these facts: The world is spending
Si.3 million each and every minute on
preparation for war. This, while the
majority of its inhabitants live in abject
poverty.
More money for arms, less money for
living. The poor are getting poorer
while the risk of nuclear war increases
by the minute. Our failure to act is our
stamp of approval of the status quo.
Resistance!
That single word is the answer to the
whole problem. Resistance to will,
resistance to lies, resistance to
hopelessness � this is our solution.
With resistance will come pain. Mar-
ching to a different beat is not easy.
People will laugh at you (often to hide
their own fears), they will call you a
Communist (and worse) and they will
attempt to invalidate everything you
stand for. Don't let them defeat you!
During my years of resistance I have
always tried to make people understand
one important fact: the "real" radicals
are the people in Washington and
Moscow � they're the ones preparing
to destroy the world, I'm only trying to
stop them.
Concern for life is not radical,
neither is resistance to death. Speaking
out and picketing for peace is not only a
good idea � it's your responsibility as a
citizen of this world.
For years I have been challenging
ECU-ROTC students to address the
realities of the work they are doing with
that organization. Yes, I have faced a
lot of criticism because of this, but as I
watched "The Day After" it was chill-
ing to see the Air Force soldiers coolly,
calmly and thoughtlessly pressing the
buttons that launched the nuclear
missiles. Anyone of them could have
been an ECU graduate carrying out the
orders to end the world.
As U.S. citizens each of us must also
confront the reality of our citizenship.
Most of us pay taxes and in turn these
taxes are used to pay for the arms race
Whether we like it or not, all of us are
implicated someway in this process of
war preparation. Of course, resistance
options exist at this level too. Again the
risks are great.
Opting to join "the resistance" to the
status quo will obviously mean a
dramatic change in lifestyle for most of
us, however the rewards are also great.
There can be no greater reward than the
one you receive when you decide to be
"true unto thyself
Patrick O'Neill
Durham, N.C.
Student Opinion
Dorm
Cheek
Student Red
recently suggc
dormitory to
mosphere for
pus. Students
nions on the pij
La Tanya T
Senior� "If
money, I say
the quiet hour
The librar
can't take the
Tina Vassl
Freshman �
idea beca .
among residenj
my room to fir
( edric
Technology. S !
in my dorm
and I have to
dying in the
noise Quiet
would con
Susan Ra
Education. Ju
real tough set
aider living i
funny anytimel
YOUR
OFFICI
1
Bl
BECOi
1 oca) ECl students celebrate Xhi

I
I
1
I


i
a
i
� �- - ��-
wwiitmmVmsimfm -4-m- -wnmmmm m .m 0 �m�
I
I
I
i
f
I
i
-
V
Why are a kc4 I
becoming buddies in Ai
Probably because C
the kind of pv V-
wav to meet
ROTC students teij
who are interested in md
They're popu. ffSi 1
but who like to have a d





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 23, 1984
r-
M
Beat
Cliff Robert-
. my contact
got a beat on the
ssed in Bugs
Kxasion, told the
-�: plate affair that
- out that right
Glenn threw
thai he ate for
ed by Bonzo.
scoop I'd never
jjhl a ay and sent
p story this
ve people
er. or was that
ig l:ke that.
gh I'm not bat-
es with the rest
ding my share
ui public.
� er, I'm roll-
I e � you guys
won't "win"
on George
Jing a com-
� marathon and
ting. Everyone
eone famous.
W ashmgton, if I
he last eight
: been snatch-
c were authen-
m Washington's
well.
sc elephants and
Wtt.n
ar
ke of them could have
faduate carrying out the
le world.
pis each of us must also
iity of our citizenship.
taxes and in turn these
pay for the arms race.
it or not, all of us are
tway in this process of
Of course, resistance
this level too. Again the
"the iesistance" to the
fcll obviously mean a
in lifestyle for most of
rewards are also great,
greater reward than the
when you decide to be
elf
Patrick O'Neill
Durham, N.C.
Student Opinion
Temple
L
Cheek
Dorm Proposal
Student Residence Association has
recently suggested providing a quiet
dormitory to create a better study at-
mosphere for students living on cam-
pus. Students were asked their opi-
nions on the proposal.
La Tanya Temple, Political Science,
Senior � "If it will cost students more
money, 1 say no. We should enforce
the quiet hour rules we already have.
The library is a facility for people who
can't take the noise
Tina Vassil, General College,
Freshman � "Quiet dorm is a good
idea because noise causes conflict
among residents. I often have to leave
my room to find a quiet place to study.
Cedric Cheek, Industrial
Technology, Sophmore � Quiet hours
in my dorm are not really enforced,
and I have to do quite a bit of my stu-
dying in the library because of dorm
noise. Quiet dorm is a great idea. I
would consider moving in
Susan Rape, Early Childhood
Education, Junior � "Unless I had a
real tough schedule, I wouldn't con-
sider living in a quiet dorm. I'd feel
funny anytime I turned on mv stereo.
Vassil
Obscure Bill Causes Uproar
Rape
MARK BARBER � ECU Photo Lab
(CPS) � Student aid
experts here are scrambl-
ing to beat back an
obscure bill that, if pass-
ed in a few weeks, could
severely hurt most state
student aid programs.
Congress has now
scheduled a March vote
on a measure that could
"deny countless students
the opportunity for a col-
lege education" by "crip-
pling" state student loan
programs, the aid experts
contend.
State and college loan
officials nationwide are
working frantically to
block the legislation, now
pending in the U.S.
House of jRepresen-
tatives, before it comes to
a vote.
The bill, known as HR
4170, has already virtual-
ly eliminated tax-exempt
financing for student
loans by placing a cap on
the number of tax-exempt
student bonds each state
billion worth of student
loans.
States have been issu-
ing such bonds for a long
time, but the bonds have
become even more impor-
tant fund-raising tools
since Washington began
slashing the amounts of
money from the sale of
the bonds to loan to
students.
As students repay the
state, the state pays in-
terest to the citizens who
bought the bonds. The
citizens don't have to pay
taxes on the interest they
earn from the state.
The new bill before
Congress would limit the
bond selling, and would
lump student aid bonds in
the same finance category
as tax-exempt industrial
revenue bonds.
Consequently student
loan agencies, aid of-
ficials say, will be forced
to compete with private
corporations for bond
business.
"There's no question
the legislation would be
very crippling says
Jean Frolichsen, general
counsel for the National
Council of Higher Educa-
tion Loan Programs in
Washington, D.C.
Tax-exempt student aid
bonds are also the cor-
nerstone of the so-called
"secondary" student
loan market. Special
state agencies issue the
bonds to raise money,
which they in turn use to
purchase delinquent and
unpaid student loans
from "primary" lenders,
such as banks and savings
and loans.
"What the secondary
market does is purchase
loans from these primary
institutions so they can
make more loans to other
students Frolichsen ex-
plains.
"It's a matter of free-
ing up more capital for
more loans, and if the
secondary market dries
up it will have a dramatic
effect on the primary
market she adds.
If banks and other
primary lenders lost the
option of selling their
"sour" student loans to
secondary state agencies,
aid officials stress, they
would cut back drastical-
ly on student loans in
general, and specifically
on loans to lower and
middle-income students.
can issue.
At risk
is almost $3
YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN
OFFICER'S COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
Your BSN moans you're a professional. In the Army, it also
t an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities,
P.O. Box 771 Burbank, CA 91510.
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
BE ALLYOU CAN BE.
i a � ��
M
i
SOUTH PARK
I oca! ECU students celebrate the long awaited arrival of equipment for the WASH PUB on E. 10th Street.
(paio ADvarmaMaMT)
BECOME A 4-LETTER MAN,
I


