The East Carolinian, January 24, 1984






5foe fzaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 N0vM ,
Tuesday, January 24,1984
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10,000
. vwa
Female Professors
Earn Less Than
Male Counterparts
Who Are The Good Guys?
NKIL JOMMSOM � KCU Photc Lab
Police officers are often the subject of much criticism for their part taking a crash course in breaking and entering. To find out whether
in tnforcing the law. These two officers, however, seem to be thev are controlling crime or contributing to it, see POLICE, page 3.
By DARRYL BROWN
ManactBg Mttor
A survey of faculty salaries
published last week by The
Chronicle of Higher Education
shows women earned 19 percent
less nationwide than men in the
top three college professorship
ranks during the 1982-83
academic year.
The survey of 2,700 colleges
and universities by the National
Center for Education Statistics
revealed that the average salary
for women professors, associate
professors and assistant pro-
fessors was $23,487 compared to
$29,001 for men in the same posi-
tions.
Within North Carolina, UNC-
Chapel Hill paid the highest
salaries to faculty members of all
colleges published in the survey,
with the average salary for a male
full professor set at $43,000. com-
pared to $36,400 for female full
professors.
Only two colleges in the state.
Wake Forest University and
UNC-Greensboro, showed higher
average salaries for women than
men in full professorships.
ECU pays an average of
$30,500 to male full professors,
accoruing to the survey, and
$29,600 to women in comparable
positions, a difference of 2.95 per-
cent.
(The Department of Institu-
tional Research at ECU, however,
put the salaries slightly higher, at
$32,548 for male full professors
and $29,749 for female full pro-
fessors, a difference of 8.6 per-
cent. The figures are for 1982-83
and do not include the School of
Medicine.)
North Carolina was ranked
fifth lowest in the nation in
statewide average salaries for the
top three professorship ranks.
Only Alabama, West Virginia,
South Dakota and Utah had lower
average salaries said the NCFS.
North Carolina was, however,
tied for fourth place in com-
parison of male and female
salaries, according to the study.
Along with five other states.
North Carolina's average salaries
for women were 84 perceni those
of men at the same rank. Alaska
paid closest to equal salaries for
men and women, with women
paid 88 percent of the average
male salary. Nevada and the
District of Columbia were second
and third, respectively.
Lanier To Receive
1984 Immorth Award
ECl
The 1984 John Phillip Immroth
Memorial Award for Intellectual
Freedom will be presented this
summer in Dallas, Texas to Dr.
Gene D. Lanier of the ECU
library science faculty.
The award consists of a citation
and a cash prize and is presented
annually during the annual con-
ference of the American Library
Association by the Intellectual
Freedom Round Table.
The award, named for immorth
who was an author, teacher
scholar, advocate ana defender of
First Amendment rights, honors
the courage, dedication and con-
tribution of living individuals who
have been exemplary in defending
and furthering principles of in-
tellectual freedom. The coveted
award was established in 1976.
Lanier follows author and colum-
nist Nat Hentoff who received the
award in 1983.
As chairman of the Intellectual
Freedom Committee of the North
Carolina Library Association
since 1980 Lanier has presented
more than 75 papers at con-
ferences, professional and civic
meetings in the Southeast concer-
ning the threat of library censor-
ship and the individual's right to
read, view and listen.
A former president of NCLA,
he was appointed by Gov. James
B. Hunt Jr. to serve on the State
Library committee and by the
N.C. Speaker of the House to the
Study Committee on Obscenity
Laws.
Dr. Lanier is a native of Con-
way, North Carolina and holds
degrees from ECU and the
Universitv of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill.
During his tenure he also has
received the Hugh M. Hefner
First Amendment Award in
education, presented to him last
year by the Playboy Foundation,
and the Mary Peacock Douglas
Award by the N.C. Association of
School Librarians for his efforts.
Lanier's career has also includ-
ed high school teaching, a term as
counterintelligence specialist in
Western Europe, several universi-
ty library posts as well as visiting
Discussion On Faculty Salaries Increases
Professors Not Satisfied
Gene Lanier
professor at UNC-Chapel Hill.
He was chairman of the Depart-
ment of Library Science at ECU
from 1966 to 1981 and has served
as consultant to over 50 libraries
across the state.
He currently is also serving on
the Intellectual Freedom Commit-
tee of the Southeastern Library
Association, as parliamentarian
and member of the Research
Grants Committee of the N.C.
Advisory Council of People for
the American Way. He also co-
taught an honors seminar in the
ECU Honors Program last year
on literary censorship.
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
�MVSMtai
iiccause ot a resolution passed
by the Board of Trustees at
N.C.State Uuniversity concerning
faculty salary inequities in the
UNC System, discussion of the
topic has increased, particularly at
ECU.
The resolution passed by the
NCSU board deplored the ap-
parent structural inequality in the
salary system, which pays UNC-
CH professors an avearage of
seven percent more than NCSU
professors, although both schools
are ranked as equal by the
American Association of Univer-
sity Professors (AAUP) as
doctorate-level institutions.
The UNC system uses AAUP
standards to set salaries. The
AAUP divides universities in
North Carolina into six
catergories, with UNC-CH and
NCSU in the highest category and
ECU in the second division.
Many ECU professors are
dissatisfied because they claim
they are paid salaries no higher
than faculty in schools of a lower
category. "There is a vast institu-
tional discrimination said
former ECU Faculty Senate
Chairman Henry Ferrell of the
Department of History, "which
allows some schools sucl as UNC-
Asheville, which doesn't even
have masters programs, to
grant salaries that are nearly
that of ours He added, "Friday
(President of the UNC system)
and the Board of Governors want
Carolina to be the flagship of the
fleet, which is fine, but we should
be paid according to our stan-
dards
Angelo Volpe, ECU vice
chancellor for academic affairs,
also voiced concern. "Over the
past few years, when we had
double-digit inflation, salary in-
creases simply didn't keep up
Volpe said.
The topic is expected to be
discussed at today's meeting of
the Faculty Senate, which will be
held in Mendenhall Student
Center room 244 at 2:15 p.m.
Night Transit Service To Resume
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Co-New tAllot
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Style10
Sports13
Classifieds16
� Terry Long talks of plans
to finish school before joining
the National Football League.
See page 11.
� Black playwright's tale of
social injustice in North
Carolina is chronicled in his
play Home, page 8.
� See the new Mick LaSaile
advice column on page 10.
� The Lady Pirates rallied to
defeat ASU 63-51. See page 11
for more details.
� The Kevex Corporation of
California donates state-of-
the-art technology to the ECU
School of Medicine. See story,
pageS.
� The latest recording ef-
forts by Cyndi Lauper and
The Pretenders are reviewed in
a special feature la the Enter-
tainment Section. See page 9.
Naso Claims UNC-ASG
Shares Ideas, Problems
The University of North
Carolina Association of Student
Governments is the strongest it
has ever been, said SGA President
Paul Naso after attending a
meeting at UNC-Asheville Friday
through Sunday.
The UNCASG consists of stu-
dent government presidents from
each of the sixteen universities in
the UNC system.
It usually meets once a month
to discuss policy and to "share
ideas, struggles, dreams and
goals according to Naso.
Nine presidents attended the
meeting and 11 schools were
represented. Together, these
presidents represent over 100,000
students. "It sort of overwhelms
you when you think you're
representing so many students and
their concerns Naso said.
A new computer network has
made communication between the
schools easier. "Our biggest pro-
blem is communication, both on
the state level and between the
president and constituents Naso
said. The network should make
communication more efficient he
said.
The presidents are working to
promote attendance at meetings
The SGA Night Transit bus ser-
vice will resume operation again
this week with funds provided by
the SGA. During Monday night's
SGA meeting, $1,900 was ap-
propriated to fund the service
which had recently gone
bankrupt.
Initial funding for the Night
Transit service came from the
SGA Refrigerator Rental Fund.
However, when that fund was ex-
hausted, the bus service discon-
tinued operations. Service will
resume again Friday, but on a
limited basis.
According to SGA Transit
Manager Bill Hilliard, there will
only be one bus operating and it
will only run on Friday and Satur-
day nights between 10 p.m. and 1
a.m. The bus will stop at College
Hill, Cannon Court, Eastbrook,
River Bluff, Kings Row, and
Village Green.
One of the largest costs
associated with operating the
Night Transit Service is the cost of
security for the buses. Director of
Security Joseph Calder said the
Department of Public Safety will
cover the cost of security for the
remainder of the semester.
A bill proposing an increase in
student fees of $1 per student was
presented by SGA President Paul
Naso. The increase would be used
to fund the Night Transit Service
in the future and any surplus
would be used to help fund a pro-
posed computerization of the
SGA. The bill was sent to the Stu-
dent Welfare and Appropriations
Committee for further study.
Naso also presented a report on
the meeting of the University of
North Carolina Association of
Student Governments he recently
attended (see story this page).
Also at the SGA meeting Monday
night, Kirk Shelley was elected
Speaker of the House to replace
Chris Townsend who resigned last
week.
Paul Naso
and increase student awareness of
the organization. Naso is chair-
man of the Publicity and
Awareness Committee.
The UNCASG is currently in
the process of expanding to in-
clude a legislative assembly. This
should give students a more viable
voice, Naso said.
Also attending the meeting were
Mark Niewald, president of the
Student Residence Association;
David Whitley and Musette Steck
from WZMB; Jimmie Hackett,
president of SOULS; Sarah
Coburn, SGA secretary; and Jim
Ensor, an SGA legislator.
MBIL JOHNSON � BCU
Robert G. Crounce works with ECU'S new Ultra-trace 0600. The equipment was donated to the
Medical School hy Kevex Corp. See EQUIPMENT oa pate 3.

� a- -J�- m
���.





