The East Carolinian, February 7, 1984







tttoe
(Earnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.j4f)
Tuesday, February 7, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages
Fighting Escalates;
Death Toll Hits 168
BE1RI 1 . ! ebanon (UPI) Thousands of Moslem
rebels si d nto the heart of the capital Monday,
seizing ons of west Beirut and over-
running postions adjacent to the U.S. Marine
o I S s retaliated with ship and aircraft
fire
r was confirmed wounded, one French
he international peace-keeping force was
Italian troops were wounded in the
g in the capital since the 1975-76
ewed fighting came less than a day
on of Prime Minister Chefik Waz-
M � v and his Cabinet.
( asualties were believed to be in the hundreds but
was impossible because rescue
reach many victims.
B people have been killed and 661
e das of fierce fighting in Beirut.
- an for shelters, clearing the
tutes of the arrival of gunmen, who
.is they raced through the streets in
port was closed indefinitely.
nued to explode every few seconds
ight and streets were deserted in the

f the country tonight0" one
� as eporter. "Is Amal (the Shute
I- Gemayel still president0 Is he in
limed that by mid-afternoon
tiamen had complete control of the west,
peared be holding some positions
gns of defections.
I Reagan, declaring during a visit to Dix
s - ipport tor Gemayel was "firm
blamed Syria for the new out-
u d called on the government "to
aid the American base at
surrounded b hostile forces and
position had been seized
� battles that left much of west
ntrol.
pokesman said gunmen shooting
. Marine positions and that small
. at their base from a posi-
Lebanese army.
Circulation 10,000
Surprise Snowstorm
Causes Numerous
Accidents, Closings
ECU had Its first, aad unexpected, snow of the year Monday
NEIL JOHNSON ICU P�Ml� U6
(UPI) � Forecasters predicted
North Carolina weather and
travel conditions would begin im-
proving today after a surprise
winter storm put much of the state
on skids with up to seven inches of
snow.
The National Weather Service
left a travelers' advisory in effect
Monday night for all but
southeast North Carolina because
of icy roads caused by melting
snow and plummeting
temperatures. But the weather ser-
vice said high pressure moving in-
to the state would bring fair skies.
A warming trend was expected to
begin Wednesday.
The prospect of future warmth
was little comfort to drivers who
ventured out into the snow Mon-
day morning. Authorities said
they lost track of accidents caused
by slippery conditions � which
also postponed a major trial in
Raleigh and crushed one man's
hopes of a seat on the state Court
of Appeals.
Forecasters had predicted only
a light dusting for most areas but
by early afternoon, snow ac-
cumulations of four to six inches
had been reported from Charlotte
north to Greensboro to the
Raleigh-Durham area. In the
Asheville area, strong winds had
created drifts.
The heavy snowfall forced of-
ficials to close schools over much
of the state because buses couldn't
travel on slushy and icy roads.
The State Highway Patrol advised
motorists to use snow tires or
chains. Patrol officials said the
weather had caused so many ac-
cidents that patrol dispatchers had
trouble answering them all.
"We've had so many thev
haven't had time to put them into
the computers 1st Sgt. Tony
Spainhour said. "Our troopers
are just finding them out on
patrol
"I've never heard of so many
accidents in my life said Capt
C.A. Clark, commander of Patrol
Troop C.
The accidents forced the
postponement of the murder and
kidnapping trial of Evangelista
Navas Villabona, the Colombian
charged in a 1982 hostage seige on
an Amtrak train. Deputies travel-
ing to Durham to transport one of
Navas' attorneys to court became
stranded in traffic.
The poor driving conditions
also crushed the hopes attornev
Steve Dolley of Gastonia had for
winning a seat on the state Court
' ppeals. Forced to take a plane
to Raleigh after his car became m-
volved in an accident near
Charlotte, Dolley arrived at the
state Board of Elections office
about 10 minutes after the noon
filing deadline.
Transportation Department of-
ficials said about 5,000 state
employee- spread salt on
treacherous highways and sand on
bridges
SGA Alters By-Laws,
Approves Conferences
Bv ( 1 S MM CHAN
Mif Urn
� by-laws was
SGA last night.
elected or ap-
ffice can now be bar-
king office again if
three SGA meetings .
ommittee meetings.
�r business, the SGA ap-
� : a commendations
dining ser-
cms compiled
Student Welfare
ides: early clos-
ings ; i n g s, over-
� -election of
the amount of SI,394
were appi J for three SGA
members to attend two separate
conferences. The first trip ($140)
wil ielegates to the National
Student Voter Registration Con-
ference held at Harvard Universi-
ty this weekend.
The second trip (Si.254) is to
another national conference held
at Texas A & M University Feb.
24-29. That meeting will focus on
student life, problems, concerns
and will also serve as an informa-
tion clearinghouse for all
delegates.
Other funding appropriations
passed went to: ECU Sign
Language Club, $561; and SGA
Executive Council salaries,
$1,850.
There are still several vacancies
within the legislature and in-
terested students are urged to con-
tact the SGA office for an ap-
plication. Numerous day student
and dorm reps (Fleming and
Scott) are needed. The application
deadline is next Mondav.
Athletic Success Attracts Students
ECU, State Applicants Increase
Naso
Seeley
B DARRYI BROWN
Managing EdstOf
ECU and N.C. State University
have seen a substantial increase in
applicants for admission this year,
and administrators attribute the
rise to the national recognition of
their athletic teams.
A spokeswoman for the institu-
tional research office at NCSU
said "there does seem to be some
increase" in applications since the
university's basketball team won
the NCAA championship in 1983.
Applications are up at NCSU
almost 700 over last year, from
6,478 in 1983 to 7,165 in 1984, an
increase of 10.6 percent, the
spokeswoman said. In the two
previous years the number of ap-
plications increased only slightly,
by about 65 applicants each year.
The national basketball cham-
pionship is "what we attribute it
to the spokeswoman said.
ECU Director ot Admissions
Chuck Seeley said applications to
the university were up from 4,300
in 1983 to 5,300 this year, an in-
crease of 23.2 percent, and he at-
tributed to increase to the success
of the school's football team.
"We've gotten a lot of good
publicity from there Seeley said
of the athletic department.
"We're running well ahead in ap-
plications right now he said.
The ECU football team was rank-
ed in the top 20 last year by the
Associated Press and Sports Il-
lustrated magazine.
He also cited national publictv
from the ECU's participation in
the excavation of the Civil War
ironclad ship Monitor off the
North Carolina coast.
Officials at the University of
North Carolina at Chapel Hill
said they saw a similar rise in ap-
plicants after the Tarheel basket-
Student Broadcasting Station
Reorganizing To Refine, Improve
Bv riNA MAROSCHAK
The news department at ECU'S
student radio station, WZMB, is
rebuilding and reorganizing in
order to improve it's reporting
tactics. "Contrarv to a lot of
On The Inside
Announcements 2
Editor ah4
Entertainment6
Sport8
Classifieds 10
� In this week's Mick
LaSaile column, Mick gives
rules on buying Valentine
Cards. See page 6 for the
whole story.
� For ratings on nine movies
being shown in Greenville, see
MOVIE, page 7.
� The sports section is runn-
ing a special baseball preview
See EC PITCHING, page
for part one.
8
popular belief, WZMB's news
department is not dead said
News Director Mike Butzgy.
A number of additions have oc-
curred or will occur in the depart-
ment, Butzgy said. First of all, the
station is adding a staff of writers
and reporters, along with the
newscasters. "We've been trying
to get out and do a lot more local
and campus coverage Butzgy
said. WZMB now has about seven
reporters and 20 newscasters.
Butzgy stressed that the station
is trying to become more visible
around campus. "We're trying to
get our views out to the East
Carolina student body and show
them that we are a good news
department Butzgy said.
WZMB taped the forum on
Gubernatorial Day and interview-
ed several of the candidates. The
tape will be divided into segments
and aired sometime in May. The
station also covered Gov. James
Hunt's fundraiser last Saturday
night.
Rather than relying solely on
UPI reports for spectacular
quotes and information, the news
department plans to talk to the
"experts" on campus. "This is
the sort of thing we should be do-
ing Butzgy said. "We've got a
lot of campus stuff going on
WZMB will soon have a
reporter that will cover the SGA
meetings, Butzgy said. He added
that the station hopes to interview-
several of the Democratic
presidential candidates, guber-
natorial candidates and con-
gressmen.
An old show that dealt with
campus events, "One Moment
Please" will re-air this semester.
"We're basically going to refine
that to the point where we're go-
ing to cover an issue on one show
(one week), then have student opi-
nions the following week, " But-
zgy said.
"I really have always felt that
there was so much more potential
in our news department than what
we were doing Butzgy said. He
added that he feels WZMB has
made a break-through and is
heading in the right direction.
"This is one arm of the broad-
casting department. In a way, it's
not officially, but students can
come in here and learn how to be
good broadcasters, diskjockies,
newscasters, etcetera Butzgy
said. "I think we should fulfill
our purpose as best as we can
N1U JOMNSOM BCU Mwt L��
Unbelievable! The crowd goes wild as Sledge makes a 15-foot jump-
shot. The basket gave the Pirates a 70-68 victory.
ball team won the 1982 NCAA
championship. A spokesman for
the admissions office said applica-
tions for enrollment were down
again this year for entrance in
August of 1984, but he said the
decline may be caused by a longer
application procedure requiring a
written essay.
UNC-Chapel Hill had an in-
crease in applications from 11,800
in 1982 to 12.300 in 1983, but the
official said the number was
"down several hundred" for
1984.
Officials at all three universities
said they hoped other programs in
the school were attracting
students as well.
"We'd like to think (the in-
crease in applications) is the result
of more than just one basketball
game the UNC-Chapel Hill of-
ficial said.
Minges Rocks
To Sledge's
Game Winner
B KD NICKLAS
sort� t Allot
Keith Sledge was so happy he
ran the length of the court, yelling
and arms waving frantically.
Tony Robinson, Curt
Vanderhorst and William Grady
were so happy they grabbed
Sledge and wouldn't let go.
Charlie Harrison was so happy he
jumped three feet. The Pirates
were just plain happy.
And they had a good reason to
be, as Sledge had just swished a
15-foot jumpshot from the foul
circle with two seconds left in the
game to give underdog ECU a
70-68 victory over George Mason
Saturday night at Minges Col-
iseum.
"I think that we made the big
play for the first time this year
ECU's coach Harrison said.
"If they were going to quit,
they would have done so a long
time ago. " he added. "They're
still learning but they're getting
better. You could see at noon
when we practiced we were
ready
It was David pitted against
Goliath at Minges Saturday night,
See RESERVE, Page 10
f

i






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7. 1984
?
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
since 1925
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
year anj every Wednesday dur
mg the summer
The East Carolinian is the ot
ticiai newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned
operated and published for and
by the students of East Carolina
University
Subscription Rate MS yearly
Th� East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of ECU,
CreenvHie NX
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian,
Old South Building. ECU Green
ville, NC 27834
Telephone 757 4W, M7. Ufr
ANNOUNCEMENTS
Due to limited space. The East
Carolinian requests that
organizations submit only Im
portanf announcements about
up coming events that students
need to know about in advance
Please submit such messages as
thank you" and "congratula
tlon" notes to the Personals sec
fion of the classifieds in The
East Carolinian.
The deadline for an-
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
p m. Wednesday for the Thurs
day paper
They must be typed on an an
nouncement form to be ac
cepted These forms can be pick
ed up at our office
WEIGHT LIFTING
Registration will be held Monday
Feb 70 and Feb 21 for the in
tramurai Weight Lifting Meet This
event win be held at jobbies Gym
Entry blanks are available m 204
Memorial Gym or : Xbies Gym
LIFESAVING CLASS
The Red Cross will offer an advanc
ed iifesaving class beginning
January 26 The class will meet
Tuesdays and Thursdays from 7 00
p m 8 30 p m in Memorial Pool. Call
T57 O270 or visit the local Red Cross
office to register or for further infor
mation
SWEATERS
Chi Omega tS sponsoring Tandie
Temple s Sweaters at the Chi Omega
Mouse Fec 7th from 9 00 a m to 6 00
pm Commission will go to UNICEF
NURSING MAJORS
All Nursing maiors please refer to
Official Announcement No AA 3
posted on official bullet'ng boards for
information about pre registration
�nd " intent to Enroll" forms
ISA
a valentine 5 day party on Sat Feb
li at 8 00 p m at the international
MOiise 30 East �th St See va there'
BUC BABES
"here wiil be a meeting at 9 15
tonight at Scales Field Mouse We will
elect ne officers please come
SOCIAL WORK
The Division of Social Work will
hold a group meeting for maiors and
intended majors in Social Work &
Correctional Services on Monday.
February 20. 1984 at 7.00 pm in the
Auditorium of the Carol Beik
Building (Allied Health).
AMBASSADORS
Don't forget our general meeting.
Wednesday February 8 at 5 00 p m
m the MenoenhaM Multipurpose
Room We have many an
nouncements and we will also be
discussing the by laws Please plan to
attend
ELECTIONS
All persons interested in applying
for elections chairperson may do so in
228 Mendenhall Student Center from 8
am through 5 pm , Monday through
Friday
PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers and Little Sisters of
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity would like to
invite everyone to our happy hour
tonigt at Papa Kati There are
reduced prices and everyone is
welcomed
Founders Day' is this weekend
MEN'S RUGBY
Practice begins ths week
iTues Thurs 1 from 3:30 to 5 30
behind the Allied Health building All
interested persons are urged to at
tend
KAPPA SIGMA
Brothers it's that time of year
again. The annual Valentine's Day
Cocktail is this Friday. Feb 10 Lets
oo tor it!
CSCI
Hello CSCI majors and minors. A
great part time job is avalble for so
meone who has had previous work ex
perlence In COBOL programming
Make appointment now In Rawl 313
for interview with Caop coordinator
about ot
KNOX"84
There will be a meeting for all
students who wish to support the can
didacy of Eddie fcnox for governor, in
Rm 248 Mendenhall Student Center
Feb 9 at 630 p.m. All who are In
terested are welcome to attend. If you
are interested but are unable to at
tend, please call Chris at 355-6610.
GYMNASTICS
The IRS department is sponsoring
a supervised period for recreational
free use of the gymnastics room on
Tuesday and Thursday nights from
7 40 pm 9:00 pm The area will be
available for use of the mats as well
as supervision and direction on some
apparatus An ECU ID is required for
admission
GENERAL COLLEGE
PREREGISTRATION
General College students should
contact their advisers prior to
February 20, 1984 to schedule an ap
pointment for prereglstratlon for the
summer and fall terms.
BLOOD DRIVE
The Bloodmoblle is back Here's
your chance to save some LIVES
Come to Mendenhall Room 224 on
Tuesday, Feb. 7th or Wednesday,
Feb 8th and give generously Who
knows the life you save may be your
OWN
WRESTLING
TOURNAMENT
Registration will be held Monday,
Feb 20 through Feb 22 tor the in
tramuralDomino's Pizza Wrestling
Tournament Domino's will be pro
viding T Shirts to weight class win
ners
EVOLUTION
Come to Jenkins Auditorium
Wednesday night at 6:30 p.m. to hear
some "Options on the Theory of
Evolution " You'll listen to a great
speaker
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Speed Reading Feb 23; Meditation
through Relaxation March 2; Youth
Sport Clinic March 3, BaseballSoft
ball Officiating March 12, Basic
AAUI Scuba Certification March 13,
Contact Continuing Education, Erwln
Hall
SEXUAL FULFILLMENT
Sexual Fulfillment Making It good
for you and your partner! This Is one
Psi Chi presentation that you won't
want to miss. Dr Knox, from the
sociology department will be speak
Ing on Feb. 21 at 730 in Speight 129
Be there and learn it all.
The deadline for applications Into
Psi Chi is March 2 Have you applied?
Do you have 8 hours in psychology?
Are you a sophomore or lunior with
an overall GPA of 2.7 or a senior with
overall GPA of a 2.9? Then you
qualify to oln the National Honor
society in Psychology. Pick up your
application in the Psi Chi library,
Speight 202
Don't forget to apply for The
Prewettand Wray Scholarships if you
are a Psi Chi member, you and plan
on attending ECU for the following
semester. You are majoring in
psychology or are a graduate student
in psych You must demonstrate
financial need. Apply nowl
PREPROFESSION
HEALTH ALLIANCE
The PreProfessionai Health
Alliance will meet on Thursday, Feb
9th, at 5:30, in the Cultural Center All
members are urged to attend and
especially the newly inducted
members
DINNER FOR TWO
Attention Biology Club members
and all other interested persons All
tickets for the dinner at King & Queen
must b turned in with the money by
our next meeting on Mon , Feb 13th
If you are interested in purchasing a
ticket, drop by the Biology Club office
or see a member about tickets The
drawing will be on Feb 13th and
fellas this would be a terrific Valen
tine's Day surprise
CADP
There will be a meeting of the Cam
pus Alcohol 8. Drug Program Thurs
day, Feb 9 at 3 00 in 210 Erwin Hall
it Is important that all members try
to attend
C ox
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IMPORTED
CAR
PARTS
105 TRADE ST. GREENVILLE, N.C
(beside
Todd's
Stereo)

