The East Carolinian, January 10, 1984






�he lEaat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No J9 i i
Tuesday, January 10,1984
Greenville, N.C.
14 Pages
Circulation 10.000
Technology Center
Aspires To Serve
Campus, Region
Patience Is A Virtue
N�IL JOHNSON - ICU Phot, L.h
These students are enjoying one of ECL's major attractions � drop- and waiting patiently, sometimes to the point of death. So far, it
add. Drop-add is intended to teach students the art of starding in line seems to be working.
By TINA MAROSCHAK
AakUil ttmm Editor
ECU is establishing a Center
for Applied Technology with the
goal of making Eastern North
Carolina more responsive to high
technological developments and
bringing ECU into the realm of
support for industrial activities.
In an earlier statement, Angelo
A. Volpe, vice chancellor of
academic affairs, said, "The high
degree of technological expertise
that is present within the ranks of
our faculty has been the prime
catalyst that has led to the forma-
tion of this center
Jerry V. Tester, associate pro-
fessor in industrial and technical
education and director of the
center, said that the three main
goals of the center are to provide
technological assistance to
organizations who need it, to con-
duct research on technology-
related problems and to provide
training opportunities through
contract with clients.
"The center is viewed as a
means of making a student's
education and training more up to
date and more relevant to the
needs of the individual and of in-
dustry said Calfrey C. Calhoun,
dean of the School of
Technology.
Professors with technological
expertise will have easy access to
the center's services and will
therefore be able to extend this
practical knowledge to his or her
students, Tester said. "If a pro-
fessor is working with an industry
and he brings these experiences in-
to the classroom, it's much easier
for students to see what they're
studying Tester added.
Professors who involve their
students directly in industry ac-
tivities may help students obtain
jobs more quickly, Tester said.
"If an industry is familiar with
professors in the student's major.
or even with the student himself,
then he or she certainly doesn't
have to sell himself when inter-
viewing for a job Tester said.
"So we're hoping that the ac-
tivities at the center will certainly
benefit students in terms of jobs
See NEW SERVICE, Page 3
Center Alters
Class Schedule
This Semester
Bv DARRYL BROWN
MmaacM MMoc
The ECU Counseling Center is
changing and expanding its
seminar program this semester to
help students learn good study
habits, test taking techniques and
stress-reducing exercises before
the dreaded midterm exam period
begins this spring.
The center is changing the
schedule of the classes this
semester to allow students to com-
plete the program, "How to Suc-
ceed in College: Studying
Smarter in January, before
most major exams. One-hour
classes will be offered four times a
week from Jan. 16 to Jan. 31 at 3
p.m. on such topics as taking
notes effectively, managing time,
improved textbook reading and
successful test taking.
"It's not just for the so-called
poor students said Dr. lone
Ryan, who works at the Counsel-
ing Center and is coordinating the
program. "It's a continuing need.
Figures show one out of five
freshman tend not to re-register
Ryan said the center will also
offer the classes on the regular
schedule of twice a week for five
weeks, from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m
though she believes "the timing
will be better" for students with
the new schedule.
"There is some indication that
students do do better after the
Med School Seeks Rise In Donations
Dr. Steven Deters
courses Ryan said. "The grade
point (average) does go up" for
many students.
The courses are free and require
no advance registration. Students
may come to all courses or only
those they are particularly in-
terested in, though Ryan said,
"we would hope students would
stay for the whole experience to
benefit maximally from the pro-
gram
Ryan said the courses are
helpful for students of all majors,
and seminars will cover specific
study techniques for different
types of classes such as foreign
language, science and math. The
program also offers self-rating
See MID-TERM, Page 2
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Mbtaal Ntn Kd�or
Officials at the ECU School of
Medicine are seeking a 25 percent
increase in donations during their
annual fund-raising drive. Last
year's drive raised $200,000 and
Robert K. Adams II, executive
director of the ECU Medical
Foundation, said that this year's
goal is $250,000.
In an interview in The Raleigh
News and Observer, Dr. William
E. Laupus, dean of the medical
school, cited rising costs and the
loss of federal funding as reasons
for the increased need for private
donations.
According to Adams, dona-
tions are solicited in several ways
Board Drafting Plan
from different types of sources.
Persons on the school's mailing
list receive letters three times a
year requesting their contribu-
tions. Letters are also sent to cor-
porations and medical industries
doing business with the school on
a regular basis. Adams and
Laupus also visit individuals to
ask for large donations. Adams
said planned gifts are the major
source of donations.
Although the solicitation of
funds is carried on throughout the
yesj the foundation concentrates
its efforts during December.
Adams said this is to encourage
donations made for tax purposes.
The foundation was established
in 1971 for the sole purpose of
soliciting and processing private
donations benefiting the medical
school. Adams has been director
since 1977 and said that in that
time period the foundation has
raised $4.5 million.
Some of the money raised goes
for tuition scholarships. The
medical school is currently accep-
ting 64 students in each class and
this has an increased need for stu-
dent financial aid. Laupus said in
a letter that officials were trying
to economize, but would not do
so at the expense of quality
teaching, and they would not let a
student's financial resources be a
determinant of his acceptance.
Faculty research and training
and some visiting professorships
are also funded through the dona-
tions. Both activities are impor-
tant in the quality and reputation
of the medical school program.
"We want our programs to be a
little better than what the state
provides for said Adams.
Adams added that the dona-
tions are of major importance
now, and he sees them becoming
more important in the future.
"On the horizon, we can see state
appropriations not being as much
as they've been because we won't
be in a developmental phase he
said. Once the program is set up,
state aid will be decreased.
"I think we'll reach our goal
Adams said.
Requirements May Be Raised
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
AateUat N�wi E4iior
UNC administrators are currently drafting a plan
which will make admission to the University of North
Carolina System, including ECU, more difficult.
The plan is scheduled to be voted on by the UNC
Board of Governors sometime this month. It will
probably take effect in the fall of 1984 or the spring
of 1985, and is designed to reduce the need of
remedial programs as well as increase the number of
high school graduates entering college.
Under the new plan, 20 high school credits would
be required for admission to any school in the UNC
System: four credits in English, three in
mathematics, three in social sciences and economics
and one in health and physical education, plus
several electives such as foreign languages.
ECU currently requires four units of English, three
of mathematics, two of social science, one of natural
science and six units of electives.
A problem is created because the requirements for
high school graduation are different: a student must
earn four credits in English, two each in
mathematics, science and social sciences, one in
health and physical education and nine in electives.
According to ECU Chancellor Dr. John Howell,
these requirements were recently raised.
"The essence of it is that the state department of
public instruction has already raised the number of
units required but has left electives. The university
system would be specifying what the electives would
be beyond what the department of public instruction
requires Howell said.
See ADMISSIONS, Page 3
Announcements2
Editorials4
Entertainment7
Sports 10
Classifieds13
� The Sports Section is
featuring an article on various
aspects of the ECU Athletic
Program. See USFL Picks
Pirates, page 10.
� The Entertainment Sec-
tion is running today a short
summary and review rating of
all movies currently showing
in the Greenville area. See
Local Cinema, page 9.
Cold Temperatures Cause Damage
Some Campus Buildings Flooded
i.

i
By ANDREA MARKELLO
Staff Writer
Record cold temperatures
which passed hit the university
area as well as the rest of the na-
tion during the Christmas
holidays and froze pipes in several
univeristy facilities, damaging the
physics department wing of the
science complex and at least six
dormitories. Housing and
maintenance officials said total
costs from the minor disaster are
still unknown at present.
The Department of Physics in
the east wing of the science com-
plex was flooded because a con-
trol device was not functioning
properly, one official said.
Louvers to the penthouse were left
open which caused entering cold
air to freeze coils in the air handl-
ing units. The coils burst when
thawed, causing an outflow of
water.
Pipes burst in two bathrooms in
Jones Residence Hall, but floor
drains allowed proper drainage of
water. Residents in Aycock dor-
mitory weren't as lucky. Pipes
broke in the fourth floor shower,
and drains, clogged from fallen
ceiling material, did not permit
adequate run-off of incoming
water. As a result, water flowed
from the fourth floor down to the
basement.
Investigations concluded that in
both Aycock and Jones dorms,
windows in the rooms where the
pipes froze had not been ade-
quately secured. Strong winds
blew open the windows, allowing
cold air to enter and freeze the
pipes.
In Tyler dormitory, twenty heat
convectors, turned off by energy
conscious students, froze and
burst. The same problem occurred
in Clement and Fletcher dorms,
where convectors had been shut
off. Housing Operations director
Dan Woten explained that water
is not turned off when dorms are
not in use as packing in pipes dries
out causing leaks.
In the attic of Slay dorm where
no heat is circulated, a pipe servic-
ing the structure for thirty years
without any prior trouble burst
and flooded thirty rooms.
No one around the campus area
was aware of the problem until
pipes thawed and broke. Basket-
ball players returning to the
dorms complained of cold
temperatures and pipes were
discovered frozen.
Housekeeping personnel work-
ed everyday after Dec. 26 cleaning
up the mess, with eight members
working all night Dec. 27. At least
400 rugs had to be removed from
student rooms, dried and return-
ed. In the physics complex, floors
had to be dried. In total, person-
nel spent over 300 hours cleaning
up the water.
Students discovering property
damaged from the water have
been advised to give notice of the
damage for reimbursement.
More Lines, Less Money
NCIL JOHNSON � �CO
The Student Supply Store b the scene of a lot of activity tab week at studeats crowd la to bay
semester's textbooks. The baited value of a dollar b always evident here.
;� I
.





THE EAST CAR
Announcements
The Fast Carolinian
Seeing the cjmpui community
sinct 1933
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday di'r�g the
academic yea' and every
Wednesday dunng the sum
mer
The East Carolinian s trie
Official newspaper o� Eas'
Carolina University carted
operated and published tor
ana by the students of 6as
Carolina University
Subscription Rate UO yearly
Tha East Carolinian oltices
art located in tha Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU Greenville N C
POSTMASTER Se -� �d
dress changes ' tas'
Caroimia" 0 ' Soutl
jing t Greenville
NC 27834
Telephone 'S1 �J �'
�3(X
NURSING
STUDENTS
rde� to recede your Nt
a n r. Apt :T 1VB4 orders must be
. , ta m the student Supp � Store
-� Building no late than
ceoruar 3 1984 Orders shoc-ld be
placed a' 'he ewelry Count.