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1984
?
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
unct �
Published every Tuesday and
Thursday during the academic
vear and every Wednesday dur
� ng the summer
The East Carolinian is the of
f'ciai newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated and published tor and
by me students of East Carolina
University
subscription Rate M yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the OM South
Building on the campus of ECU,
Oreenvllte, NX
POSTMASTER Send address
changes to The East Carolinian.
Ola South Building, ECU Green
Vlllt NC 2734
Telephone '57-43. M7, 30�
TURN USON
The Tenms Shoe Talk show air
each Tuesday and Thursday at 2 30
and 5 30 p m on FM �1 3 This show
features participants interviews and
s designed to keep the intramural
participant up to date on the latest In
intramural action Remember, Turn
os gn The Tennis Shoe Talk Show
COMPUTERS
The East Carolina Microcomputer
I sers Group (ECMUGi win hold a
specai meeting fo elect new officers
on Thursday Jan 26 at 7 30 p m in
room 248 Menaenhall Student
Center AH members m good standing
are urgeo to attend
PHI BETA SIGMA
The Brothers of the Xi Nu Chapter
-t the Phi Beta Sigma Fraternity inc
sre having their formal Smoker on
esoav January 24. at I 00 p m In
fenoenhaM Student Center room
221 We invite all young men who
�vant to be acquainted the new
jeoera'ion to be there
HYPNOSIS
Do you really know what it Is?
Came firto out on Feb 1 at 7 30 p m In
Speight 129 Dr Daugherty gives an
teresting and exciting talk Who
r�ows he might even hypnotize you!
p� Chi Rush Did you miss it last
� n ' ve'l don t let it pass you by
semester To qualify you must
iave completed 8 hours in psychology
. � dose o the spring semester if
. ou are a sophomore you must have
Si east a 2 70. a junior 2 70 and a
senior 2 93 So, if you qualify, pick
jp our application in the Psi Chi
brary ana loin the National Honor
Society in Psychology
es Chi Scholarships art now
�vaiacie To qualify tor the Wray
�no Prevett Scholarships, in order of
-importance are You must be a
�nem&er of Ps Chi You must be con
tinumg at ECU for at least the follow
ng semester Preference goes to
Psychology maior or a graduate stu
jerri n Psychology You must be an
active Tjmmr of Psi Chi and
aemonstrate a financial need
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS
Applications are naedad from those
persons who are interested In becom
'ng Paraonal Care Attendants to
wheelchair students We are par
tlcularly Interested In anyone who
has a background of assisting in
dlvlduals wm their activities of dally
living
For further details, contact Office
of Handicapped Student Services. 212
Whlchard Building, Phone 757 A7V9
INTERN PROGRAM
Approximately 115 lobs are
available in this program Pay is
13 73hr for full time positions
Beginning June 1 August 10. 1994
Students must have finished tnelr
sophomore year and have a 3 5 GPA
Graduate students are also eligible to
apply Application deadline Is
February 7 Interested students
should contact the Coop office, 313
Raw' Bldg . If Interested Details
about this program will be presented
at our regular Coop seminars
scheduled for January 11 from 13
noon to 1 PnA and January 12 from 4 5
PM In 306 Rawl Bldg
ROLLER HOCKEY
Reglstrsation for intramural roller
hockey will be held January 23 and 24
This activity utilizes 3 men and 3
women Play will begin January 30 at
Sportsworld Registration for roller
hockey Jan 23 and 24. Memorial Gym
room 204
WORKSHOP
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service In the Bloxton House Is
offering these one hour sessions to aid
you In developing better Interviewing
for use in your lob search A film and
discussion of how to interview
through this service win be shared
Each session win be held in the
Career Planning Room at 3 p m
Come on any of the following dates
Jan 17, 23, or 31
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
Feb 14 Dance Factory. Short Novel
Masterpieces and Conversational
German. Feb 31 Camera and
Guitar Contact Continuing Educa
tion. Erwin Hall
MICROWAVE OVEN
TESTING AVAILABLE
The ECU Student National En
vironmentai Health Association
(SNEHA) is providing a microwave
oven testing service to the residents
of Greenville and surrounding areas
if you art concerned about the safety
of your oven or are merely cur.ouS
call to set up an appointment anct a
representative will come out. check
your oven for microwave leaks and
answer any questions you might
have Appointments can be made by
calling the ECU Department of En
vironmentai Health office at 757 6961
ext 237 between I 00 am and 5 00
p m Monday through Friday A 13 00
donation is requested to help support
this ana other SNEHA service ac
tlvlties
ILLUMINA
The Student Union and the Art Ex
hlbltlon Committee Invites all ECU
Students to enter the 19�4 lllumlna
Art Competition Works will be ac
cepted from 12 6 p m on Friday.
February 3, 19U4 In Room 34 of
Mendenha Student Center The en
tries are $3 00 per piece with a limit of
three entries per artist Awards con
sist of Best In Show 1300 00. First
Place S300 00. Second Place $150 00,
Third Place 1100 00, and Honorable
Mentions $35 00 lllumlna Come ex
perlence It
MARKETING MAJORS
The American Marketing Associa
tion will hold Its first meeting of the
spring semester Tues , Jan 34 at 3:00
p m In 130 Rawl Dr Edward
Wheatley will speak on "Marketing
Yourself " All recently accepted
Business malors and present
members are urged to attend Come
out and be a part of your organize
tion
RUGBY
The East Carolina Mens Rugby
Team will have its first team meeting
Tues , Jan 34th to discuss spring
schedule and Ft Lauderdale Tourna
ment The meeting will be in the base
ment of Memorial Gym at 6 00 p m
Anyone wishing to play this season is
urged to attend Newcomers are
welcome Call Wayne 752 80-41 or Bob
by 752 8716 tor more info Practice
starts Feb 7
INTERN PROGRAM
The NC institute of Government
Summer Internf rogram provides 24
Internships in government for
outstanding students from a variety
of academic backgrounds Students
must have completed their
sophomore year to be eligible Ap
plication deadline is February 7 Con
tact the Coop office, 313 Rawl
Building to apply
ECONOMICS
The School of Home Economics Is
initiating a weekly seminar on
Wednesdays 4 00 5 00 p m Room
248 Home Economics Building We ;n
vite you to attend and participate
The Series will be kicked off by Dr
Carolyn Lackey North Carolina
State University She will discuss
-esearch on Pica Behavior of Preg
lant Women Dr Lackey prepared
this material for a National Academy
of Scences Committee on Alternative
Dietary Practices and Nuturional
Abuses in Pregnancy
Other scheduled seminars include
Feb 8 Victorian Houses in Dunn.
North Carolina. Dr Patricia Rice
Clothing and Housing Feb 15
Children and Divorce. Dr Jane
Teleki. Child Development ana Farm
ly Relation Fat) 22 Experimental
Techniques in Fish Nutr:tion. Dr
Margie Gallagher Food. Nutrition
and institution Management. Mar 4
Gastric By Pass. Dr Evelyn Settle
Food Nutrition and Institution
Management Mar 21 To be an
nounced Dr Vicki Berger Cloth ng
and Housing Mar 28, Liquid Reduc
totg Diets, Ms Janet Bryan. Food.
Nutrition and Institution Manage
ment
EVENTS COMMITTEE
The Student Union Special Events
Committee will meet on Tuesday.
Jan 24, at 5 15 p.m In the Coffehouse
of Mendenhall Student Center. All
members and Interested students are
encouraged to attend
RESUME WORKSHOPS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service In the Bloxton House is
offering one hour sessions to help you
prepare your own resume Few
graduates get ubs without some
preparation Many employers re
quest resume showing your educa
tion and experience. Sessions to help
will be held In the Career Planning
Room at 3 p.m. Come on any of me
following dates January 16, 34, or 30
CAN YOU MEET THE
CHALLENGE
We have received the Federal Sum
mer Job Booklet in our office if you
art interested, please come to the Co
op office, 313 Rawl Bldg as soon as
possible Many of the deadlines are In
lr very near future Students with
less than a 35 GPA have only a
slim" chance of being chosen We
will be happy to help yov complete
and mail required forms
PARKS & RECREATION
NC Parks and Recreation offers
employment opportunities for
seasonal employees for the period of
approximately June 1 through Labor
Day Applicants must agree to report
back to duty for the Labor Day
weekend to be considered This Is a
condition of employment A variety of
positions are available Application
deadline is March 15. 1984 Apply at
the Coop office. 313 Rawl Building
SUMMER CAMP
EMPLOYMENT
its surnmer camp employment
time Are you interested Summer
Camp representatives will be in
Mendenhall Student Center, from
11 00 am to 3 00 pm Tuesday
January 31. to interview students n
terested m summer employment
Jobs available include, but are not
limited to Counselors, Lifeguards
Cooks and dietitians. Nurses. Arts
and crafts directors. Waterfront
Assistants. Sailing and canoeing
directors Recreation Counselors.
Persons skilled in swimming, rlflery,
nature lore horseback riding, sports
and other areas
These positions will provide
valuable work, experience and salary
Some jobs i involve working with
handicapped campers
Job information is available in the
Cooperative Education Office. 313
Rawl Bldg
Summer Camp Employment Day is
sponsored by the following offices
Career Planning and Placement
Cooperative Education Counseling
Center Handicapped Student Ser
vices Program for Hearing imparied
Students, and Parks, Recreation and
Conservation
Contact the Cooperative Education
Office, 313 Rawl Bldg Telephone
757 6979 or 757 6375 immediately to
arrange interviews
AED
Alpha Epsllon Delta, ECU prm
medical society, will meat on Tues
day, Jan 34 at 7 30 p.m In Flanagan
307 Or Frank Thomas, Dept of
Surgery at ECU Medical School, will
speak about Transplants There will
be a meeting for all pledges at 7:15
p m on January 34 to discuss impor
tant Information. All members and
Interested guests are encouraged to
attend
BACKPACKING
Outdoor Recreation is sponsoring a
backpacking workshop on Wednes
day Jan. 35, at 7 00 8 00 p m. The
meeting will be in Memorial Gym
Room 102 The topic will be "How to
pack a pack" and will cover selecting
a pack, equipment needed, weight
distribution and much more Both
cold and warm weather camping will
be covered This presentation Is ex
cellent for beginning and In
termediate campers For further in
formation call John Sauage at
757 6911 Mon & Frl 15, Tues 8.
Thurs. 3-4.
SNCAE
The Student North Carolina
Association of Educators will meet
Tuesday. Jan 24, at 4 p m In Speight
129 Mr wolford Thomas, Regional
Representative of NCAE, will ad
dress the benefits of SNCAE
membership, Membership appllca
tions will be available AH members
and Interested students are encourag
ed to attend
OUTDOOR EQUIPMENT
WANTED
To All Backpackers, campers.
Rock Climbers, Sailors, canoers,
Rapellors and outdoor enthusiasts
The Outdoor Recreation Center m 113
Memorial Gym is now providing a
sen and swap board This is an ex
cellent opportunity for you to bty
more equipment To find out more
stop by 113 or call John Sauage at
757 6911 between 1 5 on Mon & Frl
Tues & Thurs 2 4
DON'T BE LEFT BEHIND
use the CLASSIFIEDS
LmimimmimiWiimiWiH
Hiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiniiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiniiiiii'
Art- you concerned with "lift iftei th assi
it and get involved: Complete this form . . .today!
� � wit!
a Art Exhibition
� Coffeehouse
a Special Events
Committee Choices
�ilm
a Major Attracti
a I ravel
a Minority Art
Spei : i
STUDENT UNION APPLICATION FOR COMMITTEE MEMBER
Vou should be notified by the chairperson in about a month If you are not notified in 30 days pleas� inquire All applications should be
turned into Room 234 in Mendenhall Student Canter Committee choices ara listed above
�. , �
Local Address
Class Grade Point Average Maior
Local Phone
1 What committeersi are you applying for?
2 What previous work lit any have you had in the field of entertainment?
3 Have you lad any eipenence m advertising & publicity' If so explain
4 Why are you seeking this position?
5 What time will you most likely be reached (if you have a phonel'
6 Are there any other statements that you would like to make that might be relevant to your seeking committee membership'
Rush Tonight
Sigma
Phi
Epsilon
Tues. 24th Casino Night 8:00 - 11:00
Wed. 25th Informal Smoker 8:00 - 11:00
505 East Fifth Street
Across Art Building & Garrett Dorm
For Information or Ride
Qll 752-2941 or 752-6502
CATCH THE RUSH BUS!
RUSH PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers and Little Sisters of
PI kappa Phi Fraternity would like to
Invite all interested men to our house
all this week for RUSH Monday night
we have "Game Room and Pliia
Night Tuesday night "Pig Picking
and Bon Fire Night" and Wednesday
night Is "Casino Night " Come by the
house with me lake on Hooked Road
and see why you should RUSH Pi
Kapp All parties begin at 8 00 p m
Buses will run from I 1 p m if you
miss the bus call the house for a ride
(754 153) Come out and meet the Pi
Kapps.
WRESTLING
Intramural Arm Wrestling sign up
begins on Monday, Jan 30 31 Co
sponsered by Budweiser, this activity
will be held in the lobby of Memorial
Gym T shirts will be given to eacn
participant Sign up by weight
classification Remember registra
tion for Arm Wrestling will be Jan
30-31
ART EXHIBITION
COMMITTEE
The Student union AM E�hioition
Committee will meet on Tuesdar
Jan 24. at 4 p m in room 241 of
Mendenhall Student Center All
Members and interested students are
encouraged to attend
EPISCOPAL WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of Holy
Communion win be celebrated on
Tuesday evening, Jan 24 in the
chapel of St Paul's Episcopal
Church, 406 4th St (one block from
Garrett Dormi The service will be at
5 30 p m with the Episcopal
Chaplain, the Rev B'll Hadoen.
Celebrating
ORIENTATION
The Office of the Assoc ate Dean
Orien'atlon and Jud'Oary ocated m
Whichard Budding, room 210, is now
taking applications for the Summer
Program of New Student Or .entat on
PRC
Hey all you PRC club memoers
come out to our first meeting of the
semester Tuesday, Jan 24. at 7 30
pm In room 24 Mendenhall WewiH
be taking orders tor T shirts setting
up new committees hav ng a mini
workshop and refreshments See rou
there
INTER VARSITY
At Infer varsity Christian
Fellowship Wednesday night, we w II
hear someone speak on Winning the
Battle With Temptation " Come to
Jenkins Auditorium at 6 30 c m so
you can learn how to win four pat
tiesl
BIBLE DISCUSSIONS
Let's get back to te Bible1 Coed
Group Bible Discussions Mendenhall
212. Tuesday. 7 X p m Everyone
Welcome
MAJOR ATTRACTIONS
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Maior At"sc
tions Comm-ttee win meet on
Wednesday Ja 25 a1 5 15 p W n
room 212 of MenoenhaM Student
Center All memoers and "itrn'tc
students are encoc-ager' to attend
SCUBA DIVING
Dive the Bahamas jnrj the uma
is.ands seven days on the 65' dive
boat "Bottom Time includes 3
mea's. lodgmg ano d'vmg Ply from
Ft Lauderdale to Nassau For
registration ana informs'on ca" Ra�
Scharf. Director of Aquatics at
757 6441 or 756 9339 Total cost J66C DC
includes a $100 00 non reundabie
leoosit
CONCERTS COMMITTEE
-he - on SpecialConcarti
Con� ftaa meal an jtvra,
Jan 24 a' 5 30 p m n 'oom 347 o
Mendenhai Student Center A
member anc nltrested student! era
encouraged to attend
MINI SERIES
A two part mmi series offeree a'
NO COST by the Counseling Center
How to succeed in college and tttl
have tun, Monday, Jan 30 from 4 5
p m and 'How to avO'd test
anxiety, Tuesday, Jan 31 Iron �
p m Both sessions win be conouctec
n 305 Wright Anne 75' 666
Advance Registration Necessar
KAPPA DELTA
kappa Delta Sorority .n. �es a
ECU women interested In G'e�� H
to attend a S more rush pe
Tuesday Jan 31. from Up-
ndes or more information ca
75 33S6
CADP
There win 0 a meeting of the Ca"
Pus Alcohol " Drug P'ogran-
26 at 3 00 p m ,n Erw �- Ma
' a ' ng Of counselors " Creg -
All interested person 8'e nvlted ��
attend
NAACP
The ECU Chapter of NAACP
hold its first meeting or yveonesda.
January 25, at 5 00 p m -
feehouse of Menaenna
Center Everyone 'S we - �
tend'
ANNOUNCEMENTS
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or the Tuesday cape'
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DEADLINE: January 27, 1984
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44
Lowest TV Rental
Prices In Town!
Now Selling Telephone Equipment
WEDNESDAY
SPECIAL
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for iust M.39
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Something That You Will
Always Treasure!
JCT8.
Your Official ECU Class Ring
Date: J�n. 24& 25 Time: 9:00-4:00pm
Place; Student Supply Store - Wright Building
HERFF JONES
WmkWm O CaViaf0A c�
sJt �" "V '
flf i�- a �
s f "
� JafHwi�
Equ

