The East Carolinian, January 12, 1984






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Bht
Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No JO 2 j
Thursday , January 12, 1984
Greenville, N.C.
10 Pages,
Circulation 10,000
Study Ranking SAT Scores
Contested By ECU Officials
WZMBDJ At Work
NdL JOHNSON � KCU
Overworked volunteer WZMB disc jockefs and news casters may one day be paid for their efforts at the
student radio station if a proposed Media Board fee increase is approved.
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
C-N�w IMMar
North Carolina students'
Scholastic Aptitude Test scores
were among the lowest in the na-
tion, according to a survey com-
piled by the National Center on
Education Statistics and released
last week. The survey statistics are
misleading, contend two ECU of-
ficials.
"One has to look at the data
and be aware of the fact that the
states that score high have very
few students taking the exam
said Vice Chancellor for
Academic Affairs Angelo Volpe.
Volpe pointed out that in Iowa
(ranked number two in the nation
by the survey) only three percent
of the high school students take
the SAT, while approximately 50
percent of the students in North
Carolina take the test.
Charles Seeley, director of ad-
missions at ECU, said this is
because most students in the
Media Board
To Propose
Fee Increase
B JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
(o-Srwi Ml for
Price increases have stretched
budgets everywhere, and the ECU
Media Board budget is among
those needing an increase. Plans
are currently being drafted for a
proposed Media Board student
fee increase.
The media board budget is
funded entirely by student fees,
although many publications
budgets are not. The East Caroli-
nian, for example, covers most of
its expenses through advertising
revenues. Each student currently
pays $6.35 per semester for media
services, and according to Media
Board Chairman Mark Niewald,
this would be increased by $2 per
semester if the plan is approved.
"We had been discussing a fee
increase for the last month and a
half. We haven't had a fee in-
crease for the media in the last few
years Niewald said.
The additional money would be
used in several different areas.
Printing costs for the Buccaneer
and the Rebel have increased
resulting in a need for more fun-
ding. Computer equipment in also
needed to increase productivity in
billing and payroll computation.
The bulk of the increase would be
to pay the disc jockeys and
newscasters at WZMB, the cam-
pus radio station. The staff there
currently works on a volunteer
basis.
"We hope to be able to pay
enough to provide some sort of
professionalism at WZMB
Niewald said, "It's a lot harder
for management to manage
volunteers
midwest use the American College
Membership Increases
Testing program. The students
who do take the SAT are usually
applying to schools in the East.
"People taking the SAT in Iowa
will be people going to Harvard or
Yale Seeley said.
"In North Carolina, in order to
get into a public university, a stu-
dent is encouraged to take the
SATs Volpe said. "The data (in
the survey) needs to be normalized
before you make an assessment
he added. Comparing states where
different percentages of students
take the SAT, Volpe said, "is like
comparing apples and oranges
Billy Helton, associate director
of institutional research, said
average SAT scores for the 1983
ECU freshman class were 840 for
in-state students and 850 for the
entire class. Asked whether these
scores are low, Volpe said, "It's
hard to tell. I would want to see
data for all of the states before I
said one way or another
"I think they are a little low
compared to some, but of course
Angelo Volpe
they're improving Seeley said.
According to Linda Balfour.
director of data collection and
reporting for the UNC system,
ECU's average SAT scores for
students enrolled during the
1982-1983 school year uere 85
continued on page 5
Fraternities Becoming More Popular

Elmer Meyer
Niewald and all the media
heads are currently working on
the proposal. It will be presented
to the Media Board today and, if
approved will be sent to Dr. Elmer
Meyer, vice chancellor for student
life. His office will approve the
plan and then send it to ECU
Chancellor John Howell, who has
the final decision on the increase.
"I think some fee increase is
justified, particularly since
WZMB hasn't had the budget to
pay its announcers a stipend
Meyer said.
"It has been four years since we
have had a fee increase. In order
to continue to grow, we need it. I
would like to see the newscasters
and disc jockeys at WZMB paid
for the overtime they put in said
Hunter Fisher, general manager
of The East Carolinian.
According to Meyer, Student
Health, Student Unions, In-
tramural Recreation Services and
Housing are also planning to pro-
pose fee increases. All proposals
will be in Meyer's office by Jan.
15 and, if approved, will take ef-
fect July 1.
BOSTON, Mass. (CPS) �
Fraternities will enjoy
"dramatic" increases in member-
ship over the next several years as
more students reach for "stability
and structure" during their time
in college, two Northeastern
University reasearchers predict.
"Fraternities are coming back
for the same reason that the
junior prom is coming back
says sociology Professor Jack
Levin, who co-authored a study
of fraternities with Northeastern
criminal justice instructor James
Fox.
Fraternity membership hit its
peak in the early and middle '60s,
and then dropped off sharply dur-
ing the campus protests of the late
'60s and early 1970s.
In the ten years between 1966
and 1976, for instance, the pro-
portion of college students in
greek organizations plummeted
from 39 percent to 19 percent.
The average fraternity chapter
membership dropped from 50 to
only 34 during that same period,
according to the National Inter-
fraternity Conference.
"During the late '60s and early
'60s, fraternities lost the support
of students, particularly at elite,
private institutions where they
were the strongest Levin ex-
plains.
"Fraternity members became
stigmatized as members of the
establishment
But today students are looking
for the security and structure that
fraternity membership offers, and
a "dramatic reversal" of the
decline in frat membership taking
place, Levin asserts.
Based on the study of frater-
nities at over 160 colleges,
membership in fraternities has
climbed from 19 to 20 percent of
the student population.
That trend is even stronger at
influential schools on the east and
west coasts, he adds, where social
patterns typically are more rigid.
But with an increased member-
ship on campuses, fraternities are
also garnering more attention,
often of a disciplinary nature,
from college administrators and
police.
"Fraternities were less pro-
blemtic a few years ago because
they didn't have many members.
In fact, membership in some
fraternities sank to zero. Now,
just by the increase in sheer
numbers of fraternity members,
they're having more problems on
campus
Indeed, last year a College
Press Service survey of ad-
ministrators and campus police
officials indicated a new, "get
tough" attitude with fraternities
nationwide.
Many states have now enacted
anti-hazing statutes which forbid
fraternities from requiring
recruits to go through
humiliating, sometimes very
dangerous rituals to become
members.
Colleges, along with national
chapters for many fraternities,
have also clamped down on drink-
ing, fizzing, and discriminatory
policies which have plagued greek
organizations in the past.
4'As fraternities return, their
character is changing quite a bit
Levin points out. "They're doing
more philanthropic work, they're
less elitist and discriminatory, and
they are controlling hazing ac-
tivities
But, he adds, the fraternities
are cleaning up their acts "not
necessarily because they want to,
but because of pressure from
legislatures, administrators, and
other organizations
Hazing still exists, but has
become "more subtle and more
psychological, like telling pledges
they've flunked an important ex-
am or telling them no one likes
them and they can't be in the
fraternity
More ECU Students
Affiliate With Greeks
By DALE SWANSON
StafT Writer
ECU's Greek system is ex-
periencing a membership boom.
According to a spokesman for
Sigma Phi Epsilon, membership
has been on the rise since about
1977 and is finally approaching the
popularity it had in the 1950s and
'60s.
Kappa Sigma Vice President
Dwayne Wiseman claims an in-
crease from 10 to 15 pledges per
rush in the late '60s to 35 in this
year's fall pledge class. Both
fraternity spokesman said the
slump of the early '70s was the
result of the war and the anti-
establishment feelings of the
period.
Sororities have also experienced
a marked increase over the past
three years. According to
Panhailenic Council advisor
Laura Sweet, the late '60s
membership drop that hurt frater-
nities and some northern
sororities had little affect on
ECU's sororities and those at
other southern schools. Sweet said
that during that period, most
ECU sororities saw drops in
pledge classes of about embers
each.
The recent surge in fraternity
membership, however, has been
accompanied by a major boost in
sorority pledging.
In contrast to the nationwide
increase in hazing problems and
fraternity related offenses.
Associate Dean of Orientation
and Judiciary James B. Mallory
said that fraternity problems on
ECU's campus are down. He at
tributed this to the North
Carolina's anti-hazing laws, na-
tional chapter rules and fraternity
cooperation. Mallory also said
most students pledging here will
not allow such practices.
Philanthropy is up in fraternity
activities while misconduct is
down. The upcoming dry rush is
an example of this, Mallory said.
The only serious hazing pro
blem over the past decade occured
last year and involved the Omega
Phi Phi fraternity.
Book Prices Increase;
Bad News For Students
By OLTDA HORTON
SUff Wrtur
Textbook prices have increased
this semester, according to
bookstore spokesmen, causing
many students to leave the book
stores with empty pockets.
Don Edwards, manager of the
University Book Exchange, said
that textbook prices rose about
five percent (one dollar) this
semester.
Edwards attributes the rise in
costs to increases passed down
from textbook publishers. "Book
prices are still going up more than
they should be Edwards said.
According to Joe Clark,
manager of the ECU Student Sup-
ply Store, publishers generally in-
crease prices before fall semesters.
Some ECU students have
already discovered the price in-
creases. Aletta Dixon, a math stu-
dent, said, "I bought fewer books
this semester, but I ended up pay-
ing more for them
"I paid $112 for five paperbacks
and two hardbacks, which is
ridiculous said Carla Waters,
an industrial technology major.
According to some professors,
price is a major factor considered
when placing textbook orders.
Collett Dilworth, assistant pro-
fessor of English, said, "Cost is a
major consideration when choos-
ing books Dilworth said he tries
to use the same books each
semester, but situations such as
new editions prevent this.
For Betty Long, associate pro-
fessor of elementary education,
quality is a major factor con-
sidered when choosing books.
However, to reduce costs, Long
said, "I try not to require addi-
tional textbooks
Edwards believes that the situa-
tion will get better because of the
improved economy. "It looks like
prices are beginning to stabilize'
Edwards said.
On The Inside
New Housing
Mill JOHNSON � BCU
Construction on RiaggoM Towen Stadent Coadoaalaianat la
Many of the 180 units are already sold.
expected to be completed by August.
Announcements2
Editorials4
Style6
Sports9
Classifieds8
� The East Carolinian
begins today an original car-
toon strip, Wolkin' the Plonk,
by A. Guy, that will appear
regularly each week in The
East Carolinian this semester.
See page 5.
� Several ECU student
leaders will meet with Gov.
James Hunt later this month
to discuss important issues for
the future off North Carolina.
See page 3.
� For the latest on the ECU
women's swimming team
which coach Rick Kobe says is
better than ever and can finish
In the national top 20, see
Sports, page 9.
� Jay Stone reviews Hunter
's latest new jour-
effort, Curse of Lono
Style, page 6.
� �
�-� - - � man