Orders must be paid In Ml when �e
order is placed
PHYS ED
! a education department
w.ii oHer aerobics tor facuit, and
staff a' noon on M A F Start ng
January � Classes will be he1 n
Mp-ioriai Gym Room '08 No en
oer,ence Is necessary
BALL ROOM
DANCE
B Room Dance for F �
oatfvv.i: begm on Janua-
in verbal Gym Roor- 1M Classes
Bre scheduled tor Tuesday and Th rs
, -h�rf, s no charge Bnng a oar
e� and plan lo ieam baa s
Tr0l � , tta Wa �: - "� range
sic Boc
PIRATE WALK
pi, ,� . , . begin rjpe� 1
. -6 1984 Thei
etlng of a escorts on
� in '84 ,n roorr �
enhall Student Center at
This meeting is manoa'
e a-e a persons no
m an escort or ope-ator tr-ev
- Bttend mis meeting At me
mee ng I mes will be set tor me
r this semes'e'
SENIORS GRAD
STUDENTS
The Career planning and Place
ment Service will meet with those in
teres'ed in learning more about this
service This general session will en
.ourage those graduating In the spr
ing and summer to pick up reglstia
lion packets and return them In
January The session will be held m
Mendenhali 221 at 4 00 p m on
January 19 n
SCHOOL OF
BUSINESS
The Career Planning and Place
ient service will offer an Intorma
'ion session for students wanting to
iearn more about how to effectively
utilize this service Some discussion
of how to prepare before graduation
will be ottered in this session on
lanuary 18 at 3 30 p m In Rawl 130
MARAUDERS
The Depar'ment of Military
v Icncc invites you to participate In
the ECU Marauders an organiiation
cnenteci toward leadership develop
ment through adventure training
military tactics and other outdoor
a tivities
All students aie welcome The next
meeting will be held on Thursday
jan 19 at 7PM In room 221
Mendenhali Student Center For
more information contact CPT
Liivak. at 757 6967
SUMMER CAMP
EMPLOYMENT
Its summer camp employment
time Are you interested Summer
Camp representatives will be In
Menoenhall Student Center from
11 00 am to 3 00 pm Tuesoar
'anuarv 31 to interview students in
� erested in summer employment
'obs available include but are not
limited to Counselors Lifeguards
Cooks and dietitians, Nurses. Arts
and crafts directors Waterfront
Assistants Sailing and canoeing
directors Recreation Counselors
Persons sk 'led in swimming, riflery.
nature lore horseback riding, sports
and other areas
These positions will provide
valuable work experience and salary
Some Obs will involve working wit
-andicapped campers
job information is available in the
Cooperative Education Office 313
Rawl Bldg
Summer Camp Employ ment Day is
sponsored by the following offices
career Planning and Placement
"ooperative Education Counseling
enter Handicapped Student Ser
vices Program tor Hearing Imparieo
Students and Parks Recreation and
Conservation
Contact the Cooperative Education
Office 313 Rawl Bldg Telephone
s'6979 or 757 6375 immediately to
arrange interviews
ECGC
The East Carolina Gay Community
will meet Monday. January la at 7:30
p m The meeting will be held at the
Catholic Newman Center, 953 E 10th
St (at the bottom o college Hill) All
interested persons are cordially In
vited to attend
AMBASSADORS
welcome Back Ambassadors! We
will have our first meeting of 1984 on
Wednesday, January 11 Wewlllmeet
m the Mendenhali Multipurpose room
at 5 00 We will discuss plans for our
induction ceremony scheduled
January 18 Please make plans to at
tend this important meeting
INTERN PROGRAM
The NC institute of Government
Summer Intern Program provides 24
internships in government for
outstand.ng students from a variety
of academic backgrounds Students
must have completed their
sophomore year to be eligible Ap
plication deadline is February 7 Con
tact the Coop office, 313 Rawl
Building to apply
ECONOMICSMINOR
An Economics minor is now being
ottered by the Department of
Sociology, Anthropology and
Economics It involves 18 hours of
course work beyond the two introduc
fory courses Intermediate and ad
vanced courses which will be ottered
in the future include both
microeconomic and macroeconomic
theory, antitrust and regulation, in
dustrial organization and structure,
econometrics, international trade
money and banking and business
cycles and economic forecasting The
minor is especially recommended tor
students in business computer
science and math For more infor
�nation contact Professor Carson
Bays. Coordinator tor Economics.
Brewster A 413. 757 6883
HONORS SEMINAR
All University faculty and all
students participating In the Honors
Program are reminded of their op
portunlty of designing or requesting
the Honors Seminar ot their choice.
The Honors Committee makes the
final selection from among proposals
submitted each semester Seminars
are topic oriented and are often Inter
disciplinary and team taught Pro
posals for courses to be taught fall
semester 19�4 should be submitted
before Wednesday. January 18, l�t4,
to Or David Sanders, Director of the
Honors Program, co Engligh
Department, Campus For further in
formation see Dr Sanders In
Ragsdale 212 or call 757 6373
IRS AEROBIC
CLASSES
The Department of intramural
Recreational Services Is ottering Spr
ing semester aerobic fitness classes
Registration for the first session will
be held January 17 20 Cost for
students, four dollars for classes
meeting once per week, eight dollars
for classes meeting twice per week
FacultyStaff, five dollars for classes
meeting once per week, ten dollars
for classes meeting twice per
week Registration for aerobic
fitness classes Jan 17 20, Memorial
Gym. rm 204
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use the form at right
or use a separate sheet of
paper if you need more lines
There are 33 units per line
Each letter, punctuation mark
and work space counts as one
unit Capitalize and hyphenate
words properly Leave space
at end of line if word doesn't fit
No ads will be accepted over
the phone We reserve the right
to reject any ad All ads must
be prepaid. Enclose 75 cents
per line or fraction of a line
Please print legibly! Use
capital and lower case letters
Return to the Media Board
secretary by 3 p.m. the day
before publication
NAVIGATORS
Check it out! The Navigators in
v e s t i g a t i v e Bible Study and
fellowship Brewster B Wing Room
304 every Tuesday, 7 30 PM, beginn
ng January 10th
INTERN PROGRAM
Approximately 115 jobs are
available m this program Pay is
$3 73'hr for full time positions
Beginning June 1 August 10, 1984
Students must have finished their
sophomore year and have a 2 5 GPA
Graduate students are also eligible to
apply Application deadline is
cebruary 7 Interested students
should contact the Coop office. 313
Rawl Bldg it interested Details
about this program will be presented
at our regular Co op seminars
scheduled for January 11 from 12
noon to 1 PM and January 12 from 4 5
PM in 306 Rawl Bldg
EDUCATION
GRADUATES
Those finishing with Degrees in
Education may sign up for Interviews
starting on January 11 at 2 30 pm at
the Career Planning and Placement
Service if they are registered in that
office Six school systems will be here
this month
NCIO
The Co-op Office has information
concerning jobs available In state
government which will be located
throughout the state Students who
are interested should attend one of
the two information sessions which
are planned for January 11 at 12 noon
in 306 Rawl and January 12 at 4 p m
in 306 Rawl Dr Don Ensley, board
member of the internship program,
will briefly discuss the various iob op
portunitles available to students
These summer jobs will begin June 1
and end August 10
SIGMA ALPHA
IOTA
Sigma Alpha lota Composer s
Musicale Compositions will be ac
cepted from students, faculty, and
members of the community who
would like to participate in this con
cert of originally composed music
The Musicale will be held on January
23. 19�4 at 8 00 p m in A J Fletcher
Recital Hail Contact Natalie
Beacham (7566252) or Betsy Laroer
(758 6712) this week
SPORTS CLUB
The fifth meeting for the 1983 84
Sport Club Council will be held Wed
Jan 18, 1984 at 4 00 pm In room 105B
of Memorial gym Representatives of
active sport clubs are required to at
tend Schedules for spring semester
activities must be submitted at this
meeting Persons or groups In
terested in the sport club program
are Invited to attend this
meeting Sport Club Council
Meeting, Wed Jan 18, 1984, 4 00 pm
Rm 105B Mem Gym
IRS AQUAROBICS
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services is offering an
aquarobics class Registration will be
held January 17 20 Cost for students
four dollars for classes meeting once
per week, eight dollars for classes
meeting twice per week
Facultystaff, five dollars for classes
meeting once per week, ten dollars
for classes meeting twice per
week Registration for aquarobics
will be Jan 17 20, Memorial Gym
room 204
IRS WEIGHT
TRAINING
The Department of intramural
Recreational Services is offering a
weight training class Registration
will be held January 17 20 Cost for
students four dollars for classes
meeting once per week, eight dollars
for classes meeting twice per week
Faculty staff five dollars for classes
meeting once per week ten dollars
for classes meeting twice per
week Registration for weight train
ing Jan 17 20 Memorial Gym room
204
REPRESENTATIVES
MEETING
The Department of Intramural
Recreational Services represen
tatives meeting will be held on Thurs
day, January 12, 194, Brewster
building room C 103 at 5 00 pm. It is
Important that all Intramural
Representatives attend Represen
tatives meeting, Jan 12, 5 00.
Brewster C 103
VIDEOGAMES
The department of intramural
Recreational Services along with the
Student Residence Association is con
ducting a video games tournament to
be held In the Aycock game room
Registration will be held January
16 18, 19fU, Memorial gym room 204
INTRAMURAL
BASKETBALL
Registration for men's and
women's 5 player basketball will be
held January 16 and 17 A mandatory
team captains meeting will be held on
Jan 19. 194 at 7 00 pm in Biology
building room 103 Play will begin
January 23 Registration for basket
ball will be held Jan 16, 17, MM H
Memorial Gym room 204
2BT
Welcome back brothers and
pledges of Zeta Beta Tau! Your little
listers hope that your Christmas was
the best yet Hope you all are looking
forward to a great semester because
we sure are! Love, your little sisters
SOAPBOX FORUM
There will be a Soapbox Forum in
front of the Student Supply Store on
Thursday at 1200 The topic will be
the Kissinger Commission's report on
Central America Everyone is invited
to listen and to speak An open
microphone will be available
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
The ECU College Republicans will
have a meeting on Wednesday night
in Mendenhali room 238 at 5 30 p.m
The Pitt County Young
Republicans will hve a meeting
tonight at 7 30 in Cindy Story's home
Ail College Republicans are en
couraged to attend For more infor
mation call Stephen at 757 1559 or
Dennis at 758 2448
OFFICIALS
NEEDED
interested in officiating intramural
basketball Attend the training clinic
held by the Department of
Intramural Recreational Services
Monday Jan 16. 19t4 at 6 00 pm m
room 102 Memorial Gym Rules, in
terpretations and mechanics will be
discussed Officials will be hired bas
ed on praticai and written tests
Basketball officials Clinic Mon Jan
16. 1984. Rm 102 Mem Gym
ZBT
Just a reminder that we have a
very Important meeting on Thursday
January 12 at 5 pm in Mendenhaii's
Coffeehouse Please try to be on
time! Remember that the cut system
is Still in effect, so if you can not make
it please call one of the officers
IRS DEFENSE
CLASSES
The Department of Intramura
Recreational Services is Offa , �
personal defense class Registra- v
will be held January 17 20 Cos' lor
students, four dollars C �
facutlystaff. five dollars rWs ass
will meet once per week reg jtri
tion for personal defense ciass -j
held Jan 17 20 Memor a Gy- 'oo�-
204
ART EXHIBITION
COMMITTEE
The Art Exhibition Comm-riee j
the Student Union is accept ng ac
plications for committee tM-i
now through January 20 '984 Mora
information and applications a't
available at the Office of Hm Student
Union (Room 234 Menoenna
Center) why not get involved
EPISCOPAL
WORSHIP
A student Episcopal serv ceo h
Communion will be oatabratM v
Tuesday evening Jan 10 m th cac
of St Paul's Episcopal Churc �
4th St (one block from Garret!
Dorm) The service will be a1 5 X
pm with the Episcopal Chapia ftn
Rev Bill Hadden. celebrating s E
per will follow
ROLLER HOCKEY
Registration tor intramurai roi-e'
hockey will be held January 23 anc Z
This activity utilizes 3 men anc I
vomen Play will begm January 30 a'
Sportsworid Registration for r0; f
hockey jan 23 and 24 Memor.a
Gym room 204
Marsh's Surf-n-Sea
206 E. 5th St.
Downtown Greenville
WINTER SALEI
30 off Woolrich Jackets
(men's & women's)
OP Jackets (ski)-30"off
30 off Hobie Jackets
Timberland Boots - 30' off
Sperr, OP & Cool Shoes - 30'dff
OP V omen Sweaters 306ff
Ml Sweatjackets 30?oft
-Coming-
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New Dro
Mixed Re:
ByTINAMAKOSCHAi
ECU students had mix
tions towards the nc
procedure implement
semester. Registrar
said, "Our main pur
first assist students n
get a good schedule, the
remaining stud
According
ere basical
groups and assigned
dinglv The mon
scheduling problemv
afternoon group
quested courses b .
preferred hours We
schedule itsell
Donaid Font
who worked at tl
Counseling lei
Mid- Ti
Continued Fron
technique I
weaknesses in S
study.
