The East Carolinian, February 16, 1984






Mt
(Eawltniatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.5 So.46 lj S
Thursday, February 16,1984
Greenville, N.C.
Quiet Dorm
Causes Protest
By DARRYL BROWN
Muuftat Editor
More than 30 Jarvis Residence
Hall students Wednesday pro-
tested a suggestion by the Student
Residence Association to convert
their dormitory to a quiet hall
facility in the fall of 1985.
Saying they had not be con-
sulted, claiming Jarvis is not the
best site and questioning the ac-
curacy of an SRA survey on the
quiet dorm, the students
monopolized the SRA meeting in
Mendenhall Student Center.
"Jarvis is not the right dorm"
for the quiet hall, said resident
Paul Sumrell, echoing the senti-
ment of most Jarvis residents at
the meeting. More than 80 of Jar-
vis' 166 students signed a petition
reading, in part, "We are not op-
posed to the idea of a quiet dorm
but do not feel that Jarvis is the
appropriate location
Jarvis resident Donna Spurrier
suggested the quiet dorm be on
College Hill because that area is
further from Joyner Library or
other quiet study areas. Sumrell
cited Jarvis' close proximity to the
library as inappropriate, noted
that Jarvis has no access facilities
for handicapped students and said
Jarvis is not a quiet location
because of frequent loud events
on the Mall each spring.
Resident Jon Greif said the
quiet dorm should be put in a
facility without air conditioning
and other extra benefits to make a
less desirable dormitory more at-
tractive. Another student cited the
cost of air conditioning as a disad-
vantage for students wanting to
live in a quiet dorm but unable to
pay extra money.
SRA President Mark Niewald
stressed Jarvis was only a sugges-
tion for the quiet facility and no
dorm has been selected. He plans
to take another, larger survey Of
students to determine support for
the idea.
10 Pages,
Circulation 10,000
Recipients Of Aid
Ineligible For Jobs
2
NEIL JOHNSON - ECU Photo Lab
Fun In The Sun
rwt i1-10' ?keini!?y �ihers' were Xakhk "dvantaee of yesterday's unseasonably warm weather.
ixn t get used to it, though, rain is forecast for this weekend.
UNC-System Raises Requirements
Graduation Credits Increased
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
NhmBMh
Starting in 1988, high school
students will face tougher admis-
sion standards to schools in the
UNC system, the UNC Board of
Governors decided Friday.
Under the old admission policy,
only a high school diploma is re-
quired for admission to any
school in the UNC system. In-
dividual schools may set their own
requirements, however.
The new policy will require 20
high school courses for admission
to auy of the UNC campus. 12
of which are specifically
designated subjects.
The courses required are: four
in college preparatory English;
three in mathematics - one in
geometry and two in algebra; two
in social studies - one in govern-
menteconomics and the other in
U.S. history; also, three in science
- one in life science or biology,
one in physical science and one
laboratory course.
As an additional recommenda-
tion, the board is suggesting that
schools require at least two years
of a foreign language before ad-
mission.
The new Ttaarianrib hav ��
designed to "help lower the amount
of money spent on remedial
courses. Last year the UNC
system spent $4 million on
remedial courses.
Remedial courses will still be
offered to students who attended
high schools lacking the necessary
courses. However, students with
the opportunity to take required
courses must take them for admis-
sion.
Implementation of the system
will be aided by the fact that the
State Board of Education has
for high school graduation to 20
courses instead of 18.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Approximately 52 percent of
ECU students receive some type
of financial aid, and consequent-
ly, according to Robert
Boudreaux, director of student
financial aid at ECU, roughly one
in three students are technically
ineligible for jobs, both on or off
campus.
"Students receiving financial
aid based upon a demonstrated
financial need can get financial
aid up to that demonstrated
need Boudreaux said. Need is
determined by a need analysis, the
Family Financial Statement. The
amount to be contributed by the
family is determined and any dif-
ference between that amount and
tuition constitutes financial need.
"The federal government says a
student's need cannot be over-met
with any other type of assistance,
whether it be institutionally con-
trolled, federally controlled or
state controlled Boudreaux
said. "We have to keep that stu-
dent within his or her financial
need
When a student receives more
money than officials have deter-
mined he needs, he is required to
make restitution. "In the case of
employment, the student has to
make something else up and then
we have that student stop working
so they cannot continue to over-
meet needs Boudreaux said.
For students working off-
campus jobs, this is not a major
problem. Boudreaux said that
while students are required to
report additional income, 95 per-
Candidates Interviewed By Students
By ELIZABETH BIRO
StaH Writer
ECU students recently had a
chance to meet and talk with can-
didates vying for the job of chair-
man of the Department of
Political Science.
The two canidates visiting cam-
pus were Robert Thomas, from
the University of Houston, and
William Morin, from the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin.
Dr. Tinsley Yarbrough, the cur-
rent chairman of the department,
announced his decision to leave
the position at a faculty meeting
last Aug. Faculty members gave
Yarbrough their unanimous ap-
proval as chairman at the annual
four year vote, said Search Com-
mittee Chairman and Political
Science Professor Dr. Thomas
Eamon. However, Yarbrough
cited his wish to pursue research
projects and said he could not
devote enough time to the posi-
tion.
The decision to allow students
to meet and talk with applicants is
not unusual, said Yarbtough, and
it has been done at ECU in the
past. Yarbrough said he had serv-
ed on an english department
search committee in the past, and
students were given, then, a
chance to meet with applicants.
The candidates spoke informal-
ly with students in the political
science study room in Brewster.
Robert Thomas, head of the
Public Administration Depart-
ment at the University of
Houston, spoke Friday, Feb. 10.
Thomas cited his outside ex-
periences as very helpful in his ad-
ministrative work. "I'm different
in that unlike alot of academics
who start teaching after college,
they see only the inside of the
university system Thomas said.
Thomas stressed the need for
leaders to provide students with
initiative in order for students to
expand their own ideas as well as
being an advisor. Thomas said
funds should be used to enhance
the students and their ideas.
The need for a pre-law advisor
was agreed on by Thomas and
students present at Friday's infor-
mal meeting.
William Morin of the Universi-
ty of Wisconsin spoke on Wednes-
day, Feb. 15. Morin stressed the
need to concentrate on the
undergraduate program and
faculty research projects rather
than working to build a graduate
program in political science.
"Resources should be put in a
good solid undergraduate pro-
gram which already has a base
here said Morin. "If you get a
good undergraduate education
then you can go anywhere to con-
tinue your education or do
anything else you want with it
Morin said.
Morin placed emphasis on rais-
ing money from outside
resources. He cited government
resources available through
federal and state grants, con-
tracts, and workshops. Morin also
said incorporating a public ad-
ministration program into the
Political Science Department was
an effective way to raise outside
funds. Because this type of pro-
gram is trendy, Morin said, it per-
suades local officials to get involv-
ed in the educational oppor-
tunities offered.
There may be more candidates
visiting ECU, Eamon said, but the
search committee can decide on
an applicant at any point. The
new chairman is scheduled to take
the position this fall. The search
committee hopes to make a deci-
sion by the end of this summer,
Eamon said.
The committee consists of four
political science faculty members
and one outside faculty member.
Three of the members were
elected by the Political Science
Department and two were ap-
pointed by the administration.
Members of the committee in-
clude Dr. Thomas Eamon, chair-
man, political science professors
Dr. Dorothy Clayton, Dr. Robert
Thompson, and Dr. Tinsley Yar-
brough. The outside member is
Dr. John Maiolo, chairman of the
Sociology Department.
Eamon explained the search
process from its beginning. Ac-
cording to Eamon, ads were plac-
ed in different political science
and public administration jour-
nals. The applications received
were narrowed down to five peo-
ple the committee felt had
outstanding credentials. Eamon
said fifty applications were receiv-
ed, mostly from out of the state.
According to Eamon there were
no women applicants.
Eamon discussed a number of
things which influence the search
committee's choice. The needs of
the the university are considered
along with personal credentials of
the applicants. The committee is
focusing on public administration
educators because the Political
Science Department is currently
building the PADM program and
needs teachers.
See TWO, Page 3
"Technically any money that you
earn, whether it be on-campus or
off-campus, you have to report
he said, "but an outside job is not
under our control
Government regulations
stipulate that students are not
allowed to earn additional income
beyond determined need, but in
the case of off-campus employ-
ment, "the government can't hold
us responsible for what we don't
know Boudreaux said.
The problem comes in with
students working on campus. The
East Carolinian, the Ebony
Herald, WZMB and the SGA all
Boudreaux
provide paid jobs. Students on
financial aid who want to hold
these jobs must make restitution
or they will be unable to work.
"As long as you've gotten any of
that money during the academic
year then we are not allowed to let
you work on campus and earn ad-
ditional money Boudreaux said.
According to Boudreaux, the
situation has not always been this
way. "Many years ago the
government did not consider in-
stitutional employment programs
as financial aid he said.
Because on campus earnings
can be closely monitored, the
regulations are strictly enforced.
Boudreaux said he does not like
the current arrangement. "It's got
to be changed he said, adding
that "it's not for me to tell the
federal government that they
ought to change that law because
it's unfair to the student who is
getting financial aid
The function of the Financial
Aid Office has been altered by the
advent of stricter federal aid
regulations. "We've turned out to
be almost a police force
Boudreaux said. "It used to be
that most of the people regarded
financial aid (offices) as a friendly
place. I don't have that feeling
anymore. I feel that most of the
students now believe that finan-
cial aid is after them rather than
for them
Boudreaux said the financial
aid job has now become "very
unattractive" and cited abuse of
the system as the reasoning behind
the necessity for strict monitoring
of funds. He also cited the SGA
Loan Funds as a prime example of
misuse of funds by students and
the need for stricter controls.
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Style6
Sportsg
Classifieds9
� Sobering facts about Soviet
nuclear strategy. See Style,
page 4 for a new interpretation
of the arms race.
� For a preview of golf and
tennis, see Sports, page 8.
� to the Panhallenic Scholar-
ship Banquet story hi the
Tuesday, Feb. M issue of the
East Carolinian the Alpha XI
Delta sorority was fabt'y iden-
tified at Alpha Zeta Delta. We
regret the error.
Phi Kappa Phi Symposium Set,
Middendorf Scheduled To Speak
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Ambassador J. William Mid-
dendorf will be the key speaker at
the annual ECU Phi Kappa Phi
Symposium February 21-22. The
topic of the symposium is Peace
and War 1984: Power and Moral
Responsibility.
Middendorf is the permanent
representative to the Organization
of American States. He will speak
on the topic of Risks and
Possibilities for U.S. Policy in
Central America and the Carri-
bean on Tuesday, Feb. 21 at 8:00
p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium.
There will be four daytime ses-
sions on the 21st and 22nd. Ses-
sion A will be Tuesday morning
and will be chaired by Dr. Fred
Broadhurst of the School of
Technology. ECU Chancellor
John Howell will present opening
remarks and papers will be
presented by ECU faculty
members Jeanne Scafella, Kim
Smith, John Longhill and Maria
Malby.
Session B will take place Tues-
day afternoon and will be chaired
by Dr. J. William Byrd, chairman
of the physics department. Facul-
ty members John Moskop, Mary
Ann Rose and Stephen Thomas
wil be panel speakers. In addition,
ECU student Jay Stone, a junior
political science major, will pre-
sent his award-winning paper, "A
Discourse On Consciousness,
Peace and War
Wednesday morning's session,
session C, will be chaired by Dr.
Erwin Hester of the Department
of English. Biruta Erdmann,
Robert Thompson and Louis
Eckstein, all ECU faculty
members, will present papers.
Robert J. Thompson, an
economist for the Center for Navy
Analysis in Washington D.C. will
also present a paper.
Panel Speakers for session D
will be retired faculty member
Carroll Webber and faculty
member Gregory Rich. Hal
Daniel will present a paper.
the history tee page S.
Cheers!
hi one of ECU's
For
A
I
MMPIM
-
. -
.
'i �l win j y
n b � �





�he
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.
Thursday, February 16, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
Quiet Dorm
Causes Protest
Bv DARRYL BROWN
Managing Mlior
More than 30 Jarvis Residence
Hall students Wednesday pro-
sted a suggestion by the Student
Residence Association to convert
the dormitory to a quiet hall
facility in the fall of 1985.
Saying thev had not be con-
sulted, claiming Jarvis is not the
best site and questioning the ac-
curacy of an SRA survey on the
quiet dorm, the students
monopolized the SRA meeting in
Mendenhall Student Center.
"Jarvis is not the right dorm"
tor the quiet hall, said resident
Paul Sumrell, echoing the senti-
ment of most Jarvis residents at
the meeting. More than 80 of Jar-
vis' 166 students signed a petition
reading, in part, "We are not op-
posed to the idea of a quiet dorm
but do eel that Jarvis is the
appropriate location
Jem Donna Spurrier
sted the quiet dorm be on
c ollege Hill because that area is
ner from Joyner Library or
i:e' stud areas. Sumrell
v. Jarvis' close proximity to the
ary as inappropriate, noted
� Jarvis has no access facilities
for handicapped students and said
Jarv is not a quiet location
because of frequent loud events
on the Mall each spring.
�dent Jon Greif said the
iet dorm should be put in a
ilit) without air conditioning
ther extra benefits to make a
rable dormitory more at-
tive Another student cited the
- - f air conditioning as a disad-
students wanting to
a quiet dorm but unable to
itra money.
President Mark N'iewald
stressed Jarvis was oniv a sugges-
tion for the quiet facility and no
been selected. He plans
lo taKe another, larger survey of
lents to determine support for
. idea.
10 Pages,
Circulation 10,000