A Westoast mai
sophisticated ek
ment has donated om
units to the EC
Medicine so rese
plore additional apt
this technology to
biomedicai resea-
The device,
ice 0600. wai d �
Corp. o- tcr

the market valu�
range '
The Ultra
cess know
Police Bi
C
B TINA MAR'
Repor
ment
rime at EC I
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rep
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Jan. t
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Had-
10
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ident .�
reported re.
phone calls. 15
cle at VChne dorr
12 30 a.m. � Levi I
Leroy Harris. va.s
felonious entrv and I
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Avar
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24. 1984
MINI SERIES
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$1.39
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Equipment Donated To ECU Med School
ECVNr-i
A West Coast manufacturer of
sophisticated electronic equip-
ment has donated one of its major
units to the ECU School of
Medicine so researchers may ex-
plore additional applications of
this technology to medicine and
biomedical research.
The device, called an Ultra-
trace 0600, was donated by Kevex
Corp. of Forter City, Calif.
Medical school officials e timate
the market value of the unit in the
range of $130,000.
The Ultra-trace 0600 uses a pro-
cess known as X-ray fluorescence
Police Blotter
spectroscopy to analyze the
elemental composition of virtually
any material. The technique has
been used for a number of years in
such fields as geology and
metallurgy, where bulk samples
are analyzed to identify the com-
ponents of, for instance, mining
ore.
"We're planning to explore the
application of this kind of
analytic technology to the
biomedical sciences said
medical school spokesman Dr.
Robert G. Crcunse. He added
that the studies will represent "a
new area" of research.
In turn, the scientists will report
on their experience with the Ultra-
trace 0600 to the Kevex Corpora-
tion, providing feedback the com-
pany will use in product develop-
ment.
Crounse called the donation
"an excellent example of co-
operation between industry and
academic medicine
"This was only the second in-
strument donated by Kevex to an
institution related to biomedicine
in the United States, so we're ex-
tremely fortunate Crounse said.
The donation was arranged
through Dr. Selig R. Gellert of
Kevex by Crounse and Dr. John
R. Bray, director of the medical
Campus Crime Low
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Co-Nrwi Editor
Reports from the ECU Depart-
ment of Public Safety reveal that
crime at ECU is about average so
far this year. Francis Eddings,
assistant director for police ser-
vices, said the number of campus
crimes varies from week to week.
"According to the number of
reports, we're running on
schedule for what we've been do-
ing for the past couple years
Eddings said. The following blot-
ter includes incidents reported
from Jan. 15 to Jan. 23.
Jan. 15, 2:25 a.m. � Ronald
rteid was arrested for assault dur-
ing an affray at the Afro
American Culture Center: 2:40
a.m. � Timothy Blackmore Kelly-
was arrested for DWI.
Jan. 16, 3:05 p.m. � A bicycle
was stolen from a rack at Green
dormitory; 7 p.m. � Joseph
Hayden Tucker was served with a
summons for a worthless check;
10:30 p.m. � Barry Rannhamby
was arrested for writing a bad
check.
Jan. 17. 1.05 a.m. � A female
student in Fletcher dormitory-
reported receiving harassing
phone calls; 1:50 p.m. � A bicy-
cie at White dormitory' was stolen;
12:30 a.m. � Levi Johnson, alias
Lcroy Harris, was arrested for
felonious entry and larceny.
Jan. 18, 1:40 a.m. � Seth
Thomas Sweeney was arrested for
DWI and assault on a police of-
ficer.
Jan. 19, 1:14 a.m. � A female
in White dormitory reported
receiving harassing phone calls;
2:50 a.m. � A fire extinguisher
case on the third floor of Garrett
hall was vandalized; 3 p.m. � A
female in Fletcher dormitory
reported receiving harassing
phone calls; 2:45 a.m. � Police
discovered that five state vehicles
had been tampered with; 11:55
a.m. � A vehicle in the north
parking lot at Minges was broken
into and stolen; 5 p.m. � A
female in Jones dormitory
reported receiving harassing
phone calls.
Jan. 20, 1:30 a.m. � Joseph
James Abney was arrested for
DWI. 2:50 a.m � Thomas
Steven Clancy was arrested for
DWI; 4 p.m. � Joseph Stevens
Haick was presented with a sum-
mons for a worthless check; 4:15
p.m. � Gary Marder was
presented with a summons for
writing three bad checks; 2:05
p.m. � A hit and run accident in-
volving a pedestrian was reported
east of Cotton dorm; 6 p.m. �
Karen Suzanne Townsend was
presented with a summons for
writing a bad check; 6:15 p.m. �
Kevin Michael Fox was presented
with a summons for writing a
worthless check; 6:30 p.m.
Alan Smith was presented with a
summons for writing a bad check.
Jan. 22, 1:30 a.m. � Jeffrey K.
Pegues was arrested for disorderly
conduct and threatening a police
officer at the Afro American
Culture Center. 2:15 a.m � The
lobby door of Bclk Hall was van-
dalized; 8:30 p.m. � An affray
and vandalism occurred on the
fifth floor breezeway of Scott
Hall; 8:30 p.m. � A female's
vehicle was vandalized behind
Joyner Library.
Jan. 23, 12:06 a.m. � A female
from Greene Hall was threatened;
6 a.m. � Officers discovered that
a vending machine in Fletcher
Hall was vandalized and its con-
tents were stolen. The same crime
occurred at 6:30 a.m. in Umstead
Hall.
Advertise
With The
ian
The East Carolina Playhouse
presents
Studio Theatre of
the Messick Theatre Arts Center
January 25-28, 8:15 p.m.
Tickets: $2.00 � Call: 757-6390
Awards:
COME EXPERIENCE
THE 198A ILLUMINA
COMPETITION OF ART
Sponsored by the Student Union
Art Exhibition Committee
Entries will be accepted at the
Student Union - 12:00 - 6:00 - February 3, 1984
The Opening Reception is at 7:00 P.M.
And Will be held on Sunday, February 5, 1984
Best in Show - $300.00
1st Place - $200.00
2nd Place - $150.00
3th Place - $100.00
Honorahle Mentions $25.00, Purchase Awards
Call 757-6611, ext. 210 for more information
school's Trace Element
Laboratory. Crounse said the
device will be housed in a new
shared instrument facility at the
medical school for broad use by
many departments rather than to
support the work of one or two in-
dividual scientists.
The Ultra-trace 0600 will allow
biomedical scientists to determine
the elemental composition of the
tiniest samples of organic matter
such as a single human hair or a
drop of blood serum by determin-
ing the distribution of minerals,
metals and trace elements in such
samples. They may then be able to
delineate imbalances having
medical implications.
Scientists have been able to
make such determinations in the
past using other sophisticated
methods, but Crounse said the
Ultra-trace 0600 improves upon
those methodsin a number of
ways. The new unit can use much
smaller samples, the samples are
more easily prepared, and the
device can measure the amounts
of many elements simultaneously
rather than one at a time.
The ability to analyze smaller
samples can be extremely
beneficial when large samples are
difficult to obtain, Crounse
noted, as in the case of a liver
biopsy or an analysis of blood
serum from a premature infant.
Crounse stressed, however, that
at this point the device is being us-
ed only on a developmental basis
and not for routine patient
laboratory work.
Once that Crounse and Bray are
comfortable operating the new
equipment they will be inviting
colleagues from the medical
school and from the main ECU
campus to take advantage of it in
their research. Already the Trace
Element Lab is "backed up" with
requests from potential users of
the new machine, Crounse.
Say something loving on February 14.
Valentine's Day Cards
Creative excellence is an American tradition.
Central Book & News
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 9:30 till 9:30 7 Days a week
THE KAPPA SIGMA
FR AT E R N IT Y
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700 E 10th Street
Greenville. IMC 27834
SPRING RUSH WEEK 1984
January 23 rd - 25 th
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THE MOST WANTED MAN IN THE COUNTRY
Monday: Letter Night
Tuesday: Casino Night With The Playboy
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BESIDE DARRYL'S 1907
For more information call: 752-554
i �

V- if
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?
�te Eaat (Earnlimatt
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C.Hunter Fisher. .v�.��r,
Darryl Brown, �.���,�,�,
J.T. PlETRZAK, rector of Advertising
JENNIFER JENDRASIAK. CW� �� MARK BARKER. o�Wn Wfl
Tina Maroschak. cm. &, mike McPartland. m. a,
LIZANNE JENNINGS. M� TOM NORTON. Cta ww
Gordon Ipock. �m� Kathy Fuerst. �ft,�, mmm
Ed Nicklas � wmm Mike Mayo, mm a�.
January 24. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Civil Rights
Government Action Still Needed
A letter in today's Campus
Forum questions the justification
for affirmative action programs,
which were recently denounced by
the new Civil Rights Commission.
While there are disadvatages to the
programs, they are by and large ef-
fective and currently necessary, and
the letter fails to explore the real
need for or purpose behind the pro-
gram.
Affirmative action does not judge
people on the basis on skin color, as
the letter says. It simply sets quotas
to counteract racially
discriminatory practices. Judgment
is not involved; a realistic reaction
to all-too-prevalent racial attitudes
in this nation is. The policy makes
sure those who have been
discriminated against have a
recourse.
As the letter says, the ideal is
when one is judged on the basis of
qualifications alone, with no con-
sideration of race or sex. But unfor-
tunately that is not yet the case. Our
society is getting closer to that ideal,
but many minorities can still tell
first-hand stories of discrimination
that significantly affects their lives.
One's distinctions or qualifica-
tions are not diminished if a job is
obtained through affirmative action
provided one shows himself
qualified. Only if that person proves
to be less than capable are his or her
qualifications questioned.
Discrimination is illegal, of
course, but equally obvious is the
fact that its practice continues.
Marijuana smoking is illegal too,
but that doesn't stop most people.
Subtle discrimination continues
despite the law, and enforcement is
difficult. Affirmative action is to
make up not only for past in-
justices, of which there are myriad
instances, but also current racism,
which is less overt but sometimes
just as effective today.
Probably the basic flaw in the
writer's argument is an honorable
one, the belief that racism is essen-
tially gone in this society, and pre-
judice in the workplace no longer
harms anyone. A noble and ad-
mirable idea, but simply not yet the
case. In that just society, where
there is no need for affirmative ac-
tion, all candidates have equal
chances for training and employ-
ment, so a fair percentage of jobs
will be filled by minorities and
women. Quotas will be filled de fac-
to, because if blacks are 20 percent
of the population and have an equal
chance, they'll fill 20 percent of the
jobs. But that is not true today,
which can mean only one thing:
discrimination keeps minorities
from training and employment, in
which case affirmative action is
needed and justified. Quotas are no
burden, then, on a just society and
an unbiased employer, and are
necessary for unjust ones.
The East Carolinian is printing
today the results of Honor Board
cases and a summation of campus
crime reports for the week. The tv.o
stories essentially show students do-
ing things wrong and getting
caught, but the purpose is not to
embarrass or start a juicy gossip col-
umn. Campus police believe, as
seems logical, that reports of weekly
crime actually may deter a few
crimes, and the board's actions are
printed to increase awareness of
that panel's jurisdiction and power.
We hope it is informative and
helpful.
Callers Ought To Name
Costello As The Best Man
By GORDON IPOCK
The campus radio station, WZMB, is
conducting a call-in telephone poll for the
Major Attractions Committee. The pur-
pose is to check the pulse of student
musical tastes. After losing thousands of
dollars over the past couple of years, the
committee has thick-headedly realized that
Charlie Daniels Band is no longer popular
at ECU. So who is popular? The committe
doesn't know. But wisely they've come up
with an alternative (the radio poll) to aug-
ment their usual hit-or-miss method.
WZMB stresses that the results of the poll
will not be an indication of their own tastes
and opinions.
Nobody asked the East Carolinian to
conduct a poll, and nobody asked the
entertainment editor his opinion. I
wouldn't want the headache of conducting
a poll, but 1 will give my opinion for
what it's worth. If you have an opinion,
you can spill your guts in the Campus
Forum on the editorial page. It needs some
input.
John Cougar Metlencamp: This man and
his music are strictly a junior-high act: "a
little ditty 'bout Jack and Diane And the
man is hopelessly confused. In an attempt
to look androgynous (he probably read
that word m the critics' praise of Bowie or
Jagger), the guy just looks stupid. One
minute he's Mr. Macho the bad-ass biker,
the next he's tossing locks of hair out of his
eyes like a Vogue model in a photo session
and pouting into the video camera. This
guy is enough to make the average college
student switch the channel from MTV to
the Macneil Lehrer News Report.
Billy Idol: a great act for the Paddock
Club, but don't bring this fruit to Minges
Coliseum. � . . �
Heart: a throwback to 70s rock, boring
and predictable as a TofJmLi
make a quantum leap from CDB to the 80s
and skip this kind of retrograde rock and
foil. ,
Elvis Costello Fat chance of this guy
coming to Greenville, but Costello is
definitely the best of the lot. He's a proven
innovator, a knowledgeable musician who
understands rock music's roots. He takes
the past and shapes it into the future.
Costello is a class act for most university
campuses, the thinking person's rocker.
Only problem is many students won't be
able to appreciate his talent because they're
put off by his wimpy looks. Rick Spr-
ingfield he ain't � thank God.
Big Country: probably the most exciting
new band of the past year. Just when we
thought guitar-dominated rock was dead,
these guys come up with a new wrinkle.
Fresh, but not bizarre, Big Country is the
band that should prove the biggest draw
for ECU students.
The Fixx: "One Thing Leads to Another"
is being played by every geek lounge act in
the country, and the Ramada Inn circuit is
probably where this band whipped their act
together. Why bring anything this common
to Minges?
Stray Cats: Some insiders at Newsweek and
Time got together and decided to play a
joke on the public, namely the Stray Cats.
The media hype has run out, their second
album has bombed and this gang of runts,
like the old cars they wallow on, is headed
back to the scrapyard of the past. We don't
need a rock-and-roll footnote playing this
campus.
There are only two real choices here,
Elvis Costello and Big Country. The latter
is fresh and exciting, but should still appeal
to the mainline rock crowd which con-
stitutes the largest segment of ECU
students. Although currently not the rage
that Big Country is, Costello has more than
their one album under his belt. This guy
has proven himself over time. Either band
suits me, but if forced to pick one over the
other, I've got to go with Costello. His
large and varied repertoire of music should
make for the better concert. Whoever the
committee selects, I hope they will consider
the tastes of the students when making a
decision rather than what appeals to the
locals.
King's Legacy Unclear Today
By ROBERT WEISBROT
The Nh Republic
Although Martin Luther King's
vaunted place in civil rights history is
assured, the meaning of his leadership
to Americans today is less clear.
Last year's march on Washington,
organized by the King family, attemp-
ted to revive his reform vision, sym-
bolized by his inspirational cry at the
first march 20 years ago, "I have a
dream today Yet while the event at-
tracted a wider range of groups than the
1963 march (including contingents of
Hispanics, gays and women), no
cohesive social movement was in
evidence.
The original march was notable for
the way its chief organizer, Bayard
Rustin, fused its many participating
groups into a disciplined lobby for two
overriding goals: enactment of the civil
rights bill pending in Congress and,
secondarily, a federal jobs program.
By contrast, the quality of diversity
was strained at the recent march, in
which a host of otherwise disparate
placards and speeches all exalted "the
dream" more as a substitute than as
shorthand for a set of political
priorities. King's name was continuous-
ly invoked, and one speaker imitated
his manner in a recital aptly called
"Echoes of Martin Luther King
The tributes were fitting, yet in the
absence of a clear political agenda, they
underscored that the dominant mood at
this gathering for bold reform was
nostalgia.
Campus Forum �
In what direction, then does King's
legacy point for the current generation
of Americans who have enshrined his
name? Admittedly the question of what
King might have done � as with any
figure capable of dramatic growth,
from the Kennedys to Malcolm X �
must remain a matter for speculation.
It is clear, though, that civil rights
laws did not nearly exhaust King's in-
terest in social change. The flaring of
ghetto riots persuaded him that the
non-violent protest movement had to
shift its focus to aid the mass of ghetto
blacks who still lived in economic
misery.
His increasing activity in the northern
ghettos after 1965 also accompanied
growing doubts about the social conse-
quences of capitalism. Although he
continued to reject communism because
it denied individual liberty, King also
criticized capitalist economies which he
felt "Often left a gulf between
superfluous wealth and abject
poverty Increasingly, therefore, he
came to view the reforms of the early
'60's as only a first step toward curbing
disparities of wealth and opportunity in
a society still ridden by caste distinc-
tions.
Though King by no means resolved
the complex technical disputes over
how government programs could best
aid the poor, he contributed a lucid
moral viewpoint in asserting that this
cause should command the nation's
highest priority. Lamenting the
"fragmentary and spasmodic" reforms
that "have failed to reach down to 1
profoundest needs of the poor he in-
sisted that the federal governim
either ensure full employment or pro
vide guaranteed incomes peg : the
median income of society, not at the
lowest levels
King also believed that the
could attract an interracial coalition,
ince two-thirds of the nation's poor
were white. Finals, he termed the
elimination of poverty a moral na c
"if democracy is to have bread
meaning
By such efforts to tempt
with conciliation. King advanced the
cause of the poor, not only a a
who had a dream, but as one who ;
then go tell it on the mountain
American democratic mvth
In all, the nation first com menu
tion of King's life invites not onlv
celebration but also sober cerebration
over his � and the country's � un-
finished tasks. These remain as for-
midable as in his lifetime, though it was
a mark of King's leadership to discern
possibilities for reform equal to everv
test.
Unsparing in his criticism of the
country, he nonetheless believed that
"America, the richest and most power-
ful of nations, can well lead the wa" to
a "revolution if values" that would en-
sure a decent life for all people. In that
faith, he shared his dream of a just
society while realizing that this ideal
still existed, to a challenging degree, on
ly in the realm of his imagination.
Civil Rights Commission Defended
I noticed an editorial in The East
Carolinian saying Reagan was against
civil rights because of the rearrange-
ment of the Civil Rights Commission.
The subject should be analyzed deeper
for its effectiveness. In the spirit of Dr.
Martin Luther King, Jr we should
judge a person by his or her abilities
and the content of his or her character,
not by skin pigment. Affirmative ac-
tion and racial quotas judge a person
by their skin pigment. This is not in the
King spirit; everyone obviously should
agree.
The main reason I have heard in
defense of racial quotas and affir-
mative action is that they will make up
for past injustices. We cannot change
the past, yet we can plan for the future.
People applying for college next year
were born after the passage of the Civil
Rights Act. Should the burden of past
injustices be placed on these in-
dividuals? Should we wipe out one
form of discrimination by replacing it
with another? Or is this the freedom,
justice, and equality King dreamed
about?
I have a dream in which a person's
resume or application for school or
work is judged solely on the
individual's record without a checkbox
stating the person's race. I have a
dream in which a person is judged by
his record and not be his race. Does a
person have the ability to succeed just
because the law says one must be ac-
cepted for a job or school because of
his color? If the law has to guarantee a
place for someone based on race, does
that not take distinction away from his
or her successes?
I don't believe there is anyone in any
minority who will tell me that they
have to have quotas or Affirmative ac-
tion to succeed because their abilities
are inadequate. Let's follow our Presi-
dent in his forward move to realize
King's dream. Remember discrimina-
tion is illegal in job placement and
school applications, so affirmative ac-
tion is unnecessary. How would
minorities fed if the government
decreed that they must hire a certain
percentage of whites in their
businesses? I think they would react as
our president has, and say it's un-
constitutional and against the King
spirit. We should remember this: the
national holiday was made to represent
freedom for all and not subsidize suc-
cess for a few.
Edwin M. Hardy
Sophomore, General College
Stand By ECU
Recently I'm haunted by a ghost of
Christmas past: Echo-ey voices from
blurred eggnog parties saying things
like "EZU recollections of smug
faces atop Carolina blue sweaters. I
returned here with the notion that there
were an alarming number of folks that I
could have � maybe should have �
told to Like a hike. Like Ebenezer
Scrooge it's time we wake up, throw
open the shutters and shout "hey
everybody, we've got a great school
here
The way out from under the dark
cloud of our undeserved reputaiton
begins with a healthy belief in ourselves
as a school that not only plays hard, but
works hard too. If you need help with
that idea, take a look at the medical
school, or the men and women making
and preserving national history by rais-
ing the Union warship Monitor. Read
up on Ed Emory, his personal trials and
accomplishments or the nationally
rated football team he coaches. Find
out about former chancellor Leo
Jenkins or Senator John East. Go to
one of the exhibits at the art school. Ex-
cellence blooms in virtually every facet
of the university, and one need only
reach out to find it.
Any prescription to purge our school
of its invalid labels should include a
massive dose of positive talking up of
ourselves and perhaps a dash of
righteous indignation at those who
don't. The list of good things to say
about ECU is incredibly long, and we
have the right to say every bit of it. As
for those few within the university who
deride it, someone should politely show
them the door.
As surely as there are classes here that
one can glide through, (and what school
can say otherwise), there are also
courses that challenge the brightest
minds, taught by professors who ex-
emplify, demand and receive the verv
best. And as surely as there are students
who avoid the tough courses, there are
students here who eagerly seek them
out.
So, however ECU came about its par-
ty school image, it's time the sins of the
past were no longer visited upon the
undergrads. There was a time when lv
league schools thumbed their noses at a
place called Chapel Hill, and there will
come a time when everyone will know
about schools that little light shines on
now. ECU should be one of them.
Perhaps with only the faith of a
mustard seed to begin with, we can
move the mountainous reputation of
our neighbors to the west over, to
make room for the new kid: East
Carolina University.
Dave Johnston
Senior, Computer Science
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Jovner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of the authorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel, and no personal
attacks will be permitted. Students,
faculty and staff writing letters for this
page are reminded that they are limited
to one every five issues.
Student C
HaJlowgi
Manning
ph
752-31
fosset
Gn
Most
true
dehvi
PIZZ,
all thi
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 19M
fl
h down to the
i he poor he in-
Ideral government
tpioyment or pro-
nes "pegged to the
lociety, not at the
that the issue
I rraciai coalition,
nation's poor
he termed the
a moral necessity
breadth of
protest
I id anced the
as a man
- � ho could
intain of
tin
first commemora-
invites not only
sober cerebration
country's � un-
se temun as for-
rtime, though it was
adership to discern
:m equal to every
m of the
believed that
l And most power-
1 lead the way" to
ies" that would en-
all people. In that
is dream of a just
jing that this ideal
lienging degree, on-
lmagination.
ed
the university who
ould politely show
re classes here that
, (and what school
there are also
ige the brightest
rofessor. who ex-
receive the very
there are students
courses, there are
:agerl seek them
barne about its par-
time the sins of the
visited upon the
a time when Ivy
?d their noses at a
lill, and there will
eryone will know
Jttle light shines on
be one of them,
the faith of a
tin with, we can
�us reputation of
le west over, to
e new kid: East
Dave Johnston
iComputer Science
Rules
in welcomes letters
of view. Mail or
vffice in the Old
ross from Joyner
mfication, all let-
name, major and
phone number
authorfs). Letters
typewritten pages,
Uly printed. All
editing for brevi-
�, and no personal
rmitted. Students,
ting letters for this
it they are limited
MR
Student Oninion
Is Death Penalty Just ?
James W. Hutchins received a stay
of execution from the N.C. Supreme
Court after conviction for slaying three
police officers. Students expressed opi-
nions on this this issue.
Martin Halloway, Computer
Science, Senior � "Well, he will even-
tually have to die. They shouldn't have
prolonged it if he is going to die
anyway
Elizabeth Manning, Business,
Sophomore � "I believe in capital
punishment. If he was sentenced they
shouldn't prolong it. I didn't hear
much about everything that went on
Randy Mews, Broadcasting,
Hattoway
Sophomore
'I don't think he
Manning
should have been given the opportunity
to make an appeal. Anyone who kills
three people in cold blood should be
executed on the spot
Cindy Lee, Special Education,
Sophomore � "He should have been
excuted. He should get what he
deserves. He should pay for what he
did
Most Aid Provided By Government
ByOUIDAHORTON
ran
Lee
���������p
The federal govern-
ment has become the
largest contributor to stu-
dent aid according to a
recent survey published
by The College Board.
The study reveals trends
in student aid over the
past twenty years.
Eighty percent of total
assistance is provided by
the federal government as
compared sixty percent in
the early 1960's. Prior to
1960, aid was mainly in
the form of scholarships
given by individual col-
leges.
Pell Grants, formerly
BEOG, and Guaranteed
Student Loans are the
two largest programs pro-
viding federal student
aid, according to reports
available from the ECU
Financial Aid Office.
The amount of aid
given in grants has
decreased since the early
1970s. During the period
between 1970-1976, 66 to
80 percent of total aid
was awarded in the form
of grants. Currently,
grants make up 48 per-
cent of total student aid,
the College Board survey
said.
in contrast, the percen-
tage of student loans has
increased since the early
1970s. Forty-eight per-
cent of total aid is in the
form of loans. Only
seventeen to twenty-nine
percent of aid was award-
ed in loans from
1970-1976.
According to the study,
the amount of aid
available per student has
increased bv 378 percent
since 1963. However, the
amount of aid available
for the current year has
dropped twenty-three
percent from last year.
Prior to 1980, increas-
ed income and student
aid made it easier for
families to afford the
costs of college.
However, in the 1980's,
income and student aid
have not risen in propor-
tion to the costs of col-
lege, making it tougher
for families who have
children in college.
Read
The
I Classifieds
Honor Board Action
Defendant
Charge
Plea
Decision
Freshman
stealing or attempting
to steal; book stealing
and re-selling.
guilty
The East Carolinian begins today reporting the results of
Honor Board meetings from the previous week. Decisions
will be printed in an effort to make students xiware of the
board's actions, jurisidiction and penalties.
restitution $12.50
one-year probation
60 hours of voluntary
work
$50 fine
ATTIC
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1984
College Students Victims Of Eligibility Rules
WIMLmiNGTON,
Del. (CPS) � When their
voter registration drive
netted over 1,856
signatures in early
November � 356 more
than their projected goal
of 1,500 � the College
Democrats at the Univer-
sity of Delaware basked
in success and optimism.
Two weeks later, the
local election board in-
formed them that all
1,856 signatures had been
rejected because the
group failed to prove the
signers were permanent
residents of state.
At about the same
time, 3,000 Rutgers
students learned they
wouldn't be able to vote
locally because they
hadn't completed pre-
registration forms mailed
to them over the summer.
In October, a New
York election judge
denied State University of
New York College-
Purchase students the
right to vote locally
because campus dor-
mitory addresses cannot
be considered permanent
residences.
It's happened at cam-
pus after campus: the
best-laid plans of am-
bitious student voter
registraiton drives broke
up on the shoals of
peculiar local eligibility
rules, locking students
out of the electoral pro-
Photographer
Needed
at The East Carolinian
Experience with 35mm
preferred. Must lie free
Mondays and Wednesdays
cess.
And it promises to hap-
pen with increasing fre-
quency in the coming
weeks as a variety of
groups and candidates �
the College Democrats,
College Republicans,
Public Interest Research
Groups (PIRGs), Na-
tional Association for the
Advancement of Colored
People (NAACP), United
States Student Associa-
tion (USSA), the Hart
and Jackson campaigns,
among others � all try to
keep promises to help
masses of students
register to vote during the
1984 primary and general
presidential elections.
Many of them are fin-
ding, however, that the
inconsistant and
seemingly-whimsical
voting requirement of
local election officials is a
much bigger problem
than student apathy.
"It really is a big
mess laments Kathy
Downey, who just com-
pleted an in-depth study
of student voter registra-
tion problems for the Na-
tional Student Educa-
tional Fund (NSEF).
"It's really discrmina-
tion against students by
the local election of-
ficials she asserts.
"When local powers get
nervous about the student
vote � the fact that in
many places students
could actually change the
results of an election �
they put as much in the
way (of students register-
ing) as possible
"In some states you
can just mail in post cards
and you're registered
notes Gwen McKinney,
director of the USSA's
voter registration drive.
"In other states you
have to be deputized and
live in the county to be
certified to register peo-
ple she continues.
"The key to avoiding
problems is to provide
project participants with
extensive training and in-
formation on local elec-
tion laws
McKinney
acknowledges "there will
be some problems" with
regional election commis-
sions, but adds "we'll be
working directly with the
ACLU (American Civil
Liberties Union) to pro-
vide legal backup" when
such conflicts occur.
Students have had
clashes with local election
boards ever since 18-year-
olds received the right to
vote in 1972.
One of the first, and
perhaps the most notable
confrontations between
college students and local
election board occurred
in 1976, when Texas of-
ficials disqualified over
500 Prairie View A&M
students from voting
locally.
Election officials said
students had to own pro-
perty, have family, work,
or pay taxes locally to
vote.
Texas law, however
defined "resident" only
as a "fixed place of
habitation and the U.S.
Supreme Court ruled in
1979 the Texas officials
had unfairly placed an ex-
tra burden on students
that it did not impose on
non-students.
Although most student
activists hailed the Texas
Student Legislature
To Sponsor Drive
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Co-Newt Editor
A voter registration
drive will be held Jan.
25-27 at the Student Sup-
ply Store. The ECU
chapter of the North
Carolina Student
Legislature (NCSL) is
sponsoring the drive at
ECU in hopes of getting
more people on campus,
said Lisa Maness, NCSL
vice delegate chairperson
for the organization.
Maness said that the
drive will be open to all
Pitt County residents.
"Even though many
students can't register
here, at least they can
learn what to do when
they do register Maness
said.
Registrars from the
board of elections will be
available for those who
have any questions,
Maness said.
decision as a precedent-
setting case which would
end future discrimination
against student voters, it
hasn't stopped the cur-
rent conflict at the
University of Delaware
and other places.
"It's really blown up
now says Ken Weins-
tein, head of the Univer-
sity of Delaware College
Democrats. "The state
attorney general is suing
the local department of
elections on behalf of the
students, and the ACLU
and AFL-CIO have also
jumped in on our side
"Getting students
registered is a big pro-
blem everywhere
observes Bill Morton,
staff and voter registra-
tion director for the Col-
lege Democrats national
chapter in Washington,
D.C. "It's particularly a
problem when you're
dealing with a high
percentage of minorities
in southern states
Morton hopes .o
minimize hassles with
local election officials by
making sure student
workers and volunteers
are briefed thoroughly on
local election laws and re-
quirements beforehand
Similarly, the national
PIRG campaign to
register students "will
place a real big emphasis
on going through the
right channels to get peo
pie registered says Beth
Pardo, a member of the
Massachusetts PIR
which is coordination the
national voter registra
tion drive.
To drill student
volunteers on such
"basic" information,
PIRG coordinators are
planning a national con
vention and training
seminar in early
February, Pardo says.
Not all student groups
are concerned.
"It's a problem from
time to time, but certainly
not a major one shrugs
Jack Abramoff, presi
dent of the College
Republicans National
Committee, which plans
to register over one
million voters by this fall
"Most Republican
students go out to register
themselves he says, and
are usually familiar with
their local registration re
quirements.
ft
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WASHING
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drinking and
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over the la
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"1 don't cr.
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as severe
Bauer
the Der
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chairman
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School D,
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The Graeaviiie
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The 20-kilometer
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lUUIUIUl