i
i
I
i
f
i
i
i
I

i
1

1
Why are a lot of college men and women
becoming buddies in Army ROTC
Probably because Army ROTC is full ot
the kind ot people other people go out of their
way to meet.
ROTC students tend to be high achievers
who are interested in more than their studies
They're popular students with a serious side,
but who like to have a good time, too
In other words, when people join Army
ROTC they often meet people a lot like them-
selves.
For more information, contact Captain
Helduv Liivak at 757-6967 or come by Room 324
ErwinHall. Register for Army ROTC this fail I
ARMY ROTC
BE ALLYOU CAM BE.
e
Iff
M
M
n
H
N
M
M
k
n
n
H
M
n
8
8
H
I
8
u

MAYIAG
EQUIPPED
home
style
LAUNDRY
.75 Wash
.25 for 25 minutes on Dryer
Always clean, Air conditioned
35 Washers, 35 Dryers
Low Prices Drop-off Service
i
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
OFFER LIMITED TO
PER CUSTOMER
NAME
ADDRESS
CITY
STATE
ZIP
SIGNED DATE
i' siof a jnnvmlea deposit coupo" � sp�c con!j,w proodrd Retuno �m t� mi�j
THIS COUPON REDEEMABLE ONLY AT
South Park Home Style Laundry
Coupon good only Weekdays thru March 2nd
Maytag DIAL-A-FABRIC equipped store
Primed m U S A
FonnCl 63
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
i
w
M
M
t :


s

Located Next To
� SANDWICH GAME
VIDEO ARCADE
& Sandwich Shop
9 Food Lion
� In Back of Ramada Inn
I
m
8
R
H
EL k
mfM�ir���' .win �?-���-��-
r�k. � �� �"� �
v
,
m