5
� 1
� i � �
Fun In The Sun
NEIL JOHNSON ECU Photo Lab
unseasonably warm weather.
These students, like many others, were taking advantage of yesterday's
lon t get used to it, though, rain is forecast for this weekend.
UNC-System Raises Requirements
Graduation Credits Increased
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Nr�i Idllor
Starting in 1988, high school
students will face tougher admis-
sion standards to schools in the
UNC system, the UNC Board of
Governors decided Friday.
Under the old admission policy,
only a high school diploma is re-
quired for admission to any
school in the UNC system. In-
dividual schools may set their own
requirements, however.
The new policy will require 20
high school courses for admission
to any of the UNC campuses, 12
of which are specifically
designated subjects.
The courses required are: four
in college preparatory English;
three in mathematics - one in
geometry and two in algebra; two
in social studies - one in govern-
menteconomics and the other in
U.S. history; also, three in science
- one in life science or biology,
one in physical science and one
laboratory course.
As an additional recommenda-
tion, the board is suggesting that
schools require at least two years
of a foreign language before ad-
mission.
The new standards have been
designed to help lower the amount
of money spent on remedial
courses. Last year the UNC
system spent $4 million on
remedial courses.
Remedial courses will still be
offered to students who attended
high schools lacking the necessary
courses. However, students with
the opportunity to take required
courses must take them for admis-
sion.
Implementation of the system
will be aided by the fact that the
State Board of Education has
recently changed the requirements
for high school graduation to 20
courses instead of 18.
Candidates Interviewed By Students
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Maff Artier
ECU students recently had a
chance to meet and talk with can-
didates vying for the job of chair-
man of the Department of
Political Science.
The two canidates visiting cam-
pus were Robert Thomas, from
the University of Houston, and
William Morin, from the Univer-
sity of Wisconsin.
Dr. Tinsley Yarbrough, the cur-
rent chairman of the department,
announced his decision to leave
the position at a faculty meeting
Vug. Faculty members gave
Yarbrough their unanimous ap-
proval as chairman at the annual
four year vote, said Search Com-
mittee Chairman and Political
Science Professor Dr. Thomas
Eamon. However, Yarbrough
cited his wish to pursue research
projects and said he could not
devote enough time to the posi-
tion.
The decision to allow students
to meet and talk with applicants is
not unusual, said Yarbrough, and
it has been done at ECU in the
past. Yarbrough said he had serv-
ed on an english department
search committee in the past, and
students were given, then, a
chance to meet with applicants.
The candidates spoke informal-
ly with students in the political
science study room in Brewster.
Robert Thomas, head of the
Public Administration Depart-
ment at the University of
Houston, spoke Friday, Feb. 10.
Thomas cited his outside ex-
periences as very helpful in his ad-
ministrative work. "I'm different
in that unlike alot of academics
who start teaching after college,
they see only the inside of the
university system Thomas said.
Thomas stressed the need for
leaders to provide students with
initiative in order for students to
expand their own ideas as well as
being an advisor. Thomas said
funds should be used to enhance
the students and their ideas.
The need for a pre-law advisor
was agreed on by Thomas and
students present at Friday's infor-
mal meeting.
William Morin of the Universi-
ty of Wisconsin spoke on Wednes-
day, Feb. 15. Morin stressed the
need to concentrate on the
undergraduate program and
faculty research projects rather
than working to build a graduate
program in political science.
"Resources should be put in a
good solid undergraduate pro-
gram which already has a base
here said Morin. "If you get a
good undergraduate education
then you can go anywhere to con-
tinue your education or do
anything else you want with it
Morin said.
Morin placed emphasis on rais-
ing money from outside
resources. He cited government
resources available through
federal and state grants, con-
tracts, and workshops. Morin also
said incorporating a public ad-
ministration program into the
Political Science Department was
an effective way to raise outside
funds. Because this type of pro-
gram is trendy, Morin said, it per-
suades local officials to get involv-
ed in the educational oppor-
tunities offered.
There may be more candidates
visiting ECU, Eamon said, but the
search committee can decide on
an applicant at any point. The
new chairman is scheduled to take
the position this fall. The search
committee hopes to make a deci-
sion by the end of this summer,
Eamon said.
The committee consists of four
political science faculty members
and one outside faculty member.
Three of the members were
elected by the Political Science
Department and two were ap-
pointed by the administration.
Members of the committee in-
clude Dr. Thomas Eamon, chair-
man, political science professors
Dr. Dorothy Clayton, Dr. Robert
Thompson, and Dr. Tinsley Yar-
brough. The outside member is
Dr. John Maiolo, chairman of the
Sociology Department.
Eamon explained the search
process from its beginning. Ac-
cording to Eamon, ads were plac-
ed in different political science
and public administration jour-
nals. The applications received
were narrowed down to five peo-
ple the committee felt had
outstanding credentials. Eamon
said fifty applications were receiv-
ed, mostly from out of the state.
According to Eamon there were
no women applicants.
Eamon discussed a number of
things which influence the search
committee's choice. The needs of
the the university are considered
along with personal credentials of
the applicants. The committee is
focusing on public administration
educators because the Political
Science Department is currently
building the PADM program and
needs teachers.
See TWO, Page 3
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Style6
Sportsg
Classifieds9
Sobering facts about Soviet
nuclear strategy. See Style,
page 4 for a new interpretation
of the arms race.
For a preview of golf and
tennis, see Sports, page 8.
In the Panhallenic Scholar-
ship Banquet story in the
Tuesday, Feb. 14 issue of the
East Carolinian the Alpha XI
Delta sorority was falsely iden-
tified as Alpha Zeta Delta. We
regret the error.
Phi Kappa Phi Symposium Set,
Middendorf Scheduled To Speak
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
�wa l-otlor
Ambassador J. William Mid-
dendorf will be the key speaker at
the annual ECU Phi Kappa Phi
Symposium February 21-22. The
topic of the symposium is Peace
and War 1984: Power and Moral
Responsibility.
Middendorf is the permanent
representative to the Organization
of American States. He will speak
on the topic of Risks and
Possibilities for U.S. Policy in
Central America and the Carri-
bean on Tuesday, Feb. 21 at 8:00
p.m. in Jenkins Auditorium.
There will be four daytime ses-
sions on the 21st and 22nd. Ses-
sion A will be Tuesday morning
and will be chaired by Dr. Fred
Broadhurst of the School of
Technology. ECU Chancellor
John Howell will present opening
remarks and papers will be
presented by ECU faculty
members Jeanne Scafella, Kim
Smith, John Longhill and Maria
Malby.
Session B will take place Tues-
day afternoon and will be chaired
by Dr. J. William Byrd, chairman
of the physics department. Facul-
ty members John Moskop, Mary
Ann Rose and Stephen Thomas
wil be panel speakers. In addition,
ECU student Jay Stone, a junior
political science major, will pre-
sent his award-winning paper, "A
Discourse On Consciousness,
Peace and War
Wednesday morning's session,
session C, will be chaired by Dr.
Erwin Hester of the Department
of English. Biruta Erdmann,
Robert Thompson and Louis
Eckstein, all ECU faculty
members, will present papers.
Robert J. Thompson, an
economist for the Center for Navy
Analysis in Washington D.C. will
also present a paper.
Panel Speakers for session D
will be retired faculty member
Carroll Webber and faculty
member Gregory Rich. Hal
Daniel will present a paper.
Recipients Of Aid
Ineligible For Jobs
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Approximately 52 percent of
ECU students receive some type
of financial aid, and consequent-
ly, according to Robert
Boudreaux, director of student
financial aid at ECU, roughly one
in three students are technically
ineligible for jobs, both on or off
campus.
"Students receiving financial
aid based upon a demonstrated
financial need can get financial
aid up to that demonstrated
need Boudreaux said. Need is
determined by a need analysis, the
Family Financial Statement. The
amount to be contributed by the
family is determined and any dif-
ference between that amount and
tuition constitutes financial need.
"The federal government says a
student's need cannot be over-met
with any other type of assistance,
whether it be institutionally con-
trolled, federally controlled or
state controlled Boudreaux
said. "We have to keep that stu-
dent within his or her financial
need
When a student receives more
money than officials have deter-
mined he needs, he is required to
make restitution. "In the case of
employment, the student has to
make something else up and then
we have that student stop working
so they cannot continue to over-
meet needs Boudreaux said.
For students working off-
campus jobs, this is not a major
problem. Boudreaux said that
while students are required to
report additional income, 95 per-
cent of the time they do not.
"Technically any money that you
earn, whether it be on-campus or
off-campus, you have to report
he said, "but an outside job is not
under our control
Government regulations
stipulate that students are not
allowed to earn additional income
beyond determined need, but in
the case of off-campus employ-
ment, "the government can't hold
us responsible for what we don't
know Boudreaux said.
The problem comes in with
students working on campus. The
East Carolinian, the Ebony-
Herald, WZMB and the SGA all
Boudreaux
provide paid jobs. Students on
financial aid who want to hold
these jobs must make restitution
or they will be unable to work.
"As long as you've gotten any of
that money during the academic
year then we are not allowed to let
you work on campus and earn ad-
ditional money Boudreaux said.
According to Boudreaux. the
situation has not always been this
way. "Many years ago the
government did not consider in-
stitutional employment programs
as financial aid he said.
Because on campus earnings
can be closely monitored, the
regulations are strictly enforced.
Boudreaux said he does not like
the current arrangement. "It's go:
to be changed he said, adding
that "it's not for me to tell the
federal government that thev
ought to change that law because
it's unfair to the student who is
getting financial aid
The function of the Financial
Aid Office has been altered by the
advent of stricter tedeicu aju
regulations. "We've turned out to
be almost a police force
Boudreaux said. "It used to be
that most of the people regarded
financial aid (offices) as a friendly
place. I don't have that feeling
anymore. I feel that most of the
students now believe that finan-
cial aid is after them rather than
for them
Boudreaux said the financial
aid job has now become "verv
unattractive" and cited abuse of
the system as the reasoning behind
the necessity for strict monitoring
of funds He also cited the SGA
Loan Funds as a prime example of
misuse of funds by students and
the need for stricter controls.
Cheers!
These two students engage in one of ECU's favorite past-times. For
the history see page 5.

wm memm� ���� o
� � .��- - r ��
� �.