2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 12, 1984
I
Announcements
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus community
since 1925
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wednesday during the sum
mer
The East Carolinian is the
official newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated and published tor
and by the students of East
Carolina University
Subscription Rate: $20 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU, Greenville, N C
POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The East
Carolinian, Old South
Building, ECU Greenville,
NC 27834
Telephone 7S7 34, 37,
�309
SIGMA ALPHA
IOTA
Sigma Alpha lota Composer's
Wuslcale Compositions will be ac
ceo'ed from students, faculty, and
members of the community who
would like to participate In this con
cert of originally composed music.
The Musicale will be held on January
23 19�4 at 8 00 p m In A J Fletcher
Recital Hall Contact Natalie
Beacham (756-6252) or Betsy Larder
17586712) this week
HONORS SEMINAR
All University faculty and all
students participating In the Honors
Program are reminded of their op-
portunity of designing or requesting
the Honors Seminar of their choice
The Honors Committee makes the
final selection from among proposals
submitted each semester. Seminars
are topic oriented and are often Inter
disciplinary and team taught. Pr&
posals for courses to be taught fall
semester 194 should be subm'tted
before Wednesday, January 18, 19t4,
to Or David Sanders. Director of the
Honors Program, co Engligh
Department, Campus. For further In
formation see Dr. Sanders in
Ragsdale 212 or call 757 4373
INTERN PROGRAM
Approximately 115 lobs are
available In this program Pay Is
$3 73hr for full time positions.
Beginning June 1 August 10, MM
Students must have finished their
sophomore year and have a 2.5 GPA
Graduate students are also eligible to
apply. Application deadline Is
February 7. Interested students
should contact the Co-op office, 313
Rawl Blag if Interested Details
about this program will be presented
at our regular Co-op seminars
scheduled for January II from 12
noon to 1 PM and January 12 from 4 5
PM In 306 Rawl Blag
EDUCATION
GRADUATES
Those finishing with Degrees in
Education may sign up for Interviews
starting on January 11 at 2:30 pm at
the Career Planning and Placement
Service if they are registered In that
office Six school systems will be here
this month
NCIO
The Co-op Office has Information
concerning lobs available In state
government which will be located
throughout the state. Students who
are Interested should attend one of
the two Information sessions which
art planned for January 11 at H noon
In 30 Rawl and January 12 at 4 p.m.
in 306 Rawl. Dr. Don Ensley, board
member of the internship program,
will briefly discuss the various lob op
portunltles available to students.
These summer lobs will begin June 1
and end August 10.
ECGC
The East Carolina Gay Community
will meet Monday, January 16 at 7:30
p.m. The meeting will be held at the
Catholic Newman Center, 953 E. 10th
St. (at the bottom of college Hill). AM
interested persons are cordially In
vlted to attend.
PERSONAL
DEVELOPMENT
CLASSES
Yoga Feb 6, Beginning Ballroom
Dance Feb. 10; intermediate
Ballroom Dance-Feb. 10; Beginning
Plano-Feb. 11 � Contact Continuing
Education, Erwln Hall. Call 757 6143
FRISBEE FEVER
The I rates art back and ready to
start another year of competition
The ECU Frlsbee club is open to all
people Interested in learning a new
skill or refining their old ones. The
first club meeting for the Spring
semester will be held Monday, Jan
16 at 8:00 pm In Mendenhall Student
Center room 248.
MARAUDERS
The Department of Military
Science Invites you to participate in
the ECU Marauders, an organliation
oriented toward leadership develop
ment through adventure training,
military tactics, and other outdoor
activities.
All students are welcome. The next
meeting will be held on Thursday,
Jan. 19 at 7PM in room 221,
Mendenhall Student Center. For
more Information, contact CPT.
Lllvak at 757 6967
VISUAL ARTS
The Visual Arts Forum of the
School of Art will meet Tuesday, Jan
17 at 5 p.m. In Jenkins room 1326. All
interested people are asked to attend
RUSH PI KAPP
The Brothers and little sisters of Pi
Kappa Phi Fraternity would like to
welcome everyone back for the spr
ing semester. It will be lamming.
We want to remind everyone that
RUSK begins Jan 23 and lasts all
week. Everyone Is welcome to come
out and see what the PI Kapps are all
about. Listen and watch for the men
of Pi Kappa Phi.
SUMMER CAMP
EMPLOYMENT
irs summer camp employment
time Are you interested' Summer
Camp representatives will be in
Mendenhall Student Center, from
11 00 am to 3 00 pm Tuesday
January 31 to interview students in
terested in summer employment
Jobs available Include, but are not
limited to Counselors, Lifeguards,
Cooks and dietitians, Nurses, Arts
and crafts directors. Waterfront
Assistants. Sailing and canoeing
directors. Recreation Counselors,
Persons skilled in swimming, riflery,
nature lore, horseback riding, sports,
and other areas
These positions will provide
valuable work experience and salary
Some iocs will Involve working with
Handicapped campers.
job information is available in the
Cooperative Education Office, 313
Rawl Bidg
Summer Camp Employment Day is
sponsored Dy the following offices
Career Planning and Placement,
Cooperative Education, Counseling
Center Handicapped Student Ser
vices Program for Hearing lmparled
Students and Parks, Recreation, and
Conservation
Contact the Cooperative Education
Office, 313 Rawl Bidg Telephone
757 6979 or 757 6375 immediately to
arrange interviews
SCHOOL OF
BUSINESS
The Career Planning and Place-
ment service will offer an Informa
tlon session for students wanting to
learn more about how to effectively
utilize this service Some discussion
of how to prepare before graduation
will be offered in this session on
January IB at 3:30 p.m. in Rawl 130
SENIORS GRAD
STUDENTS
The Career Planning and Place
ment Service will meet with those In
terested in learning more about this
service This general session will en
courage those graduating In the spr
Ing and summer to pick up reglstra
tion packets and return them in
January The session will be held in
Mendenhall 221 at 4:00 pm on
January 19, 1984
INTERN PROGRAM
The NC Institute of Government
Summer Intern Program provides 24
Internships In government for
outstanding students from a variety
of academic backgrounds Students
must have completed their
sophomore year to be eligible Ap
plication deadline is February 7 Con
tacl the Co-op office, 313 Rawl
Building to apply
COFFEEHOUSE
COMMITTEE
Do you want to help make the world
around you a more Interesting place
for everyone Are you tired of lust go-
ing to classes and then going home
Well you can moke a difference. The
Student union Coffeehouse Commit
tee located in Mendenhall Student
Center Is taking applications for
membershlp. This committee Is sole
ly In charge of booking and proofing
local and national entertainment in
the Coffeehouse Application will be
available at the Student Union Office
(Room 234 Mendenhall) from
January 16-20. Take an active role in
the world around and get Involved!
SAB
There will be a Student Athletic
Board meeting on Monday, Jan. 16 at
t 3C in Room 248 at Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Lady Pirate Classic
details will be discussed All
members are urged to attend
MINORITY ARTS
COMMITTEE
The Student Union Minority Arts
Committee will meet on Thursday,
January 12, 1984, at 8:00 P.M. In
Room 248 of Mendenhall Student
Center All members and any In-
teresting students are urged to at
tend.
smoking
5-Day Plan, Jan. 16-20m 7:00 P.m.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER, Coffee Shop
Group Therapy - Films - Lectures -
Demonstrations � Buddy System, Your Own
Control Book. It's Great! And You Won't Gain
Weight If You Follow The 5-Day Plan.
Directed by Alien F. Bowyer, Chief of Cardiology, ECU, in cooperation with Pitt County
Health Ate.de For Inform.tio. oil, 757-4651,756-5543. It b not nectary to pre-reter.
Stop Smoking Week. Jan. 16-20, 7:00PM
� � 1 ttTi .TTI �
PHOTOS - BUTTONS - PHOTOS -
BUTTONS - PHOTOS - BUTTONS
GREATEST CONCERT ROCK N5 ROLL
STARS & MOVIE GREATS.
COLOR PHOTOGRAPHS & BUTTONS
NOW ON SALE
Dates: Mon Jan 16-Fri Jan 20
Place: MSC � I st Floor Newspaper Lounge,
Sponsored By: Mendenhall Student Center
Adam & the Ants
Pat Benatar Eddie Money
Beatles Genesis
Clash C ?. . " "7
Hi

Springsteen
Lep Zepplin
Police
J. Geils
L
1
a
.i
)
a
Skynyrd
Tom Petty
Rolling Stones
Rush
Springfield
Journey
Van Halen
the Who
And Hundreds More.
CLASSIFIED ADS � Nime
You may use the form at right
or use a separate sheet of
paper if you need more lines.
There are 33 units per line.
Each letter, punctuation mark
and work space counts as one
unit. Capitalize and hyphenate
words properly. Leave space
at end of line if word doesn't fit.
No ads will be accepted over
the phone. We reserve the right
to reject any ad. All ads must
be prepaid. Enclose 75 cents
per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use
capital and lower case letters.
Return to the Media Board
secretary by 3 p.m. the day
before publication.
I
Address
CityState.
No. Lines-
.z.
(IrXpakacl.
. �� � M
. � � i� � � �

TTT" "tt � tt X
SPECIAL CONCERTS
COMMITTEE
Th� Student union Special Concerts
Commltee will meet on Tuesday,
January IT. 1�4. at 5:00 P.M In
Room 243 of Mendenhall Student
Center All members and any In
terestlng students are urged to at
tend
BASKETBALL
OFFICIALS
Interested In officiating intramural
basketball Attend the training clinic
held by the Department ot
Intramural Recreational Services
Monday, Jan , 16, 19�4 at 600 pm In
room 102 of Memorial gym Rules, in
terpretatlons and mechanics will be
discussed. Officials will be hired bas
ed on practical and written tests
ROLLER HOCKEY
OFFICIALS
Can you Roller skate Interested lr.
making some money Try officiating
Intramural Roller Hockey The
department of Intramural Recrea
tlonal Services will begin training
clinics for Roller Hockey Officials
Mon Jan 23 at 6 00 pm In room 102
of Memorial gym Rules, Interpreta
tlons and mechanics will be discuss
ed Officials will be hired based on
skating ability and practical and
written tests
PERSONAL CARE
ATTENDANTS
Applications are needed from those
persons who are interested In becom
Ing Personal Care Attendants to
wheelchair students We are par
tlcularly Interested In anyone who
has a background of assisting in
dividual with their activities of daily
living.
For further details, contact Office
of Handicapped Student Services, 212
Whichard Building, Phone 757 67V9
LACROSSE
There will be a meeting for all who
are Interested In playing Lacrosse
this spring. The meeting will be held
January 17 at 7:30 pm In the base-
ment of Memorial Gym. There will be
a sign posted on the door where the
meeting Is being held. If you can not
attend this meeting please call: Bob
Fox at Sports Club Information or
Chris Tomaskl at 752 4999 Please try
to come to the meeting.
HEALTH ALLIANCE
The Pre-Professional Health
Alliance will hold Its first meeting for
the semester on Thursday, January
12, at 5:30, at the Cultural Center. All
persons planning to be inducted must
be present or contact the President or
Vice President Plans for the
semester will also be discussed and
all Interested persons are urged to at
tend.
PARTY
The ladies of Zeta Phi Beta Sororl
ty, inc. will start the new year off
right by having a party at the
Cultural Center on Friday, January
13, 19f4from 10:00 p.m2:00 a.m.
SIGN LANGUAGE
The sign language club would like
to Invite all past and present
members and anyone Interested to at
tend our first meeting. We strongly
encourage new members. Sign
language skills are not necessary. We
will meet on Monday, Jan. 16 at 6:30
in Mendenhall, Room 24t. We will be
showing the video tape of the
Christmas Fantasy performance.
SPORTS CLUB
The fifth meeting for the 193 t4
Sport Club Council will be held
Wednesday, January II, 19(4 at 400
pm in Room 105B of Memorial Gym.
Representatives of active sport clubs
are required to attend. Schedules for
spring semester activities must be
submitted at this meeting.
NAVIGATORS
Check It outi The Navigators In
vestlgatlve Bible study and
fellowship. Brewster B Wing, room
304. Every Tuesday, 7:30 PM, beglnn
Ing January 10th.
ZETA PHI BETA
AND PHI BETA
SIGMA
The Blue and White Family an
nounces Its INFORMAL
SMOKERRUSH on Sunday. January
15, 19�4, at 7:00 p.m. The event will
take place in'Mendenhall Multi
Purpose Room All Interested young
ladles and gentlemen are encouraged
to attend
SIGMA PHI EPSILON
We'd like to welcome back all ECU
students and congradulate our new
executive board members President
Jim White, Vice-Pres MlkeMoriey
Comptroller: Glenn Gorham, Recor
ding Sec : Joe Leonard. Correspon
ding Sec James Griffin Good Luckl
We're looking forward to a great
year
KINGTRIBUTE
The ECU Chapter of N.A.A C.P
will sponsor a Tribute to Or Martin
L King, Jr. on Friday 13, 194. at 6 00
p.m. In Jenkins Auditorium A special
guest will by there There is no
change Everyone Is welcome
FITNESSCLASSES
Registration will be held for classes
in Aerobics, Weight training, Per
sonai Defense and Aquaroblcs on
Jan. 1620 in Memorial Gym room
204 Cost. Students, 4 dollars tor one
classweek, S dollars for two
classesweek
PSICHI
Welcome back to school I We hope
you all had a great vacation and are
looking forward to an eventful
semester We will have a dinner
meeting at 600 pm on Monday, Jan.
23, In the Psl Chi library It will be
covered dish, so call Trlna at 75a S552
or Cathy at 758 2293 and let us know
what you can bring This Is an Impor
�ant business meeting, so please plan
to attend I
Applications for membership and
for our two scholarships will be
available next week Check the an
nouncements on Tuesday for the
criteria for each and for more Info
about upcoming meetings
HOURS CHANGED
Weekend clinic hours for the Stu
dent Health Service have been chang
ed to 3:10-5:30 pm on Saturdays and
Sunday A physician will be
available during those times. Nursing
staff will be available during other
weekend hours and will have a physl
clan on call for emergencies. The'e
will be no Saturday morning clin!
WZMB
The Electric Rainbow Radio Show is
back on WZMB Late night Friday
and Saturday nights Heavy Metal
fills the airwaves This weeks album
specials are Fri van Haien's 19H
album and Sat Coney Hatch's album
ta Hand
CATHOLIC NEWMAN
CENTER
Sunday Mass at 12 30 in Biology
Building Room 103 Everyone is
welcome This Sunday (Jan IS)
Leaf Raking PARTY at 300
URGENT EVERYONE NEEDED
Daily mass on Wednesday at 5 00 PM
at Newman Center on Tenth Street at
the bottom of the hill Dinner
afterwards Come Celebrate with US I
4-H
There will be a meeting of the 4 h
Club Thursday. Jan 12 at 600 in
Mendenhall Student Center
Everyone Is welcome inquire at the
information desk for location
ISA
The International Student Assocla
tion will be having their first meeti.tg
and dinner on Saturday. Jan. 14 at
5:30 p.m. at the International House
306 East Ninth St Old and new In
terested students are welcome
BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU Biology Club will hofd its
first meeting for the semester on
Mon , January 16th. at 7 p.m. In
BN 102 All members and interested
persons are grged to attend Lers
start the New Year off rlghtl
GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA
There will be a sorority meeting
Tuesday, January 17 in room 212
Mendenhall Student Center See ya'
there sisters!
Wim.�ij.i;irf.iiiii.iiri.ng.i:M.iiiJ.i;i.i�iiui;w�i'ii�i;i�Mm�g
$ -j 00 OFF ANY DINNER
TACO CID
B
Hwy 264 By-Pass
756-2072
Expires Jan. 25. 1984 j
Otter not good with any other special - :e' CUStomet
EVERY WEDNESDAY 4 TACOS FOR M.39
Something That You Will
Always Treasure!
o5v&
.V.VV
mmm
Your Official ECU Class Ring
Order Now For Early Delivery
Date: Jan. 24 & 25 Time: 9:XM;00pm
pi e. Student Supply Store � Wright Building
j
Gov. Hi
ECU,
Three ECU students lncj
SGA President Paul Nas
scheduled to meet with
James B. Hunt Jr. latel
month at a gathering gover
hosting for student leaders
the state
Naso, East Carolinian
Manager Hunter Fishe:
Managing Editor Darryl
and Ebony 7eraFeatures
Rueben Ingram were invi
the Governor's Mansion . j
along with student
presidents and college newj
editors from every collej
university in the staj
Univer
(CPS) "The cost of liv-
ing in the residence halls
will rise predicts Allan
Slagel. a junior at
diana L'niversitv.
"Billing will be her-
oic" adds freshman
Mark Kurowski.
They're probably rig
for when students return
to campuses nationwide
in January they'll be
ing the brave new world
of telephone service
brought on by the
breakup of AT&T
Kurowski, a business ma-
jor who actually has tried
to calculate the impact on
student phone bi.ls.
estimates his own dorm
ECU Stud!
Be Affect
Phone Ra
B STEPHEN
HARDING
be affected by thi
breakup of America)
Telephone and Telegraph
at the present time,
however, there is n
guarantee they will not b
in the future, sai.
Ramona Nor mar.I
Business Office Manager
of Carolina Telephom
and Telegraph in Green-
I
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WELO
25
ON AN)
G'eenvtlle Squat
Open ?
Seven Di
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Now Ope '
Located Bestd
Plan Now For
Let Our Tan
You Gin Stav
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Cathy Davenpoi
Operator;
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12, 194
r' i

i


L i i
1
��

j
OLIC NEWMAN
ENTER
Mi a' 12 X in Biology
ort lOj Fvvryon is
Ml Soro�y ij-n 15)
8 PARTY at 300
EVERYONE NEEDED
lor Weone�j�y it; 00 PM
l enter or T�ntt Srr�t ��
of the hill Dlhr��r
. - Celebrate with USI
4 H
be a rne�t,r�fl o m� 4-h
Jan 12 at a 00 in
Student Canter
�eicome � ��Mjuirt at the
oe� tor location
ISA
�� ona Student Auocia
r . �� � rH meeting
n Saturday Jan 14 at
�w nrernafionai Mouae.
n s? Ola and new In
" are welcome
icOGY CLUB
� oiogy Cue win hoicj its
tor the semester on
I �th at 7 p m m
isanalkan and interested
r9c t0 attend Let's
v��r OH right!
SIGMA SIGMA
Be a sorority meeting
i ary 17 n room ?lj
sTvoent Center See ya'
I COUPON COUPON
a
i COUPON COUPON
jre!