�.

I'
KS,

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We carry a complete Rne of parts & accessories.
UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP
i1�
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LP & Cassette Sales
Latest Release By
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ABC
Duran Dunn
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Huey Lewis & the News
East Carolinian
Available Here!
How to make peace withTblstoy
If the academic wars are getting you down, declare a cease-fire. Take a break
with a rich and chocolatey cup of Suisse Mocha. Ifs just one of six deliciously
different flavors from
General Foods
International Coffees.
GENERAL FOODS INTERNATIONAL COFFEES.
AS MUCH A FEELING AS A FLAVOR
Available st Student Supply Store
C Ganarrt Foods Corporation 1963
SENDMUSIC
Want to give a special massage to
your Valentine on February 14? Well
don't ust say it, have your message
sung for you Alpha Phi Omega will
sing your message to your sweetheart
on February 14 You can buy your
singing telegram at the Student Supp
ly Store lobby or Feb. 9 and 10 trom
9 00 until 3 00 both days The cost Is
75 for an on campus delivery. So
make this Valentines Oay special;
send the greatest gift of all: music.
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of Holy
Communion will be celebrated on
Tuesday evening, Feb. 7 in the chapel
of St Paul's Episcopal Church, 406
4th st (one block from Garrett
Dorm) The service will be at 5:30
p.m. with the Episcopal Chaplain, The
Rev. Bill Hadden, celebrating. Sup
Der will follow
SPORT CLUB COUNCIL
The sixth meeting for the 1983 84
Sport Club Council will be held
Wednesday, Feb 15 at 4 00 pm In
room 105B Memorial Gym Represen
tatives of active sport clubs are re
quired to attend and must submit up
dates for the current spring semester
activities Persons or groups in
terested In the sport club program
ore invited to attend the meeting
BIOLOGY CLUB
On Feb 7th (Tuesday) & 8th
(Wednesday), the Biology Club &
AED will be co-sponsoring a blood
drive The time and location are
12 00 6 00 in Mendenhall Room 224
Give generously because many lives
depend on YOU
NEW YORK CITY
SPRING BREAK
Spend a whole week in New York
City during spring break, March 2,
1984 March 9, 1984 The trip will be
full of fun and excitement The ECU
Student union Travel Committee is
sponsoring the trip For further Infor
mation, contact the Central Ticket
Office at 757 6411, ext 266 between the
hours of 10 00 am 4:00 pm The sign
up deadline is Friday, Feb 17, 1984
PLAYER OF
THE MONTH
Nominations will be accepted for
the intramuralMiller High Life
Player of the Month, through
February 9. So If you know an in
tramurai participant who exhibits
sportsmanship, ability, verslllty and
knowledge of sport rules, come by fbe
Intramural office and nominate them
for Player of the Month.
CO-OP JOB
Don't miss this chance to
OPERATE a COMPUTER. A firm
wants a mature, self motivated per
son who knows how to operate an IBM
38 on the 3rd shift (night) Make an
appe'ntment now In Rawl 313 to apply
tor this -b.
LACROSSE
If you are interested in playing
lacrosse, go to the bottom of college
hill Tuesdays and Thursdays from 3
p.m. to 5 p.m. We already have
games scheduled with State and Duke
in March and April. Please come out
now. For more Information call Chris
Tomaslc at 752 4999.
OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT
TO: All Backpackers, campers.
Rock climbers. Sailors, canoers,
Rapellors and outdoor enthusiasts
The Outdoor Recreation Center In 113
Memorial Gym Is now providing a
sell and swap board. This Is an ex
cellent opportunity for you to buy
more equipment. To find out more
stop by 113 or call John Sauage a
757 6911 between 1 5 on Moo &, Frl ,
Tues. & Thurs 2-4.
NEWMAN SPEAKER
This Wednesday at the Newman
Center we will have a special guest.
Dr Dennis Bagarozzi, from the Dlvi
slon of Social Work at ECU He will
speak about pre marital considera
tlons He is a consultant to organize
tlons and mental health agencies and
specializes in family diagnosis and
family evaluation He is me author of
over 30 clinical articles and is cur
rently writing a book on Family
Evaluation Anyone who Is in a reia
tionshlp, or would like to be, will find
this interesting. The presentation will
begin at approximately 6 00 PM
RACQUETBALLCLUB
The East Carolina Racquetbaii
Club will have a meeting Tues . Feb
7 at 6 p.m. In Memorial Gym room
IOTA We will discuss about new of
fleers election and up coming events
(Clinics, club tournament, �tate tour
nament, etcAll members or anyone
Interested, all welcome Call Wayne
756 9175 or Raymond 757 0208 tor
more Info
SUMMER JOBS
We have received the Fedei ai Sum
mer job Booklet in our oHIce If you
are Interested, please come to the Co
op office, 313 Rawl Bidg as soon as
possible Many of the deadlines are in
the very naar future Students with
less than a 3 5 GPA have only a
"slim" chance of being chosen We
will be happy to help you complete
and mail the required forms
SUMMER INTERNSHIP
Thomas Nelson irtc will be inter
viewing students for their summer in
ternshlps program Twenty positions
will be available All maiors may ap
ply The average for ECU students
earnings last summer was over
13000 00 interested students should
attend an interview on Feb 7,8.9 a'
3 00 or 7 00 in BD 206 S'udenfs not
able to attend an in'erview a' the
above time can contact Michael
R abort at 752 1471 for an appointment
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan �o declare
physical education as a major should
report to Minges Coliseum a' 1 00
pm Wednesday, PfOruary 8 for a
motor and physical fitness test
Satisfactory performance on this test
is required as a prerequisit for of
fieial admittance to the prwsicai
education maior program vore
detailed information is available Sy
calling 757 6441 Or 6442
HORSEBACK RIDING
The outdoor recreation center s
sponsoring horseback riding trips tc
Jarman's stables each Tuesday after
noon Transportation and an uninter
rupted hour of horseback riding art
provided for 85 00 Advancec
registration is available by calling
the outdoor recreation cente'
(757 6911) Mondays and Fridays trorr
1pm to 5 p m Tuesdays ac
Thurscays from 2pm 3 30 p m Ge'
together with a tew friends make I
available tor the whole hall or com
by yourself and mee' some rev.
"rangehands'
REGGIE SWINSON
SERVICE AWARD
The Reggie Swinson Service Aware
s a recognition award tor an cxjtvar
ding Residence Lite Student s�a�
member if you would ite h)
nominate a student staff member see
our Hall Director or a copy of Living
Spaces' for a nomination forr-i
Nominations will be accepted u
Friday February 10. 1964 For more
formation concerning this awa'C
see our Hall Director
SENDACUPCAKE
On Tuesday and Wednesaar Fee
7 8. the Little Sisters o� Sigma 1 -
GAMMA will be taking oroers ry
Valentines Cupcanes
For 50 cen's each, you 'oo c�r
Surprise your favorite person or per
sons with these tasty treats per
sonaizec cards included
Cupids reipers will del'ver these
goodies on valentines Day
Look for us at the Student store or
confac' any Sig Tau Lil' Sis Supc M
are limited, so order nowi Make so
meone s FeD 14 a D' nicer
YEARBOOK PORTRAITS
Vearboo Portras now be ng
'aken in tre Buccaneer O ce un'
February 17 Portrays are for
Seniors, underclassmen anc Grac
Students Sgn jp for yOur apoo Bl
men' now 11 This is the :ast opportur
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1

" ' r

i.hm
Options on the
Theory of Evolution
Inter- hrsity Christian fellowship presents
Dr. George Drum
MS and PR.D. at Tulane University:
Post-Doctoral at Rice University:
'Biologist in Dept of Natural Science
and Faculty Member at Michigan
State for fifteen years:
IV.C.F Area Director;
A Pastor
at the Jenkins Art Building Auditorium
February 8. at 7:30 p.m. be There
I.V.C.F is a Christian group dedicated to teaching students in evangelism and
disipleship and mission work
Unusua
By GLENN MAIGHAN
Staff �rMer
Crimes reported by
ECU campus police for
the period Jan. 30 - Feb
are as follows:
Jan. 30 12:25 p.m. - A Ji
fire in a clothes dryer at
Greene dorm activated
the fire alarm. No serious
damage was reported
8:59 p.m. - No heat on
the 4th floor of Clement
Jan. 31 12:40 a.m.
Malfunctioning radiator
104 Fleming. 11:15 pm
Keith Zambito. Scot:
Dorm, was arrested for
allegedly failing to
pear
Feb. 1 12:35 am - 2 �
Counseling Cen
Cho
B JENNIFER
JEN DR ASIA K
w
$3
F
J
Mm
"Making a ma -
sion" is the topic of a
program to be offered
the ECU Cou- � .
Center
"A lot of '
grams to help studk
choose career- are
somewhat intii
said Dr. Steer. De
counselor zr.i
dinator of the ceni
outreach program He
said some studer
this was a step do
the more immed
blem of choosing a
jor.
"In choosing a
the emphasis
choosing a particular
career area but looking at
a major which will :r
porate a cluster �
ferent types of careers
Re
Th
Class.
QUIXOTE
COLLEGE MSfT;
19&4 Summer Travel f
24 days through Furoi
Escorted programs t'oj
Time to explorerui
climb Birghaus or fine
Call for brochure and
Come in for free SK1
QUIXOTE Tr
319 Cotar
Greenville .
NQ AN
��;
CIj
Lunch Buffet:
AJItbxpua
spaghetti tad wted
yoa caa tf
$2.99
DaM llan to 2pm
Corner of CaUncbe
������





THE EAST CAROLINIAN FEBRUARY 7. 1984 3
CLUB HORSEBACK RIDING
-fan The xifooor recreation center is
" . rv - Mi sponsor ng horseback riding trips to
a'rnan s jfacieseacl Tuesday after
or Transportation and an unlnter
Kit! ruptej nocir ot rtorseback riding are
s'a'e 'ovr prav aed tor $5 00 Advanced
� one regulation is aa laoie by calling
i Wayne the Hit door recreat.on center
I tor r57 9I1 Mondays arid Fridays from
to o m Tuesdays and
- a�s "om 3pm 3 30 p m Get
tr with a ev trienos make it
3S ava able for ItM wnoie hall or come
rsarf ano meet some new
REGGIE SWINSON
SERVICE AWARD
" egge Swnsor Service Award
sa recogn Mon awad tor ari outstan
� Residence l �e Student staff
e � � ,ou would like to
" s'a� member see
Our Ha D sector or a copy of Living
Spaces �or a oomination form
Homiw De accepted until
troa� Fefcr.arv i(j 194 For more
learning this award
sr I D rector
SEND A CUPCAKE
� nd Wednesday Feb
� � 5'e-s of Sigma tau
. avma be 'aking orders for
� � � pcanes
cor v ��, ea Ou too can
'� M person or per
- fti )icm tasty treats per
� - ' aras ciuoec
� i eipers will deliver these
� M on . aientine s Day
ook tor us at the Student Store or
S�g Tau Lll Sis Supplies
o so order now Make sa
�e s ep '4 a bit n.cer
YEARBOOK PORTRAITS
BOOk Portras now being
'afce "le Buccaneer Office until
Februa-� 17 Portraits are tor
Mtarclastsmon ano Grad
�" jC �0r your appomt
- rtrts , Hta as opportuni
' "�vf ,our picture appear in the
�4 B� aeer Sittings are con
from o-ij am ano 1 5 pm No
K or obligation to purchase pic
. res Your portrait automatically
appear - me Buccarfeer
INSMIP
.P.
.nan.
1 " T �t1

i
J .
- - . .f
. A i


TTTH
1. h�

he
lution
pmsents:
nty:
lence
in
litoriiim
here ! !
'in evangelism and
Unusual Crimes Top Report
By GLENN MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
Crimes reported by
ECU campus police for
the period Jan. 30 - Feb.
6 are as follows:
Jan. 30 12:25 p.m. - A
fire in a clothes dryer at
Greene dorm activated
the fire alarm. No serious
damage was reported.
8:59 p.m. - No heat on
the 4th floor of Clement.
Jan. 31 12:40 a.m. -
Malfunctioning radiator
104 Fleming. 11:15 p.m
Keith Zambito, Scott
Dorm, was arrested for
allegedly failing to ap-
pear.
Feb. 1 12:35 a.m. -2:30
a.m. Brian Gurganus,
Jarvis, and Gordon Ted-
dler will receive ad-
ministrative action for
allegedly possessing
alcohol. 8:06 p.m. - An
alarm was activated at
Jenkins Art Building,
nothing was reported
missing but an electrician
was called to work on the
system. 9:45 p.m. - Jef-
frey Hargett, Jarvis
dorm, reported the
license plate from his
1980 Datsun was stolen.
Feb. 2 2:16 a.m. -
Female student on 2nd
floor of Fleming said an
unidentified person tried
to enter her room. 10:12
a.m. - Bike was stolen
from rack at Slay Dorm.
3:00 p.m. - David
Youmans and Joe Hot-
tinger, Jones Dorm, were
allegedly found possess-
ing stolen state property.
Feb. 3 1:45 a.m. - Peder
Berge, Columbia, SC and
Michael Whaley, Wat-
chung, NJ were banned
from campus for being
intoxicated and urinating
in public near Jones. 3:10
a.m. - Chris Coll-
ingwood, Springfield
VA, was arrested for
DWI on College Hill.
Feb. 5 2:10a.m. -Nan-
cy L. Horner, Tyler, and
Rodger Decker, Belk
were found to be in viola-
tion of visitation policy.
9:15 p.m. - Gerald
Johnson, Garrett, was
issued a warrant for pass-
ing a worthless check.
12:40 a.m. - Gary
Richard Smith of Cary
NC was arrested for DWI
near Tyler dorm.
Feb. 6 3:55 a.m. - An
unidentified student was
being treated for a bullet
wound at Student Health
Clinic. His condition is
not serious and he is seek-
ing private treatment for
the wound. The student
reportedly bent over a
B-B-Q grill which caused
some bullets in his pocket
to fall into the fire. One
ignited causing the
wound.
Honor Board Action
Defendant
Charge
Plea
Decision
Freshman
Freshman
Freshman
Vandalizing � misus-
ing public property;
Stealing or attempting
to steal;
illegally possessing
alcoholic beverages;
intoxication in public;
h. Stealing or attemp-
ting to steal;
k. Illegally possessing
alcoholic beverages in
public
Guilty
Guilty
Guilty to h;
Not guilty to k
Probation until end of
semester
voluntary work: 15
hours
Written reprimand
Drug and alcohol
workshop
Restitution
Guilty on both
charges:
Drug and alcohol
workshop
Probation for one
semester
Written reprimand
Restitution
Counseling Center Strives To Guide Students
Choosing Major Is Focus Of Workshop
By JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
Co-News Editor
"Making a major deci-
sion" is the topic of a
program to be offered by
the ECU Counseling
Center.
"A lot of times pro-
grams to help students
choose careers are
somewhat intimidating
said Dr. Steven Deters,
counselor and coor-
dinator of the center's
outreach program. He
said some students felt
this was a step down from
the more immediate pro-
blem of choosing a ma-
jor.
"In choosing a major,
the emphasis is not on
choosing a particular
career area but looking at
a major which will incor-
porate a cluster of dif-
ferent types of careers
Deters said.
College students
average 2.5 major
changes, according to
Deters. He added that
during the process of
choosing a major, many
students are subjected to
a great deal of pressure
from parents, advisers
and other students. "We
recognize that students
are facing a lot of dif-
ferent pressures he
said.
This is the first time a
program like this has
been offered at ECU. The
program approach differs
from that of a lot of
traditional programs. "I
think in the past a lot of
the programming has
been done from the
perspective of and for the
convenience of the people
who are designing the
programs rather than
meeting the students
where they are Deters
said.
The program focus is
on increased awareness of
individual interests,
values and abilities.
Deters said when a stu-
dent chooses a major that
enhances his abilities, his
GPR generally goes up.
The structure is a small
group format. There will
be some testing, some in-
dividual discussion and
Z Plans Chicken
Buttarmilk Biscuit
M.19
some group activities.
Three sessions will con-
stitute the program. They
are all from 3 p.m. to 5
p.m. on Mon. Feb. 13,
Wed. Feb. 15, and Mon.
Feb 20 at the Counseling
Center located in 305
Wright Annex. These
dates are not independent
workshops; they are all
part of one workshop.
Advance registration is
not required, but Deters
said the Counseling
Center would appreciate
advance notice to
facilitate planning.
A Life Planning
Workshop is planned for
March. This program will
focus on individual goals
for the future with em-
phasis on lifestyle expec-
tations.
Information may be
obtained by calling the
Counseling Center
WasnPii&
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COMING SOON TO 10TH STREET
we Do Chicken
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Get 2 pieces of the Colonel's Original Recipe or Extra
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with this coupon. Coupon good only for combination white
dark orders and may not be used with any other special of-
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sales tax. Offer expires Nov. 30. 1984. (This coupon good
only at store locations listed In this ad.)
Kentucky Fried Chicken
TUESDAY NIGHT
COLLEGE NI7T
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Including Skates
6:30- 10:00
MliSiC 'EiEilSlON with MTV
16ft SCREEN
Read
The
Classifieds
QUIXOTE TRAVELS
COLLEGE VISITS TO EUROPE
1984 Summer Travel for Students
24 days through Europe$1897
(land only)
Escorted programs for students only
Time to explore-cruise down Rhine
climb Birghaus or find that quaint cafe.
Call for brochure and details.
Come in for free SKI BEECH brochure.
QUIXOTE TRAVELS, INC.
319 Cotanche St.
Greenville, N. C. 27634
Q Phone 757-0234,
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FREE computer storage of your resume 'til June.
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phone
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Bausch&Lomb
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Includes initial eye examination, lenses, care kit,
instructions and follow-up visits for the raoatb
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Seafood Cakes $1.99
French Fries or Baked Potato,
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35- extra
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Class getting you down?
Get
PIZZA MIND
At Gatti's.
�SgSSMS'

NO CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.
If you're a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
serious look at the Army
Army bands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month. In every-
thing from concerts to parades.
Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel
The Army has bands performing
in Japan, Hawaii. Europe and all
across Amenca.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to play with good musicians. Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills
It's a genuine, right-now, imme-
diate opportunity
Compare it to vour civilian offers
Then write: Armv Opportunines. P.O.
Box 500, North Hollywood. CA 9M03
ARMY BAND.
BE ALL YOU CAN Bt.
Lunch Buffet:
Alltbepiua.
spaghetti �ud salad
ou caa eat
$2.99
Daily: Han to 2pm
Dinner Buffet:
Spaghetti Dinner
All the piita,
spaghetti and salad
you caa eat
$3.09
Mon. A Toes. 5 to ipm
The best pun in town Jimmiirl
All The Spaghetti
You Caa Eat
$2.65
Wed. 54pm
Corner of Catanche A 10th
Greek Night
(with fraternity or
sorority shirts)
Happy Hour prices
5-untii
Free pitcher of your
choke with huge pizza
Thursday Nights
Phone: 758-4121
- -
��� �.�,?
� �� �
I.





?
i
i&tft iEaat (Eartfliman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C.Hunter Fisher. &-������
Darryl Brown, mmm �r Mark BarkjeR( 0fn(totaI
Jennifer Jendrasiak, c� mm am J.T. Pietrzak, dcotMmmm
Tina Maroschak, co-h, Edo, Mike McPartland, ��� w��Wf
Lizanne Jennings, so s� Tom Norton, o Ma,
Gordon I pock, ammra��r Kathy Fuerst, product
Ed Nick las �a &iw Mike Mayo, r�-�jow sivrv�v
February 7, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Fund Raising
Hunt Record Outshines Helms
Fund raising figures released last
week by the campaign committees
for Sen. Jesse Helms and Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr. showed an in-
teresting contrast both in the
amount of money raised for their
upcoming Senate battle and in the
sources of those campaign funds.
Reports filed with the Federal Elec-
tions Commission in Washington
this week and reported by The
Raleigh News and Observer showed
that last year Helms' political
organizations spent more than twice
as much as Hunt's groups and rais-
ed nearly twice as much money to
fund the campaign.
It is interesting to note that the
Helms people raised $4.41 million
last year and felt compelled to spend
$4.26 million of that, while Hunt
committees raised only $2.5 million
but were comfortable spending just
$1.7 million. By Jan. 1, Helms'
committees had only about
$151,000 on hand, while Hunt
recorded almost $858,000 in his cof-
fers.
More important, however, are the
sources of each candidate's funds.
At least half of the Helms commit-
tee funds came from outside North
Carolina, meaning more than $2
million, according to the commit-
tee's reports to the Federal Elections
Commission. Meanwhile, Hunt's
people collected only about 25 per-
cent of their money outside the
state, totaling less than $650,000.
Thus, not only did Helms spend
twice as much as Hunt in 1983, but
he raised more than three times as
much money outside the state as
Hunt, and it is more a significantly
larger portion of his total campaign
fund.
Still, the Helms committee,
specifically campaign press
secretary Claude Allen, have the
gall to say they need large amounts
of money to counter support for
Hunt from "out-of-state, left-wing
groups
If candidates are at all beholding
to their contributers, and one
assumes people or groups don't give
money to a candidate without ex-
pecting his support once in office,
then the figures last week which
candidate will be more obligated to
groups outside North Carolina.
Voters in the state should remember
the facts next time they hear charges
of a candidate accepting campaign
funds from outside North Carolina.
Definition
Illusiona: When hundreds of art
students throw all their master-
works into one pile, stick
outrageous price tags on each, and
pretend someone in Greenville will
pay $500 for a class assignment.
Meanwhile, most of the good art-
work is propped up on chairs and
leaned against brick walls in a dimly
lit back room. Symptoms are most
severe when accompanied by boiled
shrimp served on ice, with golden,
bubbly grape juice poured from
wine bottles.
The Attraction Of Sport
What's the best way to improve a
university's recognition and reputa-
tion, and to recruit more students to
a school? Well, of course one could
develop an unparalleled department
in the college, or lure some Nobel
laureate to teach a few classes and
carry on a little research, but why go
to all that trouble? It's much easier,
and much more fun, to just build up
the school's athletic teams and
watch them soar to national
recognition, bringing the rest of the
university along with them.
Such was the case, albeit done
unintentionally and with less sar-
casm, this year at ECU and N.C.
State. After the Wolfpack won the
national basketball championship
and the Pirates earned a spot in the
nation's top 20 football teams, ap-
plications to both schools increased
20 and 10 percent respectively. But
does it show much prudence and
studied consideration to choose a
school (from which you will carry a
diploma on job applications until
death do you part) on the basis of
who is getting feature stories in
Sports Illustrated at admissions
time?
Quality athletics often can say
something about the quality of
school spirit and student life at a
university, and those are a
legitimate factors to consider when
choosing a college where one will
spend four years. But it is far from
proven, or even likely, that sports
fame attracts not just more but bet-
ter students to a school.
N.C. State and ECU will undoub-
tably benefit from their newfound
popularity. The quality of entering
students is bound to go up at least
(and probably only) a little just
because the admissions offices will
have more students from which to
choose. But hopes for a brighter,
more promising freshman class
might be a little better if applica-
tions had poured in after ECU
graduate Rick Atkinson won the
Pulitzer Prize rather than after the
Pirate football team finished in the
AP top 20.
� USTCN SON
FKeeRiKsar
THIS UNIYOSnt:
ewcancw is
nteNweoF
wnnewcsi