JHE EAST CAROLINIAN
H-HRI MO 16, 1984

Announcements
The East Carolinian
Sertng the campus community
strict IMS
Published everv Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year and every Wednesday dur
ing the Summer
The East Carolinian is the of
ticial newspaper of East
Carolina University owned
operated ana published tor and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate �jo yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located In the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU
Greenville N C.
POSTMASTER Sent) address
changes to The East Carolinian
O'd South Bunding ECU Green
� -e NC 2?834
Telephone TS3 A3 �J7 JW
SCUBA DIVING
Spring Break Scuba Dive in the
Bahamas Seven davs on me 6 6 t
boat Bottom Time includes 3
��eals lodging ana diving Fiy from
F1 tauderdaie to Nassau For
eg'Stration and information call Rav
Schart Director of Aquatics at
tS? �w4l or �'S6 9339 Total cost $660 00
rn udes a $100 00 non refundable
OSit
RESUME WORKSHOPS
"he Career Planning ana Place
lent Service in the Bloxton House is
-g one hour sessions to help you
p opare jw ow resime Pew
9'aouates get iobs without some
preparat on Many employers re
� St a 'esume showng your educa
' on ac experience Sessions to help
e held in the Career Plan" rig
a' 3 p m Come on a
H ow ng ja'es Feb Dli ?o
COLLEGE SENIORSOR
GRADUATE STUDENTS
College Seniors or Graduate
Students who have not previously
taken the MAT One hundred (100)
students are needed
Testing will require approximately
2 hours 15 minutes Subiects will get
their Form M stores tree i$?0 sav
mgs) ana these scores will be im
mediately available to be sent tree up
to 3 schools KM a period of one year
The store from the second form will
also be sent tree at e later date if the
equating p'fves satisfactory Scores
are retained for 5 years
MAT ADMINISTRATION
There will be a special evening ad
ministration of the Miller Analogies
Test iMAT) held on Wednesday
March �� at 7 p m m the Testing
Center Speight Building, Room 105,
a1 East Carolina University The tee
tor the test s $20. ana canoidates may
pay and register In the classroom at 7
p m Canoidates will need some type
of picture ID (i.e Driver s License1
and two number 2 pencils Since
school will not be in session on this
date the regularly scheduled
Wednesday afternoon (2 30 p m i test
will not be given
YEARBOOK PORTRAITS
Yearbook portraits are now being
taken in the Buccaneer Office until
Feb 17 Portraits are for seniors,
underclassmen and grad students
Sign up tor your appointment Now
this Is the last opportunity to have
your picture appear in the 1984 Buc
caneer sittings are conducted from
9 12 a m and I 5 p m No charge or
obligation to purchase pictures Your
portrait automatically appears in the
Buccaneer
ECU HILLEL
The ECU Hillel Councilorship will
be having a meeting on Sunday, Feb
19 at Mendenhaii Student Center in
room 238 at 8 p m join us and let us
know what's on your mind or iust sit
back and listen
INTENDEDSLAP
MAJORS
All General College students mten
ding to maior in Speech Language
and Auditory Pathology will pre
register for Fall and Summer Terms
on Tuesday Feb 21 at 7 p m in
Brewster. D 103
BANKING
Beta Kappa Alpha Banng ana
C CraVv : 3ve a
- eel -ig on Thursday Fee ia at 5 30
p m in Bawl 103 Mr Bfia
Womax of o.anters Na'iona' Bank
sp. on Dank-ng Ae w
have a c ' rr made 'or tie Y en
- " - leetmg Dress according
s,eA memberships and dues arf
V :e r�g raken
NATIONAL INSTITUTE
OF HEALTH
ecresenta� ve from s H
Be'hesda MD will be on campus
March 19 ana 20 to ;nterv .ew students
� would xe 'o worx n a clinical
-g as Normal ,o'uoteers
! -Jes win be paid dai'y stipends
� e'sVa s'udents must af'eno a
j, -era meet.ng a 7 d m on Monday
Vjrch if m Rawi 30 before nav -g
. -ss on the 20th Students ma
Health, Nursmg anc!
� ited f eids are encouraged to app
u Contact the Co op office 313 Raw i
�e'a s anj applications
WORKSHOP
The Career Planning ana Place
ment Service in the Bloxton House s
offering these one hour sessions to aid
you in developing better interview ng
skills for use in vour ic search A
film ano discussion of how to infer
view through th s service will be
shared Each session will be held m
'he Career Planning Room at 3 p m
Come on any of the following dates
Feb 2 8 13 21
SOCCER TOURNAMENT
ZBT ana Budweiser are sponsoring
a soccer tournament March 24 & 25
information is available at the cen
tral desk In Menaenhah Student
Center On the t.rst 16 teams will be
accepted so turn your roster In early I
MALE STRlP-OFf-
rhf Sigma Pn, Eps,ion L.ttle
S i'f'5 are sponsor ng 'he FirSt An
a Ma'e Strip OH Tuesday Feb 21
at the Elbo Room ook tor the tab'e
In fronl ex tne Student store for sign
ups and "� 'e n'ormat.on
MEDTINTENDED
MAJORS
Pre registration tor Fail Semester
oe held as shown beiow The
faculty would appreciate it it students
would arrive on time sc that everyone
an hear the general announcements
Monday Feb 27 7 Brewster D101
Freshman
Tuesday Feb 28 7 Brewster 0102
Sophomore
Students who cannot attend aftnar
one of these sessions should can Dor s
Johnson at 757 6961 to schedule an ap
po ntment students who have been
acm tied to the Depar'ment tor Fall
w be notif.ed b, le'ter 'he week of
Feb 20 ana may complete change of
maior forms at the same �.me that
they pre reg ster
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be a meeting on Thurs,
Feb 16 at 5 30 p.m m room 212
Mendenhaii All members should at
tend this meeting' We will be discuss
mg projects for this semester and in
duction of new members Please
mark your calendar, and don't miss
this meeting!
PARTY 50 KEGS
The East Carolina Rugby Team
will have a pre spring break party
Saturday Feb 25 from 7 12 pm at the
Greenville Moose Lodge Buses v Ifl
run to and trom the party at no
charge Pick ups will be made at apt
complexes or on campus Call
752 8041 if you have groups of 10 or
more
CIRCLE K
Circle K ECUS coed service
organization! The Circle K Club in
vites you to come out and iom us
every Tuesday this semester at 7
pm in Mendenhaii. Room 221 Bring
your ideas �or projects Hope to se
vOti there'
LADIES RUSH
The sisters of Eta Mu Chapter of
Sigma Gamma Rho soror ty inc , in
vite all interested ladies to attend
their formal rush on Feb 21 1984 at
7 30 in Room 244 Mendenhaii Be so
meone special get envolved with S G
Rho the ladies of royal blue and gold
NUCLEAR ARMAMENT
The Eastern Nort" Carolina
Chapter of Physicians for Social
Responsibility will present a pro
gram, "Nuclear Armament Nuclear
Disarmament � on Thursday,
February 23 7 30 p m , in The Brody
Building Auditorium Speical gues'
speaker is Howard A I Sugg, PH D
retired USN Commander and Ad
lunct Professor of Political Science,
East Carolina University
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Personal Development Classes,
March 13 Survival Italian, A New
You, Money matters. Career Change.
Dreams, Contact Continuing Educa
tlon, Ervvln Hall
PI KAPP LITTLE SIS
The Brothers and Pledges of Pi
Kappa Phi Fraternity would like to
remind all of the Little Sisters of the
Valentine's Party tonight (Thursat
8 00pm We feel that this is a special
time of year for a special group of
girls, this is a way to show ail of you
how much we really appreciate you
Happy Valentines Day I Let's Party!
NEEDED
Figure drawing models for beglnn
mg and advanced scheduled classes
in the school of art Draped 3 35 and
undraped 5 02 Please contact wes
Crawley at 757 6264
ISA
There will be a meeting on Satur
day, Feb 18 at 6 00 p m Rm 221
Mendenhaii Student Center Be
there!
EVENTS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Special Events
Committee is sponsoring a logo con
test for Barefoot on the Mall The only
requirement is that the year. "84' be
included in the logo Priie is $50 00
For more info call Mendenhaii Stu
dent Center or call Bruce at 752 3065
CLASSIFIED ADS
t - -ay use the form at right
oi use a separate sheet of
paper if yoy need more lines
There are 33 units per lint-
Each letter, punctuation mark
and work space counts as one
unit Capitalize and hyphenate
wca properly Leave space
at end of line if word doesn't fit.
No ads win be accepted over
the phone We reserve the right
to rejec any dd. All ads must
be prepaid Enclose 75 cents
j� ,me or fraction of a line.
�ense print legibly! Use
capital and lower case letters.
Return to the Media Board
secretary by 3 p m the day
nefore publication
Name
Address -
CityState.
No. Uses.
.� ryt tm hac t.
T ' � , f imam
1 ' 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 J 1 1 1. 1 i llllJ 11 � J
PRCCLUB
There will be a meeting on Tues
Feb 22 in Room 244 Mendenhaii This
is your last chance to order your
T shirts
BEDTIME ENTERPRISES
Let us tuck you or your friend in
with the reading of a bedtime story by
one of our world renowned Scott Han
Storytellers For $1 this service is
yours For more information and to
reserve an appointment, call 752 9320
9 o m 12 pm Mon Fri
TRAVEL COMMITTEE
The Student union Travel Commit
tee will meet on Thursday February
16. 1984 at 4 15 p m in Room 238 of
Mendenhaii Student Center All
members and interested students are
urged to attend
PEACEMEETING
What can you personally do to pre
vent world War III? For ideas, come
to the Peace Committee meeting Fri
day night Bring something for a pot
luck supper at 6 30 or just come for
the meeting at about 7 45 The place
is 610 S Elm Street, iust east of the
campus Telephone 758 4906
MARAUDER MEETING
Next ECU Marauder Meting will be
held 7.00 p m on Feb 23rd in the
Mulfi Purpose Room at Mendenhaii
Student Center All new comers
welcome
CAR WASH
Pi Kappa Phi Fraternity will be
having a car wash this Saturday at
Plaza Shell on Greenville Blvd We
will start about 1000 a m and last
thru out the day So if you want that
nasty, ragged car to look brand new
again be sure to come by this Satur
day
The Pi Kapp "A" basketball team
plays tonight at Minges at 8 15 Come
out and help support the undefeated
Pi Kapp "A" team
MANAGEMENT
The Society for Advancement of
Management, an organization
designed to promote management in
all tields of study, will be meeting
Thursday, February 23 at 3 00 in
Rawl 130 Members, non members
and faculty are urged to attend
SEX
Sexual Fulfillment � get your
Dr David Know will be the speaker
from the Sociology Opt on this ever
popular subject! The lecture will be
held on Tues , Feb 21 at 7 30 in Room
129, Speight Open to everyone who
wants to learn more1 Also Cer
tificafes and initiation Cards from
Fall '83 Psi Ch, initiations can be
picked up m the Psi Chi library now!
CONCERTS COMMITTEE
The Student union Special Concerts
Committee will meet on Tuesday,
February 21. 1984, at 5 30 p m in
Room 238 of Mendenhaii Student
Center All members and interested
students are urged to attend
FELLOWSHIP
If you re looking tor fellowship witti
people who love 'he Lord, come to
Jenkins Auditorium on Wednesday
nights at 6 30 You'll be surrounded
by happiness and iOy'
CADP
There w 11 be a meeting of the Cam
pus Acohol and Drug Program Thurs
day. Feb 16at5 00pm m210Erwin
CAOP promotes responsible deci
sions concerning drug and alcohol
use Everyone is invited
CHEMISTRY SEMINAR
Dr James L Anderson, university
of Georgia, will present a seminar en
titled "Optimizing Electrochemical
Detectors for Liquid
Chromatograpy" Friday, February
17, 1984 at 2 00 p.m Flanagan
Building Room KM Refreshments
will be served in Room 204
FLATBALLPLAYERS
Attention all fiatbali players, me
Fristoee Club Irates have planned to
go to Raleigh this weekend to play the
State boys in some horizontal
ultimate. All members who would
like to go. Play Ultimate today at hot
torn of hill Next club meeting is 220
Mon in Mendenhaii 248 at 8 00 p m
Membership fees($10) are needed
from all unpaid members in order to
get our New Jersey's For a good
time. Play Ultimate!
ALL CAMPUS PARTY
Little Sisters Rush, your favorite
beverage. Thurs Feb. 16, 9 00, Delta
Sigma Phi, 510 E 10th St Across
from Wendy's
CHAIRPERSON NEEDED
Applications for elections chairper
son are now being accepted File in
Mendenhaii 228
KYF
The King Youth Fellowship will
have a meeting Thursday. February
16. 1984 at 8 00 p m in Mendenhaii
Meet m upstairs lobby
PHYSICAL THERAPY
General College Pre Physical
Therapy Preregistration will be held
February 28, 1984 at 7 00 p m in
Brewster B 102
ALLSING
Spring is hearing so be ready for
ALL SING in the Spring if will be
challenging and fun!
COLLEGE REPUBLICANS
There will be a meeting of the Col
lege Republicans tonight at 5 � in
Room 271 Mendenhaii
ELECTRIC RAINBOW
The Electric Rainbow Rado Show
lams Greenville on WZMB Fr.oay
and Saturday nights from midnight to
4am This weeks 2am album
specials are Fn Thin Lizzy's
"Life" album and Sat it's new
Michael Shenker with Built to
Destroy "
SOULS
Society of United Liberal Students
will have a meeting Thursday
February 16. 1984. at 7 p m The
meeting will take place in Room 22'
Mendenhaii Membership appiica
tions will be taken at this time All in
ferested persons are invited to come
Out PLEASE GET INVOLVED'
HONORS PROGRAM
All seniors expecting to grada
spring semester or summer sess on
1984 who nave taken more 'nan 24 s n
course work in the Honors Program
and who want this worn acknowledg
ed on their transcr pt should see Dr
Dav d Sanders in 212 Ragsdae
757 63731 before spr ng break
PHILOSOPHY CLUB
The Philosophy ciub ana Pn s.gma
Tau will be having a meeting Mon
day Feb 20 at 7 00 p m In Brews'er
D 313 Jeff Whsnant w,n presen' a
paper ent.tted An infroauctor- �-
Benksons Mefaphys.es Everyone s
Welcome
Thurs. Ladies Night
�� The Big "E"
Eddy Hemingway
H.H. 5:00-9:00
Fri.
Coart"L.C Johnson
H.H. 4:00-9:00
Sat. Steve Hardy
H.H. 5:00-9:00
S IUDENT OPPORTUNITIES
We are looking for girls interested in being
counselors - acthit instructors in a prhate girls
camp located in Hendersonille. NC. Instruc-
tors needed especially in Swimming (WSI),
Horseback riding. Archery. Canoeing. (,m-
nasiics, Crafb, Also Basketball. Computers,
Soccer. C heerleading. Drama. Art, Office
work. Dancing. Nature stud. If your school
offers a Summer Intership program we will be
glad to help. Inquires - Morgan Havnes P.O.
Box 400C, Tryon. NC, 28782.
Beaus s a private ciub for members
gust only.
FREE FOOD???
Not Quite, but
the CHEAPEST
and BEST
SUBS99
Anytime
Soup 99
Fresh French Fries 65
OnionRings 65C
Blue Moon Cafe
205 E. 5th St.
tAcrosj from Apple Records)
ATTIC
Thurs. & Fri.
SKIP
CASTRO
Sat.
Pegasus
ROX
ECU Student $1 00
Coming Wed.
Feb. 27th
Solo Appearance
by Robbin
Thompson
jmnnoni
MARATHON
Restuarants
Greek
Dishes and Pastries
Pizza
We Serve Daily Specials
752-0326
560 Evans St
Call Us ��- Fast Delivery
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
FRATERNITY
presents
The 1st Annual
"PLANNING
FOR FINANCIAL SUCCESS"
SEMINAR
GIKSTSPKAKER: Cyrus B. Fotlmer, Jr.
President Follmer Financial Advisory
TOPIC. Why's and Wherefores of Financial
Planning
' INSURANCE
RETIREMENT ACCOUNTS (IRA. TSA & KEOGH1
INVESTING FUNDAMENTALS
INVESTMENT TAX SHELTERS
TIME: Wednesday, February- 22 at 7:00 p.m.
PLACE: Mendenhaii Student Center Room 220
(BRING YOUR QUESTIONS!)
FOR INFORMATION CALL
355-2836
Sandwiches
Subs,
DATE:
Wed. Feb. 15,
Thurs. Feb. 16
TIME: M
PLACE: Student Supply Store
Saving Include All Quality Rings
9
HERFF JONES
Division of Carnation Company
All!
B I INI VKK
-nmg: alu
could be ha.
your health
alarm being
scientists aa
tion Research-
ding that akin
have some dange-
tects on hui
regular
100-
Bn MM r
Bicycle err
have the
tkipate
enjoy whik
funds for
Lung V
v -
The a
sponsc .
two-nigh: b
seer
southe
Honors
Offer
The H
will offer �
four semi: u
fall, said Dr
Sander- rJir
program
be fou-
tions oi
the honor
of 1?. No
semina-
women -
American :
cultures
as an

Su-
Studer
honor-
a 3.5 aver.
tage of the
smalllasse n
sudents. a
Two
V
Continued From
Persona,
are a
Eamon sa
very spe. .i li
son to be
departmerv
said. "He
meone � I
and can op
legial bas -
this vv iv
beca.t rr - .
Tv
I Appi
Carol
758-0
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Our S " I
ous rad.a-v tar
tan you can ic t
U V A light ana
flaking u. gOt
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while you n
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way to tan A i
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M O
ROl
601





THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 16, 1984 3
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IORS PROGRAM
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.ight
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lion Company
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Aluminum Could Be Dangerous To Health
By CUNT WERNER
StofT Writer
Warning: aluminum
could be hazardous to
your health. This is the
alarm being sounded bv
scientists across the na-
tion. Researchers are fin-
ding that aluminum mav
have some dangerous ef-
fects on humans when
regularlv ingested.
Dr. Leopold Liss, a
professor of pathology
and psychiatry at Ohio
State University, found
that feeding rabbits
aluminum apparently
results in neurofibrillar
tangles in the brain.
Other scientists have
found concentrations of
aluminum four times
higher than ncmal in vic-
tims of Alzheimer's
disease, a particularly
devastating form of
senility.
These patients' brain
cells were found to be
structurally damaged.
Two forms of cellular
damage were identified:
tangles and plagues.
Tangles are clumps of
filaments within the nerve
cell and plagues are knots
of debris marking the site
of a burned-out nerve en-
ding. Excessive
aluminum may also in-
terfere with calcium ab-
sorption and storage,
causing weakened bones.
In the U.S people are
consuming massive
amounts of aluminum
every day without know-
ing it. A small amount of
aluminum seems to pose
no problem because most
of it is excreted. The huge
amounts of aluminum be-
ing consumed today,
however, increase the
amount retained in the
body.
People ingest
aluminum in a variety of
ways. Ricky Langley, an
employee of Greenville
Utilities said aluminum
sulfate is added to the ci-
ty's tap water. This is
done to give the water a
clear appearance. Some
of the metal inevitably re-
mains in the water and is
consumed.
Another way in which
that element is ingested is
through the use of
aluminum cookware.
Cooking or storing acidic
or alkaline foods in
aluminum pots causes
some of the metal to leak
out into the food.
The ECU Dining Ser-
vice uses only stainless
steel utensils for food
preparation, according to
Ira Simon, director of
dining services. There is
also the popularity of
aluminum soft drink and
beer cans to contend
with. Other sources of
aluminum are self-rising
flours, pancake batter,
buffered aspirins and
various Dowdered foods.
100-Mile Fund Raiser To Be Held
By KIM CRAIG
S�aff Writer
Bicycle enthusiasts now
have the chance to par-
ticipate in the sport they
enjoy while helping raise
funds for the American
Lung Association of
North Carolina.
The association is
sponsoring a two-day,
two-night bicycle tour of
scenic, historical
southeastern coastal
North Carolina, April
13-15.
The "Bike Trek" will
cover 100 miles in two
days, following a circular
tour along the Cape Fear
River with an overnight
stop on the Atlantic
Ocean at Long Beach and
return via the ferry and
coastal highway.
Interested cyclists are
encouraged to sign up
because only 150 riders
will be accomodated.
Lodging and meals along
the way will be provided
along with support
vehicles to carry luggage
and spare bicycle parts.
Participants must be 16
years of age or older and
in good physical condi-
tion. However, persons
under 16 may be accom-
panied by an adult.
Cyclists are expected to
supply their own gear and
bicycles along with secur-
ing donations totaling a
minimum of !200 which
will be contributed to the
Lung Association.
All participants will
receive an official Trek-
ker T-shirt and patch,
compliments of
Budweiser Light. Also,
complimentaiy weekend
packages for two will be
provided to trekkers with
the highest amout of
sponsorship money col-
lected prior to the
weekend. The weekend
resort packages include
the following: Blockade
Runner in Wrightsville
Beach, Inn on the Plaza
in Asheville, Foxfire Inn
and Country Club of
Pinehurst, and Mid Pines
Resort in Southern Pines.
Gift certificates ranging
from $25 to $100, will be
given to riders depending
on the amount of their
total sponsoring con-
tribution.
Buy.Sell & Trade
through the
Classified
Advertise With
The
East Carolinian
Honors Program To
Offer Five Seminars
The Honors Program
will offer five instead of
four seminar classes next
fall, said Dr. David
Sanders, director of the
program. There will also
be four additional sec-
tions of regular classes on
the honor level for a total
of 13. Next year's
seminars will deal with
women writers. Latin and
American people and
cultures, the human body
as an art object,
psychology and the topic
of "Technology and or
Survival
Students enrolling in
honors classes must have
a 3.5 average. The advan-
tage of the program is
smaJdasse with superior
students, and the best
teachers. Students have
access to a lounge and
special lectures by visiting
speakers.
The Honors Program
works with students in
their
freshman sophomore
years while work in the
juniorsenior years is
handled directly by in-
dividual departments.
Sanders said he hopes
to expand the program by-
getting students more in-
volved. Students can now
request seminar classes,
and there have been stu-
dent co-teachers in the
past. Sanders said he
would like to see more of
this as well as work on the
junior senior years.
Pizza inn
Greenville's Best Pizzas
Now Being Delivered
Two Visit Campus
THURSDAY.FEBRUARY 23, 1984
iOOPM MENOniX THEATRE ECU CAMPUS OKEENVK.LE
�.���� �� �
C0U � a.Ml tM -mm UOB M �.�� � �� �' QO
t,cn�.M��i( conwu nc�rr gma.mmmwi
UondtT Frtda, 10 00am 40Opm
Most delivery pizzas lack in
true quality and have 'hidden'
delivery costs in the price-
PIZZAINN has changed
all that! We se our dejvery
pizzas at Menu Prices.
No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
pizzas. TRY US TODAY !
Daily i etl days a week
andMon Tue Wed. nights
CALL 758-6266 Greenville Blvd.
1
I
I
I
I
$1 off any Large or
Giant 3 topping Pizza

�?
Continued From Pap 1
Personal credentials
are also imporiant,
Eamon said. "It takes a
very special kind of per-
son to be an effective
department chair he
said. "He should be so-
meone who enjoys people
and can operate on a col-
legia basis Eamon said
this was important
because making decisions
requires input of the en- I
tire faculty and a good
chair should have skills in
negotiation, compromise
and a feel for people's
reactions. However,
Eamon said the commit-
tee also wants someone
who is a good teacher in-
terested in research, with
better than average
credentials.
Typesetters
Needed
Apply at The East
Carolinian office
HAIRWORKS
Call Kim Kooncefor
Appointments.
Specializing in Hair
Cutting and Perms
ALL Haircuts $8.00
For Men & Women)
Location: Charles Street
Beside Carriage House Apts.
756-7057
Redken
Nexus
TOM GILMORE
Candidate For Governor
Reception 3-5 Sunday Feb. 19
A t Three Steers Inns
On Memorial Drive.
All Students Welcome
7 5 8-08 80
plaza uf-i'i'H-i
cinema P2m3
PITT-PLAZA SHOPPING CENTER
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"Broadway Danny Rose' gets the new
year off to an exhilarating start �Vincent
Ccinby. New York Times it's a dandy
entertainment -Gene Shalit NBC-TV.
The TocLiy Show Broadway Danny Rose'
has its full quota of Allen gags Jack
Kroll Newsweek Broadway Danny Rose'
is a great film, and it's funny too. In many
ways it's Woody Allen's best�Joel Siegel
ABC IV. Good Morning America down-
right hilariousMr. Allen gives his best per-
formance
since 'Annie
Hall �Pat
Collins.
tTf6ay ' 9 I CBS TV "It
all works
-Roger Ebert
W� o com by loi
R0FFLER OF GREENVILLE
602 EAST 10TH STREET SUITE A
GREENVILLE NC 2783U
r
WEEKDAYS
3:00-7:10-9:00
lack Rollins
Charles RJofle
Susan Morse
Mel Bourne
� -ip.
Gordon Willis �c
Ski!
Robert Greenhut
Wood)! Hen
S
SAT-SUN
3:30-5:20-7:10-
Budweiser ZBT
Soccer Tournament
March 24 & 25
Rosters and tournament information
available at Mendenhall Information
desk.
Only the first 16 teams will be accepted
' ��
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Stye iEaat (Earnltnnm
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, �����,�
Darryl Brown. ����,�, �
Jennifer Jendrasiak. mmm jt. Pietrzax, ww ouhv
Tina Maroschak, o- � mike McPartland. Ww
Ed Nicklas. sports eio, tom Norton, cm MMa
Gordon Ipock. �, kathy Fuerst. �mm-m
Mark Barker. a�,� Wwf Mike Mayo. 7ws,
February 16. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Aid Laws
Policy Is Discriminatory, Wasteful
In a sense, the current federal
government policy on student finan-
cial aid embodies all that is bad in
social programs, and it also occa-
sionally deprives a student of an
education.
Any program that cuts incentive
to get a job, that gives free money
only on the condition that one not
go out and work, is wasteful and
wrong. But such is now the policy of
the federal government on student
aid.
As the law now stands, a student
cannot receive more money from
any source than the amount that the
federal government sets as his need.
Thus, if one's need is set at $4,000
annually, and the government
awards $3,000 in financial aid of
any form, then a student cannot get
a job and earn more than $1,000 per
.ear. In other words, it often comes
io the point where a student must
either accept free money and give up
a job, or work and give back federal
aid.
Never mind that a student can
work and earn $2,000 or $3,000 a
year and thus qualify for less aid
next year, earning more and taking
less, the rule stands.
On top of that, the rule is in-
advertantly discriminatory.
Students working on campus are
easily caught when holding down a
job and receiving aid, for the
paychecks are processed through
the same administration that hands
out loans and grants. But students
working off-campus are left on their
honor to report their income, and
most do not. There's a chance the
system will catch up with them at
the end of the year on their tax
report, but many are not caught.
Perhaps the greatest injustice is
that the law does not permit
qualified, talented, but poor
students to hold jobs in which they
can learn and gain valuable skills
and experience. A student can wait
tables or cook hamburgers off-
campus, but only those whose
financial aid limit is high can hold
skill-developing, salaried jobs such
as student government president or
editor of the school newspaper.
The ECU minority newspaper,
the Ebony Herald, employs mostly
minorities, and most minorities
receive financial aid. As a result, the
paper's staff has been ravaged
because valuable, trained workers
have had to quit since they earned
too much money. The same thing
sometimes happens at The East
Carolinian, WZMB, the SGA or
other salaried student jobs.
Moral of the story: it is easier for
students to not work and receive aid
than get a job and give back money.
And, only rich students can hold
educating, salaried jobs on campus
and develop job skills and leader-
ship experience until the current
federal policy is changed.
How Come
a cup of coffee costs 60 cents in
the Mendenhall cafeteria and you
can't get refills, when around the
corner McDonald's sells the same
size cup of coffee for 30 cents and
you can have all you want?
the library has four photocopy
machines, and the Student Supply
Store and the Croatan have one
each, but invariably no more than
three have worked at the same time
since 1970-something?
there are pencil sharpeners in only
about one of every five classrooms
at ECU, and the remaining four
rooms just have a couple of holes in
the wall near the door?
0HSURE,C0MRAPEm�5OMEONE'5 MAKING FACES
AT US IN THE WINP0W,�
Thinking An Unthinkable: Supreme
Court Justices Picked By Reagan
Requirement For
Registration Of
Frat Members
A Great Idea
Among Democratic presidential
candidate Jesse Jackson's many
good ideas for increasing voter
registration, there is one par-
ticularly good one applicable to
college campuses.
Jackson is generally better a
voter registration policy than, say,
foreign policy, and in a speech
Sunday at Harvard University he
had some especially innovative
ideas on increasing the number of
registered voters. One suggestion
was that fraternities and sororities
require all members to register to
vote before they be allowed the
join the organization. Party af-
filiation would of course be left to
the individual, but the idea seems
to have no hitches for the
organizations; the requirement is
simple for anyone and only pro-
motes good citizenship.
For honor fraternities, who are
usually trying to represent excep-
tionally talented, bright in-
dividuals, registration would be
setting a good example with
registration by a group that itself
should be a good example. Social
fraternities and sororities
sometimes have a reputation of be-
ing lit �t more than party organiza-
tions, and a registration require-
ment would show their interest in
encouraging active citizenship and
character development.
r
Campus Forum
By GREG RIDEOUT
Campaign '84 may well drag up an
oft-used but ineffective issue to throw
at voters. The issue is age and health
and their relation to Supreme Court ap-
pointments. The man elected in '84 may
get the chance to replace up to five
justices between 1984 and 1988, and the
matter of who gets to appoint them
should be paramount in light of the
stark differences this year in the
Democrats and Republicans.
Voters know this. Besides President
Reagan and former Vice President
Mondale both being native-born and
over 35, the two prospective nominees
have little in common. Their views on
almost every issue contrast sharply with
one another. Their beliefs will affect us
far beyond the next four; in fact,
because of the men and women they
will appoint to the high court, their
policies will linger for most of our adult
lifetime.
The issue should be driven hardest by
Mondale. It will be tough; most voters
do not choose a lever to pull because of
future intangibles. Yet, he may be able
to appeal to liberally-oriented people on
social issues who are satisfied with the
economy and the president's hard line
on defense. He can scare them by say-
ing just one or two Reagan appointees
could overturn recent court decisions
on school prayer and abortion. But he
can't do it without the media's help to
make people aware of the present situa-
tion.
Five justices are between the ages of
75 and 77; two of these, Thurgood Mar-
shall and William Brennan, are con-
sistently the most liberal members of
the court. Mondale knows he has to
warn voters of the irrepairable harm of
the Reagan-packed court; "Above all
he tells voters, "we must win to save the
Supreme. If that court is replaced by
Mr. Reagan, it could well be that the
great course of justice will be doomed
for the lifetime of everyone
VievPoint
Mondale realizes most people aren't
aware of the impact of our third branch
of government. He must tell them
about judicial review and the possible
damage it could come to our country if
Reagan-appointed justices are out of
step with the rest of the country. He
must tell them how past decisions of the
brethren profoundly affect our world
today. Cases like Brown vs. Topeka
Board of Education and Gideon vs.
Wainwright.
But Reagan and GOP strategists
could put this strategy in reverse. They
could, and probably are, telling
loyalists throughout the land how great
(read conservative) a world it would be
with six justices picked by the "great
communicator
Of course, there is no guarantee Iha:
a justice, once picked, will echo the
beliefs of his appointing president.
There are many instances where men
safely installed on the nation's highes:
judicial bench have changed their views
and confounded the president that pick-
ed them. Then again, the justices could
defy the actuarial tables and serve, as
Oliver Wendell Holmes did, until thev
are 90.
But Americans can't take that
chance. A Supreme Court marching to
a different tune is a danger to our
system. It can not only force presidents
to initiate dronted measures (like FDR
and courtpacking). it can, as we know
sway the course of human events, Hc
the Dred Scott decision and its impact
on the Civil War.
The point is that a Reagan court
would be a burden for our children to
bear. We must not let liberty be toppled
by conservative jurisprudence. We need
men and women with vision who will
pull for equality and freedom and pro-
tect our Constitution. We all know Mr.
Reagan is against these virtues for all
people. Mr. Mondale must carry the
cries of the court to all people. A vote
for Mondale is a vote for a good and
just Supreme Court.
Message
The editorial entitled "Tobacco
Road Economics Faltar" which ap-
peared in the Feb. 4 edition of The East
Carolinian requires a few footnotes.
Having the misfortune of not seeing
the play "Tobacco oad I will not
attempt to pass judgement on the
author's review. However, I wish to
comment on what is referred to as "the
overall message
Apparantly the author is not aware
of some fundamental changes in
American social thought dating back
to the end of the 19th century. The
"American Dream" of hard work plus
moral righteousness equals economic
prosperity underwent a major redefin-
ing process with the advent of the 20th
century. Factors such as industrializa-
tion, the closing of the frontier, urban
poverty and the inability of farmers
and factory workers to make a decent
living prompted the American people,
not politicians, to demand a change.
The result is what is known as the Pro-
gressive Movement.
From the collective forces of urban
labor to the exhaustive work of
women's clubs across the nation,
Americans demanded and fought for
education, health and public welfare
legislation to insure the availability of
the American Dream for everyone.
This legislation, and subsequent pro-
grams throughout the 20th century
such as the New Deal, New Frontier,
etc. have served not as an attempt to
"erase poverty" or "change human
nature" but to make the American
Dream more accessible and attainable
for all Americans. Suffice it to say that
I believe economic equality is
desirable, for it is a major tenant of
Christianity. (Read the Acts of the
Apostles and we'll talk). Economic
equality is a goal Americans should
strive to attain, just as Christians
should strive to be Christlike. A free
education is but one facet of the corn-
problem of
plex and multi faceted
economic inequality.
Regardless of the political swing of
American thought back to the
nostalgic days of Daniel Boone and
"rugged individualism the social
problems of American society will not
disappear. Inattention to social and
economic inequality will not make it go
away. I suggest that we, as Americans
and Christians, practice the "Social
Gospel" rather than Social Darwinism.
Rick Brown
Senior
HistoryEnglish
Abortion Redux
Bern (McCrady, who wrote to Cam-
pus Forum Feb. 14), here are some
statistics that might interest you.
1. 35.5 percent of the legal abortions
in 1980 were for females from the ages
of 20-24 years old.
2. 35.3 percent were over the age of
25 years old.
3. An alarming 70.8 percent of all
abortions in 1980 were for women over
the ages of 20 years old.
4. 23.1 percent of the total abortions
in 1980 were between married couples.
5. There are now 1.5 million legal
abortions performed every year in the
United States.
We say the greatest holocaust man
has ever known was the WWII
genocide plan of Germany that
destroyed 6 million Jews. We are told
to this day that this must never be
allowed to happen again. I say to you
that the greatest holocaust of all time is
going on right now in this country. In
the four years you'll be at ECU Bern
there will be 6 million more dead
babies. This is equivalent to the Jewish
destruction of WWII in only four
years.
In the Vietnam War there were a
total of 47,253 battle deaths from the
years 1964-1973. Look at the stink this
war is still causing. How ironic that we
talk about the senseless loss of human
life in the same breath. What then is
abortion with figures that make the
Vietman War statistics look insignifi-
cant?
Almost 71 percent of abortions in
1980 occurred with females over the
age of 20 years old. This age represents
a college sophomore or older. How
does a college sophomore tell me they
accidentally got pregnant and it will
destroy there life? Are they not respon-
sible for their actions? Or how about
the 23.1 percent of the total abortions
in 1980 occurring between married
couples, what's their excuse?
I think what Ronald Reagan and Bil-
ly Graham as well as myself want is the
innocent slaughter of human life to
stop. The bottom line is when we start
putting a woman's right ahead of
human life we are in trouble. (Statistics
provided by World Almanac.)
Ben Carver
Junior
Business
ISA Alive And Well
There were several discrepancies in
your article on the International Stu-
dent Association that require correc-
tion.
1. The I.S.A. has not been inactive
for the last 10 years, rather it has never
made as great an effort to expand its
membership and its scope of activities
as we have this year and has hence
never been as well known as at this
point in time.
2. The article implied that we have
few American students in the I.S.A. In
fact American students consist of
about 30 percent of our total registered
members (by far the largest number
from any country).
3. We arc in the process of trying to
establish a fund for emergency loans to
our members. We are also working on
a list of problems faced by foreign
students in their encounters with local
banks together with the foreign student
advisor. Neither of these services is
provided at this stage, but we hope to
be able to provide them in the near
future.
4. Tickets to the international dinner
will be available on the 27th of
February, not the 20th as stated in the
article. The I.S.A. is in the process of
evolving into a "service" organization.
We believe that this can be facilitated
by increased participation in our ac-
tivities by American students, and a
widening of the scope of our activities
to include as much of the ECU campus
as possible.
Mildred Godley
Vice President, ISA
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
oP them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
wisisnatwre of the authorfs Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed All
lettersare subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted, Sudenls
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
�iit� hi 11 mmii !�� n,ti
i A �� ��� ��
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i
I
?
Prog,
. B ANDREA
Due to efforts of EC i
coordinator of Handicap
pcd Student Service
C.C Rowc and the I S(
Board of Governors
Joyner Librarv has
developed a self-help pro
gram using a word pro-
cessor system to assist
learning disabled
students.
Jeri Graham, computer
science major, ana
Kimberly Cox, biolog.
major, have provider
motivation for the pro-
Drinking Topi
B DAVID JOHNs I (
�tmf1 Vbmrr
L nderneath this marhu
tomb
In endless shade lie
drunken Tom
Here safely moor 'd Jc a :1
as a log.
Who got his death
drinking grog.
By whiskey grog he
his breath.
Hno would not die soli
sweet a death.
So goes the epita
Kentucky poet
Johnson, whose tomb
stone lyric reflect
sentiments of a wl
generation of our I
ancestors boozing si up
on the lone prairie
And that's just on
the jewels cast by usiting
lecturer W.J. Rorab- .
who spoke Monda
Pitt Counts Mem
Hospital. Hi
Rorabaugh is a .
depicting the vanou-
levels of alcohol
Fe
Is The
To
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 16, 1984 5
33
AflSA
FACES
upreme
eagan
d il ould be
� the "great
guarantee that
:ked, will echo the
pointing president.
stances where men
the nation's highest
- ged their views
rsident that pick-
he justices could
trial tables and serve, as
Holmes did, until they
, can't take that
I art marching to
tune is a danger to our
- not only force presidents
rued measures (like FDR
xiog), it can, as we knou.
rse of human events, Wtc
decision and its impacl
i'ar-
l'x that a Reagan court
S ' v our children lo
tl liberty be ioppled
rudence We need
on who will
reedom and pro-
e all know Mr.
, e virtues for all
r J.aie must carry the
all people. A vote
"�te for a good and