x
M
aafat v '
Gov. Hunt Will Meet With
ECU, N.C. Student Leaders
Three ECU students including
SGA President Paul Naso are
scheduled to meet with Gov.
James B. Hunt Jr. later this
month at a gathering governor is
hosting for student leaders around
the state.
Naso, East Carolinian General
Manager Hunter Fisher and
Managing Editor Darryl Brown
and Ebony eraMFeatures Editor
Ruebcn Ingram were invited to
the Governor's Mansion Jan. 30
along with student body
presidents and college newspaper
editors from every college and
university in the state. A
spokesman for the event said 150
to 200 students are expected at the
event.
Also scheduled to be in atten-
dance are UNC system president
William Friday, Community Col-
lege President Bob Scott and John
Henley, president of the N.C.
Association of Independent Col-
leges and Universities.
Each student received a per-
sonal letter signed by Hunt in-
viting them to the Monday even-
ing gathering "for a forum and
discussion of the important issues
that face us Students were also
The meeting is part of N.C.
2000, a Hunt-supported program
to examine the future of North
Carolina in the next century. A
spokesman with the Department
of Administration said Hunt will
meet student leaders to hear their
ideas on important issues concern-
ing North Carolina since they will
be the citizens leading the state in
the next century.
asked to identify the five issues
most important to them for the
future of North Carolina and
return them early so they could be
compiled and discussed at the
meeting.
Democrats Seek
1st District Seat
University Student Predicts High Phone Bills
(CPS) "The cost of liv-
ing in the residence halls
will rise predicts Allan
Slagel, a junior at In-
diana University.
"Billing will be horri-
ble adds freshman
Mark Kurowski.
They're probably right,
for when students return
to campuses nationwide
in January they'll be fac-
ing the brave new world
of telephone service
brought on by the
breakup of AT&T.
Kurowski, a business ma-
jor who actually has tried
to calculate the impact on
student phone bi.ls,
estimates his own dorm
bill of $20 to $50 a month
may rise to $35 to $65.
Some observers think
basic campus phone ser-
vices may triple in cost.
In early December, a
group of higher educa-
tion associations
predicted the higher
phone rates caused by the
breakup could
"devastate" research
libraries that use phone
lines to tie into shared
data bases.
The National Associa-
tion of State Universities
and Land-Grant Colleges
estimates some schools
may pay up to $500,000
more a year in phone
bills.
While no one yet
knows the exact impact
on students themselves,
Kurowski concludes the
breakup will "make
dorm life harder
The event, of course, is
the breakup of giant
AT&T. As of January
1st, 1984, AT&T will spin
off into eight separate
companies: a massive
long-distance phone and
communications com-
pany still called AT&T,
develop.
The breakup will mean
a number of changes in
phone costs as well as in
the way people get phone
service.
dependent of institutional
systems - will continue to
deal with the local phone
company to get a dial
tone and access to local
and long-distance service,
dent would have to make
up the cost difference.
The university wouldn't
be able to absorb higher
local call costs.
In the past, AT&T kept explains Joyce Berryman,
residential and local an AT&T district
phone rates low by charg- manager in Denver,
ing artificially-high long- Students with their
distance rates. The pro- own phones will be sub-
fits from long-distance ject to the same residen-
calls went to help pay for tial rates as everyone else,
local service. But students who use
But after the breakup, phones provided by their
the regional phone com- schools may face even
The two Democratic
candidates for the 1st
District congressional
seat formally filed with
the State Board of Elec-
tions this week, with in-
cumbent Walter B. Jones
seeking re-election and
State Rep. John Clllam
of Windsor hoping to
unseat the 11-term con-
gressman.
Jones formally filed
for re-election Wednes-
day in Washington,
N.C, after an announce-
ment at a local hotel. His
filing fee was donated by
area supporters.
Giliam filed his can-
didacy at the end of a
"John Giliam Apprecia-
tion Day" in his home
town of Wmdsor, which
featured a parade down
Main Street in his honor.
The two candidates will
face one another in the
May 8 primary.
Jones, 70, is running
on his 18-year voting
record in the U.S. House
of Representatives, which
he said Wednesday is
"consistant with the
views of the majority of
the citizens of the 1st
Congressional District
Giliam, 37, is an
astern North Carolina
agribusinessman who has
served in the State House
of Representatives since
1980. In a speech declar-
ing his candidacy he
stressed the need to work
for economic develop-
ment, environmental pro-
tection and protection
for the region's farmers.
He also pledged to hold
1,300 town meetings
before the primary for
voters and said "their
message will go to
Washington
Giliam, a former
English teacher with a
master's degree in educa-
tion, also stressed the
need for improved public
schools with assistance
from the state and federal
government.
Jones has been rated by
the National Education
Association as having a
100 percent voting record
in support of educational
programs, according to
his Washington office.
Jones has served as
chairman of the House
Merchant Marine and
Fisheries Committee for
three years and is credited
with upgrading the Mer-
chant Marine fleet and
Coast Guard. He is also a
member of the House
Agricultural Committee.
plus seven regional com- panies will have to charge higher rate hikes.
panies that will handle
local telephone service
and any other kinds of
businesses they can
ECU Students Probably Won't
Be Affected By AT&T Breakup;
Phone Rates Shouldn't Increase
customers enough to
make a profit off local
service, too.
Just what those charges
will be remains to be
worked out by phone
companies, local utility
rate boards, and Con-
gress.
For the moment,
however, much will de-
pend on the kind of
phone system a campus
has.
Students who get their
own phones - who are in-
At Indiana, for exam-
ple, students historically
pay local call costs as part
of their flat room rental
fee, paying extra only for
their long-distance calls.
But now, local rates
also depend not just on
the number of lines or
phones, but on how often
a student uses them, even
for local calls.
"Undoubtably says
Tom Meglemre,
Indiana's communica-
tions director, "the stu-
East Carolina University's
mi STUDENT UNiON
mm
STUOf NT UNION
Needs YOU!
m
mm
STUOBfTUNMN
By STEPHEN
HARDING
a5CV students will not
be affected by the
breakup of American
Telephone and Telegraph
at the present time,
however, there is no
guarantee they will not be
in the future, said
Ramona Norman,
Business Office Manager
of Carolina Telephone
and Telegraph in Green-
ville.
On Jan. 1, AT&T
broke up. Local
telephone service is now
handled by seven regional
companies, however,
AT&T still controls long-
distance service.
ECU telephones are
connected with Carolina
Telephone, part of the
United Telephone System
and not affiliated with
AT&T.
The Federal Com-
munications Commission
proposed that in April an
access fee be required to
help pay for long-
distance lines. "There is
considerable doubt there
will be any access charges
in 1984 said H.D.
Terry, public relations
supervisor for Carolina
Telephone in Tarboro.
Due to the different
proposals by government
members, what will hap-
pen is not certain.
WELCOME BACK STUDENTS
25 Discount
ON ANY BOOK IN STOCK
Expires Jan. 17. 1984
WITH COUPON
Greenville Square Shopping Center
Open 9 30 a m 9 30 p m
Seven Days a Week
756 7177
CENTRAL BOOK & NEWS
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3H?e iEaat (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Hi NTFR FlSHFR, i iifnjiiin
Darryi Brown, nhnrtm
If NNH I K JENDRASIAK, . ,� �v J.T. PlETRZAK. Urn,A
riNA Mari ac hk. &� mike McPartland, ��. m��
I IZANNI l! NMSus s,w,iy,fo, TOM NORTON, rrd,f m���
Gordon Ipock, &������ Kathy Fuerst. wut ����
I Nickj as so e Mike Mayo. ru &���
fanuan 12. 18'
Opinion
Page 4
SAT Scores
�C� Mws Step Lfc Recruitment
Once again the average Scholastic
ptitude Test score for entering
I CU students was among the bot-
tom half in the UNC system, rank-
ing ninth out of 16, in a state that is
among the bottom quarter in the na-
tion.
The state's ranking is not actually
hard to explain as the
university's, for states have dif-
ferent ways of distrubuting and
tabulating the scores. Vice
i hancellor Volpe is right in advising
that one take Nomi Carolina's spot
in the bottom 10 with a grain of salt,
because the many mo of high school
students take the SAT in North
rolina, than in some other states
onl top, college-bound students
rake it, thus coming out with a
higher average, but from a much
smaller sample of the population.
the university's ranking
among ! INC schools that should be
� en more seriously, for the
sons are more subtle, and the
university needs to recognize them.
I CU ranks behind eight schools in
the state: Chapel Hill, State,
Greensboro, Charlotte, Asheville,
mington. School of the Arts and
Appalachian. Granted, many of the
averages are close: ECU has an
average of 856, while UNC-
Wilmington's is 862. But whether
you like it or not, the SAT scores of
entering freshmen are one indica-
tion of a university's quality, and
the low ranking reflects on both the
perception and reality of ECU's
quality.
r its flaws, the SAT is a
rough estimate of a student's abili-
ty, especially when used in conjunc-
tion with other criteria. ECU's pro-
blem lies in recruitment methods by
the administration, coupled with
special difficulties recruiters have in
presenting ECU to prospective
students. ECU certainly has more to
offer than many high school
students are apparently realizing.
There are probably reasons other
than academic that attract students
to other schools in the state. UNC
and State justly pull in good
students for their high quality
academic programs, but when a
studentis looking for another col-
lege, many may head for Ap-
palachian or UNC-Asheville as
much for the scenery and skiing as
the scholastic opportunities. Others
may go to Wilmington for "UNC
by the sea" surf and sand, and ur-
ban areas such as Greensboro and
Charlotte have attractions to many
that rural small towns do not. Not
to say that these schools don't offer
good programs, but aside from the
fine points of academia, many beat
out rural Pitt County's offer of
tobacco fields as far as the eye can
see.
It adds up to the need for stronger
recruitment by the ECU administra-
tion. Programs such as Scholars
Weekend, at which ECU rolls out
the red carpet for top high school
juniors (selected, among other
ways, by SAT scores), are ideal but
too little, too infrequently. In years
past there has been little follow-up
on the students in their senior year,
when they actually make their col-
lege choice. And there is a need for
a much expanded, much more ac-
tive effort taking more represen-
tatives into high schools, increasing
published recruitment materials,
following up interested students and
parents and just making ECU's
assets known. ECU has the state's
only accredited art school, one of its
best music schools, and last year the
medical school had the highest
board scores in the North Carolina.
ECU can attract top students, but it
takes extra work at a university
without ski slopes, city life or surf
and with a reputation as a party
school. Administrative recruitment
efforts needed to be greatly stepped
up, probably requiring additional
funding, staffing and volunteer ef-
forts bv ECU students.
I OUST GOT LAIP OFF FROM WPMV PLAHEL,
THE V 5AIP THB WAS A dOB FOR JESSE rACKSON,
Republicans Can Blow It, Too
By DARR I BROWN
If Ronald Reagan has proven nothing
else in his first term in office, he has
proven that Republicans are no better
at balancing the budget than
Democrats. In his first three years,
Reagan has increased the national debt
by half. When he took office in 1980,
the deficit stood at a hefty $940 billion.
Three years later, $475 billion has been
added.
It is almost beyond belief that this
was brought about by the same man
who campaigned for office promising a
balanced budget and who earlier in his
administration endorsed the idea of a
constitutional amendment requiring a
balanced federal budget. (He doesn't
mention it much these days.) He'd be
breaking the law he asked for.
What happened? Was Reagan really
so unaware of the realities of national
economics that he thought he could in-
crease the biggest budget item, defense,
then cut taxes and off-set it with cuts in
social programs? Or was he just lying
through his teeth back in campaign '80,
knowing it could never be done? It
seems it must be one or the other, or a
combination of the two.
Generalizations are always at least a
little inaccurate, but the stereotype has
been that Democrats are the good-
hearted party and Republicans are the
partyof good sense. After the conser-
vative "landslide" of 1980, many
Democrats were forced to reconsider
their big-bucks-for-good-causes
philosophy. As one prominant
Democrat concluded, people recognize
Democrats as the party for health care,
social security, the environment, educa-
tion, the arts and public service, but
they have lost faith in them for one im-
portant task � balancing their
checkbook.
Reagan may have ruined for
Republicans the best preconception
they had going for their party, namely,
that they are fiscally conservative and
responsible, the better businessmen
with the nation's budget. Reagan has
proved the most conservative
Republican can get the nation in more
red ink than the biggest spending
Democrat.
One can understand a politician up
for re-election this year not wanting to
increase taxes. One can also understand
him not dwelling on a horrendous na-
tional debt in public. But he must con-
front the problem, and his fiscal plans
for next year should reflect it. Unfor-
tunately, they do not. In Reagan's new
budget submissions to Congress he calls
for more of the same: yet more in-
creases in defence, yet more cuts in
social programs, and no tax increases.
Again projections for the deficit are
growing.
Politicians not up for re-eiection can
be more realistic and ensible. Sen
Howard Baker, R-Tenn , Senate ma-
jority leader, has expressed discontent
with the skyrocketing deficit and the
lack of initiatives to control it. One of
the president's own economic advisors,
Martin Feldstein, repeatedly casts
omens about the potentially
catastrophic results of the evergrowing
debt. He is repeatedly ignored by the
administration, and repeatedly agreed
with by most economists.
So, voting Republican has been
redefined by Reagan. It is no longer a
choice of big social programs and debt
vs. a lean federal government and fiscal
sensibility. It is now a choice of going
broke through huge military expen-
ditures or going broke through
overabundant social programs If
Democrats have learned anything from
the last three years, as they claim they
have, they may not let the second choice
happen. But will sensible Republicans
get a chance to prove they can eliminate
the first before Reagan ruins their
reputation and credibility, and mavbe
the national economy?
I Never Thought I Would Hear That
Here are some of the things I doubt
you'll hear said in 1984.
From John McEnroe: Sir, my ball
was out, and you called it in. Jimmy
Connors deserves the point
From Jesse Jackson: "I have no in-
tention of making waves in the
Democratic Party. The system as it now
operates is fair to all the candidates
President Ronald Reagan: "I receiv-
ed a touching letter from a little gir! in
Madison, Wisconsin, but I have no
desire to read it to you
Secretary of Defense Caspar
Weinberger: "We overestimated our
defense needs, and we're asking Con-
gress to cut our budget in half
John DeLorean: "I believe we have
the finest Drug Enforcement Agency in
the world
Henry Kissinger: "I have no com-
ment
Secretary of State George Shultz:
"Sec that the press gets a copy of
everything we discussed here today
Rev. Jerry FaJwell: "If there is a
God, and I'm not saying there is
Fritze Mondale: "If I am elected I
will continue the policies and
philosophy of President Jimmy
Carter
The editor of Pravda: "When we're
wrong we're wrong, and we should ad-
mit it. The Soviets overreacted when the
United States placed Pershing 2 missiles
in Europe. They're not the threat to the
Warsaw Pact nations that we thought
they would be, and we would like to
return to Geneva as quickly as
possible
Art Buchwald
Johnny Carson: "I believe a wife
deserves every penny she can get when
she feels she's been wronged
A power company executive: "We
have just discovered that our new
nuclear plant was built with cheap
materials and shoddy labor. This is no
fault of our customers and therefore we
intend to pay for our mistakes without
passing on any cost to the consumer
The Japanese Minister of Commerce:
"Japan can no longer export more than
it imports without upsetting other na-
tions' balance of trade We are
therefore lifting all restrictions on
foreign goods, so other countries mav
compete fairly in the marketplace
A Big Ten football coach: "I don't
care if he's Ail-American material. If
the kid can't keep his grades up I don't
want him on my team
Fidel Castro: "I've been shaving with
this Remington electric for months. I
liked it so much I bought the
company
Howard Cosell: "I'd rather not give
my opinion on that because I don't
know anything about it
Prince Andrew: "I'm sorry, dear.
I'm third in line for the throne, and it
would not be right for me to get into a
hot tub with you
Ayatollah Khomeini: "In the name
of Allah, and I'm not saying there is
one
Loa
iJS)� The progr
'hat allowc icnts
consolidate all
school k
out the payment time
them "has g
of blue suede shoes"
the moment, aid offi
in Washington re
The Senate re
November wit ha
ng a bill tha mid I
continued the
through the
� ear, and p
deration
stop
pa
reconvene
says Den.
Studer
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Indian r
Topic of
B TIN MX ROM H
In an efl
familiarize
and stud:
cult
m our societ. Be
edine Ma
of I
N C Der .
Public Ir
con j
tions on Ir
next Tues:
A. � Dea
Charles R (
"the talks are pa:
Multicultural Ej
Comm
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comm.
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good furniture, china
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75;






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12, 1984
4,
?