Gend
B GLENN MAUd
Reagan Should Face The Nation
On Re-Election With His Record
By the editors of The New Republic
Right up to the week of his an-
nouncement there was doubt in some
quarters about whether President
Reagan would seek a second term. He
received some friendly advice on The
New York Times Op-Ed page not to do
so, and from The Economist of London
to think hard before doing so. Those
predicting he wouldn't run and those
advising that he shouldn't used essen-
tially the same arguments � that he
would be better advised to quit while
he's ahead, and that the problems of
the next four years are likely to be suffi-
cient to wreck his reputation as a suc-
cessful president.
But welcome to the fray, Mr. Presi-
dent. We're glad that you � and not
some apologist or substitute � should
be held responsible for your policies
and for the dismal prospects they pose
for the nation and the world over the
next four years.
The president has been enjoying
himself lately, basking in the glow of
record-high post-Eisenhower poll
ratings, denouncing doubters of his
economic program, asserting that he
has restored America to international
strength, and claiming that "there is a
new feeling on the part of the American
people a belief in themselves and
their country" as a result of his
presidency. We don't deny the man's
communicative skills, and we don't
begrudge him credit for boosting the
morale of a large portion of the public.
But Mr. Reagan's ability to infect
others with his illusion � and his luck
� are ephemeral instruments on which
to rely in a world of hard realities.
One reality is that America exists in a
world of increased economic competi-
tion requiring increased savings, invest-
ment and ability to export. Yet Mr.
Reagan has put America on a binge of
consumption and borrowing that may
be permanently disabling. Another
reality is that America's postwar
military superiority is lost forever and
cannot be regained at any price, and
that this country will therefore have to
rely on strategy, politics and persuasion
to protect and expand freedom.
Mr. Reagan has supplied only
military spending rhetoric and the
threat of force. Furthermore, America
cannot be a great country with its peo-
ple pitted against one another in
economic and social struggle. The
Reagan administration has increased
the ranks of the poor and has encourag-
ed others to be callous and uncaring
toward them.
On economics, Mr. Reagan pictures
himself as the conqueror of double-
digit inflation, the author of prosperity,
the defier of doomsayers. According to
the president, the latest version of
nay saying holds that the recovery can't
last.
"Government deficits, we're told,
will kill the recovery by draining captial
needed by business to keep the economy
expanding he has said. "Well, I hap-
pen to believe those who
underestimated the strength of this
recovery may be wrong about the size
of future deficits, too He went on to
acknowledge that "the deficits do mat-
ter but he claimed for the umpteenth
time that "we don't face large deficits
because you're not taxed enough, (but)
because government spends too much
No doubt we will be hearing a good
deal of this line of reasoning all through
the 1984 campaign, but it is a fabrica-
tion, an illusion believed in only by the
president and a few (a very few) of his
fellow dreamy-eyed ideologues.
The deficits that Mr. Reagan has run
up presumably will be one of the major
issues of this campaign. Republicans
denounced President Carter for pro-
ducing deficits of $60 billion in two
years of recession induced by the raising
of OPEC's prices. President Reagan's
deficits in his first two years in office
were SI 10 billion and $195 billion. This
year's will be in the $185 billion range
and the president's new fical year 1985
budget anticipates $180 billion deficits
after that until fiscal 1989, when the
figure descends to $130 billion on ac-
count of accelerated increases in Social
Security taxes.
The economic assumptions underly-
ing these deficit projections are as
breathtakingly optimistic as the deficits
are terrifying. The president is an-
ticipating growth rates of 4 percent or
better for five successive years. Among
his other ambitions, the president plans
to repeal the business cycle.
Obviously things aren't going to hap-
pen as Mr. Reagan's officially publish-
ed work of fiction anticipates, though it
is not clear which of several real-life
consequences will ensue. One plausible
scenario is that real interest rates �
already almost as high as when the
president came to office � will go
higher still, cut off recovery, and induce
recession. Or the Federal Reserve will
become alarmed at the interest rate level
and print more money, causing a rise in
inflation. Or the American political and
economic establishment will do the
tcfmnattrlc Cfilng rnnd deal with the
deficits.
Mr. Reagan, for his part, is ready
with more fiction.
On another domestic front, it's ob-
vious that there arc sharp limits to Mr.
Reagan's dedication to civil rights and
civil liberties, and we fear the worst in
both fields in a second Reagn term. The
president and the outgoing attorney
general, William French Smith, have
essentially shut the switch on enforce-
ment of laws designed to protect
minorities from discrimination in jobs,
education and voting.
Attorney General-designate Edwin
Meese is unlikely to turn it back on.
And Meese, a former law enforcement
official, is likely to be even more ag-
gressive than his predecessor in seeking
to control government information and
ensure government victories in criminal
cases.
In foriegn policy, too, there is reason
to fear that a second Reagan term could
bring disaster � in the form of hot war
in Central America or the Middle East,
a cold war between the United States
and the Soviet Union, and the
deterioration of the Atlantic alliance.
What troubles many
Americans above all is the
possibility that re-election
will liberate "the real
Ronald Reagan" from
moderating political con-
straints and set him loose
on the world.
We do not dispute that America
needed a more forceful foreign policy
than it had during the early years of the
Carter administration, but a strong
policy actually was being implemented
by the time Mr. Carter left office, in-
cluding increases in defense spending,
the grain embargo against the Soviet
Union, and military aid to El Salvador
conditioned on human rights im-
provements.
The Reagan administration has relied
almost entirely on military spending,
force and noise as its instruments of
foreign policy, and it has little in the
way of concrete accomplishments to
show for it: no arms control treaties, no
movement toward Middle East peace,
no improvement in southern Africa
and a more dangerous situation in Cen-
tral America.
It's true that Grenada is no longer in
the grip of Marxist-Leninists and that
Mr. Reagan defeated Yuri Andropov in
their political duel over deployment of
Penning II missiles in Europe. But
these will count for little if the United
Reagan
States backs out of Lebanon in
humiliating cirumstances and if Eat-
West tensions worsen.causing Europe
to look increasingly inward.
What troubles Europeans and man
Americans above all is the possibility
that re-election will liberate 'the real
Ronald Reagan" from moderating
political constraints and set him loose
on the world. We do not believe the real
Mr. Reagan is a warmonger lusting tor
a chance to zap the Soviets or their sur-
rogates in combat. But he is sufficient!)
committed to believing the worst about
the Soviets that he might easily pa� up
a valid arms treaty with them. After ill,
he did so with SALT II.
He might well forgo an offer N
Nicaragua to make peace with its
nieghbors, either out of disbelief in the
sincerity of the Sandinistas or out of
loyalty to anti-communist "freedom
fighters" who had risked their lives A
Nicaraguan attack on Honduras or the
collapse of El Salvador might well lead
to intervention by American forces.
And in the Middle East, Mr
Reagan's failure to thwart Syrian aims
in Lebanon could induce President
Hafez Assad to press against Jordan or
Israel, producing a conflict in which a
face-off between the United States and
the Soviet Union was threatened.
We do not believe Mr. Reagan wants
any of these dire events to occur. We do
worry he may not be competent enough
as a foreign policy strategist to avoid
them.
In spite of the failings and excesses of
this first term and the potential disaster
of his second, the president right now is
a remarkably good bet for re-election
Presidential races tend to be referenda
on the performance of the incumbent
rather than choices of alternative
futures, and at the moment public opi-
nion polls indicate Mr. Reagan is sup-
ported by around 60 percent of the
population. That is unusually high for a
president at the three-year mark. But
there are indications in the polls that he
is vulnerable.
The mid-January Gallup Poll shows
the president tied with Walter Mondale
and with John Glenn, 45 percent to 45
Percent. The Democrats have an oppor-
tunity to make a convincing critique of
Mr. Reagan - Mr. Reagan's record
gives them that - and to put forward
an alternative program that will win the
Jfence of the country. We wish
tnem success.
hen the 16 nx
UNC system conseni
1981 to recruit
minorities, white
predominated the
administrat i v e
tenured facult posil
Efforts to impro
gender racial rr.dl
ith those job I
to improve the
balance of its II
students have pr
mixed results.
"Affirmative
goals are a probier
.nd nationwide
Jeffrev Orlea
assistant to IN(
William B f-
e system did a I
ghcsl percer,
minorities eve'
although an inte
� nine percent
tudent enrolln
-non
Recent fig
"v UNC do reveal
-ght spots ECl
needed the t
�erall average �
cent) of enrollec
.dents The
a more thar.
minority enre
Orleans pra
school's effort
better tha
most univers I
reaching
goals he sa .
Overall, bla
ment increased 5 pel
across the n
system fbf � � -
decline dunn �
the system dm
a 10.6 percer
enrollmerr h
face possible
federal func-
I'NC's flV;
ly black inst
reported a re-cord
enrollment (mot
2.300 studen:
percent gain (ft
enrollment a
system is about 80
These schools have
sented to raise

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�ttt
Local East Carom
newest, and most t
If You Need
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Greenville. N
VICTOR 5
Speakers:
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Was $350
Like New
12 Speed
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THE EAST CAROI INI AN
FEBRUARY 7, 1984
,VURI.
MY W.�
Nation
iecord
Reagan
s out of Lebanon in
:irumstances and if East-
I worsen,causing Europe
ngiv inward.
ibles Europeans and many
above all is the possibility
:tion will liberate "the real
leagan" from moderating
mstraints and set him loose
II i We do not believe the real
� a warmonger lusting for
the Soviets or their sur-
mbat. But he is sufficiently
to believing the worst about
that he might easily pass up
treaty with them. After all,
SA1 T II
' ell forgo an offer by
make peace with its
either out of disbelief in the
the Sandinistas or out of
anti-communist "freedom
ho had risked their lives. A
r. attack on Honduras or the
El Salvador might well lead
i'ion h American forces.
the Middle East, Mr.
lure to thwart Syrian aims
could induce President
to press against Jordan or
lucing a conflict in which a
�ween the United States and
Jmon was threatened.
lot believe Mr Reagan wants
5e dire events to occur. We do
tav not be competent enough
policy strategist to avoid
the failings and excesses of
frm and the potential disaster
id, the president right now is
ly good bet for re-election,
races tend to be referenda
Komiance of the incumbent
in choices of alternative
d at the moment public opi-
indicate Mr. Reagan is sup-
around 60 percent of the
That is unusually high for a
ft the three-year mark. But
Idications in the polls that he
Jle
-January Gallup Poll shows
it tied with Walter Mondale
hn Glenn, 45 percent to 45
e Democrats have an oppor-
ike a convincing critique of
� Mr. Reagan's record
jthat � and to put forward
ve program that will win the
of the country. We wish
is.
l
Gender, Racial Distribution Studied
By GLENN MAUGHAN
Staff Wrtfer
When the 16 member
UNC system consented in
1981 to recruit more
minorities, white males
predominated the upper
administrative and
tenured faculty positions.
Efforts to improve the
genderracial makeup
with those jobs as well as
to improve the racial
balance of its 100,000
students have produced
mixed results.
"Affirmative action
goals are a problem with
us; and nationwide said
Jeffrey Orleans, special
assistant to UNC Presi-
dent William B. Friday.
The system did enjoy the
highest percentage of
minorities ever in 1983
although an interim goal
of nine percent minority
student enrollment fell
short.
Recent figures released
by UNC do reveal some
bright spots. ECU ex-
ceeded the UNC system's
overall average (8.1 per-
cent) of enrolled minority
students. The school has
a more than 11 percent
minority enrollment, and
Orleans praised the
school's efforts. "ECU is
better than or equal to
most universities in
reaching its (AA)
goals he said.
Overall, black enroll-
ment increased 5 percent
across the entire UNC
system for 1983-84 after a
decline during 82-83. Yet
the system must produce
a 10.6 percent minority
enrollment by 1986-87 or
face possible cuts in
federal funds.
UNC's five traditional-
ly black institutions
reported a record white
enrollment (more than
2.300 students) for a 12
percent gain. (Total white
enrollment across the
system is about 80,000)
These schools have con-
sented to raise white
enrollment to 15 percent
by 86-87 also.
For all the gains in
minority student enroll-
ment, the system lags in
employing minorities in
upper administrative and
faculty jobs.
Dr. Mary Ann Rose,
AA officerECU, summ-
ed up the feelings of
many administrators.
"We've come a long
way Rose said. "We
try hard to be AA, but
we've a lot of work to do
yet
Minority defined by
UNC - women-blacks,
American Indians or
Alaskans, Asian or
Pacific Islander, and
Hispanic.
For example, 46 per-
cent of the women
employed at ECU work
as clerks and secretaries.
In contrast, 44 percent of
white males employed
work as tenured or
tenured track faculty.
Overall, women
employees at ECU hold
13 of all instructional
positions. Minority males
fare worse; 70 percent
work as service-
maintenance employees.
These males hold only 4
percent of the tenured-
tenured track positions.
Their female counter-
parts hare the same
figure, 70 percent of
minority females
employed at ECU work
as clerkssecretaries or
servicemaintenance
employees. Only 2 per-
cent of all fulltime
tenured and tenured track
faculty jobs are held by
minority women.
These same gender and
racial disparities exist
throughout the 16
member UNC system.
Women comprise 42 per-
cent of the fulltime
workforce, (over 22,000
employees) but 40 percent
of them are working as
secretaries or clerks.
White males dominate
the administrative,
managerial tenured and
tenured track positions
with over 23 of these
positions held by this
group.
The remainder of those
jobs are held by minority
males (10 percent); white
women (18 percent); and
by minority women (5
percent).
A number of other
universities outside the
UNC System face similar
difficulties. "Wc are
caught in a bind said
Sondra Stallard, AA
spokesperson for U
Virginia. "Part of the
problem is not enough
people involved in the
higher education
process she said.
Stallard explained U
Virgina enjoys a "fairly
high" percentage of
women faculty but a
shortage of women work-
ing in upper ad-
ministrative levels is ap-
parent.
"We've also fallen
short of our goals in
recruiting black faculty
members; some we've
recruited have left she
added.
Not all AA plans have
met with such frustra-
tion. Dolores Burke, AA
spokesperson for Duke
University said seven new
black faculty were
employed in 1983.
"There are some promis-
ing trends Burke said.
Duke's undergraduate
minority enrollment has
risen to 6 percent, 12 per-
cent of the tenure and
tenure track positions
belong to women, and
about 4 percent of those
jobs are occupied by
blacks. Why is there a
shortage of minority
faculty and minorities0
Orleans claims the supply
is inadequate. "Due to
budget cutbacks and
economic recession, there
has been a contraction of
black enrollment he
said.
Stollard said "we can't
wish for black
professors "The shor-
tages have their roots in
our grammar and high
schools; we won't have
qualified people if our
schools don't train our
future educators she
added.
What is the future for
AA� Reagan's recent
shuffle within the Com-
mission on Civil Rights
may pose problems.
Statements from them in-
dicate a shifting of
away from
quotas for
Instead, the
will begin
Love
Arrives Feb. 14