fHt EAST CAROLINIAN
Styje
FEBRUARY 23, 1984
E.C. Dance Theatre
Casts Varied Program
A varied program of modern, ballet and jazz dance
will be presented by the East Carolina Dance Theatre
on Friday and Saturday, Febuary 24 and 25, and
again Monday through Wednesday. Febuary 27-29,
at 8:15 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre on the ECU cam-
pus in Greenville.
Members of the ECU dance faculty have
choreographed eight pieces to music ranging from
traditional bluegrass to Grerogian chants, to contem-
porary jazz and electronic.
Of the eight dances, two will be performed to
original scores: "Crooked Sky" choreographed by
Patricia Weeks, and "Why " choreographed by
Jerome Jenkins.
"Crooked Sky got its name from an old American
Indian term used to describe the rugged rocks in the
Southwestern United States. Using the image. Dr.
Otto Henry of the ECU School of Music composed
the music, and Ms. Weeks set the dance in architec-
tual terms using angular shapes and designs. Ms.
eek explained. "My inspiration actually came
from the years I spent in Utah and the intricate
deigns I saw in the rocks of that region. The more I
worked on the choreography, the more 1 began to see
the dancers moving like the wind and water, carving
patterns in the sandstone as only Mother Nature can
do
"Why " is decicated to the wives and families of
the Marines recently killed in Lebanon and shows the
strengths of women � how they communicate sup-
port for one another without the use of words, only
feelings. The music for this piece was composed by
Sara Otto of the University of Iowa and is the result
of her observations of women in the dance classes
taught by Mr. Jenkins.
Other dances to be presented include a rousing,
foot-stomping barn dance entitled "Down the River
and Up the Creek choreographed by Patricia Per-
talion. With a cast of eight women and six men, it is
divided into five sections using music of the old-time
bluegrass genre.
"Moods of Jami choreographed by Mavis Ray,
is an energetic piece using some of the more famous
music of famed composer Scott Joplin; "Let
Perpetual Light Shine by choreographer Pat
Downey-Kuhn, is an unusual dance adapted to
Gregorian chants.
In its entirety, the production will feature some 45
dancers from the ECU Department of Theatre Arts.
Selected pieces have been scheduled to go on tour of
eastern North Carolina in early March.
��� fey LtSLil TOOO
While researching for an upcoming book on ethnic American autobiographies, ECU English faculty
member James Holte discovered it hasn't been easy for all immigrants to melt into America's mainstream
culture.
After Sidewalks Roll Up
Krispy Kreme Doughnuts Is
The Late Night Place To Be
?
By GORDON IPOCK
Featara Editor
With a single headlight burning, a '64 Falcon sta-
tion wagon swings off a deserted 10th Street and rolls
to a halt outside Krispy Kreme Doughnuts. The
driver is a chubby girl of perhaps 19. She sits huddled
behind the steering wheel of the old car. The
passenger, a fat girl in army fatigues, climbs out of
the car. shoves open the heavy glass door and limps
across the red tile floor to the counter.
"I want a half-dozen plain, three creme-filled,
three chocolate and a half-dozen raspberry she
says, pointing to the different trays of doughnuts in-
side the long glass case.
"Is that all?" asks a middle-aged woman in a
monotone as bland as her white polyester uniform.
The fat girl clutches the bag and hurries out to her
waiting friend. They paw into the bag, and each in-
hales a thick creme-filled doughnut; then, the driver
starts the car, and they sputter into the black night.
It's now 2:20 a.m and traffic is infrequent on
10th. Suddenly, blue lights flash through the large
plate-glass windows. A drab green '70 Catalina eases
off the street. A city police cruiser follows it into the
parking lot. It stops on the Pontiac's flank, hemming
it against a dumpster. A young, white cop, big in the
formless, bulky way cops often are, hustles out of his
cruiser with a nightstick in one hand and a flashlight
in the other. He peers down into the Catalina.
The driver, a young black, slowly pushes open his
door and steps cooly into the night air to meet the of-
ficer. Dressed in designer jeans, a gray wool sports
coat and a pink shirt, he is soon talking animatedly to
the cop, his exagerated gestures a testimonial to
sobriety. The cop listens, then points suspiciously at
the dealer's tag on the Poncho. The black motions to
his partner in the passenger's seat who fumbles
through the dash and produces a slip of paper. The
cop inspects the paper under the beam of his
flashlight, nods his head and returns to his cruiser.
The two young blacks wait until the police car disap-
pears through a couple of stop lights. Rather than
drive away, they walk inside and buy doughnuts.
"Cop hassling you guys?"
"Naw says the driver. "He just thought he saw
us weaving a little
They sit at one of the little green tables. Another
police cruiser charges up 10th Street, lights flashing,
siren wailing.
A short time later, a shabby Olds Vista Cruiser
stops outside. Four young men in jeans and bulky
jackets, sporting shoulder-length hair walk stiffly in.
They cut up, act cute, joke and laugh in the self-
centered way that struggling rock musicians think
they're supposed to whenever they're in the public's
eye.
"And what else? And what else?" the woman
behind the counter says as one after another points
from tray to tray. The band buys lots and lots of
doughnuts, a heavy bag apiece. They're Illusion.
They've just finished playing the Attic and are head-
ed to Fayettenam. They plod one-by-one back to the
waiting Olds, crawl inside and motor away into the
night.
A new silver Thunderbird pulls up and stops right
outside. The car door opens, and a heavy-set man
wearing a burgandy parka climbs out of the back seat
and waddles forward with the stiff gait fat men have
after riding long distances in cramped quarters.
"Oooh, is that all you have?" he asks the woman
behind the counter.
"It'll be a while before we have fresh ones she
says.
An equally heavy-looking man waits in the
Thunderbird. A pretty young brunette sits beside
him. Her eyes sparkle, and the two laugh, perhaps
sharing a joke. Their errand boy hurries back to the
car. The brunette opens the door, snatches the bag of
doughnuts from his meaty grip and leans forward so
the thick fellow can squeeze into his rear seat. Then
they're gone.
Greenville's bars and clubs have been closed for a
couple of hours. The town sleeps. I bite into a thick,
filled doughnut. The white creme is sweet. I wash the
sugar from my mouth with coffee, sharp and bitter