Though stud
seminars in one la g
Counseling Cent
nex room 305 r.
Supply Store. R
dividual c i
aallablefor stuJ
other problems. '
tion of the coin
help studc l
netting she
Starting in
follow-up tc
program will be a a
classes on "Cor a
taught b C ounseling Ce;
member Dr. Steven Dei
classes will focus
such problems a-
other stress-rela:
ming from such
loads, career j
Admissi
Continued
Howell :dciec ha
tain courses, a
not satisfactory
the necessary :
schools do not of f j
a contingent
basis is "very re-
"We end up '
not applying here
course Hov,el! said '
math credit- are
while three n a
ZP
rncoco
i urn to
fSKMO
WE CATER ANY OCCASION - CALL US!
ECU
Only
�. �?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN MNUARY 10. 1984
- -�,

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IRS DEFENSE
CLASSES
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Memorial Gym room
ART EXHIBITION
COMMITTEE
bitton Comm.rte� of
�" � accepting ap
- n�� members
' � 20 19fc� More
� applications are
�� i of the Student
I - Mindsnhall Stuoent
a- not je' rivolvec"
EPISCOPAL
WORSHIP
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v Ecsoca Church. 40
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ROLLER HOCKEY
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� Itr�1 on for roller
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Record
Cleaner
rOCOOUTSlOC
MCOtttOtT
New Drop-Add Procedure Brings
Mixed Responses From Students
By TINA MAROSCHAK
ECU students had mixed reac-
tions towards the new drop-add
procedure implemented this
semester. Registrar Gil Moore
said, "Our main purpose was to
first assist students who did not
get a good schedule, then help the
remaining students more efficient-
ly
According to Moore, students
were basically divided into two
groups and assigned times accor-
dingly. The morning group had
scheduling problems, and the
afternoon group received the re-
quested courses but not at the
preferred hours. "We went on the
schedule itself Moore said.
Donald Fontenot, a student
who worked at the ROTC booth,
said the new procedure was more
organized than it has been in
previous semesters. "Of all the
years I've gone through drop-add,
they've finally thought of a better
way to organize it to cut down on
the long lines and having to get up
at 6 a.m
Business major Jennifer Parker
agreed with Fontenot. "I thought
it wasn't bad at all Parker said.
"It was better than it was last
year she added.
Moore said the new system was
more efficient. "By the time the
second group came in, 've were
almost completely finished with
the first group Moore said.
Student Rick Brown said there
was little difference between this
semester's drop-add procedures
and previous ones. "I thought the
people were generally pretty slack-
they could have been more effi-
cient Brown said. "I could have
stood around a lot less he said.
Susan Tollefsen, a student who
changed her major and had to
drop 18 hours, was angry about
the new procedure. "I had to wait
until 1 p.m. to go to drop-add and
the lines were ridiculous
Tollefsen said. "I don't unders-
tand why I couldn't get special
permission to go in the morning
she added.
Nursing major, Jeri Hingo
thought this semester's pro-
cedures were about the same as
last semester's. "I got the classes
that I wanted, but not the times
Hingo said.
Moore said that the new pro-
cedure will be evaluated to deter-
mine whether or not it will be con-
t i n u e d .
Counseling Center Offering Study Program
Mid- Term Exam Skills Studied
Continued From Page 1
techniques for students to find
weaknesses in specific areas of
study.
Though students attend the
seminars in one large group at the
Counseling Center, in Wright An-
nex room 305 next to the Student
Supply Store, Ryan said in-
dividual counseling is still
available for study techniques and
other problems. "The basic func-
tion of the counseling center is to
help students succeed in a college
setting she said.
Starting in February as a
follow-up to the study techniques
program will be a a series of four
classes on "Coping with Stress
taught by Counseling Center staff
member Dr. Steven Deters. The
classes will focus on alleviating
such problems as test anxiety and
other stress-related problemsstem-
ming from such causes as work
loads, career decisions or living
conditions, according to Deters.
He said about 10 percent of all
students have lower test scores
because of test anxiety.
The classes will use lectures,
audio tapes and printed hand-outs
to help students recognize stress
and learn techniques such as
relaxation exercises to alleviate
stress. Deters said such ideas as
"psyching up" for a test can often
produce excess stress that hurts
test performance. "Going blank"
during a test is also a stress-related
condition that will be dealt with in
the classes, he said.
New Service For ECU
Continued From Page 1
in the technological areas Tester
auded.
Because a major portion of the
funding will come from private
sources, Tester said the center will
always maintain close ties withthe
industrial business community.
To assure this, a 15-member Ad-
visory Board of Directors from
business, industry and local
governments, including mayors,
legislators and chamber of com-
merce officials, was chosen to
"assure industrial and community
input on activities and programs
within the center Tester said.
The Center for Applied
Technology staff will conduct a
survey of ECU to determine those
services it can offer industry in
this region. "We're hoping to in-
volve the university as a whole in
this service Tester said. "We're
also hoping it will serve the
technological needs of the region
and will impact directly upon the
students Tester said. "That, in
a nutshell, is what it's all about
Admissions Standards To Be Raised
Continued From Page 1
Howell added that admission to ECU requires cer-
tain courses, and a high school diploma by itself is
not satisfactory. A few students who have not taken
the necessary courses (generally because their high
schools do not offer them) are currently admitted on
a contingency basis, but Howell said this contingency
basis is "very restricted
"We end up not admitting students, or students
not applying here, because they didn't take that math
eourse Howell said, referring to the fact that two
math credits are required for high school graduation
while three math credits are required for admission to
ECU.
One ot me reasons cuea ior lmpiciiicuuuiuu ui mc
ntw plan is the amount of money the UNC System
expends for remedial work.
According to a UNC official, last spring 210
remedial courses were offered throughout the UNC
System at a cost of approximately $4 million.
Howell said remedial courses were not a major ex-
pense at ECU. He estimated the cost at "between
$40,000 and $50,000, a small amount compared to
what is spent in the system
"If you don't take this course, it's not a question
of whether or not we'll provide remedial work, it's a
matter of whether or not we'll admit you Howell
said, describing the ramifications the plan will have if
put into effect.
The East Carolinian 1$
Now Accepting Applications For
Circulation Manager
Only Responsible, Highly Motivated Persons Need Apply
See General Manager 7576309
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iii i
i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
�tje �a0t Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
C. Hunter Fisher, Gtmi�,�
DARRYL BROWN, Manafin, Editor
J.T. PlETRZAK, Director of Advtrtain,
Mike McPartland, ��dm.�v
Tom Norton, o� Mont
Michael Mayo, Ttcmucm super
ED NlCKLAS, Sports Editor
Gordon I pock, Emmam Editor
Lizanne Jennings, stykEdnor
KATHY FUERST, Production MaMtrr
January 10, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Jackson's Coup
could yield spot on ticket
Without much doubt, the major
news event over the holiday break
was the Rev. Jesse Jackson's suc-
cessful mission to bring home Lt.
Robert Goodman, the American
flyer held prisoner by the Syrians.
The event has been much lauded
and even more debated, but in hind-
sight it is clearly a triumph for
Jackson, and probably more impor-
tant for him than for Goodman
himself. The ambitious and risky
move showed Jackson's strength of
character and placed him in the
limelight of the Democratic
presidential race, and probably the
inside track for the vice presidency.
Assuming (and it is a big assump-
tion) that the Democratic race stays
much as it is now until the conven-
tion this summer, Mondale should
wrangle the nomination, and
Jackson, very possibly, will get the
vice presidential spot on the ticket.
Consider the alternatives. Glenn is
unlikely to gain the No. 2 spot, if
for no other reason than geography
(Mondale is from Minnesota, Glenn
from Ohio); Jackson is No. 3 in the
polls, and Hart, Hollings and
Askew are so far back in the runn-
ing that none would be an irrestible
candidate. Among other possible
Democrats, Ted Kennedy would
never take a back seat on the ticket;
a long shot such as Patrick
Moynihan is a possibility, but not
likely in the face of Jackson.
Jackson would deliver many
more voters to the polls on election
day than he will delegates to the
convention, though he cannot
guarantee, as could most other can-
didates, to carry his home state. His
presence on the ticket would surely
increase black voter turnout
significantly, and yet in the No. 2
spot perhaps wouldn't lose as many
white voters via that underlying
stench of racism that still pervades
American life and politics.
Too, Jackson is perhaps one of
the best candidates for vice presi-
dent, regardless of race. The job is
largely a symbolic one, that of a
figure head a official and foreign
occasions, delivering the American
presence and point of view where
ever the president can't go. The
United States probably would
benefit greatly from a black vice
president, especially in dealing with
Third World nations, where, in-
cidentally, Jackson has the most in-
terest and influence within his
foreign policy experience. Too, if
Jackson's trip to Syria proved
nothing else, it showed he is an
astute politician able to seize the
moment and make the most of it.
Jackson is not likely to sit in
obscurity as vice president, and he
would probably make a capable and
uniquely effective ambassador and
spokesman for the nation. He could
reach sectors both within the coun-
try and around the world that are
not easily opened to yet another
rich, white, male U.S. president.
A Mondale-Jackson ticket would
be a liberal one for sure � no trying
to appease the moderates with a
more conservative choice such as
Glenn. But if the economy manages
to out run the deficit for another 11
months, and Reagan makes no ma-
jor foreign policy gaff, he'll be hard
to beat anyway. If the fourth of Ju-
ly polLal climate resembles that of
early January, the Democrats best
political bet, as well its most impor-
tant symbolic stance, may be to put
up a Minnesota farmboy and
Chicago preacher against the
Hollywood actor and his produc-
tion company.
Ever Wonder
if anyone has ever dropped dead
during drop-add?
CONCCPNM6- THE �CU 5-GOtR�u. PoPOL.A'noN
) It 5 ays li V&o? your.
AKQ -)WWU COUMT To
A THOU5Af4t-
i'
Orwell Strikes Again
More Trouble Than Big Brother
By DICK WEST
WASHINGTON (UPI) � In the
many parallels I have seen drawn bet-
ween the year 1984 and the book
"1984 the emphasis has been on
govermental invasion of individual
privacy.
None has dealt with what I consider
an equally significant, if less Orwellian,
theme: the extent to which we private
citizens are snooping on each other.
However, that deficiency has now
been remedied by Forum magazine.
Not just Big Brother is watching you;
thanks to modern technology,
Suspicious Spouse also may have you
under surveillance.
"A new generation of sophisticated
electronic gadgets requires little exper-
tise and costs surprisingly little
Forum reports in its February issue.
"Not only can we now be heard
whispering in the closet, but seen,
videotaped and instant-replayed as
well
Gee! America's divorce lawyers must
have greeted the New Year by rubbing
their hands together in gleeful anticipa-
tion.