tion
the largest number
process of trying to
r emergency loans to
are also working on
faced by foreign
rncounters with local
th the foreign student
' these services is
tage, but we hope to
le them in the near
le international dinner
le on the 27th of
20th as stated i:i the
is in the process of
organization.
Ihis can be facilitated
Iticipation in our ac-
can students, and a
:ope of our activities
of the ECU campus
Mildred Godley
Vice President, ISA
Rules
nian welcomes letters
its of view. Mail or
office in the Old
�reran from Joyner
verification, all let-
the name, major and
Jjress, phone number
te authorfsj. Letters
typewritten pages,
neatly printed. All
to editing for brevi-
bel, and no personal
?rmirted. Students,
truing letters for this
yhat they are limited
rues.
Program Designed To Assist Handicapped
By ANDREA
MARKELLO
Staff WiMar
Due to efforts of ECU
coordinator of Handicap-
ped Student Services
C.C. Rowe and the UNC
Board of Governors
Joyner Library has
developed a self-help pro-
gram using a word pro-
cessor system to assist
learning disabled
students.
�Jeri Graham, computer
science major, and
Kimberly Cox, biology
major, have provided
motivation for the pro-
gram. At present, eight
students use the equip-
ment, but others are en-
couraged to join.
Cox explained pro-
cedures on the Apple II,
emphasizing its unique
dictionary feature that
serves to correct spelling
errors in research papers
,ind class notes. "By stor-
ing papers and notes on
the computer it helps
organize for class, which
in turn saves time by be-
ing more efficient than
handwriting she said.
Cox said special
features provided by the
eauipment irclnde print-
Drinking Topic Of Lecture
out sheets in large type or
in Braille for blind
students, and a green
screen for a variation
from the typical black
and white.
She said wheelchair
students who have trou-
ble with dextety find us-
ing the word processor
and print-out is much
easier than writing
everything longhand.
Graham said the equip-
ment lessens time spent
on teaching. "One
feature is the computer
speaking to what is
printed on the screen, but
it's still in the training
stages. We are just at-
tempting to put the
students on equal footing
with others in the class
she said.
"There are a lot of
misconceptions concern-
ing the learning
disabled Cox said.
"It's a hidden disability
discovered through
psychological testing.
Most learning disabled
students have average to
above average in-
telligence, but a braii
dysfunction creates pro-
blems in receiving and
analyzing information. A
lot of factors come into
play she said. she said. disability unless someone
Cox said learning Cox said learning has one - you can't go in-
disabilities have a disabledness is not a side a mind and become
neurological base which laziness or stupidity. No temporarily disabled, she
causes perception pro- one knows what it's like said.
blems. One example is to have a learning "The learning disabled
difficulty looking from
blackboard to notebook
and copying information
correctly.
"The disabilities may
have their origin in the
prenatal process Cox
said. "Public schools are
doing a better job
locating disabilities,
especially in those
students who choose not
to identify the problem
and cope on their own
is a brain dysfunction
related to academically
important topics basically
in the math and verbal
areas Graham said.
Rorabaugh Speaks On Alcohol
By DAVID JOHNSTON
. Stamtrittf
Underneath this marble
tomb
In endless shades lies
drunken Tom
Here safely moor'd dead
as a log,
Who got his death by
drinking grog.
By whiskey grog he lost
his breath,
JfTio would not die so
sweet a death.
So goes the epitaph of
Kentucky poet Tom
Johnson, whose tomb-
stone lyric reflects the
sentiments of a whole
generation of our U.S.
ancestors boozing it up
on the lone prairie.
And that's just one of
the jewels cast by visiting
lecturer W.J. Rorabaugh
who spoke Monday at
Pitt County Memorial
Hospital. History to
Rorabaugh is a graph
depicting the various
levels of alcohol con-
sumption during our na-
tion's past. Apparently
the period of the early
1800s roughly resembles a
35-year homecoming
weekend as our three-
sheets-to-the-wind
ancestors fought British
and Indians and
heightened their con-
sumption of pure alcohol
to almost four gallons per
patriot per anum.
But they weren't the
only ones to fire a musket
ball at two blurred im-
ages. Rorabaugh points
out that in Plymouth the
idea was alcohol is good
in moderation, whereas
in Virginia the idea
wasalcohol is good,
period.
During the revolution
when the British cruelly
cut off our rum imports,
yankee ingenuity trium-
phed again with the in-
vention of corn liquor. In
the 1790s the Scotch-Irish
sailed over to help us
build distilleries. By 1810
the whiskey business was
the third most important
in the nation. By then our
liquid corn crop was
cheaper than milk, cof-
fee, or tea at only 25 cents
per gallon. That's a
nickel a fifth, but who's
counting.
Rorabaugh added that
there were some proper
reasons for all that col-
onial glass tipping. In
manv places stood clean
water was scarce, milk
was sometimes lethally
contaminated, tea was
unpatriotic and coffee ex-
pensive. Americans felt
that corn whiskey was a
patriotic drink; One
distiller suggested that it
become our national
beverage. Whiskey work-
ed well to wash down
food that was often
greasy. But in any event
the temnerenre move-
ment sharply curtailed
the drinking of whiskey
beginning in the 1830s
and the rest is
well history.
If your appetite is wet-
ted for more on the sub-
ject Rorabaugh has writ-
ten a book, The
Alcoholic Republic, An
American Tradition Ox-
ford Publishing Co.
Happy 20th Birthday Darlen!
Matt
f�AIO AfWHTIMMWm
Early arrivals to the WASH PUB, Greenville's newest laundromat, widen
will be open 7 days a week, ask the now famous question, "Where are all
the washers?" Coming soon to E. 10th Street.
EAST CAROLINA
DANCE THEATRE
KS�
rCwCiCI
Classifieds
Feb. 17
Is The Last Day
To Drop
A Course
The East Carolina Playhouse
McGinnis Theatre
February 24, 25, 27-29 ECU Students: $2.50
8:15 P.M. General Public: $4.00
Call 757-6390
41
IP5IL0N
PLEDGES
rusHT.
HHPPV HOUR

-

-
jeb. r iio-7-ooi
$l.oecm a" pitcher
60 2?
AN ASSOCIATE MEMBERS PRODUCTION
ONSOuDATED
fuEATRES
YENTL
2:00-4:30
7 00-9:30
ADULTS $2.00 TIL 5:30 � gjjgtg)
PO
unfaithfullythe prey
YOURS 1.10-310-5:10
X 1-3-5-7-9-PG
7:10-9:10
rx.lt Mi M )Rf
"iASTASSIA KJNSM
llnfuiihjuffcj
See it with
someone
you trust.
100
300
500
7 00
900
Tnt tiut story �1 o fornHy
tioppad in tht wNdanwss
and how fhey teoni
to survive .pG-
LATE SHOW
FRISAT. NIGHT
BOX OFFICE OPEN-11:00
SHOW STARTS-11:30
ADULTS ONLY
SWR0F00D
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1 ��� ��� stfasi fasjta ataatl