but good.
Krispy Kreme Doughnuts is Greenville's late, late,
late night place to be.
P��t� fey OAKY PATTtHSON
Three dancers perform in one of the eight dance pieces that will comprise this year's East Carolina Dance
Theatre.
Fabled Melting Pot?
Or Many Ethnic Lumps In American Pie?
By FRANCEINE PERRY
Kl Ncwi Sanaa
Pro-American zeal abounds in
many autobiographies of im-
migrants to the United States,
says an East Carolina University
scholar. They also challenge the
common assumption that this na-
tion is "a land of opportunity"
for all, a vast "melting pot" of
diverse ethnic groups.
Dr. James Craig Holte of the
ECU English faculty, a specialist
in American ethnic literature,
finds in immigrant and ethnic
writing an "almost obsessive in-
quiry into what it means to be an
American
For most, becoming American
meant struggling for economic
security, making the most of
whatever opportunities were
available and adapting to the new
society, Holte finds.
In studying autobiographies
which represent dozens of ethnic
groups, Holte has observed that
newcomers who found success
assimilated themselves into the
culture of the United States, for-
saking the customs and language
of their native lands.
"The message is, 'If you cannot
adapt, you will remain alien "
Holte says.
This message is plain in "The
Promised Land the 1912
autobiography of immigrant
Mary Antin, whose family sought
refuge here from the persecution
of Jews in czarist Russia. Her
book recalls years of tedious labor
in the sweatshops of New York's
garment district and eventual rise
into a better life through
American public education.
Another tale of hard-won suc-
cess is told by Italian immigrant
Constantine Paunzio in his "The
Soul of an Immigrant" (1924),
which begins as an incredible
story of hardship and bitter
alienation. The young Italian feels
himself outcast by urban America
and escapes into the Maine woods
where he works as a lumberjack to
earn his passage back to Italy.
However, he finds sympathetic
friends, learns English, decides to
stay and eventually converts to
Methodism.
Panunzio's book exhorts all im-
migrants to adopt sound
"American virtues and thereby
succeed in the new land.
Hard work is recommended in
immigrant autobiographies as the
surest means of achieving success,
Holte notes, but the writers do
concede that they were blessed
with luck as well.
"Even Andrew Carnegie, a
Scottish immigrant who achieved
enormous wealth, admits that
luck and some capital to begin
with was at least as important as
labor and determination Holte
said.
All immigrant life histories
don't have happy endings,
however. Holte noted that im-
migrants who are not only poor
but also non-white have had to
confront not just economic,
educational and language bar-
riers, but also the formidable
obstacle of racial prejudice.
"Even as a theory, the melting
pot has seldom been applied to In-
dians, Hispanics, Orientals or
blacks he said. "Color, it ap-
pears does not melt
But simply being white has not
always guaranteed acceptance by
middle-class America, Holte ex-
plained.
"The hostility from the
established community, the peo-
ple who 'got here first is
remarkably similar throughout
our history.
"Oklahoma drought victims
who migrated west to California
during the 1930's were regarded
with dislike and distrust. Irish im-
migrants who arrived in the Nor-
theast during the mid-1800's were
subjected to the same type of
negative stereotyping as blacks
and Puerto Ricans are today; as a
group they were termed 'shiftless,
no good Italian kids in the
public schools were once routinely
put into industrial arts classes
rather than college prep pro-
grams
The time of their arrival worked
to the advantage of some im
migrants.
"Making it in America, at leas.
by the second or third generation,
was easier, much easier, during
the industrial expansion between
the Civil War and World War I
Factories needed labor, so im
migrants could at least get jobs
Many gradually prospered and
managed to assimilate themselve
into middle-class American socie
ty-
"Those who came later ma
have worked just as hard, but
were generally not as successful
Also, farmland in the Midwest
was no longer widely available
and cheap
In adapting to a new land an
new culture, European ethnic
families have gained status, while
the customs, language and maybe
even religion of the old country
were forgotten.
"Now the descendents look
back and regret the loss of their
cultural identity
Holte describes his own origins
as "Irish-Norwegian complete
with a grandmother who spoke
Norwegian. "I had a strong sense
of two different backgrounds
he recalls. His boyhood was speni
in New York City where
neighborhood and parochial
school chums included children
from German, Irish, Polish, Puer
to Rican and black families.
He's now completing a book
about ethnic American
autobiographies, to be entitled
"The Ethnic I Studies of ethnic
writings have convinced Holte
that American literature classes
could be enriched with examina
tions of ethnic American writings,
along with the mainstream Anglo
writers-Hawthorne, Melville and
Henry James.
"A lot of good stuff doesn't get
taught in the classroom; we teach
the same classic books. But some
ethnic writings can 'stand up' as
good literature in themselves. Our
culture is more diverse than we
think it is
Dance
By PAT FELTON
��jriMfes
You come back to your
room after class and
switch on the radio just
like you always do You
may turn the dial to
"Rock 93" or WSFL or
any of the popular sta-
tions during prime time,
and within three songs or
less, what do you hear?
Thump-bump slam get-
down wave wham It's a
dance tune, and the more
you hear of them, the
more you seem to hke
them (unless you, in the
Ozzy shirt, just refuse to
like them). The populari-
ty of dance music has
catapulted recently,
largely due to the merging
tandem of New Wave and
funk music. Dance clubs
are more crowded
ever, which is evide-
you frequej
as the Elbe
the
crowds, bi
affecting
chart.
The prj
something
jor dance
new mat'
patron I
pond
gets aroun
song becoi
evening m
over "I
shoots tl
�oan
Top �
chart ia
mine sor
Tor
we-
.
COMMERCI
ART STUDENl
20 o
ttek Camera
F s. S:cs 5
ask for t it
OPEN 12 HOUR
NAondcTy i
zz 9-7
rug jcJjc"
42 Gree e8
Phone 756-0825
2 For 1
Special
(Pizza Only
Offer Good Thru Hq i
Not Good kVH Any Other Specif
Buy One Pizza at Reca- Pr Cfl
d Get Another ol Sar � a
Of Less FREE
Q
WA
HOU
More fm
LARGEST
PIT
Fully
Coloi
Fluff
BEER-VII
A roost for night owls, an oasis for Insomniacs and sugar addicts, Krispy
go when the rest of Greenville sleeps.
by ���DON IPOCK
Doughnuts Is the place to
whet
F.x
mm ,��) na





JHEEAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 23. 1984 7
BRUAJn 23. 9M
��� a, OAV �TT��ION
1 I Fastarolina Dance
Pot?
mean Pie?
a work
e i m
j generation.
easier, during
. ween
W'a a id World War I
I I'll
d least gel jobs
pered and
cmselve
m socie
tter ma

-
: t �- able
�iapting to a nev. land an
ean ethnic
status, while
g .age and mavbe
regr the loss ol their
own origin
v- 'Aegian complete
ndmother who spoke
"1 had a strong sense
o different backgrounds
-alls. His boyhood was speni
I � York City where
I rhood and parochial
included children
Oerman, Irish, Polish, Puer-
ican and black families.
fcs . ompleting a book
lut ethnic American
?biographies, to be entitled
e Ethmc I Studies of ethnic
ings have convinced Holte
American literature classes
Id be enriched with examina
Is of ethnic American writings.
ig with the mainstream Anglo
le-Hawthorne, Melville and
Jr. James.
lA lot of good stuff doesn't get
iht in the classroom; we teach
Isame classic books. But some
BC writings can "stand up' a.s
literature in themselves. Our
ire is more diverse than wt
Ik it is
iKteme
fev�o�ooNirocK
Doughnut is the place to
Dance Music
W6 AR6 NOT ALONE
By PAT FELTON
Staff Writer
You come back to your
room after class and crowds, but they're also
switch on the radio just affecting the Top 40
like you always do. You chart
�V iTE. lhc dial to Thc Procedure goes
1 ? or something like this. Ma-
you frequent such places League's "Fascination
as the Elbo. Not only are The Romantics' "Talking
the clubs drawing in Your Sleep and
thesizers, rhythm boxes
and the other electronics
used by today's bands,
music is taking a new
direction. For instance,
Van Halen is using new
"Undercover of the
Night and ancient Yes
came up with "Owner of
a Lonely Heart both
getting considerable mix-
ing time at the clubs.
Of course, I can't com-
pletely do the dance trend
Shannon's "Let the
Music Play" were all big
club smashes and conse-
quently number ones on technology to their ad-
uonslr518- ��EZ� UpwhS julVT!
leSTCm"bdu�myOUlhclr? SM&S 's is not to say dance SS �&"�� SS'ttftg?
Thump-bump slam get- gets around, and soon the music is taking over the more, other groups who MTV and a no fin " ,�f
down wave wham. It's a song becomes part of the Top 40; but instead, it's have Sen known for Sow LSESfZ
tTuVTmT cvenin� �i� c,ubs aU making a big splash that music at is good to " MafCh �f
them, the over. This, a turn, inevitably affects all listen to are beginning to
kinds of music. Due to incorporate steady dance
the introduction of beats in their songs. The
computer-controlled syn- Rolling Stones did
more you seem to like
them (unless you, in the
Ozzy shirt, just refuse to
like them). The populari-
ty of dance music has
catapulted recently,
shoots the song up the
Billboard DanceDisco
Top 80. And this record
chart can usually deter-
mine some of the songs
that will be hot on the
'82, MTV finally broke
down and added "Billie
Jean" to their rotation of
videoes, perhaps because
of pressure from CBS
Rcords or because they
couldn't keep him out
any longer without per-
manently scarring their
reputation. But
regardless of the reason,
this event broke the dam
and a flood of new dance
music by rookie and
veteran bands alike surg-
ed into the mainstream.
We learned the "Safety
Dance" from newcomers
Men Without Hats and
swayed to old-timer
David Bowie's "Let's
Dance The flood
spread and continues to
do so today.
y v
Lose
ENCOUNTERS
OF TK THWO KNO
He
ACotumaa ?�� ��i
largely due to the merging Top 40 pop music chart
tandem of New Wave and weeks ahead of the
funk music. Dance clubs song's actual emergence
are more crowded than on a station like WITN.
ever, which is evident if For example, The Human
COMMERCIAL
ART STUDENTS
20
off
Itek Camera
Films, Stats, Screens
(ask for discount card)
�!XMWWSmfSSSfSSSMVSs, MSSSSSSf'SSM W�fA v. �SSSSSSSSSSSSWS,WSSSSSs�wss�.
OPEN 12 HOURS
Monday - Thursday
Friday 9-7 Saturday 9-2
THE GEOfiGETOWN ShOPS
Close Encounters is this
weekend's feature film at Hendrix
Theatre.
8 00PM
THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 23, 1984
HCNDaiX TmATKE ECU CAMPOS QUEEUVKLE
eru
� J �1 �(
I. �
S3 0C
PU�C
H00
UOO
TICKETS �v�H.At�.E CENTKAi. TICKET Off ICE. MHMMMU
Uonda, Frid, �:�,� toe em
sssssssSfssssss,
421 Greenville Blvd.
Phone 756-0825
2Forl
Special
(Pizza Only)
Offer Good Thru Nov. 8,1983
Not Good With Any Other Specials
Buy One �izza at Regular Price
d Get Another ot Same Value
Or Less FREE
ECU
m:Mmvissaz
M�i�����J�JU�J ���. �.
Watch for our
Fling Before Spring Break Sale
Ad in Tuesday's edition of
The East Carolinian
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Wright Building
LASAGNE
JUST $1.99
� TO GO $2.29 -
with this coupon
(REG. PRICE $3.35)
(Not good with other Lasagne Specials)
EXPIRES MARCH 31,1984
SMALL SPAGHETTI PEPPI
JUST $1.99
� TO GO $2.29 �
with this coupon
(REG. PRICE $3.25)
(Not good with other Spaghetti
Peppi specials)
ill-NJi-lIiiLJa jJUiJdJLLiJJJJXXLiM
items ana Prices
Effective Tnru Sat
FeOruary 25 1984
JPr-
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight � Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
HOUSE
"More Than a Laundromat

LARGEST LAUNDROMAT IN
PITT COUNTY
Fully Attended
Color Cable T.V.
Fluff & Fold
BEER-VIDEOS-POPCORN
Coupon
Good for 1 Free wash
when paying for another
Expires Feb. 28,1984
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of these adver
tised items is re-
quired to be readily
available for sale in
each Kroger Sav-on.
except as specifically
noted in this ad if
we do run out of an
item we will offer
you your choice of a
comparable item
when available
reflecting the same
savings or a rain
check which will en
title you to purchase
the advertised item
at the advertised
price within 30 days
Limit one manufac-
turers coupon per
item
Jk 'j
Sfi J
o
a
paper
TOels
� ih'
n ,
m
-El
fefc"
fM
2PW
jumoo
oN
KROGER
Corned
F
12 Oz.
Can
� � �;
naii'triinjiiif
-� �� � � � � �
-4k� ft.
"iV"
m