Here are some of the more advanced
"snoopware" devices that presumably
are capable of standing up in court:
� For as little as $20, "a jealous hus-
band or wife can easily install a hidden
tape recorder that automatically turns
on when the phone is in use
� A $24.95 spray that makes
envelopes temporarily transparent,
thereby revealing their contents to the
naked eye. Conveniently, "the solution
evaporates quickly and the envelope
reverts to its untampered-with ap-
pearance Forum assures us. It sug-
gests the spray will surplant "a stan-
dard ploy of the jealous spouse which
is "to steam open incoming mail �
especially those slightly perfumed let-
ters without a return address
� A $125 "night vision enhancer"
that can penetrate the cover of darkness
and expose what is going on in the
moonlight, starlight or "ordinary
skyglow
All of these prices seem dirt cheap to
me, compared to the alimony they have
the potential of producing, although
some of the equipment originally was
developed for other purposes.
The aforementioned envelope spray,
for example, is called a "Letterbomb
Visualizer That evidentally means it
was primarily intended to be used as an
anti-terrorist tool.
One can easily imagine how
suspicious spouses could terrorize un-
faithful mates with it.
"True phone taps Forum tells us,
"present formidable problems for the
amateur
Nevertheless, trysts and assignations
can be bugged fairly inexpensively.
According to the magazine, the costs
of "miniature FM transmitters ranging
from the size of a quarter to half a pack
of cigarettes" run from $20 to $150.
"Stuck under a shelf or table and
tuned to any standard FM frequency,
they can broadcast anywhere from
several feet to half a mile, depending on
quality and external surroundings it
advises.
What I fear is that such technology
might fall into the hands of government
busybodies, thereby creating a
"Snoopgate" scandal, with attendant
cover-ups.
That sort of corruption could give
marital reconnaissance a bad name.
utrior
,EORGt OPWELL
'tffAZTl
Waghom
CPS
Nine-
Teen
Eighty
Four
i� Campus Forum
Naso Asks For Participation
KS1
t
Fellow students,
I hope that all of you have had a very
restful and enjoyable vacation and are
once again ready to undergo the stress
and strain of college life. In an attempt
to alleviate some of the problems ac-
companied with student life here at
ECU, we, at the Student Government
Association, will be setting up some
trouble shooting committees to look
into the current problems which plague
our campus. I write to you today to ask
for your help. I need some students
who are interested in helping with these
committees
There has been much progress so far
in the Student Government this year.
Plans devised last semester have been
set into motion and will soon become a
reality. Thanks to an energetic
legislature, under the leadership of the
Speaker, Chris Townsend, along with
his competent committee chairpersons,
we have been able to make great strides
in dealing with student concerns. Cur-
rently, we have set up a network of
communication between all s adent
organizations on campus. This
achievement tnables the student voice
to reach directly to more than 400 stu-
dent leaders and indirectlv to
thousands more. There still is much
progress to be made and many goals to
be reached, however, the first step has
been taken.
I realize that classes, homework and
extra curriculars take up the better part
of your week. However, I urge you to
become involved regardless of the time
you can contribute. What I am looking
for is your interest. If I can get that, we
can work together to see in what
capacity you can help us.
The SGA is an exciting organization.
It is growing and becoming involved
into more facets of student life than
ever before. You will benefit and grow
from the experience.
I would like to take this opportunity
to express my thanks to the staff at The
East Carolinian, for without their help,
this message would not have been
possible. Moreover, The East Caroli-
nian's co-operation throughout the
year has played a big role in enabling
our plans to become a reality.
If anyone has any questions or
would like to get involved, feel free to
give a call at 757-6611, Ext 218 or
come up to the offices on the second
floor of Mendenhall. Thank you for
your connderiiion.
Paul Naso
SGA President
Knocking Knox
I noted witi great interest that
Charlotte Mayor Eddie Knox, now a
candidate for governor, has been going
around Eastern North Carolina, look-
ing for votes.
He must think that we Eastern North
Carolinians have very short memories.
Mayor Knox led the fight against the
East Carolina medical school in the
early '70s, voting against it numerous
times and proposing amendments
which would have denied it and con-
tinued his fight against it up until the
last vote, which we won.
Does anyone in Eastern North
Carolina believe we could get a road
from this man when we couldn't get a
medical school?
I also recall that in early 1974 this big
city mayor introduced gun control
legislation in the Senate which would
have required all of us to register our
guns.
In my opinion, this big city mayor
had better stick to going on television
singing the praises of the PTL Club
and leave governing our state to a can-
didate more in tune with the wishes of
our people.
Peggy Greene
Greenville
Campus Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail
them to or drop them by the
newspapers offices on the second
floor of the publications building,
across from Joyne? Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
and signature of author(s). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed. All
letters are subject to editing for brevi-
ty, obscenity and libel. Students, facul-
ty and staff writing letters for this page
are reminded that they are limited to
one every five issues.
The campus forum is a regular
feature of The East Carolinians's
editorial page which allows students,
faculty and area citizens to express opi-
nions on current issues. It is a visible
and effective vehicle for expressing
opinions and communicating ideas on
the ECU campus.
1
Break-1
Highlig
By DALESANSO�
�MtfMki
The cold weather was thj
problem for campus secun
the 1983 Christmas holid;
cording to Assistant Direcj
Public Safety Francis E(
larcenies and break-ins rej
normal for this period.
bursted pipes caused mor
blems than in past yearj
pipes bursted in Jones,
Clement and Tyler (see
story).
Six bicycle thefts were r
between Dec. 20 and Jar
Dec. 31 a non-student was
from the campus for su
activity around the bicyci
outside White dormitory
Jan. 6 a head lamp was I
stolen from a woman's bi
side Cotten dorm.
Group
SAN FRANCISCO.
Calif. (CPS) - Colleges
that give too much we j
to standardized exam
scores when deciding
whether to admit a stu-
dent won't be able to see
any students' scores in
the future if the Mexican-
American Legal Defense
and Education Fund gets
its way.
In November.
MALDEF asked the na-
tion's three largest stan-
dardized test givers
stop sending test results
to schools that reject ap
plicants who don't get al
certain minimum scorr
on the exams.
But the test givers
the Educational Testing
Service, the American
College Testing program
and the College Entrance!
Examination Board � aJ
say there may be legal
reasons why they car.
SHOP
SEL
mm
'
� �-
- Tim
mp





THfc EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10. 1984
I
'
�C
lAta mt
ther
;ps
e-
n
ty
r
on
.idn't get a
74 � is big
led gun control
Wch ould
to register our
J Pig city mayor
Jing on eievision
If the PTL Club
1 tate to a can-
nth the wishes of
Peggy Greene
Greenville
ules
welcomes letters
of view. Mail
them by the
m the second
utions building,
ibrary.
'fication, all iet-
xame, major and
phone number
or(s). Letters are
'written pages,
uly printed. All
editing for brevi-
Students, facul-
pers for this page
'v are limited to
m is a regular
U Carolinians's
allows students,
to express opi-
It is a visible
for expressing
ucating ideas on
Break-Ins, Bicycle Thefts
Highlight Police Activity
Bv DALE SWANSON
Staff Wrttar
The cold weather was the main
problem for campus security over
the 1983 Christmas holiday. Ac-
cording to Assistant Director for
Public Safety Francis Eddings,
larcenies and break-ins remained
normal for this period, while
bursted pipes caused more pro-
blems than in past years. The
pipes bursted in Jones, Aycock,
Clement and Tyler (see related
story).
Six bicycle thefts were reported
between Dec. 20 and Jan. 8. On
Dec. 31 a non-student was banned
from the campus for suspicious
activity around the bicycle racks
outside White dormitory, and on
Jan. 6 a head lamp was reported
stolen from a woman's bike out-
side Cotten dorm.
Campus police also said a
female student reported a rape on
Jan. 5 that allegedly occured on
Oct. 27 at about 10 p.m. in a
wooded area near the intersection
of 10th Street and Rock Springs
Road. The suspect was described
only as a white male. The public
safety department is investigating
the case, but currently has no
leads.
The first report of a breaking
and entering came Jan. 3 from an
Aycock resident. On Jan. 4 a
Scott resident reported a larceny
of personal property, and a Jones
resident reported a radio cassette
player and a stereo stolen. Three
other reports of missing or stolen
property have been reported by
students in Greene and Aycock
dormitories during the past week.
Thcives also struck while
students were moving back into
their rooms. A Greene resident
reported property stolen from her
car on Jan. 5, and on Jan. 8
camera equipment was stolen
from a woman's suitcase in the
lobby of Tyler dorm.
Academic buildings affected by
holiday crime included state pro-
perty stolen from Joyner Library
on Dec. 20. An attempt to break
and enter a safe in Memorial
Gymnasium was reported on Jan.
5. No arrests have been made.
It was a typical holiday break
for the campus police, according
to Eddings. Two DWI arrests
have been made so far in 1984 by
campus security. Five arrests were
made in December. Eddings
hopes DWI arrest will remain low
because of the new Safe Roads
Act laws.
New Video Equipment
1983 Senior Class Gift of videotape equipment presented for ECU Graduates to refine their
interviewing skills or review company information tapes. Shown are David Cook, 1983 Senior Class
President, Furnev James, director of career planning service, and Jim Westmoreland, assistant
director.
Group Seeks To Reduce Importance of SAT, ACT
SAN FRANCISCO,
Calif. (CPS) � Colleges
that give too much weight
to standardized exam
scores when deciding
whether to admit a stu-
dent won't be able to see
any students' scores in
the future if the Mexican-
American Legal Defense
and Education Fund gets
its way.
In November,
MALDEF asked the na-
tion's three largest stan-
dardized test givers to
stop sending test results
to schools that reject ap-
plicants who don't get a
certain minimum score
on the exams.
But the test givers �
the Educational Testing
Service, the American
College Testing program,
and the College Entrance
Examination Board � all
say there may be legal
reasons whv they can't
stop sending students'
test scores to specific
schools.
MALDEF says they
need to stop, however,
because the current
system has "the potential
for screening out some
very able people" from
college, spokeswoman
Annette Oliveira said.
Setting "cutoff scores
presumes that an in-
dividual scoring a few
points below the
minimum acceptable
score has a significantly
lower likelihood of suc-
cess in college than does
the individual scoring a
few points above
MALDEF's petition to
the testing agencies said.
Julio Franco, for ex-
ample, was a high school
academic honors student
who couldn't get into the
University of California-
Berkeley's engineering
school because of the
school's combined
Schlastic Aptitude test
minimum score of 1000.
Because Franco had
570 math and 390 verbal
scores, Berkeley "sum-
marily rejected" is ap-
plication, Oliveira said.
MALDEF subsequent-
ly intervened in the case,
and Franco got into the
school.
Estimating just how
many schools do set
minimum score cutoffs
depends on which survey
one views.
A 1979 study by the
College Board and the
American Association of
Collegiate Registrars and
Admissions Officers
found that only two per-
cent of the nation's col-
leges use test scores as the
single most important
factor in deciding
whether to admit a stu-
dent.
Forty-three percent
judged scores very impor-
tant. Thirty-one percent
of the admissions officers
called high school
achievement the most im-
portant factor, with 34
percent listing it as very
important.
But a 1980 study by the
same two organizations
found that 39 percent of
the country's public and
42 percent of its private
four-year colleges set
minimum SAT scores for
admissions.
Approximately a third
of all four-year schools
have minimum ACT
scores.
Using those numbers,
MALDEF's Oliveira con-
tends "the use (of
minimum test scores) is
definitely growing
MALDEF has not yet
drawn up a list of schools
it wants cut off from test
scores, but Oliveira nam-
ed Berkeley, Florida and
Texas as three likely
targets.
Admissions officers at
Florida and Texas con-
cede they use minimum
test scores in screening
out applicants, but also
weigh high schools grade
point averages heavily.