I

e cuts in
j tax increases,
e deficit are
re-election can
sensible. Sen.
i Senate ma-
Iressed discontent
and the
mtrol it. One f
I :isors,
I- atedly casts
p o t e n t i a 11 y
he evergrowing
gnored by the
I itedly agreed
n has been
:lt is no longer a
jograms and debt
Irnment and fiscal
nee of going
military expen-
uoke through
11 programs. If
ea anything from
is they claim they
the second choice
sible Republicans
they can eliminate
fagan ruins their
lity, and maybe
at
mistakes without
� the consumer
jster of Commerce.
r export more than
?nmg other na-
ide. We are
restrictions on
her countries may
marketplace
coach: "I don't
lencan material. If
s grades up 1 don't
m
been shaving with
trie for months. I
1 bought the
'd rather not give
lit because 1 don't
it it
I'm sorry, dear,
the throne, and it
for me to get into a
fcini: "In the name
not saying there is
Loan Consolidation Program May Be Cut
WASHINGTON, D.t
(CPS) �The program
that allowed students to
consolidate all their
school loans and stretch
out the payment times for
them "has gone the way
of blue suede shoes" for
the moment, aid officials
in Washington report.
The Senate recessed in
November without pass-
ing a bill that would have
continued the program
through the next three
ears, and political con-
siderations probably will
stop the Senate from
passing it when it
reconvenes in January,
says Dennis Martin of the
National Association of
Student Financial Aid
Administrators
Students who already
have lumped their school
loans together under the
Student Loan Marketing
Association (usually call-
ed Sallie Mae) program
won't be affected by the
program's ending.
But Martin says no
more students will be able
to consolidate their loans
with Sallie Mae until
Congress comes up with
some kind of replacement
in the future.
The bill that failed
wasn't as generous to
students as previous loan
consolidation programs
had been.
Under the new bill,
students would have had
to pay nine or 10 percent
interest on their loans.
compared to the seven
percent they now pay.
Moreover, they would
have to pay the loans
back over 15 years in-
stead of the 20 year
period they now have.
In addition, the new
bill would have pro-
hibited state loan agen-
cies from making con-
solidation loans to
students.
Bill sponsor Rep. Paul
Simon, D-Ill excluded
the state agencies to try to
increase the federal
government's tax
revenues.
Under the old system,
states got money to lend
to students by selling tax
exempt bonds to their
citizens. The U.S.
Treasury consequently
couldn't collect taxes on
the money used to buy
the bonds.
But excluding state
agencies ws the major
reason the Sallie Mae bill
staggered in the Senate
after being passed by the
House.
"There are some real
differences of opinion (in
the Senate) over allowing
state agencies to par-
ticipate (in making con-
solidation loans) Mar-
tin says. "It probably
won't pass this time
In that event, "The
people already in the pro-
gram will continue in it,
but (the program) won't
be available for any new
people" after it expired in
November.
But Martin is "hopeful
the program will be pass-
ed as part of the (new)
Higher Education
Reauthorization Act
which may not come to a
vote until late 1984 or
earlv 1985.
SA T Ranking Validity Disputed
Indian Education
Topic of Lecture
B TINA MAROSCHAK
In an effort to
familiarize ECU faculty
and students with the
cultural diversity present
in our society, Betty Ox
edine Mangum, director
of Indian Education for
the N.C. Department of
Public Instruction, will
conduct two presenta-
tions on Indian education
next Tuesday.
Acting Dean of the
School of Fducation
Charles R. Coble said,
"the talks are part of the
Multicultural Education
Committee's efforts to
increase campus and
community awareness of,
and respect for, the
ethnic diversity of
American life
Mangum's talks will be
the second multi-cultural
awareness program
presented this academic
year. "The Multicultural
Education committee en-
courages consideration of
the implications of such
ethnic diversity upon ef-
fective teaching Coble
said.
The ECU School of
Education will sponsor
Mangum's visit as a part
of their efforts to gain
reaccreditation.
The faculty workshop
will be held at 4 p.m
followed by a lecture to
Teacher Education
Students at 7 p.m. in
Hendrix Theater.
News Writers
Needed
at The East Carolinian
Students interested in reporting and
writing news for The East Carolinian
can come by the offices on the second
floor of the Publications building,
across from the entrance of Joyner
Library. Mondays and Wednesdays
are best.
- continued from page 1
The school was ranked ninth out
of the 16 schools in the UNC
system. UNC-Chapel Hill was
first with average scores of 1056,
while Elizabeth City State College
was 16th with 584.
Another point of contention
concerning SATs has been the
amount of emphasis placed on the
scores by college admission of-
ficials. Seeley said SAT scores are
an important factor in admission
to ECU, but not the most impor-
tant factor.
The applicant's SAT score is us-
ed in a formula with their class
rank or high school grade point
average in order to determine a
predicted GPA for their freshman
year at ECU. The predicted GPA
is the determining factor in admis-
sions, Seeley said.
Volpe said he thought the SAT
scores were needed to a certain ex-
tent. "You need to have some in-
dication of how well a student is
doing he said. However, he also
stated that he felt that high school
performance was of greater im-
portance. "There's no doubt in
my mind that the student's four-
year performance should carry
more weight than how the student
does on an exam Volpe said.
"Most schools probably use it
(the SAT), but it does not carry as
much weight as performance
said Seeley. "I think we need to
keep the data in perspective and
weight it properly Volpe said.
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THE EAST C AROL1NJAN
Black Conservatives Support Helms
By GORDON IPOCK
OOHOON IPOCK � �cu
'Reagan and Helms 1984'
Dwight Simpson attends a dinner held at the Moose Lodge in honor of Jesse Helms. Simpson Is founder
and president of U.N.I.T.E.D, an organization based on the economic advancement for blacks.
"We've rode this horse too
long says Willie Simpson speak-
ing of the black community's
reliance on liberal social pro-
grams. According to Simpson,
social-assistance programs are the
source � not the solution � of
black economic problems.
"Liberal programs have
destroyed our first line of defense
which is the family unit says
Simpson. "And because of that,
these programs haven't worked.
They have created and perpetuate
an underclass of people
Simpson, age 26, is a founder
and president of U.N.I.T.E.D.
(United Network Investing
Toward Economic
Developement), an organization
whose goals are economic ad-
vancement primarily for blacks.
The organization is also open to
other minorities and whites as
well.
"Presently, we're active only in
Craven County, but in the future
we hope to have a charter in all
North Carolina counties says
Simpson. "We feel that it's going
to be needed to help people
become self-sufficient. That's our
philosophy. Because in the long
run, if you're vulnerable to be
fed, you're also vulnerable to be
misled
Simpson and his fellow
U.N.I.T.E.D. members definitely
feel that blacks are being misled
with a great deal of misinforma-
tion, not only by the press, but
also from political organizations
that claim to support black in-
terests. Simpson frequently uses
the term "demagogues" when
speaking of these leaders.
"It's all politics and power he
explains. "There are many leaders
who are more interested in mak-
ing black people dependent on
them than in making black people
free
The irony in all this is that
Simpson and his associates'
beliefs have led them directly to
the Republican Party. At a recent
political rally and dinner in
Greenville that honored North
Carolina's senior senator Jesse
Helms and included fellow
Republican senator John East,
Simpson along with his brother
Dwight and friend Jeff Swindell
were the only blacks among a
crowd of several hundred whites.
Sporting "Reagan and Helms in
'84" lapel buttons the three young
men mingled freely in the crowd
chatting and shaking hands after
the speeches � including the hand
of Helms himself.
"We've had our eye on Helms
for sometime said Simpson.
"All we really know about him is
what we see on TV and read in the
papers; but then there's so much
misinformation and sensa-
tionalism about him that you
can't really believe what you hear.
So we heard about Helms being
here in Greenville tonight and
thought we'd hear him in person.
And we've also talked to Claude
Allen a good deal about him
Allen is Helms' young black
press secretary. I asked Simpson
if he felt Allen was a token black
on the Helms staff.
"A token is a person set up in a
position who can't think or walk
or talk on his own said Simp-
son. "Now I think Claude Allen
has shown that he has a mind of
his own and can think for
himself
"It's not so much the
Republican Party; it's their
philosophy � a conservative
philsophy says Simpson.
"That's what we believe in, the
free enterprise system. And it just
so happens that that's what
Reagan and Helms and the
Republicans stand for
Simpson admitted the social
programs of the past 20 years had
helped blacks some, but added
they are dead-end programs and
would never lead blacks to
economic prosperity. Instead,
Simpson says U.N.I.T.E.D.
believes if blacks are allowed to
operate freely and fairly under the
free-enterprise system, they can
achieve economic parity.
"Blacks don't support black
businesses the way they used to
said Simpson. "Back in the days
of Jim Crow, blacks stuck
together because they had to. For
example, in New Bern 20 years
ago, black businesses were thriv-
ing. Now instead of shopping
local and neighborhood mer-
chants, blacks are shopping out at
the malls, and the small
businessman has lost out to the
corporate merchants Simpson
admitted, however, that this
decline in small business was not
just a black problem. Local white
merchants are losing in the battle
with the corporate giants as well.
"But the Reagan administra-
tion is trying to cut through the
red tape and give small
businessmen a break by rewriting
the business and tax rules
claims Simpson.
And what about racism. Wasn't
See Simpson, Page 8
THE EAST CAROL I MAN
Get The Sc
Michael Ja
Young superstar
Michael Jackson is un-
doubtedly the entertain-
ment sensation of the
year His album
"Thriller" has sold more
than five million copies
worldwide and given
birth to a record six hit
singles. From the cover o:
People Magazine to the
top of the MTV chai
is clear that Michael
Jackson is the rock stor
of the '805
Yet behind the glil
there is a differer
storythe inside stof
this top male vocalist
Nelson George, the fc
music editor at Billboard
magazine, has wntter.
The Michael Jacksc
Story ($2 95), the I
book to give the real
scoop on M
Jackson. Former I
4

