The East Carolinian, December 1, 1983






She -East Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No J6 yO
Thursday, December 1,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages,
Circulation 10,000
1
ECU Student Organizations To Sponsor
Forum For Gubernatorial Candidates
By DARRYL BROWN
In what should be the first ma-
jor gathering of all N.C. can-
didates for governor, ECU will
sponsor a "Gubernatorial Day"
next month featuring press con-
ferences, speeches and a panel
discussion with the candidates
from both parties, student coor-
dinators announced Wednesday.
Six Democrats and one
Republican have been invited so
far to the Jan. 27 forum organized
by the ECU Student Government
Association and the ECU Chapter
of the N.C. Student Legislature.
ECU officials said Lt. Gov. Jim-
my Green, U.S. Rep. James Mar-
tin and former ECU Chancellor
Leo Jenkins have already agreed
Spring Semester
to attend. The campaign head-
quarters of Charlotte Mayor Ed-
die Knox yesterday confirmed
that he will be present.
The campaign offices for At-
torney General Rufus Edminsten
and Insurance Commissioner
John Ingram could not confirm
Wednesday whether they will at-
tend the gathering, but ECU of-
ficials expect them to accept soon.
Former state Commerce Secretary
D.M. Faircloth did not accept the
invitation when contacted by SGA
officials Monday.
ECU Media Board Chairman
Mark Niewald said the tentative
agenda for the event includes a
lunch for the candidates followed
by a one-hour press conference.
Each candidate will give a short
speech, and the highlight of the
event will be a question-and-
answer session with the candidates
conducted by a panel of 8 to 10
ECU students and perhaps one or
two faculty representatives.
Media coverage of the event is
expected to be heavy. PM
Magazine from WRAL-TV in
Raleigh has tentatively said it will
cover the event, according to
Niewald.
Chancellor John M. Howell
said the event is entirely organized
by students. "I didn't know about
it until the students came and ask-
ed me about it he said. "I'm
glad to see it happen. I've urged
generations of students to get out
and vote
NCSL President Kirk Shelley
said his group will conduct voter
registration during the week prior
to the "Gubernatorial Day
Registrars from Pitt County will
be on campus to register students
and to explain such procedures as
absentee balloting.
SGA President Paul Naso said
the purpose of the event for ECU
is to "make students aware" of
the candidates and the election. "I
feel SGA should help students get
that education outside of books
and the classroom he said. Naso
campaigned on a platform of
combatting student apathy and
said Wednesday the "Guber-
natorial Day" should help
students become more interested
and involved in the election pro-
cess.
New Drop-Add Procedure To Debut
Mendenhall's Christmas tree was decorated by ECU students.
Christmas Spirit Displayed
By CLINT WERNER
Staff Writer
The ECU Registrar's office will
implement a new procedure for
drop-add in Jaunuary, and
students will be divided into two
groups and assigned times when
they may enter the drop-add
building, Registrar Gil Moore said
Wednesday.
A time will be printed on each
student's class schedule, to be
picked up in December. Students
may drop or add classes anytime
after the hour printed on their
schedule.
The previous procedure had
been unregulated, resulting in
three-hour long waiting lines as
thousands of students tried to
change their class schedules.
"Those students who have dif-
ficult schedule planning will be
given first priortiy to get into
Memorial Gym for drop-add
Moore said. "The second group
must wait until about 1 p.m
Schedules will be checked at the
door of the gym to enforce the
time assignments. The time
assignments will apply only for
the first day of drop-add.
"We've found that there are
many students in the gym shopp-
ing around while others are trying
to get a good schedule Moore
said. "Many students want to
switch for their own convenience,
but they're taking spaces away
form students who really need
that course to graduate or to get
into their prospective majors
said.
he
Moore expects the new pro-
cedure to speed up the drop-add
process at the beginning of each
semester and eliminate some of
the long lines.
"We'll hopefully spread it out so
that everyone has a better shot at
what they need. Last fall we had
8,000 students who went through
the process and made an excess of
31,000 changes Moore said.
By ANDREA MARKELLO
Staff Writer
With winter rapidly advanc-
ing, ECU is eagerly preparing
for the Christmas holidays.
Mendenhall Student Center
is playing its part by installing a
fifteen-foot evergreen tree out-
side the snack bar. Colored
lights and some decorations
have been provided by the
Department of University
Unions, who intend for this
year's Chirstmas tree to be
decorated by students. In doing
so, letters have been sent to stu-
dent organizations requesting
an ornament donation.
Linda Barkand, director of
crafts and recreation for
Mendenhall, said about a
dozen organizations have
responded with handmade or-
naments and believes more will
be included in future years.
The initial decorating of the
tree took place Monday, Nov
29, the day before the opening
of the annual Madrigal Dinner.
A reception was given for the
forty students who helped
decorate the tree.
Future Christmas activities
at Mendenhall this holiday
season include two caroling ses-
sions on the stairway around
the tree. The Women's Glee
Club will perform at noon on
Dec. 5, and the Concert Choir
will perform at 1 p.m. on Dec.
7. Refreshments will be provid-
ed for those who attend.
Educators Study Teacher Certification
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Writer
Can the best math teachers be
identified by certification stan-
dards? Is a teacher's own educa-
tional background reflected in the
performance of his or her own
students ?
Charles R. Coble, acting dean
of the ECU School of Education,
and Parmalee Hawk, assistant to
the dean, have received a $38,400
grant from the Spencer Founda-
tion to research the relationship of
certification requirements to
classroom performance and effec-
tiveness.
The Spencer Foundation,
located in Chicago, provides
funds for research in the educa-
tion field.
Coble and Hawk are using stan-
dard achievement tests to evaluate
approximately 30 N.C. public
school teachers and the achieve-
ment of the teachers' students in
grades 6-12. The two will also
observe the teachers in the
Hawk to the Spencer Foundation
said, "Teacher certification re-
quirements are based on the
assumption that an accumulation
of hours in general education,
plus some generalized field or
clinical experience, produce an in-
dividual who has the necessary
background to operate in the
classroom to evaluate their pro- public school classroom.
fessional skills.
Math teachers and students in-
cluded in the study were chosen
from the 17-school system in the
northeastern part of the state.
Half of the teachers are certified
in math, and half teach outside
the field in which they received
certification.
A report written by Coble and
College Republicans Adopt-A-Marine' in Beirut
The local chapter of the College
Republicans is sponsoring an
"Adopt A Marine Project" to
help boost the morale of Marines
stationed in Beirut.
According to the chairman of
the project, Dennis Kilcoyne, the
project's goal is to help show the
marines that people in the United
States care about them after the
Holiday Shopping
recent bombing.
Kirk Shelley of Army ROTC is
helping with the project. He and
several ROTC members are
gathering letters and "basic
goodies" to send to three chosen
Marines in Beirut.
The program is part of a na-
tionwide project of the College
Repulicans. Each participating
chapter is supposed to adopt
several Marines and send care
packages to them.
"Even though the Army and
Marines don't get along together
very well on Saturday nights in
downtown Greenville Shelley
said, "we will support them in
their combat situation
Anyone on campus is welcome
to participate, and if interested,
should contact Kilcoyne at
759-2448. People are encouraged
to send Christmas cards, razors
and anything non-perishable.
Both the College Republicans
and Army ROTC are putting
together care packages of their
own to send to the troops.
It is assumed that if you are
certified in the area you are
teaching in, then you will be a bet-
ter teacher Hawk said.
Hawk said the rigid certifica-
tion standards often place hard-
ships on many small and rural
schools. Many school
superintendents are forced to
utilize their existing staff in a
variety of subject areas because
they cannot afford to hire cer-
tified teachers in every field.
"If the study reports that
teachers teaching in-field are more
knowledgeable in math and that
their students achieve more, then
empirical data becomes available
to support certification rules and
laws Coble and Hawk said in
the report. They also said that if
no difference is reported in
Co We
teachers or students, then the cer-
tification requirements may need
to be re-evaluated. The study is
funded for one year. "We are
hoping to establish a procedure
that is viable � usable in a more
expanded and larger study � in
the years to come Hawk said.
"We hope to expand the study
statewide or to the Southeast
region
Greenville Christmas Rush Begins
made by parents buying gifts for
children, and most buyers in his
By KATRINA HOBBY
Staff Writer
Most stores in the Carolina East
Mall say it's too early in the
Christmas shopping season to tell
if business is improving.
The shopping season didn't of-
ficially start until the day after
Thanksgiving, but Jan Ferree,
On The Inside

Announcements2
Editorials4
Style6
Sports�
Classifieds10
� The answers to Tuesday's
crossword puzzle appear today
on page 5.
� For the story on ECU's
59-43 win over Christopher
Newport, see Sports, page t.
� Don't Miss Art
Buchwald's latest column on
the Editorial page, see page 4.
manager of GandolPs in the
Carolina East Mall, said, "We
decorated a little earlier because
of Christmas customers She
said people seemed to starting
Christmas shopping earlier this
year.
Brody's Assistant Manager Tim
Byrd said the day after
Thanksgiving is the fourth busiest
day during the season for the
Greenville store. He said the three
days just before Christmas are
usually the busiest, but he noticed
people are buying "bigger ticket
items" such as coats, handbags
and blazers this year.
The Chocolate Chip Cookie
Company in Carolina East Mall
store are once-a-year customers,
he said. He claimed parents are
"hiding kids out in the mall" to
keep the gifts a surprise.
Toy stores are selling out of
items and re-odering because of
customer demand. A Circus
World cashier said "people are
spending lots of money and we
have been real busy � especially
on weekends
Even Santa Claus speculated on
Christmas sales, saying most
children are asking for "Cabbage
Patch" dolls, tape recorders and
dirt bikes. Sue Sutton, one of
Santa's elves, said, "Children are
expects to fill a lot of orders for so excited, and people seem to be
Jumbo Christmas Cookies. "Dan in the Christmas spirit. Christmas
the Man(ager)" said "we will be always seems to bring out the best
making cookies that say anything in people
from Merry Christmas Grandma Most area stores say the warm
and Grandpa to Merry Christmas weather has affected the
Eat Me He said people seem to Christmas spirit. "Things seem
be more jovial this season than different when you are all bundled
last year. up with lots of packages and
Mike Shane, manager of the pressed for last minute
Record Bar, said he can already shopping Ferree said.
see an increase in sales. Most peo- Most stores have hired extra
pie are spending from $10 to $20 help for the holiday shopping
on items, according to Shane. Fif- season, and others say they plan
tv percent of the purchases are to hire more employees soon.
WiP&Sfeb y. Urn
� M L u SS
Fall Cleanup
Fatting leaves are fan to watch, bat rakiag them is another
ttdpatiag la this yearly tradltioa.
. An ECU
is showi par-
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Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would Ilka to have an Ittm
prlntad In me announcement
column, please type It on an an
nouncement form and tand It to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd sized paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
rtouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
The deadline for an
rtouncements is 3 p.m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and J
p.m Wednesday for the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
This space Is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
PREPROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
T�e Prapraeeaaienal Heart
alliance will hold a meeting on
Thursday. December 1, ten at
5 30 p.m in me Ledonia Wright
Cultural Center
The guests speakers will be
Or Linda Spino, Associate
Director of CSO and Mr Em
merson Harrison, ECU Medical
Student The topic will be, "How
to deal with stress " All
members and interested guests
are invited to attend
BIOLOGY CLUB
The ECU Biology Club will
meet Mon , Dec 4, at 7 p.m in
BN 102 This is the last official
meeting tor the semester Plans
will be finalized for the
Christmas Party on Dec 9th All
members are urged to attend
CAREERS
The National Oceanic and At
mospheric Administration will
have a representative on cam
pus December 5, 1983 ECU
students who might want a
career studying the seas and the
atmosphere might come and
listen to a film in Brewster B 103
at 11 00 a m or 2-00 p.m. Please
mark your calendars if in
terested
PART-TIME
JOBS
V� 75 an hour taking inventory
,n stores within this region In
tormational Meeting in
Menoenhall 221 on Monday.
December 5. 1983, at 2 30 p.m.
Team leaders and workers need
ed Mark your calendars if in
terested
USHERSNEEDED
ushers needed! Sign up to
usher tor "Album" in Messick
i Theatre Arts) Building Ushers
need Dec l 3 and 5 6
ALL CAMPUS
PARTY
Friday, Dec 2 Phi Kappa Tau
will host their annual Chill Thrill
All Campus Party located at 40
Elizabeth Street from 3 pm. to 6
p.m Drawing tor 10-speed bike
will be held along with many
other prizes. Show your Pirate
Spirit and stop by and enioy the
fun Must have valid ID to con
sume beverage. Tickets for
drawing available In front of stu
dent supply store or from any
Phi Tau
CAMPUS
CRUSADE
We did not leave you behind
Hurry You need to have your
KC S3 bus money In by Thursday
December 1, 1983 KC 83 is the
chance of a lifetime, do do not
miss out on mis most historic
event There will be a SPECIAL
MEETING tor all of those that
are planning to attend KC 83 at
PRIME TIME on Thursday.
December 1, leo In the Nursing
Bui Wing Room 101. Be there and
bring M
EPISCOPAL
WORSHIP
A student Episcopal service of
Holy Communion will be
celebrated on Tuesday evening,
Dec. a in the chapel of St Paul's
Episcopal Church, 406 4m St
(one bock from Garrett Dorm).
The service will be at 530 p.m
with the Episcopal Chaplain, the
Rev. Bill Hadden celebrating
An "Open House" and supper
will be enjoyed after the service
at the home of the chaplain, 1600
E Sixth St
SAB SUPPER
The Student Athletic will have
its final meeting of the year on
Dec I, lenatAbram'sBar B Q
All members are asked to meet
at Mendenhail at 5 15 In order
for everyone to ride to the
resturant. Please come
prepared to eat and have a good,
social time! �!
AOII
Hey AOII's Girls this is It
This is me big weekend The
Rosebaii 83 is two days and
counting! To all you wedges
hope you're as excited as the
sisters it's going to be great
SCEC
The Student Council for Ex
ceptional Children is having a
Business Meeting Monday
Dec 5 at 4 p.m in Speight 129
All members are urged to at
fend
PUBLIC
LECTURE
The Medieval and
Renaissance Studies Committee
and the Lutheran Campus
Ministry will sponsor a public
lecture on me topic "Martin
Luther on the Authority of
Faith" by Professor Scott h
Hendrix, on Monday. December
5 at 4 p m , in Jenkins
Auditorium
KNOX 'M
There will be a meeting to
form at student group to support
Eddie Knox for Governor, on
Dec. 1 at 5 p.m. The meeting will
be held at 112 Jamestown Road.
All interested persons ara in
vlted to attend. If you cannot at
tend or need directions or more
information please call Chris at
355 6610
NCSL
It is very important for ail
members to be In Mendenhail
room 212 at 7 p.m Monday. Last
minute details of all our ac
tivities will be given The bru
ha ha will be running over so
please be there.
EC6C
The East Carolina Gay Com
munity will meet Monday, Dec
5 at 7 30 p.m The meeting will
be held at the Catholic Newman
Center, 953 E. 10th St. (at the
bottom of College Hill) All in
terested persons are cordially
Invited to attend
BAMMA
BETA PHI
The final meeting for the fall
semester of Gamma Beta Phi
will be held on Thursday, Dec. 1
at 7 p.m. in Jenkins Art
Auditorium Attention: The in
duction ceremony will be held on
Monday. Dec 5 at 8 p.m. at the
Ramada Inn. Final plans will be
discussed at the meeting. Atten
dance is important Please be
there.
YARDSALE
Begin your Saturday morning
activities by coming out to the
Pre Christmas Yard Sale given
by the Alpha Delta Pi. The
House is located at 1407 E 5th
St directly across from the
Speight building The sale wli
begin at 8 am.
PI KAPP
LITTLE SISTERS
The Brother and Pledges of Pi
Kapp Phi Fraternity would like
to take mis opportunity to con
gratulate the new little sisters
Good work girls Keep working
hard for Pi Kappa Phi
Congratulations also goes out
to the Pi Kapp "B soccer team
on winning the soccer champion
ship. Lets win the Chancellor's
Cup for the third straight year
PS Beware Pledges!
GAMMA
BETA PHI
The next general meeting of
Gamma Beta Phi will be held on
Dec l, at 7 p m in Jenkins Art
Auditorium Please attend!
Final Plans tor the inductions
ceremony will be announced
FRISBEECLUB
When a ball dreams it dreams
its a frisbee. Ultimate Tuesday,
Thursday and Sunday at 3 p.m.
College Hill Drive Frisbee Club
will meet tonight in Mendenhail
room 248 at p.m Be there or be
oblong
PART-TIME
JOBS
84.75 an hour taking Inventory
in stores within region. I nforma
tion Meeting In Mendenhail 221
on Monday. Dec. 5, at 230 p.m.
Team leaders and workers need-
ed Mark you calendars If In
terested.
PHI ETA
SIGMA
There will be a dinner meeting
Thurs. Dec 1 at Parker's Barbe
que at 600. Dr Markowskl will
speak about marriage and fami-
ly relations. All members are
urged to attend
AEDPLEDGES
All pledges for Alpha Epsilon
Delta are required to attend the
tour of the Brody Bldg. on
Thursday, Dec. 8. Meet In the
Brody Bldg Lobby promptly at
10:00 a m Call 752 518 for more
info
UBE
SCHOLARSHIP
The Department of t.igiish in
vites applications for newly
established University Book Ex
change Scholarship, a 8250
award based on academic
achievement, citizenship and
leadership and potential. To ap-
ply, you must (l) be a currently
enrolled senior English major
(2) have an overall GPA of 3.5 or
above. (3) submit a one page,
double-spaced, typed statement
of goals as an English major. (4)
submit the names of two pro-
fessors who are willing to
recommend you (5) submit a
completed application form,
available at the department of-
fice
The deadline tor application is
Monday, January 9, 104. All
materials should be addressed
to the Student Services Commit
tee, UBE Scholarship, and turn-
ed in to the Department of
English, Austin 124.
For more information, con
tact: Dr. Joyce Pettis, Chair,
Student Services Committee
English Department
Church
CLASSIFIED ADSIMitm
You may use the form at right j .
or use a separate sneer of j �� paper if you need more lines, t -m�. c���
There are 33 units per line. J'a�w' Each letter. Dunctuation mark i u� t inc�iTpario�o ��� - -e-rios�d
and work space counts as one l v �
unit. Capitalize and hyphenate i words properly. Leave space at end of line if word doesn't fit. No ads will be accepted over the phone. We reserve the right j to reject any ad. All ads must be prepaid. Enclose 75 cents i per line or fraction of a line, i Please print legibly! Use i capital and lower case letters. Return to the Media Board secretary by 3 p.m. the day before publication.
1