mm





THb EAST CAROL 1NJAN
Style
FEBRUARY 16. 1984
Page
Libe
?
Why Does The Media Ignore
Sobering Facts Of Soviet Nuclear Strategy
By GORDON IPOCK
Fcalara i ttitot
The threat of nuclear war is a constant topic in the
media. The so-called "arms race" between the U.S.
and the U.S.S.R the likelihood of nuclear war, the
morality of possessing � much less using � these
implements of horrific destruction, arms talks,
nuclear protest movements all these and other
related topics are constantly on the media's agenda.
In the March '83 issue's "Why Strategic Superiori- curate, and thus, they could be used effectively only
ty Matters Jastrow explains precisely how the cur- against targets as large as cities. Massivley powerful
rent nuclear buildup came about. Initially, the U.S. warheads were used, and even if the missile missed?
had a big lead on the Soviets in nuclear weapons. We it's intended target by several miles, the city would I'
developed the atomic bomb, the hydrogen bomb, still be destroyed. However, advances in electronics, y
strategic bombers, intercontental ballistic missiles micro-circuitry and mini-computors have greatly im-
(ICBMs) and missile-firing submarines before the proved warhead accuracy on the latest missiles. Most
Soviets did. But with each developement we made, of the newer U.S. and Soviet MIRV warheads can hit
the Soviets developed � or stole � the same within 250 yards of their intended target. This ac-
As a result, the American public's state of mind technology within a few years. curacy now means each side has the ability to hit
ranges from one of serious concern and uneasy fear By 1967, the U.S. had built a force of ICBMs, specific targets and destroy them, targets such as
utter confusion and overwhelming missile-firing submarines and strategic bombers that hardened missile silos and command centers. Because
U.S. defense planners felt was sufficient to deter any of the improved accuracy, warheads no longer need
attack on this country. Sec. of Defense Robert to be as powerful. In fact, nuclear weapons in the
McNamara ordered a halt to further production and American arsenal now average one seventh the size
placed a ceiling on strategic defense weapons at this they did 25 years ago, and the total megatonnage of
1967 level. The Soviets continued to build, and by the U.S. arsenal is one quarter what it was then
1969 had reached a rough parity with our own
nuclear forces. Each side had 1000 silos for land-
based ICBMs.
paranoia.
I'll admit. With the constant talk about the bomb,
I'm a little worried myself, worried enough that I've
begun reading extensively on the subject in an at-
tempt to try and find some answers. The media,
however, pumps out much information but few
answer Watching TV network news, reading the
papers and new magazines only adds to one's confu-
sion and paranoia. I recently read two lengthy ar-
ticle on the nuclear arms scare, both in prestigious
magazines. One was typically confusing and the
other was unexpectedly clear. First, let's examine the
media garbage. ����.m
In this January's issue of The Atlantic magazine, It was at this time that U.S. intellectuals and
:ontributing editor Thomas Powers devotes 18 pages strategists felt each side was secure since both had the
Feature Analysis
� perhaps 20,000 words - - in an attempt to answer
the question "What Is It About?" That is the title to
his wandering article on what he calls a nuclear com-
petition between the superpowers. Despite in-
teresting, but perhaps irrelevant, asides on numerous
conflicts ranging from the Pelopenesian War to the
Napoleonic Wars to WWI and WWII, Powers never
answers his question. He recalls numerous conversa-
tions with military men and civillians, with
Americans and Soviets, with experts and people in
capability to annihilate the other. This reasoning was
reflected in the concept of MAD (mutually assured
destruction). U.S. strategists felt neither side would
risk attacking the other since such an attack would
surely bring a devastating counter attack against their
own cities. SALT I was signed by both countries in
1972 along with a seperate ABM (anti-ballistic
missile) Treaty that forbade either side to develope
the means to defend against the other's ICBMs. The
reasoning was that if one side developed the means to
It is now clear to American strategists that the
Soviets are not developing a nuclear arsenal for the
destruction of American industrial and populations
centers as was envisioned under MAD. All indica-
tions are that they are developing weapons suited for
a strike against our own nuclear forces. The numbers
support this conclusion. While the U.S. has 1,650 ac- Why are the Soviet elite so concerned about the Per-
curate warheads on their Minutemen and Titan shing IIs?
missiles, the Soviets have 4,560 warheads � an would surely call the bluff, or perhaps worse, use it
almost three-to-one advantage � and they are still as an excuse to launch a decisive first strike against
building more. The Soviets now have a force large us. Our only choice would be to acquiese to Soviet
enough to target two warheads against each of the power. Thus President Reagan refuses to com-
1,000 U.S. ICBM silos (assuring destruction), plus promise on cuts in defense spending � especially on
destroy U.S. bomber and submarine bases and wipe new strategic weapons. He senses the urgency to
out strategic command centers and still have a land- deploy the MX missile svstem and build theB-1
based force in reserve as large as the total original bomber to partially restore the strategic imbalance
: streets, and the reader gets the impression that, defend itself against the other's missiles it would have
somehow, civilization teeters precariously on the an unfair advantage, and MAD would not work.
erge of nuclear annihilation, and there is no logical Essentially, each country agreed to give its popula-
reason for it. Powers seems to suggest that the cur-
rent situation evolved by chance � blindly � with
neither side planning nuclear war. It's as if the Accoiding to Jastrow, this was a peculiar logic that
.uclear stockpiles of arms have grown with a peculiar the U.S. planners had developed � and one the
and natural will of their own, inexplicable as quartz Soviets never believed in for a moment. In the
U.S. force. According to Jastrow, the Soviets now
have the ability to destroy most of our Minutemen
missiles in their silos with a surprise first strike. We
lack that ability. "The Soviets have strategic
superiority he says.
American strategists now clearly see the Soviet
threat. U.S. Senator Patrick Moynihan calls MAD,
tion up as hostages for massacre in the name of "a policy in ruins In 1979, Sec. of Defense Brown
peace
confirmed that since 1963, "The Soviets have had a
between the two superpowers.
Many will say that America can rely on its
submarine-launched missiles, that one Trident sub at
sea has enough missiles to destroy all major Soviet
cities. Jastrow admits the truth in this claim, but he
also points out that the present sub-launched missiles
do not have the accuracy of land-based ICBMs. They
are useless against hardened targets such as Soviet
ICBM silos and therefore are of no value in answer-
negotiation of SALT I, the Soviets had refused to
limit missiles or warheads. The only thing limited
were the silos that held the missiles. Hardly before
the ink had dried on the SALT I document, the
Soviets replaced all the missiles in their silos with a
new generation of much heavier, more powerful
tals, and are certain to eventually fulfill their
destructive purpose. Finally, Powers answers his
question with "1 don't know
The Atlantic claims to be a magazine that supplies
the answers that television news, and daily � and
even weekly � newspapers and news magazines can-
not. This is supposedly American journalism at its
most detailed and analytical best. If the answer of the
media's best is "I don't know then there's little
wonder that confusion reigns across the land. Powers
has produced a massive text of dis-information wor-
thy of the KGB "What Is It About" is worse than a
�travesty of journalism; it is a document of contradic-
tions and ommissions of truths and facts that borders
on treason. It can only add to the public's paranoia
and confussion and thus erode a common sense of
will, reason and purpose.
It is ludicrous to believe, as Powers suggests, that
both the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. have spent hundreds
of billions of dollars stockpiling nuclear arms with no
clear purposes in mind. Matters of such importance
are never left to chance. (So much for the garbage.)
Robert Jastrow, in two outstanding articles in missiles, each containing eight-to-10 MIRVed (in-
Commentary magazine (Why Strategic Superiority dependently targeted) warheads instead of the single
Matters, Mar. '83; and, Reagan vs. the Scientists: warheads of the old missiles. Also, they began adding
Why the President Is Right About Strategic Missile new silos and developing an anti-ballistic missile
Defense Systems, Jan. '84) has written the first clear defense system. They developed a new multi-purpose
policy of building forces for a preemptive strike on ing a first strike by the Soviets against our strategic
U.S. ICBMs According to General John W. military sites. With the current Soviet strategy of
Vessey, Jr chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, destroying our bombers and Minutemen missiles'and
the Soviets can now destroy 70-75 percent of our sparing our cities and industrial areas � thus leaving
Minutemen missiles in a surpise attack. New Soviet
missiles (fifth generation, more accurate) may be able
to eliminate 90-95 percent outright. According to
Henry Kissenger, we are now in "a period of
vulnerability such as we have not experienced since
Peaceniks and freezeniks? They're sincere, but are they playing into Moscow's hands?
the early days of the Republic If Congress passes a
nuclear freeze, Jastrow warns that the vulnerability
will be extended into the 1990s.
us succulent but defenseless prey � we would surely
not launch a counter-strike against their cities. To do
so would bring the full force of the Soviet nuclear
arsenal upon our own cities. In such a situation,
Henry Kissinger has named our alternatives: "suicide
or surrender Our sea-based deterrent is of value
only if the Soviets attack our cities, which they have
no reason or plans to do.
Jastrow also points out that the Soviets have 700
hardened shelters to insure the survival of the Party
elite (100,000) should we risk a counter-strike with
our Trident subs. Again, the elite would be safe from
such an attack. But the Pershing II missiles that
Reagan is now deploying in Europe could easily
destroy these shelters and hardened missile silos. The
Pershing IIs use the latest computorized technology
within their intelligent guidance systems enabling
them to land warheads within 25 yards of their
targets. In Jastrow's words, the Pershing IIs can
almost drop a nuclear warhead down the air vent to
the Politburo's command bunker. The Pershing IIs
have the sort of kill accuracy that Trident missiles do
not have. They are a certain threat to the Soviet elite,
and that is why the Soviets will do anything to pre-
vent their deployment: support anti-nuke groups,
Jastrow also gives numerous quotes from the k .
SvelSrvr4TI�SLB.1�: "n aCieilSe Syulemo �ey 3??�Ped a new multi-Punose writings of the Soviet General Staff and military walk out of arms talks - anything! Having the Per
first sc is to JSEsi 7Jnu2rntJ, t ST" 2 SS'?' ?? 1S prescntly targeted at Pners. All their writings for the past two decades shing IIs in Europe is like having a loaded gun
�ftcTJfZt Western Europe but also has the range to hit the U.S. repeatedly state that the key to winning a modern war against Chernenko's head. And until we can
most innovate and thouahtf�F& ntlZl En' I 5�� the SS-20 with a t0n of is thrOUgh the use of massive surPrise rocket attacks- the MX or � �� against Soviet ICBMs,
publisn anles in this �ES2�� il? ?? $� W�U,d 3PPCar l� have the limited American idealists and peaceniks cannot conceive deploying the Pershing IIs mav be the only thing that
amDle Pa rick MoihSSTlZLSl E �ge �f an intermediate missile. Replace the ballast of fighting a nuclear war and refuse to believe the can insure the Soviets will not use their current
S; 7?ta�2SJ3 Tffi?T rkpat�k S Wlt fuuel� and � can ny over the polar ice cap and Soviets can. They should listen to the words of Soviet strategic superiority.
Commentary strike the U.S. Since the SS-20 is a mobile missile not strategist Major General A.S. Milovidov: "There is Unlike presidents of the past, Reagan realizes the
housed within silos, technically it does not violate the profound error and harm in the disorienting claim of folly of MAD, the lunancy of offering up the
letter of SALT. But it does rip the heart out of the bourgeois idealogues that there can be no victor in a American public for slaughter bv the Soviets in a
spirit and purpose of the treaty. thermonuclear world war. The peoples of the world
Liberal critics of a U.S. buildup in nuclear will put an end to imperialism, which is causing
resulted in national recognition and ultimately to ap-
pointments as U.S. Ambassadors to the United Na-
tions. Jastrow himself has had a distinguished career
as a scientist. He founded NASA's Institute for
Space Studies and served as its director until his
weapons like to point out that the Soviets only react
retirement in 1981. He is presently a faculty member to American advances in the arms race. Obviously,
at Dartmouth.
this is not the case. Since the signing of SALT I, the
Soviets have spent approximately $500 billion on new
strategic nuclear weapons. Since signing the arms
agreement, they have added 308 monstor SS-18
ICBMs to their strategic nuclear arsenal. The SS-18 is
about as accurate and twice as big as America's pro-
posed MX missile. Each SS-18 carries eight to ten
nuclear warheads with an aggregate explosive power
of five megatons. The Soviets have also deployed 360
SS-19s, a fourth generation ICBM of comparable ac-
curacy and destructive power as the MX. According
to Jastrow, "The megatonnage residing in just these
two types of missiles is far greater than the megaton-
nage of the entire U.S. missile and bomber force. All
of this has happened since the signing of SALT I and
in the name of arms control The Soviets are conti-
nuing to spend about $40 billion a year for strategic
weapons. They are adding 150-200 ICBMs each year,
says Jastrow, and we are adding none.
This continued massive buildup cannot be in
mankind incalculable suffering
Over 10 years ago Soviet dissident Aleksandr
Solzhenitsyn gave Americans this grave warning:
At one time there was no comparison between
the strength of the USSR and yours. Then it
became equal Perhaps today it is just greater
than balance, but soon it will be two-to-one.
Then three-to-one. Finally, it will be five-to-
one. With such a nuclear superiority it will be
possible to block the use of your weapons, and
on some unlucky morning they will declare:
"Attention! We're marching our troops into
Europe, and if you make a move, we'll an-
nihilate you. " And this ratio of three-to-one, or
five-to-one will have its effect: You will not
make a move.
And how far off is something like the above
scenario? Jastrow quotes a speech that former Soviet
Premiere Brezhnev made to the Communist leaders
in Prague: "We are achieving with detente what our
predecessors have be?n unable to achieve using the
fist By 1985 we will have achieved most of our
response to new developements in nuclear arms by objectives in Europe Come 1985, we will be able to
the U.S. The Soviets surpassed us nearly 10 years ago extend our will wherever we need to "
but still build more weapons in violation of existing It is clear now that President Reagan understands
treaties. As Harrold Brown, the secretary of defense the Soviet nuclear threat to America. He realizes the
under President Carter, said, "As our defense danger in persisting blindly to believe in MAD as our
budgets have risen, the Soviets have risen. As our deterence to nuclear war. Jastrow points out that in
defense budget has gone down, the Soviet's has the past our security was based upon strength. Three
"scn" times the U.S. went to nuclear alert against the
Liberal idealists ignore the Soviet buildup. "What Soviets: in 1948 during the Berlin Airlift crisis, in
does it matter they say, "if the Soviets have 1962 during the Cuban Missile Crisis and in 1973 dur-
enough power to blow us up once over, or 10 times ing the ArabIsraeli War. During the first two in-
over. Eventually you reach a point where added stances, the U.S. had overwhelming nuclear
destructive power is irrelevant. If more weapons superiority and thus kept the Soviets in check. In '73,
make the Soviets feel more secure, then that should we had parity and were able to stop a Soviet threat to
lessen the probablity of nuclear war. And we still intervene to prevent a complete Israeli victory. Ob-
Pershing ill Missiles have tnc mcans to blow thcm UP" viously, if a similar crisis developes in the Middle
. But the idealists are still thinking in terms of East or some other area where the Soviets or their
J? !l n�C i r"cl US'S MAD� that P01 � turfed against the client states posses coventional superiority, the U.S.
mediate deterrent against a Soviet first strike? enemy's cities. The first ICBMs were not very ac- cannot threaten the Soviets with nuclear war They
false hope of gaining peace. He has proposed an
alternative: a relatively inexpensive anti-ballistic
missile system that would protect not our cities, but
our Minuteman missile sites. The U.S. already has
the advanced technology to make such a "point-
defense" system that will work, according to
Jastrow. Thus for a much smaller investment, we
could defend our missiles and nullify the Soviet's ex-
pensive superiority in ICBMs. And to eventually pro-
tect the American public from Soviet attack, Reagan
has proposed his "New Frontier" lasers in space
defense system. Though the liberal press calls Reagan
an idiot and an outright fool who makes promises of
false security to the American people, Jastrow says
the critics of the system are wrong. He says the
technology is available now to build a workable
system. And after we have a workable defense
against nuclear holocost in place, a combination of
laser satelites and point defense missiles, Reagan has
proposed to freely give the technology to the Soviets
and thus make nuclear war a thing of the past.
Yet, Reagan's critics in the liberal press prefer to
paint him an incompetent idiot itching for nuclear
war. The liberals, peaceniks and freezeniks would
rather put their trust in MAD and the benevolence of
the Soviet leaders than in our own president. The
media continues to ignore the facts and realities of
the times. Like Thomas Powers of The Atlantic, thev
continue to instill fear and confusion in the American
people. By writing and broadcasting half-truths and
the past our security was based upon strength. Three dis-information, they replace reason with ignorant
fim� h- i t , , and 1 with fear one need only look at recent
political cartoons on the editorial page of this paDer
or the editorials themselves to see the ignorance
purveyors at work. Why they ignore the truth inrf
mislead the American public I don't know I!��
don't know.
just
AHeaGvy
ax�wiMgfccwajufr nrtt���'w
m
Witili f I
��r -�� -
B JAY STONE
MafTVfcrlVf
'Forty-fie milhoi
eligible voters are noti
registered � " proclaim
ed a brochure from thel
Untited States Studen:f
Association. " � the ma-
jority of them are
women, minorities anci
the poor! Students
change this
And so the came fom j
all 48 states in the con-
tinental U.S Over 1,5001
strong the gatherec
masse at the Ha-
Law School in (
bridge, Massach .
usher in a ne era ol
dent activism Voterl
registration was the
which united the stu .
who participated
National Studer.
ference on
Registration, frc
10-13; yet, the ev
organizers clearly intend-
ed to advance a broader
Man
Club
New
B GORDON IPtX K
Sometimes a club
go flat, and nobod) -
a rip.
What do you do?
The r e a m i n i
members can take the
of the club's funds, buy A
half-gallon of vodka (it' j
cheap and effective),
drunk and burn ths
chaffer � pur rhe suffer-
ing organization out ol
miser!
Or. They can suck
deep breath and pu
themselves up by the t
straps. They can fii
declare: "We're v
make this thing w
We're gonna make
count for someth. j
The ECU chapta
the Societv for
ment of Manage
(S.A.M has -
chosen the latter A.
ding to its new pre-
Steve Htzhenry, the .
recentlv suffen
two years of c
apathy. It had become i
yawner of a studer
organization. Membc
ship had dwindled to
But now. newly organ
ed with fresh studer
leadership, he is op
timistic about the club-
future.
Fitzhenry explain
that the club's adv
Dr. Louis Eckstein, had
made strong efforts to
keep the club vibrant,
but yawn who cared
"A faculty advise
traditionally plays a sup
proting role said Fit-
zhenry. "And this, sadlv
enough, reduced the
society to a led
scries
Perhaps it figures thai
a club whose pnmarv
puposc is instilling strong
management and leader
ship qualities within its
members will wither
when members function
solely in a passive role
But instead of breaking
Out the bottle and holding
� wake, the remnants of
the club took sweeping
�ction. They elected of-
Type
Neel
Apply at
Carolinu