'Curse Of Lono' Delivers Pages Of Insanity
ST
By JAY STONE
Staff Writer
Hunter S. Thompson, deep in the hearts of
modern day connoisseurs of the new journalism his
name is synonmous with fear and loathing. Yet, this
fear and loathing is no garden variety fear and
loathing. It is not ordinary. It is not trite. No, in-
deed � it is profound!
BOOK REVIEW
Yes, it is an existential fear and loathing. For
Hunter S. Thompson has generally concerned
himself with the aspects of contemporary American
life that are beyond bizarre, eccentric, or weird.
They are, in fact, conscientiously vulgar; even
obscene. This is because Thompson has always ex-
ercised a keen eye for those events that bring to light
some facet of the social psyche which was previous-
Binge and Purge
ly ignored or obscured in the prevalent national
consciousness. More to the point � these facets
were ignored with good reason � because they
were, and are, too ugly to be confronted.
As a consequence, when Thompson writes a book
about a national presidential election and includes a
passage on the Super Bowl in which the competing
football teams are described as coming together
under a brown California sky howling and
clawing at each other like wild beasts in heat one
cannot help but seize upon the sense of irony that he
intends to convey.
A presidential election and Super Bowl Sunday;
two forms of quintessential American catharsis.
Both are events filled with pomp and ostentatious
hype, yet both inevitably degenerate into a seamy
spectacle of ludicrous philistanism. Yes � an ugly
spectacle. And Dr. Gonzo is running loose and
weird again. He is running in the streets. And he's
running right at you in The Curse of Lono.
"Dear Ralph,
I think we have a live one this time old sport.
Some dingbat named Perry up in Oregon wants to
give us a month in Hawaii for Christmas and all we
have to do is cover the Honolulu Marathon for his
magazine, a thing called Running
So begins Hunter S. Thompson's newest book.
The Honolulu Marathon serves as the backdrop for
a demented odyssey that includes big game sport
fishing, wild drug orgies, and snatches from the
macabre legend of Captain James Cook, ostensibly
the first European to discover Hawaii. The book is
an indictment, a paen, a raving epithet.
"The Curse Of Lono is purely a com-
mercial venture designed to keep Hunter 5.
Thompson in drugs for another three
years.
In many respects it is reminescent of
Thompson'searlier work, Fear and Loathing In Las
Vegas. Once again Ralph Steadman illustrates the
doctor's tale superbly � this time "profusely" and
in "blazing" color. Once again the story is almost
hebephrenic, rambling unpredictably from one
deranged episode to the next with no obvious
philosophical point to be made unless it is that when
one is confronted with mass insanity the only ap-
propriate reaction is to respond in kind.
In the latest work, however, Dr. Gonzo is after
something different from what he was after in Fear
and Loathing In Las Vegas.
"You mean drugs?' Ralph said finally.
'Of course I mean drugs Skinner screamed.
'You think I came here to talk about art?"
Indeed, and there lies the bone of the matter. The
Curse of Lono, priced at $9.95 a copy, is a purely
commercial venture, designed to keep Hunter S.
Thompson in drugs for another three years. It does
not hold together, even by Gonzo Standards. It
lacks the edge and bite of Thompson's earlier work.
In short, it borders on being a piece of self in-
dulgent memorabilia produced strictly for con-
sumption by the Gonzo cult and I, for one, am not
sanguine about it.
The word is folks � Hunter S. Thompson has
either huffed too much ether or he's hit male
menapause. Either way The Curse of Lono doesn't
quite make the nut. Save yourself ten bucks.
Bulimia: The Secret Disease
By SUSANNA GOCKE
Staff Writer
"I wish so badly I could eat like
a normal person. No one will ever
understand how I can eat so
much, yet stay so thin. I do have a
secret, one which has caused some
of the biggest problems in my
life said a 20-year-old
sophomore at ECU.
Mary (not her real name), is one
of an increasing number of college
girls who suffers from what
psychologist call the "binge and
purge" syndrome.
In September 1979, Glamour
magazine published "Full
Stomachs and Empty Lives an
article which brought national at-
tention to an eating disorder
known as bulimia.
Many females who suffer from
bulimia were surprised to know
that there is a name for this ab-
surd thing they practiced, in some
cases several times a day.
Bulimia is defined as the rapid
consumption of large amounts of
high-caloric foods within a short
time period, followed immediate-
ly by self-induced vomiting.
Ninety-eight percent of the vic-
tims are women between the ages
of 16 and 25. These women suffer
from similiar feelings of low self-
esteem, paranoia about ap-
pearance, and obsession with
food and dieting.
Dr. Mathis, a psychiatrist at the
ECU School of Medicine,
describes bulimia as ox eating. He
also refers to bulimia as "khon-
drosphobia a Greek term mean-
ing fear of being fat.
'I have studied bulimia for 23
years and I probably know all
there is to about this disorder, but
I still don't understand it said
Dr. Mathis. He explained that this
type of behavior has been around
for several thousand years.
Case studies first reported the
Romans and Egyptians par-
ticipating in the "binge and
purge" syndrome after a large
feast. During that time, this type
of behavior was accepted; today
bulimia is considered a serious
eating disorder.
Statistics predict that one out of
every 10 college females will
become a victim of bulimia in
some form, Mathis noted.
"I have treated several different
patients with bulimia, and I have
yet to find one single cause for the
disorder stated Mathis. "My
patients can vary from one ex-
treme to another
According to statistics that deal
with eating disorders, the largest
known number of calories con-
sumed by a bulimic within a
24-hour period was 55,000
calories.
Characteristics which are com-
mon to bulimics include: in-
conspicuous eating, consumption
of high-caloric foods, repeated at-
tempts to lose weight, recurrent
episodes of binge eating and self-
induced vomiting.
Bulimics usually come from
middle to upper-class families and
are rarely found among the poor.
They tend to alternate between
hinging and dieting to maintain
their normal weight.
Considerable research has been
done on the dangers involved in
self-induced vomiting. Fatalities
occur when such vomiting creates
an imbalance of electrolytes which
upsets the body chemistry.
Another effect of constant
vomiting is tooth decay. This hap-
pens when hydrochloric acid pro-
duced by the stomach reaches the
teeth and initiates decay. The con-
stant Dinging and purging may
also upset the potassium level
which can lead to heart failure.
Experts believe that the idea
"to be thin is to be in" has a
growing impact on the nation at
large. Researchers at Michael
Reese Hospital in Chicago found
that women pictured in magazines
have gotten significantly thinner
in the last 10 years.
"I often wonder if the popular
skinny model Twiggy, back in the
sixties, created the image that to
be skinny is to be beautiful said
Dr. Mathis.
In order to cure a bulimic, dif-
ferent methods are used for dif-
ferent cases. In some cases, con-
tinued psychotherapy has proved
successful and in some of the ex-
treme cases, anti-depressant drugs
are used.
According to Dr. Mathis, the
first step in curing the patient is to
decondition the behavior.
However, because the majority of
victims occupy 50 percent of their
thoughts around food, it can be a
long process. Doctors continue to
research new methods to cure
bulimics, but because of the varie-
ty of victims, it becomes difficult
to find one specific cure.
Support groups have formed
throughout the United States,
particularly on college campuses,
to help those who suffer from
bulimia. One famous nationwide
groups is call BASH (Bulimia
Anorexia Self Help).
These groups attract over 300
victims a month and have a very
high success rate. Most bulimics
feel they are the only ones who
suffer from this bizarre disorder
and are often afraid to seek help
or even admit they have a pro-
blem.
In Greenville, a group entitled
"Eating Disorders" meets once a
week at 4 p.m. on Tuesdays in the
Outpatient Center of the Brody
Building.
The group is designed to help
those victims cope with their pro-
blem and to realize that they are
not alone. For additional infor-
mation, contact Dr. Carol
Richardson 757-4100, extension
689.
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mini





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12, 1984
S
nuch the
their
onservative
Simpson.
eve in. the
And it just
uhat
diui the
the social
20 years had
but added
arris and
blacks to
v Instead,
NIT.ED.
e allowed to
ander the
m, they can
pport black
.ised to
k in the days
-tuck
had to. For
20 vears
; were thriv-
)f shopping
hood mer-
: rmg out at
the small
to the
Simpson
that this
(siness was not
Local white
in the battle
ants a well,
iinistra-
ugh the
ei e -mail
cwnting
tax rules
icssm Wasn't
age 8
I
f 1
is it is that when
iiy the on ap-
ind.
Gonzo is after
is after in Fear
naJly
it creamed.
j- t art?"
ie matter. The
is a purely
Ikeer Hunter S.
ree ears. It does
o Standards. It
in's earlier work,
nece of self in-
:ly for Con-
or one. am not
Thompson has
he's hit male
of Lono doesn't
ten bucks
caa be � major
Get The Scoop On
Michael Jackson
Young superstar
Michael Jackson is un-
doubtedly the entertain-
ment sensation of the
vear. His album
"Thriller" has sold more
than five million copies
worldwide and given
birth to a record six hit
singles. ?. rom the cover of
People Magazine to the
top of the MTV charts, it
is clear that Michael
Jackson is the rock story
of the '80s.
Yet behind the glitter
there is a different
storythe inside story of
this top male vocalist.
Nelson George, the black
music editor at Billboard
magazine, has written
The Michael Jackson
Story ($2.95), the first
book to give the real
scoop on Michael
Jackson. Formerly a
music critic at Record
World magazine and the
Amsterdam Mews, as well
as a columnist at Musi-
cian magazine, George
has a long history of
covering the top names in
entertainment. He has
written articles for Roll-
ing Stone, Essence, Black
Enterprise and En-
cyclopedia. In The
Michael Jackson Story he
gives millions of fans a
glimpse of the never-
before-seen private side
of this highly public
entertainer. George's
biography is packed full
of 16 pages of black and
white photographs and
includes observations by
Jackson's prominent
friends; Diana Ross, Jane
Fonda, Quincy Jones and
the Jackson family, plus
much more.
ALL YOU CAN EAT
RIBS!
RIBS!
RIBS!
Every Monday between 5:00-10:00 Darryl's 1907, Green-
ville is having an ALL YOU CAN EAT FEAST of our tender,
juicy beef ribs for the unbelievable price of $7.95.
'Flashdance'
Jennifer Seals stars in Flashdance, a hit which
originated Break Dancing and cut-off sweatshirts.
The show appears January 12,13. and 14 at 7 and 9
p.m. in MendenhalPs Hendrix Theatre. I.D. and Ac-
tivity Card or MSC Membership is required for ad-
mission.
SO . . . COME AND GET A TASTE OF
KICK WE
The Michael Jackson Story' is available now.
ILlNG
ANDWICH
Now Serving:
Homemade Chili and
Homemade Soup along
with the many
great sandwiches.
Call in advance for take-out.
752-4297
2711 E. 10th St.
(Colonial Height Shopping Center)
Don'settle for
a lunch that was
made right after
breakfast r ' :orPd
in a shrofoam box. Enpy
a fresh sandwich or salad from
Subway, made to your order from
choice sliced meats and cheese, garden fresh leqetabtes.
Alaskan King Crab, zest hot meatballs and sausage
and freshly baked fool-long rolls. So kick the burner habit.
and we'll px you a special bonus if you go "Cold Turkey'
208
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758-7979
e
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758-7979
Pizza ion
Greenville's Best Pizzas
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Pi ZZ A INN has changed
all that We Seii our delivery
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No Surcharge. We also
give FREE Drinks with
our large and giant
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Daily Buffet 7 days a week
andMon Tue Wed. nights
CALL 75i-2tt Grewivill Blvd.
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along this money-savin1 coupon.
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8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 12, 1984
-r .�
?
li
Simpson Promotes
Cont'd from Page 6
that still a factor for
blacks in an open, free
enterprise system?
"Yes, it's still there,
but usually in more subtle
forms said Simpson.
"If they don't want you,
they'll even tell you're
overqualified or make up
some other excuse not to
hire you Simpson add-
ed that he felt racism
would never be entirely
eliminated.
But surely courting the
likes of Reagan and
Helms supporters is flir-
ting with racists?
"Most Republicans are
really friendly. They're
surprised at first to see
us said Simpson, "but
they're always glad we're
there Indeed they
should be. Polls show
blacks overwhelmingly
against a Reagan re-
election, as high as 90
percent committed to any
Democratic opponent.
Rlack opposition to
iwlms is almost
unanimous, especially
after his controversial
stand against the Martin
Luther King national
holiday. I asked Simpson
if he felt Helms' position
on the King holiday was
motivated by racism.
Simpson said he didn't
know all the facts, and
that he didn't trust the
press anyway, agreeing
with charges made by
East that the press was
strongly slanted with a
liberal bias. "If he did act
out of racism, it's
something only he and
God can know, and he'll
be held accountable for
it said Simpson. "But
it did hurt him a great
deal in the black com-
munity
Simpson said that
despite the King affair, he
still likes Helms for his
conservative and moral
beliefs. "Whatever
religious beliefs Jesse
Helms has, I can only say
that's good, because this
world is so full of
destructive people. When
you sec a man that's
good, you don't throw
stones at him, you ap-
plaud him Still it's dif-
ficult to sell other blacks
on Helms and Reagan.
"They listen only because
they know and they trust
me says Simpson.
But what about Jesse
Jackson? I asked Simp-
son if he would vote for
Jackson if he recieved the
Democratic nomination.
"Yes, I could support
him for trying to be
responsive to the needs of
the black community
said Simpson. "But when
I look back over the
Reagan record, I'd have
to vote Republican
Simpson believes,
however, that the time is
ripe for blacks to return
to the party of Linclon.
"Blacks adopted the
Democratic Party with
F.D.R. because it offered
them something: jobs
programs and more
equality. But now the
Republican Party is
where the opportunity is
at says Simpson. "It's
like fishing. Why should 1
stay home and hope my
neighbor will bring me
back a fish when I can go
and catch all I want. The
Republican party is open
to any young person with
an open mind, black or
white, and it's a perfect
opportunity for blacks to
get in on the ground
floor
It's doubtful that many
blacks are ready to buy
what Simpson,
U.N.I.T.E.D. or Ronald
Regan and the
Republican Party have to
sell. But as larger
numbers of blacks
achieve middle and
upper-middle class status,
more are certain to even-
tually drift into the
Republican camp. And
with grass-roots
movements like
U.N.I.T.E.D. preaching
an alternative, that solid
block of black votes may
erode much sooner than
the Democratic leader-
ship would like.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
75 MAVERICK, A.C auto, 4 dr naw
radlalt, AMFM 1115.00
'74 PINTO waaon, auto, air, radial
tlra and '74 Ford pickup truck, waak
angina ists.09 7S2-1401
NEW STEEL ballad Radlalt.
U5xl3 142.00 Incl. bal, mounting
FET-otnar alia. raa� nidi uaad
Oraanvllla Tira, Pactolyi H'way
752 1402.
ART SUPPLIES tor aala 752-257.
NOROICA SKI Boot. Hie 10. A ataal
at $40.00. 752 1541 attar 4:00.
PERSONAL
PHI TAV'S, NO B�.r No Balltlll
SUSAN FREEMAN It'j tima to par
tyl Happy 21itl Lova Ginger
WANTED
Good location. Call 752 24u attar JO
pm.
ROOMMATE WANTED: nan-
tmofcar, sariout atudant. t Mock
from campus, prtvata room, W rant
and utilittaa, rant �1 .aa. dapoalt 100.00,
naad bedroom (urnltura. Call 7�4-a147
evening.
FEMALE ROOMMATE NEEDED.
Wilton Acraa Apt Call Dabbla
7S0-lt00 or Linda 75-S47.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Wilton
Acrat, Vt utiutlat. rant ttf.a! mo.
Nonsmoking temala. Ptaata call
752 504.
FEMALE ROOMMATE needed:
f7.S0mo ptut W utilitlea. Carpeted
bedroom and kitchen privileges. Call
75-04t ask tor Lisa.
NON-SMOKINO ROOMATE wanted:
half block from campus, hilly tur-
nithed 3 bedroom house, AC
5125mon and V� of utilities.
WANTED: Responsibta person to
pick up children from school 3 or 4
days a week. Call 754-407 attar 4pm.
WANTED: Rasponslbto party to
atsuma small monthly payments on
spinatconsole piano. Can be seen
locally. Writs: (Includa phana
number) Credit Manager, P.O. box
$11, Reckemeyer, IL 4211.
ROOMMATE WANTED: Wilton
Acras i45.00mo , half utilities, ph.
752-0753
ROOMMATE WANTED: neat, mala,
non-smokar to shara fully furnished
mobile home-Call Sonny at 7S0-M10.
MALE ROOMMATE NEEDED: 2
blocks off campus. Matura, clean par-
son. Call Kyia (4-7 pm only) 754-470
NEED FEMALE ROOMMATE te
shara nlc 2 bedroom townhousa.
MISC.
WE ARE ELECTRONICS tachnl
clans. At "audio techs" we don't
charge for repair estimates. Call us
at tha TECH SHOP 757-10.
WANTED: Responsible person to
pick up children from school 3 or 4
days a week. Call 7S4-4M7 attar 4 pm.
stop smoking
5-Day Plan, Jan. 16-20m 7:00 p.m.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER, Coffee Shop
Group Therapy - Films - Lectures -
Demonstrations - Buddy System, Your Own
Control Book. Its Great! And You Won't Gain
-�c- . Weight If You Follow The 5-Day Plan.
Directed by Allen F. Bowyer, CWef of Cardiology, ECU, in cooperation with Pitt County
Health Agencies. For information call, 757-4651, 756-5543. It is not necessary to pre-regtster.
Stop Smoking Week. Jan. 16-20, 7.Q0PAA
�TpjfpJLO
xxx
lizst:
PAPA KATZ
; i
Your Adult Entertainment Center
Open
Tues. - Sun.
Wednesday Nite
Greenville's First & Still 1
LADIES LOCK OUT
8:30-10:00
Free Draft & Wine
Thursday Nite
Penny Draft Nite
Doors Open 8:30
Friday Nite
College Nite
25C Draft
Doors Open 8:30
Saturday Nite
John Moore Beach Show
Lady Members Free All Nite
Doors Open 8:30
Happy Hour Til 9:30
�.
k
Where the Night comes to Life
Papa Kau is A Private Club
F Of Members 4 Guests
We Hava All ABC Permits
10th St. Ext
At Riverbluff Rd.
Sunday Nite
25C Draft
6:00 - 8:00 P.M.
Greenville Athletic Club
Why Settle For Less When
You Can Have It All
Steam & Sauna
Indoor Track
Swimming Pool
Hot Tub
Racquetball
Nautilus
Free Weights
Exercise Classes
Big Savings with the
Semester Rate, $120.00
For January - May
(Figures out to $24.00
per month)
Also have monthly rates which start at $45.00
Don V Be Left Out. Enjoy The Finest
Fitness Facility In Town.
Open 7 Days A Week
140 Oakmont Drive 756-9175
NOW OPEN AT CAROUNA EAST CENTER.
WHATS AMORE?
EXPECT THE BEST WEIL DO THE REST!
SERVING GREAT PIZZA PIES,
LASAGNA, SPAGHETTI, AND SANDWICHES.
COME DINE IN OR TAKE OUT FOR LUNCH OR DINNER.