1 "The stronger the
academic record, the
lower the test score re-
quired explains James
Parrish, Florida's admis-
sions director.
Texas, like Florida, of-
fers chances to make up
deficiences to students
who don't score a com-
bined 1100 or meet other
admissions requirements.
"In effect, we don't
close off UT to anybody
who wants us asserts
Sterling Miller, a Texas
admjsMonounselor
Even the ETS, ACT
and the College Board
agree that schools
shouldn't use test scores
as the sole admissions
criterion.
"To rely on the SAT or
ACT alone is tremendous
injustice, not only to the
students but to the
parents and the school as
well says Thomas Ew-
ing of ETS. "We have
always said from the
beginning that the high
school transcript is the
best indicator of achieve-
ment
But the testing
organizations object to
trying to punish schools
that do set minimum
standards.
Because students pay
the testing services to
send their scores to
schools that they choose,
"we would have to look
long and hard at whether
we'd withhoia or deny ac-
cess of test scores to col
leges the ACT's Dave
Crockett says. "That
data belong to the stu-
dent
But College Board
President Gregory Anrig
last week said his
organization would
withhold the scores of
teacher competency ex-
ams to states that use the
scores to determine
teachers' salaries and
ranks.
"It seems just plain
wrong to tell someone
who has been judged a
satisfactory teacher for
10 or 15 or 20 years that
the passing of one test on
one day is necessary to
keep his or her job or
salary as a teacher
Anrig says.
ATTIC
FREE
WED.
'
ALL ECU
STUDENTS
DIAMONDS
THURSDAY
X-RA VES
w ZMB LADIES LIGHT MTF
FRJ.&SAT.
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OUR BIGGEST "USED"
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EVER!
IENCE
r(TH
"Our December Book Buy Back has produced the largest used tex-
tbook inventory in the history of the U.B.E. We've got 20more used
texts in our store than in Jan. of 1983. Check Downtown first for all
your books and supplies.
SHOP EARLY FOR BIGGEST
SELECTION OF USED
TEXTBOOKS!
Open Tonite until 9:00PM
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 8, 1983 Page 7
Pat Carrol Plays
Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein, Gertrude Stein
The award-winning play Ger-
trude Stein, Gertrude Stein, Ger-
trude Stein will star Pat Carroll
who bringhs to life the controver-
sial poet in a role she has played to
great acclaim for the past three
years. The performance is
scheduled for Monday, January
16 at 8:15 p.m. in McGinnis
Theatre.
This remarkable one-woman
play is an imaginary monologue
by Gertrude Stein set on the eve of
her eviction from the famous
studio at 27 rue de Fleurus. Begin-
ning with her irritation at being
evicted, she reminisces � in true
Stein style � about her life in
Paris, her childhood in Califor-
nia, studies at Harvard with
William James, the decision to
come to Paris with her brother,
her discovery of Alice B. Toklas
and the pleasure of that relation-
ship, and the famous people they
entertained: Picasso, Matisse,
Cezanne, Bernard Berenson,
Isadora and Raymond Duncan,
Scotty and Zelda Fitzgerald,
Ernest Hemingway and a host of
others.
Winner of the 1980 Outer Circle
Award as the outstanding produc-
tion of a play off-Broadway, this
is a work of theatrical magic that
captures the essence of Gertrude
Stein. Pat Carrol has worked
theatre, televison, supper clubs,
films and radio consistently for 33
years. She has been honored with
numerous awards and citations
for her work, including the
Drama Desk award as best actress
in 1980 for Gertrude Stein, Ger-
trude Stein, Gertrude Stein and
other recognitions for her
outstanding perfromance in this
play.
Tickets for the play are current-
ly on sale at the Central Ticket Of-
fice, Mendenhall Student Center
(757-6611, ext. 266). The ticket
office is open Monday - Friday,
10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Prices are $5 for
ECU students, $7 for youths 14
and under, and $10 for ECU
faculty, staff and the public.
Mick Rates Best And Worst Films Of 1983
It was a decent year for movies
but a much better year for movie
reviews. But now it's 1984. And
that calls for a look back with
Mick LaSalle's Top 5 and Bottom
5 of 1983.
L- s
�.
Mick
LaSalle
-
St: !�.

'if
The Top Five of '83
Scarf ace. Al Pacino's got pizazz.
He's my kind of actor. In Scar-
face he plays Tony Montana, a
Cuban refugee who becomes King
of the cocaine smuggling racket.
"Only balls gives orders
Montana says. And so he starts
off by going after the boss's
girlfriend � a sweet, young,
chain-smoking, liquor-ridden,
coke addicted, Deborah Harry
look-alike named Elvira. And he
ends up by firing a machine gun
from his balconey at a hundred
guys who've come to kill him.
Don't believe all that stuff
about violence in this picture. The
movie is less violent than you'd
expect.
Tootsie. Tootsie is sensitive and
well-acted. Jessica Lange plays
the kind of woman a guy just
wants to take care of. Dustin Hof-
fman plays the guy. Lange thinks
Hoffman in drag is a woman, and
so Lange and Hoffman get to
know each other better than they
ever would have.
Tootsie is a funny movie about
men, women, and sex roles that
tells the truth and steers clear of
the cheap laugh.
Flashdance. This movie was so
bad I saw it three times. Don't
believe the critics. You walk out
of this film feeling like you own
the street.
Rear Window. A guy is recovering
from a broken leg. He spends
everyday looking out the window,
and what d'ya know? He and his
girlfriend wind up solving a
murder.
Rear Window is a 1954 Hit-
chcock flick that for some reason
or other hasn't been seen in
theatres since its original release.
It stars James Stewart � playing
his usual likeable self � and
Grace Kelly.
I gotta go on record saying
Grace Kelly in Rear Window
knocked me for a loop. The lady
had it all. I walked out of the
theatre feeling real bad for both
of us that I wasn't born 30 years
earlier.
Zelig. Zelig is a mock documen-
'Sudden Impact9
Eastwood's Film A Social Reaction
By GORDON IPOCK
taurlaiamral Ulttw
Are you a bull dyke? Do you sit
around and suck on fish heads?
Are you a psychopathic pervert
who loves to kill and rape? Are
you a liberal female judge? Are
you a fat-ass lazy cop? Are you a
scum-sucking punk, or a junk-
shooting piece of dog shitIf
so, you won't like Clint
Eastwood's latest film, Sudden
Impact. Eastwood's out to get
you.
But. If you own a handgun, if
you're a Republican, if you think
the U.S. should invade Nicaragua
and you'd volunteer to lead the
assault, if you think capital
punishment is the answer to
America's problems then Sud-
den Impact is your kind of movie.
Clint Eastwood is your kind of
man.
Sudden Impact is not just pulp
entertainment for the redneck
masses. It is a reflection, or better
yet, a reaction to the times if ever
there was one. It is a reaction in
much the same way that Jesse
Helms, the Moral Majority and
N.C.P.A.C. are. Eastwood pro-
duces it, directs it and stars in it.
It's his baby, and he's making a
statement with it � a blunt state-
ment. "There is a thing called
justice leading lady Sondra
Locke says at the film's close.
And when the government and it's
laws make a mockery of justice,
the individual is compelled to take
justice into his own hands. This is
Sudden Impact's message � or
warning.
Over the holidays I watched a
segment of ABC's "Nightline a
news analysis program. The sub-
ject was capital punishment and
the skyrocketing crime rate, par-
ticularly capital crimes. A panel
of experts including the articulate
George F. Will, film director
Brain DePalma, an A.C.L.U.
lawyer and a Georgetown Univer-
sity professor could not explain
the nationwide explosion in
heinously violent crime. Each
mumbled something about the na-
tary by Woody Allen about a
"human chameleon" living in the
Jazz Age. The picture is a
technical masterpiece that's in-
telligent and funny. It's probably
the best movie of 1983.
I hear people handing out the
word genius to people like Eddie
Murphy or Richard Pryor. Next
thing they'll tell me David Bren-
ner's a genius. But Woody Allen
manages to get laughs without
saying f� every five words. Plus,
he's made a handful of the best
films of the past ten years. If
there's a genius working in com-
CHat Eastwood Is toagk �� paai-J, dykes, Jaakftes sssd perverts la Us
Utt�tfilm Sua Impact. Montlumpwiptmt�iaaami$tkt mm iau
reactionary statesaeat agaiaat the American legal system.
tion's social fabric coming apart
at the seams, but none had any
solutions to the problems of
justice and law and order in
America.
Sudden Impact deals with these
problems much more effectively
than Ted Koppel or his experts
did. Basically, the answer is to
meet the junkies and perverts
head on with brute force, ie. with
a slug from a .44-caliber
Magnum. Eastwood as police in-
spector Harry Callighan does just
that. He and Sondra Locke blast
at least a bus load of scum into
oblivion. At the film's end, the ac-
ting credits roll on and on listing
the thugs who have had their
brains blown out and their balls
shot off.
In a civilized state, government
is the only agency that is legally
sanctioned to use force � in-
cluding violent force � to insure
justice. Anyone else who resorts
to violence is cast an outlaw. The
frightening aspect, though, is that
many Americans now see
themselves with their backs
against the wall, with
psychopathic killers at their door
and their only salvation a han-
dgun. Call it a siege mentality or
the Dirty Harry syndrome, but
more average citizens than ever
are packing handguns. They're
losing faith in law and govern-
ment and adopting a Magnum
Force brand of justice. They're
listening to Clint Eastwood's
message.
As entertainment, Sudden Im-
pact is superb. The film is a
Christmas-season, box-office
smash hit, one of Eastwood's best
efforts. But the film also hits a
raw nerve in the current American
psyche. It poses some serious
questions about American justice
in the the 1980s. It's a dark,
brooding, angry film with gut-
level honesty that appeals to the
average citizen � especially those
concerned about crime and
justice. Eastwood is a modern-day
Arthur weilding his awesome .44
Magnum like Excalibur, bringing
justice to the land: heroic but
serious stuff, and a great topic for
discussion in Sociology 2111.
edy today, it's Woody Allen.
The Worst of '83
The Big Chill. A band of old
potheads get together for a
friend's funeral and end up hump-
ing each other. If that sounds like
something you want to watch, lot-
sa luck. I'd just as soon stick my
fingers down my throat.
Stroker Ace. If they wanted Loni
Anderson to play a 30-year-old
virgin they should've made this
picture 10 years ago. At least then
she was 30.
As for Burt Reynolds: The gu
has money, right? He doesn'i
haveto make these pictures. So
why does he bother?
Stayin' Alive. This movie was so
bad I didn't even bother to see it.
Brainstorm. The movie had
Natalie Wood and an interesting
premise. But it had no heart.
To Be Or Sot To Be. I'll tell you
more about this one when it
comes to our fair city. To put it
briefly, this is a very disappoin-
ting � and dismal � remake of a
great movie. But more on that
later.
Guest Pianist Cynthia Lawing
The Charlotte Symphony Or-
chestra will perform in Wright
Auditorium on the ECU campus
this Thursday, Jan. 12 at 8 p.m.
The performance replaces the
cancelled appearance of the North
Carolina Symphony from the
1983-84 Artists Series.
This marks the fifty-second
season of the Charlotte Sym-
phony Orchestra. Considered one
of the nation's finest regional or-
chestras, the Charlotte Symphony
has grown and greatly expanded
its schedule of performances and
its wealth of talent. The orchestra
has earned the highest praise from
the general public and critics alike
for outstanding musicianship.