A
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16, 1984
Pdcc
i
- .
rned about the Per-
use it
e against
-c to Soviet
ises to com-
: . especiall) on
the urgenc to
ujld the B-l
pc imbalance
rei on its
. I ndent sub at
major Soviet
laim, but he
jhed missiles
ised ICBMs. They
is Soviet
value in answer-
i j linsl our strategic
rategy of
Mssiles and
i. area � thus leaving
ev � we would sure'y
.lies. To do
' the Soviet nuclear
In such a situation,
rnames: "suicide
i deterrent is of vaf'ue
h the have
have "00
f the Partv
'ike with
. safe from
a II missiles that
could easily
sile silos The
zed technology
ems enabling
23 .ards of their
the Pcrshing lls :an
tad down the air vent to
The Pershing lls
ndent missiles do
real to the Soviet elite,
: anything to pre-
?r. I anti-nuke groups,
lything! Having the Per-
having a loaded gun
And until we can
se against Soviet ICBMs.
ia be the only thing that
I not use their current
. Reagan realizes the
of offering up the
,iter by the Soviets in a
be. He has proposed an
Inexpensive anti-ballistic
protect not our cities, but
The U.S. already has
to make such a "point-
Ill work, according to
smaller investment, we
id nullify the Soviet's ex-
Is. And to eventually pro-
m Soviet attack, Reagan
rontier" lasers in space
liberal press calls Reagan
i who makes promises of
:an people. Jastrow says
ire wrong. He says the
bw to build a workable
ve a workable defense
place, a combination of
rnse missiles, Reagan has
�technology to the Soviets
a thing of the past.
he liberal press prefer to
idiot itching for nuclear
cs and freezeniks would
and the benevolence of
Jour own president. The
trie facts and realities of
ters of The Atlantic, they
Jonfusion in the American
ideasting half-truths and
ce reason with ignorance
keed only look at recent
ltorial page of this paper
� to see the ignorance
ley ignore the truth and
Ic I don't know. I just
1
tilt
Allem dy
Liberal Conference Pushes Student Activism
By JAY STONE
Stan Wrtlcf
"Forty-five million
eligible voters are not
registered � " proclaim-
ed a brochure from the
L'ntited States Student
Association, " � the ma-
jority of them are
women, minorities and
the poor! Students can
change this
And so they came form
all 48 states in the con-
tinental U.S. Over 1,500
strong they gathered en
masse at the Harvard
Law School in Cam-
bridge, Massachusetts to
usher in a new era of stu-
dent activism. Voter
registration was the issue
which united the students
who participated in the
National Student Con-
ference on Voter
Registration, from Feb.
10-13; yet, the event's
organizers clearly intend-
ed to advance a broader
political agenda.
Perhaps citizen-activist
Ralph Nader best sum-
marized the goals of the
conference when he said:
"This conference could
be a watershed for
building the kind of stu-
dent movement that will
reach out into the com-
munity and build the kind
of political organizations
necessary for transform-
ing our world into a
global community
It came as no real sur-
prise to those in atten-
dance, then, that the
workshops which filled
much of the conference's
intinerary dealt with
topics not directly related
to voter registration.
Workshops were con-
ducted dealing with
everything from organiz-
ing PIRGs and develop-
ing student lobbying,
skills to finding jobs in!
the public interest and
cultivating media ac-
cumen. Public interest
groups from across the
nation were, in fact,
responsible for organiz-
ing the event.
The students who at-
tended the conference
were representative of a
broad spectrum of
ideological diversity.
There were conservative
Republicans as well as
liberal Democrats and
leftist Democratic
Socialists. The over-
whelming majority of
those in attendance,
however, were decidedly
left-liberal. Moreover,
the keynote speakers for
the affair were reflective
of this political complex-
ion. Among those who
addressed the conference
were former congress-
woman Bella Abzug,
Managers
Club Sets
New Plan
B GORDON IPOCK
Sometimes a club can
go flat, and nobody gives
a rip.
What do you do?
The reamining
members can take the last
of the club's funds, buy a
half-gallon e f vodka (it's
cheap and effective), gel
drunk and burn the
charter � put the suffer-
ing organization out of its
misery!
Or. They can suck in a
deep breath and pull
themselves up by the boot
a raps. They can firmly
declare: "We're gonna
make this thing work.
We're gonna make it
count for something
The ECU chapter of
the Society for Advance-
ment of Management
(SAM.) has boldly
chosen the latter. Accor-
ding to its new president
Steve Fitzhenry, the club
recently suffered through
two years of crippling
apathy. It had become a
yawner of a student
organization. Member-
ship had dwindled to nill.
But now, newly organiz-
ed with fresh student
leadership, he is op-
timistic about the club's
future.
Fitzhenry explained
that the club's advisor,
Dr. Louis Eckstein, had
made strong efforts to
keep the club vibrant,
but yawn who cared.
"A faculty advisor
traditionally plays a sup-
proting role said Fit-
zhenry. "And this, sadly
enough, reduced the
society to a lecture
series
Perhaps it figures that
a club whose primary
pupose is instilling strong
management and leader-
ship qualities within its
members will wither
when members function
solely in a passive role.
Jut instead of breaking
)ut the bottle and holding
wake, the remnants of
the club took sweeping
iction. They elected of-
Typesetters
Needed
Apply at The East
Carolinian office
nuclear freeze advocate
Randall Forsberg, former
director of the Congres-
sional Black Caucus
Francesca Farmer and
presidential candidate
Jesse Jackson. All of the
speakers, with the excep-
tion of Barbara Anderson
who is the director of
Citizens for Limited Tax-
ation and a conservative,
fervently condemned the
Reagan administration.
The charges they leveled
against the president in-
cluded: severly undermin-
ing the cause of civil
rights, slashing social
programs which assist the
poor while reshaping the
economy to benifit the
wealthy, increasing the
military budget to levels
of redundant excess,
Dracticing unwarrented
adventurism abroad and
dismantling environmen-
tal protection regula-
tions.
Presidential candidate
Jesse Jackson echoed
many of these criticisms
in his speech before the
conference.
"There is a rising
misery index, a rising
danger index under this
administration Jackson
said. He added, "Half-a-
billion people starving in
the world and we are
bragging about our abili-
ty to kill each other. It's
uncivilized. We must do
more than survive we
must live. The issue is not
whether or not we can
survive. Rats, rodents, in-
sects survive. We are
higher animals
Jackson went on to
charge students with the
task of "making things as
they ought to be and not
embellishing things as
they are
And so it was that ac-
tivists and organizers
from all over the country
left the conference with a
renewed commitment to
activism and enhanced
organizational skills for
accomplishing their
political objectives.
Their immediate goal
would be to register many
of the nation's 16 million
18-24-year-old voters,
particularly those who
are enrolled in colleges
and universities. A secon-
dary goal would be to
reach out into the com-
muntiy and help register
minorities and the poor.
Many who left the con-
ference also left commit-
ted to work on behalf on
of a half-dozen issue-
oriented organizations
like Nuclear Freeze Voter
'84 which made appeals
for support at the con-
ference. Others left intent
on organizing PIRGs on
their campuses and
building effective student
lobbies within their
states.
Overall, those who at-
tended the National Con-
ference on Student Voter
Registration seemed to
agree on the need to build
a strong and effective stu-
dent movement to deal
with the political issues
which confront students
as citizens. The spirit of
the weekend seemed to be
captured by Ralph Nader
when he said: "No one
will be able to accuse you
of not grappling with the
greatest problems to ever
confront humankind
That will be your civic
platform because that is
the age in which you were
born
ficers earlier this month
and lifted the burden of
management from Ecks-
tein. That makes sense. If
potential professional
managers can't manage
their own club, there's no
hope for them.
Fitzhenry says the club
should appeal to anyone
planning a career in
management or business.
He added that because
sound management
techniques are important
in all professions, the
club has something to of-
fer a wide spectrum of
students whether they're
headed into medicine,
law, or technical fields.
"It's not just a club for
business majors he
said.
According to Fit-
zhenry, ECU and Elon
are the only two schools
in North Carolina that
have a S.A.M. organiza-
tion. However, over 350
other campuses across the
nation have active clubs.
There is also a senior divi-
sion of S.A.M.s for pro-
fessional managers.
Fitzhenry says the club
plans a media blitz to at-
tract new members. (Ob-
viously, they've achieved
some success with this
paper.) It will include an-
nouncements on WZMB,
a poster campaign and
informal presentations in
business classes. A beach
trip and a pizza party are
in the works, and a car
wash is plannded to raise
funds. A major member-
ship drive is slated for
Feb. 23 in Rawl 130 at 3
p.m. "We want to appeal
especially to
underclassmen says
Fitzhenry.
A question is asked in
S.A.Ms literature:
What is the key ingre-
dient in the success of any
S.A.M. chapter?
Answer: The involve-
ment of its members.
Apparently, E.C.Us
S.A.M. members have
finally discovered the
wisdom of their advice.
421 Greenville Blvd.
Phone 756-0825
2Forl
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ECU
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SMALL SPAGHETTI PEPPI
JUST $1.99
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1HI hASI CAROI INIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 16. 1984
Page 8
Busb
Howard Tops Pirates
Tenacious D Poor Shooting Result In Loss
B KI) MC'KI AS
ECl guard Curt Vanderhorst
connected on a 20-foot jumper
uith three seconds left in the first
halt to give the Pirates a 31-29 in-
termission lead over Howard
University But once again, the
Pirates came out for second half
play, with jerseys that should have
read "Joe's Bar and Grill and
went scoreless in the first six
minutes in route to a 71-57 loss to
the Bison at Minges Coliseum
;da night.
The Plates played well in the
opening half, shooting 60 percent
and turning the ball over only
seven times. The Bison played
g; defense in the second half,
. ve er, and ECU responded by
turning the ball over 14 times.
In the first half, ECU opened
up an eight point lead with 11
minutes elapsed, 22-14, when
ird Tony Robinson hit a layup
ter a nice feed bv Vanderhorst
on the fast break.
But the Bison outscored the
Pirates 11-3 over the next four
minutes to tie the score, and then
took a 29-27 lead on Robert Mcll-
waine's two free throws with 1:25
left in the half.
A goaltending call on a shot by-
Robinson and Vanderhorst's last
second bomb enabled the Pirates
to regain the lead at intermission.
For the first six minutes of the
second half, Howard totally
dominated ECU, scoring the first
10 points to obtain a 39-31 lead.
The Pirates cut the lead to four
with two straight baskets, 39-35,
and eight, 55-47, mainly on steals
resulting from full-court pressure,
but because of pour shooting
ECU could never get closer.
In the second half, ECU shot
only 26 percent as opposed to
Howard's 68 percent. Many of the
Bison's points came on "back
door" layups.
Howard was led bv forward
Kevin Scott's 15 points. Forward
David Wynn added 14 points and
seven rebounds and Mcllwaine
and Fred Hill each had 10 points
for the Bison.
Vanderhorst, who scored 29
points Saturday night against
William and Mary, led the Pirates
with 13.
William Grady had 12 points
and Robinson 10 to round out
ECU's double-digit scoring.
Howard University (71)
Wynn 7 0-0 14, Scott 6 3-5 15,
Mcllwaine 5 0-1 10, Hamilton 2
0-3 4, Jones 3 0-0 6, Hill 4 2-2 10,
Ringer 0 3-7 3, Caracciolo, 1 7-10
9.
Fast Carolina (57)
Sledge 3 0-0 6. Battle 3 0-0 6,
Bass 0 0-0 0, Vanderhorst 6 1-5
13. Robinson 4 2-3 10, Gilchrist 0
2-2 2, Turnbill 0 2-4 2, Gradv 5
2-3 12, Smith 2 2-3 6, Harris 0 0-0
0.
MASK IKIED - fCU ���te L�6
It Ain't No Fun To Lose
Forward Roy Smith, center Leon Bass and forward Derrick Battle look on near the end of Tuesday night
game.
Loss Leaves Coach Concerned About Team
B FD MC'KI AS
�� F4lto
of his team blowing
leads is continuing to
tl' coach C harlie Har-
ned about how our
- off from a lead he
: Tuesday's loss to
"We're doing things I
e'rc not capable o

