The East Carolinian, November 29, 1983






�he iEaHt (Earolmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 Noj6 2 7
Tuesday, November 29,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Supervisory Board
Created To Guide
Rental Operations
Director of Student Health Services Dr. James McCallum addressed
the Student Government Association Monday night. McCallum spoke
on the various health services offered on campus. After the speech.
the SGA voted to create a refrigerator board to oversee ail refrigerator
rentals. In the past, the rental system has been abused. SGA meetings
are held every Monday at 5 p.m.
Watkins Selected As WZMB Manager
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Sttff � r1l�r
The ECU Media Board in a
meeting last Tuesday appointed
Greg Watkins as General
Manager of WZMB, the campus
radio station. Watkins replaces
Jim Ensor, who resigned in Oc-
tober.
"I'm pleased with it Watkins
said. Watkins, 29, has been work-
ing at WZMB since last summer,
when he began as a disc jockey.
Since then he has served as rock
music director, assistant general
manager and promotional direc-
tor. Following Ensor's resigna-
tion, Watkins was appointed in-
terim general manager.
"We had some really good in-
terviews with some really
qualified candidates said Media
Board Chairman Mark Niewald.
"Greg had the experience, and I
do feel that that was what got him
hired he said.
Watkins said he would like to
make the station more accessible
to students. "To accomplish this
we're playing more and different
types of music and providing
readier access to our public service
facilities he said.
Stressing that the station is a
student station, Watkins said he
has strong beliefs about the type
of music that will be played.
"When I became rock director, I
made a few changes in the music
we're playing. 1 personally believe
that a radio station which by
charter belongs to the student
body should serve as much of that
student body as possible he
said.
Niewald cited the changes made
by Watkins. "The board was real-
ly impressed by a lot of the
changes that have been taking
place during the past six months,
as far as format change and play-
ing music that's more appealing to
students. A lot of the students I've
talked to have been really impress-
ed and are starting to listen to
WZMB a lot more he said.
Ensor's resignation was due to
what he termed academic and
health problems and "the
pressures of the job Watkins
said he didn't think that this
would be a problem for him.
"It was a combination of things
that forced Jim to resign. My
situtation is a little better than
Jim's was he said. Niewald add-
ed that the Media Board was con-
cerned about keeping the radio
station at its current level in order
to limit the responsibilities and
pressures of the job.
The possibility of WZMB's at-
taining national public radio
status was raised recently. "The
-mm
rr- T. �
physical restrictions of our radio
station make it impossible to ob-
tain NPR status Watkins said.
"We are not a public radio sta-
tion, that's the bottom line. We
are a student radio station
Watkins said he feels that many
students listen to the station, but
added that he "would like it if
more students would give us a
listen. More than any other radio
station, we are open to sugges-
tions and requests from our
listeners Watkins said.
By GREG RIDEOUT
The Student Government
Association Legislature created
Monday by unanimous consent a
refrigerator board to oversee the
operation of the Refrigerator
Rental System. A governing
board like the one created was
greatly needed according high-
placed SGA officials.
The refrigerator board is the
end result of more than one year's
work. The impetus behind
creating it, according to SGA
Secretary Becky Talley, was the
lack of supervision the SGA had
over past refrigerator rental
managers. Talley said the free rein
in past years have led to abuses of
the system.
The board will be effective in
January 1984 and be chaired by
the SGA treasurer. Members will
include a staff member selected by
the vice chancellor for student
life, the three Student Residence
Association vice presidents, a day
student and the university unions
business manager who will not
have a vote.
Policy making will be the main
concern of the board. The separa-
tion of policy from administra-
tion, according to Director of
University Unions and SGA ad-
visor Rudolph Alexander, will
lead to a smoother operation. The
board will recommend to the SGA
Legislature how budget surpluses
should be spent. Over the past
several years, the rental service
has accumulated slightly less than
$40,000 in surplus revenue.
"I'll now have someone to go
to when I need some advice or
have an idea said Refrigerator
Rental Manager Tory Russo.