Music Director Leo Driehuys,
now in his seventh season with the
orchestra, brings to the podium
an exciting blend of charisma and
musical intelligence which has
made him a favorite with au-
diences everywhere. Born in
Holland, Maestro Driehuys has
had a distunguished career in
Europe as an oboist as well as a
conductor.
The 75 musicians who make up
the Charlotte Symphony Or-
chestra come from all parts of the
United States, and many of them
have studied at the nation's most
prestigious conservatories. The
musicians are a vital force in the
state's musical life, not only as
members of the Charlotte Sym-
phony, but also as teachers and
recitalists across the area.
The program for the Jan. 12
performance includes Mozart's
"Symphony No. 35 in D Major
"Haffner, K.385 Ravel's
"Piano Concerto in G Major;
and Rimsky-Korsakov's
"Scherazade: Suite Symphoni
que Guest pianist is Cynthia
Lawing whose performances have
gained her great acclaim from the
Far East where she was born to
the United States where she has
won numerous concerto competi-
tions.
Tickets are on sale at the Cen-
tral Ticket Office at Mendenhall
Student Center: $2.50 for ECU
students, $3.50 for youths 14 and
under and $7.50 for ECU faculty,
staff and the public. Persons with
individual tickets for the North
Carolina Symphony Orchestra
performance and season ticket
holders may use those tickets for
admission to the Charlotte Sym-
phony as this concert replaces the
former.
,
- - � - - ��-
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JAM
?
English Literature Class Focuses
In American Film
THP PAST CAROLINIANJANUARY 10, 1914
Women
The way Hollywood
has presented women and
their lives on screen, and
also the actual careers of
some great Hollywood
female stars, writers, and
directors, will be the sub-
ject of a special course in
Spring Semester 1984.
Students in the class, call-
ed "Women in American
Film: Image and
Reality will have a
chance to see classic
feature films ranging
from Lillian Gish in Hay
Down East (1920) to Jane
Fonda in Julia (1977).
The legends and careers
of stars of the past such
as Marlene Dietrich,
Bette Davis, and
Elizabeth Taylor will be
studied along with their
greatest films. So will the
upsurge of women's films
since the late 1970's.
Dr. William Stephen-
son, professor of film
literature in the English
Department, recently ex-
plained the course offer-
ing. "Actually, the
course number is English
5900, and it appears in
the cataloge as Special
Studies in Film. That's
the general course title. I
choose a different topic
for study each time. I've
only offered the tonic of
women in film a couple
of times before, and it
was a fantastic class ex-
perience. The students
really enjoyed it. I'm
looking forward to offer-
ing it again in 1984
Asked what the
prevailing image of
women is, Stephenson
commented, "A lot of
times it's just the sweet
little homebody who only
wants to knit socks for
hubbv and bake cookies
for the kids. That's
generally what the
American public has
wanted to see over the
years. But there have
been times, like the
Depression and Second
World War years, when
women were forced into
the labor market. Then
you had some tremen-
dous films about women
who could make it own
their own, like Joan
Crawford in Mildred
Pierce and Katharine
ried man.vAll the men in
the class sympathized
with her, thought she was
adorable and
misunderstood. All the
women in class hated her.
They call her a
homewrecker and worse.
The sparks really flew
between the sexes when
we had a class discussion
of Garbo. I wonder if it
will happen the same way
again?"
Stephenson said the
class will meet on
Tuesdays and Thursdays
from 2:00 to 4:00.
"There are no special
prerequisites. I'll
welcome all students with
a personal interest in film
or in women's studies.
The course can be taken
for credit or audited
For further information,
contact Professor
William Stephenson in
Austin 217.
Godfather's Pizza
Hepburn in Adam's Rib.
Yes, I'll be showing both
of those
Besides the big-star
films, Stephenson will of-
fer offbeat films of
special interst. "There
have been some
devastating comedies
made about how men
treat women and how
some women hook onto
men like parasites said
Stephenson. He spoke of
another very unusual
film. "There's a film of
1958 nobody ever heard
of, called The Goddess,
that offers the best com-
ment on the life of
Marilyn Monroe I've ever
seen. It even predicted
her suicide four years in
advance
He expects sharpest
class reaction will be to
Greta Garbo who stars in
Flesh and the Devil. "The
last time, class reaction
was amazing. Garbo
plays a femme fatale who
has an affair with a mar-
'Flashdance' Plays Hendrix
Great Flick With No Plot
By GORDON IPOCK
- - - �( Mltor
It's the big'un, the one
we've all been waiting for
� and the one we've all
probably seen.
Flashdance!
So if you've already
seen it (maybe even twice,
like 1 have), and you've
already read everything in
print about it (Mick
LaSalle pretty much
covered it last semester as
well), then why am 1
wasting time and print
with this.
But!
In case you just got
here from off the farm,
and your Primitive Bap-
tist ma and pa wouldn't
let you go into town and
watch this sinful filth,
then the following is just
for you.
Filthy? Yes. Sinful?
Yes, yes. Jennifer Beais
plays a grimy, sweaty
18-year-old construction
worker by day who sleeps
around with older men by
night. In between she
aspires to become a pro-
fessional dancer. And, as
is the nature of all sinful
filth, this is indeed en-
joyable fare.
Mouthwatering fare!
Whether we're gazing
into Beals' dark seductive
eyes or staring at her dan-
cing double's firm sleek
thighs, young dancing
flesh is this films's major
attraction. The dance se-
quences are superb.
Whether it's Beals work-
ing out in her warehouse
flat, her French double
nightclub dancing at the
local pub, the break dan-
cing by street kids, or the
euphoric dance finale it
doesn't matter. All of it
works and works well.
The plot?
What plot? I never saw
it, but I'll bet Bedtime
For Bonzo has a more
believable plot. Most of
the films at the 264
Playhouse probably have
a better plot. The plot is
insipid, idiotic,
unbelievable. Forget the
plot. You don't think a
complex believable plot
makes for sinful filth. It's
the flesh in Flashdance,
my boy. Go to Hendrdix
and drool this weekend.
See it all three nights. Ad-
mission is by student I.D.
and activity card.
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5-Day Plan, Jan. 16-20m 7:00 p.m.
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER, Coffee Shop
Group Therapy - Films - Lectures -
Demonstrations - Buddy System, Your Own
Control Book. Its Great! And You Won't Gain
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Directed by Allen F. Bowyer. Chief of Cardiology. ECU, la cooper-Mon with Pitt Coaaty
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If you love fine writing,
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Happy Hour Prices - 5pm til closing
Pitcher of choice with large pizza
Current movies or basketball game
GREEK NIGHT
�fCOtaKattttailitfl
ptasa hi tore. fie1
Local Cin
Each week the East Caroling
will attempt to give a brief reie
of every movie playing at Green
ville's four major cinemas. CarlyX
Ebert, Darryl Brown, Mic
LaSalle and myself will nte tl
reviews and give a personal raw
from one to five stars. Of cours
each of us has different opintot
and tastes, and our ratings M
reflect this. For example. I �oul
give All The Right Moves foi
stars and The Man Hno Lovf
Women two But then, eero
has their own opinions, and ajt
you see the films, l'm sure
have your own us �elt Me hoi
this new feature is of some
to ECU students, and that
enjoy the films you decide to si
The Ratings
Awful. Don't bother to sec rJ
even if someone gives you a
pass. A total waste of time
Poor. Save your money
catch this at Hendrix
semester, or watch it wher
TV.
A Decent film If y j
an interest in either the ad
the topic, go see it.
� A very good film
worth the price of idmissi
Anyone should enjoy this.
� Great stuff A
tial classic. Deser.es an Os
Forget tommorrow's ex
Forget everything. Go see it
Buccaneer Movies
Terms of Endearment, rae,
Comedy-drama starring
Maclaine as an eccentric, eg
trie mother. Debra Wing
well-adjusted daughter anc
Nicholson as their neighbc j
astronaut John Glenn could
be. Chronicles the lives and
of a peculiar but lnitmate mol
daughter relationship, revealj
mother who needs and
from her daughter as x
daughter from her The
age together and d
themselves and their relatioj
before the film's end. The
somehow rushes through
lives while dragging in plac
the same time, but examines
interesting human reiatior
problems and faults in a
made two hours. Guarantf
jerker.
D.B.
Uncommon Valor rated R
With financial backing
Texas oil baron (Robert St
retired Marine colonel
Hackman) rectruits and on
a group of Vietnam vets at
leads them back into the
of Southeast Asia to
American POWs that are sj
ing held there years after
has ended. The film's i
stvle violence and ballsy
humor should appeal to real
Soldier of Fortune and Gu
Ammo magazines A
version of The Dirty
without the big names
quality of acting. A cath
those who still chafe over
of Nam.
G.I.
The Man WTio loved
rated R
If this picture is mildly
taming it's only becau-
Burt Reynolds and a
prettv girls. Overall it's
pointing picture: not furuj
dramatic, not intelligent
Reynolds plays a
sculptor who goes to a lacv
TTIXT
cw
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Papa MB � l
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Wr





iAM ARY 10,1984
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
JANUARY 10, 1984
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ightClub
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7.95
6.95
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208
E. 5th St.
75S-797
Local Cinemas9 Movie Fare Rated
Each week the East Carolinian
will attempt to give a brief review
of every movie playing at Green-
ville'sour major cinemas. Carlyn
Ebert, Darryl Brown, Mick
LaSalle and myself will write the
reviews and give a personal rating
from one to five stars. Of course,
each of us has different opinions
and tastes, and our ratings will
reflect this. For example, I would
give All The Right Moves four
stars and The Man Who Loved
Women two. But then, everyone
has their own opinions, and after
you see the films, I 'm sure you '11
have your own as well. We hope
this new feature is of some value
to ECU students, and that you '11
enjoy the films you decide to see.
The Ratings:
Awful. Don't bother to see this
even if someone gives you a free
pass. A total waste of time.
� � Poor. Save your money and
catch this at Hendrix next
semester, or watch it when it hits
TV.
� A Decent film If you have
an interest in either the actors or
the topic, go see it.
��� A very good film well
worth the price of admission.
Anyone should enjoy this.
Great stuff. A poten-
tial classic. Deserves an Oscar.
Forget tommorrow's exam.
Forget everything. Go see it!
Buccaneer Movies
Terms of Endearment, rated PG
Comedy-drama starring Shirley
Maclaine as an eccentric, egocen-
tric mother, Debra Winger as her
well-adjusted daughter and Jack
Nicholson as their neighbor, an
astronaut John Glenn could never
be. Chronicles the lives and times
of a peculiar but initmate mother-
daughter relationship, revealing a
mother who needs and learns
from her daughter as much as the
daughter from her. They come of
age together and define
themselves and their relationship
before the film's end. The movie
somehow rushes through their
lives while dragging in places at
the same time, but examines some
interesting human relationships,
problems and faults in a well-
made two hours. Guaranteed tear-
jerker.
D.B. � �
Uncommon Valor rated R
With financial backing from a
Texas oil baron (Robert Stack), a
retired Marine colonel (Gene
Hackman) rectruits and organizes
a group of Vietnam vets and then
leads them back into the jungles
of Southeast Asia to rescue
American POWs that are still be-
ing held there years after the war
has ended. The film's military-
style violence and ballsy macho
humor should appeal to readers of
Soldier of Fortune and Guns and
Ammo magazines. A Vietnam
version of The Dirty Dozen
without the big names or high
quality of acting. A catharsis for
those who still chafe over the loss
of Nam.
G.I.
The Man Who Loved Women,
rated R.