Greenville Flower Shop
1027 Evans St.
758-2774 MCA Visa
mmmMU
priorities
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revere e
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COME EhRLY
Capture
Your
Valentine
75c A Line Will Say It All On
Valentine's Day
WITH A
sfr
?
Call 757-6366
Come by our office on the second floor of
the Publications Building across from Joyner Library
FILL OUT THIS FORM & MAIL TO:
Valentine Love Lines
The East Carolinian
Publications Building, Second Floor
COMPOSE YOUR OWN MESSAGE BELOW
ttt
L�
I I
1 ' I
U�" L ni -J tiileinily
If you want to build a great
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then Theta Chi wants
YOU!
Local East Carolina students waiting with bated breath for the opening of the WASH PUB Greenville's
newest, and most luxurious laundromat, where an attendant is always on duty.
A'W'
M�lW�MM���M�MJlWMj�i&4
Organizational Meeting
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7:30 pm
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758-8492
AMERICAN'IBrGREETINGS
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If You Need Cash Fast Come To
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Corner of North Green Street &
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Greenville, North Carolina 27834
752-5759
ECU Specials
of THE WEEK
VICTOR 5 Way Club Type
Speakers: Reg. $400 Now $299
Fall Size Pin Bail Machine
Was $350 Now $289
Like New Raleigh CMyanpian
12 Speed Was $140 Now $119
I
Valentine's Day
Cards & Gifts
Express a loving thought
and make someone's day.
Student Supply Store
Wright Building
Owaed ud operated by
East CaroHM I aierm

.
TOBACCO
ROAD
presented by
THE EAST CAROLINA
PLAYHOUSE
With
Marvis Ray Tom Hull
McGinnis Theatre
February 9-11,13 & 14,8:15p.m.
ECU Students: $2.50
General Public: $4.00
Call 757-6390
4
0mimmfm. '
�-ijWfr '� S� ��V
I
�1
- r






THf EASTCAROUNIAN
Entertainment
FEBRUARY 7. 194
PM� 6
Playhouse Stages 'Tobacco Road'
White Crackers In McGinnis
phofo by Doofl Ray
Mavis Ray, Brain Cottle and Tom Hull star in the East Carolina
Playhouse production of Tobacco Road. Presented in stark realism,
the McGinnis stage is covered with several tons of dirt, a dilapidated
shack and a live Chinaberry tree. One of Broadway's longest playing
hits the Plavhouse production should prove a treat
Two Broadway veterans have
teamed up onstage for The East
Carolina Playhouse's production
of Tobacco Road, Febuary 9-11,
13 and 14, at 8:15 in ECU's
McGinnis Theatre.
Mavis Ray and Tom Hull have
performed on and Off-Broadway,
toured plays in all but four states,
and have both had leading roles in
The Lost Colony but have never
appeared on stage together until
now.
Miss Ray is well known to area
theatregoers as a choreographer
and leading actress for the East
Carolina Summer Theatre;
however, she also has numerous
national credits to her name. She
performed on Broadway in
Michael Bennett's Ballroom,
toured the country in the award-
winning production of Da, and
has had roles in ABC's All My
Children, My Body, My Child
starring Vanessa Redgrave, and
just last year in the higly acclaim-
ed movie-musical Annie. For two
seasons she was seen in the power-
ful role of Queen Elizabeth in The
Lost Colony on Roanoke Island;
and now in Tobacco Road she will
pla the wife of a back-woods dirt
farmer who aspires only to snuff
and a new dress to be buried in.
A Durham native and graduate
of ECU, Tom Hull will play the
dirt farmer, Jeeter Lester, in
Tobacco Road. In professional
theatre Mr. Hull is known for the
wide variety of character roles
played from coast to coast in such
plays as One More Time, Jim
Thorpe, All American, Little
Mary Sunshine, and The Fan-
tastics. For eight seasons he
played Old Tom in Lost Colony
and last October was seen in
Times Remembered produced in
Wilmington's historic Thalian
Hall.
Adapted from Erskine
Caldwell's best-selling novel,
Tobacco Road centers around the
aging toothless Jeeter Lester who
lives with his bickering family in a
dilapidated shack on a dusty track
of once-rich farm land. Originally
written as a compassionate social
document about a family of
Georgia crackers ground by
poverty into an animal-like pur-
suit of starved apetites, its au
diences have come to love the play
as a comedy. They have laughed
at the family's pitiful efforts to
maintain human dignity and to
scrabble even foi a bag of turnips
as food � for the same reasons
that the whole world has laughed
at Charlied Chaplin's desperate
struggles against adversity �
because the struggles were too
fantastically absurd and
unrealistic. Instead of being mov-
ed to pity, theatregoers have burst
into roars of laughter when Jeeter
says, on being told that his senile
mother has died in the woods,
"I'll have to go out and bury her
one of these days
Tobacco Road is now considered
to be the most famous rural com-
edy since Uncle Tom's Cabin. It
ran for eight years on Broadway
in the mid-30s, and at one time
there were four companies touring
simultaneously boasting a box of-
fice, in all, of $6 million. For six
consecutive seasons the play
toured the country playing one
and two-night stands in cities
which had not witnessed a Broad-
way attraction in 15 years. Con-
sidered controversial these days, it
was banned in a number of towns,
including Raleigh. But Durham
allowed the touring company to
come, and they presented the
show in the ballroom of the old
Washington Duke Hotel.
The movie version of Tobacco
Road, which cost $750,000 to
make, including $200,000 for the
rights to the play, has never fur-
nished any competition to the
stage drama, even when appearing
concurrently. It vvas released in
1941 by 20th Century Fox, was
directed by John Ford and starred
Gene Tierney, Dana Andrews and
Ward Bond.
The East Carolina Playhouse
production is being presented in
stark realism. The shack on stage
has been constructed of rotting
lumber salvaged from an old slave
cabin in Pitt County; a real
Chinaberry tree now stands on the
McGinnis stage, and one-and-a-
half tons of dirt has been spread
over 800 square feet. Commenting
on the realistic style, director
Edgar I oessin said: "It would be
hard to imagine this show without
the soil on stage, because that is
what the plav is about the
land
Reserved seat tickets are on sale
at the McGinnis Theatre Box Of
fice, corner of Fifth and Eastern
Streets in Greenville. The box of-
fice is open each weekday from 10
a.m. until 4 p.m. Reservations can
be made by calling "5-6390
Egg People? Think Before Buying Valentines
Valentine's Day is tough for
me. I got so many names and ad-
dreses to remember. And face it:
Every girl wants to get the present
from Mick LaSalle.
JIMick
WLaSalle
X.

So I order my Valentine's cards
from a wholesale warehouse and
have them delivered by truck. But
nday I decided to look in the
Student Supply Store to see what
one half of ECU will be sending
the other half.
I saw this morose looking
character studying a few cards in
the corner. He was at least 30
pounds overweight. And he was
slouching like he's been getting
called a moron every day since he
was ten.
"What cards you got there,
pal?" I asked.
He mumbled something and
made to put them back, so I took
the cards out of his hand. The
cards were a sorry assortment. I
shook my head.
"Buddy I said, "You send
ei one of these cards, and you
may as well cut the thing off and
put it in your pocket
Valentine's Day is a time to
celebrate love, reassess it, or just
have fun with it. It might even be
a time to tell a girl you love her.
But don't make yourself pathetic
in the process And don't make
yourself into a nuisance.
Companies that make Valen-
tine's cards don't care whether
you get the girl or not. They're
not out to appeal to her, but to
you. They want you to buy their
card. To get you to do that, com-
panies appeal to some of your
worst impulses: self-pity, self-
indulgence, maudlin sentimentali-
ty. Face it: When you're in love,
you're a little weak in the head.
Thaf! why I've developed Mick
LaSalle's Five Rules for Choosing
lalentine's Day Cards. Following
these rules won't get you the girl,
but they'll keep you from cutting
your throat trying.
Rule One: Don't send any cards
with strangers on the cover.
Use your head. If the guy on the
cover is better looking than you,
she's gonna think it's funny
you're associating yourself with
this Handsome Harry. If the guy
on the cover is worse looking than
you, she's gonna wonder why
you're sending her pictures of
dorks.
Every couple snould be unique.
Don't link yourself with a couple
of Hallmark wimps wandering
Gilligan's Island
Rule Two: Don't put her on the
spot.
One card I saw said, "Valen-
tine, our relationship should be
perfectly clear to you by now
The inside said, "So would you
mind explaining it to me?"
This card does two things: It
antagonizes the woman, and it
gives her complete control of the
situation. If you want a woman to
like you, don't put her on the
spot. On the other hand, if you
want to get on her nerves, come
up with a more manly way than
sending a Valentine's Day card.
Besides, even if the card works
and the sender gets what he wants,
he still loses. Forcing a conversa-
tion about the "relationship" is
almost always a mistake. Conver-
sations like that kill the spontanei-
ty between two people and make
the one who cares the most come
off like a jerk.
Rule Three: Don't send any
Valentines with ugly dogs on the
cover.
At best, you come off cute. But
who's kidding who? You're not
looking for a pat on the head.
No woman but the kind you
find in very sick stag films prefers
dogs to men.
Rule Four: Don't say, "Hey, hey,
bey, I'm a crazy guy
There's a card in the bookstore
that says, "Normally, I wouldn't
ask you to be my Valentine But
I haven't been normal for years
Don't send it.
People want to hear about
themselves, not you. Go up to the
most boring professor on this
campus and say, "Gee, you're a
crazy guy He'll smile and say,
"Oh yeah? Really? In what
way?
When a woman gets a card, she
wants the card to say something
about her. If the card says that
you 're crazy, you're a bore. If the
card says that she's crazy, sudden-
ly you're interesting. Unless she
hates your guts, she'll find plenty
of time for you to tell her all
about herself.
Rule Five: Don't send Egg Peo-
ple.
I shouldn't have to tell anybody
this. Don't send cards with Egg
People on them.
The bookstore has one big Card
with an Egg Person sitting, as
always, alone and depressed.
Here's the message: "I sure hope
there's room in your heart for me.
I'd love to be your Valentine
Then you open it up and it says,
"But I'd even settle for a spot on
your waiting list
No good can come from a man
associating himself with a big,
round, sexless nothing. A woman
doesn't have to think you're
handsome or rich or smart in
order to want you. But she has to
respect you � and believe you
respect yourself.
People see too many movies
and hear too many songs. Then
they go around believing that life
is one big movie and one long
sonabout themselves.
Aiy will believe the movie is
about how this slob got the girl of
his dreams. But the woman sees
the movie as a thing about a mild-
ly pretty woman getting pestered
by an idiot. So the guy will send
the card that spills his guts. And
she'll look at it and say. Give me
a break
For me. the direct approach
the best. That's just the kind of
guy I am. 1 like cards that say, 1
love you Or if that doesn't app-
ly, 1 like funny stuff like. 'N.
made me what I am todav hor-
ny
But that's me Everybodv has
to find what works for him And
what usually works is something
that expresses your personality �
not at its most sniveling and
miserable � but at its bet
Before you buy any card, ask
yourself. "If I were in the other
person's place, how would I feel
about getting this?"
If you can answer that question
honestly, then trust your instincts
and take it from there.
'Reckless' Depressing
Teen Life In 80s Sick, Fractured
MGM is putting a lot of promotional hype into
Reckless. The ads evoke memories of James Dean or
Marlon Brando, the angry young man in a leather
jacket, the loner on a motorcycle. The film promises
excitement, but it delivers depression.
Aidan Quinn is Johnny Rourke, a high school
senior growing up in a dying steel town. A fractured
home life has left him rough on the outside but in-
secure and frightened on the inside. His dad is an ag
ing alcoholic loser who doesn't know how to tell his
son just how much he really loves him. His mother
left their shabby home nearly 10 years before. In
order to hide his life of poverty and loneliness,
Johnny appears aloof at school, never letting anyone
get close enough to find out the truth about him. Bet-
ter to remain an enigma than to be looked down
upon.
Daryl Hannah is Tracey Prescott. Even the name
sounds like little miss rich girl, and she is. She's tall,
blond and fine as fine as a high school girl gets.
Her daddy gives her a white convertible Caddy to
drive, and mommy makes a solemn occasion out of
giving her her own charge card. Her steady boyfriend
is a jerk, a big, handsome-in-a-boring-sort-of-way
rich boy who is already learning how to be a
psychopathic asshole. When Tracey first lays eyes on
Johnny Rourke, she says, "God, he's wierd
And Johnny is wierd. The kid's personality is
splintering before our eyes. In a drunken fit, his dad
throws him out of the house, and Johnny sleeps in
the boiler room of the high school. Johnny's football
coach is a pure bastard, an immature imbecile who
tosses Johnny off the squad rather than admit he's
wrong. And at school, everyone thinks Johnny's a
is
creep.
Tracey's world isn't perfect either. Her dad
never around, and her mom's sacchrine per-
missiveness is as disgusting as Johnny's dad's
drunken insensitivity. Tracey is a good girl who's
ready to be bad.
By chance, the two meet, and the sparks jump, the
chemistry is right. The steel worker's son and the mill
owner's daughter, we know it can't work, and they
know it can't work. But just maybe it does work.
In many ways, Reckless is similar to AU the Right
Moves. It's about kids growing up in the '80s facing
an uncertain future. It's teenage realism set in a
decaying steel town. It's about a world that's verging
on moral as well as economic bankruptcy. This is a
far cry from teenage life in the '50s, "Doby Gillis
or "Happy Days Tracey and Johnny's world is
worn out and rotten. The bloodshot look in Johnny's
eyes, the sleaziness of the high school girls, the decay-
ing factories, towns and school, the smart-ass
12-year-old punks director James Foley piles up
the images of a sick society. Depressing! By the film's
end, there was no way I could buy writer Chris Col-
umbus' merciful � but predictable � attempt at a
happy ending. There's trouble just up the road for
Tracey and Johnny.
With songs by INXS, Romeo Void and Bob Secger
and the Silver Bullet Band, the sound track is right on
time. Technically, the film is well made. The acting is
passable. My only criticism is that Johnny looks 30
instead of 18. But then, the kid's had a rough life.
G.I. Vi
Reckless is now showing at Greenville's Plitt Theater.
Van Ha
Heavy
By MATTHEW GILLIS M
Mlknkr
Just go up to anybody
and ask. "What's
another name for hard-
driving, wild and crazy,
non-stop rock 'n roll0" If
they're smart, they'll tell
you in two words �
"Van Halen
No doubt about
since the early Os. these
California boys have
turned the world upside
down with their energ
form of rock � and we
do mean rock, rr.
With Eddie Van Haien's
fast fingers explodr.
both keyboards anc
guitar. Eddie's broth
Alex on drums. M
Anthony stalking awa
on bass gur tod
absolutely crazy and agile
David Lee R
on the stage as he roa
into the n he
"heavy me
Halen fans have com
expect, this band built a
loyal fv
California I .
Tha f roci
Gene Simmons
once-pov. erf I nd
Kiss to encourag
make themselves
nationw.de Plant
their LP Ian Halen and
top-10 bit,
Night Away.
� and axe stil
after sevcal
hit LP after hit LP. I
extensive concert
including a bif
pearance last vear I
US Festival.
Been a Van Halen fai
Then you'll go c its t:
their new LP. 1984 t
the res: of you poof
souls, now'v .our cha:
to hear what VH s
about! If you're reac
some Krious rock
then grab this one �
is the big time
The IP's lead cut.
"limp.
mak :
rock arc r
should give
what to expect
agine Roth
saults and crap
right in front ol
while off to one side I
i
n
2
STRAK
Wed. &
(5pm till
Beef Tips
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500 W. Gr
2O03 E
The
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CHRISTIAN DIOR HAISTON Tl RJ
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1 Of
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OPTICAL
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1
W84
Page c
Ginnis
VojJ. which cosl $750,000 to
lake, including $200,000 for the
ghts to the play, has never fur-
iNhed an competition to the
age drama, even when appearing
mcurrentK li was released in
Ml b 20th Centurv Fox, was
lirected b John Ford and starred
ene Fierney, Dana Andrews and
Bond
The East Carolina Pla house
iction is being presented in
� realism. The shack on stage
�cen constructed of rotting
imber salvaged from an old slave
.ibin :n Put County; a real
tree w stands on the
stage, .md one-and-a-
lons of dirt Mas been spread
8 � square feet Commenting
he realistic stvle, director
li n said: it would be
� agme this show without
stage, because that is
av is the
eai tickets are on sale
c McGinnis Theatre Box Of-
cornei oi Fifth and Eastern
ts in Greenville. The box of-
- open each weekdav from 10
Reservations can
a 757 6390
e.
entities
- i sa. Cnve me
tpproach is
the kind of
fiat say, "1
' that doesn't app-
iff like. "You
i am todayhor-
c Evcrybod) has
Its for him And
works is something
expresses your personality �
I at its most sniveling and
serabte � but at its best
I i buy any card, ask
� 1 were sn the other
ice, how would 1 feel
s?'
wet that question
I then trust your instincts
take it from there.
Let
v
J