�1I
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to
declare physical education as a
major should report to Minges
Coliseum at 10:00 am, Thurs-
day, Dec. 8 for a motor and
physical fitness test. Satlsfac
tory performance on this test is
required as a prerequlste for of-
ficial admittance to the physical
education major program. More
detailed information concerning
the test Is available by calling
757-6441 or 6442. Any student
with medical condition that
would contraindlcate participa-
tion contact Dr. Israel.
RUB DOWN
Need a good rub-down? I The
Physical Therapy Club will be
giving massages Thursday,
Dec. 1 from 6:30 p.m. to 9 30
p.m. In the Allied Health
building first floor. The cost is
SI.00 for a 10 minute massage
CIRCLE K
ECU CIRCLE K CLUB Invites
you to come out and join us mis
coming and every Tuesday night
at 7 p.m. In Mendenhail room 231
for fun and socializing. Hope to
see you there.
ACCT SOCIETY
DINNER
The Accounting Society will
hold It's dinner meeting on Mon-
day, Dec. 5 at 7 p.m. at Western
Sizziin, 10th St. The quest
speaker will oe Lorry Kaech,
CPA from Plttord and Perry
Members and prospective
members arm invited to attend
Sign-up sheet is on the Accoun-
ting Society Bullentin Board.
A CHRISTMAS
FANTASY
Sunday, Dec 4th at 8 00 p m
the ECU Sign Language Out
will present "A Christmas Fan
tasy " We'll be signing your
favorite Christmas carols it
will be held at the Drama studio
next to McGinn is Theater Ad
mission Is FREE Hope to see
you there I
ATTENTION
FEMALES
We are now accepting ape -�
tlons from female student �or
housing for spring quarter �� Hu
Methodist Sutdent Center a-v:
Wesley House if you are
terested. stop by meoWcea- sc
East Fifth Street between � �
am 2 30 O m or phor t'
758 2030
MaffWritcr
A noise ordinance
designed to curb noise
from the student
population has run in-
to an unexpected snag
� church bells
The Environmentaa
Advisory Commission
of the city of Green-
i
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pr
top
dif
dii
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The East Carolinian
Serving ikt campus community
smct 192)
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
academic year and every
Wednesday during the sum
mer
The East Carolinian is the
official newspaper of East
Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for
and by the students of East
Carolina University
Subscription Rate: $2 yearly
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus of
ECU. Greenville. NO
POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The East
Carolinian, Old South
Building, ECU Greenville,
NC 27834
Telephone 757164,6147.
4109
Use the
Announcements
of The East Carolinian if your
campus group or organization
Eias a meeting or project of in-
erest to ECU students.
And don't forget
The Classifieds
At just 75 cents per line,
classified ads in The East
Carolinian are the best way in
town to advertise to the campus
community.
East Carolina University's
STUDENT UNION
fs taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1984-85 Term
Any Full-time student can apply,
applications available at Mendenhail
Student Center's Information Desk.
Deadline: December 2,1983
Corps S
For Oce
B ELIZABETH
BIRO
su" Wni�r
National Ocei
and Atmosphere K6
ministration (NOAA)
will hold an Infoi
tionai meeting at ECU
about careers in the
NOAA Q rps on Dec
5.
Jim Westmoreland
of the ECU Ca
Planning and P
ment Center said
will be the first time
the government agen-
cy has recruited on
campus. NOAA has
recruited on the ECU
campus.
I
Call Pira
403 S.
S8UMVI
Latest M
Ladies Hat aj
VIMW
Mfa
KINGSTON
PLACE
on Place is especially for the student at ECU
An ideal alternative to the crowded dorm is at hand. Kingston Place offers two bedroom, two bath Garden or two
bedroom, two and a half bath townhouse condominiums, fully furnished, including all accessories, easy access to
tennis, on-site pool and clubhouse with laundry facility. With the spacious size of each condo, the quality fur-
nishings and appliances and the well planned amenities, Kingston Place will become the standard by which all
student housing will be judged. Yet, with all these quality features, th best part of Kingston Place is the ability to
select the roommate you want. Call the Kingston Place Sales Office at 756-0285 or come by 3101 S. Evans Street and get
the facts and figures to take to your parents. A limited number of these quality condominiums are available at the
pre-construction price of $59,900.00. Before you the student recommend to your parents where you would like
to live, compare the following: amenities, sq. footage, quality, construction, and privacy. Preconstruction prices to
end at end of December.
C ou
Peking Clipi
(Take Adantage
Perms ith this
$32.50 short hi
medium and S3"
Bring in new d
Sculpture Nails ai
on haircut. Offer
1983.
Call for appoii
758-1505, 1005-
Greenville. NC.
I oul
If you are a freshman or sophmore attending
ECU and would like to register for a free three
d�.u.�HlltonHeadlsland
South Carolina
fill out the attached form and mail to the
Kingston Place office or stop by and register
and pick up a free brochure.
Name
ID number
Home Address
Home Phone
School Phone.
Only freshman and sophmores eligible for vacation offer.
Drawing to be held by Dec. 15th.
CLEAR VUE
140
Off
All
Designer
Frames
30
All Other
30
Ray Ban Si
Prices Good Trv
.
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ATTENTION
FEMALES
M accepting apphca
� 'emaie student ?�
ling �x spring quarter �t the
'mci' SvJtoent Center aryj
rrf. -hXjw you are in
reV�s stop e� tne oftice at SO)
ai- FlfMl See� between 9 00
: 30 p rn or phone at
tV S
for
:SIDENT
rni
n apply,
endenhall
Ition Desk.
.1983
len or two
tccess to
ity fur-
rvhich all
ability to
treet and get
able at the
mid like
prices to
ffer. j
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1, 1983
Church Bells Violate Noise Ordinance
.
Staff Writer
A noise ordinance
designed to curb noise
from the student
population has run in-
to an unexpected snag
� church bells.
The Environmental
Advisory Commission
of the city of Green-
ville met Monday,
Nov. 28 to discuss a
proposed amendment
to the noise or-
dinance. The or-
dinance, which took
effect last July, set
specific decibel levels
for noise, with viola-
tions punishable by
stiff fines. Recently,
the city received an
anonymous letter
complaining about
the loudness of the
church bells at the
Pentecostal Holiness
Church on Brinkley
Road.
Inez Fridley, a
member of the com-
mission, said the
bells' decibel level was
measured and found
to be in violation of
the ordinance.
However, she at-
tributes this to "am-
biant noise" � noise
due to the fact that
the church is located
at a busy intersection.
The proposed
amendment would
raise the acceptable
level of noise ten
decibels. The commis-
sion
unanimously
recommend
amendment
believed it
reduce the
tiveness of
noted
not to
the
"We
would
effec-
the or-
dinance said Andy
Harris, community
development ad-
ministrator.
The City Council
will vote on the pro-
posal but council
member Stuart Shihn
does not see a need
for passing it. "The
council is going to let
the ordinance stay in
place for just a little
longer to see if this is
a fluke he said.
; �
Corps Seeking Recruits
For Oceanic Studies
By ELIZABETH
BIRO
Slafl Writer
National Oceanic
and Atmospheric Ad-
ministration (NOAA)
will hold an informa-
tional meeting at ECU
about careers in the
NOAA Corps on Dec.
5.
Jim Westmoreland
of the ECU Career
Planning and Place-
ment Center said this
will be the first time
the government agen-
cy has recruiied on
campus. NOAA has
recruited on the ECU
campus.
Westmoreland
described NOAA as a
sort of military service
without combat. Peo-
ple who work for
NOAA go through
programs similar to
military training but
spend most of the
time on ships studying
and testing oceanic
and atmospheric con-
ditions.
According to
Westmoreland, the
NOAA Corps is
responsible for such
things as reporting
weather and oceanic
conditions. "These
are the people who
ride in hurricane
tracking planes
Westmoreland said.
The NOAA Corps
employs approximate-
ly 400 people and is
most interested in
math and science ma-
jors, however skills in
communications and
English are also im-
p o r t a n t.
The NOAA Corps
will be in the Brewster
Building, B-103, at 11
a.m. and again at 2
p.m. A short film will
be shown, and infor-
mation on the service
agency will be
available.
Call Pirate Walk 757-6616
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Perms with this coupon will be
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Bring in new client for Silicone
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in
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Drawing for 10-Speed Bicycle
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RUNNER-UP PRIZES
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?
QUr Eaat (EutalMun
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Hunter Fisher, c
Darryl Brown, Hamg warn
J.T. PlETRZAK. Director oAdvtninnM ClNDY PLEASANTS, Sport, Edttor
Robert Rucks, su, ��.����. Greg Rideout, Eduonai ��, Editor
ALI AFRASHTEH . 0�r Ata�r GORDON I POCK. W . Editor
Geoff Hudson, cw a, Lizanne Jennings, ��,
Michael Mayo, r, svwv Todd Evans, produce ����
December 1. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Ebony Herald
Proposal, Paper Unacceptable
The Ebony Herald editor wants
to make her paper a supplement in
The East Carolinian. The reason,
she states in an unjournalistic
front-page editorial in the latest
issue, is to upgrade the quality of
minority news. Well, we certainly
agree the paper needs upgrading,
but we're sad to see she isn't will-
ing to do it herself. Herald Editor
Donna Carvana's concern for
minority coverage of campus
events is valid; her approach,
though, is unprofessional.
Carvana wants to add a minority
section to The East Carolinian
equal to that of the sports, enter-
tainment or style pages. This, she
says, will abolish the segregation
of a mainstream campus paper
from a minority paper. But is a
segregated section any better than
a segregated paper? We subscribe
to more than a dozen university
newspapers from across the coun-
try, and not one has a separate
minority section � not Duke,
Berkeley, Iowa, Alabama, Pitt,
N.C. State, or Chapel Hill.
In all honesty, we cover
minorities better than they do, and
actually see no need for a minority
publication at all. When tliere is
minority news to be covered by the
newspaper, we want it to be on the
front page, not in a segregated sec-
tion. To cite just a few examples,
on Aug. 30, our top story and pic-
ture were devoted to the
Washington, D.C Martin Luther
King rally. On Nov. 15, we ran a
front-page story on minority
financial aid problems, and last
week an editorial was printed on
racist business practices.
By no means is our paper the
best in the country, and all areas of
our coverage could be improved.
But, we strive to b a quality pro-
duct. The editor of the Herald has
chosen to blast us on her front
page with distorted and false facts.
"The Media Board has informed
me that if it is the wishes of the
minority students to have this sec-
tion in The East Carolinian, then it
shall be done Carvana says.
Media Board Chairman Mark
Niewald said this was absolutely
untrue. We feel we owe it to all
readers to point out the problems
with her paper.
First, it only comes out once a
month, and the staff still can't get
enough copy to fill the paper. In
the latest, an eight-page issue,
three pages were devoted entirely
to pictures, and one page had
(non-student) poetry and cartoons.
(And they say, we don't cover the
news!)
Second, the overall layout is
atrocious. Anyone who even looks
at a newspaper would be able to do
a better job. If the editor had any
pride and cared about presenting a
quality product to minority
students, she would at least make
sure the columns were laid down
straight, border tape cut properly,
space between columns adequate,
dates put at the top of the page,
headlines spelled correctly and
valuable news space not wasted.
(Space for all those minority
stories.)
Third, we think the stories
should be proofread some. We cer-
tainly have our share of "typos
but, in the front-page editorial of
the latest Herald edition, there are
at least 43 errors. Forty-three!
That is just plain ridiculous. How
anyone can call herself an editor
and then make 43 mistakes in one
story is beyond our comprehen-
sion.
Fourth, cutlines, the captions
under pictures, are supposed to fit
under the pictures, straight and
spelled correctly. The ones in the
Herald are neither. Plus,
photographers are supposed to be
given credit for their pictures, a
legal practice the Herald has yet to
adopt.
We could probably go on and
on. But the point has been made.
The paper is a horrendous waste of
student fees. The people who put it
out should be ashamed of its lack
of quality. Students who pay for it
should demand their money back.
It is not a newspaper; its not even a
minority newspaper. It's a waste of
newsprint.
We will continue to cover all stu-
dent events on campus that are
newsworthy. We will continue to
welcome all qualified students to
be members of our staff. We will
continue to strive for quality jour-
nalism.
The Herald to us is a reminder
of segregation. Its claim of cover-
ing minority events isn't even true.
It at present pretends to coyer only
black events. What about Jewish
events, Indian events, foreign stu-
dent events, women's events and
handicapped student events?
We strive each day to be jour-
nalistically sound. We just can't
say that for the Herald.
VELLTO MTHEV WERE ONW HIRING QUALIFIED
mxm DRIVERS m
How To Buy Underwear
According to newspaper reports,
subliminal messages are now being in-
serted into music played in retail stores
to get people to buy things. Several com-
panies are producing tapes for clients
which have secret messages in them to
attack the shopper's brain and un-
consciously motivate him to buy a pro-
duct he hadn't planned to purchase.
I was very skeptical about this infor-
mation until I went to a shopping mall
last Saturday. The music being piped in-
to the mall was Christmas carols, intend-
ed to get the people in a holiday mood.
Art Buchwald
1 stopped to buy a chocolate chip
cookie, when suddenly something
possessed me. While the loudspeaker
blared out "We Wish you a Merry
Christmas I blurted out the word
"underwear Everyone in the line look-
ed at me. I grabbed the man behind me
by the lapels and said, "I've got to have
underwear
He pushed my hands away, "so what
are you standing in the chocolate chip
cookie line for? Go to a men's shop
NOW IU NEVER SET BACK TO KANSAS
Campus Forum
I dashed down the mall and stopped a
uniformed security guard.
"Underwear I screamed at him.
"Give me underwear He wasn't sure
whether to arrest me or give me direc-
tions. Finally he pointed me to a large
menswear store at the end of the mall.
Two salesmen were standing at the
door smiling. One said to the other,
"Here comes another one Then he
said, before I could speak, "Third
counter to the left, but you have to take
a number and wait your turn
The underwear counter was jammed
with people, all screaming and shouting.
I said to a man next to me, "Maybe
there won't be any left by the time my
number is called. What am I going to do
if I can't buy any underwear?"
"Do you need some that badly?" he
asked.
"I didn't think so, but suddenly I got
this craving for underwear while I was
waiting to buy a chocolate chip cookie
"I came into the mall to buy pizza and
the same thing happened to me
My number was called, and I bought
50 jockey shorts and 50 undershirts.
That's all they would sell me.
I walked out of the store and stopped
to look at an artist doing charcoal sket-
ches of children. While I was watching,
someone was singing "Jingle Bells" over
the speaker.
The word "Wok' lit up in my brain
My eyes became desperate, and 1 start
searching for a wok store. I rushed up to
a lady at the information booth, but
before I could blurt it out she sa .
"Woks can be found in the basemen
the department store at the end of the
building
"How did vou know I wanted a
wok?"
"Everyone wants a wok when
play 'Jingle Bells "
"You mean you have a secret message
in 'Jingle Bells'?"
Of course. Today it's woks, tomon n
it's wax for your floor
"I don't need a wok I said
"Then put your hands over your ears,
and you won't get a message
"What comes after 'Jingle BeUs?"
She looked at her schedule. " 'White
Chirstmas' and home computers '
"I don't need a home cerium
either
"I don't think you do until Bing
Crosby sings it
"Do I have time to buy a chocolate
chip cookie?"
"It depends. After 'White Christmas'
they're playing 'Silent Night' and there's
going to be an awful crush for hand-
knotted Chinese rugs at the end of ihe
mall
(c) 19tJ. Loj Ajiseles Times Syndicate
ECU Graduate Tells His Story
Several days have passed since I
revisited ECU for Homecoming. I've
had the opportunity to reflect upon my
experiences as a former student of
parks, recreation and conservation as
well as recall my observations of the
campus during my recent stay. I
thought you (students and staf 0 would
be somewhat interested in what I
observed from the point of view as a
graduate.
I was kindly asked by my depart-
ment to be a guest lecturer. I spoke on
the opportunities in commercial recrea-
tion. I now can sympathize with pro-
fessors in what they encounter by
teaching a class. As a student, I never
appreciated the time and preparation
that goes into a lesson. I now want to
publicly say "thanks" for all the hard
work.
That afternoon, I had the chance to
eat at Jones Cafeteria. I was simply
amazed at all the changes I saw and
tasted. Back when I was a student, I
was on the meal plan and felt an award
should be given to anyone who surviv-
ed such an ordeal and lived to tell the
story. I was now pleased to see such
improvements being made to the decor
of the cafeteria. I was also impressed
with the menu and salad bar, as well as
the all-you-can-eat format. I think
more students should take advantage
of the meal plan and the opportunity to
socialize with other students during the
meal.
As I was leaving the cafeteria at 2:20 -
p.m I noticed a student who was ob-
viously working for the campus securi-
ty. He was stalking the parking lots in
search of illegally parked cars. First of
all, it was ironic to me that security ac-
tually had a student doing their dirty
work of distributing tickets to
students. Secondly, I noticed the car
which was being given the ticket had no
dorm sticker and had Georgia license
plates. Perhaps that person was like
me, coming back for homecoming and
visiting someone in the dorms. At his
time in the afternoon, that person may
have been taking someone home for
the weekend. I'm sure that in any case,
$5 was not worth the short visit. Later
that day, I visited a friend at the Stu-
dent Life Department and parked my
car in front of the Whichard building. I
placed my dime in the parking meter
and 40 minutes later returned to a
parking ticket on my windshield. My
thought was, does it ever end? I'm so
glad to see campus security on the job,
as usual. As a student, I would be in-
terested to see how these funds are go-
ing to be spent in the near future.
Friday night, I attended the Char he
DanielsMarshall Tucker concert; I
was glad to see a nearly-packed house.
I feel if the Student Union and Major
Attractions are going to recruit top-
notch bands, students should support
their efforts in order to continue hav-
ing outstanding talent and conceits
come to Greenville.
I went" to the 'Homecoming Game'
Saturday afternoon and witnessed a
packed Ficklen Stadium. It was the
largest crowd I've ever seen at ECU. It
gave me a good feeling to see such sup-
port for the Pirates. I would like to
personally commend Ed Emory, his
staff and the fine football team for
their great season. They have proven
that ECU can play against anyone in
the nation, no matter how high their
opponents are nationally ranked.
I did find one saying to be true dur-
ing my visit, "once you leave, you
can't come back That is, you can't
relive college � only recall it.
However, the time I spent at ECU
enabled me to set my goals and build
my dreams. These dreams have given
me the confidence to believe in my self;
to be able to sell myself to others. With
plenty of hard work, patience and
dedication, I have been able to find a
glimpse of success. However, I don't
measure success merely on winning,
money or job titles. I also measure it by
the many friends and good memories I
have shared in the past. I have found
these to be the true tropics in this game
we call life.
To me, that's what "COMING
HOME" was all about!
Michael H. Cooper
Kiawah Island. S.C
Graduate '81
Mick Blasted, Again
This is written in reference to Mick
LaSalle's article titled "Davtime Soap
Operas Wallow In Nastiness I have
worked on a newspaper for three years.
and I have never read anything this bad
thus far. First of all, I think you should
have found a new headline; preferably
one that goes along with the storv that
is to follow! You have such a big
headline, and it's a shame that the
story doesn't go along with it. There is
hardly anything written in the story
about all the nastiness that is wallow-
ing around the soap operas.
The second thing that I would like to
say is that I hope the article doesn't
show your true personality. It is ob-
vious that you are a MALE
CHAUVINIST PIG. You put down
General Hospital's Blacky and Jimmy
Lee, but then again what guy isn't
jealous! Oh, and by the way, Celia, the
one that you favor so much, is a
helpless, little, frail, rich, spoiled-
rotten brat. Monica, on the other
hand, is a strong, independent women
who knows how to stick up for herself.
You seemed to have forgotten to put
these facts into your story. I'd like to
turn your attention away from General
Hospital and onto All My Children to
clear up one more fact. Cliff Warner is
not a bad guy.
My advice to Mick LaSalle is to
watch the soap operas more than a
week before making anymore
statements.
Tracy Merritt
Greenville
Forum Rules�
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail
them to or drop them by the
newspaper's offices on the second
floor of the publications building,
across from Joyner Library.
-4
: ,t -
Student OpL
A