$2.00 OFF ANY
LARGE PIZZA PIE OR
$1.00 OFF ANY
MEDIUM PIZZA PIE
756-9550
Carolina East Center
(next to
Carolina East Mall)
Greenville. NC
Expires March 1 1984
Cannot De used witn any daily special
wmmm
BUY ONE
SPAGHETTI DINNER
GET ONE FREE
756-9550
Carolina East Cente-
next to
Carolina East Main
Greenville. NC
Expires Marcrt I 1984
i � �� ;c) ir a la sp�d
BUY ONE
LUNCHEON SPECIAL
GET ONE FREE
(11 00 AM to20OPM)
aVa.a�
r��
$2.00 OFF ANY
LARGE PIZZA PIE OR
$1.00 OFF ANY
MEDIUM PIZZA PIE
ft: 756-9550
Carolina East Center
(next to
Carolina East Mall)
GreenviHe. NC
Expires March 1 1964
Cannot be used with any dMy special
Wl


I
Jean Keating. Cinch Nei
freestvle rela Saturday
Peartn
Felt T
By ED MCK1 AS
Bruce Peartree tried
them. He said his leg asj
ing right, thai il uas aff
game. The physicians saiu
was wrong. The coaches
The fans couldn't under su
he wasn't scoring as mud
Peartree was in a real d
"I kept telling everyonj
was injured, but no one
me, so I kept on p .
Peartree, who damages
at the beginning of Last sa
nevertheless continued
after seeing doctors.
"I didn't want to let
down he continued ' I
reason I was out
because of desire
Peartree began a rehabil
program last summf
ameliorate the handicap
process, he lost four to f
of muscle in his leg.
In September, he finallyj
operation he had been aski
Surgeons removed f
fragments in his knee
Since then, Peartree has
remarkable reco er. even
he really didn't start pr
until ECU had alreadv sti
season. Against INC-O
on Jan. 3, the junior gui
nothing but net for 16 poinl
Yates
Unethi
By ED N1CKLAS
If the answer to the q
"Why was Carlos Yates'
lion lifted in view of an imj
EC AC contest?" was
doubt, George Mason cos
Harrington certainly made
Cinctly clear after Monday
ballgame.
"I suspended him for
reason and brought him be
� team reason Hamngtc
you have it.
Does the fact that Hi
dropped Yates' two game
�ton raise a question of eth
Il it just sour grapes on the
PCU? Or both?
Whatever the case mij
ates' entry came at a
t in the ballgame, wit!
by only six points
t guard Tony Robing
bench with three fouls.
The impact of Yates reij
t can be exaggerated, ti
triot guard John N
an exceptional
Ricky Wilson and
Said ECU
Peartree of Niehoff J
to be the
�am�'m
mmw "� wir
- mi nail, Haw�
ainUi�I






ib
Vhen
11
tail
Ights
lasses
30
45.00
est
E?
A
REST!
ICHES.
R DINNER
DINNER
EE
569550
NY
PIE OR
Y
iZA PIE
1756-9550
jroiina East Center
next to
Ima East Main
Greenville. NC
�Dres March l 1984
THE EASTCAROi INIAN
Sports
JANUARY 12, 1984 9
Swimmers Set Freshman Record
Jean Keating,
freestyle relay
Cindy Newman
Saturday.
M�IL XM4NSON � ICU � L�fc
Scotia Miller and Cavcee Poust broke the freshman record in the 400 meter
Peartree: Treated Wrong;
Felt The Injury Was Hidden
By ED NICKLAS
SporU TMtor
Bruce Peartree tried to tell
:hem. He said his leg wasn't feel-
ing right, that it was affecting his
game. The physicians said nothing
was wrong. The coaches agreed.
The fans couldn't understand why
te wasn't scoring as much. Bruce
Peartree was in a real dilemma.
"I kept telling everyone that I
was injured, but no one believed
me, so I kept on playing said
Peartree, who damaged his knee
at the beginning of last season but
nevertheless continued to play-
after seeing doctors.
"I didn't want to let my parents
down he continued. "The only
reason I was out there was
because of desire
Peartree began a rehabilitation
program last summer to
ameliorate the handicap. In the
process, he lost four to five inches
of muscle in his leg.
In September, he finally got the
operation he had been asking for.
Surgeons removed floating
fragments in his knee.
Since then, Peartree has made a
remarkable recovery, even though
he really didn't start practicing
until ECU had already started its
season. Against UNC-Charlotte
on Jan. 3, the junior guard hit
nothing but net for 16 points. Five
days later, he ignited for 17
against a strong Northeastern
team
Although his basketball game is
looking better and better,
frustrating memories still lurk in
the back of Bruce Peartree's
mind. "I don't think I was treated
right from a medical standpoint
and a coaching standpoint he
said.
"At the beginning, they (the
doctors) told me nothing was
wrong Peartree continued.
"They said I had 'jumper's knee
But I knew something was wrong
with my leg
Peartree also experienced pro-
blems with the coaches. "The
coach (Harrison) couldn't unders-
tand why I couldn't perform he
said. "At the end of the season 1
really wasn't on their good side. I
felt 1 was treated wrong because I
played the whole season injured
and nobody even mentioned it. I
feel it was all hidden
"They (the fans) made it out
that I was a bad guy because I
wasn't playing
Peartree said he and Harrison
eventually discussed the matter
and reached an agreement. He
also said Harrison apologized,
regretting what had happened.
Harrison is now pleased with
Peartree's performance this
season. "He has really sur-
prised me with his attitude he
said. "He doesn't have the lateral
quickness on defense, but we put
him in when we need the jump-
shot
"My jumpshot is coming back,
but it is not what it used to be
Peartree said. "I'm getting
quicker and quicker and playing
better 4D
Things are looking much better
nowadays, even though Peartree
is only playing half a game. "I've
got to be a leader and get the
young guys up he said. "If you
aren't ready, you are going to get
your butt kicked
Yates Comes Off The Bench
Unethical Or Sour Grapes?
By ED NICKLAS
S�ort� mior
If the answer to the question,
"Why was Carlos Yates' suspen-
sion lifted in view of an important
EC AC contest?" was ever in
doubt, George Mason coach Joe
Harrington certainly made it suc-
cinctly clear after Monday night's
hall game.
"I suspended him for a team
reason and brought him back for
a team reason Harrington said.
There you have it.
Does the fact that Harrington
dropped Yates' two game suspen-
sion raise a question of ethics? Or
is it just sour grapes on the part of
ECU? Or both?
Whatever the case might be,
Yates' entry came at a crucial
point in the ballgame, with ECU
down by only six points and its
point guard Tony Robinson on
the bench with three fouls.
The impact of Yates' reinstate-
ment can be exaggerated, though.
Patriot guard John Niehoff
played an exceptional game, as
did Ricky Wilson and Rob
JNieberlein. Said ECU guard
Bruce Peartree of NiehoffHe's
got to be the most improved
player in the conference
The Pirates were also lacking
the tenacity that Harrison is trying
so hard to ingrain in the team.
"Our kids have got to start being
agressive Harrison said.
"George Mason is a good basket-
ball team; they pressed us from
the start and kept pressing to the
end.
"You win with agressive, hard-
nosed basketball, and we're just
not playing that way right now.
I'm an agressive person, but I'm
having to be patient because the
number of young players on the
team
"You have got to have heart
Peartree said. "1 don't think the
younger players have that yet.
Last night (Monday) was good ex-
ample
At any rate, the Pirates keep
slipping as they set a school record
of nine consecutive losses. Accor-
ding to Peartree, one win could be
instrumental in turning the season
around. "What we need most is a
win he said. "We are going to
take one game at a time; we will
turn things around.
"It (the losing streak) isn't the
coaches fault. We are prepared
well. All he wants us to do is play
hard.
"Everyone still hasn't found his
role yet. I think the togetherness
has to be better before we turn
around. Otherwise, it wil be a
long year
mmsmahsmmm
Utgue Overall
George Mai 10