highway la Reckless.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7, 194
Van Halen LP
Heavy As Lead
By MATTHEW GILUS
SUff �rttH
Just go up to anybody
and ask, "What's
another name for hard-
driving, wild and crazy,
non-stop rock 'n roll?" If
they're smart, they'll tell
you in two words �
"Van Halen
No doubt about it,
since the early '70s, these
California boys have
turned the world upside
down with their energetic
form of rock � and we
do mean rock, music.
With Eddie Van Halen's
fast fingers exploding on
both keyboards and lead
guitar, Eddie's brother
Alex on drums, Michael
Anthony stalking away
on bass guitar, and the
absolutely crazy and agile
David Lee Roth prancing
on the stage as he roars
into the microphone the
'heavy metal" Van
Halen fans have come to
expect, this band built a
loyal following of
California fans.
That type of rock led
Gene Simmons of the
once-powerful rock band
Kiss to encourage them to
make themselves known
nationwide. Thanks to
their LP Van Halen and a
top-10 hit, "Dance the
Night Away they did it
and are still doing it �
after seveal long years,
lit LP after hit LP, and
Extensive concert tours,
Including a big ap-
rearance last vear at the
IS Festival.
Been a Van Halen fan?
Then you'll go nuts over
their new LP, 1984. For
tile rest of you poor
iOuls, now's your chance
to hear what VH is all
about! It" you're ready for
le serious rock 'n roll,
grab this one � this
the big time!
The LP's lead cut,
fJurr.r is currently
kaking its way up the
and pop charts and
ioaid give you an idea
ifhat to expect. Just im-
?ine Roth doing somer-
iults and crap like that
ight in front of you,
'hile off to one side, Ed-
die is racing his hands up
and down his famed
guitar, all to a catchy
melody and some good
work done throughout.
These are the kind of
rock 'n roll songs that are
loud, driving and just
plain fun to listen to.
Looking for some
more "fun?" Then just
listen to a naughty and
wild number called "Hot
For Teacher Eddie,
David, Alex and Mike are
back to business as usual
being wild and crazy little
boys in this song about a
student who's just dying
for some extra
"homework" with the
sweet little thing who's
teaching them the finer
things in life. (The birds
and the bees, most likely,
hmmm?) Anyway, the
boys can rock to their
best � and their
naughtiest � with this
power-packed cut full of
David's raunchy voice
and the group handling
the musical "dirty
work
But how wild � and
how good � can this
group get? Just get an
earful of the final cut,
"House of Pain Here is
where the group pulls out
all the power they can
give. This cut is one
monstrous heap of pure
energy: Alex with a drum
solo that rivals even
brother Eddie's best work
on guitar, Michael giving
his all on the bass to keep
up with the rest, and
David making good use
of the lyrics he has (which
aren't too many). All in
all, this is one song the
fans will be asking for
time and time again when
VH goes back on tour �
a real rockin' tune worthy
of Van Halen.
The message is clear as
far as Van Halen feels:
For 1984, "We'll play
whatever we want �nd
however we want, and
there ain't gonna be no
"Big Brother" telling us
what to do
Fellas, we're not stopp-
ing you! Your latest
album proves it: You're
playing rock 'n roll, and
good rock 'n roll at that!
Movie
Ratings
SUkwood (rated R)
Stars Meryl Streep as Karen
Weekend Pass (rated R) Yentl (rated PG)
Four young sailors fresh out of Much more than just the kosher
SUkwood, a working girl whose boot camp m San Diego head for answer to Tootsie Barbara Strei-
hfe ends tragically, perhaps Los Angeles for a weekend's liber- sand writes, directs, produces
because she knows too much ty. They catch several exciting stars in, etc. this visually �uW
about cover-ups of nuclear boo female dance acts at the G String, ting movie based on Issac B
���S. !�ShC, W�rkS- Kurt � topless nightclub that peddles Singer's story. It's the tale of one
Russel and Cher also star. flesh 24-hours a day. The 15 Hasidic Jewish girl's Libir.t�n
C.t. � � minutes you spend in the G String from societal constraints that for-
Reven. nf th, Ninia 5r2�? ?0rth thu P?CC �f SCCing bid womcn to d anything but
Revenge of the Ntnja the film. Later, the boots are in- bake bread and hirth hahi
An Amencan-made martial arts termpted while eating barbecued StTdsand sfngsf sogs welt but
film (the lips match the sound) chicken, ham hocks and greens in deprives her golden Wed costal
shot in San Francisco. Not view- Watts by the Mau Maus, a street ifflySSS?, ���
gang that the black sailor used to way's Evtta) from even one A
lead. A show down in Soul Town
ed, no rating.
Big Chill (rated R)
Seven college friends gather at a
classmates funeral to catch up on
each other's lives and worry over
their lost youth and '60s idealism.
C.E. � � � Yi
Gorky Park (rated R)
Lee Marvin and William hurt
star in this suspense thriller set in
Moscow. Terrific plot, good ac-
tion.
G.I. � � � Vi
Sudden Impact (rated R)
Clint Eastwood returns as Dirty
Harry � better than ever.
G.I. ���
ensues. The weekend continues,
and so do the limp adventures. All
four, including the nerd, eventual-
ly find a sweetheart before Mon-
day morning. A Navy recruiter
must have written this thing for
unemployed bimbos back on the
farm.
G.I.
Terms of Endearment (rated PG)
Comedy drama starring Shirley
Maclaine as an eccentric mother,
Debra Winger as her well-
adjusted daughter and Jack
Nicholson as their neighbor.
Guaranteed tear jerker.
D.B.
few self-indulgent and sentimental
moments speckle the film, but
story, cinematography and stars
all survive to make a film well
worth seeing.
D.B. � �
Hot Dog (rated R)
Adolescent fantasy about snow
skiing, drugs, booze and sex
G.I. �$
Balloons with lovely tunes
Bouquets orfaeart in a tote
VALI
TINE DAY
Balloons Over Greenville
Call 752-3815
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2 For 1
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EXPIRES MARCH 31. 194
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Wed. & Thurs.
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2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd
2903 E. 10th St.
The Underwear Built
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All frames in stock 30joff
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Expires Feb. 29th
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CHRISTIAN DIOR. HALSTON. TURA. AVANT GARDE. ELIZABETr
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Attention:
All student organizations re-
questing student funds must
submit budgets beginning
Feb. 13 thru Feb. 29, 1984.
Please turn in requests to the
SGA office in Mendenhall
Student Center. Any ques-
tions, please contact either
Becky Talley or John Rainey
at 757-6611.
OMIHiEil'SMlMli'MiliES.
Shaw Players Present
In My Father's House
On Saturday evening, ing thought and deep
Febuary 11, at 8 p.m the emotions and borders on
Shaw Players and Com- the genre of classic
pany will perform a tragedy. The play is pure
serious drama of power- drama of substance and
ful emotions. In Thy entertainment for the en-
Father's House, in tire family and for
Wright Auditorium on theatregoers who elect a
the campus of East preference for theatre
Carolina University. A that catches one up.
matinee will also be For reservations and
presented for senior additional information
citizens, college and call Pitt-Greenville Arts
public school students. Council, 757-1785, or
In My Fathers House, 757-3924 daily and
by H. Bruce Caple, the 757-1037 evenings. Ad-
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Shaw University, is an in- performance is $5.00,
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drama about the tragic matinee is $2.00. Tickets
erosion and eventual are on sale at Headlines
disintegration of a black in the Rivergate Shopping
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
FEBRUARY 7. 1984 Page 8
Letdown Evident
Pirates Crushed
By ED NICKLAS
Sorti Editor
The Eastern Illinois Panthers
took advantage of a flat ECU r?r-
formance to breeze to a 78-58 vic-
tory last night at Charleston, 111.
Four players scored in double
figures for the Panthers, as they
raised their record to 9-9.
The Pirates, coming off a big
win last Saturday against con-
ference opponent George Mason,
fell to 4-15.
Eastern Illinois was led by 6-11,
300 pound center Ken
Duckworth, who had 18 points.
Forward John Collins had 15 and
Jim Richardson added 14 for the
Panthers.
William Grady was the Pirate's
leading scorer for the second
game in a row, tallying 15 points.
Curt Y'anderhorst was the only
other ECU player in double
figures with 12 points.
Eastern Illinois, which was
playing only its fourth home game
this season, shot 58 percent in the
first half to lead 40-24 at intermis-
sion.
The Panthers then outscored
the Pirates 12-5 in the First six
minutes of the second half to take
a 52-31 lead, their largest of the
game.
ECU began a mild comeback,
outscoring Eastern Illinois 16-8
over the next seven minutes to cut
the lead to 13 points, 60-47.
But the Pirates let the comback
slip away, and a frustrated ECU
coach Charlie Harrison drew one
of his few technicals with 5:51 left
in the game, and ECU losing by
22 points.
With the loss, ECU has yet to
win a game on the road this
season. In this game, the Pirates
never led.
The Pirates will stay in the state
of Illinois for a few more days, as
they take on Western Illinois
Wednesday night. ECU will then
return home for another ECAC
contest against William and Mary
this Saturday.
East Carolina
Robinson 3 2-3 8, Grady 3 9-11
15, Smith 1 2-2 4, Bass 1 0-0 2,
Vanderhorst 6 0-1 12, Sledge 1 0-0
2, Battle 3 2-4 8, Turnbill 2 1-2 5,
Harris 1 0-3 2, Gilchrist 0 0-1 0.
Eastern Illinois
Knighting 1 4-6 6, Richardson 7
0-0 14, Tyss 3 1-2 7, Weese 5 3-4
13, Collins 6 3-8 15, Duckworth 5
8-9 18.
William Grady has been named
ECAC-South Rookie of the Week
for his play against Navy and -e l john.c f
George Mason last week. Tony Robinson works against George Mason's John Niehoff in Satuday night's 70-6 upset of the Patriots.
ECU's victory was their first in conference play.
Lady's Split With Overtime Win
NCIL JOHNSON � ICU Wwto Lb
Pirate forward Annette Phillips doesn't seem to
have much of a chance at getting this loose ball,
but ECU defeated Georgia Tech 61-56.
By RANDY MEWS
AjtfcUal Sporti Mitor
The ECU women's basketball team split a part of
home games over the weekend, bowing to East Ten-
nessee State 68-58 Saturday afternoon, then taking a
61-56 overtime victory from Georgia Tech on Sunday.
ECU broke a three game losing streak in Sunday's
contest, but Pirate head coach Cathy Andruzzi was
forced to go deeper on her bench then she has all
season long.
With Annette Phillips and Jody Rodriguez fouling
out, and sixth-man Annette Anderson unable to play
due to sickness, walk-on Crystal Grier saw more play-
ing time against the Lady Jackets then she has for the
entire season.
Although she didn't score any points in 17 minutes
of action, Grier played a solid game and contributed
one steal to the defensive effort. "Crystal came in
when we needed her and played a great game An-