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 24, 1984 7
lies
icnts beforehand
lidriv, the national
campaign to
students "will
a real big emphasis
)ing through the
channels to get peo
iistered says Beth
a member of the
Uchusetts PIRi-
is coordination the
lal oter registra
Inve
drill student
teers on such
information,
coordinators are
lg a national con-
l and training
ar in early
Pardo says.
ail student groups
r erned.
a problem from
tme. but certainlv
r one shrugs
bramoff. presi
the College
is National
nee. which plan.
istei ovci on
this fall
R e p u b 1 i c a
Out to register
' he says, and
.all familiar with
ip a registration re
mts
� - -
w
A � ' 1
aj
25th,
S BEGIN
NIGHT
AT
PM
RE INFO
IDES CALL
-3540
Colleges Unaffected By Stricter Discipline
WASHINGTON, DC.
(CPS) � The Reagan ad-
ministration's recent
release of suggestions to
toughen school discipline
probably won't have
much impact on colleges,
where a crackdown on
drinking and student par-
ties has been in the works
over the last several
years, officials say.
"1 don't think the pro-
blem at the college level is
as severe says Gary
Bauer, undersecretary in
the Department of
Education. Bauer is
chairman of the Presi-
dent's Working Group on
School Discipline, which
recently completed a
report emphasizing the
rights of attentive
students over those who
misbehave.
"The report found that
it (discipline) is such a
significant problem that
it is having an extremely
negative effect on perfor-
mance in high school
Bauer says.
The study, titled
"Disorder in Our
Schools proposes the
departments of justice
and education join local
school districts to curtail
the legal options students
have when suspended.
Reagan will use the report
to focus national atten-
tion on an issue that
needs solving at state and
local levels, Bauer notes.
Bauer concedes the
possibility that some high
school students may carry
discipline problems into
college, or lose their col-
lege opportunity because
of bad behavior.
"But a student's own
self-interest mitigates
against too many severe
problems" in college, he
suggests.
"Students don't have
to be here agrees Dr!
Roland Vuck, assistant
vice chancellor for stu-
dent services at the
University of Missouri.
Most of MU's
disciplinary problems are
handled informally with
an administrator, and
rarely before a formal
studentfaculty judicial
board, he says.
"The trend in universi-
ty discipline is for
students involved in con-
duct cases to have more
administrative hearings
says Dr. Scott Rickard,
vice chancellor for stu-
dent affairs at the Univer-
sity fo Maryland and the
author of a 1981 study on
college discipline.
Students are choosing
to go to administrators
rather than to peer panels
for two reasons, Rickard
surmised.
"I think they have
more trust in the system
now. Students feel they
get more
confidentiality In deal-
ing with administrators,
students "know what the
consequences are
Before their peers, "sanc-
tions are tougher than
they used to be
But Rickard sees no in-
crease in the number of
disciplinary problems on
campuses nationwide. "I
think there's been some
leveling off
Rickard previously
found in a 1980 study
that schools were suspen-
ding students at a faster
clip, increasing form an
average 5.5 per campus in
1979-80 to 7.8 in 1980-81.
Since then, scores of
schools have banned
alcohol as a means of
controlling behavior on
their campuses. Arizona.
Michigan State and
Virginia, among many
others, have imposed
strict new rules to govern
student parties.
Research Skills Taught At Writing Center
By CARLYN EBERT
StafT Writer
An innovative
workshop program
covering research skills
from "Finding a Topic"
to "Revising" begins
next Monday in the
English department's
Writing Center.
Although the week-
long, hourlv workshops
are aimed primarily at
English 1200 classes,
Writing Center Director
Patrick Bizzaro said
they're open to any in-
terested students or staff.
"It's to be more a sup-
plement than anything
else, though if people are
sending their students
from whatever course to
get those kinds of skills in
the Writing Center, then
it seems they wouldn't
need to teach that stuff in
the classroom Bizzaro
said last week. "And
hopefully, the kinds of
research skills we're go-
ing to talk about here ap-
ply to classes other than
just 1200
Each of the four topics
will run a full week, Mon-
day through Friday, with
identical presentations
going on each hour, on
the hour, at the scheduled
times.
For the week of Jan.
30, the theme is "Finding
a Suitable Topic The
following week, beginn-
ing Feb. 6, will cover
"Paraphrasing, Sum-
ing and for the final
week, beginning Feb. 20,
the workshop will cover
"Revising
English
1200 students may attend
at any time on the day
their class meets except
their regular class hour.
The Writing Center is
located in Austin 308 and
marizing and Plagiariz- 309.
Indian Education Is Topic Of Lectures
By OL IDA HORTON
Sun Writer
As a continuing effort
to create awareness of
ethnic diversity, the
School of Education
sponsored a program on
Indian education last
Tuesday. Betty Oxedine
Mangum, director of In-
dian Education for the
N.C. Department of
Public Instruction.
presented a seminar on
the American Indian in
North Carolina.
The program was the
second in a series of lec-
tures on multicultural
awareness. The seminars
are being presented as
part of the School of
Education's effort to gain
reaccreditation.
Mangum, a native
I umbee Indian, spoke
firsthand about the
public's unawareness of
American Indians living
in North Carolina. Ac-
cording to the 1980 Cen-
sus, there are 64,635 In-
dians residing in the state.
In 1977, A. Craig
Phillips, superintendent
of public schools in
North Carolina, decided
there should be a Division
of Indian Education in
the N.C. Department of
Public Instruction.
CROP Walk Planned
By ELIZABETH BIRO
SUf Writer
The Greenville Hunger Coaiiuoa
will sponsor the 12th annual CROP
Walk to raise money for the hungry on
March 25.
The 20-kilometer walk raised ap-
proximately $4,000 last year and is ex-
pected to raise $12,000 this year, accor-
ding to Helen Shondell, a coordinator
of the walk. Twenty-five percent of the
money raised will be used to fight local
hunger through Chruch Ministries
United, Shondell said. Church
Ministries United is a group of local
churches working fogether to serve the
poor.
The other 75 percent, Shondell said,
will go to aid international hunger
relief. Chancellor John M. HoweU's
wife. Okadyt. is expected to be the 1984
chairwoman of the walk, Shondell
said.
Anyone interested can participate in
the walk. Shondell said the Greenville
Hunger Coalition is urging any on-
campus organization, including frater-
nities and sororities, to get involved.
Coordinators for the walk ask that all
groups wishing to participate have a
representative contact the Newman
Center for more information. Other in-
terested persons can also contact the
center for information.
Mangum said, "One of
the reasons for creating
this division was to bring
about more awareness of
the American Indian
tribes living here in the
state
The division promotes
and supports better
academic performance of
the American Indian stu-
dent. To explain the need
for such a division,
Mangum said,
"Historically in our state,
the American Indian stu-
dent has not tested ex-
tremely well, and our tex-
tbooks do not support a
lot of their history
Under the Title IV In-
dian Education Act,
twenty-five public
schools in North Carolina
receive federal funds for
each American Indian
student enrolled in their
school. Aproximately
$1.7 million is allocated
to 16,000 Indian students
in North Carolina. In
order to receive federal
funds, schools must have
at least ten Indian
students enrolled.
Mangum stressed that
teachers should educate
their students about the
North Carolina American
Indian.
ACROSS
1 Kind of latch
5 Stalk
9 Greek letter
12 Sandarac
tree
13 Carry
14 Male sheep
15 Sarcasm
17 Conjunction
18 High
mountain
19 Post
21 Surfeits
23 Stretched
27 Pronoun
28 Warms
29 Obtain
31 Bambi's
mother
34 Babylonian
deity
35 Weirdest
38 Mrs. Kettle
39 Arid
41 Cry
42 Downy duck
44 Printer's
measure
46 Ink
absorbers
48 Spoor
51 Direction
52 Possessive
pronoun
53 Preposition
55 Sowed
59 Writing
implement
60 Transaction
62 Girl's name
63 Worm
64 Goddess of
discord
65 Appear
DOWN
1 Possesses
2 Macaw
3 Posed for
portrait
4 Archbishop
5 Beer mug
6 Infinitive
indicator
7 Greek letter
8 Army meal
9 Boxed
10 Healthy
11 Demons
16 Lifts
20 Easy to read
22 Part of
"to be
23 Lean-to
24 Rip
25 Sun god
26 River in
Scotland
30 Sleeping
sickness fly
32 Hebrew
measure
33 Auricles
36 Take
unlawfully
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
FROM COLLEGE
PRESS SERVICE
37 Snickers
40 Longs for
43 Prefix: down
45 Note of scale
47 Fertile spots
in desert
48 Drink heavily
49 Regrets
50 Be defeated
54 Distant
56 Expire
57 Paris season
58 Obstruct
61 Chinese
distance
measure
12341567891011
121314
15iff1718
i r2012122
26�27
28�2930I 313233
34� 35n38
3414243
4647 I
P1
521551 56 1 57 I 58 1
59&)61 1 62 III
63641 I65! 1 1
1983 United Feature Syndicate. Inc
Classifieds
SALE
3 PIECE FUP.N ��1 Sofa. ItvitNt
and chair. Vary good con UH Call
Boo64o Iryw at JMlWt.
Ipersonal
TO CEO In A BIO COUNTRY:
Baby. I miss you The Beav
DEAR ALL rW. US lbs. giraffes
you'll never gat a data until you gat
your skinny roar back to � tncsn
continent Signad Ed "Tha
Zoofceeper
WANTED
WANTED:
room mat
nonsmoking, responsible
ralaiad atmosphere, two
bocks from campus. Private room.
Rent $U5 mo. �i utilities. Call
7SM114.
MALE ROOMMATES wanted, tilt
per month Includes utilities, phone
and TV with HBO. Showtime and
MTV. Close fo campus. Call 7Sa-740.
WANTED: Musicians needed:
keyboard, guitar, drummeer, horns,
etc. con temporary religiousgospel
music format. Call: Life and Peace
Ministry, 7S1-74M or 7S-14fI Linda
Wilder
FEMALE ROOMMATES needed:
�7.Mmo olus half utilities. 1 Mock
from campus, S blocks from
downtown. Call 7S�-M4�. Ask for Lisa.
DRUMMER NEEDED lor
Rockabilly-Blues Band. Call 122-S5M.
PART-TIME EMPLOYEES wanted
to put up posters on campus now and
throughout itM 2 19 hrsmonth,
M.SAhr. Send name, address, phone
no class year, etc. to Ms. Maury,
3414 Peachtree St N.E Atlanta, OA
1314
MISC.
TIRED OF COLD nasty weather T
Well get ready for spring BREAK
�4 at Dayton Beach. Round trip
trans, with kegs. 7 nights accom.
Ocoanfront at the Kings Inn. 3
pootsMe keg parties, bands, contests
plus lots morel 11 All far only SlfB.gg
For mere Info, call Mike at ru 797
after 4:30 p. m
SPRING BREAK In the
BAHAMAS" 7 nights on Paradise Is.
Round trip let flight, party cruise,
FREE BEER, Transfers, gambling,
and more. SM Call Mitch at 7M-llet.
MCAT: Tha Stanley H. Kaplan
review course for the MCAT is of-
fered at ECU. Course starts Feb. 1,
it4 Deadline for registration Is Jan.
30, l�B4. For more information call
toll-tree i eoo-47i-jtit or 7SB-IS47.
SERVICE IS ALL that we do at the
TECH SHOF and our audio techni
clans don't charge tor repair
estimates. Call us at 7S7-lfM.
? TKE little sisters
Present
rUDENT GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
AND
THE NORTH CAROLINA STUDENT
LEGISLATURE OF THE
EAST CAROLINA DELIGATION
PRESENT A
GUBERNATORIAL
FORUM
DRAFT NIGHT
Wed. Jan. 25, 1984 8:30-1:00am
Adm.$1.50 18yrs$1.00
KHDraft All Night
Come Eariy
JANUARY 27, 1984
2 p.m4 p.m. Candidate Forum
A panel of students will question the
candidates on the issues
that relate to students and the
Greenville community.
4 p.m6 p.m. Candidate Reception
A chance to meet with candidates and
representatives. Hors d'oeuvres and
beverages will be served.
Take advantage of this unique opportunity to hear
the Candidates for Governor
speak at the first forum held in
Our Region of Eastern North Carolina.
Where: Jenkins Fine Arts Center Auditorium
Open to Students and Public
NO ADMISSION CHARGE

-�w "�?��
'�-





Entertainment
One
louse Presents
Tl �T A.
ale Set
If 11II3









'itiiatt ulii 1at. but not
evei ipproves of such fli tie is fr(im the
Samm-Art Williams P!a
life in North Carolina, staged th
r
ltfii
Trading
Places
'To Be Or Not
Movie Cra
Face it: !
.
laughii
In Mel B: To Be
To He. it's Poland
time Polish theatre
their compart) deal -
upation, n
bad guys ai t
tr. Sounds like load
right?
2

Eddie I1uiln
Can a
; ins! mil. a commoditu genius? V ill a
wealth) blue blooded financial wizard res rime
it he's stripped of his riches? Trading Places, a tale oi
altered identies, tells this sidesplitting
(and vice ersa) sti
Directoi lohn Landis (Kentucky Fried Movie)
unleashes the comedic talents ol two zany Saturday
Sight I ie products. Dan Aykn yd a id Eddie Mur
pin i he pan become unknowing guinea pigs in a
bizarre experiment concocted by two bored
billionaire brothers Ihiough trumped-up drug
charges, they bump Aykroyd from Ins prestigious job
and social standing ami ushei in a befuddled Murphy
to take his place When the boys finally catch on to
the scam, they plol to thwarl the eccentric twosome
with a Wall Street swindle oi then own
Newest king ol comedy, Eddie Murphy, tush.
from his critically acclaimed peit.Min.iHvf in 4H
HHS provides nonstop hilarity as beggai turned
brokei A frenzied Aykroyd keeps pace as the slutted
shirt forced to pound the pavement - superlative
supporting cast includes Ralph Bellamy and Don
Ameche as the two amusingly despicable con men.
and Jamie I ee Curtis (Halloween) as the sumptuous
streetwalker with a gold plated heart
Trading Places is a frantic romp into the prince
and the pauper genre, a box office bustei thai takes
cheering audiences along tor the ride as it pokes fun
at the world of finance and the supei rich
Mick
I aSalle
Actually, this plot has �
done before The 198? I H,
ot To He. starring Brooks
Anne Bancroft, is actuall
remake of the 1942 To He Or Sot
To He, which starred Jack Benin
and Carole I ombard The
original movie was gn right
up there in Mick I aSalh � I
time Ten Best Flicks. But the new
version Hops not only in .
panson. but on its own terms
This To HeOr Xoi Io He is
slapstick here, serious di
there, and farce in between Ai no
point do you ever believe anything
bad can happen to the mam
characters - so there's little
drama. Yet you have long sen
timental stretches with the violins
up to tell us how to react where
there are no laughs at all.
The picture crawls No mattei
when you walk in, you walk out
needing a shave Things thai
should take live minutes take ten
Details the audience needs to hear
once are told over and over again
as if the audience is made up ol
the usual morons that like Mel
Brooks' movtes
The typical Mel Brooks touches
are all there homosexual jokes,
boring dance routines and guvs in
-
To Ht I Hi
a
necessary f
with x
being a beautifi was one
the
history ol the movies Bui the
origina i n a
brilliant s(
twists in it tha S � ano
the direction ol 1 ins: i ubitsch, a
pioneer in sophis
comedy
PaS he remake and catch
the original on the 1 ate Show
Even forgeti . , better version.
Mel Brooks' To He Or 'ot To He
is not worth seeii .