'

r
THfc KASTC AROl INI AN
Sports
FEBRUARY 23, 1984 Page 8
pset First Place Richmond
Coach Andruzzi: 'We Stopped Them With Great Defense'
By RANDY MEWS
AMfcUat Sjort. Editor
The ECU women's basketball
team turned in one of its best per-
formances of the year Tuesday
night, defeating league-leading
Richmond 51-41 in Minges Col-
iseum.
"This was a very big win for
us Pirate head coach Cathy An-
druzzi said. "Our kids knew Rich-
mond was going to be tough, and
they went in and did a tremendous
job
Richmond entered the game
with a 14-9 record and atop the
ECAC-South with a 5-0 con-
ference mark, but as Andruzzi
pointed out, "We stopped them
with great defense
The Spiders had been averaging
over 70 points a game, but were
held 20 points under their average
by a tenacious Pirate defensive ef-
fort.
Andruzzi especially noted the
defensive play of Darlene Hedges
on highly regarded Karen Eisner.
Although she scored a game-high
20 points, Eisner only connected
on a below par eight of 22 shots
from the field.
With the score knotted at 21 at
the half, the Pirates jumped out to
a quick three-point lead in the
opening moments of the second
half on a free throw and an out-
side jumper by Jody Rodriguez.
Richmond was able to cut the
lead back to one on a Glenna
Miller turn-around in the lane,
but after Sylvia Bragg converted a
three-point play, the Pirates never
looked back.
Bragg led ECU with 18 points
and a game-high 13 rebounds
while also playing the entire 40
minutes.
After Delphine Mabry con-
verted a Spider turnover into an
easy layup, making the score
36-27 with 11:09 left in the game,
the Pirates displayed an air of
confidence that had seldom been
witnessed during the course of the
season. "We were really fired
up Andruzzzi said.
The two teams exchanged
several baskets until Richmond
was able to stage a short rally in
which they ran off five
unanswered points, making it
40-37 with 4:36 remaining.
Rodriguez pushed the score
back to 44-37 when she broke free
for a layup with 2:26 left, and the
Pirates coasted to victory as the
Spiders were unable to convert on
any of their final poc"ssions.
Although ECU only made three
of its final six free throw at-
tempts, Richmond could only
muster four points in the final
2:26, eventually losing by a
10-point deficit.
The Spiders were plagued by a
horrendous 18 of 60 shooting per-
formance from the field, a
statistic Andruzzi credits to the
Pirates' defense.
"I'm so proud of the way our
girls played Andruzzi said.
"They came back after a tough
loss over the weekend and played
the exact game they wanted to
Although the Pirates turned in
an excellent performance in the
second half, Andruzzi felt the
Pirates could have gotten off to a
better start in the first half of ac-
tion.
After an extremely slow start by
both teams, and the score 6-4 in
Richmond's favor with 13:23 left
in the first half, the Spiders scored
seven straight points to jump out
to a quick 13-4 lead.
The Pirates took advantage of
several Richmond turnovers,
however, and scored six straight
points of their own to narrow the
margin to 13-11 with 9:55 left.
The teams exchanged baskets
for the remainder of the half, un-
til Anita Anderson sank a driving
layup with two seconds left tying
the score at 21.
ECU improves to 11-15 on the
year, and will play their finaJ
game of the season at 7:30 p.m.
Saturday night against Sou:h
Carolina in Minges Coliseum.
East Carolina (51)
Bragg 7 4-5 18, Phillips 0 1-31,
Hedges 0 0-0 0, Rodriguez 4 1-3 9,
Mabry 6 4-7 16, Squireeli 0-0 1-1
I, Anderson 2 2-2 6.
Richmond (41)
McCormick 4 1-3 9, Rollins 1
0-0 2, Eisner 8 4-5 20, Drver 2 0-0
4, Isreal 1 0-0 2, Cabrev 1 0-0 2
Miller 10-0 2.
Newman From H.S. Star To Nationals
NEIL JOHNSON � ECU Photo Lab
Mabry Displays 'Flying D'
Cindy Newman has come a long
way in the past year.
Last year at this time she was
completing her senior year in high
school in Statesville, N.C. A suc-
cessful swimming career had in-
cluded four school letters, four
MVP awards, two years as swim
team captain and three state
records.
Then Cindy decided to come to
East Carolina.
"I came for several reasons
she explains. "My brother Perry
(a four-year Pirate swimmer) was
here so I knew something about
the school. I liked the program.
And I thought at a Division II
school I'd get a good chance to
swim and do something
So far, as a member of Rick
Kobe's strong freshman recruiting
class, Newman has been doing a
lot. In a recent meet against
Duke, she won the 100 yard Fly,
setting a freshman record, a varsi-
ty record and qualifying for
NCAA Nationals. She has also
been a member of the 200 and 400
freestyle relay teams which have
set new freshman marks. March
7-10 she will be in Hempstead, NY
with eight of her teammates to
swim in the national champion-
ships.
According to Cindy, "I never
got to travel that much in high
school, so I'm really looking for-
ward to New York. I want to
place � that's my goal
Newman is enjoying her first
year at ECU. "We all get along
really good she comments
about the squad. "There are a lot
of freshmen this year and we
didn't know what to expect at first
but it's worked out okay
"The work is harder here than
in AAU she adds. "I come
from a small club and there
wasn't a lot of competition. Here
Rodriguez Contributes More,
Becomes ECU Starting Guard
we do a lot more work. There's
more pushing from the other girls
but that's good. I need that
The Tyler dorm resident is not
sure how long she will continue to
swim. "This is my tenth vear
she says. "I like to work hard and
it's good exercise. Seeing your
times get lower is fun. But it's
also monotonous and you have to
miss things, like happv hour and
socializing. As you get further
along it gets harder
For now, Newman is enjoving
the transition from prep swimmer
to college record holder and from
Statesville resident to traveller.
B RANUV MEWS
AuisUll SporU Kdltor
After being slowed by a pre-
son injury, freshman guard
fod Rodriguez has come on
ng to start the last nine games
tor the ECU women's basketball
team.
"It shouldn't have happened
aid Rodriguez, referring to a
broken foot she suffered one week
efore official practice began for
he women's basketball team.
"There was a game of flag foot-
all going on, and I wanted play
� St to have something to do
:riguez explained. "As soon as
nit the ground I knew something
as wrong with my foot
Rodriguez said the hardest
ling about her injury was not be-
ig able to practice with the team.
1 had to learn all the plays from
he sidelines, and it wasn't the
ime thing as being out on the
nirt
After missing all of pre-season
actice, as well as the Pirates'
ason opener agianst George
Washington, Rodriguez returned
the Pirates second game of the
ason against St. Peters.
She scored six points in ten
nutes of action, but said,
laying in that first game was
se starting from scratch
During the first 20 games of the
ison Rodriguez said she was still
arning coach Andruzzi's system,
� hile only averaging a mere 2.3
j ints per game.
Then she sat down and had a
talk with her coach. "We discuss-
ed things, and both of us thought
I should be contributing more to
the team Rodriguez said. "At
that point I decided to give it
everything I had. I told myself
there were only two months left to
the end of the season, and that if I
pushed myslef as hard as I could,
I could help the the team out.
She got her chance against
William & Mary, and scored a
career high 10 points. Next up was
East Tennessee, and Rodriguez
became a starter after pumping in
another career high of 14 points.
"Playing in that first
game was like starting
from scratch
�Jody Rodriguez
"Jody came in because of some
injuries, and really responded
well Andruzzi said. "She has
come on strong and really played
well in our last few games.
Since becoming a starter,
Rodriguez has averaged 8.5 points
and has played over 25 minutes a
game and just recently knocked in
13 points and pulled down a team-
high seven rebounds against Fair-
field in the Converse Lady Pirate
Classic over the weekend.
Andruzzi said Rodriguez is a
very smart player, but sometimes
turns the ball over due to over-
enthusiasm. "I got that way in
high school because our team
made it to the state playoffs for
three straight years, but now that
I'm in college I know I have to set-
tle down. A lot of times I get too
anxious, and that causes me to
turn the ball over
Rodriguez comes from Fayet-
teville's Terry Sanford High
School where she started on the
varsity team as a freshman, and
led her team to the playoffs. In
her senior year, she averaged over
20 points a game and was named
the team's most valuable player.
Upon graduating, Rodriguez
was recruited by such schools as
North Carolina, Kentucky and
Florida, but chose ECU because it
was close to home and "there was
a lot of spirit and enthusiasm in
the program
Rodriguez is glad she decided to
come to ECU, but said when she
first arrived, things weren't quite
as she expected. "There wasn't
much competition in high school,
and when I started playing with
people on the team, I realized just
how hard college ball was going to
be
When asked if she any specific
goals she wanted to accomplish
while at ECU, Rodriguez simply
replied, "I want to be as good as I
can in everthing that I do
If Jody Rodriguez can continue
to perform as she has over the last
few games, she won't only be
good, she'll be better then anyone
ever expected.
EC Trivia:
Know It?
1. The ECU Sports Hall of Fame
was initiated in what year?
2. What former Pirate head
baseball coach is presently an
associate dean of students at
ECU?
3. Who is the former ECU foot-
ball player recognized by the
nickname of Captain Crunch now
playing in the Canadian Profes-
sional Football League?
4. Name the first female athlete
inducted into the ECU Sports
Hall of Fame?
5. What current assistant athletic
director was the former head
wrestling coach at ECU?
6. What conference was the East
Carolina athletic program a
member of until 1976?
7. Who is the ECU basketball all-
time leading scorer and
bounder?
re-
OA�V PATTtRSON - ECU
Rodriguez has gone from reserve to starter
8. Who is the present director of
athletics?
9. Name the four current Pirate
head coaches who are
undergraduates of ECU?
��������
All Questions were furnished by
the Student Athletic Board, and
answers will appear in Tuesday's
issued The East Carolinian
Ruggers Getting Psyched For Lauderdale
By MEG MOREADITH
By MEG MOREADITH
SoemWrMar
The ECU Rugby Club is look-
ing forward to the rest of the 1984
schedule, highlighted by the Ft.
Lauderdale Tourney, and is ex-
pected to be ranked in the upcom-
ing season.
The first match against N.C.
State was the "hardest that the
club will play this season says
captain Wayne Rouse. "State is
probably the number one col-
legiate club, and we played a great
match even though we lost
Rouse said he is confident that
the club will win most if not all of
its remaining matches, playing
such clubs as Duke, Appalachian
State and Campbell University.
However, the last scheduled
match against North Carolina at
Chapel Hill could present some
problems. "They have a really
good team and are older than our
guys says Rouse.
Leading the 30-member club in
experience are Rouse of
Goldsboro, N.C, Bobby Beard of
Charlotte, N.C, Ted Williams of
Wilmington, N.C, Bill Zimmer-
man of Raleigh, N.C and Doug
Evans of Greensboro, N.C
These returning ruggers will
help the newcomers adjust to the
fast-paced game of rugby, which
has two 40 minute periods. "Most
of our ruggers had never played
before they came to ECU says
Rouse. "Some say rugby is
tougher than football.
"The competition is real tough
during practice because the guys
want their positions says Rouse,
"but during the matches we back
each other up. We're just like a
frat because we play rugby, party,
and study together
Rouse said most of the players
are serious about their studies, but
on Saturdays "they just go wild
The Ft. Lauderdale tourney is
the event the club is anticipating.
The ECU ruggers will be matched
against four of the 11 clubs par-
ticipating in the annual tourna-
ment. According to Rouse, the
club will not know its schedule for
the tournament until they arrive in
Ft. Lauderdale.
The club is having its first home
match against Campbell Universi-
ty on Saturday, Feb. 25. In keep-
ing with rugby tradition, the ECU
ruggers will host the visiting club.
"The physical competition is
rigorous, and we all get excited
but after the match is over we
(both teams) are friends savs
Rouse. '
Advising the club is Dr. John
Cope of the psychology depart-
ment. The club also has been
helped greatly by Dr. Wayne Ed-
wards, director of intramural and
recreational services, and Bob
Fox, coordinator of sports dub,
andhas expressed apptecfetEuo
i
Hoss
BMCkIK
BROUN FT I
Strong Arm Finish
Final compe
the lotramurml-Budwieser
Arm
meot
evenii
strongl
m
Chris "Hoss Kelh �nn tht
ment in the men heaw
coooocoocoo
RA1