Russo, along with SGA President
Paul Naso, SGA Secretary Sarah
Coburn, Legislator Mike Dixon
and Talley, worked on creating
the board.
Past abuses of the system, ac-
cording to Russo, have resulted in
the loss of refrigerators. In April
of 1981, then Refrigerator Rental
Manager Ed Walters was accused
by state auditors of being un-
Roaao
cooperative during an audit of the
rental system. The auditor said
problems in management led to
the accumulation of outstanding
contracts and lost refrigerators.
Before the creation of the
board, the SGA secretary kept
track of the refrigerator rental
budget although she had no
authority to do so. Talley said she
now feels she has the authority to
rule on rental manager decisions.
Rental managers are appointed
by the SGA president without
consent of the legislature. This
method of appointment can lead
to favoritism, and thus, according
to SGA officials is another reason
for the creation of the board.
Russo said of the $40,000 the
rental service has now, $10,000 of
it have been given to the Transit
System for the operation of their
night bus schedule and $1,000 to
Pirate Walk for the purchase of
jackets.
The remainder will be used for
the purchase of badly needed new
refrigerators and the branching
out of rental services, according
to Russo. At present, the rental
system offers a copying services to
the students through the student
supply store and the Croatan.
A charter for the board will be
drawn up by the SGA Legislature.
Demand For Courses Causes Problems
(CPS) � Student demand for cer-
tain career-oriented courses has
outstripped colleges' ability to
provide them, and soon only top
students may be able to get into
them, educators around the coun-
try report.
"We have students back for a
fifth year because they rraven't
been able to get all their required
courses says Harold Kidder,
faculty chairman at West Virginia
University.
To cope with student demand
for business courses, the Universi-
ty of Illinois' business school now
only lets in freshmen with high
grade point aver ages. (The ECU
School of Business has instituted a
similar policy, requiring a 2.5 gpa
or special permission for upper
level business courses.)
"Students admitted this year
are no longer guaranteed that they
will be able to graduate in certain
majors said David Sprecher,
provost of the University of
California-Berkeley.
Berkeley no longer will allow
students to declare majors in
business economics, communica-
tions, computer science,
economics and certain engineering
specialties.
About a third of the student
body at the University of
Nebraska-Omaha was affected by
class closings this fall, according
to a poll taken by the student
government there.
Nevertheless, says Jack
Peltason of the American Council
on Education in Washington,
D.C "It would be misleading to
say thousands of students aren't
getting an education because
courses aren't there. We have
many problems, but that's not a
major one.
The problem does seem less
severe at private colleges, but a
wide variety of public campuses
are having trouble hiring enough
professors to teach the "meal
ticket" courses and finding ways
of moving money from less-
popular courses.
"We just don't have as much
flexibility as we would like says
Warren Haffner, registrar at Penn
State. "It's difficult when you're
working with human resources
"There simply has been a boom
in business, computer science and
some engineering areas says
Kathy Jones, Iowa State's assis-
tant registrar. "The demand is
growing faster than the ability to
fill it
To fill it, universities must com-
pete directly with private in-
dustries for computer scientists
and engineers.
Fewer people are going into
teaching, however. A recent study
by the Association for Computing
Machinery, a national computer
industry information center,
found that only 13 percent of its
members stayed in education after
graduating.
The study also found that half
the grads make $30,000-$50,000 a
year, while 27 percent of them
make more than $50,000.
By contrast, college faculty
members generally get starting
salaries between $20,000 and
30,000.
Schools are finding that to at-
tract anyone at all to their high-
demand departments, they have
to pay more than $30,000.
When they do, the new recruits
See SCHOOLS, Page 3
Groups Provide Thanksgiving Aid pn The Inside
By MILLIE WHITE
i-acu
t
And They're Off
Two ECU students rash to make it to dans on time Monday. Three
anexcused cuts and their grade could be lowered.
Most of us spent Thanksgiving
stuffing our faces and visiting
relatives; however, some Green-
ville residents weren't so lucky.
Locally, many organizations
donated food, money and time in
an effort to help needy families
celebrate Thanksgiving.