V
Hill
j
m
L
Scott
Resolutl
Not Be
BERkELi
(UPI) � A Univ
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committee has
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w arning
m e m b
teachi:
not involve going
bed with th.
The resolution wi
adopted 2
Wednesday a:
meeting
Academic
representing
Gaps i
Since a 19"
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gap between
female facult) alar
has continued
vsiden.
reaching $3,374,
cording
last year
the National
f or Educa
Statistics
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
'3.
illFIED
ear
m brain.
. and I started
1 rushed up to
booth, but
she said,
c basement of
ic end of the
I wanted a
' ��hen the
: message
�morrow
your ears,
i
Bells"1"
" 'White
:nputers
mpviter
til Bing
bocoUte
"r;stmas'
and there's
for hand-
ne end of the
pry
H Cooper
iand, S.C.
. aduate '81
ted, Again
r eference to Mick
led "Daytime Soap
Nastiness 1 have
Japer for three years,
id anything this bad
ll. 1 think you should
r idhne; preferably
with the story that
have such a big
a shame that the
ng with it There is
'ntten in the story
less that is wallow-
p operas,
that 1 would like to
the article doesn't
rsonalny. It is ob-
are a MALE
G. You put down
Blacky and Jimmy
un what guy isn't
the way, Celia, the
or so much, is a
ail. rich, spoiled-
jica, on the other
Independent women
stick up for herself,
'e forgotten to put
ir story. I'd like to
away from General
All My Children to
act. Cliff Warner is
lick LaSalle is to
;ras more than a
taking anymore
Tracy Merritt
Greenville
Rules�
m welcomes letters
its of view. Mail
pp them by the
on the second
Mentions building,
Library.
DECEMBER 1. 1983
Student Opinion
A Christmas Wish
Hill
Scott
By THERESA DULSKI
Staff Witter
In an informal survey at the start of
the holiday season, students were ask-
ed what thev want for Christmas.
Thomas Hill, radio and broadcasting,
freshman � "A car, a leather jacket, a
girlfriend and for everything to go
smoothly without any problems
Tom Hopper, physics, sophomore �
"I would like to see my whole family
get together for Christmas because we
haven't been together for three years. I
don't really know what items I want
for Christmas
Danny Scott, business management,
senior � I don't believe in the
Christmas celebration. I want to
celebrate the African celebration of
our black heritage
Sandra Foster, nursing, senior � "I
want a diamond necklace, and I want
to go to see my husband in Texas for
Christmas. I also want happiness and
joy
ma jo�w�� - ecu Phot L�t
Resolution Stresses Classroom,
Not Bedroom When Teaching
BERKELEY, Calif.
(UPI) � A University
of California faculty
committee has ap-
proved a resolution
warning faculty
members that
teaching students does
not involve going to
bed with them.
The resolution was
adopted 20-14
Wednesday at a
meeting of the
Academic Senate,
representing all nine
UC campuses, despite
a complaint by UCLA
math professor Ray
Redheffer that "some
things are so obvious
to civilized people
that they shouldn't be
in the rules book
But Carol Bruch of
the UC-Davis law
faculty countered that
"many of my col-
leagues need to be
reminded at least
several times a year"
to adhere to such a
rule.
She said existing
sexual harassment
procedures are "in-
adequate to deal with
this problem"
because intimate
faculty-student rela-
tionships are often
voluntary.
Supporters said
such relationships are
apparently no more
prevalent at the nine
UC campuses than in
any other university.
UC-Berkeley
history professor
Richard Abrams, who
wrote the resolution,
conceded it may be
"reiterating the tradi-
tional but he hoped
it would serve as a
"reminder and a rein-
forcer of already well
established profes-
sional ethics
The resolution ap-
plies only to an in-
structors current
students.
Gaps in Faculty Salaries Widen
l ampul Digest Nc�s Service
Since a 1977-78 dif-
ference of $3,500, the
gap between male and
female faculty salaries
has continued to
uiden. last year
reaching $5,374, ac-
cording to a study on
last year's salaries by
the National Center
for Education
Statistics.
The study at
tributed much of the
difference to the
lower-level positions
women hold. As in-
structors, 53 percent
are women, compared
to only 11 percent of
full college pro-
fessors.
Another possible
reason for the dif-
ference is the fields of
study. Engineering
and computer science,
for instance, is male
dominated and have
higher pay scales than
other fields. The
average male
teacher's salary was
$28,394 compared to
$23,020 for women.
NCES analyst Tom
Snyder believes time
will help narrow the
gap as more women
work their way up,
achieving more
seniority.
The study also
showed that faculty
salaries increased less
over the previous
year, and that public
school teachers make
more than their peers
in private schools.
Exams Schedule
8 a.m. MWF U-l Friday, Dec. 9
8 a.m. TTh 2-4 Friday, Dec. 16
9 a.m. MWF n-i Tuesday, Dec. 13
9 a.m.TTh i-i Wednesday, Dec. 14
10 a.m. MWF n-i Thursday, Dec. 15
10 a.m. TTh 2-4 Friday, Dec. 9
11 a.m. MWF n-i Friday, Dec. 16
11 a.m.TTh 2-4 Monday, Dec. 12
12 noon MWF 2-4 Tuesday, Dec. 13
12 noon TTh
1 p.m. MWF
1 p.m. TTh
2 p.m. MWF
2 p.m. TTh
3 p.m. MWF
3 p.m. TTh
4 p.m. MWF
4 p.m. TTh
2-4 Wednesday, Dec. 14
2-4 Thursday, Dec. 15
11-1 Monday, Dec.12
8-10 Friday, Dec. 9
8-10 Monday, Dec. 12
8-10 Tuesday, Dec. 13
8-10 Wednesday, Dec. 14
8-10 Thursday, Dec. 15
8-10 Friday, Dec. 16
Student Condos
r
BUYING -
LOANS
TVs, Air Con�m��trt,
S�ero�. tuni. fold silver,
diamonds cimirts and
equipment, typewriters,
kerosene heaters.
aerators . dorm til e�
�y) vMm fames A cr
triplet, power toots,
musical instilments,
microwave ovens video
recorders, bicycles, and
anything alga el value
Southern Pawn Shop
'oat�d 4M Evans Street
I��p, 7 SI MM
RINCCOLD TOWERS
At The Campus 'East Carolina University
We re build.ng . sp�� p,ce for East Carol.na Un.vers.ty students to hve - next to
campus in your own pnv.re. secure, a.r-condmoned condorn.n.um un.t, Surrounded on
three s.des by ECU property. R.nggold Towers ,s closer to classrooms than some
on-campus dormitories
Three floorptans are available, and units are completely furnished Each unit will be
individually owned either by students and their parents or by investors rentma to
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Recent changes in tax laws make ownership of this type property advantageous for both
investors and parents of students Wed like to show you how Rinejold Towers can
provide a special place for you to live and provide your parents with an excellent
investment requiring very little down payment
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P O Drawer 568
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(919) 355-2698
Expert On Luther
To Present Lecture
On Reformation
ECU News Bureau
An internationally-
known Reformation
scholar will present a
public lecture entitled
"Martin Luther on
the Authority of
Faith" at ECU Dec.
5, under auspices of
the ECU Medieval
and Renaissance
Studies program.
The lecture by Dr.
Scott H. Hendrix,
professor of church
history at Lutheran
Theological Southern
Seminary, Columbia,
S. C, is also spon-
sored by the Lutheran
campus ministry as
part of the 500th an-
niversary of the birth
of Luther in 1483.
Dr. Bodo Nischan
of the ECU history
faculty, also a Refor-
mation scholar, is the
coordinator of ECU's
interdisciplinary
Medieval-Renaissance
Studies program.
Dr. Hendrix holds a
doctor of theology
degree from the
University of Tub-
ingen. He has also
done post-graduate
work at the Harvard
Divinity School and at
the University of Got-
tingen as a Senior
Fulbright Research
Award recipient. His
works are widely
published in English
and German Refor-
mation, Medieval and
Renaissance journals
and volumes.
During the 500th
anniversary of
Luther's birth Hen-
drix served as a
panelist on the pro-
gram "Interpreting
Luther Today" at the
Luther Quincenten-
nial Celebration in St.
Louis and as a respon-
dent to the theme,
"Luther and the
Church at the Sixth
Internation Congress
for Luther Research
at Erfurt, East Ger-
many. He also served
as a participant in a
symposium "Luther
and the Middle Ages"
at Marquette Univer-
sity, and as a
presenter at the Mar-
tin Luther Jubilee in
Washington, D.C.
The public lecture
will be at 4 p.m. in the
auditorium of ECU's
Jenkins Fine Arts
Center.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Style
DECEMBER I, 1983
Page 6
From Mistletoe To Santa
Christmas Trivia
Ho, Ho, Ho
"I want an Atari video game, an Apple home computer, a Walkman.
By ELIZABETH JENNINGS
It's that time of year again!
Time to untangle the endless cords of Christmas
tree lights that were thrown into a box and stuffed
on some shelf in the bottom of your basement.
Once the cord has been straightened and plugged in,
time to replace the burnt out lightbulbs.
Time to get out the ladder and make thai death-
defying climb on the highest tree in your front yard
to hang those lights on thin, unsturdy treelimbs.
Place a burning candle in every window of your
house, a wreath on every door and perhaps a
ceramic Santa Claus and his nine-reindeer team on
your roof.
The tedious, hard work is finished. Time to sit
back, relax, and enjoy the good feeling of your par-
ticipation in the holiday spirit.
But wait a minute. Have you ever wondered who
ever thought to put lights on uees, candles in win-
dows, or even imagined San a Claus? The history
and customs of Christmas are known to most of our
culture but where did it all come from?
The word Christmas comes from the old English
Christes Masses, meaning Christ's mass. Because of
the fact that the date of the birth of Christ was not
definately known, the early Popes decided to use
the time of the pagan festivals as the religious
celebration of the birth of Christ.
Yet, Christ's birthdate, December 25th, was not
an officially observed holiday until the middle of
the forth century. The first recognition of
Christmas occurred A.D. 320, when the theatres of
Rome were ordered closed on Christmas Day.
The first recorded use of a tree as a Christmas
symbol occurred in the eighth century by Winifred,
who was later canonized as St. Boniface. Con-
tradictory to the ritual burning of a yule log, a can-
dle was placed in a fir tree to celebrate Christ's
birth. Thus, the lone candle originated the hanging
of lights and other ornaments on the Christmas
tree.
After a Christmas tree is finally ornamented,
many choose to layer the tree with tinsel. Long,
silver threads of glittery material are sprinkled onto
pine needles of the tree. As the legend explains,
many years ago a woman with a large family trimm-
ed her Christmas tree from top to bottom. During
the night, spiders crawled from branch to branch,
leaving their beautiful webs behind them. To
reward the woman for her goodness, Christ blessed
the tree, and all the spider webs were transformed
into shining silver.
The customs of using greenery at Christmas is
based upon ceremonies and legends developed by
the pagans. The greenery, along with the yule fire,
was to persuade the sun to bring back its warmth.
Holly, in particular, is aquainted with the fact that
Christ ended up with a crown of thorns and
bloodletting. The thorns and red berries of the holly
symbolize Christ's drops of blood.
In the language of flowers, Mistletoe means
"give me a kiss Mistletoe, a parasitic plant on
some fruits and trees, has beautiful green leaves
with clusters of translucent berries. Mistletoe's
most popular use is to hang it high above heads at
Christmas time and persue the custom of Kissing
under it.
According to an old English custom, each time a
boy kisses a girl under the mistletoe he must pick
off one of the berries and give it to the girl he just
kissed. After all the berries have been plucked the
magic is suppossed to be removed, and no more
kissing should be allowed. But, that's an old
English custom.
The origin of candles goes back in time as far as
the first monks, who used them to determine the
passage of time. The Jewish and Catholic churches
have always used an abundance of candles. To these
sects, the candle is a symbol of enlightenment, and
in the New Testament, Jesus is called the Light of
the World.
The image of Santa Claus is known to children at
a very early age. It has been a part of our culture for
almost two hundred years. In Washington Irving's
Knickerbocker History, in 1809, he developed an
image of Santa Claus as a jolly old man. But it was
Clement Moore who gave the world its modern im-
age of Santa Claus in his poem, A Visit From St.
Nicholas.
Certain customs shared with different countries
over the many years add to the specialty of a holi-
day. All the colored lights, glowing candles, and
decorated trees mean only one thing to people all
over the world Christmas.
Buying Tips For The Gift Giving Season
Gift giving is one of mankind's
most powerfully significant
gestures. History and literature
are filled with tales of gifts that
have changed the lives of men and
women.
The expression, "Beware of
Greeks bearing gifts stems from
the ironic conclusion of the Tro-
jan War � Greek soldiers stowed
away in the body of a large
wooden horse delivered to the
gates of Troy as an apparent
token of surrender. In The New
Testament, wise men brought
gold, frankincense, and myrrh to
a Baby in a Bethlehem stable. The
Dutch West India Company gave
trinkets and beads to the Manhat-
tan Indians in exchange for an
obscure island. Impressionist Vin-
cent Van Gogh literally lent an ear
to the lady he loved. And the
French gave Lady Liberty to the
American people.
"People in all cultures give
gifts observed well-known
psychologist Dr. Tom Cottle dur-
ing an interview on NBC-TV's
Today Show. Speaking on the
psychology of giving and receiv-
ing gifts, he noted, "We're either
complimenting somebody or
we're reciprocating. But it's a very
elaborate set of issues. Ultimately,
we give gifts to make an attach-
ment, a bond, an exchange, or to
create a coming together of peo-
ple
"Sometimes we can't help plac-
ing deep psychological meaning
on gifts. They can leave on feeling
delighted or disappointed, loved
and understood, or insulted and
embarrassed added Dr. Cottle.
"On the other hand, it's unfair to
deny the giver the pleasure he or
she derives in making the
gesture
"People invariably select inap-
propriate gifts because they're
often in too great a rush to think
carefully about who they're really-
shopping for says Robert
McKay, Regional Public Affairs
Manager for The Sperry and Hut-
chinson Company, Inc which
distributes S&H Green Stamps
and the widely known S&H gift
catalog.
"Some department stores ac-
tually hire psychologists who train
their sales staff to counsel
customers during the Christmas
rush and steer them away from
buying gifts that will only result in
time-consuming returns or ex-
changes adds McKay.
The Sperry and Hutchinson
Company, whose S&H Green
Stamps have contributed to 87
years of gift giving, offers some
hints to giving presents that might
best reflect what you mean to say
this holiday season:
� Give a gift that says "Your
are special to me" � don't look
at gift giving out of a sense of eti-
quette or duty.
� Show an awareness of and
sensitivity to a friend's or a loved
one's individual tastes � too
often we give what we would per-
sonally like to receive rather than
taking time to find out what that
person really likes or enjoys.
� Set a realistic budget before
you start, and stick to it using
Green Stamps to stretch your
dollars. Christmas is for sharing
warm thoughts and good feelings
� not for going into debt.
� Give with no strings attach-
ed. Don't use a gift as a bribe or a
payment that will impose
gratitude or future obligation on
the recipient.
� Don't be afraid to express
your unabashed sentimentality!
"Although Christmas, bir-
thdays, graduations, and wed-
dings vt traditional times Tor giv-
ing gifts, they needn't be the only
occasions declares McKay.
"Buying gifts year-round with
S&H Green Stamps has been as
unique to the American tradition
as Halloween or the Fourth of Ju-
ly
Merchants have been thanking
their customers with Green
Stamps for so long that one often
hears of S&H gifts being handed
down through the generations.
Last year alone, American con-
sumers saved more than 105
billion S&H Green Stamps for
more than 10 million items of gift
merchandise.
Hanukah Celebrates
Religious Freedom
By LOR1 GIEGER
Staff Writer
Hanukah is the Hebrew word
for dedication. The holiday in
comemoration of the victories of
the Hebrew family, the Mac-
cabees, in the year 167 BC. The
victories were over the Syrians
who had forced the Hebrews to
practice the Greek religion and
distroyed the Holy Temple in
Jerusalem. After the victorious
battle over the Syrians, the Jewish
leader Ha Maccabees had his peo-
ple rededicate the Temple to God.
From this dedication comes
Hanukah.
Upon return to the Temple, the
priests found there was only
enough oil to keep the Eternal
Light burning for 24 hours,
though the light is supposed to
burn continuously. Miraculously,
the lamp burned for eight days
and on the eighth day a soldier
returned with a supply of oil. In
all the world now Hanukah is still
celebrated as the Festival of
Lights, with the lighting of the
Menorah, the eating of traditional
foods and, the giving of gifts on
each of the eight nights of
Hanukah.
Symbolic also of Hanukah is
the struggle of religious freedom
and liberation of the Jewish peo-
ple over the years. Above all,
don't forget � Nes Gasol Haya
Sham � a great miracle happened
there. HAPPY HANUKAH!
For'Tobacco Road'
?
Auditions will be held on
December 5 and 6 from 7:30 to
10:00 p.m. in Room 206 of the
Messick Theatre Arts Center for
Tobacco Road, the third major
production in the 1984 season of
the East Carolina Playhouse.
Under the direction of Edgar R.
Loessin, the play offers roles for a
mother and a father (Ada and
Jeeter Lester), their sixteen-year-
old son, and two teenage
daughters. In addition, there are
roles for three other young men
Gate teens and mid-twenties) plus
a middle-age woman and a mute
grandmother.
Second only to Life With
Father as the all-time, long-run
theatrical American favorite,
Tobacco Road was a Broadway
fixture for nearly eight years.
Road companies criss-crossed the
nation for thousands of other per-
formances over a period of six
years.
"When this play opened on
Broadway on December 4, 1933,
it shocked or repulsed all of the
major critics except the New York
Times' Brooks Atkinson says
Edgar Loes�sin. "This is the 50th
anniversary of that opening he
added, "and I felt the play was
worth reviving. There is still a
blunt truth powerfully stated
about the evils of ignorance and
poverty
Performance dates of the pro-
duction are February 9-13 in
McGinnis Theatre on the ECU
campus.
Christmas Madrigal Dinner
These singers perform various Christmas carols at the Christmas Madrigal Dinner. These dinners will conthrae
Dec. 5. Tickets for places at one of the banquet tables may he reserved at MendenhaH's Ticket Office.
each night until
Concert
B MIKE HAMER
This Saturda, at noon,
ville will celebrate the 8th aj
Green Grass Cloggers Da
event will take place at ih
County Fair grounds on th
By-pass. Activities for the da
include workshops, craft di�
demonstrations and an ev
concert. The 'vent is or,
everyone, young and old �
who can clog, and those writ
� and those who rmgr -
learn or those who no .
want to watch Green Grass
gers Day is the premier occ
of the ear in this area in
one can get in touch �
lional music, traditi
dance and folk a
The evening concert, wh
begin at 7:30 p m
"7H
Touchstone, a talented