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SALEtS

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A





THE EAST C AROl INIAN
AM AHY24 19�4
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a tale of a ounjj black man's
eek b the ECl Plahouse.
To Be'
Crawls
tg. ties don't fit �
and I wouldn't like Them anyway.
if me, but I've never
understood h a gu dressed as a
oman is anything to bust a gut
er.
Still, there's something likeable
about Mel Brooks as an actor.
Earlv m this picture Brooks does a
funny shtick as Hitler which is an
mside joke for anybody who's
ever een Chaplin's The Great
Dictator Brooks doesn't imitate
Hitler He imitates Chaplin's im-
itation Elsewhere, Brooks does a
decent job of keeping up with a
enplay that changes its tone
every 15 minutes.
V for Anne Bancroft: I like
this lady, really But she's a good
20 years too old for the part she
plays The director knew it too.
That's why every close-up of her
is done in soft focus. But the
camera can only lie so much. Tim
Matheson, her ardent young
lover, seems less ardent than mer-
ll � and crazy There are so
many actresses between 30 and 35
that need work. One of them
should've gotten Bancroft's part.
The 1942 To Be Or ot To Be
somehow managed the combina-
tion of comedy and drama. Part
of the reason was the casting.
Jack Benny had the subtlety
necessary for a comedy dealing
with such a sensitive subject. And
Carole Lombard, in addition to
being a beautiful woman, was one
of the best comediennes in the
history of the movies. But the
original also benefited from a
brilliant script that had more
twists in it than Snake Hill, and
the direction of Ernst Lubitsch, a
pioneer in sophisticated screen
comedy.
Pass up the remake and catch
the original on the Late Show.
Even forgetting the better version,
Mel Brooks' To Be Or ot To Be
is not worth seeing.
One Hot, One Cool: Female Stars Pace 80s
By CARL V N EBERT
IMMMka
And then there's Cyndi Lauper, surely the
owner of one of the most distinctive voices in rock 'n'
roll, with a hit-bound first LP called She's So
Unusual. She is unusual, too; she plays her powerful,
New-York-Martian meets Betty Boop vocals off a
delicious selection of cover and original tunes with
feeling, pathos and aplomb.
Cyndi Lauper
Lauper, best known to MTV audiences for the
LP's hit single, a cover of Robert Hazard's "Girls
Just Want To Have Fun pushes her resonant voice
up and down the scales, trilling and hiccuping, bopp-
ing and rolling. She belies the cartoon-character
cuteness of her phrasing on "Girls" and on "He's So
Unusual with gutsy, polished delivery on the
superb version of The Brains "Money Changes
Everything" that opens the album, her own "Time
after Time and "Yeah Yeah a closing rocker that
shows she really knows how to project more than
strangeness.
Side one's cover version of Prince's "When You
Were Mine" should have Mitch Ryder clasping his
hands in despair; there's more passion in Lauper's
version than in anything but the meaty beaty jiggle of
a go-go dancer in the Ryder video. When Lauper
sings, "When u were mineYou were kindasorta my
best friend the innocent urgency of that voice
packs more heartwrenching pathos than a kid ex-
plaining how he didn't mean to break Mommy's
vase. And on "He's So Unusual a 1929 number by
Al Lewis, Al Sherman and Abner Silver, Laupcr calls
up that crazy babydoll voice again. On an MTV New
Year's Eve special, she accompanied herself on this
one with an old ukelele, giving it up halfway because
she forgot the chords and decided she'd rather climb
the scaffolding and dance her wild dances in the au-
dience instead.
But it would be a shame to focus only on the
engaging power of Lauper's singing on "She's So
Unusual" without mentioning that this is a really
danceab'e, happy, lift-you-outta-your seat bit of
New York Rock 4n' roll, aptly carried by Lauper's
backup band, which sounded a mite dizzy and out of
tune live, but are in fine shape on this album. Heady
synthesizer, crisply trebled guitars and a boatload of
percussion instruments � plus the occasional sax
break � make She's So Unusual an invigorating and
utterly promising album from Cyndi Lauper. It's just
too bad Portrait Records couldn't enclose a
hologram of Lauper singing and dancing in her black
taffeta-and-net-strapless gown as well.
With Learning to Crawl, their third full LP, The
Pretenders offer a dark, harsh, but satisfying slice of
life on the chain gang � the everyday world. The
album closely mirrors the lack of glamour in getting
older, the trend toward complacent, middle-of-the-
road lifestyles, and the ease with which a life taken
for granted slips beyond our control.
Kicking it off with "Middle of the Road their
current MTV-pumped "concert" video, Chrissie
Hynde sings of the forces of time, the little falsities of
life, the uninvolved attitudes of Americans, and
perhaps even about safe, "middle-of-the-road" rock
'n' roll as well. This is a tune purposesly sung, in
quiet resignation to the powers that be: "When you
own a chunk of the bloody third worldThe babies
just come with the scenery barks vocalist rhythm
guitarist Hynde, who writes all the band's songs.
Hynde, known for her tough-girl stance and well-
fuckem lyrics, is softening up (in her way) as she ad
mits defeat to the aggravations of stardom: "The
middle of the roadIs my private cul-de-sac1 don't
rehearseOr can't you tellI'm goin' homeI'm tired
as hellI'm not the kind I used to beI've got a kid,
I'm 33
The Pretenders
"Back on the Chain Gang with its easy rolling
beat and countrified rhythm guitar flashes, is the
oldest of the singles included on Learning To Crawl.
Hynde, drummer Martin Chambers and ex-Rockpile
guitarist Billy Bremner recorded and released "Chain
Gang"over a year ago and dedicated it to James
Honeyman-Scott, the Pretenders guitarist keyboard
man who died of a drug overdose in June of '82. Ex-
cept on one track, the new album contains no
keyboards. In "Chain Gang Hynde rails against
the intrusions of media and of fate that separated
them, hinting at a possible love affair.
Perhaps Learning To Crawl has been so long
delayed (Pretenders II came out in the summer of
1981) because of the sad events that led to the bands
restructuring. Pete Farndon, the original bassist who
quit just before Honeyman-Scott's death, died last
April. On Crawl, Robbie Mclntosh takes over guitar
duties and Malcolm Foster fills in the Pretenders' un-
dulating, beat-heavy bassline and as on the previous
albums and EPs, the bass carries Hynde's voice and
ties the LP together.
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
410 Greenville Blvd.
7$6-3023 � 24 HRS.
The wistful sadness of "Chain Gang" lifts with the
upbeat "Watching the Clothes the Chrissie Hynde
version of Donna Summer's "She Works Hard For
the Money As the song's speaker, a woman resign-
ed to spending another Saturday night at the laun-
dromat, muses "I been kissin' assTryin' to keep it
cleanServin' the middle classIt's a clean routine
Mclntosh runs wild with some brighter-than-bright
lead guitar that makes you wonder how he gets that
axe to sound like a small horn section. Hynde � who
does an endearing working-girl portrait on their
"Brass In Pocket" video as a waitress in a burned-
out diner � can sing the daylights out of this kind of
bitterly humorous raveup, and I wish they'd chosen
"Watching the Clothes" for the big MTV push
rather than "Middle of the Road
On "Show Me Hynde recalls the guitar line and
feeling of the first album's "Kid and on "Time the
Avenger returns to the album's theme of human
helplessness against the passing of time: "Nothing's
permanentEverything's on loan hereEven your
wife and kidsCould be gone next year
"Thumbelina an odd lullaby sung to a child on a
cross-country train ride, pairs a country beat with
unadorned, Dave Edmunds-style twanging rockabilly
strings. It perhaps owes its poignance to Hynde's giv-
ing birth to a daughter by Kinks leader Ray Davies
last January.
The second side's showpiece for Hynde's angst-
ridden vocals, Foster's luscious bass and Chambers'
crisp, spare drumming is "My City Was Gone the
song I swore had to be on the new album or I'd eat
my copy oiConcerts for Kampuchea. An FM hit
since summer, "My City Was Gone" relates Hynde's
odyssey back to her home town of Akron, Ohio,
where she was born in 1952; but instead of family
and familiarity, she finds concrete replacing
greenery, emptiness replacing love, shopping malls
and Muzak replacing the roar of the downtown she
remembers so well: "I went back to OhioBut my
pretty countrysideHad been paved down the mid-
dleBy a government that had no pride Billy
Bremner echoes the chunky bass hook on lead guitar
on this track, and it's hard to sit still to.
And as a final twist on the second side, Crawl in-
cludes a single non-Hynde composition: a stand-out,
old-fashioned slowdance R&B number that Hynde
wraps her voice around like Marvin Gaye in drag.
Fully backed by harmony from the band and
Bremner, Andrew Bodner and Paul Carrack, "Thin
I ine Between Love and Hate" is a perfect vehicle for
The Pretenders' weary, cynical stance on the in-
evitable erosion of perfect love in an imperfect
world.
Records provided by Record Bar, Pitt Plaza.
Cyndi Lauper's hit-bound first LP. She's S,
Unusual, showcases her broad vocal talents. Sharp
and energetic, the album is a delight.
The Pretenders' third L.P learning to Crawl, has a
more mature theme than previous albums, but the
power and drive are still there in this superb collec-
tion of songs.
PLAZA SHEL
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FIFTH & READE STREETS � 757-3558
INTEHIOKS. ACCESSOKIES. SPECIALTY GIFT SHOPPE
MON -SAT 10 A.M P.M.
items ana Prices
Effective Thru Sat
January 28 1984
J�L.LLi
ADVERTISED
POLIO
fca�-f o' mese aover
f'sed 'f�ms 13 re
qui'ed to be 'eady
a�a aDe or sa e n
eacn K'oge' Sav on
ecepr as spec.
� - - -