If this picture is mildly enter-
taining it's only because it has
Burt Reynolds and a couple of
pretty girls. Overall it's a disap-
pointing picture: not funny, not
dramatic, not intelligent.
Reynolds plays a famous
sculptor who goes to a lady shrink
(Julie Andrews) to talk about his
problem: Every woman he meets
falls in love with him. Reynolds
spends most of the movie whining
on a couch and trying to look up
Julie Andrews' skirt. Give me a
break. The picture is long on
psychological explanation and
short on action. When they film
my life story I hope they do a bet-
ter job.
M.L. �
Plaza Cinema
Sudden Impact rated R
Clint Eastwood and perennial
leading lady Sondra Locke star in
this action-filled drama about per-
sonal revenge and American
justice. Ten years after a group of
thugs rape and brutalize her and
her sister, artist Jennifer Spencer
(Locke) buys a .38 caliber
Magnum pistol and one-by-one
kills the men, and one lesbian,
who raped her. A slug in the groin
followed by another in the
forehead is her trademark. Harry
Callighan (Eastwood) is sent to
solve the murders a"d ultimately
must save Spencer and himself
from the final psychopath. With
viens popping out on his
forehead, a bitter Harry must bat-
tle a soft, bureaucratic justice
system as well as thugs. The
former is intent on putting him
out to pasture and the latter wants
to put him six feet under. Clint
Eastwood at his best.
G.I. � � � � See feature article.
D.C. Cab rated R
Stars Mr. T. What more need be
said? Not reviewed No rating.
The Keep rated R
It's 1941, and a column of Nazi
soldiers flushed with recent vic-
tory are reduced to ashes by a
mysterious and sinister force. The
German soldiers occupy a granite
fortress (The Keep) of inex-
plicable origins recessed into a
mountain pass in Romania.
Suspense is provided by an evil be-
ing imprisoned within The Keep
who preys upon the soldiers.
Filmed in England, crystalline
photography and beautiful
scenery � along with the requisite
special effects � can't compen-
sate for a plot that might have
been lifted from an MTV video. If
films with nether world themes
are your bag, this should prove
acceptable fare. Anyone else will
need a bong hit to get through it.
G.I.
Park Theatre
All the Right Moves, rated PG
High School drama starring
Tom (Risky Business) Cruise as a
football player whose only chance
to escape a life in his steel mill
home town is an athletic scholar-
ship to college. The story is also
about the changing of the guard in
steel mill families; as the industry
is dying, so is the town and their
way of life. The younger genera-
tion can count on neither the
plodding but secure life of a steel
worker nor any way to escape the
mill town. The film is full of
parallels: the high school coach's
fate for a college job depends as
much on the big game as does his
players' hopes for a scholarship;
Cruise is kicked off the team just
as his older brother is laid off at
the steel mill. The film is full of
slow spots but is as good a film
about high school as is likely to
come along for a while.
D.B.
PUtt Theatres
Christine rated R
Highly predictable and not the
least bit horrifying, unless the
sound of crumpling steel bothers
you, Christine recasts the plot of
Carrie as an unpopular high
school kid gets supernatural
revenge on his tormenting peers.
Arnie, the boy who falls for and
buys a '58 Plymouth with a buried
past, goes from Scrabble-playing
nerd to possessed demon on
wheels with laughable
unbelievability. Director John
Carpenter (Halloween, The Fog)
shies away from actually shooting
much bloody gore, instead favor-
ing shots of Christine's mangled
red body rejuvenating itself to a
score of '50s hits that not-so-
mysteriously issue from the car's
AM radio. Christine's trademark
blinding brights as she stalks her
victims are about as subtle as the
theme music from Jaws. Despite
Christine's violent disposition,
Carpenter succeeds in making you
root for the car, not the kid. Car
buffs remembering an obsession
with their own first set of wheels
will get a real kick out of this tur-
nabout fantasy, but much of the
film (taken from a Stephen King
novel, not from a "My Mother,
The Car" TV show) is pretty fun-
ny stuff for a horror movie.
C.E.
Two of a Kind, rated PG
A romantic comedy starring
John Travolta and Olivia Newton
John as a down-on-his-luck inven-
tor and a down-on-her-luck ac-
tress, respectively. The couple
goes through the requisite eccen-
tric meeting (he robs her at a
bank), period of mutual disdain,
then well, you can fiqure it out.
The film has a Heavan Can Wait
twist with the fate of mankind
resting on this nouvelle Adam and
Eve, guided by some good-
hearted, bungling angels who
have a week to prove mankind's
goodness in Travolta and
Newton-John. Not a really fine
performance in the film, but en-
joyable if you take your 13-year-
old sister. D.B.
Scarface rated R
Al Pacino plays an often uncon-
vincing Cuban political refugee
rising and falling through the
Miami drug underworld in Brain
DePalma's remake of the 1932
film directed by Howard Hawks.
Pacino's performance as Tony
Montana, the gangster who's as
overprotctive of his kid sister as
he is of his wife and his empire, is
much like the film itself � flashy,
harsh, oversimplified and uneven.
Director DePalma got the film's
much publicized X rating reduced
to an R by removing the visual in
an early scene in which a drug
dealer uses an electric chainsaw to
get tough with one of Montana's
pals, but there's plenty of blood
and guts left in for fans of movie
violence. Doused in machine-gun
fire, billows of blood and what
the Goldsboro News-Argus tact-
fully calls "the F word Scarface
is still enthralling on a gut-level �
if you've got those kind of guts.
C.E.
Mickey's Christmas Carol and
The Rescuers rated G
Animated Disney double feature.
Not reviewed. No rating.
� TT II TJLjpjjjjDp
iiiiii
iiiiii
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Tues. - Sun.
r
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("HE EASTCARO! INI AN
Sports
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 8. 1983
Pae 10
PirateYout
Growing Up
By ED MCKLAS
Sports fjllio.
Be patient East Carolina fans,
says basketball coach Charlie
Harrison. The Pirates are not far
away from being a contender.
The team is in a cocoon
stage Harrison said. "One day
they will be a butterfly
The Pirate youth element is
promising, but. after winning its
first two games against Cambell
and Christopher Newport, the
team dropped seven straight.
However, except for the losses to
Virginia Commonwealth, Bradley
and Duke, Harrison's youngsters
have not been blown out, and
could have won had it not been
for "mental lapses
"I thought we would be better
as far as record right now Har-
rison said. "They are not playing
consistently well. The mistakes
are magnified three-fold
"They played well at times he
continued, reflecting on the losing
streak. "1 can't describe it. It
seems like I'm watching the same
movie over and over again. Usual-
ly at the start of the second half
the have the lapse
The "mental lapses" Harrison
refers to. which include bad shot
selection, forced passes and miss-
ed lay-ups, occur in three to five
minute stretches. "They are the
same mistakes that occur in prac-
tice and by the same people he
said- "1 keep using the term 'men-
tal lapses 1 can't correct that.
They'll have to
The team is going through a dif-
ficult stage, Harrison said,
because there is not a good blend
of older and younger players. And
the older players do not have the
leadership personality.
So the success of the team will
depend on how the freshmen, i.e.
Leon Bass, Derrick Battle, Keith
Sledge. Jack Turnbill and Roy
Smith, progress.
According to Harrison, that
progression will not ccur over-
night. "Last year at thk time they
(t,he freshman) were playing
against high school kids he said,
noting that in the Duke game, the
Pirates were
outmuscledPhysically, we are
weak right now. We are working
on that with the weight program
and learning to play with
agressiveness
"We have good players and
they will be very good Harrison
added. "Right now we can't sur-
vive on their talent and size
(height)
For example, Harrison men-
tioned Smith, who has displayed
great potential in various games
thus far, has had a difficult time
adjusting to the physical nature of
college basketball.
In addition, Harrison called
Battle a "super athlete but said
he has had some defensive lapses
in the second halves that have led
Hedges, Lady Pirates
Break Losing Streak
By RANDY MEWS
Dariene Hedges drives in for two of her 23 points in Sunday's 67-58
victory over Fairleigh Dickinson.
Dariene Hedges scored 23
points and pulled down 14 re-
bounds to lead the ECU women's
basketball team to a 67-58 Sunday
night victory over Fairleigh
Dickinson in Minges Coliseum.
"Dariene played the best game
of her career Coach Cathy An-
druzzi said. "She was the game's
leading scorer and rebounder and
just did a great overall job
Going into the game, Hedges
had been averaging a mere 5
points and 4.8 rebounds per
game.
Fairleigh Dickinson jumped on
the Pirates early in the contest, as
Stephanie Burt and Carolyn
Rodgers combined for 10 points
to give the Knights a 15-5 edge
with only six minutes elapsed.
The two teams exchanged
baskets for most of the half, but
the Pirates were unable to cut into
the lead.
Lynn Jackson gave the Knigths
their biggest lead of the game at
37-25 when she hit a 10-foot
jumper with 4:25 remaining in the
half, but the Pirates connected on
their last three shots narrowing
the score to 39-34 before the inter-
mission.
"We didn't play a good first
half Andruzzi said. "We
weren't executing like we should
have and that took us out of our
game plan
The second half was a different
story as the Pirates came out of
the lockerroom like a team
possessed. Lisa Squirewell hit
four consecutive shots inside the
lane as ECU outscored the
Knights 16-5 in the first nine
minutes of play.
The Knights were never able to
regain their composure as ECU
extended its lead to as many as 11
points on a Hedges layup with
2:23 left in the game.
At that point the Knights began
commiting a barrage of inten-
tional fouls, but were never able
to come any closer then 66-58 as
the Pirates were successful from
the line.
"We came back because we
played the game we wanted to
Andruzzi said. "When we got
down by 10 points in the first half
we became anxious and started
taking bad shots, but in the se-
cond half we were patient
Andruzzi said another key to
the Pirate's victory was their in-
side play. "We knew we had to be
physical to win the game, and it
turned out that we got 40 points
from our inside people
Other Pirates to have good
games included Lisa Squirewell
with 8-11 from the field for 1"
points and 10 rebounds, and point
guard Delphine Mabry with four
steals and six assists.
ECU broke a three-game losing
streak with their victory and now
stand at 6-6 on the season.
USFL Picks Pirates
B ED MCKLAS
sprii Mllor
Offensive guard Terry Long
and defensive back Clint Harris
participated for the South against
the North in the frigid Blue-Gray
all-star game, which was played
over the holidays. Long's and
Harris' Rebels beat the Yanks on
a last-minute touchdown pass by
Duke's Ben Bennett.
Long, Harris, defensive tackle
Hal Stephens, defensive end Steve
Hamilton, offensive tackle John
Robertson and quarterback Kevin
Ingram were chosen in the United
States Football League draft.
Long and Harris went to
Washington in the fourth and
sixth rounds, Robertson to
Arizona in the tenth, Ingram to
Tampa Bay in the fifth, Stephens
to Memphis in the fourth and
Hamilton to Michigan in the
fourth.
� � �
Once again, Long made the
news. He appeared on the Bob
Hope Christmas special on Dec.
19, along with .lie rest of the AP
All-America team. The jocular
Hope said Long "flattens more
ends than a masseur at a fat
farm
� � �
ECU Sports Information made
the national news in Sports Il-
lustrated's year-end issue. The
subject concerned a promotional
poster of Long, which showed
him flexing in the weight room
and listed his lifting achievements.
The poster was sent the media by
ECU Sports Info before the
season, and some contend that
this strategy enabled the less-
touted Long to make first team
AP Al-America instead of Lom-
bardi Award and Outland Trophy
winner Dean Steinkuhler of
Nebraska. Neverthless, in the arti-
cle, Sports Info was commended
for a "creative publicity
endeavor
Former ECU football coach
Pat Dye, who is now at Auburn,
said he didn't think Miami should
have been ranked number one
because of its easy schedule.