fCodeal
CAMPUS Al
Ml
oocosococoocccoccol
IF

.
ALL-Y
I
EVERY FRIDA
5 PM � 9 PJ
INCUDES:
A variety of Fillets.
including Lousiana-
Style Fish Fillets, Hush
Puppies. French Fries.
a choice of Hot Vegetal
and our own Famous
SPECIAL KID S PRll
cSHONEYl





1

�� rtlvvJL.lillSl
1-tOKvruvl 4J, l��4
d
r Defense'
ivor with 13:23 left
I ilf, the Spiders scored
jht points to jump out
" 4 lead.
ites took advantage of
Richmond turnovers,
red six straight
I to i.arrow the
.1 with 9:55 left.
t anged baskets
of the half, un-
son sank a driving
onds left tying
cs to 11-15 on the
pluv their final
I 7 30 p.m.
� against Souvh
� Minges Coliseum.
Iina (51)
- v Phillips 0 1-3 1.
1 R driguez4 1-3 9.
- i ire well 0-0 1-
i : 2-2 6.
(41)
I :k 4
h 8 4
; 9, Rollins 1
Dryer 2 0-0
v 1 0-0 2.
tionals
rk There's
. om the other girls
- 3d. I need that
resident is not
will continue to
m tenth year
ke to work hard and
exercise. Seeing your
wer is fun. But it's
note md you have to
: - like happy hour and
ng you get further
rder
Newman is enjoying
from prep swimmer
cord holder and from
-idem to traveller.
Trivia:
ow It?
ECU Sports Hall of Fame
jiated in what year?
f former Pirate head
coach is presently an
le dean of students at
is the former ECU foot-
layer recognized by the
c of Captain Crunch now
in the Canadian Profes-
ootball League?
ne the first female athlete
rG into the ECU Sports
Fame?
lat current assistant athletic
Ir was the former head
ig coach at ECU?
lat conference was the East
Ina athletic program a
t of until 1976?
is the ECU basketball all-
pleading scorer and re-
fo is the present director of
me the four current Pirate
coaches who are
graduates of ECU?
Questions were furnished by
udent Athletic Board, and
rs will appear in Tuesdav's
�f The East Carolinian.
ale
is. and we all get excited,
cr the match is over we
tarns) are friends says
king the club is Dr. John
Y the psychology depart-
Jlhe club also has been
greatly by Dr. Wayne Ed-
Idirector of intramural and
lonal services, and Bob
)rdinator of sports clubt,
expressed appreciation to
Hoss Wins Arm Wrestling
By VICKIE
BROWNELL
Ml iMnaank
Strong Ann Finish
Final competition in
the lntramural-Budwieser
Arm Wrestling Tourna-
ment was held Tuesday
evening. It was sheer
strength as four men and
two women were declared
strong are champions. In
the women's 135-under
weight division, it was
Laura "Killer"
Quisenberry winning her
title as Lori "the arm"
Green captured her
throne in the 135-over
weight division. In the
men's 150-under, it was
Carl "Crusher" Krati
defeating Tom Allen and
Reggie "The Hammer"
McDonald muscled out
Bob Eason to capture the
151-175 weight division
crown. Chuck Northcutt
showed his strength as he
defeated Arthur Burnett
to become the 176-199
weight division cham-
pion. In the 200-over
class, Chris "Hoss" Kelly
fought off the strength
of Mike "Thriller"
Parnell to take the divi-
sional title. Congratula-
tions to all participants
and a special thanks to
Jefferies Beer and Wine
(Budweiser) for co-
sponsering the tourna-
ment.
Last Exercising Chance
If you are wishing to
take off the extra inches
before the dog-daze of
summer, your last chance
to exercise with IRS is
here. That's right, the se-
cond and final exercise
class session is about to
hit. Registration will
begin on Monday, Feb.
27 for noncredit instruc-
tional classes in Aerobic
Fitness, Weight Training,
Aquarobics, and Per-
See KELL Y, Page 10
NCIL JOHNSON � ICU WlOto Lb
Chns "Hoss" Kelly won the Intramural-Budweiser Ann Wrestling Tourna-
ment in the men's heavywieght division Tuesday night.
1
STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES
We are looking for girls interested in being
counselors - activity instructors in a private girls
camp located in Hendersonville, NC. Instruc-
tors needed especially in Swimming (WSI),
Horseback riding, Archery, Canoeing, Gym-
nastics, Crafts, Also Basketball, Computers,
Soccer, Cheerleading, Drama, Art, Office
work, Dancing, Nature study. If your school
offers a Summer Intership program we will be
glad to help. Inquires - Morgan Havnes P.O.
Box 400C, Tryon, NC, 28782.
HAVINQ PggjtEMf
i
with
DttUGST ALCOHOL?
)Vf
V
FAMILY?
WeCnHeipTI
StoMfeaU belplaf Urn!��!�
llCOMItNMPI
Ml-MS ErwIaBMa).
vl S
'5COSSCGCCOOC0090QCOCOGOCOCOaOCOCOOO
w
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT!
EVERY FRIDAY
5 PM � 9 PM
ONLY
INCLUDES:
A variety of Fillets,
including Lousiana-
Style Fish Fillets, Hush
Puppies, French Fries,
a choice of Hot Vegetables
and our own Famous Seafood Chowder
SPECIAL KIDS PRICES, TOO!
rli
With All Vou-Can
Salad Bar $5.49.
MONEYS
205 Greenville Blvd.
rsSySSSSSfSfSSSSSsSs'
HOLIDOME, HOLIDAY INN
Drinks and Hors d'oeuvres Will Be Served
Tickets Must Be Purchased In Advance
Throush Your Residence Hall
Must Present Valid ECU ID and SRA Card
Tickets Will Not Be Sold At The Door
SINGLE $3 00
DOUBLE $5 00
�� - �
zzszEZEzsMzmm.
�ssyssx�sssssvss'ssys;vsMs'wsssA
KAYPRO 11.T595.
COMILETE WITH SOFTWARE.
r l95 a k.ivpro 1! not only comes complete
irdware you need, it comes complete
with .ill the software you need
Word rVieessingSpellii
� DataBase ManagementItilii g
reporting! I ii Spread-
sheeting And with CPM
K.iypto it � ii thousands of
chei :n- -� � r mi rv specialized
needs i me in t da lor a ErJtf
complete demonstrai i C '
( OMPI time. IM
Corner of Arlington & Evans
Greenville 355 6687
Bring This Ad in and Receive
$50 $150 off on a printer
With Kay pro Computer purchase
Expires 3 20-84
T a 963 Whliar Brewing Co MfeaukM vtf
I MIGHT GET WORKED UP.
BUT I DON'T GET FILIED UK
John Madden
W
!����
1
"