10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1984
N.C. Journalist Records 50 Years
By CARLA BAGLEY
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UP1) � Former Wall
Street Journal Editor
Vermont Connecticut
Royster has retired, but
he hasn't stopped work-
ing.
Royster has rubbed
elbows with the famous,
reported on history in the
making for the past 50
years and held some of
the top posts and honors
in the world of jour-
nalism.
But when he dies,
Royster would like the
simple word "newsman"
engraved on his tomb-
stone. Just don't plan to
do it anytime soon.
The Pulitzer-Prize win-
ning editor has retired to
Chapel Hill, N.C, but he
hasn't stopped writing.
He has a regular column
for the Journal and has
written several books, in-
cluding his recently com-
pleted autobiography.
My Own, My Country's
Time, released in October
and now in its third prin-
ting.
The book's title is an
appropriate one. In his
nearly 70 years, Royster
has watched and reported
on some of the nation's
swiftest, most intense and
traumatic changes.
The young man who
majored in classical
languages at the Universi-
ty of North Carolina at
Chapel Hill in the
mid-1930s never dreamed
he would live through
four wars, the greatest
depression in history and
the space race. That's one
reason he advocates a
"good, solid, general
education" for future
reporters.
"A journalist
graduating from college
today has no idea of what
he'll be covering 30 years
from now says the
genial Royster. "I
graduated in 1935. It
never occurred to me I
would be writing about
space flights and atomic
energy
It also probably didn't
occur to him that by 1936
he would have graduated
from a job as a cafeteria
busboy to covering his
first presidential press
conference � the 295th
such conference held by
Franklin Roosevelt.
Roosevelt was the first
of nine presidents
i Royster has known and
interviewed. Other world
leaders such as
Khrushchev and Vice
Premier Keng Piao of
China followed. Those
were heady dealings for a
native of Raleigh, N.C,
whose first bylined story
in the Journal was at-
tributed to "C.V.
Royster
The former president
of the American Society
of Newspaper Editors
didn't set out to be a
journalist.
"If you are unqualified
to do anything else, you
become a
newspaperman he says.
"I sort of drifted into it.
After I got in it, I like it
Royster is now a jour-
nalism professor emeritus
at the University of North
Carolina at Chapel Hill.
He admits his rise in jour-
nalism would be a little
difficult to imitate today.
In the 1930s when he
went to work at the Jour-
nal, the newspaper had a
circulation of 35,000 and
a tiny staff. Given a
niche, a hard-working
reporter with a dash of
talent and a modicum of
luck could quickly make
a name for himself.
Royster did, rising
from "one cut above a
copy boy" to become a
senior vice president of
the parent firm, Dow
Jones and Co. Royster's
first encounter with
William Grimes, then
managing editor of the
Journal, left an impres
sion on Grimes.
"1 looked around the
office, which was much
cluttered with copy paper
strewn around the floor,
and replied, 'Well, if you
will give me a broom, I'll
sweep up this office
Grimes hired that
brash young man who
took his name from two
states � and apparently
was never sorry about his
decision.
Vermont Royster
doesn't know exactly how
long he'll continue to
write, but he plans to do
it until he has "trouble
thinking about what to
write or thinking what to
think about
Big Apple Trip Announced
The Student Union
Travel Committee is
sponsoring a trip to New
York City during Spring
Break. The trip will be a
fabulous repeat of the
Thanksgiving Trip,
however, there will be
more fun and excitement
becuase it will last a full
week.
Spend six full days in
the "Big Apple Plan
your own schedule of ac-
tivities � museums,
galleries, Broadway
shows. shopping,
restaurants, etc. � and
enjoy the world's most
exciting city at your own
pace.
The trip will depart
from Mendenhall Student
Center (West parking lot)
at 8 p.m. on Friday,
March 2, 1984. Travel
will be via a 46-passenger
Trailways bus. After
traveling all night, except
for necessary rest stops,
the destination of the trip
(The Hotel Edison in
New York City) will be
reached at approximately
7 a.m. Saturday, March
3. The trip will depart
from the Hotel Edison in
New York City at 10a.m.
on Friday, March 9, for
the return trip to Green-
ville.
The Price of the trip in-
cludes roundtrip
transportation, six
nights' lodging at the
Hotel Edison (located at
Time Square) and bag-
gage handling fees. Prices
are as follows:
$315.00 per person in
single occupancy room.
$210.00 per person in
double or twin occupancy
room.
$190.00 per person
triple occupancy room
$165.00 per person
quad occupancy room
in
in
Time and space are
limited. For further in-
formation contact the
Central Ticket Office at
757-6611, ext. 266, bet-
ween the hours of 10 a.m.
and 4 p.m. The sign-up
deadline is Friday,
February 17, 1984.
'Tron' Lecture At Hendrix
The East Carolina
University Unions Lec-
ture Series presents "The
Computer World of
Tron Tuesday, January
24 at 8 p.m. in Hendrix
Theatre.
Larry Elin is the direc-
tor of computer special
effects animation for
MAGI, the computer
company responsible for
much of the electronic
animation work for the
futuristic Walt Disney
film, Tron. Mr. Elin
presents a fascinating lec-
ture demonstration
about the use of com-
puter technology that
could radically alter film-
making and revolutionize
the movie business. Tron
represents an un-
precedented orchestra-
tion of the new
technology of computer-
generated imagery. It has
opened up to the movies
not only a new range of
technology, but a whole
new way ot seeing film
ttiat no eye or camera has
ever before beheld. Elin
demonstrates these com-
puter special effects and
shows spectacular film
clips from Tron.
Tickets are available at
the Central Ticket Office
in Mendenhall Student
Center. Ticket prices are
$1.50 for ECU students,
$2.50 for ECU faculty
and staff, and $3.50 for
the public. All tickets at
the door will be $3.50.
Eh, Mick!
Dear Mr. LaSalle,
I am a 23-year-old, male virgin, a senior, major-
ing in marketing. Normally, I would never con-
sider writing to an advice column, but this is a
private matter that I would rather not discuss with
my friends. I was not sure if this advice column
was a hoax, but I figure I will give it a try.
I met my girlfriend a couple of months ago
while at work. (I will refer to her as Clarisse.J
Clarisse is only 17, so there is a slight age dif-
ference. For the past month now, Clarisse and I
have been all but inseparable.
However, the problem is, Clarisse has been
pressuring me to have sex with her. Of course, I
am anxious for us to make love, but I am worried
about the future. Clarisse is emotionally attached
to me, and I am afraid that eventually I am going
to hurt her.
Before you go ahead and say, "Oh, do it
anyway let me emphasize that I really care
about Clarisse and that I want what is best for her.
I am a lot more mature and intelligent than she is,
so I know I am going to have to decide for the
both of us. What do you think I should do?
Signed: Undecided
Dear Undecided:
Hold it: You're 23, you never got laid, and
you're not sure what you should do? What have
you been doing for the past ten years anyway?
You want to go to bed with this girl, right? Then
go ahead. You don't want to hurt her, right? Then
don't.
Get over your guilt trip, pal. Mick LaSalle
knows what's going down in this town. Ninety
percent of the girls cruising McDonalds have been
getting it since they were fourteen. Drop Suzy off
at the East Carolinian, and I'll give her what's best
for her.
Got a problem? Write:
Eh, Mick
co The East Carolinian
Publications Building, 2nd Floor
East Carolina University
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Or, drop your letters off in person, addressed to
Features Desk.
THE OLD 50UTI "
KAPPA ALPHA
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INVITES ALL MEN TO
RUSH
January 23, and 24 8:00 Until
In September of 1958, East
Carolina's firat fraternity was founded.
Those same southern ideals and tradi-
tions that then made Kappa Alpha the
school's most outstanding fraternity
can still be found today.
Kappa Alpha has enjoyed the en-
viable position of being the pacesetter
in virtually every facet of fraternity life
year after year. The Brothers of KA
strive to maintain the highest standards
in scholarship, community service, in-
tramural sports competition and social
stature. Our belief in long standing
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heritage, success and tradition are
what you're made of, you owe yourself
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If you are considering pledging a
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house and meet the brothers of KAP-
PA ALPHA ORDER.
It would be our pleasure to pick you
up at your dorm room or apartment.
Please call 758-9781 or 758-4808 for
some southern hospitality.
For more information call: Wayne
Rouse 752-8041 or Jeff Parks
758-9781.
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ECX
Falls!
B hi) Ml Ki An
Spurn td
With 13:59 ��
fight's game.
Spiders converted �:
pla to take a "�- 24
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Thi tim
would be
fcfused '
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pthougl the mc
Sta:
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group
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deficit to w
an EC ?AC
place Spide;
pam
11 -gai
Richmond
who � . ' EC
was
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"Q . frank
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have pla v .
be -� gai
made a rui
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I HI I M c K()l INIAN
END
ECU Rally
Falls Short
Sports
JANUARY 24, 1984
Page 11
H H) Ml kl AS

J sgto play, in Saturday
game, the Richmond
convt- J on a three-point
take aJ8 24 lead over the
r linaPirates li the seem
the same old movie, as
Charlie Harrison
Wk- � �&
t howev ei, the movie
edited 1 he Pirates
iil thr igl . same
depi essing flu k nd
. the movie didn't w in an
was definitely .� three
1 he show w as about an
moth .i
� . layers, w ho nearl
� Kk k from ihe 14 point
to win, but ended up losing
U hea vet to the first
Spiders, 61
i r e 11 (
a t seen that has an
ak said
:oach Dick rarrant,
tj � ECl played like it
t tournament
d with intensity
1 knew they, weren't go-
the
f ECl or Ha
! I
mkly,
-
it
I
ere a
nk tl
teai ild
11 wa
d
and
.
i connected
d goals than
rie difference was
. spiders
he Pirates
points and seven of seven free
throw shooting. Senior center Bill
Rye had 11 points and sophomore
forward John Davis added 10 and
pulled down eight rebounds.
ECU got 12 points from
freshman guards William Grady
and Keith Sledge. Curt
Vanderhorst also contributed nine
points for the Pirates, who at one
time were playing four freshmen
in the game.
1 he Pirates wiere down by 10
points with 7:47 left in the game
when they made their move. Ap-
plying hard-nosed, full court
pressure, ECl' was able to cut in-
to the Spider lead.
The lead was trimmed to 44-37
when ECl' forward Barry Wright
stole the ball on Richmond's end
of the court, then pushed the ball
up to Vanderhorst ,who made a
layup, was fouled and converted
on the free throw.
rhen, as Richmond was bring-
ing the ball up court, Vanderhorst
stripped the ball loose and went
the distance again for a layup to
close the margin to 44-39.
With Minges Coliseum roaring
after two straight steals, ECU
center Leon Bass added to the ex-
citement with a blocked shot, and
seconds later teammate guard
Tony Robinson was fouled and
made both free throws. Suddenly,
the lead was three.
After Richmond opened a up a
e point lead, 50-45, ECU
freshman forward Derrick Battle
connected on a baseline jumper
and Grad) drove the baseline for
a lav up to pull the Pirates within
. point, 50-49.
Continued
See spiders, page 13
Players Honored
A t Dinner A wards
By RANDY MEWS
I rtlnl Syorti Ull�
"Bowl participaion should be
based on merit, not by whom
television wants Those were the
words of Chancellor Leo Jenkins
at the ECU football banquet Fri-
day as he called for the NCAA to
regain full control of bowl games.
Jenkins was the featured
speaker at the King & Queen
North and payed tribute to the
Pirates for thier successful 1983
season. Jenkins took a large part
in helping ECU make the move
from small time athletics to the
Division I level.
All-America Terry Long carried
home the most awards from the
banquet, while teammates Mike
Grant and Earnest Byner each
received two major awards.
Long, who is clebrated as the
strongest football player in the
world, recieved the most valuable
award for offensive blocking, the
most outstanding senior and most
outstanding senior strength
player.
Grant, who was the highest
Pirate choosen in the recent USFL
draft, received the most valuable
defensive player award and was
named permanent defensive cap-
tain.
Senior fullback Byner, who led
the irrepressable Pirate ground at-
tack, was named the most
outstanding offensive back and
was named as permanent captain
on offense.
Jenkins went on to tell the au-
dience that the universities belong
to the people, and that a school's
football future should be controll-
ed by the universities' administra
tions, not the whims of television
networks.
"Television is calling the shots
more and more as to which teams
play on T.V and when, and
which teams play in the bowls
show and it is the fault of all o? .
because we all encourage it.
"Being slaves of television i
a school of the ability to be in
charge of its own destiny. We
must put dignity back into college
sports. There is no dignity when a
team accepts something that it
hasn't earned
Jenkins also expressed the tee.
ing that a football playoff I -
Division I-A is needed and should
be further explored.
Other players to earn major
awards included seniors John
Floyd and Hal Stephens They
were recipients of the Swindell
Memorial Award for dedication
and leadership.
The E.E. Rawl Memorial
Award for character, scholarship
and athletic ability was awarded
See Pirates, page 14
Lady Pirates Beat ASU
V t v.
?iuu Perns
ECU guard Keith Sledge (24) and forward Barry Wright tigm tor it-
bound while teammate Ion Bass (42) looks on.
b, ��.
SAVE 14c
foca Cola
ie 1 05
Discount
oases
iNOl 0
OVtR
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
i
I
I
�pmg Center
leenviile, N.C
Gary P�t1tr�ofi ECU Photo Lab
The ECU Lady Pirates rallied
from an 18-4 deficit in the first
half last night to beat Ap-
palachian State 63-51.
The Lady Pirates were down 14
points with 12:40 left in the half,
but, behind the shooting of Sylvia
Bragg and Dal Mabry, they trim-
med the margin to just three
points before intermission.
ECU was led by Bragg's 20
points and Mabry's 16. The Lady
Pirates shot a respectable 43 per-
cent from the field and a
phenomena 92 percent from the
line.
With the win, coach Andruzzi's
team raised its record to 8-8. The
team's next game is Saturday at
South Carolina.
Long, Premier All-America
"I'm honored to be picked It is a
reflection on the type of people that
come out of here � jerry iong
B EDMCKI AS
sports rdHor
Since becoming ECU'S first consensus first team
All-America for his outstanding play at offensive
guard this season, Terry I ong has been a busy man,
competing in the Blue-Gray and Hula Bowl all-star
games and partaking in various publicity endeavors.
Although Long has already been drafted by the
United States Football League and should be taken
very high in the Sational Football League draft, he
plans to stay in school through the spring semester to
work toward his degree.
EN: Which league would ou rather play in, the
USFL or the NFL? Why?
TL: The NFL. The benefits are a lot better because
you have a pension after five years. Also, they have a
lot of insurance policies that the new league doesn't
have.
It's more established and the players are a lot bet-
ter. You don't have to worry about the team you are
playing for; you know (in the USFL) in the next two
or three years it might fold.
EN: Who would you like to play for in the NFL?
TL: Pittsburgh or Dallas. I like Dallas and I have
always been a big fan of Pittsburgh. I think they (Pit-
tsburgh) will take a chance on my height. They like
physical type guys and they have a tendency to take
guys with my height.
EN: What round do you think you will go in? Why?
TL: I was told that if I was two or three inches taller I
would go in the first round, but some teams told me
not to worry about it. I still might go pretty high. I'm
hoping either the second or third-somewhere in
I there.
EN: How does it feel to be ECU'S first ever first team
All-America?
TL: I'm honored to be picked on the first team. I just
think that it is a reflection on the type of people that
P come out of here and the type of people it has
recruited. In fact, we should have had more players
selected first team or some kind of All-America.
EN: With the pro scouts watching, how well did you
think you performed in the all-star games?
TL: Playing with those guys is not like playing with
the guys from ECU because you're used to them be-
ing at certain places and doing certain things.
You have three or four days to get ready for it, so I
guess it was a learning experience for me to show that
I could adapt quicker than I thought I could.
In the Blue-Gray game, 1 thought 1 had an average
game. I didn't have the type of game I thought would
boost my chances, so I went into the Hula Bowl
thinking that I have to do it now or never. So I went
in there, I quess you could say, a little "psyched up
I knew I was going to play against (Rick) Bryant
(of Oklahoma). He told me before the game started
that he was going to line up over me, so right there I
knew I was going to have to play a lot harder. He
will definitely be a first-rounder.
EN: What did you think of the Sports Illustrated ar-
ticle that questioned your being chosen AP first team
All-America over Nebraska's Dean Steinkuhler,
arguing that the pre-season publicity poster of you
was the difference?
TL: I have heard a lot about it. I hadn't read it, but
everyone was telling me about it everywhere I went.
Their primary goal was to use it (the poster) to
make me All-America. But no one said anything in
the article about Nebraska. I mean, they have so
much money and (Mike) Rozier was doing good.
Automatically he is going to get a lot of publicity.
No one said anything about the other guys that had
posters out around the country. This linebacker from
Alabama had a full-size of him standing with his
arms folded, and no one said anything about that. I
guess my poster got all of the attention. It doesn't
bother me.
No matter what poster you make, to make the
Kodak and Walter Camp All-America teams it is not
press-associated whatsoever. There is a selected
group of coaches that vote on the film, and if they
don't like it they won't vote for you.
EN: Coach Ed Emory had been saying all year that
he thought that you deserved the Outland Trophy.
Do you think you should have gotten it instead of
Steinkuhler?
TL: As far as the Outland is concerned. 1 feel they
gave it to the guy who deserved it. I don't think they
would make a mistake and just give to anybody that
didn't deserve it. I think the guy deserved it, but I
hope they think I'm one of the top three.
EN: How did you and Steinkuhler interact at the
Hula Bowl?
TL: There wasn't too much said. 1 think there was a
little static in the air, and I think you could feel it. I
was looking at him funny and he was looking at me
funny. After a while things loosened up a little and
we started talking to each other.
EN: One of the rewards of being named AP All-
America is that you were able to appear on the Bob
Hope Christmas Special. Did you enjoy the jokes?
TL: I talked to a lot of guys when we were getting
dressed in the back. Me and (William) Perry from
Clemson were having a good time. Bo Jackson and I
were picking at Perry the whole time. We had a good
time because he (Perry) is real big and has fat hang-
ing off him.
EN: As Hope said, do you really flatten more ends
than a masseur at a fat farm?
TL: I thought he had me mistaken for being a defen-
sive player than an offensive player. I was a little
upset about that, but I was honored to be on the
show.
EN: Did you watch the Orange Bowl? Do you feel
ECU could have easily been there?
TL: I saw the whole game. I thought we could have
been there. Especially after we lost to Florida State, 1
figured we were going to be pretty good for the re-
mainder of the season because we played them that
close.
EN: Reflecting on the past season, what do feel were
the high and low moments?
TL: I think the high note was getting to know the
players as well as I did, being part of the football
team and playing with the guys. I think I'm going to
miss that most of all.
The low moments this year were in some games 1
felt I should have done much better.
EN: What about your career at ECU?
TL: I think one of the high moments was when the
powerlifting started everything rolling for me. My
low moment was probably my freshman year when I
didn't play as well as I wanted to.
EN: What are you going to miss most about ECU
besides football?
TL: I like the friendships I made with the fans and
the people that supported the Pirate organization. 1
think I'm going to miss them a lot.
.
c