"We gave food to several
famines last week Mrs. Rapson
of the Salvation Army said. Ac-
cording to Rapson, the organiza-
tion gives food to needy families
every week on a regular basis.
However, the food is given to
emergency cases only.
Various ECU groups also con-
tributed to the Thanksgiving Day
cause. Three sororities, Alpha Xi
Delta, Alpha Delta Pi and Delta
Zeta collected food to give to local
families. Along with collecting
food, the Delta Zetas contributed
money to send their house mother
to Maine so she could visit her
grandchildren. Residents of Jones
dorm collected food for their
housekeepers.
One of Greenville's bigger
Thanksgiving dinners took place
at St. Gabriel's School
Auditorium where members of St.
Gabriel's Catholic Church and the
Tabernacle of Prayer held a din-
ner for many local residents.
Father Jerry Sherba of St.
Gabriel's said, "Everyone was
welcome � the rich, the poor, the
lonely, the old. We didn't want
anyone to be lonely or hungry on
Thanksgiving
Dr. Nina Blount, who is the ad-
ministration manager in the allied
health department and a member
of the Tabernacle of Prayer, said
approximately 300 dinners were
served; 180 of these dinners were
delivered to various families.
Blount said a church van picked
up elderly persons who had no
transportation to the event.
Sherba said the Thanksgiving
Day dinner "was a dream I've had
for years and it came true He
added, "The neighbors are still
talking about it so I know it was a
huge success
"We are going to try to con-
tinue this throughout the years
Blount said.
Announcements2
Editorials4
Entertainment7
SportsIt
Classifieds12
� Starting today, The East
Carolinian wffl be nuuaag �
crossword puzzle once a
Answers will appeal
for each Tuesdays
the puzzle, page 6.
� U.S. Rep. R
(D-Ore.) has propoi
college scholarships for
It
S.

'�a wn iahi l a�i ii o�i





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 1983
I
J
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed In the announcement
column, please type it on an an-
nouncement form and send It to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manaoer
Announcement forms art
available at the East Carolinian
office In the Publications
Building Flyers and handvrrif
ten copy on odd-sized paper can
not be accepted
There Is no charge for an
nouncements, but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
The deadline for an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
p m Wednesday tor the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to a"
campus organizations and
departments
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
Tonight at 530 p.m the Col
lege Republicans will meet In
the Mendenhali Coffeehouse
Details of our new project,
Adoot a Marine will be
presented All CR's and persons
interested in the College
Republicans are urged to at
tend.
ECGC
The East Carolina Gay Com
munity will meet Monday. Dec
5 at 730 p.m The meeting will
be held at the Catholic Newman
Center, 953 East 10th Street (at
the bottom oi College Hill) All
Interested persons are cordially
invited to attend
ACCOUNTING
SOCIETY
DINNER
The Accounting Society will
rold it's dinner meeting on Mon
day. Dec 5 at 7 p m at Western
Sizziin, 10th St The guest
speaker will be Larry Keecr.
CA from Pittard and Perry
Members and prospective
members are Tvited to attend
Signup sheet is on Accounting
Society Bulletin Board
ALL CAMPUS
PARTY
Friday, Dec I Phi Kappa Tau
will host their annual Chill Thrill
All Campus Party located at 40�
Elizabeth Street from 3 p.m. to a
p.m Drawing for 10 speed bike
will be held along with many
other prizes. Show your Pirate
Spirit and stop by and enoy the
fun Must have valid ID to con
sume beverage Tickets tor
drawing available in front of stu
dent supply store or from any
Phi Tau
PHYE MAJORS
All students who plan to
declare physical education as a
malor should report to Minges
Coliseum at 10:00 am, Thurs
day. Dec. � for a motor and
physical fitness test Satlsfac
tory performance on this test Is
required as a prerequiste for of
flclal admittance to the physical
education malor program More
detailed Information concerning
the test Is available by calling
757 4441 or 444J. Any student
with medical condition that
would contralndlcate partlclpa
tion is the testing program
should contact Dr Israel at
757-447
PHI ETA
SIGMA
There will be a dinner meeting
Thurs. Dec. 1 at Parker's Barb
que at 4:00 Or Markowski will
speak about marriage and fami
ly relations. All members are
urged to attend
ACCT SOCIETY
DINNER
The Accounting Society will
hold if s dinner meeting on Mon
day, Dec 5 at 7 p.m at Western
Sizziin, loth Street The guest
speaker will be Larry Keech.