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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
DECEMBER 1,1983
i via
y o bottom. During
m branch to branch.
behind them. To
ss, Christ blessed
bs were transformed
nerv at Christmas is
ids developed bv
I v tth the vule fire,
. back its warmth.
with the faci that
'�n . � thorns and
ries of the hollv
M tletoe means
Murasitic plant on
tifu green leaves
berries Mistletoe's
$ri above heads at
m of kissing
me a
. must pick
girl he just
been plucked the
and no more
it's an old
ick ne as far as
K determine .he
d Catholic churchev
� dies. To these
I ment, and
the Light of
dren at
ure 1
n ashington Irving s
�he v d an
B ' was
:ern lm-
i, A I isit From Si
cnl countries
h a holi-
iow b indies, and
people
n
nas. b �
is, and wed-
H i" :mes for grv-
needrr be the only
ires McKay.
v ear-round with
amps has been as
American tradition
rth of Ju-
lave been thanking
� ' Green
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handed
� the generations.
' an con-
more than 105
Mamps for
nillion items of gift

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until
Concerts, Clogging A t The Green Grass Cloggers Day
ByMIKEHAMER
IWitar
This Saturday, at noon, Green-
ville will celebrate the 8th annual
Green Grass Cloggers Day. The
event will take place at the Pitt
County Fair grounds on the 264
By-pass. Activities for the ua: will
include workshops, craft displays,
demonstrations and an evening
Iconcert. The event is open to
everyone, young and old � those
jwho can clog, and those who can't
and those who might want to
learn or those who might just
.ant to watch. Green Grass Clog-
gers Day is the premier occasion
f the year in this area in which
ne can get in touch with tradi-
tional music, traditional folk
iance and folk arts.
The evening concert, which will
egin at 7:30 p.m. at the
fairgrounds, will showcase some
nationally acclaimed acts. Phil
and Gaye Johnson, from Green
Creek, North Carolina, have been
featured on National Public
Radio's famous "Prairie Home
Companion which is broadcast
across the country on Saturday
evenings. Since 1979 they have
been the hosts of their own radio
show, "Cornbread and Sweetmilk
Time which is broadcast over a
number of stations in the
Carolinas. They also have a
record album, Cornbread and
Sweetmilk, which is available on
Park Street Records.
Touchstone, one of the hottest
of the new Irish bands, will be
making their third appearance for
Cloggers Day. Touchstone's
sound is a kind of fusion between
the old and the new. They com-
bine the driving energy and highly
emotional quality of traditional
Irish songs with the down home
exuberance of American country
music. The group has released
The New Land, an excellent
record, on Green Lennet Records.
Instrumentation in the band in-
cludes clarinet, tenor banjo, man-
dolin, flute, whittle, bodhran,
guitar, mandocell, bouzouki and
synthesizer.
Also featured will be Green-
ville's own, nationally famous
Green Grass Cloggers. The Green
Grass Cloggers have performed
on national television, Carnegie
Hall, Lincoln Center, Lake Placid
Olympics, and at scores upon
scores of folk festivals. They have
been imitated by many dance
groups up and down the East
Coast.
Wouchstone, i

t alented Irish band, will apear on Saturday at the Green Grass Cloggers Day.
i


NOW is the best time to sell!
CASH for your textbooks.
����
U.B.Ei
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE, N.C.
Big Boy Henry, one of the few
remaining Carolina blues singers,
will return to perform again this
year. Big Boy lives in Beaufort,
N.C. He performs throughout the
state, and he has recently been in-
volved in recording his first
album.
Two "old time" string bands
will perform for the concert, and
for many of the workshops. The
Too Wet to Plow String Band is
from Greenville, and the Wild
Goose Chasers will be coming
down from western North
Carolina.
Also featured will be the Cane
Creek Cloggers from Chapel Hill;
the Swift Creek Cloggers; Rob
Sharp, a juggler; and various area
square dancers. The Fiddler Pup-
pets, a zany and unusual act, will
return to Cloggers Day this year.
The workshops will begin at
noon with a beginning clogging
workshop. This will be followed
at 12:30 p.m. by a puppet show
which will be pr sented by the Ivy
Vine Players from New York
State. At 2 p.m. an Irish
workshop will be held. At 2:30
clogging workshops and a
children's program featuring
Robin Garrett from Chapel Hill
will be presented. A square dance
workshop will take place at 4 p.m.
and a free-style insturment play-
ing and dancing demonstration
will take place. Big
Boy Henry and Mike "Lightnin"
Wells will be presenting a blues
workshop on throughout the
festive afternoon.
Tickets for the event will cost
$6.00 at the door and $5.00 in ad-
vance. Advance tickets are
avilable at Greenville Record
Bars, Mendenhall Student Center,
Apple Records, The New Deli and
the Rothskellar. Children aged 12
and under will be admitted free if
accompanied by an adult.
I have attended Green Grass
Cloggers Day in the past several
years for my yearly clogging
lesson, but my clogging hasn't im-
proved much over the years. I
have, however, always had an ex-
cellent time, and caught some very
memorable evening concerts in
the past. The folk scene died a
long time ago, but Cloggers Day is
an opportunity to hear some first
class traditional music and to see
some first class traditional danc-
ing. That's an opportunity I
wouldn't miss.
Christmas
Cards
They span the miles and the
years � and show you've remembered.
AMEWCNBrGREETINGS
Amencard
The right card for that special person
STUDENT SUPPLY STORE
Owned and operated by
East Carolina University
EDDIE
MONEY
WHERE'S
THE PARTY?
including.
Maybe Tomorrow
Bad Girls
Club Michelle
The Big Crash
Don t Lei Go
PAT BENATAR
LIVE FROM EARTH
including.
Love Is A Battlefield
Live Versions Of:
Hit Me With Your Best Shot
HeartbreakerFire And Ice
TOMMY TUTONE
NATIONAL EMOTION
including
Get Around GirlMoney Talks
LaverneDumb But PrettyI Believe
PAT BENATAR
IJVE riKW fHTH
HIMM1 Tl TOM
SM�l4t I ����
BILLY IDOL
REBEL YELL
including:
Rebel VeilDaytime Drama
Flesh For FantasyBlue Highway
RAUL
McCartney
PIPES OF PEACE
including:
Say Say Say and The Man
(Duets with Michael Jackson)
So Bad
Merry Christmas
ECU!
from
CBS RECORDS
AL00N0VA
SUBJECTAUTO NOVA
including:
Hold Back The Night
Monkey On Your Back Hey Operator
Cry Baby CryVictim Of A Broken Heart
AND
Apple Records
McCAKTNCV
WAYSTED
VICES
including:
Love LoadedWomen In Chains
Sleazy
BLUE OYSTER CULT
THE REVOLUTION BY NIGHT
including:
Take Me AwayEyes On Fire
Shooting SharkShadow Of Catttomia
WAY8TBD .
VMS M
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Karma Chameleon Miss Me Blind
Church Of The Poison MindMister Man
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THRU DEC. 17th, 1983
BU'EOYSTUtTU
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METAL HEALTH
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I HI 1 AM t AkiINI AN
Sports
l MM k 1 IV� Page 8
mbinson Speeds Pirates Fast CNC
IM) I'll SANTS
. �
� K
had fiv e
�: w in ov ei
Wednesda
; ! i
( aptains
hese-
. t proved
Ro inson's
and Freshman
k to kuk
1 foot shots gave the Hues a
34 -30 lead.
1 he Captains, led by
Sophomores Buck Moore and
Terrv McPherson, made two
short baskets to push CNC ahead,
37 34. That lead didn't last long,
however.
! he Hues, who. began setting a
fast-tempo game, turned to
Robinson to execute an effective
fast bieak He did. With 10:05 re-
maining. Robinson scored eight
points And assisted junior forward
Bar; Wright and sophomore
NEIL JOHNSON ECU Pfvofo Lab
snrd ilaii U,ight goes up against two aptain
. Wright was the Pirates' second leading
'ii. nine point
Kurt Vanderhorst to leave the
Captains far behind, 56-37.
After going scoreless for 10:05,
the Captains' Buck Moore made a
layup with 1:19 left, making the
score, 56-39. Moore led the Cap-
tains in scoring with 15 points.
'We were just tired
Christopher Newport head coach
Glenn Russell said. "We just ran
out of gas.
'Their pressure did the job and
turned the ball game around in the
second half. They tried to hurry
our offense up, and we just
couldn't keep up with those
guys
That wasn't the case in the first
half. Neither team pulled ahead in
the first five minutes of the game.
Tied at 10-all, Captain forward
Vince Eure scored four points and
Moore nailed a 20-foot jumpshot
to give CNC the biggest lead of
the game yet, 17-10.
The Captains held on to their
lead until Robinson hit a shot
from the top of the freethrow line
to put the Bucs up. 20-19, with
7.06 remaining.
The Pirates led 23-21 with 3:29
left when the Captains began
holding the ball for a last-second
shot. Sophomore guard Keith
Cobb sank a 15-foot shot to tied
the score, 23-23 at halftime.
"We did a good job
establishing tempo in the first
half Russell said. "I was very
pleased with our players. We lost
eight plavers this year, so w're
really lacking in depth. There
were two young teams out there
Harrison said he could have
predicted what the first half
would be like before the game
started "Exactly, what 1 though
would happen, happened he
said. "Christopher Newport came
out with a slow, deliberate o
fense. and we were ready foi that
in pre-game, but not when they
threw the ball up.
"We kept waiting for someone
to ignite us, but no one came to
the front
The Captains did have that
somebody in the first half. Moore
scored 10 of his 15 points in the
first period. "He's quite a
player Russell said. "We
couldn't rest him in the second
half, and that reallv hurt us
OABY PTTH$ON ICU PMl Lab
Robinson, who scored 12 of his
16 points in the second period,
was the Pirates' much-needed
leader. "1 thought Tony Robin-
son came ready to play tonight
Harrison said. "He knows how to
win
According to Russell, the
Pirates' fast-tempo game will be
their trademark this season.
"They've got some talent, and
they're going to get quicker and
quicker he said. "We just
couldn't keep up with them
Although the Pirates' picked up
the game's tempo in the second
period, Harrison wasn't too pleas-
ed about the team's overall show-
ing. "We shot freethrows the
same way we came to play he
said. The Bucs made nine-of-21
freethrow shots for a 42.8 percen
tage.
The Head Coach did quite a bit
of substitution earlv in the second
period too see which players could
make the fastbreak work best.
Freshmen forwards Keith Sledge
and Derrick Battle, along with
(enter I ,i . k I u r n b 111 and
freshman William Gradv had
playing tune, while sophomore
David Harris came in to help
under the boaids.
Smith, who scored IX points
againstampbell last week, add-
ed seen pv 1111- and pulled down
seven rebounds against the Cap-
tains. Wright was the team's se-
cond leading scorer with nine
points, while Sledge added seven.
Grady and Vanderhorst finish-
ed with five points each. Junior
guard Bruce Peart ree, who is
coming back from knee surgery,
scored tour points in his first
game this yeai Freshman Derrick
Battle also had four
The Bucs ni.uk- : of 56 shots
from the floor t finish with a
44.6 overall pei, entage.
No 2 0, the Bucs will play at
Virginia Commonwealth Satur-
dav and will meet Duke I Diversity
on Dec. It)
I he I-v I , arne will begin
at 7:35 p.m
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Point guard Ton Robinson
shows whv the Pirates dominated
the second half against
Christopher Newport Wednesdav
night. Robinson scored 12 of his
16 points in the final period and
had five assists.
ncil jomnson ecu Photo Lab
Andruzzi Smiling Over Lady Rats,
Team Playing with Needed Unity
�irate junior Annette Phillips. � transfer from l.ouisburg t ollege. guards a (Jeorge Washington opponent in
an earlier game this vear. PK
Following last weekend's split
in the Big Apple, the 1983-84
Lady Pirates' record stands a
solid 2-1, a mark which has Coach
Cathy Andruzzi well almost
smiling.
"I was very pleased with the
way we bounced back one day
after our first loss of the season to
beat a good lona team Andruz-
zi said after a 51-39 victory in New
Rochelle, N.Y. "We needed to
come back strong � and the team
responded very well
The 12-point victory over the
Gaels was sparked by forward
Anita Anderson, playing her first
season in purple and gold after
two years at Chowan Junior Col-
lege. The 5-10 junior led the Bucs
in scoring, pumping in 13 points
in limited playing time.
"Anita came off the bench
and really provided the lift we
needed to pull away with the
game Andruzzi commented.
"She shot the ball very well and
hit the boards hard and picked up
the team just at the right
moment
Unfortunately for the lady
Pirates, the preceding night, it
was their opponents who got the
"lift" they needed.
After sticking close to St.
Peter's through 27 minutes, the
Bucs fell prey to an 18-4 scoring
deficit in just nine minutes, seeing
a four-point game expand to 18
and finallv, i 25. Final score:
77 52.
But ccn big loss, there
were a few bright spots tor the
Pirates Sophomore guard Sylvia
Bragg turned in a 17 point perfor-
mance, while forward Lisa
Squirewell hauled in 11 rebounds
� both respectable outings.
So. with a 2-1 record, the Lady
Pirates will end their three-game
road swing as the) travel to Fayet-
teville tonight to take on the Lady
Broncos o Fayetteville State. The
Broncs are 2 2 going into last
night's game with Johnson C.
Smith College in Charlotte.
Fayetteville State starts the
youngest team possible in college
basketball, with five freshmen in
the probable lineup. Ironically,
according to Coach Mary Lamb,
the 1 adv Broncos' leading scorers
are sophomores Annetta Faulcon
and Joyce V aughn.
ECU opened the 1982-83 home
season with a crushing 91-51
defeat of the Broncos in the two
teams' only meeting to date.
Following tonight's game in
Fayetteville, the I adv Bucs return
home on Sundav afternoon to
face UNC-Charlotte at 3:00. Go-
ing into last night's matchup
against Clinton, the Lady 49ers'
record stood at 3 1, having posted
victories over UNC-Wilmington,
N.C. A&T and Sun Belt Con-
ference foe Alabama-
Birmingham, their sole defeat
coming at the hands of Tennessee
Tech.
At the heart of the 49er club is
All-Sun Belt Conference guard
Candy Lucas, who's averaging
better than 22 points per game.
Not far behind her. though, is
5-11 senior forward Sylvia Akers.
averaging 15 points and 10.8 re-
bounds per contest.
Unlike the longstanding men's
rivalry with the 49ers. the L adv
Bucs series with UNCC just began
last year, with ECU winning both
matchups, 59-48 in Charlotte and
72-58 in Minges. ECU's Bragg
turned in two sparkling perfor-
mances in those games, scoring 13
points on the road and 20 at
home. And at forward, Squirewell
gave her best showing of the vear
in the season finale in Minges with
an 11-point, 10-rebound game vs
UNCC.
Nevertheless, Andruzzi knows
she can't rely on just one or two
good individual performances and
expect to come away with a pair
of wins this weekend. And, as she
explains, "The thing which excites
us the most right now is that there
is such a team atmosphere on the
club. The chemistry is just the wav
we want it at this stage of the
season, where we seem to have
different people pick us up each
game
Brooks May Be Headed To Los Angeles For '84 Olympics
B RANDY MEWS
The ECU men's track team is
pointing towards what should be
their most successful season ever,
and leading the way will be
homore sensation Chris
Brooks.
he Pirates didn't lose anyone
to graduation, and Coach Bill
( -son is expecting ECU to be
well represented at this year's Na-
als.
The Pirates strongest event will
he the mile-relay team, anchored
b Brooks. All four members are
returning veterans, and Carson
believes they can be one of the top
twenty relav teams in the country.
"With Brooks running healthy,
our chances of running a 3:05 in
the mile are very good Carson
said. "The school record is
3:06.15, and I think we have a
good chance at breaking that this
year
Individually. Brooks will con-
centrate on the long jump. "Chris
has been working as hard as
anyone in practice and is showing
great leadership Carson said.
"He's one of the best long-
jumpers in the country
Although he doesn't see himself
in a leadership role, Brooks says
he helps out fellow long-jumper
Maurice Monk once in a while. "I
don't know about being a leader;
I've just never been a follower
Brooks said.
Brooks certainly wasn't a
follower in high school, as he
racked up award after award. "I
never even thought about running
track until I got to high school
Brooks said. "I played on the
basketball team, and when
everybody decided to go out for
track, I did too
Brooks ran the 400-meters and
on the mile relay team at first, but
it wasn't until his junior year that
he discovered his talent. "I had
never tried the long jump before,
so one day in practice I decided to
try it and ended up jumping 24'
4" ��
As a senior, Brooks par-
ticipated in the prestigious Golden
West track meet, a National event
held in California which invites
the top eight seniors in their event
from across the country.
Although he had only been jump-
ing for two years. Brooks came
away as the best long jumper in
the nation with a leap of 25' 9
In his short high school track
career, Brooks went on to anchor
the Natonal winning mile relay
team, was named national long
jump champion two consecutive
years, set a state record in the 400
meters and was named an Adidas
All-America.
Last year, Brooks was one of
the few freshmen in the nation to
compete in the NCAA Track and
Field Championships.
He turned in a reputable perfor-
mance, but came with the wrong
pair of shoes which ultimately
cost him a difference of more then
a foot on each of his jumps.
Coach C arson had not been to
the Nationals in several years, and
was unaware the take-off board
on the long jump was made of
wood.
The tips of Brooks' shoes were
made of plastic, and that caused
him to slip whenever he hit the
board. As a result, Brooks was
never able to properly execute his
jump.
Brooks has much higher expec-
tations for himself this vear and
says he wants to become an' 1L
Amenca. "You have to Pace in
the top five at the Nationals to be
named All-America, but I'm Irv-
ing for the top three
AlthoUgh he's considered a
possible candidate for the 1984
01ymp.es, Brooks said he hasn't
given them much thought "I'd
hketo go, but how I perform
wTc hV, 8�mg to d�nmnine
wnt.ber I go or not
If Chris Brooks continues to
improve as he did throughout the
course oflast season, a triUlS
A,ge,rjust mtght be m �s sJm
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. -







THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 1. 1963 9
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13 � 43
ird Ton Robinson
the Pirates dominated
nd half against
r Newport Wednesday
inson scored 12 of his
the final period and
sists.
y Rats,
Unity
n. their sole defeat
Ithe hands of Tennessee
eart of the 49er club is
4t Conference guard
is who's averaging
22 points per game,
rhind her, though, is
forward Sylvia Akers,
115 points and 10.8 re-
contest .
ie longstanding men's
h the 49ers, the Lady
'with LNCCjust began
nth ECU winning both
p9-48 m Charlotte and
linges. ECU'S Bragg
It wo sparkling perfor-
Ihose games, scoring 13
1 the road and 20 at
j at forward, Squirewell
tst showing of the year
n finale in Minges with
10-rebound game vs.
Iless, Andruzzi knows
ply on just one or two
luaJ performances and
)me away with a pair
weekend. And, as she
The thing which excites
right now is that there
vn atmosphere on the
�emistry is just the way
at this stage of the
:re we seem to have
ple pick us up each
pics
is much higher expec-
imself this year, and
Jits to become an All-
ou have to place in
lat the Nationals to be
America, but I'm try-
(op three
he's considered a
adidate for the 1984
Jrooks said he hasn't
i much thought. "I'd
ut how I perform this
totng to determininc
p or not
Brooks continues to
pc did throughout the
H season, a trip t0 Los
might be in his sum-
Sneaker Sam Sez
Next week brings
intense basketball ac-
tion in intramurals
with the Miller Pre-
season Basketball
Tournament, Dec.
1-3.
In women's action,
the Heartbreakers,
last year's champions,
are a definite favorite.
The team will feature
Yvonne Williams and
Ginger Rothermel.
They'll have some
tough competition
from Angie Hum-
phrey, Phyllis Willis
and Stacey Weitzel
from Fastbreak, last
year's second-place
winners. But don't
write off the T.As
Lori Washington and
Jill Condarino, or the
always ready Vernice
Riddick, Jackie Ter-
rain and Denise
White.
In men's action, the
defending champion
Joint Eight, featuring
William Chapman
and Steve Hixon are
expected to make a
strong return, though
they'll be challenged
by the Enforcers' An-
thony Martin and
David Battle. Also
look for the Beach
Bums, the Clique,
Delta and Two RB.
There should be
some great basketball
action, so come
and watch.
out
In soccer action,
Aycock's Men
without Talent beat
the Maulers in the
Men's Residence Hall
division. In the In-
dependent division,
Sensation beat Storm
in a 2-0 victory.
The Sigma Phi Ep-
silon team again took
the championship
over the Tau Kappa
Epsilon team, 2-1, in
the fraternity divi-
sion.
In Women's
Residence Hall ac-
tion, the Umstead
Jockette will advance
to the all-campus
competition since they
defeated the Tyler
T.A's. Sigma Sigma
Sigma took the Alpha
Phi's in sorority com-
petition.
Finite freshman Derek Battle goes for two i. the lane against ChristopheT NlZrTwZZZZ
Battle scored four points and had four rebounds. -raiopner Newport Wednesday
OARY PATTERSON�ECU Ptwto Lab
Lady Pirate Lisa Squirewell pulled down 11 rebounds against St. Peters last week, and the sophomore forward will be trvina
to break that record tonight in Fayetteville.
Duke's Last-Second Shot Silences Tribe
WILL1AMSBUR-
G, Va. (UPI) �
Johnny Dawkins ex-
ploded with 28 points
to lead Duke to a
70-68 win over
William and Mary
Wednesday, while
teammate David
Henderson put (he ic-
ing on the victory by
tossing in the final
basket with eight
seconds remaining.
The Blue Devils
rallied after falling by
as much as seven
points in the second
half, eventually clos-
ing the margin and
then surging ahead
with 4:21 left in the
game.
William and Mary's
Mark Alarie tied the
game up, but Hender-
son proved right on
the mark with his
12-foot jumper in the
final seconds.
W&M's Keith
Cieplicki, who earned
12 points for the
game, attempted a
long shot at the
buzzer, but the shot
fell short.
"It's a very dif-
ficult loss but one
which we should learn
a great deal from
because we did a lot
of things well against
a very good basketball
team said William
and Mary coach Barry
Parkhill.
"We had our op-
portunities, but it just
didn't go our way
down the stretch
said Parkhill, who
took over head
coaching duties this
year from his brother,
Bruce Parkhill, now
the head coach at
Penn State.
Dawkins, with 28
points, was trailed by
Alarie and Hender-
son, who scored 10
points each.
Cieplicki, Gary
Bland and Matt
Brooks led the In-
dians in high scoring.
duke on
Bilai 4-6 0-0 8. Meafner 3-5 0-0 6.
Alane 2 8 6-7 10, Amaier 4-6 0-0 8.
Dawkini 1M9 2-2 28. NcuJey 0-1 0-0
0. Henderson 5-9 0-0 10. McNcdy
O-JO-OO TolaU 31 57 8-11 70.
WILLIAM A MAEY lUi
Richardson 4-7 3-5 11, Bland 6-9
2-3 14. Brooki 6-9 3-5 13. Traver 17
6-6 8, Ciepucki 5-11 2-2 12. Hams
I 2 04 2, Coval 3-4 0-0 6. McFartane
0-0 OO 0. Trimble 0-0 2-2 2 Totals
25-48 18-23 68
tiaWWaii - Data 33. AM 30.
Taal iMk Dakt 21. WM IS. Fo�i-
mi a�at. �m Dak 28
(Aaartt I), WaUtf 27 (WrawSaii.
�aaat ). Aaatats Omkt ! 7 i Dawklaa
4). WAM 13 (Traar 3).
I
from "The Modern Master of Horror'
STEPHEN KING
CHRISTINE (Paperback)
PET SEMATARY (Hardback)
CENTRAL BOOK & NEU)$
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10 THE EAST CAROLINIAN DECEMBER 1, 1983
Classifieds
FOR SALE
POM lALi mi OM Delta M
�w DM braka itaal reeHaU.
veo feed mechanical condition
gw. caii m-rm.
PO� SALt: MOI !Mt
7MO013.
note book, Minolta selfwinding
attachment; no question aaked
It returned.
LOST: brown �pirai notobook In
F 103 PIMM return Reward
offered no queitlom asked.
Need tor final l 710-0305.
WANTED
RIDE NEEOED: to Hilton Head
Is. SO or down I ts tor
Christ�at break Please call
Lynn at WMjjj,
reasonable Call 1SS-IM2.
MISC.
Two Bluopolnt Seamesa cats tor
give-away. Ten years old. Yoa
folks, that's old but not tor
seamese catsi The exact ar-
rangements are odd- I'll ampleta
everthlng. Pick up the phono,
give mo a call. fjMjg.
POR JALR 2 Pioneer HPmTMO
speakers I technics receiver 4)
watt per channel. 1 pioneer belt
�rive turntable. Call 7SI-4M1 tor
details
Oarr in shape. You got 4
visits to each of the a prominent
heetth ctobs In the Oreenville
eree Thats M visits for only
!� M Contact Kim C at
TOO-MOI
OMB YRAR OLD box sprln g
and nsattross for sale. Call
ISS-arii or 'M �) !HI collect
As tor Susie. Asking S12S.
POR SALR: Sale
crolaer good condition I months
�M. �m.e� or best otter. Call
rtt-rf after p.m.
PERSONAlT
COMiRATULATIONS: to the
now brothers or Lambda Chi
Alpha Jay, Ken, Sam, Matt,
�rog. Rob. Eric, and Dean
Leva, your Little Sisters.
ORLAIMI: Thanks for rospon
ding YISli is a date for April?
LavoTJ.
"lostand
FOUND
LOST: Bast Atlantic Resorts
One female roommate
for Jan. Can move In end of Doc.
SM par month, one fourth
utilities Oeoroetwn Apts. Call
TSS-SW.
NEEDED: Female roommate
SIM rant. Contact Suiie at
TSS-2US.
MALE ROOMMATE WANTED:
Wilson Acres, no a month plus
utilities. Call anytime 7So 20�.
MALE ROOMMATE to share
apt. Will have own bedroom.
Prefer nonsmoker. social
drinker. Rent use plus half
utilities. Oeargetown apts.
Available In Doc. Call 752740,
ask for Fred Call before 10 am
or after 11 p.m.
ROOMMATE NEEDED. Wilson
Acers, Nl. rent 1123 JO one third
utilities, phone 7J0 $100. Three
bedroom apt.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED to share 3 bedroom
apt. at Eastbrook. One third
rent, utilities. Call Karen at
7S2-7S71.
�RODY'S for man has an
opening for a part-time
salesperson. Individual must
be experienced In men's
clothing and have previous sell-
ing experience. Apply to Sara
Hampton Brody's Pitt Piaia
M-F, 2-S.
LOWEST TYPIHO RATES on
campus include experienced
professional work. Pro-
ofreading, spelling and gram-
matical corrections 3SS-474S
after S:S0.
PROFESSIONAL
1SS-4074
TYPING
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SIONAL typing. Call Julia
bloodworth at 734-7074.
TYPING. TERM, THESIS,
7S4 40J3L
TYPING: Rush Jobs Evenings.
Scientific symbol element. Pro
tesslonal. CaH 7M-0017.
PROFESSIONAL Typing ser-
vice: experience, qualify work,
IBM selectric typewriter. Call
Lanle Shiva 7S0 SJ01.
ATTENTION ECU skiers and
sunbathers. January Vermont
ski weeks from S172. Spring
break Florida weeks from Silt
Call tor yourself or origlniie a
group and travel tree. Luv tours
000-340 2�4. Ask for Laura.
THE TECH SHOP: We're on the
corner of 14th and Charles. We
sell stereo maintenance service.
RIDES
Quality typing IBM typewriter
15 years of experience. Full time
typing for faculty and students.
Call 754-3440.
JOB HUNTING? Full resume
and cover letter service. Let Dr
Axelrdd capture on paper. Call
750-400 for appt.Word for Word,
Georgetown Shops; Second floor
TYPING SERVICE
Neat,fast,reasonable Call
355-2042
Typing service, neat.
fast.
Bousch & Lomb
Soft Contacts
$59.00
1
!$ 15.00 OFF ANY COMPLETE I
PAIR OF EYE GLASSES j
Must present this ad for discount. ,
f
Phone
756-4.04
' .
PALACE,
703 Greenville Bivd (Across From Pitt Plata Neat To ERA Rralu
Gary M Harris Licensed Optician
Open 9 30 a m to 6 p m Mon Fn
! i n t ' n n n i tr n' jjj III jijii jjjjj I nn m n n ttttttti
ADULTS
ONSOUDATED
fHtATRES
mm' lllHlljIfffl '
CMILOtE
i'bwcanWrmoves
ENDSTHUR
"HERE AND
NOW" R
lliiiiiiiiiimiiiiiimiiiiiilliiiiii
1:10-3:10-5:10
7:10-9:10
"A CHRISTMAS
STORY" PG
ENDS THL R
AMITYVILLE
3-D" -pa
11II11 III I Mil 1111111II1111111
M:
MICHAEL CAINE and JULIE WALTERS
1:00-3:05 Sometimes students
5:10-7:15 end up being the
9:20 best teochers.
'One of the surprise delights
of the season.
A literate, literary, offbeat comedv Julie Walters
is a JOV - Cent Shalit. B TV TOD AN SHONN
PG
?
STARTS fRIDM!
1:15-3:15
5:15-7:1
9:15
JEREMY IRONS
BEN KINGSLEY
SHIRLEY MacLAINE
r.niniiiiiinniiuniinn
a DiBsunuNT PICTURE
$4MiJmlW
Ill.illllMIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMHIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIMIIIIimillHHIIMIMMIIIMIIIIimilllllllllllllll
Cathy Andnizzi is happy with her players' team
tonight.
atmosphere so far this season. The Lady Rats play Fayetteville State
So Many Ways To Say
"Merry Christmas"
Christmas cards carry Your personal message for
the holidays. Because you want the design to be
perfect and the words just right, we have a
complete assortment of beautiful Ambassador
Christmas cards for you to choose your favorites.
c 1982 Ambassador Cards a division ol Hallmark Cards Inc
Student Supply Store
Owned and operated by East
Carolina University
TWO FREE MEALS
When you sign up for a meal plan
for a month at Sammy's.
$50.00 for 22 meals
(good for daily specials)
Regular Plate and Large Plate Meal Plan Available
11AM-8PM
Daily
Phone
752-0476
COUHTRV C0OJCIH6
512 E. 14th Street
(2 blocks West of Mens Dorms)
�� ; � �- -

.
mm





freewheeler
VOL. 1 NO. 1
A Lab Publication Of Journalism 3200
DECEMBER. 1983
ecu
oil ��! I���i
FREEWHEEUN' AT ECU
We like to think of students mov-
ing forward in a free and easy man-
ner with gears engaged � similar
to the mechanisms which permit
"freewheeling" in automobiles and
bicycles.
The FREEWHEELER reflects
the easy side of life at ECU and the
often overlooked activities which
make leisure time most enjoyable.
� CU MM i�
� CO PIMMLM
liHnfrafton tn OWIOMT TOOCMtKKV