10-1
Ww
By SCOTI POWERS
Staff Wfttar
It's not often that a group of
freshman girls can make a major
impact on a varsity sport at a top-
notch university, but that is just
what some new freshmen have
done for the ECU women's swim
team this year, according to head
swim coach Rick Kobe.
Heading into this season, Kobe
really didn't know what to expect
from a women's swim team that
had lost many top performers
from a team that had finished
23rd in the NCAA Division II Na-
tionals last year, but now he is
more than enthusiastic. He feels
that this year's team has a chance
to finish higher than last year's
and admits that this is the best
team in the six-year history of the
sport at ECU. He also feels that a
lot of the credit goes to the
freshmen that have been added to
the roster since last year.
The top six scorers on the team
are freshmen. Four of these, Jean
Keating, Cindy Newman, Scotia
Miller and Caycee Poust, recently
broke a freshman record in the
400 meter freestyle relay, that had
stood for over three years, with a
time of 3:43.7. This is just off the
national qualifying time in that
event.
While all of the freshmen look
promising, the best right now ap-
pears to be Poust. She was a
member of the winning 400 meter
medley relay team in the National
Junior Olympics last summer.
"She's the best recruit ever in the
backstroke to attend ECU says
Kobe. Her times in the 100 and
200 meter backstroke are better
than the ECU record. She swam
the anchor leg of the relay team
that set the record.
Keating, who swims in the 50
and 100 meter freestyle events as
well as relays, has only lost in one
individual event this year. She was
the only true freestyler on the
relay team that set the record.
Kobe feels that she has yet to
reach her peak and that she will
probably qualify for the nationals
in her events.
Newman, as well as swimming
with the freshman relay team, also
swam with the 400 meter relay
team that qualified for the Na-
tionals with Keating, sophomore
Jessica Feinberg and Lori Liv-
ingston, who is also an outstan-
ding freshman. She also swims in
butterfly events and her best time
is the 100 meter butterfly is only
three-tenths of a second off the
ECU record.
A former backstroker, Miller
converted to the 500 and 1000
meter free styles. She has been
astrong performer thus far and
looks for greater success as she
becomes more adjusted to the
change.
These and the other freshmen
really have Kobe excited with their
enthusiasm and ability. "Not only
are they good swimmers, they are
all around good kids. They are
fun to be around and to coach
say Kobe.
The girls feel that the closeness
of the team and the coaches has
attributed to their success. Says
Miller, "We all like each other,
and when someone swims good, it
just makes the rest of us try
harder
They also like and respect coach
Kobe. "He allows us to be
students as well as athletes. If we
have conflicts, he will let us make
up workouts says Keating.
The whole team is aiming for
their meet against Duke at the
beginning of February. "I feel
that we will have a lot of girls
qualifying for the nationals at that
meet. That's what we're shooting
for said Kobe.
The team is now 4-2 against
mainly Division I competition,
and the way things look now, a lot
of ECU records could fall before
the end of the season, and coach
Kobe's aspirations for a high
finish in the nationals could
become reality. One thing's for
sure, things are definitely looking
up for the ECU women's swimm-
ing program, thanks to a lot of
talented and hard-working
freshmen.
"I
Phillips A Masterpiece
By RANDY MEWS
Ajatetaat Sporti VMtot
Making the transition from a
junior college to Division I
athletics is something most people
never dream of, but in the case of
Annette Phillips, the move was
well worth her while.
Phillips has become a mainstay
in the ECU women's basketball
team starting lineup, and has
played more minutes then anyone
else on the team.
"Annette is doing a super job
head coach Cathy Andruzzi said.
"She learned our system in a very
short amount of time, and she's
an extremely hard worker
Phillips is currently averaging
8.0 points and and 5.8 rebounds
per game, but according to An-
druzzi, it's her hard-nose style of
play that has earned her a starting
spot on the team. "Annette's
presence is felt on the court
because I always know she's going
to give a 110 per cent Andruzzi
said.
At Louisburg, Phillips was just
as hard-nosed in the classroom,
receiving Phi Beta Kappa honors
with a 3.7 grade point average.
"It was hard playing basketball
and keeping my grades up at the
same time Phillips said, "but I
just disciplined myself and tried
not to waste any time
Now at ECU, Phillips is major-
ing in art and says she has even
less time then ever before. "I
never have time to go out and I
have to deny myself a lot of
things, but I know it will all be
worth while in the future
Andruzzi calls Phillips the
epitomy of a student athlete.
"Annette is extremely responsible
and is very dedicated to academics
as well as athletics
At Louisburg, Phillips guided
her team to the National Juinor
College Championships. She
averaged 12 points and 7.5 re-
bounds per game in her
sophomore season and was named
the team's Most Valuable Player
Upon graduating, Phillips was
offered scholarships to Kent State
and Western Kentucky, but chose
ECU because of the art school's
nation-wide reputation, and it was
close to home-town Smithfield.
When asked what she wants to
get accomplished before she
leaves ECU, Phillips replied,
"I'm just going to concentrate on
art and basketball, and when I
leave, know that I've done my
best
Aaaette Phlttpe dearaetratea the
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10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN JANUARY 12, 1984
f

Weekend
Sports
Sat. Jan. 14
7:30pm
Men's Basketball at William and
Mary
7:30
Men's and Women's Swimming
vs. UNC-Wilmington (Home)
2pm
Men's and Women's Indoor
Track at George Mason
Sun. Jan. 15
3pm
Women's Basketball vs.
George Mason (Home)
The ECU women's basketball team snapped a three-game losing streak
over the weekend by defeating Fairleigh Dickinson 67-58. The Lady
Pirates will be in action again this Sunday when they host George Mason
at 3:00 pm. All ECU supporters are encouraged to come over to Minges
and cheer the Pirates to victory.
Garrett Leads In Chancellor
Electronic Mania
Asteroids, ghosts,
spaceships and numerous
creatures have invaded
the IRS activity plan.
Yes, video mania is com-
ing into the world of in-
tramurals. This can be
your chance to prove that
you are without doubt the
"video expert
Co-sponsored by Stu-
dent Residence Associa-
tion and the Aycock
Game Room, A Video
Games Tournament will
be held on January 18.
Registration for this way-
out event will be held on
January 16 through
January 18. Participants
will sign-up for a time
slot to play each game.
All people participating
in this tournament will
play 3 video games of
their choice with a total
score taken to determine
eight finalists. Separate
tournament brackets will
be provided for both men
and women.
Get your game plan
readv and come over
ECU Intramurals
Memorial Gym and sign
up to participate in this
new and exciting event.
Remember, the first peo-
ple to sign up will be
choosing from the best
times.
A Slapshooting Affair
Looking for some thrill
and excitement on roller
skates? Try the IRS Co-
Ed sport of roller hockey.
This activity utilizes 3
men and 3 women
clashing sticks in at-
tempts of scoring goals.
Competition will be held
at Sportsworld. Registra-
tion will be conducted in
Memorial Gym on
January 23 and 24. So,
put those skates on and
try Intramural Roller
Hockey, where the gals
can skate as hard as the
guys.
Basketball Fever Is
Here
Once again the time
has come for the fierce
sport of basketball. One
of the most popular in-
tramural activities is
about to dribble into the
spring semester. Entry
dates are January 16 and
January 17 with a man-
datory team captain's
meeting being held on
January 19 at 7:00 p.m.
in Biology building room
103. Play will begin
January 23 in Memorial
Gym. Remember, instant
scheduling will be used so
get those sharp shooting
teams ready.
Exercise With IRS
Aerobicize: Spring
semester Aerobic Fitness
Classes will be offered in
two-six week sessions.
Registration for the first
session will be held
January 16-20 in
Memorial Gym room
204. Classes will begin on
January 23 and end
February 24. The cost for
the class will be:
Students, four dollars for
one class-week and eight
dollars for two classes-
week. Faculty staff, five
dollars for one class-week
and ten dollars for two
classes-week.
Not only will the
department of
Intramural-Recreational
Services offer aerobic
fitness classes, but classes
will also be offered in
personal defense, weight
training and aquarobics.
The registration and cost
will remain the same as
the fitness classes. So
what ever type of exercise
fits your lifestyle, check
out the IRS fitness
schedule.
A Chancellor Chase
The race is on between
Intramural teams com-
petiting for the covented
Chancellor's Trophy.
Leaders include, the
women's Independent
team the Heart breakers;
the women's Residence
Hall team, Clement Hall
and the Sorority leader,
Alpha Phi. In the men's
Residence Hall, the
leader is Garrett Hall
with Third Regiment in
first place in the men's
Independent division.
Kappa Sigma is leading
the Fraternity division.
The race appears to be a
close one, so pick your
ATTIC
WZMB A LIGHT I
LADIES U NIGHT1
THURSDAY
X-RAVES
-FRI&SAT-
STORMZ
SUNDAY -
JUNIORS AND SENIORS
EAPN OVER S1000.00 PER MONTH
If you are a math, physics, chemistry or engineering major with d
"P" average or better, ern over $1000.00 fer month through your
junior and senior yearssummers included! The Navy's
(Nuclear Propulsion Officer) Collegiate Program
qualifier individuals. Other nenifits
NUPOC
is looking tor
include:
� $3000.00 cash bonus immediately upon acceptance into program
$22,000 starting salary - $40,000 after just four years

FREE
FABULOUS
KNOBS
MedicalDental care and many other TAX EREE benefits
30 days PAID annual vacation
1 year graduate level training
Immediate responsibility
Valuable engineering experience
Education benefits
Job security with fast promotions
If you're interested in finding out more, see the f(avy
Officer Programs Tan, they'll he on campus 17-10 January at the
Placement Office. If you can't make it, send your resume or
transcripts to:
ROY SARVIS
U.S. NAVY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr.
Raleigh, MC 27609
Or call 1-800-662-7231
9am-3pm, MOW - THURS
ionuory BlCYCl
Tire& P0S
Tub
Sole
27 X1 14 Gumwall 4.95
27 X118 Skinside 4.95
27 X1 14 IRC 4.95
Tubes 2.75
Nautilus
Fitness and Diet Control
Center
1984 Spring Semester Rates
Individual-$100.00
Group of 3 - 90.00 10discount
Group of 5 - 85.00 15'idiscount
THE
FITNESS
CLUB
for men and women
I00t EVANS STREET
GREENVILLE. N.C. I7�S4
530 cotanche street
Greenville, n c 27834
757 3616
Notice Female Students: take advantage of
buying an individual membership and receive a
second membership for 12 E"ce- XP- Jan- 20.
-Call and ask about our affiliation wAerobic
Workshop
-Our semester membership will expire May 20
(Must bring in ad for discount)
favorite team and follow
the race to the end.
Faculty and Staff, Join
Now
East Carolina Faculty-
staff members are invited
to participate in in-
tramural activities.
Teams for the various
sports may consist of
members of one depart-
ment or other department
members. Participation is
limited to half time or
more faculty or staff
EPA-SPA employees.
Graduate students will
not be allowed to par-
ticipate in the Faculty-
Staff division.

j��
We Sell Bargains
IN
USED FURNITURE
USED STEREO
USEDT.Vs
USED DORM REFRIG
USED HEATERS
Check With Us Before
You Buy Anything
rOitt & R'NC man
400 EVANS, "on the corner
Downtown Greenville
752-3866
AiVjWSAfJJW
BAC
Russell Hooded Sweatshirts
Russell Hooded Sweatshirts
(with E.C.U. screens)
Long-sleeve t-shirts - $6.95 or (3 for $15)
(with E.C.U. screens)
Reg. $11.95 Sale $9.45
$11.95
SHOE-OF-THE-WEEK SPECIALS
Asahi Men's Leather - Reg. $42.95 Sale $32.95
Asahi Men's Canvas 25.95" 19.95
Asahi Women's Leather- Reg $40.95 " 30.95
Asahi Women's Canvas - " 24.95 " 18.95
Look For Our "Shoe-of-the-week" display every week
D.P. (Diversified Products) 110 lb. Combo.
Dumbell & barbell set (cast iron, with bar)- Reg. $79.95 Sale $69.95
Tennis Racquets (conventional size, wooden & aluminum frames) by
Davis, Dunlop, Donnay, Spalding, Yamaha, & Rossignal
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 12, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 12, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.310
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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