CPA from Pittard and Perry
Members and prospective
members are invited to attend.
Sign up sheet is on Accounting
Society Bulletin Board
UBE
SCHOLARSHIP
The Department of English in
vltes applications tor newly
established University Book Ex
change Scholarship, a $750
award based on academic
achievement, citizenship and
leadership and potential. To ap-
ply, you must (1) be a currently
enrolled senior English maior
(1) have an overall GPA of 3 5 or
above (3) submit a one-page.
MALE STRIPPER
The pledges of Sigma Nu pre
sent the first ever Ladles Lock
in at the Elbo room, Nov 29
featuring a professional Male
Stripper Ladies will be allowed
in at � p.m. to get happy hour
prices and to see the STRIP
PER. Then at 10 p.m the men
will be let in to get the same hap
py hour prices all night Great
door prizes will be given out at
11 p.m Get your advance
tickets from any Sigma Nu
pledge See ad this page
CIRCLE K
ECU CIRCLE K CLUB invites
you to come out and loin us this
coming and every Tuesday night
at 7 p m in Mendenhall room 221
for fun and socializing Hope to
see you there
INTER-VARSITY
inter Varsity will meet
Wednesday night at 4:30 in
Jenkins Auditorium Our guest
speaker's topic this week is
"Giving Life and Talents to
God" Come and fellowship with
us.
AEDPLEDGES
All pledges for Alpha Epsiion
Delta are required to attend the
tour of the Brody Bldg on
Thursday, Dec 8 Meet in the
Brody Bldg Lobby promptly at
10:00 am Call 752 5189 for more
info.
PIKAPP
HAPPY HOUR
So you had a nice but boring
Thanksgiving Break Revive
yourself by coming out tonight
to papa Ketz for the PI Kapp
Happy Hour. Cover charge is on
ly II 00 and there are reduced
prices Come out and party with
the Pi Kapps
To the Pledges: This is "Hell
Week be prepared and know
your stuff This is the week we
find out how bad you really want
to be Pi Kapps
ATTENTION
AMBASSADORS
There will be a "special"
general meeting for all Am-
bassadors on Wednesday, Nov.
30 at 5 p m. In Mendenhall Stu
dent Center. Room 221.
Members are especially en-
couraged to attend as this will be
our last official meeting of the
semester
CANDY CANE
O'GRAMS
Candy cane o'grams are com
ingll The AOll's are sellfng
giant candy canes.
ATTENTION
STUDENTS
University student who enroll-
ed before the first summer ses
slon of 19t2 are reminded that. In
accordance with University
regulations, before they enroll
for the first time in a foreign
language that they studied in
high school, they must take a
placement examination in that
language.
All other students should con
suit the current University
catalogue, pages M 39
Foreign language Placement
Tests will be given Thursday,
Dec 1, 19�3, as follows: French
3:00 pm BD 304
Spanish 3:00 pm BD 304
German 3:15 p.m BD 307
Latin 315 p.m BD 307
Students intending to take a
language placemtn test on Dec
1 MUST REGISTER for it in the
Foreign Language departmen
tal office, Brewster A 431, ON
OR BEFORE WEDNESDAY,
NOV. 30.
LANGUAGE PLACEMENT
TESTS WILL NOT BE GIVEN
ON REGISTRATION DAY OR
DURING THE DROP�ADD
PERIOD AT THE BEGINNING
OF SPRING SEMESTER. 194
Students not properly enrolled
in a foreign language course will
have to withdraw from the
course
CLASSIFIED ADS J Name
CityState
No. Lines-
You may use the form at right i Address
or use a separate sheet of -
paper if you need more lines.
There are 33 units per line.