However, he said ECU was the
best team Miami played, and
Miami played bowl winners
Florida, Florida State and Notre
Dame. Brownie points?
ECU defensive secondary coach
Phil FJmassian is giving up his
football job to serve as an assis-
tant at the University of Min-
nesota under the recently hired
Lou Holtz, the former N.C. State
mentor.
� � �
Derrick Battle, freshman for-
ward from Whitakers, N.C, was
named ECAC-Southrookie of the
week for scoring 15 points and
pulling down four rebounds in the
Pirates' 80-64 loss to Duke on
Dec. 10.
Kevin Ingram (left), Terry Long (center) and John Robertson talk
things over in a game earlier this season. All three were drafted by the
USFL last week.
to easy buckets.
"Nothing is going to happen
overnight Harrison said. "We
need hard work and good people,
and we have them
"They (the players) have been a
joy for me to be around. They are
very good people. It would be
good for the students to come
watch them grow he added.
Yates Leads George Mason Past ECU
By ED MCKLAS
ECU seemed hungry. In prac-
tice the day before, Leon Bass
gave teammate Jack Turnbill an
elbow that resulted in a concus-
sion. The Pirates weren't about to
be outmuscled this game.
However, George Mason had a
say in the game, too.
Forward Carlos Yates came off
the bench to pump in 18 points,
and guard John Neihoff scored all
his game high 13 points in the first
half, as the Patriots won its ninth
straight game,beating the Pirates,
83-66, in the ECAC-South opener
at George Mason Gymnasium.
Yates, who was supposedly ser-
ving the second of a two game
suspension, came into the game
midway through th first half,
with George Mason leading 16-10.
That was when the roof fell in
on the Pirates. With ECU guard
Tony Robinson sitting out with
three fouls and Niehoff continual-
ly driving the lane effectively, the
Patriots ran off a 16-3 advan-
tage to take a 31-13 lead.
The spree began when Yates,
who is the leading returning scorer
in NCAA division one and has
never scored below double figures
at home, went up for a shot and
was fouled by ECU forward Bass.
Yates made the basket and added
the freethrow to give George
Mason a 19-10 advantage.
Niehoff, a walk-on who became
a starter under Patriot coach Joe
Harrington, hit a jumper and the
next time down the court tossed in
two free throws, as ECU fell
behind 23-10.
The Pirates attempted a corn-
back with George Mason leading
31-13, as guard Kurt Vanderhorst
hit for four points and forward
Barry Wright connected on both
ends of a one-and-one to cut the
lead to 31-19.
But the Pirates trailed 41-23
halftime and were behind as much
as 26 in the second.
The loss was ECU's ninth in a
row. The Pirates, last in the
EC AC in field goal percentage,
shot onlv 26 per cent in the first
half.
Keith Sledge pumped in a career
high for the Pirates with 16
points, and Wright added 10.
George Mason now holds a 4-2
advantage in the series and aveng-
ed a 66-64 loss to ECU in last
year's conference tournament.
Sports Schedule
Sat. Jan. 14
7:30pm
7:30pm
2pm
Cart Vaaderhorst Is Just one of the many talented yoaag players on
ECU's squad.
?
3pm
Men's Basketball at William and
Mary
Men's and Women's Swimming
vs UNC-Wilmington (Home)
Men's and Women's Indoor
Track at George Mason
Sun. Jan. 15
Women's Basketball vs George
Mason (Home)
Swim
By JOEL SCALE
MVVMhi
The ECU women s
swim team easilv di-
ed of Navy Satui
winning bv a 9 4
margin, but the a
team did not fare
dropping its meet 71 -33
In their meet. th
women's 400 medl
relay team qua.
the nationals and set
freshman record
"The girls swarr.
cellent meet coacr -
Kobe said. "Il was th
best performance
year, and the wei
to several nation
times
Both worr-
teams won w
pressive time
medley relav tea
sisting of Je
Feinberg, Jean Kr
Lori Livingston and Ci
dy Newman, with a tir
of 4:09.95
the NCAA d
championsh
Keating and v-
also participated
400 free relav, alonj
Lon Miller and C a
ECU' diver Scott Eagle
mance in Saturday m
bet
I
A:
I
men
of rtl
out
the
On your mark, get set
V
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Pa�e 10
ates
ak
a barrage of inten-
rut were never able
closer then 66-58 as
�re successful from
hack, because we
e e wanted to
"When we got
: its in the first half
:ious and started
s lots, but in the se-
vere patient
iid another key to
v or as their in-
e knew we had to be
n the game, and it
hat we got 40 points
ie people
ites to have good
led Lisa SquireweU
rom the field for 17
abounds, and point
Mabry with four
assists.
e a three-game losing
heir victory and now
It a the season.
'W-
fonn Robertsoa talk
were drafted by the
CU
le-and-one to cut the

iPirates trailed 41-23
were behind as much
second.
as ECU's ninth in a
Pirates, last in the
field goal percentage,
per cent in the first
lge pumped in a career
the Pirates with 16
Wright added 10.
lason now holds a 4-2
the series and aveng-
loss to ECU in last
;rence tournament.
a

Swimmmers Split
By JOEL SCALES
Staff Writer
The ECU women's
swim team easily dispos-
ed of Navy Saturday,
winning by a 95-47
margin, but the men's
team did not fare as well,
dropping its meet 78-35.
In their meet, the
women's 400 medley
relay team qualified for
the nationals and set a
freshman record.
"The girls swam an ex-
cellent meet coach Rick
Kobe said. "It was their
best performance of the
year, and they were close
to several national cut-off
times
Both women's relay
teams won with im-
pressive times. The 400
medley relay team, con-
sisting of Jessica
Feinberg, Jean Keating,
Lori Livingston and Cin-
dy Newman, with a time
of 4:09.95, qualified for
the NCAA division II
championships.
Keating and Newman
also participated in the
400 free relay, along with
Lori Miller and Caycee
Poust. They turned in a
time of 3:43.7, which is a
freshman record.
Besides winning both
relays, the women also
captured six individual
first place wins. The team
was paced by Keating,
who won the 50 free in
:25.6. She was also a
member of both relay
teams.
Feinberg won both the
100 breast in 1:12.7 and
the 200 breast in 2:41.1.
The other two firsts were
by Poust in the 100 back
in a time of 1:02.6 and
Newman in the 100 fly in
1:01.5.
"We swam our best
meet of the year Kobe
said. "We beat a team
that finished in top 20 last
year
The outcome of the
men's meet was quite dif-
ferent, but Kobe com-
mented: it wasn't that
we swam that poorly,
Navy just had a good
team; we got beat by a
pretty good team
The men managed only
two first place and three
second place finishes.
However, six of them
swam their best times
ever.
The team was paced by
Scott Eagle, who finished
first in the 3-meter dive
with 249.6 points and se-
cond in the 1-meter dive
with 274.4. The other
first place finish came
from Chris Pittelli, who
won the 200 free in
1:45.5. The remaining se-
cond place finishes were
obtained by Kevin
Richards in the 200 back
and Kevin Hidalgo in the
200 fly.
The men's and
women's records are now
an identical 4-2. Both
teams recently returned
from Florida, where they
were victorious over
Johns Hopkins. The next
meet is Saturday at UNC-
Wilmington.
An ECU swimmer gets off to aa earty start la �i of
season.
Bargains
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Presents
DRAFT NITE
Tue. Jan 10,1984
Adm $1.50
8:30-1:00 AM
18yrs. $1.00
Pizza Ixui
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10CDRAFT
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Come Early
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Most delivery pizzas lack in
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"I
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GRAND OPENING
t�
ECU diver Scott Eagle turned in another fine perfor-
mance in Saturday's meet.


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?
Baker Leaves
ECU associate head
coach and offensive coor-
dinator Art Baker ac-
cepted a position at
Florida State Sunday,
having just finished a suc-
cessful first season under
Pirate head coach Ed
Emory.
Baker, mentor of
ECU's explosive offense
last fall, which averaged
350 yards per game, will
succeed Mike Kruczek,
FSU's quarterback coach
who just recently ac-
cepted a job in the United
States Football League.
In a United Press inter-
view, Dean Pearson, FSU
assistant sports informa-
tion director, said Baker
will "take over a lot of
Bowden's administrative
duties and also coach the
quarterbacks under of-
fensive coordinator
Wayne McDuffie
Under head coach Bob-
by Bowden, whose team
went 7-4 this year with a
season ending 28-3 Peach
Bowl victory over North
Carolina, Baker will be
next in command.
Baker began his col-
legiate career as an assis-
tant at Clemson
(1965-69). He later
became a head coach at
Furman (1973-77) and
The Citadel (1978-82),
prior to his arrival at
ECU.
The 54-year old
Sumter, S.C. native is a
graduate of Presbyterian
College.
Perkins Honored
, N.C. (UPI) � Universi-
Vv of North Carolina All-
America Sam Perkins is
the Atlantic Coast Con-
ference Player-of-the-
Week for his perfor-
mance in two Tar Heel
wins last week, league of-
ficials announced Mon-
day.
Perkins, a 6-foot-9
senior from Latham,
NY started the week
off with a strong 21-point
performance as North
Carolina breezed by
Boston University 87-54.
Perkins scored 22 points
in North Carolina's con-
ference opening victory
over North Carolina
State 81-60.
Perkins, one of the
league's best rebounders,
added 11 rebounds in the
two games to move his
per game average to 9.3.
His 43 total points last
week increased his scor-
ing average to 16.9 per
game.
For the week, Perkins
connected on 16 of 21
shots from the field while
making 11 of 16 tries at
the line.
A special committee of
the Atlantic Coast Sports
Writers Association
selected Perkins as well as
gave honors to North
Carolina's standout
center Tresa Brown,
named the conference's
Women's Player-of-the-
Week.
Brown led the Tar
Heels to an 80-79 win
over ninth-ranked
Maryland last week.
Brown, a 6-foot-2
senior from Raleigh,
scored 27 points and pull-
ed down 11 rebounds
against the Terrapins.
North Carolina was down
42-39 at the half, but
behind Brown's seven of
eight shooting from the
floor, they pulled out the
one-point victory.
Brown is averaging 21
points a game, the second
best mark in the con-
ference, while reboun-
ding at a league-leading
10.6
SyMa Brmf
� Ml attempt
against
Dickinson
East Carolina offensive lineman Terry Long Uses ap opposite Dtooey Lands Ontiandtsa Trophy winner, Goofy, during a visit
to the famous theme park In December.
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Graphic Supplies by Letraset,
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Largest Selection of Mat Board
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i. IT
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Sylvia Bragg (25) of
f- ECU attempts � lay up
against Fairleigh
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Sunday Hours 9AM til 9 PM
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These prices good thru
Saturday, January 14, 1984
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utilities ii phone Stnous female
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PERSONAL
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through IO01 A Shop Odyssey without
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wanted sm.Sdmth half utll. and
phone. Call 7Sl-mi.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED to
share two bedroom mobile home. SfS
a month rent plus half utilities. No
deposit required 4 miles from ECU
campus Ask for Ginger at 7M-4eM
work phone.
FEMALE ROOMATE WANTED to
share a one bedroom apartment two
blocks from campus, prefer non-
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immed 7Se I7t7. Total rent MM e
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Title
The East Carolinian, January 10, 1984
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
January 10, 1984
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.309
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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