PAGE 2
FREEWHEELER
A Lab Publication Of JOUR 3200
Editor
Ken Bolton
Page Editors
Elizabeth Biro
Susan Cross
Assignment Editor
Lizanne Jennings
PhotoArt Editor
Paula Norman
Susanna Gocke
Micah Harris
Ruben Ingram
Gail Jones
Jennifer Singletary
Eric Tilley
Faculty Adoisor
Dr. Jeanne Scafella
TKu publication wai completed as i laboratory exercise by
students in Journalism 3200. Copy-editing and makeup. TKe
views presented are those of the individual writers and in no
wav reflect views of the Department of English or East Carolina
University.
Great Escape From Ordinary
Available in Greenville Parks
By GAIL JONES
For nature lovers of all kinds and ages,
the city of Greenville maintains 16 public
parks where people can go to escape the
hectic city life.
The parks offer various versions of the
great outdoors so visitors can select the
park that matches their mood of the day.
Parks range from the beautifully land-
scaped Town Common to the rugged
"Mother Nature vs. You" exercise trail
Green Springs offers for those who want
to test their stamina and endurance under
tall trees and blue skies.
To help outdoor lovers find their place
in the park, Greenville's facilites are
listed as follows:
JaatJM Park
Cedar Lane (11.5 acres), includes:
auditorium
�ennu courts (4); lighted
balKeJdfsoccer field: batted
playground
picnic shelter
branch horary
Elm Street Paris
Ekn Street (8.4 acres); includes:
CJro otreet ienter
gymnasium
tennis courts (6): lighted
LrtrJe Leap fields
football field
playgrounds (2)
picnic shelters (3)
Kiwanis Shelter � indoor frill, deck, picnic table
Sunday m to Park
Grassy slopes of Reade St. (between 3rd and 4th
streets).
Tbotnm Foremn Park
West 5th and Nash St. (9 acres): includes:
gymnasium
tennis courts (2 � lighted by April I83)
playground
Mo je wood Part
West 3rd Street (16 acres): includes
one acre of pity area
picnic shelter
baaketbaO goals
Guy Smith Part
Comer Chestnut St. ft Manorial Dr. (12.17
baiifields (2 with lights, I without)
iwsnmmg pool and bathhouse
South Greenville Park
Howell St (9.1 acres): includes:
community center
gymnasium
playground
picnic shelter
lighted ballfield
Evan Park
Arlington Blvd. (25 acres); includes:
2 baiifields (lighted)
River BsrcJi Temus Complex (12 courts, 4 lighted)
terms center
stand and lestrootnt
Green Spnnft Park
5th Street (25.5 acres); includes:
picnic shelter
picnk areas with grills
exercise trail (I.I mile with 20
Hilledaie Park
Sunset Ave. (1.72 acres); includes.
playground
small shelter. 1 able
small UlrMd
basketball court
Pavp-rmiat Park
1 4th St. I I 4 acres); avciudes:
playground
paveed haskrrnall court
pscnic shelter
Rjtw Park North
338 acres; me hides:
5 ponds
I -mile fioutage on Tat River
fishing (ponds and nver)
pedal boat rental (spring. '83)
picnic shelter
nature trails
1st S. (19
Town
i: includes
Greenfield Terrace Park
Greenfield Terracr (1 2 seres); includes
paved baaketbaO area
PAULA SMMMAM � ICU I
Doss this scene look familiar to you? If you're tired of hanging around
the dorm, check out the great outdoors of North Carolina.
Get Your Camping Equipment
At ECU Outdoor Rec Center
small ballfield
WoocBawn Park
Woodsawn Ave. (.63 acre): includes:
playground equipment
picnic table
??wo
walking paths sod beaches
unpaved boat ramp
w. aaj i t. - -l
Wnt aagegaBfJgasBjBsj
Lanjjev Dr. (30 acres): incudes
pscnic shelter
play equipment
baiifields - Little League. tootbaUJsoccer. softbail
(lighted)
By SUSAN CROSS
Do you spend your weekends moping
around your dorm room or apartment,
complaining that "there's nothing to do
Alas! There is plenty to do � just ask
the ECU Outdoor Recreation Center.
The Outdoor Recreation Center,
located on the first floor of Memorial
Gym, is a threefold University service
sponsored by the Intramural-Recreation
Department. The three areas which the
Center concentrates on are equipment ren-
tals, resource information, and adventure
trips.
On a daily basis you may rent camp-
ing, canoeing, andor backpacking equip-
ment. These outdoor necessities include
tents, sleeping bags, canoesand grills (see
list this page).
The rental fees are reasonable and af-
fordable for college students. The Center
invites solo rentals or group deals, in ad-
vance. They will also help you plan your
outing by sharing information from their
Resource Room.
Displayed in the Resource Information
EQUIPMENT RATESCHARGES
DailyWeekendWeakly
Backpacks$2.00$3.50$8.00
Flashlights.25.501.00
Folding Gr'ls.25.501.00
Cook Sets (1 person).25.501.00
Cook Sets tgroup).501.002.00
Camp Stoves1.001.504.00
Backpack Stoves1.001.504.00
Canoes7.0014.003000
Car Camen.501.002.50
Ground Qotht.25.501.00 j
Sleeping Bags2.003.508.00 i
Ufejackets.25.502.00
Tent (2 person)2.504.008.00
Tent (3 person)3.505.0010.00
Tandem Bicycle1.503.008.00
Wster Bottles.25.301.00
Wet Bags (canoes).25.501.00
Foam Pads.25.501.00
Camp Lantern1.001.504.00
Room (113 Memorial Gym) are
brochures, manuals, and maps. The con-
tents of these publications reveal details of
hiking, backpacking, camping, biking,
and canoeing areas in North Carolina.
You can discover the four national
forests and numerous national parks in our
state by browsing through the colorful
literature in the Resource Room.
Even though pictures convey the
beauty of a natural waterfall or still river,
the excitement of actually being there
must be experienced. For this reason.
Outdoor Rec Program Director Pat Cox
schedules weekend or one day adventure
trips for interested ECU students, faculty
and staff members.
This semester. Cox led students on a
white-water rafting expedition down the
French Broad River near Hot Springs,
NC. He also ventured to Uwharrie Na-
tional Forest, near Asheboro, for a
backpacking trip.
"Most of our trips are for the novice
camper, but some more experienced en-
thusiasts frequently go with us because
it's so enjoyable commented Cox.
Cox also explained that the Outdoor
Rec Program sponsors instructional clinics
for those who wish to learn or review
camping, canoeing, and even hang gliding
skills.
Backpacking, white water rafting, and
canoeing trips will be offered this spring.
Don't spend weekends couped up � ex-
plore the outdoors of North Carolina!



















GREENVffTE
MUSEUM OF ART
Enter a quiet refuge of beauty
and enjoy the finer things in life
For information, call 758-1946
802 South Evans St














Equestrians Rejoice
Trying to hide your horse in your
dorm room was a big mistake. University
rules and regulations don't permit "pets"
the residerr; halls- and of course.
in
horsey had to go back to the farm.
The Outdoor Recreation Center notic-
ed this dilemma and now offers a
horseback riding service through Jarmon's
Stables in Greenville.
Every Thursday afternoon the Center
takes interested ECU students � begin-
ners and experts � to the stables for a
one hour ride along trails and dirt roads.
If you register for the outing with the
Outdoor Rec Center, 113 Memorial
Gym, the overall cost is $5. You must
register by Wednesday, 5 p.m to be in-
cluded in a Thursday trip.
Student Cal
By PAULA NORMAN
Many college students find it necessar.
to work thetr wav through schooi. orr-
obs offer high wages, some offer rewa-
dang experiences and others, like the Bar
Carolina Cafeteria, after the challenge of
a lifetime.
College Hill Dining Hall. Dining Ser
vices, Jones Cafeteria, Servomahon � or
Night Club
Offers Classy
Evening Out
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Are you getting hred of the same
downtown scene? Do you think you
deserve more? Do you feel like getting
dressed up and really going out to a nice
club? But then you think, "Hev. who
am 1 kidding: college students can't afford
such luxuries, right?"
Wrong.
If you're dressed to kill and readv to
hit one of Greenville's hot spots, then it t
the new King and Queen North. Ever
Wednesday night. King and Queen of-
fers a good time with a touch of class.
Fonnerly called Casablanca, this new
dinner club still carries on the tradioona.
Wednesday night ladies' special and hap
py hour. Now there is an added attraction
for students on Wednesday nights � tree
admission from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. with
college ID.
Okay, so now you know you can at-
ford to go someplace special, bu: what
happens once you get inside? That $
where the fun begins.
The usual Wednesday night crowd at
King and Queen North averages 500 to
700 people. At times, this number ex-
ceeds 1000. The club has three iarg?
banquet rooms in the rear, which can be
transformed into one large area to provide
enough space to accommodate a large
crowd.
If you are the shy type and are afraid
you may not fit in or meet anyone in-
teresting at the King and Queen North.
don't worn. Wednesday nights attract
people of all ages who join together for
one of the better parties in Greenville.
Bands appear regularly and perform a
popular mixture of beach and Top 40.
The Tarns, The Caiahnas, The
Castaways and Greenville's popular
North Tower have all played to en
thusiastic crowds.
Wednesday night starts off with happv
hour at 4:30: beverages run about hal!
price. King and Queen North has al.
ABC permits, and can accommodate
anyone's taste. As a mater of fact, you 11
find the entire atmosphere at King and
Queen North warm and friendly-
If me Wednesday night special has
already caught your attention, then you'll
probably be interested in the entire dinner
club. Sheer beauty is one descnption
given to the King and Queen North.
In the main dining room, you'll find
large round tables and plush, thick carpets
and large stained glass hangings. .All of
this surrounds a large hardwood dance
floor and a stage. In the rear, a spectacular
circular bar with cushioned chairs invite
one to sit down and unwind.
So if you haven't been to one of
Greenville's beat, then it's time you put
your fears to rest. King and Qseen North
could become one of your favorite habits.
Lair de
vomatson
abou -rv
a piar
greaK :�:
Outj-
ed r&i
Hn
pass
Brown
path throus;
.ocate
the room.
Four o
manager
talking '
preparing
a- 4:30 pj
These
and stotc
when all
entering.
Ira gnvt
plan. '
Ira c
thai
recognize
through
Ira
"Keep
barked.
at 6:30-
and sero
at 4:30
The
minutes
serving.
of the rw
nervous
ther
The
The v
looks likel
A.
m
Manv
the comoj
room stu
drinking
fastest
pounds
exercise
Ae
relativelv
erase.
300calc
tone,
system.
proves
Greenl
offer
ft hnd
purposes
The
Aerobn
Shop.
vices al
vanerv
The
Otuunooi
10:30
and 8 aj
Sundav
costs $31
luatton !g
Howt
together
fc





Ordinary
ville Parks
GrMnSpruift Parii
- 3BK 25 5 cm) iadaaas
ptcnx if -
im with gruk
� t I milr with X U�txm)
IMhalala Hut
VJi�r "� - fcr"1 nciuoe:
��I inrttei I table
�mI balKald
its email court
Peppermint Park
4di n I 4 tcrni; incrjott-
4 -re -a��e(bali court
. cv �-
Rjver Park North
� , m m ode
� od�
fraalsft on Tu Rjvef
- -ij pond ind HM
�ii boK waul spring. 83)
picnic iheto
-estrootra
HUt miai
Town Common
tS � acre I: include:
ATO�i-�prC '�1 ire
� i.i.rni pada ane bencne
jipavrc bolt ramp
WeM MMdowbrook
anfk Df (30 icre); include:
BC Oeiter
j iguipmen;
�Ohekk - Ljafc Leatue. footbailiaoceer. oftball
fhte
PAGE 3
iENVILTE
IM OF ART
quiet refuge of beauty
y the finer things in life
formation, call 75c-1946
&02 South Evans St.









ians Rejoice
Student Cafeteria Workers Get Taste Of Real Life
i M-
l5. You musi
.m �' be II
By PAULA NORMAN
Many college students find it necessarv
to work their way through school. Some
jobs offer high wages, some offer rewar-
ding experiences and others, like the East
Carolina Cafeteria, offer the challenge of
a lifetime.
College Hill Dining Hall. Dining Ser-
vices. Jones Cafeteria, Servomation � or
Nigit Club
Offers Classy
Evening Out
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Are you getting tired of the same
downtown scene? Do you think you
deserve more? Do you feel like getting
dressed up and really going out to a nice
club? But men you think, "Hey. who
am I kidding: college students can't afford
such luxuries, right?'
Wrong.
If you're dressed to kill and ready to
hit one of Greenville's hot spots, then it's
the new King and Queen North. Every
Wednesday night. King and Queen of-
fers a good time with a touch of class.
Formerly called Casablanca, this new
dinner club still carries on the traditional
Wednesday night ladies' special and hap-
py hour. Now there is an added attraction
for students on Wednesday nights � free
admission from 4:30 p.m. to 7 p.m. with
college ID.
Okay, so now you know you can af-
ford to go someplace special, but what
happens once you get inside? That�
where the fun begins.
The usual Wednesday night crowd at
King and Queen North averages 500 to
700 people. At times, this number ex-
ceeds 1000. The club has three large
banquet rooms in the rear, which can be
transformed into one large area to provide
enough space to accommodate a large
crowd.
If you are the shy type and are afraid
you may not fit in or meet anyone in-
teresting at the King and Queen North,
don't worry. Wednesday nights attract
people of all ages who join together for
one of the better parties in Greenville.
Bands appear regularly and perform a
popular mixture of beach and Top 40.
The Tarns, The Catalinas. The
Castaway and Greenville's popular
North Tower have all played to en-
thusiastic crowds.
Wednesday night starts off with happy
hour at 4:30; beverages run about hall
price. King and Queen North has all
ABC permits, and can accommodate
anyone's taste. As a mater of fact, you'll
find the entire atmosphere at King and
Queen North warm and friendly.
If the Wednesday night special has
already caught your attention, then you'll
probably be interested in the entire dinner
club. Sheer beauty is one description
given to the King and Queen North.
In the main dining room, you 11 find
large round tables and plush, thick carpets
and large stained glass hangings. All of
this surrounds a large hardwood dance
floor and a stage. In the rear, a spectacular
circular bar with cushioned chain invite
one to sit down and unwind.
So if you haven't been to one of
Greenville's best, then it's time you put
your fears to rest. King and Queen North
could become one of your favorite habits.
Cafe de la JonV as christened by Ser-
vomation employees � is merely a room
about the size of a basketball court with
tables placed randomly on orange and tan
grease-speckled carpet.
Outdated photographs of old students
placed haphazardly on finger-smeared tan
walls surround these tables. Plastic plants
try to pass themselves off as real.
Brown linoleum marks a follow -me-
path through the carpet to the two serving
lines located strategically in the middle of
the room.
Four o'clock finds this area quiet and
void of the 1700 students who have pur-
chased meal tickets. However. Ira Simon,
manager and ruler of the Jones domain, is
talking to a group of employees who are
preparing for the attack which will begin
at 4:30 p.m.
These brave souls will remain calm
and stoic against the assault until 6:30
when all latecomers will be kept from
entering.
Ira gives his new recruits the battle
plan. "Tell them what you are serving
Ira commands. "If it doesn't look like
their mother's cooking, they will never
recognize it. Besides, it helps push them
through the line
Ira calmly picks up a dish cloth.
"Keep everything wiped down he
barked. "The student who comes in here
at 6:30 deserves the same clean counters
and serving area as the one who comes in
at 4:30
The speech continues for 20 more
minutes on all the do's and don't of line
serving. As the clock hits 4:30, ten out
of the twelve employees look as though a
nervous trip to the bathroom would do
them good.
The other two appear to be veterans.
The first veteran, a large blonde, who
looks like a Florida orange in her Ser-
vomation uniform, tries to get a 24-inch
apron string around a 30-inch waist as she
speaks to the other veteran. "Hey
Karen, don't eat any of the spaghetti this
week she exclaimed.
The second veteran, who favors the
center pole in an orange circus tent looks
puzzled and asks. "Why not?"
The blonde orange smiles knowingly.
"Because Servomation bought pounds
and pounds of hot dogs for a catering
when nobody showed
The tent pole looked confused.
"What's that got to so with spaghetti
sauce?"
"Well, the cook came up with this big
idea of grinding up all those franks and
adding the usual sauce. Voila! �
Spaghetti Sauce
The orange heads for the serving line
with the tent pole close behind. The tent
pole grabs a spoon and asks, "How does
it taste?" The orange doesn't answer
because the first customer of the evening
is waiting to be served.
The customer looks like a mixture of
the Hulk, Frankenstein, and an escaped
N.C. State football player complete with
muscles and a blank look. He points at
the spaghetti.
"Ugh, Ugh The orange throws it on
his plate. The bulky monstrosity is now in
front of the tent pole. He points at the
com or the beans. "Ugh. Ugh The tent
pole can't tell which one he wants.
She says. "Do you want corn or
beans?"
He points ambiguously. "Ugh, Ugh!
The tent pole gets exasperated and
yells. "Can't you speak ENGLISH
The thing bunches himself up and
screams. "I want some corn
DAMMIT
Meanwhile, on the other side. two
rookies are hard at work adhering to
every rule just stated to them by the com-
mander.
A girl dressed in light blue corduroy
shorts, two sizes too small, is the first in
line. She stares through the glass with
fascination at the food. The first rookie,
softly whispers, "We have fried chicken
and spaghetti. Which would you like?"
The girl, who looks like a Webster
definition of an "airhead" suddenly yells.
"What's THAT?"
The first rookie stares at the plate in
her hand for the answer. "Spaghetti and
meat sauce
"h doesn't look like my mom's
spaghetti Meanwhile a line is forming
behind the airhead girl, "b it any good?"
she asks the rookie while she chews on
her add-a-bead.
The rookie says rapidly. "Yes it is
great. Would you like some?"
The airhead takes a step and looks at
the dish beside the spaghetti. "I'll have
the spaghetti, but what's that other
stuff?"
The first rookie putt the spaghetti on
the plate, "it's cheese for the spaghetti
The airhead stomps her navy-dextered
foot and squeals, "Yuck, don't you put
any of that on mine
She moves on down the line and starts
inspecting the vegetables.
The second rookie, not taking any
chances, yells, "We have com.beans.
potatoes and gravy
The girl thinks for a minute and says.
"I'll have potatoes with no gravy The
rookie puts the potatoes on the plate and
hands it to the girl. The dippy looks
down at the conglomeration, and says, "
changed my mind. Could I have gravy?"
The second rookie grabs the plate, throws
gravy on it and hands it back to the girl
who looks down at it and then backup.
"Could 1 have cheese on my spaghetti?"
The first rookie looks at the 25 people
in line, grabs the plate, tosses cheese all
over it, and then plops the plate on the
counter in front of the girl. Gravy anc
sauce slosh out all over the glass counters
The airhead finally picks up her plate and
leaves.
Five minutes later, gravy, spaghetti
sauce, and potatoes cover the counter,
glass covers, pans and both rookies. The
line is 40 students long and increasing. Ira
makes his way to the casuality area with a
grim look on his face.
Needless to say, there is a job opening
for two line servers at Jones Cafeteria.
Corrigan's Journey
Inspires Night Spot
Aerobics Catch On
By PAULA NORMAN
Many students have discovered that
the combination of sitting around a dorm
room studying and going out on weekends
drinking results in added poundage. The
fastest way to get rid of these excess
pounds is through diet modification and
exercise.
Aerobic dance provides a fun and
relatively inexpensive way to get that ex-
ercise. Aerobic exercise bums 240 to
300 calories per half hour, builds muscle
tone, strengthens the cardiovascular
system, helps release tension, and im-
proves coordination.
Greenville has seven major places that
offer aerobics classes, so students can easi-
ly find the best clan for their individual
purposes and pocketbooks.
The Greenville Athletic Club, the
Aerobics Workshop, the Spa, the Body
Shop. Sportsworld. and the ECU
Department of btramural-Recreation Ser-
vices all offer classes in aerobics at a
variety of times and costs.
The Greenville Athletic dub, 140
Oakmont Drive, operates from 6 a.m. to
10:30 p.m Monday through Friday,
and 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. on Saturdays and
Sundays. An individual membership
costs $30.40 a month, following an in-
itiation fee of $168.75.
However, if 10 or more people join
together.the monthly rate is only $28.80,
following an initiation fee of $112.50.
Besides aerobics classes, these fees cover
admittance to all other faculties such as
the whirlpool, steamroom, pool, and the
Nautilus fitness center.
The Aerobics Workshop. 417 Evans
Street Mall, has hour-long classes at 9:30
a.m 2:15. 4:20. 5:30,and 6:45 p.m.
on Mondays through Thursdays; 9:30.
12:00. and 3:1 5 on Fridays; and 1 1 KX)
on Saturdays.
The Aerobics Workshop's monthly
charges are $20 for two classses a week,
$24 for three classes a week, $27 for
four classes a week, and $32 for
unlimited weekly classes
Sportsworld of Greenville. 104 E.
Red Banks Road, offers a unique pro-
gram that combines aerobics with skating
on Monday and Thursday nights from 7
to 9 pjn for the cost of only $2 per per-
son.
In the first hour, a trained instructor
holds an ae.obics class, and in the second
hour, individuals may skate to bum off
additional calories.
The ECU Department of Intramural-
Recreational Services offers aerobic
fitness classes every semester. The classes
are divided into two sessions with each
session costing $8 for students and $10
for faculty.
This semster's classes are already
underway, but registration for next year's
session will be on Jan. 16 for the first ses-
sion, and on Feb. 27 for the second ses-
sion. For more information, call
757-6387 or go by 204 Memorial
Gym.
Aerobics may require a little time and
money, but there are tangible rewards.
Strength, flexibility, cardiovascular en-
durance, and the fun of getting in shape
with others make it all worthwhile.
By SUSANNA GOCKE
Back in the early 1930s. Douglas
Corrigan took off in a single engine
airplane with alleged intentions of flying
from New York to California.
Corrigan had previously attempted to
get approval from the Department of
Commerce to proceed with a trans-
Atlantic flight. His plan was rejected,
but as the world was to later discover,
that didn't stop him.
After flying for 27 hours on the sup-
posed New York to California run, Cor-
rigan mysteriously landed in Baldonnel,
Ireland. With no radio to warn the un-
suspecting Irish of his arrival. Corrigan
was indeed a surprise to see.
When asked where he had come from.
Corrigan told them New York. The
crowd was astonished. Corrigan explain-
ed, "My compass got stuck He later
added, "I really didn't mean to end up
here.
Because Corrigan was the first man to
fly across the Atlantic Ocean,
Wrongway Corrigan became a national
hero.
Leave it to Greenville to take off on
the Wrongway image and add a new bar
to the downtown scene; a bar in a class of
its own.
Wrongway Corrigan's is located on
Cotanche and Fifth Street. Jim Lashley.
former manager of Grogs, and Pat
Speckman, who also was employed at
Grogs, have been working on the plans
for the bar since early September.
They have worked together in various
bars throughout the Greenville area, and
are now the owners of their own bar.
Lashley and Speckman believe
Wrongway Corrigan's will offer more
food tones to Greenville.
Laahley and Speckman have a unique
i frying. Laahley bat a
cial flying license, and Speckman often
accompanies him on flights.
"We thought and thought about a
name for a bar Lashley said. "Because
we both love to fly, we were familiar with
the story of Wrongway Corrigan. So we
took the story and used it as our theme
The two designed the plans for the bar
themselves. With the help of their
carpenters Rocky Fallen and Barry
Brown, the remodeling was completed in
two months. The furniture is contem-
porary and is made with natural wood
from Cargo Furniture of Greenville.
The atmosphere is unique. Hanging
from the ceiling is a 40-pound F4U Cor-
sair made out of solid pine wood. Ceiling
fans, plants and table cloths add a touch
of class to the atmosphere.
Behind the bar. along with their friend-
ly bartenders, is a wide assortment of
drinks. The new specialty drinks include
"The Bomber "Crash and Bum and
"The B-52 Happy Hour is from 5 to
7 p.m Monday thru Friday, with a dis-
count on all drinks.
The building itself has been totally
remodeled, including the restrooms.
"There are so many bars that have
disgusting restrooms. we have made a
special investment to make sure our
facilities are as pleasant as possible for our
guests Laahley said.
The music played is a mixture of jazz
and contemporary rock. "We play the
musk at a comfortable conversation level,
so our guests can enjoy the music as well
as then conversation Speckman stated.
Memberships are $10 per year and
$50 lifetime. All members must be 21
years old.
So if you just happen to be downtown,
and want to try wMJJM new, go the
right way and drop in Wrongway Cor-
V