10
JHEEASTCAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 23. 1984

Classifieds
SALE
KOWA F lit l�flM J3 mm SLR
camara. axcallanf condition for MS
call 7S7-3M4.
171 vEGA good condition, rebuilt
angina. MS.000. ona owner, call
7M-0tfS after J 30 pm
THE SiSTBRS af SMjma Sigma
Sigma Sorority would Ilka fa welcome
fwafr new �lifer�. We Leva Youl
KAPPA SIOMA The �rotnarj of
Kappa Sigma would Ilka fa con-
Kelly Wins Arm Wrestling
gradulate Tne Alpha thl pledge clan
and alto ttte now llftta lUtart on their
initiation Bahama Mama coming
PRASTICALLY NEW King (lie Ser
fa Perfect Sleeper Maftret. pad, box
iprings, frame. Super buy af S12S.0O.
Call 7M-U27 after a pm.
FOR SALE: Boas Earth Cruiser bicy-
cle Like new SI23 00. Call 7S1-42S3
after a pm.
KEF lOSs Threshold 400 A Amp. PS
Audio Preamp SI20 or bast offer
over. Flrstrate 7Se-31M.
I BEDROOM Apt. All t lee trie SM0 a
montti rent 42 W Sth St 7S4-7471.
LOST AND
FOUND
REWAROI Loaf rust colored velcro
wallet. Thought to be lost on the Hill
by basketball courts between 3:M
and 5 00 Sat Fab. Itth. call 7SI-2U0
or 7S7-41M ask for Jim.
MISC.
WANTED
WHEN A FRIEND has stereo system
problems, tell them that the audio
technicians at the TECH SHOP don't
charge for repair estimates Call us
at 757 !?�� The TECH SHOP
TIME IS RUNNING Out fasti II you
are interested in some SERIOUS
PARTYING this Spring Break with
no hassles, check this outi Round trip
trans to Daytona Beach with Kegs 7
nights accom oceantront at the
Kings Inn FREE Keg Parties,
poolsid Bands, contests, hell raising
and more! For into, call Mike at
7S 707 or Buddy at 7S-�Ma.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All typing needs,
7St S4M 7SJ 1241
AUTO ACCIDENTS Specializing in
perional inury litigation. J David
Duffus, Jr Attorney, NCNB
Building. Greenville. North Carolina.
750 4700.
IF ANYONE SAW a red Honda get hit
in the parking lot between Garret and
the Art Building on 220 please call
3SS-4714 or 752 SS5S
ROOMMATE WANTED: Private
Room fully furnished - House
Privileges clean, neat, responsible
only behind Balk Dorm SIM 7M-7470
PART TIME work processor to work
for local law firm. Good secretarial
skills required. Programing ex
parlance helpful call 7M-4200
ROOMMATE WANTED: 7S2-4TQ4
PART TIME employment. New
supermarket super store coming to
Greenville in April. Positions
available for cashiers, bagger, and
clerks starting the week of 3 24 M
For employment consideration
please send a brief data sheet and in-
clude the time whan you will bo
available to work. Mall to Farm
Fresh, inc 3417 Inventors Rd Nor-
folk. VI. 33S02, ATTN: Debbie
kremers.
WANTED: Responsible female
roommate as soon as possible. i
rent utilities Wilson Acres. Evenings
call 7S2-OS2S.
Continued From Page 9
sonal Defense. The cost
for students will be four
dollars for one class per
week and eight dollars for
two classes per week.
Cost for faculty staff will
be five dollars and ten
dollars, respectively.
Registration will be taken
in 204 Memorial Gym
from 8:30 am until 4:30
p.m. So get ready for the
last session of exercise
classes.
Wrestling Meet Set
The deadline for
registration in the
Inrtamural-Domino's
Pizza wrestling meet is to-
day, Thursday February
23. A mandatory par-
ticipants meeting and
ECU Intramurals
m
ADVERTISED
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
sale at or below the advertised price m each A4P Store, except as
specifically noted in this ad
weigh-in will be held tough as several teams are
tonight at 7:00 pm in MG boasting of champion-
i02. Here is your last ship dreams. Some of
your
chance to show
grappling strength.
Basketball Playoffs
Ready
Playoff action is set to
begin next week. Com-
petition apperars to be
these teams include the
Suns, Clique, Enforcers,
Six Pack Attack and the
Bussboys. Good luck to
all playoff bound teams,
and be watching for con-
tinued playoff updates.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING Service-
experience, quality work, IBM Selec-
trie Typewriter. Call Lanie Shive
7S� S301
RIDES
PERSONAL
RIDE NEEDED: to and from
BeaufortHilton Head �rt�, S c over
spring break. Will pay half of gas.
Contact joe at 144 Slay, 7504(5.
m
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
'8 34
Combination Special
Trout. Shrimp
and Deviled Crab
9-9 5 032"
m
m
m
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
'0 Greenville Blvd.
7S6-3023 � 24HRS.
PLAZA SHELL
?4 hour lowing Service
L-Haul Rentals
Available
I
I
MAKE TRACKS FOR THE
BESTEAWALL AROUND!
The next time you stop by for the BestEatin bring
along this money-savin' coupon.
" ImklieFBrscuiTMkD "
0RAH6E JUICE $1.29
Please present fhis coupon before ordering One coupon per customer per
visit please Customer must pay any sales tax due This coupon not good in
combination with any other offers Offer good during regular breakfast hours
only at participating Hardee s Restaurants
through May 31 1984
PRICES OFFERED THRU Sal. Fee). 25 AT A4P IN GreoareV, !NC
HEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
DOUBLE COUPONS
Clip MFCs "Cents-Off" Coupons from your mail, newspapers
and magazines. . . then bring them to your A&P Food Store.
i
B�n now and Feb.�, aa a redeem national man-
oenta-oft coupon up lo SO" for double their
vakie Oner good on istlonei
i only. (Fi
(Food
Cuasomer mutt purchase coupon product In apailflail
Hm eaaWadcoupon �4H nothonored Oncoupon
"ST nmm Ho coupon doubkjd tor fnw
Oner doe not apply to UP or other atom
coupon �Mlw manutecluiei la manttonaa or not
Whan the vaSue of the coupon aioeade SO or the rotaM
of the Hem. thl oner � Npnnad to the retail once
FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND,
WE WILL DOUBLE FIVE
MANUFACTURERS COUPONS
EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE S COUPONS,
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS, AMD SO OH.
GOOO ONLY IN Greenville, NC
SAVE
LIMIT TWO
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Whole
Rib Eye
9-12 lb.
avg.
fi
m
m
raj
m
ra
I
I
I

ifa
PJ
raj
WurAonr
FKIES i MEDIUM SOFTOKIHK $1.79
rrA-a,ne iK.rlwJl ���
1
m
I
I
I
Please present this coupon before ordering One coupon per customer per
visit please Customer must pay any sales tan due This coupon not good in
combination with any other offers Offer good after 10 30 AM. only at
participating Hardee s Restaurants through
May 31. 1984
-1983 Hardens Food Systems Inc
Haidecr
i
i
i
raj
I
1
m
m m
ATTIC
'ileaWaWiiif
I
raj
lllllilliili

f

VISSION IS
��aooooooocoocccoooeqcoogooooooooocc�o

i

NOW
SAVE 34 EACH
White Grapefruit
LARGE FLORIDA
SAVE 5' EACH
Navel Oranges
JUMBO CALIFORNIA
THUR.Feb23iij
Ladies Free til 11:001 !j
w
I
1
1
I
I
1
i.
SUBWAY I
FRI. Feb24 1
$1.00 ECU Students 1 R
1
ILL USION i
SAT. Feb 25 I
$1.00 ECU Students L
.1
STOCK!
BOXING EQUIPMENT
Discounts Are Available For
TKE Tournament Participants & Area
Boxing Clubs (Ask At Store)
Double Mouth pieces-$3.95 Hand wraps-$4.95
Single Mouth pieces-$1.95 Jump ropes-$12.95 & $13.50
Also
Headguards, Boxing Gloves, Bag Gloves,
Striking Bags, Heavy Bags, & Bladders-
Styles To Suit Boxers At Any Competitive Level Or Price
Range
"ECU Students Receive A 10
Discount As Always With Valid I.D
We Can Handle Your Special Orders, Also!
(Eastern N.Cs Boxing Headquarters)
A&P Spaghetti
REGULAR � THIN
H.L
HODGES CO.
210 E. FIFTH ST.
752-4156
SPORTING GOODS
"mn-nnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnnniioftoouuuouijuuui-
rCP P AftP COUPON"
SAVE 50 ON i
WHITE YELLOW BLUE I
4 ROLL PKG.
White Cloud rSL
i
KP &PCOUPON1
SAVE 60 ON i
REGULAR
3 LB. BAG
Eight O'clock
LL��E3
Coca Cola
DIET COKE -SPRITE � TAB
2 Liter Bottle $1.05
GOOD ONO N Gr�B�tU�. V
J JP ASP COUPON )l
SAVE 40 ON
DEL MONTE
320Z.BTL.
Tomato Catsup
AP COUPON -
Senior Citizens '
Discount
Orosuvills Squart Shoppift Ctnter
f� Grsajtivillt Blvd. Grtonvilfe, N.C
a�iaa�i � ����
�HM i m �� m aaaaaa
aaaaai mm aw.
majii� '��ajfc�fajBgaaa�j
BBS.






KINGSTON
Brand new, very spacious living
Totally Furnished and Accessorized (Linens, Cookware, Designer Furniture,
Appliances)
Large Private Pool (With Lounge Chairs)
Beautiful Clubhouse (Laundry & Rec. Facilities)
Within One Mile of Campus (City and University Bus Service Available)
And, lots of social activities & parties planned throughout the year.
90 Financing Available
For More Information on Purchase or Rental
On The Student Alternative CALL NOW!
Kingston Place 3101 S. Evans Street Greenville, N.C. 27834 Local Telephone (919) 756-0285

k





Title
The East Carolinian, February 23, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 23, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.323
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Permalink
https://digital.lib.ecu.edu/57627
Preferred Citation
Cite this item
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of ECU Libraries. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

Contact Digital Collections

If you know something about this item or would like to request additional information, click here.


Comment on This Item

Complete the fields below to post a public comment about the material featured on this page. The email address you submit will not be displayed and would only be used to contact you with additional questions or comments.


*
*
*
Comment Policy