t
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24. 1984
Lady Pirates
Run In State
Invitational
By PETE FERN ALD
Staff Writer
The ECU women's
track team participated in
the North Carolina State
Invitational track meet in
Chapel Hill this weekend
Jamie Cathcart led the
Lady Pirates, finishing
second in the quarter mile
with a time of 59 seconds.
Teresa Hudson finish-
ed fourth in the 60-yard
dash in 7.3 seeconds, and
was followed by team-
mates Valerie Finley and
Robin Cremedy who
finished fifth and sixth
respectively.
Assistant coach Wayne
Miller said the team per-
formed as well as could
be expected. "We took
over the team in May
after the recruiting season
had ended, and we were
left with no recruits for
this year
Other teams par-
ticipating in the meet in-
cluded North Carolina,
N.C. State, Duke, Pem-
broke State and Wake
Forest. "Almost every
team from the state of
North Carolina was
there said Miller.
The next scheduled
meet for the Lady
tracksters is at the George
Mason Invitational on
Feb. 5.
"TT
Pirate Scott Eagle won the one meter diving event in
last Thursday's meet.
1111 LADES NIGHT AT
FYi n o THE KING AND queen north
O and Wed. Jan. 25
Oueen
NOR I II
North Tower
8-12
All Dining costumers admitted free.
Coming Feb. 1 st - The Rhondels
College I.D. - FREE Admission
Til 7:30
Happv Hour 6-8
Bui@er
NOW OPEN
Spide
Are
G�rv P�tt�r�on ECU Photo L�o
The Pirate swimmers lost to North Carolina last Thursday, but don't tell Stan Williams. He was victorious in the 50 and 100-meter freestyle events.
Swimmers Dunked By UNC
By SCOTT POWERS
"Well, what can I say.
UNC is ranked third in
the country said head
swimming coach Rick
Kobe as he watched his
ECU swimmers fall to the
highly-touted Tar Heels.
The men lost by a score
of 81-32 as their record
fell to 5-3, and the
women's record fell to
4-4 with their 88-23 loss.
There were some bright
spots tor the men, in-
cluding double winner
Stan Williams. Williams
won the 50 and 100 meter
freestyle events with
times of 21.8 and 47.5
Other winners for the
men were Scott Eagle in
the 1 meter diving event
with a score of 295.5, and
Kevin Richards in the 200
meter butterfly with a
time of 1:57.6.
The women had no
wins in their meet as the
UNC women proved to
be too strong. The UNC
women broke pcol
records in the 200 meter
backstroke and in 400
meter medley relay.
Top finishers for the
Pirates were Scotia
Miller, who finished se-
cond in the 1000 meter
freestyle, and Cindy
Newman, who finished
second in the 200 meter
freestyle. Other second
place Finishers for the
Pirates were Lori Liv-
ingston in the 400 meter
freestyle and Jean
Keating in the 50 meter
freestyle.
Kobe was
disheartened by
not
ECU'S
showing. "We swam with
them and our kids did a
nice job. Most of our
people swam different
events than they would
normally said Kobe.
The next meet for the
ECU is today at Rich-
mond, where the men will
take on the Spiders and
James Madison, and the
women will attempt to
splash the women quad
of Richmond.
OFF ON
COMPLETE
PAIRSOF
GLASSES
WE PAY
CASH
FOR
PS
II
Class Rings Diamond Rings
Gold & Silver Jewerly
Silver Coins
I rWMtl -V. � rUl ;
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DISCOUNT NOT GOOD ON OTHER SALE ITEMS
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WE BUY & PAY CASH FOR
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portable AM-FM, cassette, walkmans. beaters,
good furniture, china & crystal, tpeliters, etc.
VV" of Ki SALES CO H V
400 EVANS, "on the corner'
Downtown Greenville
752-3866
Barn Wright plased an agjjresj
ECL's loss Saturdas to Rlchrru
Richmond
William and V
George Mason
James Madison
Navy
East Carolina
xxv�v
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Flamed Broiled Burgers
Seafood and chicken
Famous Hotdogs & Salad Bar
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Opening Specials
Trout Dinner $1.99
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Salad Bowl .89
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Featuring Top 40 & Beach
Tues. H.H. 5:00-9:00
with Mark Wilson
Weds. H.H. 5:00-9:00
with Coart L.C. Johnson
Thurs. Ladies Night with
The Big "E"Eddy Hemingway
H.H. 5:00-9:00
Beauss a pnvate club for members and guest only.
Apply now in Room 234 of Mendenhall Student Center
to be on the day representative on the Student
Board of Directors.
The responsibilities of the members of the
of Directors include:
� Selecting the Student Union President
� Approving committee chairpersons
� Approving the Student Union Budget
� Setting policy for the Student Union
HAVING PROBLEM
with
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OPEN 10am-10pm
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Students helping Students
CAMPUS ALCOHOL Al
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DEADLINE TO APPLY: Friday, January 2 1984
r
20) & Delta Zeta
i )Pj Present
Dance Contest
Tuesday, January 24, 1 984
8:30-1:00 A.M.
Admission $1.00 18 yr. S2.00
Couples or Individuals,
Any Music, Any Style!
PRIZES:
1st
$25.00 Cash. Plus S25.00 gift certificate at
The King & Queen North
2nd $10.OOCash. Plus S15.00 gift certificate to the
Riverside Oyster Bar
$5.00 Cash. Plus large 2 item pizza from P T A
Com Early!
3rd
Sponsored by:
H L Hodges
Heart s Delight
PTA
Riverside Oyster Ba'
Shirley s Cut & Style
Sub Station II
Back Stage Studios
Book Barn
King & Oueen North
Jobbie s Gym
, PLUS Drawing for Door Prizes Gifts For Everyone!
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Lynn s Hailma-i-
Record Bar
D A Kedy s
Great Expectations
Marsn s Surf & Sea
Tapscott s
UBE
The Body Shopoe
Snooty Fox
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Look01
foe perfect
218





I
I
pn
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 24, 1984
13
I
Spider's Foul Shots
Are The Difference
�ote L�6
Kirijj
Continued from page 11
And, with the score
51-49, Wright was fouled
going up for a rebound,
giving ECU a chance to
tie the game for the first
time since 4:08 of the
opening half, as he went
to the line to shoot the
one-and-one. But Wright
missed the front end of
the one-and-one and the
Spiders rebounded.
After a Richmond free
throw, ECU guard Keith
Sledge hit a shot from the
top of the key to bring the
margin back to one point
with 2:44 left, but the
Spiders ran off eight
straight points, with all
but two coming from the
free throw line. Leading
59-51, the Spiders had
put the game out of
reach.
In the first half, the
lead changed hands seven
times. Bass put in a
jumper inside the key to
even the score at 20-20,
but Richmond pulled
away to a 29-20 halftime
advantage.
� ry Panrton ECU Ptwto Lab
Harry Wright played an aggressive defensive game and added a few baskets in
EClTa loss Saturday to Richmond.
H H)R
.manv, heaters.
corner
i lie
ECAC-South Stan
League
Richmond3-0
v illiam and Mary1-0
George Mason2-1
James Madison1-1
Navy0-2
East Carolina0-3
Overall
10-5
4-7
8-7
12-5
2-12
ECU freshman Keith
Sledge has been named
ECAC-South rookie of
the week for his play in
the Pirate's two games
last week.
The 6-3 guard-forward
led the Pirates in scoring
in both of their games,
knocking in 10 points
against Francis Marion
and contributing 12
points in Saturday's loss
to Richmond.
Sledge hit nine of 16 at-
tempts from the field and
was four-for-four from
the line in the two games,
and has led the Pirates in
scoring in three of their
last four games.
His selection as rookie
of the week was the first
time all season an ECU
player has been recogniz-
ed by the ECAC.
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210 E. Fifth Street
BOND'SrtL. HODGES CO.
SPORTING GOODS
a
ECU Loses Big
Oary PalHrtm - CCU "Iwte Lab
Lisa Squireweil pumped in 12 points for the Lady
Pirates, but ECU lost to UNC-CH Sunday, 65-39.
By RANDY MEWS
AHtittrntSfrUfjittmi
Candy Lucas poured in
19 points and Sylvia
Akers added 12 to lead
UNC Charlotte to 65-39
victory over the ECU
women's basketball team
on Sunday.
Lisa Squireweil was the
only Lady Pirate to score
in double figures, as she
knocked in twelve points.
ECU only connected
on 15 of 65 shots from
the field for 23 percent,
and was an even more
miserable seven of 39
from inside the lane.
"Charlotte has really
improved a lot since the
first time we played
ECU head coach Cathy
Andruzzi said. "They
packed it in inside the
lane. We did get inside
shots, we just couldn't
make them
The Lady Pirates
played Appalachian State
in a late game last night.
The two teams met in an
earlier game this season,
with ECU taking a 77-51
decision in Minges Col-
iseum.
Karen Robinson is the
leading scorer for the
Lady Apps, hitting 13.0
points per game. LuAnne
Underhill is close behind
averaging 12.6 an outing,
while former starter
Carolyn Cameron,
averaging 7.4, is no
longer on the squad.
The Pirates travel to
South Carolina on Jan.
28, and then to William &.
Mary Feb. 1 before com-
ing home to face East
Tennessee State on Feb.
4.
Lisa Squireweil was
named to the ECAC-
South honor roll for her
performances against
George Mason and UNC-
Wilmington in women's
basketball action last
week.
Squireweil scored 19
points and pulled down
21 rebounds in the Lady
Pirate's victories, while
shooting an extremely ac-
curate 57 percent from
the field.
Founded in New York City in I 898. ZBT has a
long and distinguished past, and is growing and vibrant
organization. Here at ECU the Epsilon Kappa chapter
has become established in a little over a vear. ZBT of-
fers vou a chance to enter a fratemitv in its infancv.
e invite you to attend rush at Mendenhall Student Center
January 23.24. and 25 from 7 to 1 1pm.
If vou have a question call 752-31 78.
1895
a litHe
cfyou
Sigma Nu Fraternity
Corner of Cotanche & 13th
Rush Monday thru Wednesday 9:00 p.m.
'Wfc�





t
14
THE EAST CAROLONIAN
JANUARY 24, 1984
Soccer Soon!
By JOEL SCALES
Staff Writer
The ECU men's soccer
team will host the second
annual Budweiser Indoor
Tournament in Minges
Coliseum on Saturday,
Jan. 28. The contest will
begin at 8:30 a.m. and
last until 6:00 p.m. Admi-
sion is free.
ECU will enter two
teams, while ten other
colleges are expected to
compete. According to
head coach Robbie
Churchindoor Soc-
cer is a very exciting and
fast moving sport; fans
will really enjoy the game
because it is usually a
high score affair
There are a few dif-
ferences between indoor
and outdoor soccer, but
the main contrast is the
smaller, more compact
playing area. Also, two
10 minute halves are
played.
The men entered a
similar contest this past
weekend at Atlantic
Christian College. ECU
entered two teams and
both faired well. The pur-
ple team finished 2-1-1
and the White team made
the semi-finals, finishing
4-2-1.
"Both our goalies,
Grant Pearson and
George Pedgoamy, had
great games com-
mented Church. "Our
team is still young, and
we're playing a lot of
freshman, but they're still
carrying the load
Following this Satur-
day's contest, the Pirate
booters will travel to
N.C. Weslyan on
February 4 to enter a
similar tournament.
Pirates Honored
Continued from page 11
to offensive tackle John
Robertson and noseguard
Gerry Rogers.
The most valuable of-
fensive player award was
given to senior quarter-
back Kevin Ingram, while
the most improved offen-
sive award went to tackle
Tim Dumas and center
Tim Mitchell. The most
improved defensive
awards went to Kenny
Phillips, Murray Banks
and Jeff Pegues.
Darrell Speed and Gary-
London were named the
outstanding freshman;
Randy Lowry and Scott
Lewis, outstanding scout
team players; Henry
Williams, Jeff Bolch and
Stuart Ward, outstanding
specialty team players;
Reggie Branch and Lloyd
Black, special team cap-
tains and Williams and
Tyrone Johnson as
outstanding newcomers.
Other awards included
academic acievement to
Gerry Rogers and Chuck
Northcut; clutch players
award to Norwood Vann
and Clint Harris; special
coaches award to John
Williams and strength
awards to Pegues and
Daniel Cole.
ECU Sports Schedule
Jan.24 Men's and Women's
Swimming
At Richmond 3pm
Jan.25 Men's Basketball
Home 7:30pm
Jan.28 Women's Basketball
At South Carolina 4pm
Jan.28 Men's Basketball
At James Madison 2pm
Mm
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 24, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 24, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.313
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
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