PAGE 4
From Rugby To Lacrosse
Sport Clubs Offer Athletic Variety
By KEN BOLTON &
LIZANNE JENNINGS
If vour athletic interests lie somewhere
beyond the realm of varsitv sports or in-
tramurals. then the place to turn is the
ECU Sport Club Program.
The sport clubs offer a wide range of
sports and activities, from men and
women's rugbv to lacrosse. With one of
the fastest growing sport club programs on
the East Coast, the ECU Department of
Intramural-Recreational Services has
something for everyone.
The 1 1 clubs which are currently ac-
tive on the ECU campus offer activities
ranging from instructional to competitive
in nature.
Of all the clubs on campus, the men s
rugby club is the most prolific one of all.
RUGBY
Named ECU's Outstanding Sport
Club in 1981 and 1982. the men's
rugbv club is currently ranked 3rd in the
state.
Rugby clubs from Virginia, South
Carolina. New York and even Canada
travel to ECU to compete against this
top-ranked club.
Two vears ago the Rugbv club travel-
ed to Nassau. Bahamas to compete in a
national rugbv tournament. The trip was
financed from pnre money awarded in a
previous tournament.
Last semester, the rugbv club com-
peted against nine rugbv teams down in
Myrtle Beach. After a hard-playing
weekend, the ECU ruggers placed 3rd in
the tournament.
Future plans for the club include one
tournament at Myrtle Beach during
Easter Break and another tournament
down in Fort Lauderdale during Spring
Break.
Anyone interested in the rugby club is
urged to come out and play. Those who
do not know how to play the game will
be taught the rules during practice. The
next rugbv season will begin in late
February.
Check for the announcements in The
East Carolinian this February for infor-
mation.
SURFING
The surf club is a talented and hard-
working organization that practices not
onJv in the summer but all seasons of the
year.
The club currently consists of 25
members under the supervision of Bob
Smith, a member of the ECU Biology
Department.
"At the beginning of every semester,
we have an annual surf-off to determine
the 12 best surfers said Bill Zimmer-
man, of the surf club. "The club usually
goes to Avon Pier, on the Outer Banks,
to have this surf-oti.
Last spnng. the club went to Coco
Beach. Fla. The club took second place
in a surf tournament against seven other
clubs, five of which were native Flon-
dians.
Those interested in the surf ciub mav
attend meetings held every Thursday
night at 7 p.m. in Mendenhall s Cof-
feehouse.
ECU rugby at iU finest
ecu ����� l��
This rugger leaves the opposition behind and heads tor day light.
ARCHERY
Those people you see on College Hill
every Monday and Wednesday with
their bows and arrows are not re-bom
Robin Hoods.
They are members of the archery sport
club, which was activated on the ECU
campus in March of this year and im-
mediately became very popular.
Competition is available for those who
wish to compete in target and field tour-
naments, or for those just interested in
learning a new skill.
FRISBEEDISC
The Frisbee disc club is in its third year
of operation and has gained acclaim by-
hosting the "Natural Light Flying Disc
Classic" and the "Natural Light Ultimax
Ultimate Tournament
Whether you're into freestyle, golf or
ultimate, the Fnsbee disc club coven it
all.
Practices are held on College Hill
Field. Tuesdays and Thursdays, (see
related article, page 5j
KARATE
Karate is one of the oldest and most
respected clubs on the ECU campus, as
the club dates back to the late 60s.
Annually ranked as one of the top col-
legiate teams in the nation, the club par-
ticipates in tournaments throughout the
Southeast, including the "Great Battle of
Atlanta" and the "U.S. Open.
The karate club practices in Room
108 of Memorial Gym on Tuesdays and
Thursdays. Classes for beginners are held
on Mondays and Wednesday's.
tournaments in the area, m
Mirstes Coliseum serving
practices and meetings.
.
a
as the
ifi&t ff
a
fc
mm y arraaaoss - �eu
If you're looking for a aport that u rapidly growing theaat, lacroaae has moved down South, including the
in popularity, then lacroaae may be the answer, establishment of a lacroaae aport club at ECU.
Known in the past aa a aport exclusively for the Nor-
LACROSSE
While known mainly as a sport for the
northeastern part of the country, lacrosse
has flourished recently in the south, in-
cluding the establishment of a lacrosse
sport club on the ECU campus
Skills acquisition and the enjoyment of
the sport are promoted by the club.
The lacrosse club practices on College
Hill Field every Tuesday and Thursday.
WOMEN'S RUGBY
Since its organization in 1979, the
women's rugby club has hosted tour-
naments and has played a regular
schedule of matches each year.
The club constantly proves that
women, as well as men, can play this
sport from "down under
The chib, which has hosted tour-
naments involving teams from the
Southeast and Northeast, practices at the
same rime the men do, Tuesdays and
Thursdays at the Allied Health Fields.
WOMEN'S SOCCER
This vear marked the occasion of aw
women's soccer club tomirat the North
Carolina Soccer League, with a regular
schedule of games and indoor and outdoor
league championship tournaments now on
the format.
The club, which has been in existence
since 1981. practices at the Minges
Fields. Tuesdays and Thursdays, and a
Memorial Gvm on Sundavs.
TEAM HANDBALL
MEN AND WOMEN
The men's team handball team has
been around the ECU campus since
1975. and the women were establishec
in 1980.
As a tribute to the strides taken bv
both these clubs, two men and 10 womer.
from ECU' have plaved in the U5. Na-
tional Sports Festival.
The women have also piaved in the
West Point Team Handball bvitawnaa
Tournament and the USTHF National
Tournament.
Both clubs practice in Memorial Gvm
on Tuesdays. Wednesdays and Satur-
days.
RACQUETBALL
The racquetball club holds clinics each
semester with an emphasis on learning the
skills of this energetic sport.
Most of the members of the club enter
WOMEN'S LACROSSE
ECU a currendy in the process of ad-
ding another club to the currer roster �
the women's lacrosse chib.
Women's lacrosse is identical to men s
across except for a few alterations in the
rules.
Unlike men. women do not wear any
type of equipment dunng play, and each
member is required to own a women s
lacrosse stick.
Practice for women's lacrosse will
begin the first of February. Check the an-
nouncexnents section in The East Carob-
w � w , -
While a lot of people would be ml i En e i
this member of the Fnabee club practical
Bodaciousl
By SUSAN CROSS
Unfortunate! v. ECU bears
oon of being a "suitcase
last bell on Fndavs not oar; Bath aases,
but it seems also so signaj atndenti
the road. This weekend mam
from the mvrh that there?
around Greenville.
Extend "around Greer- -
elude areas � thin an hour i:
drive of the citv. and yoal Bad at
marvelous Saruroav � Saawkn slam �
adventures!
We're about to bun aW a b wkid
haunts this L ruversjn. r�erv w�e�.eoc
No more lazv. wastea hour � and
Get on vour sneakers Cai �? ��? i
to explore the wilderness!
Mattamuskeet Nations '�'
Refuge. Goose Creek State Paak, anc
the Tar River area all represer- lifluul
types of entertainment. One a'er
wildlife, one caters to peopie. anc .w �
unrestricted tc all creatures � thai
warning.
Mattamuskeet borders the rnaimanc
side of Panubco Sound (from Greer -
US 264 to New Holland Tail 5 B
acre refuge and lake exists primary fa
wildlife preservation. lluMlif' "�
are encouraged to witness �!p -
masses and mammals in their narura.
habitat. . -
Each winter, approximately MMXX
Canadian fees. 20.000 whistling s�sr�
and 20 other duck species dot Ae 18
mile long lake, which stretches iV-4 d
nearly six miles.
Lake Mattamusaeet is a en- popalai

� �
� - a
ft

-
en
I
. ibsf h
es -V
Carnpsng
- - be z
as a
fOSj sjt r
Goose
- m �
protects a
n� ).
side .k I
campers.
Cainpsai
areas -
s a
sruderttsts
bojm pment
BO





PAGE 5
Variety
0-
'
i
-
ECU Pftefo Lab
3
ht.
1
I
- courti in
the site of
.
WOMEN'S SOCCER
� � ajion of the
v die North
. with a regular
. i and outdoor
.mament? now on
U een in existence
he Minaes
ind Thursday?, and at
lays.
TEAM HANDBALL
MEN AND WOMEN
andKall team has
� ECU campus since
aj. ere established
e rtrida taken bv
- m r.en and 1 0 women
ed in the LS. Na-
Festjval.
en hae also plaved in the
Team Handball Invitaional
nd :ne L'STHF National
practice in Memorial Gym
Wednesdays and Satur-
a- �
WOMEN'S LACROSSE
ECU is currentiv in the process of ad-
ding another club to the current roster �
�ne women's lacrosse club.
J. men's lacrosse is identical to men i
M except for a few alterations m the
Rr Tn. women do not wear any
c of equipment during play, and each
rnembei a required to own a women s
�ise stick.
Practice tor women's lacrosse will
-mn the first of February. Check the an-
-xincements section in The East Caroli-
-
irate' Frisbee Team Is
On An
By SUSANNA GOCKE
Fnsbee anvone? Have vou ever at-
tempted to throw one but vou weren t
quite sure how to? Or has anvone ever
asked vou to throw but vou politely refus-
ed because vcu reallv didn t feel confi-
dent of vour abilitv to return it?
A Frisbee is a round disc which glides
through the air horizontally from one
plaver to another. The real beauty of the
sport lies m the simplicity of the rules.
The East Carolina Fnsbee Club com-
bines the pure fun of throwing and cat-
ching a Frisbee with the excitement ot
team sports.
TV Fnsbee club has a subdivision �
a seperate club which focuses mainly on a
game called Ulimate.
The game is a fast-moving, non-contact
team sport which requires both good
throwing and catching skills, elusive runn-
ing tactics, stamina, and the ability to
plav defensively-
(n a new book entitled "Ulimate I fie
Fundamentals of the Sport bv lrv Kalb
and Tom Kennedy, the fundamentals of
the sport are described.
Climate is plaved bv two teams of
seven people each. The ob)ect of the
game is to score goals by completing a
pass from a plaver to a teammate � the
endzone. ,
The Fnsbee can only be moved by-
passing and once a plaver catches the disc
heshe must stop and attempt to throw.
The plav is continued until a goal is
scored. i l n
A throw off - similar to a football
kickort � restarts play after each goal. It
is crucial to connect the passes because if
the disc is dropped, the opposing team
gets possession where it was dropped.
"Ulimate offers aerodynamic
capabilities that no other sport has said
Jack Gouch. an ECU junior who is a
member of the Ultimate team. "It � bet-
ter than football, soccer or basketball in
that there are so manv vanations in throw-
ing the disc
There are approximately L memDers
on the ECU Fnsbee Club, and others
who are interested in becoming members
are encouraged to come to the practices.
The club is University funded through
the Intramural Sport Qub.
Ultimate is considered an international
sport, and the participating teams are
members of the Ultimate Players
Association. The club was introduced to
East Carolina in 1980 by two students.
Mike Cotter and Peter Laubert.
David Bamhardt. who is the acting
president of the club, said "I enjoy the
travel, exercise, and the competition with
other teams. Dunng a game 1 average run-
ning 3 to 5 miles.
"Fnsbee offers not onlv a challenge,
but a great physical fitness program.
Bamhardt added.
Over Spnng Break, the club will
travel to the University of Florida m
Gainesville to compete in the 2nd -An-
nual Gator Frost Breaker Ultimate Bowl.
Approximately 10 teams will be par-
ticipating from the Southeast. Tentative
plans are now underway for those
Whirl
mat manv people know about our club.
Lake anv sport, having an audience
always helps the plavers' attitude and
performance.
Anv living disc can be used in the
game as long as it is acceptable to both
teams. The ECU Ultimate team current-
ly uses the Wham-O I65g. wkack is the
most common in competition.
Although the strategy of the game
seems relatively safe, there are nsks in-
volved. One of wh,ch is called "the
horizontal slam" bv the plavers.
This occurs when a plaver lavs his
bodv horizontally in midair, attempting to
catch a pass, and lands horizontally on the
ground after a 3 to 5-foot fall.
"It can be very painful said Bar-
nhardt.
The East Carolina Fnsbee Club has
wntten in its bv-laws that the dub at
tempts to promote all aspects of Fnsbee
plav.
This includes other games such as
fnsbee golf and freestyle. However.
Ultimate is the most active part ot the
club.
One of the most unusual aspects ot the
game is that an official referee is not re-
quired to control the game. The plavers
themselves control the game, calling their
own fouls.
The East Carolina Fnsbee Club holds
bi-monthlv meetings in Room 24 in
Mendenhall and weeklv practices at the
bottom of College Hill at 3 p.m. on
Tuesday and Thursday at 2 p.m. and
While a lot of people would be aabafied to be able to throw a Frijbee.
Z member of theFri.bee club practice, hi. unconvenuonal form.
Bodacious Roadtrips
m i i rtnwl destined for Spanish moss and nanow w
vacauon spot tor waterfowl destined tor p�-
Bamhardt said. "I reallv don't think enjoy the tun.
id. I reallv don t inin enjoy u ��
If You Dare
By SUSAN CROSS
Unfortunately. ECU bears the reputa-
tion of being a "suitcase college. The
last bell on Fndavs not onlv ends classes,
but it seems also to signal students to hit
the road. This weekend vacancy stems
from the mvth that there's nothing to do
er and Greenville.
Extend "around Greenville to �-
elude areas within an hour and a halt
drive of the citv. and vou'll find several
marvelous Saturday or Sunday afternoon
adventures! ,
We're about to burv that mvth which
haunts this University every weekend.
No more lazv. wasted hours around here.
Get on vour sneakersCur we're going
to explore the wilderness! ,�
Mattamuskeet National Wildlife
Refuge. Goose Geek State Park and
the Tar River area all represent different
types of entertainment. One caters t
vacation spot tor waterfowl destined for
the South. ,
Swamps and marshland surround the
lake. The refuge officials flood or drain
these areas according to the seasons. All
efforts have a common goal: to preserve a
habitat for wildlife.
As a wildlife spectator at Mat-
tamuskeet. vou will see manv of the 114
species of birds currendv roosting at the
refuge, a. if vou're a patient and a quiet
hiker, you mav catch a glimpse of any ot
the following animals: deer, bobcats, ot-
ters, raccoons, minks, weasels, and
possibly a black bear.
The 20 miles of marsh dikes make tor
enjoyable hiking, that is. no boots or steep
Spanish moss and nanow winding trails
through stands of virgin pine are all next
to the good 'ole Pamlico River, as one
frequent visitor recalls it.
Goose Geek State Park also sports
recreational facilities such as picnicking,
boating, fishing and swimming. The
p.ckmcking area can accommodate large
groups: however, solitarv tables are tuck-
ed awav for romantic duos.
Fishing at GCSP is unique because
the saltwater sound and the freshwater
creeks promise catches of flounder,
bluefish. bass, bluegill and perch.
Both Mattamuskeet and Goose Creek
have distinguished trails and suggested
facilities. But the Tar River area, nght
here in Greenville, also offers a vanety ot
enjovauK: "��"��� ,
nM And the lake invites fishermen to �
35&��-�- r&rrr�j
striped bass, catfish, and bream. Outdoor Rec Program. However,
Coping at Mai! iHtg J ��t a cancel all the ac-
hibited because it i, a national refuge. But youoan re
of entertammen, One cater, to - �S� " "
wildlife, one caters to people, and one a you are promised an eyeru nVer with your tnends.
unrestricted to all creatures - that . fair hib.tr Quaint areas are now being
� L-JI- nland -wTttSh!Gvule (SE of developed, bu, you may choose to -I
rStacSS WXS caters to the publicand up camp,
side of Pamibco Sound (Greenvilk. Wasmngt a, fa
The I 300 acre park rests on the north
side of the Pamlico River and invites
campers, as well as day visitors.
Camping sites are divided into three
areas: wilderness camping, tent camping.
US 264 to New Holland). This 50.180
acre refuge and lake exists pnmanly tor
wildlife preservation. Howeve- ors
are encouraged to witness waterfow
masses and rnamrnals in their natural
areas wuaemew v-��erf i
KablUt- .J n (V)0 or trailer camping- Remember - ttU
Each wmter. approximately 30.00U or traUer ��P�� j
Canadian gee. 20.000 whistling swans iloJt R� Center.
"�KStof.SvS K which are adiacentto
mile long lake, which stretches a belly .��, are not novice in beau-
nearly six miles. Ak1�wUnt live oaks draped with
Lake Mattamuskeet is a very popular ty. Abundant oa� f
camp. I i �
ECU students should take the in-
itiative and organize an afternoon of ex-
ploring one of these scenic areas. So much
of our environment is oimmercialized that
a day full of natural beauty should be
welcomed.
Once you've experienced these site,
you may never have another boring
weekend. There's plenty more to do
around Greenville: Pungo Refuge. Mer-
chants Mill Pond, the Eao River. Pet-
tigrew Park. Raven Rock.�
Getting In Shape?
Green Spring. Park offer a 20-station exercije trail for those who
would Eke to get rid of a few unwanted pounds.