iday's loss, the Pirates
SO percent in the first half to
take a 31-29 lead, but fell to 26
percent in the second half. In ad-
dition, the team turned the ball
oer 14 times after intermission
Commentary
The loss uas an example of a
reoccuring theme that has plagued
ECU this season. The Pirates at
one time or another hae led a:
crucial points in most of their
losses but have acquiesced victor)
to the opponent. Minus the
"lapses" and the Pirates could
perhaps be around the .500 mark.
The "lapses" usually occur
when the other team applies
pressure either in the form of a
full-court press or a zone trap on
defense. In turn, the Pirates are
forced to pla under pressure, and
the hae not responded suc-
cessfull.
The root of the problem seems
to be inexperience. However,
senior starter Tony Robinson, a
leader out on the court, has also
been shaky at times.
"When somebody comes out
aggressively, it's like there's a
bomb in the ball and its going to
explode Harrison said.
"They're turning it over on traps.
It's nothing that we didn't know
about them.
"People are open; they have
got to hit the open man. People
have to come to the bail. We shy
away from pressure. They take
fadeaway shots and we work all
practice on power shots.
"Maybe I've tried to make
them a good basketball team
before they're fundamental �
capable of doing it
Although the team is struggling
at the present time. Harrison
doesn't see the momentarv pro-
blem as being permanent "I was
hoping thev would be accustomed
to it. but they're not. We're get-
ting beat up to death inside
However, he says, "I d
ever in East Carolina thai a gr.
of players have beer, assimulated
with this much talent
According to Harrison, the .
of the team is improvement
improvement means being rr.
consistent. "Against William a
Mary, I thought we were ag
gressive in the first halt he a.c
"You can't do it for 15 or 20
minutes. It is a 40 minute
baiigame
Pirates Host Classic
GABY PATTERSON � ECU Photo Lab
ECU center Darlene Hedges will have to turn in one of her best defensive efforts if the Pirates plan on
beating Marshall in the first round of the Converse Lady Pirate Basketball Classic Tomorrow night. Mar-
shall is led by Karen Pelphary, who is the 14th leading scorer in the nation, averaging 24.3 points per game.
By RANDY MEWS
ViataUat Soorti idtun
The ECU women's basketball
team will host the third annual
Converse Lady Pirate Basketball
Classic this Friday and Saturday
in Minges Coliseum.
The field of teams is headed by
nationally ranked and 1982
NCAA finalist Cheyney State,
while other teams participating in-
clude Fairfield and Marshall
Universities.
The tournament is only one of
four sponsored by Converse
throughout the country, and ECU
head coach Cathy Andruzzi is ex-
pecting her team to have a tough
time of it against "three very fine
teams with solid line-ups
The Pirates will play in the
opening game at 6:00 p.m. against
Marshall, while Cheyney State
and Fairfield square off at 8:00
p.m.
Marshall is led by sophomore
Karen Pelphary and currently
stands at 14-7 on the vear.
Pelphary is the 14th leading scorer
in the country, averaging an
amazing 24.3 points per game
while also pulling down seven re-
bounds per contest.
The festivities begin at 1:00
p.m. on Friday, when all the
athletes will be welcomed to ECU
at a luncheon buffet in the
Ramada Inn.
ECU's assistant to the
chancellor. Dr. Marion Rose, will
serve as guest at the event which is
being sponsored by H.L. Hodges.
ECU has done well in past tour-
naments, making it to the finals
both years. In 1982. the Pirates
demolished Western Kentuckv
108-54, with Sam Jones, Mary
Denkler and Loletha Harrison
making the all-tournament team.
Last year, ECU lost to return-
ing champion Cheyney State,
80-61, as Denkler was the only
Pirate named all-tourney.
Converse, the tournament's
sponsor, will provide sportswear
for the athletes, and is also trying
to negotiate with cable officials to
have the last two games televised
The winners on Friday will meet
in the finals at 8:00 p.m. Saturday
night, while the consolation game
begins at 6:00 p.m.
Tournament Schedule
Friday
6:00 p.m. East Carolina vs. Mar-
shall
8:00 p.m. Cheyney State vs. Fair-
field
Saturday
6:00 p.m. East Carolina-Marshall
loser vs. Cheyney State-Fairfield
loser
8:00 p.m. East Carolina-Marshall
winner vs. Cheyney State-
Farifield winner
Spring Sports
Golf, Tennis Seasons To Spring Up Soon
Helmick: 'The Best Seven Players That We've Had'
Sherman: 'Tremendous Improvement In Play
By GENE WILLIAMS
Sort. Writer
'The chemistry and maturity of
this team is the best I've ever
,een says ECU Associate Direc-
tor of Athletics and former golf
coach Bob Helmick of this year's
golf team, which will get its 1984
season under way this weekend at
Hilton Head Island, S.C.
The team of Mark Arcilesi,
Mike Bradley, Chris Czaja, Mike
Helms, Roger Newsom, Paul
Steelman, Kelly Stimart, Don
Seeting and David Waggoner will
be under the direction of coach
Jerry Lee. Lee took over the
coaching responsibilities last year
to give Helmick more time to
fulfill operational duties.
This year's team will boast
seven players who are capable of
shooting under par. "This is pro-
bably the best seven players that
we've had says Helmick.
"We've been weak in the past at
the fifth slot and down, but this
year we have the depth that is
needed
Indeed, great things are ex-
pected out of this year's linksters.
While showing talent and per-
sonal accomplishments, the team
is still young. There are only two
seniors on the team to go along
with one junior, three
sophomores and three freshman.
One of the freshman is Arcilesi,
a transfer from perennial
powerhouse Florida State. Ar-
cilesi is eligible to play this spring
and is expected to contribute
much to the success of the Pirates.
Also sharing responsibility will
be Bradley, Czaja, Helms,
Newsom, Stimart and Sweeting.
Freshmen Steelman and Wag-
goner, a sophomore, are expected
to contribute this season as well as
in the future as they gain more ex-
perience.
"Personalities and maturity
levels blend so much better this
year than in the past says
Helmick. "They help each other
with their game and in
academics
"If there was an academic All-
America golf team, ECU would
have seven players on it The
grade point averages of seven of
the players range from 3.0 to 4.0.
According to Helmick, the up-
coming weekend will be more of a
pre-season tournament to see how
the players react to NCAA com-
petition and the pressure that is
always present.
There will be 18 teams playing
this weekend and among them will
be traditional powerhouses UNC-
CH, Clemson and Vanderbilt.
The Pirates are expected to finish
in the top five, according to
Helmick.
"It took us five or six years to
get seven people on the team that
could play under par golf says
the former coach. And now that
the Pirates have them, the
possibility at an NCAA bid is
within their grasp.
OAKY P ATTMiOK - 1CU MWH LMb
The golfers will be in Hilton
Head this weekend.
By MEG MOREADITH
Sporu Wriirr
The 1984 ECU Men's and
Women's Tennis Teams and
Coach Pat Sherman are prepared
for a challenging schedule this
year, having to face such teams as
Old Dominion, N.C. State and
George Washington.
Leading the men's team are
Paul Owen, a senior from Lyn-
chburg, Virginia, David Creech, a
sophomore from New Bern, N.C.
and Galen Treble, a junior from
Jacksonville, N.C.
All are returning players from
the 1983 season. The team ij
working hard on improving all
aspects of its game, and Sherman,
pleased with the fall performance,
expects an equally outstanding
team for the spring.
George Washington, Old
Dominion University, N.C. State,
Atlantic Christian College and
Virginia Commonwealth will be
the toughest opponents for the
men. However, the "total
schedule is composed of very
strong teams says Sherman.
The only returning player and
leader of the women's team is
Janet Russell, a junior from
Virginia Beach, Va. According to
Sherman, the women's team "is
lacking in numbers, but the
players are very dedicated and are
working extremely hard on their
game She also feels there will be
some adjustments for the young
team in moving from high school
tennis to division I-A tennis.
William and Mary will be the
most difficult opponent for the
women. However, savs
Sherman, "Every team on the
1984 spring schedule for the
women will be a great challenge
Sherman is pleased with the at-
titudes of the present players and
the "tremendous imporvement in
play and match performances
shown during the fall
The goal of the men's and
women's teams and each in-
dividual player, according to
Sherman, is to "play the best
possible tennis that they are
capable of and to continue "to im
prove their game during practice
and match play cc
The men's team, consisting of
11 Players, has its first match
March 1 against Mt. Olive at
ECU. The women's team of ciaht
Players, seven of whom K
freshmen, has its first two mat
ches Feb. 27 at N.C. State 7�h
March ,at Atlantic Oug&g
In In
VICKIE BROWNE
El iatrtaami
Several tea
posting flav. �
as basket ball compel
enters mid-season. Ii
men's independe
sion, Streak Of 1
ing. Eaforcers
are impress .
while Bosboys
and Suns all
men's reside:
pet
favorite; Pi
pa Tail, kappa ipn
and Pi kappa Phi
In worr:
dent compel h(
breakers and Thi
look vei
Boa
The �
Board wi
membe-
in Mer.c
Center
The p
club is to promc
terest in EC!
and a
terested
spor agec
tend.
y
Ti
M
1. ENFORCE
2. STREAK (
I
3. CLIQUE
4. UNKNOW
5. BUSBOYS
Co-sp
I
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EVERY
5 PM �
INCUDES:
A variety of Fill
including Lousij
Style Fish Fillet;
Puppies. French
jt choice of Hot!
and our own Fj
SPECIAL KJ1

i

V. H
�. - �

r- .






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 16, 1984
MIIE9 e.
pi�o�o jJb
of fuesdai night
earn
:
SS1C

- i . .
.
f.
rnament vhedule
hall
� eld
i-lai
on
are
� ' I ' their
here will be
for the youi g
' ;gh sch
� - tcnn
Mary will be

H o w e v ei
'earn on
' edule t
' � � �- . �
e prese: i -r and
. A
nrl
.
lmpor-vemenr in
match performances
i fall '�
al of the men's and
:eams and each in-
Mlaer. according to
is to "play the best
ennis that the are
It and to continue to mv
lir game during practice
pla '
n i team, consisting of
�, has us first match
against Mt. Oiie at
women team of eight
levea of whom are
has its first two mal.
. at N.C. State and
ii Atlantic Christian Col-
Busboys, Clique, 'Lightning Dealing
In Intramural Basketball Action
Classifieds
SALE
VICKIE BROWN ELL
FO Utruarafc
Several teams are
posting flawless records
a, basketball competition
enters mid-season. In the
men's independent divi-
sion. Streak Of Lightn-
ing, Enforcers and Clique
are impressing the polls
hile Busboys, Sk force
and Suns all shine out in
men's resident hall com-
petition. Fraternity
favorites include Pi Kap-
pa Tau, Kappa Alpha Psi
and Pi Kappa Phi.
In women's indepen-
dent competition. Heart-
breakers and Thriller
look very impressive to
the poll picks while
Lmstead Jockettes, Jones
and White Ringers are
favorites in the women's
residence hall division.
Alpha Phi and Alpha
Delta Pi are the teams to
beat in the sorority divi-
sion. Catch all this boun-
cing action in Memorial
gym or Minges Col-
lesium.
Strong Arms Still Strug-
gling
As competition con-
tinues in the In-
tramural Budweiser Arm
Wrestling Tournament
several individuals re-
Some of the favorites in-
clude Tom Allen, Chad
Fields, Reggie
McDonald, Steve Taylor,
be held at halftime of the
Lady Pirate Basketball
game on February 21.
Catch all this action and
ECU Intramurals
Steve Elgin,
Mike Parnell
Rob Rice,
and Chris
main in a quest to deter- Kelly.
mine a strong champ. Final action is slated to
Board
Meet
watch the muscles bulge
in the lobby of Memorial
Gym.
Weight Lifting, Wrestling
Set For Action
Registration will begin
on Monday, February 20
for the Intramural
Weight lifting meet. This
event will be held at Job-
bies gym in the
downtown mall. Entry
blanks may be obtained
in Memorial Gym room
204 or at Jobbies. Action
is set to begin Feb. 22.
Registration will also
begin on Monday,
February 20 for the In-
tramuralDomino's Piz-
za Wrestling Tourna-
ment. Domino's will be
providing the winning
t-shirts.
So whatever your
pleasure, Weight Lifting
or Wrestling, catch the
sign-up next week in
Memorial gym.
) PIECES of Df Fumlfur; couch,
lovotoat, coHoo a 1 and tablos Ei
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ONKYO rocoivor 40 watts par Chan
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1973 VEGA, 900d condition
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and moral For Into call Mika at
7S� Tti or Buddy at 75a ���
PROFESSIONAL TYPING SER
VICE: All typing naadi
7M-MM7M �41
FREE � a mo old cat Littar tralnod
and playful Call 7Ja 7ag
PERSONAL
CIS 7S7�1
FOUND Man's pair of glasses
Brown with plastic rims Con
tact cas mud, glasses casa
Found on cornar of $tfi �r�c
Mapla St call attar J ��
7Sa-a7sr
LOST Rosowood High School
class ring p:M� C,M Thomas
Hill 7saU If
rebuilt
ona owner, call
S� OTH aftar i M pm.
MISC.
WHEN A FRIEND has stareo system
problem remind tnem that tha audio
technicians at tha TECH SHOP don't
charge for repair estimates Call us
at 737-lt� Tha TECH SHOP.
TIME IS RUNNINO Out fasti If you
are interested in some SERIOUS
PARTY I NO this Spring Break with
no hassles, chock this outi Round trip
trans, to Daytona Baach with Kegs. 7
nights accom. oceanfront at tha
Kings inn FREE Kag Parties,
ALIBOB Happy list B Day legal at
last get psyched for th party at
Don's, hall yall Love S and S
lostand"
FOUND
WANTED
LOST ECU class ring, gold
Blue Zircon. BSBA. 1�e4. initials
FGBIII inside, reward call
752 444J.
REWARD Lost White silky
scarf with white fringe � sen
timental value. Lost near Austin
Bldg Call Lynne Siddan
PART TIME Telephone worn � t om
Call Southern Credit Adiustor �t
757 111)
WANTED. Full Blooded Germar,
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Contact Kathy Harrell MSC Room
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The Student Athletic
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membership drive Feb. 20
in Mendenhall Student
Center.
The purpose of the
dub is to promote in-
terest in ECU athletics,
and any student in-
terested in any kind of
sport is encouraged to at-
tend.
Club President and
former Lady Pirate
basketball player Lor-
raine Foster will preside
over the meeting. Foster
said she wants to make
the student body more
aware of Pirate athletics,
and stressed that
membership is open for
everyone, not only
athletes.
Foster said club
members represent
athletes on the student
level, and get the oppor-
tunity to work closely
with all the Pirate athletic
teams.
Anyone intersted in at-
tending the meeting
should call Pam Holt at
757-6417 for more
details.
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 16, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 16, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.321
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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