druzzi said.
Andruzzi was extremely upset with the officiating,
and blamed the high number of fouls on how the
game was called. "The refs made this into a bad
game she said. "They added to the sloppiness of
play be calling unnecessary fouls
With the two teams tied at 50 going into overtime,
ECU jumped on the Jackets immediately when
Darlene Hedges was fouled in the lane and connected
on both ends of the one-and-one.
The Pirates never relinquished their lead as they
connected on 7 of 8 free throws down the stretch.
ECU connected on 74 percent of its attempts for the
game.
Andruzzi felt her team handled the pressure well in
overtime and was pleased to come away with a vic-
tory. "We were outrebounded and didn't play a good
inside game, but we didn't make any stupid mistakes
and that enabled us to win
The game was a struggle from the outset, as neither
team was able to gain control of the tempo.
Tech took their biggest lead of the entire contest
when Kate Brandt knocked in a 17-foot jump shot
giving the Jackets an 8-2 edge with 16:01 remaining in
the first half.
Brandt was the Pirate's primary concern going into
the game as she was averaging 16 points per outing,
but ECU guard Sylvia Bragg held her at bay, limiting
Brandt to 12 points on a 5 of 21 shooting perfor-
mance.
ECU fought back, and took their first lead at 9:42
of the opening half when Lisa Squirewell popped in a
short jumper giving the Pirates a 16-14 advantage.
The lead changed hands four times from that point
on, with Delphine Mabry giving ECU a one point
halftime lead when she banked in a driving layup with
41 seconds left.
The second half was much like the opening period
of play as Tech held the lead for the first 15 minutes
of play.
Lisa Squirewell pumped in a five footer with 5:34
remaining giving the Lady Bucs a 40-39 edge. ECU
never trailed the rest of the game, but Jennifer
Leachman hit a layup with 21 seconds left to tie score
at 50 and send the game into overtime.
Bragg led the way for the Pirates with 20 points,
while Rodriquez was impressive off the bench con-
tributing eight in 21 minutes of action.
In Saturday's loss, 6-5 center Tammy Larkey came
off the bench to score 23 points for East Tennessee
State University.
Larkey, a transfer from Tennessee, is the team's
leading scorer and rebounder, but doesn't start
because she just became eligible several weeks ago.
"I'm loyal to my people and they will be starting the
rest of the year ETSU Coach Susan Yow said.
Despite being a substitute, Larkey played 33
minutes and was inserted whenever the Lady Buc-
caneer's lead seemed in danger.
The first half was a battle between Squirewell and
Larkey, as the two players seemed to dominate all the
inside play. With the score tied at 25, Bragg hit from
the outside to give the Pirates a two point advantage
at the half.
"We wanted to work the ball inside and get some
fouls on their big people Andruzzi said, "and we
were pretty successful in doing that in the first half
The second half was a different story, however, as
ETSU took control of the boards. "The problem was
we didn't help out on the inside like we did in the first
half Andruzzi said.
Leigh Jaffke got things started with a three-point
play that put ETSU in front 28-27, and then back-to-
back baskets gave the Buccaneers the working margin
they needed to take control of the game.
ECU managed to trim the lead to one several times,
but the Pirates began to tire as Mabry saw only eight
minutes of action, and ETSU slowly pulled away.
Bragg and Squirewell led the Pirates with 17 points
each, while Rodriguez scored a career high 14 while
substituting for Mabry.
The Pirates will return to action Feb. 9 when they
travel to face nationally ranked Old Dominion.
East Carolina (58)
Phillips 0-2 1-2 1, Anderson 2-A 0-0 4, Hedges 2-3
0-0 4, Rodriguez 6-12 2-2 14, Bragg 7-17 3-3 17,
Mabry 0-2 1-2 1, Squirewell 7-8 3-5 17.
East Tennessee State (68)
Blair 7-13 2-5 16, Mills 1-5 0-0 2, Jaffke 4- 4- P
Hines 1-3 8-10 10, Skala 2-8 1-2 5, Larkev 10-16 3-4
23.
East Carolina (61)
Squirewell 3-5 2-4 8, Phillips 0-6 4-4 4, Hedges 5-11
5-6 15, Rodriguez 4-7 0-0 8, Bragg 23 6-6 20, Mabrv
3-5 0-3 6.
Georgia Tech (56)
Rucker 2-110-0 4, Jicka 2-5 0-0 4, Weinert 3-9 4-6
10,5-21 2-2 12, Ehle 2-8 5-6 9, Carter 1-2 2-3 4, James
1-2 2-5 4, Leachman 2-4 3-4 7, Cochran 1-4 0-0 2.
EC Pitching 'Good Enough Group Of Arms'
By ED NICKLAS
Sports V-dltof
The first in a series
ECU baseball coach Hal Baird
will be relying on a young but
talented pitching staff to bring the
Pirates back from an average per-
formance last year to their
1980-82 nation-leading form.
The Pirate staff of two
freshman, four sophomores, three
juniors and one senior will at-
tempt to reduce last season's ab-
normally high 4.01 earned run
average. The team has four ex-
perienced pitchers in Winfred
Johnson, Robby Mclanahan, Bob
Davidson and Chubby Butler, but
the rest have seen little or no ac-
tion on the college level besides
fall-season competition.
Nonetheless, Baird is optimistic
and speaks enthusiastically regar-
ding the potential of this season's
staff.
Baird commented on his star-
ting rotation:
Winfred Johnson (Sophomore,
righthander. Last season: 7-1
record, 3.26 ERA): "He returns
as the number one guy on the
staff. Basically, his best pitches
are his sinking fastball and a
short, quick breaking curveball.
His mentiJ approach to pitching is
more impressive than his physical
attributes although he is a gifted
athlete. He brings intelligence to
the pitching game that is really
outstanding
Robby Mclanahan (Senior, lef-
thander. Last season: 3-3 record,
3.93 ERA): "The only left-
handed pitcher on the squad. Rob
has been drafted by the Phillies.
"He really didn't have a good
season for us last year. He had an
outstanding fall and threw pro-
bably better than anyone we had.
I would say at this point he would
Baseball Preview
probably be our number two guy.
"Being the only lefthander, we
want to make sure we match him
against those teams that have ex-
ceptionally good left-handed hit-
ting lineups
Bob Davidson (Junior,
righthander. Last season: 3-5
record, led the team with a 3.10
ERA and 78.3 innings pitched):
"Went into last year as our
number one guy based upon his
freshman year, but had a subpar
season. He has an outstanding
throwing arm. There are a lot of
professional scouts that are in-
terested in him.
"He had arthroscopic surgery
in December and as a result of
that we had to change his
mechanics a bit. So he's going to
look different to those who have
seen him before.
"In terms of arm strength and
potential, he is the best. Our suc-
cess will be determined on how he
does
Mike ChristopherFreshman,
righthander): "We have had very
few pitchers come in here that
have the potential he has. He is
6-6 and was a highly recruited
player. He has a fine arm and had
a really outstanding fall for us.
"He will start the season as one
of our starting pitchers. We really
believe that Mike will be one of
the best that we have had before
he leaves.
"I think that if he gets off to a
quick start, he 'may be good
before this year is over with. It
just depends upon how rapidly he
can adjust from high school to
college baseball
Baird's spot starters and middle
and short relievers include the
following pitchers:
Chubby Butler (Junior,
righthander. Last year: 3-2
record, 4.29 ERA, led team in
relief appearances): "He has been
throwing very well this spring. He
was used mainly in that kind of
role last year (as a reliever), and if
he continues to throw well, he has
a chance to bump one of the guys
out of the starting rotation. He
would be the first guy out of the
pen or a fifth starter.
"What we need for him to do is
throw strikes consistently and
develop a little bit more of a
breaking pitch. His best pitch is a
fastball
Tommy Webb (Junior,
righthander, junior college
transfer): "Has a good arm. He
didn't throw real well in the fall
but with his two years of junior
college experience he gives us
another arm out of the bullpen.
"He has an outstanding
changeup and he throws hard. His
breaking ball is not as good as it
needs to be.
"Beyond that, I think the only
thing between Tommy right now
and him being outstanding is if he
will really be a tough, cold-
blooded competitor. I'm not say-
ing he isn't right now, I'm just
saying he hasn't demonstrated it
yet. He will definitely have to
pitch for us
Craig Van deventer (Freshman,
righthander): "Craig is another
one of those who will be a fine one
before he leaves. He really has
been a pleasant surprise. In the
fall he proved to us that he can get
college hitters out.
"He is in a situation now that
he is going to pitch a lot as a
freshman. We still need to work
on the breaking ball a little with
him, but we changed some things
with him this fall and his fastball
now is sinking very well and he
has good movement on it.
"We feel Craig is a very in-
telligent kid. We know he is not
going to make many mistakes
more than once
The rest of the staff includes
those who Baird says are "right
there at the edge as being ready to
win for us
Roger Greer (Sophomore,
righthander): "We redshirted him
last year as a freshman. He has
made more improvement in one
year than any other pitcher we
have had. He's definitely going to
be needed, but we're just not sure
what role he is going to have right
now
Phil Spring (Sophomore,
righthander): "Right now he
looks to be in a short relief role.
He still needs to get some things
ironed out before he will get a
whole lot of pitching time
Jim Peterson (Sophomore,
righthander): "He's come on. He
has pretty good breaking stuff.
Right now he will be a short
reliever. He will have to battle
some to get pitching time
According to Baird, the pit-
ching staff does not have any
other proven winner except
Johnson, but the potential of the
rest of the staff is cause enough to
boast. "We feel we have a good
enough group of arms to com-
pete he says.
The staff will have to perform
masterfully to compete at the
same level as past ECU hurlers,
but Baird shows unbending faith!
"In the last few years ECU has
been known as a pitching school,
and I think the guys that we have
will carry on the tradition
mmmSm- -$; kfi
� � .�.
i , -�
fiJSL�
��
Four
By SCOTT POW ERS
"We swam the best
meet in the history of
ECU Swimming said
head coach Rick Kobe,
summing up the Pirate
victories over Duke
Saturdav
Revenging a loss tc
Blue Devils last yea:
men's team soundly
defeated Duke b
score of 65-41
women, who had four na-
tional
broke
-
For
La-
Wrav
��
time
! � �
Injurie
B PFTFFERNM I)
"We don't know
the injuries are h t
ing. we've expel
more this vear tl
have in the
vears combined
Those were rd
of head trav .
Carson as he e
why his team
ticipate in rwc
were schedu ed
this year.
Sprinter Nathai M
Corkle
severe inju-
penenced pail
STIDENTOPPORII
We are looking for tr
counselors - actmtv in�tnn 1
camp located in HenderM.riMl
tors needed especiallv in &
Horseback riding, rchery
nasties. Crafts. Abo Baket!
Soccer, Cheerleading, Drai
work. Dancing. Nature m
offers a Summer Interchip pn
giad to help. Inquire - V
Box400C. Trvon. M -x;
T"
$$$$
Tues. Feb. 14