PAGE 6
New Disc Zaps Arcades
By M1CAH HARRIS
Does anyone remember Pong, perhaps
the premier video game? Almost ten
ears have passed since its debut and dur-
ing that time video has added new vistas
to the word 'arcade.
However, the fast appeal of video
games has faded. Manv arcades had to
close. Still, it would be an unfair assump-
tion to think that the video game parlor
will soon go the way of the dinosaur and
disco.
Reminiscent of the movie industry's
response to television during the 50 s.
the video game industry is flaunting new
technical innovations in an attempt to br-
ing in more patrons. These innovations
Arcades Fading
The arcade industry has been tapped
so hard it mav never completely recover.
From 1980 to 1982 video game parlors
flounshed, doubling to 10,000 in a short
amount of time. However, over 1500 ar-
cades have shut down this past vear.
The novelty appeal of arcades has
worn off, leaving manufactorers and game
room owners in search of a "blockbuster
that will lure game players back to the ar-
cade. Dragon's Lair is one of the current
"hits" arcades are leaning on. It stands to
reason that if someone goes in to plav a
video disc game, they might also put
some quarters in some other machines
with less visual flash.
So while arcades have been zapped,
they are at least putting their shields up
and firing back.
can best be summed up in two words:
video disc.
Video technology is responsible for br-
inging the cartoon game Dragon's Lair.
to the arcade. The fully animated
graphics of Dragon's Lair, brought a
Walt Disney ish appeal to the arcade
game with good reason.
The animation studio responsible for
Dragon's Lair is headed bv former
Disney animator Don Bluth. The
Dragon J Lair is not a flash in the prover-
bial pan. Bluth's studio will soon release
another game and a rival studio has plans
for a game that will combine cartoon
animation with the traditional arcade-type
animated figures.
Another current video disc takes a dif-
ferent approach than Dragon's Lair.
This is M.A.C.H. 3. the game that puts
you in the cockpit. This game uses live
aenal photography and a magnified
screen in an attempt to give the player the
illusion of flight.
One thing about these fun machines is
the cost � thev are expensive. One
game of Dragon s Lair cost 50 cents and
it can be over quickly if you're new to the
game. M.A.C.H. 3 will cost you 75
cents.
These "state of the art" games, along
with many old favorites, can be found in
Greenville. So. if you're one of the few
million who still enjoy the np-zap of the
arcade, the following information will be
of good use to you:
The Space Castle on Greenville
Boulevard offers a club membership. For
two dollars you can enjoy the fun of
video games for six months.
During the period, members receive
eight tokens for a dollar. Space Castle
offers the following games: Star Trek.
Donkey Kong. Donkey Kong Jr
Joust. Galaga. and Popeye. As of this
writing. Star Wars, Buck Rogers and
Pole Position were forthcoming.
The Sandwich Shop is a combina-
tion arcade and eatery. It offers five
tokens for a dollar as opposed to the usual
four. On Saturdays, six tokens can be ob-
tained for a dollar and eight on Sundays.
Wednesday night is College Night and
students presenting their school I.D. get
three tokens free. Also notable are
Ladies' Night on Monday and Men's
Night Thursday. If you're there on the
right night, you can get five free tokens
when you buy a dollar's worth.
The Sandwich Shop offers such
games as Krull, Star Wars and old
favorites such as Donkey Kong, Cen-
tipede, and Pac Man. Possible additions
in the future include Chexx which is not a
video game but a type of fooz ball and a
video jukebox.
Aladdin's Castle in the Carolina
East Mall has many games, including
some for sale. A few hundred dollars
could get you your own Space Fury,
Centipede, Defender, Frogger. or
Tempest. Among the games to play are
Dragon's Lair, Disc of Tron, Star
Wars, Burger Time. Popeye, and Time
Pilot.
Old favorites include Donkey Kong.
Pac Man. Zaxxon, and Space Inoaders.
Space Inoaders Yep, old arcades games
never die they just disintergrate.
Maybe Video Games
Are Getting Too Realistic
A student in this drawing by Richard Haselrig learns that
the "Monster From Mars" plays rough. Maybe he should
have saved his quarters for the laundry.
STUDENr CHRISTMAS SPECIALS!
STUDENTS RECEIVE A 15DISCOUNT
(INSTEAD OF THE USUAL 10) ON ALL
MERCHANDISE IN THE STORE (EX-
CEPT FREE LETTERING SPECIAL &
SALE SHOES) UNTIL DEC. 20th!
STUDENTS RECEIVE FREE
LETTERING (ONE- COLOR)
W THE PURCHASE OF
ANY GARMENT
UNTIL DEC. 20th!
R US SELL SPOR TS WE A R
(THE FINEST IN QUALITY!)
-GREEK JERSEYS
-LONG & SHORT-SLEEVE T's
-HOODED T's wPOCKETS
-CREW NECK & HOODED
SWEATSHIRTS
-SWEAT PANTS wELASTIC
WAISTBAND
-TANK TOPS
-LINED & UNLINED
JACKETS
-HOODED LINED
JACKETS
ALSO OUR LA TEST ARRIVALS
-TODD 1 WARMUP SUITS
-FARWEST SKI CLOTHING
-D.P. PHYSICAL FITNESS EQUIPMENT
-EKTELON RAQUETBALL EQUIPMENT
AND SPECIAL SALE MERCHANDISE
-CLOSEOUT SHOES - PRICED TO SELL!
(NIKE, ETONIC, NEW BALANCE, & MORE)
-SCREEN-PRINT T-SHIRTS - E.C.U. LOGOS!
(LONG & SHORT-SLEEVE)
BONDS
218 Arlington
756-6001 &
Ml. HODGES CO.
210 E.Prfth Street
752-HJ56
ECU Stud
By JENNIFER SINGLET ARY
Hum � it I that
Students are rushing u; the ime are
racing towards west a �
towards centra campus. Some ar lopp-
ing on the ECL- bus so thai the
sure to make it on time.
That's right, it's shnosl v
This hour mav not be � .
everywhere, but at ECL t mesj
Opera Time.
"The Young and The Restless
"All Mv Children" and "Dbvj of Our
Lives" begin the soap opera ff
each dav. Soaps, as thev arc
called, have become a maior source i
entertainment for college �
throughout the United States
Not onlv are females attractec I
"sagas" but soaps are becoming
inglv popular among the tmlt popufal
as well.
Many students rash to their dona
dav with the hope that the wiO :��
their roommate to the tele vision arvc
their favorite network soap. If vou re not
fortunate enough to grab the kese �
vour room, there's aiwavs T set in 'he
dorm lobbv.
You oniv hae to get there nbou
hours eariv in order to stake � a
During soap hour in Tyiei Dora
one so much as twitches an eyebr w r
fear of missing a romantic rnomer bet
ween Luke and Laura. Everyone �
too busv concentrating.
1 recentiv asked a group of ttudeati �
male and female � to list the ttver -
reasons that thev watch soap operas
There were some interesting answer
fee
Tne
gianv -
-
Mt
- - �
i
� -
I
Don
L
x o y

v
d6
X
vC
.
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PAGE 7
: s
.
iames
loo Realistic
. this drawiruj by Richard Haaelrig learns that
From Mars" plays rough. Maybe he should
bi quarters for the laundrv.
CIALS!
ORTSH EAR
V QUALITY!)
-GREEK JERSEYS
-TANK TOPS
-LINED & UNLINED
JACKETS
-HOODED LINED
JACKETS
R RIVALS
UTS
ITHING
NESS EQUIPMENT
BALL EQUIPMENT
E MERCHANDISE
priced to sell!
ibalance, & more)
rts - e.c.u. logos!
;ve)
M.L HODGES CO.
210 E.Ftfth Street
WJ 752-4156
ECU Students Slip Away To Soaps
By JENNIFER SINGLETARY
Hurrv � it's that time of day!
Students are rushing up the hill. Some are
racing towards west campus, many
towards central campus. Some are hopp-
ing on the ECU bus so that they'll be
�ure to make it on time.
That's right, it's almost one o'clock.
This hour mav not be significant
everywhere, but at ECU it means "Soap
Opera Time
'The Young and The Restless
"All Mv Children" and "Days of Our
Lives" begin the soap opera afternoon
each dav. Soaps, as thev are popularly
called, have become a major source of
entertainment for college students
throughout the United States.
Not onlv are females attracted to these
"sagas" but soaps are becoming increas-
ingly popular among the male population
as well.
Many students rush to their dorms each
dav with the hope that they will beat
their roommate to the television and catch
their favorite net vork soap. If vou're not
fortunate enough to grab the television in
vour room, there's always the set in the
dorm lobbv.
You onlv have to get there about two
hours earlv in order to stake vour claim.
During soap hour in Tvler Dorm, no
one so much as twitches an evebrow for
tear of missing a romanoc moment bet-
ween Luke and Laura. Everyone is just
too busv concentrating.
1 recently asked a group of students �
male and female � to list the three major
reasons that they watch soap operas.
There were some interesting answers.
Distraction, relaxation and humor were
listed as the biggies-
Many students say that the soaps offer
a distraction from classes, tests, projects,
term papers and reality. "It makes you
feel like your life isn't so terrible, "said
one student.
All the beautiful clothes, the
glamorous parties, and some strategic
ruthlessness offer a great escape for one
co-ed.
"Just turn on 'The Young and the
Restless' and cool out said a female stu-
dent. Many believe that you forget your
own problems because you are too ab-
sorbed in the lives of fictional characters
to remember the trials and tribulations of
life.
They make you forget a painful rela-
tionship or maybe even an argument with
a friend.
Males interviewed tended to find the
everday saga of Steve and Betsy (As the
World Turns) very funny, "h takes five
weeks for them to bury someone said a
male student.
This reflects the attitude among many
guys. Most said they watch the exag-
gerated dramas not because they are in-
terested but because they love a good
laugh.
No matter what the reason for wat-
ching soaps, people tend to be tuning in to
them on a regular basis (at least four times
a week).
Are you a Soap Opera Freak) Take
this test and find out. Can you name the
soaps these characten appear on?
1. Rachel, Felicia, Sandy
2. Tom, Doug, Micky
3. Victor. Nikki, Andy
4. Erica, Opal, Jenny
5. Sam, John. Margo
6. Nola. Vanessa, Annabelle
7. Lira, Travis, Wendy
8. Frank, Jill. Delia
9. Beau. Vicki, Asa
rO.Corky. Jimmy Lee, Slick
rtjidsoj ra��Q(Q a�r-j oi
ana,I0(6 H .aAcJ(8 "O0!
joj ipn�g(� m8r-j fcurpinryq �unj
PPOtfV "P V(5 aajPmD AW I1V(
stJtissy rj dot fcrnoj saAr jnQ jo
�ate PH�y v (i :���v
Students Offered Variety Of Tunes
By JENNIFER SINGLET ARY
When an aspiring college student final-
ly leaves home, not only are cherished
memories, family and friends left behind,
but a favorite radio station too.
Fortunately, East Carolina students
can chose from a number of radio stations
in the Greenville area.
From contemporary rock stations, soul
stations, easy listening stations to jazz and
rock and roll, you name it, this area has it.
Just name your tune!
During the past few weeks, a random
poll was taken to find which stations most
ECU students listen to � and why. The
information revealed that many college
students, depending on their mood, are
very choosy about their music.
There are four stations that were found
to be more popular among students:
WZMB, the ECU radio station; WITN.
Washington 93; WRQR, Farmville 94;
and WQDW. Kinston 97.7. (all FM)
WZMB, the campus radio station, of-
fers its listeners a contemporary rock
sound but not a heavy acid-rock beat. If
you are a Journey fan or maybe you like
AC-DC, then this is probably your sta-
tion.
WZMB also offers a jazz and soul
hour on the weekends.
If you love soul, contemporary and
oktes-but-goodies. then WQDW is the
station for you. 24 hours of soul and
rhythm-and-blues. The station catches the
older crowd with tunes from Marvin
Gaye, Gladys Knight and the Pips, and
Aretha Franklin.
It offers the younger set music from
Prince. Jeffery Osboroe. Qaka Khan,
and Michael Jackson. So tune to 97.7 if
vou're a soul lover.
WRQR. Farmville. offers its listeners
a mixture of rock and soul. For all you
country fans, there's even a little flair of
country music thrown in from time to
time. A good station for people who en-
joy all tvpes of music.
For variety and just plain entertain-
ment, there is WITN, Washington 93
FM. It's a smooth mixture of soft rock,
Top-40 and a little soul. According to
the poll, this station is the most popular
among ECU students.
Now all of you out there in radio land
know what station is best for you. Have
you made a decision? Pick one and turn
your radio on!
ST AMIS V LBA�Y � �CU P
WZMB, ECU campus radii station. offers a variety of music.
Attention
Graduating Seniors
Don't leave Pirate athletics behind when you graduate!
FREE FREE FREE
$30 one year membership in
The
(jrjvtofe
Club
As our gift to you, become a member to-
day by simply filling out the form below,
or call Charles Shavitz at the Pirate Club,
757-6178.
V
as?
s&
Pirate Club Student Membership '84
�SP
Name
qP o
Home address
Mail to:
Student membership
ECU Pirate Club
Greenville, N.C. 27834
Will graduate: Fall '83
1st summer '84
Spring '84.
2nd summer '84
v -





PAGE 8
HOW PARENTS CAN PAY TUITION
WITH INTUITION.
Think about it
Four years of tuition. Four years of rental
student housing plus all the incidentals of financ-
ing a college education. For most of us, it
isn't easy Not by a long shot
But here's a thought that not only
makes it more affordable, but makes it
sensible as well:
You can purchase a fully-furnished
2-bedroom, 2 or 2 Vz -bath condominium
"A
townhouse apartment at
Kingston Place (only a
mile from ECU.) at pre-
construction prices
with a full 90
financing plan to make it
even easier.
Think about it.
Tax laws now permit a parent to rent to a
son or daughter so long as the rent charged is at
"fair market value
KINGSTON
PLACE
So, you want a gixnJ place tor your student
to live. You rent him or her your gtxxi place. At the
end of four years you've not only educated a young
person, but you've also paid a goodly sum
toward the costs of owning income
property!
And at the end of their college
stint, you can continue to rent your condo-
�$ minium at Kingston Place or sell it outright
. . an excellent tax
shelter for parents
Think about it
Why wait four
years for a return on your
college investment dollars
when Kingston Place can
begin paying you back today?
Pre-construction purchase
reservations are now being accepted on a first-come,
first-served basis. We invite your inquiry
Kingston Place 3101 S. Evans Street Greenville, N.C 27834
IN N.C. CALL TOLL FREE 1-800-682-8102 (Outside N.C, call collect 919-756-0285)
Kingston Place is a development of and marketed by Unkon of America. Inc
If you are a freshman or sophomore attending
ECU and would like to register for a free
three-day vacation to Hilton Head Island,
South Carolina, fill out the attached form and
mail to the Kingston Place office or stop by
and register and pick up a free brochure.
Name
ID number
Home address
Home phone
School phone
Only freshmen and sophomores are eligible for the vacation of-
fer. Drawing to be held by Dec. 15.





Title
The East Carolinian, December 1, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
December 01, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.306
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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