0s'

,yu
V
V
Bring This Coupon
on Valentine Da
For l Price Memberhi
(S5.00alue)
DEO
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�A�Y �ATT�ftMN -ICU
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nxnrs
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hero- garden fresh lettua
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208
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� � -�
f-nr.B'00Hm
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vS4
Pager 8
I
PL
b
NCH JOHN JON - ECU Pl���� Lab
'0-aH upsf t of the Patriots.
Win
' - Bragg hit from
: adantage
: get some
Vndn "and we
in :he firsl half
fferent story, however, as
' The problem was
ke we did in the first
ted with a three-point
28 27 and then back-to-
orking margin
�- game.
me several times,
-aw only eight
kvlj pulled avvay.
Pirates with 17 points
er high 14 while
Feb. 9 when they
� i Old Dominion.
n 2-4 0-0 4, Hedges 2-3
: 2-2 14. Bragg 7-17 3-3 17,
bquirewell 7-8 3-5 17.
hSi
fke 4-5 4-5 12.
1 arke 10-16 3-4
t 4-4 4, Hedges 5-11
U '23 6-6 20, Mahrv
I, Weinerl 3-9 4-6
: 1-2 2-3 4, James
-ran 1-4 0-0 2.
f Arms'
Baird, the pit-
��'� Joes not hae any
en winner except
but the potential of the
taff is cause enough to
"We feel we have a good
ough group of arms to com-
aff will have to perform
erfuily to compete at the
:eel as past ECU hurlers,
aird shows unbending faith'
"In the last few years ECU has
been known as a pitching school
' 1 think the guys that we have
will carry on the tradition
�A�YATT.���cu��Ufc
lumber one pitcher. Ust season be
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
FEBRUARY 7. 1984
Four Women Qualify; ECU Rips Blue Devils
By SCOTT POWERS
Sp�rnitMt
"We swam the best
meet in the history of
ECU Swimming said
head coach Rick Kobe,
summing up the Pirate
victories over Duke on
Saturday.
Revenging a loss to the
Blue Devils last year, the
men's team soundly
defeated Duke by the
score of 65-48. The
women, who had four na-
tional qualifiers and
broke four varsity and
freshman records, also
easily defeated Duke
7(M3.
For the men, Chema
Larranaga and Greg
Wray were double win-
ners. Larranaga took the
1000-yard freestyle with a
time of 9:56.87 and the
500 freestyle with a time
of 4:52.62.
Wray won the 200 in-
dividual medley with a
time of 2:01.65 and the
200 butterfly in 1:58.50.
Wray also swam on the
400 meter medley relay
team with Kevin
Richards, Stephen
Hollett and Stan
Williams that won with a
time of 3:37.29.
In the sprint freestyle
events, Hollett won the
50 meter event in 22.70,
Williams took the 100 in
47.51, and Chris Pittelli
won thf 200 in 1:46.20.
Other winners for the
men were Scott Eagle in
the one- meter diving
with a score of 244.3, and
Richards in the 200
backstroke with a 2:01.6.
The women won 10 of
13 events in their half of
the meet, with many of
the girls turning in
outstanding times.
The women that
qualified for the Na-
tionals in March were
Cindy Newman, Jean
Keating, Jessica
Feinberg, and Lori Liv-
ingston.
Newman won the 100
meter butterfly with a
time of 1:00.16, which
also surpassed the quali-
fying standard of
1:00.69. This time also set
new freshman and varsity
records for ECU.
Newman also won the
200 meter freestyle with a
time of 1:57. 46.
Keating qualified for
Injuries Hamper Tracksters
the nationals with a 25.0
in the 50 meter freestyle
which also sets a
freshman record.
Feinberg qualified with
a 1:08.40 in the 100
breatstroke while Liv-
ingston had a 2:14.46 to
qualify in the 200 meter
backstroke. Both of these
were varsity records and
Livingston's time was
also a freshman record.
The 200 meter freestyle
relay team of Keating,
Newman, Vickie Gorrie,
and Caycee Poust set a
freshman record with a
time of 1:42.80, which
was .3 off the national
qualifying time.
Besides Newman, dou-
ble winners for the
women were Poust and
Rene Seech. Poust was
victorious in the 100
backstroke and the 200
individual medley, with
times of 1:01.81 and
2:15.91 respectively.
Seech captured the one
and three-meter diving
events with scores of
215.4 and 227.18.
Other winners for the
Pirates were the 400
medley relay team of Liv-
ingston, Feinberg, An-
nette Burton, and Vickie
Gorrie, with a time of
4:11.71. Gorrie also cap-
tured 100 meter freestyle
in 56.10.
With the victories, the
women up their record to
9-3 while the men go to
8-3.
'Duke was really
pumped up for this meet,
but we went in and swam
well said a happy
Kobe, "it really says a lot
for our kids
Both teams will be
back in action this
weekend at Atlantic
Seaboard, for an all da
meet.
B PETE FERN AID
Nporu �rrttf
"We don't know why
the injuries are happen-
ing, we've experienced
more this year then we
have in the last three
years combined
Those were the words
of head track coach Bill
Carson as he explained
why his team did not par-
ticipate in two meets they
were scheduled to attend
this year.
Sprinter Nathan Mc-
Corkle suffered the most
eere injury when he ex-
perienced pain in his legs
and it was later diagnosed
as tendonitis.
Others sustaining in-
juries included National
qualifiers Chris Brooks
and Craig White, Rueben
Pierce and Erskine
Evans.
Carson said all his run-
ners, with the exception
of McCorkle, will be
ready for the George
Mason Ivitational on
Feb. 19. the Pirates final
indoor meet of the
season.
Carson, who took over
as coach of the women's
team at the beginning of
the year, said they will
not attend becuase they
don't come up to the
meet's standards.
The Pirates are follow-
ing a tough rehabilitation
program which Carson
hopes will get his team in
shape for their upcoming
meet. All the runners are
lifting weights and runn-
ing twice a week, while
working on a special
STUDENT OPPORTUNITIES
We are looking for girls interested in being
counselors - activity instructors in a private girls
camp located in Hendersomille. NC. Instruc-
tors needed especially in Swimming (WSI),
Horseback riding. Archery, Canoeing, Gym-
nastics. Crafts, Also Basketball. Computers,
Soccer. Cheerleading. Drama, Art. Office
work, Dancing, Nature stud. If vour school
offers a Summer lntership program we will be
glad to help. Inquires - Morgan Hanes P.O.
Box 400C, Try on, NC. 28782.
ATTIC
i'
Weds. Feb. 8
Making of Thriller
9:00 7ft. TV. Beta Hi Fl
Thurs. Feb. 9
Staggerning
I-adies Free till 11.00
Fri. Feb.10
Panic
WZMBH.H.4:30
Sat. Feb. 11
D.C.Star
ECU ShKlcnfi $1.00 oil niflhfc
ammmiifl
�sVs?SN�iN5
Tues. Feb. 14
V
m
yj


P
m
lfvyMv
Bring This Coupon
on Valentines Day
For l 2 Price Membership
($5.00 value)
&
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DECORATE I
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Decorate the hen of your choice at peppers All made-toorder and sen ed
Suhum Our fi.xins" make a hearty on Subway's famous freshly baked
hero�garden fresh lettuce, cheese, rolls. So come in to Subway, where
tomatoes, onions, olnes. pickles and heroes get decorated eivry day.
208
E. 5th St.
75S-7979
?SUBGKrW
Sandwiches A Salads
208
E. 5th St.
758-7979
technique to increase
their speed on the other
days.
The recent cold and
rainy weather has limited
several of the Pirate's
practices because the
university is not equiped
with indoor facilities.
AJthough ECU doesn't
have an indoor track
complex that would
alleviate the weather pro-
blem, Carson is confident
the Pirates can have a
successful season.
"We're starting to jell
together, and once we get
over the hump we'll have
a pretty good track
team Carson said.
"We've had more Ail-
Americans in track and
field then all the other
sports at ECU
combined"
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL
FOUR (4) Tacos
for iust M.39
Not Good With Any Other Special
$2.25 I
or
a Pitcher of Beer
fACQ
CIQ
Feista Time
Everyday
5:00 until
Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight
600 Greenville Blvd. -
Su
aa 'u" ouf o �� � r'ry
�� -�� rOu yOu'
� a �
parat'e le -��"
a.a ar -
n. 9 am to 9 pm
Greenville
��� sae sa. �
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35
'��a "e a��� �;��
ten a-�-?� a �����-�
e a �- � -a
99c
CORONET
Bath
Tissue
Pack
99'
- ���1t
�w�
5SS
M





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
U HRl AR 7, 19K4
Reserve Smith Plays Inspired Ball
Continued From Page 1
as the 3-14 Pirates were
confronted by a 15-3
George Mason team that
was ranked 10th in the
prestigious R.T. French-
Widmer Eastern College
Poll and had defeated
ECU 83-66 earlier this
year. But the Pirates
never trailed by more
than five points in the
contest and held an im-
pressive 22-8 lead earl in
the game.
The climax began with
14 seconds left in the
game, as ECU'S Grady
made the front end of a
one-and-one to give the
Pirates a 68-66 lead.
However, Grady missed
the second shot and ECU
forward Derrick Battle
was called for a foul
while attempting to grab
the rebound.
That put George
Mason's Ricky Wilson on
the line for a one-and-one
situation also, and the
forward made both to tie
the score at 68-68.
Then, after an ECU
timeout, Robinson
brought the ball upcourt
and passed to Sledge on
the left wing. Sledge
drove superbly to the key,
as he had done all even-
ing, and left his defender
behind. No one from
George Mason converged
on Sledge, and he put up
a high, arching shot that
fell through.
"Keith just took it on
himself Harrison said,
when asked if Sledge's
shot was part of a set
play. "It was just so-
meone that had the guts
to take it on himself
With the win, ECU up-
ped its record to 4-14 and
1-5 in the ECAC. George
Mason dropped to 15-4
and 3-3 in the conference.
Grady led the Pirates in
scoring with 15 points,
while Robinson and Roy
Smith added 14 and 13
apiece.
George Mason's Carlos
Yates, who is second in
the ECAC in scoring with
a 22.6 average, led all
scorers with 23 points.
Smith, who has not
seen much playing time
all season, was thrust into
a close game when ECU
center Leon Bass col-
lected two quick fouls in
the first half. The 6-8
freshman played 30
minutes and was 5 of 7
from the field and pulled
down seven rebounds.
"He's been practicing
better Harrison said.
"We gave him the oppor-
tunity tonight.
"I think Roy Smith
finally realized what our
offense was about
The Pirates held a
38-25 rebound advantage
for the game.
Classifieds
McCorkle First
SALE
B PETE FERN ALD
Soom� U riier
The ECU men's track
team finished last in total
points at George Mason
University oer the
weekend.
Other teams par-
ticipating included Penn
State, George Mason,
Virginia, Maryland and
Wiliam & Mary.
Teammates Steve Rash
and Walter Southrland
tied for fourth in the
55-meter high hurdles
with a time of 7.71.
Sprinters Nathan Mc-
Corkle and Henry
Williams finished first
and fourth in the
55-meter dash with times
of 6.35 and 6.45 respec-
tively.
Eddie Bradley, Willie
Fuller and Rueben Pierce
finished third, fourth and
fifth in the 400-meter
dash with times of 49.24,
49.6 and 49.71.
Greg Richardson and
Rob Rice finished fifth
and sixth in the 500-meter
dash with times of 1:05.4
and 1:05.88.
Rounding out the
Pirate finalists was
Phillip Estes finshing
third in the 300-meter
dash with a time 35.47
seconds.
Some of the Pirates ex-
perienced freak
injuries" that according
to ECU head coach Bill
Carson were acquired
because the runners
"payed the price to win
ECU will complete
their outdoor season
when they return to
George Mason on Feb.
19.
HOUSE FOR RENT: Spacious house
2 blocks from ECU; 7 bdrms, : baths.
Dap. and laasa required. 75J-ST.
PURPLE
WATCHES-ONLY St.M,m-4W4.
MISC.
STUDENTS Interested In part tlma
work with flexible hours! 11 20 00 par
week and up. Only dependable, naat,
and aggressive parsons naad apply
Contact Randall William or Bruca
Spaars �Sat and Sun. at
l-MO-allIM.
CALLING ALL GOOD Studants
(DramafllmTV studants, In par
titular! to coma to tha aid of
NEWPORT PACIFIC, a young and
ambitious motion pictura studio who
naads you NOW
Your rasponsa could put HI in your
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SPRING BREAK t Is right around
tha cornor. Don't miss this yaars
BEST PARTY! Round trip trans, to
DAYTONA BEACH with KEGS 7
nights accom OCEANFRONT at tha
Kings Inn 3 FREE KEG PARTIES.
Pool-sida. Bands, Contasts and more
For mora into, call Mika at 7M 707 or
Buddy at 7M4M aftar JO
PERSONAL
PARTY DIP v, cup manayoisa. V
cup sour crama. 1 tip worstershira
sauca, I tsp. saasoning salt, I tsp
dillwaad, 3 tsp onion llakas, Vi tsp
Accanf. Good with chips A
vegetables
TO THE PHI TAUS Gat raady to
RUMBLE with all tha girls of ALPHA
XI DELTA tonight It will ba on
GANG of a party
RAISE HELL BETA TAUS Ph. Kap
pa Tau is tha JAMMINEST
TO ALL YOU JERKS who live and
dia by Randian philosopy, it's crap
IN MEMORIAM SIMON He was the
King Cat at Overtons Laundromat
Life is too fast to live and he was too
young to die Just more than a pet. he
was Family.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Brown and white Brit
tany Spaniel. Naads medication
Red collar, name "Lucy"
REWARD ph 7M4t4
WANTED
ROOMMATE WANTED � to share
nice house, walking distance to cam
pus. House and bedroom already fur
mined 1125 deposit required, rant
1123 a month plus '� utilities and
phone Neat, responsible typas call
7S2 114, keep trying
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED To Rochester
NY or to Hilton Head IS SC
down I ts tor Spring Break
PLEASE CALL LYNN at
FSB-OB.
flfiiiiiritimiTtiiTTTT
mi
LADIES NIGHT AT
FO n o THE KlIS G AND QUEEN N0RTH
VD and Wed. Feb. 8
Oueefl The Embers
(I II
8-12
All Dinii . costumers dmiffd free.
Coming Feb. 15th- The Fantastic Shaken
College l.D. - FREE Admission
Til 7:30
r lappy r lour tS-fi
Watch ror Special S�turda Nighi Bands!
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SPRING BREAK IN NEW YORK
March 2 � March 9. 1984
B
FAMILY RESTAURANTS
, N 278 M
919) 758 �. '
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Trout. Shrimp
and Deviled Crab
nmnmm umittntit nnnm �tt
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sale at or below the advertised price -n each A4P
specifically noted m this ad
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S20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS. AND SO ON
GOOD ONLY IN Greenville. M
Btwwri now and Fo w �-�� nit�m ntttonm ff�sv
ufacturw � cevntfr-off coupon up to SO" for 6ouM tttetW
valu Of 90041 on national meamrtBciurw cvms-oft
couponi only (Food '��� coupon not Kcaptjcd
Custom muat purcfwjM coupon product � �pmciDmC
�� E Kpvrtad coupons win noi te honorad On coupon
paw custom par tl�wn Mo coupon doubted tor -�
� haMMlNM Of do not appr. 10 AAP or othar mar
coupons �rnatt�ar rnanutacturar is mantmnari or not
MThan ma vaua of ma coupon sicaadi SO or ma ��
of tha rtam this o s ttmrtad To m �� pnea
New York Strips
WESTERN GRAIN FED BEEF
Whole
Boneless
16-20 lb
avg. b
SAVE 60 LB.
Pork Loin Roast
FRESH LEAN COUNTRY FARM
I oin End
WOMEN'S HIALTW
CAAEYOUCAN Atom, a
DEPEND ON. �jcr mot�rrw-oeeofuw by
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ttano you Your totery oomtBrt ond pnvocy afs
aaaurexj Ov r canng 0 c r� Remsng Ceofer
NfJMCSl: � Tij�da - Sorurdav Abortion Ap-
pO�rTTn�s � !�?rx3trimaejfAPorrior�ijpto
1� WastB � Fiat Pregnancy Teats � Very Earty
Prsgnancy Teati � aj inciustve tm fj insurano
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and eOucotton fty wo ,ne r��,W�
oumk
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Present
Draft Night
Tue.FE.B7 IW 130-r.OOHrVS
fiDw'l.So' I? YR6 I 00
NIGHT
SAVE 50- LB.
Rome Apples
EASTERN
5! 'b WW -1 Krnr - tor only I
SAVE 5' EACH
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JUMBO CALIFORNIA
HSSEEa
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5eat toocerp
Savings yA
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ANN PAGE
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Title
The East Carolinian, February 7, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
February 07, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.317
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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