Each letter, punctuation mark
and work space counts as one
unit. Capitalize and hyphenate j
words properly. Leave space
at end of line if word doesn't fit.
No ads will be accepted over
the phone. We reserve the right
to reiect any ad. All ads must
be prepaid. Enclose 75 cents
per line or fraction of a line.
Please print legibly! Use
capital and lower case letters.
Return to the Media Board
secretary by 3 p.m. the day
before publication.
Zap.
�i 75 pci hue I.
1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 11�!�H
1 1 1
1 11 I-� 1L.L.I
RUB DOWN
Need a good rub down? I The
Physical Therapy Club will be
giving massages Thursday,
Dec 1 from 4:30 p.m to 9:30
p.m. in the Allied Health
building first floor. The cost is
$1 00 tor a 10 minute massage.
PART-TIME
JOBS
14.75 an hour taking Inventory
In stores within region. Informa-
tion Meeting In Mendenhall 221
on Monday, Dec 5, at 2:30 p.m.
Team leaders and workers need
ed. Mark you calendars If in-
terested.
A CHRISTMAS
FANTASY
Sunday, Dec 4 at 8 p.m. the
ECU Sign Language Club will
present "A Christmas
Fantasy " We'll be singing all of
your favorite Christmas Carols.
It will be held at the Drama
Studio next to McGlnnls
Theatre. Admission is Free!
Hop to see you there!
ASPA
The American Society for Per
sonnel Adminlstraiton will hold
its next meeting on Nov 30 at 3
p.m. in Rawl Building room 204.
The speaker will be the Vice
President of Personnel at Pitt
Memorial Hospital Everyone Is
Invited to attend and all dues
must be paid in full at this
meeting. We are all looking tor
ward to seeing you there!
USHERS NEEDED
Ushers needed! Signup to
usher for "Album" In Messick
(Theatre Arts) Building. Ushers
need Dec 13 and 5-4.
CAREERS
The National Oceanic and At
mospherlc Administration will
have a representative on cam
pus Dec 5. ECU students who
might want a career studying
the seas and the atmosphere
might come and listen to a film
in Brewster B 103 at 11 am or 2
p.m. Please mark your calender
If interested.
ATTENTION
DEMOCRATS
Attention Deiadent
Democrats and (turn staid
Republicans?) There will be a
meeting to discuss our upcom
ing social and speakers. We'll
need new members to help with
logistics of our upcoming
events We will meet in on
Thursday Dec 1 in Mendenhall
room 238 at 7:30 pm Bring a
friend!
FRISBEECLUB
When a ball dreams it dreams
its a frisbee Ultimate Tuesday,
Thursday and Sunday at 3 p m
College Hill Drive Frisbee Club
will meet tonight in Mendenhall
room 248 a' 9 P m Be there or be
oblong
IFCMEETING
There will be an inter
Fraternity Council meeting at 5
p.m. in room 221 Mendenhall to-
day Officers for next year will
be elected. Everyone be present
CADP
There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol and Drug prty
gram Tuesday Nov 29 in 210 Er
win Hall All interested persons
are invited to attend
ATTENTION
FEMALES
We are now accepting appiica
tions from female student for
housing for spring quarter at the
Methodist Sutdent Center and
Wesley House if you are in-
terested, stop by the office at 501
East Fifth Street between 9 00
am. 2X p m or phone at
758 2030
ZETA
PHI BETA
The Lambda Mu Chapter of
Zeta Phi Beta Sorority will be
having a BAKE SALE in front of
the bookstore today from 9 �
p.m. until 4-00 p.m The sorority
will also be having a COIN
DRIVE tor a needy Haitian
family Your support will be ap
predated
The East Carolinian
Serving the campus commune
nnct I92
Published ever 'u�v!�.
and Thursday during Hn
academic year and ever,
Wednesday during it�jU"
mer
The East Carolinian is 'he
official newspaper of Eas'
Carolina University, owned
operated, and published y
and by the students of Eas'
Carolina University
Subscription Rate SM yearly
The East Carolinian oficet
are located w� the Old South
Building on me cempui of
ECU Greenville. N C
POSTMASTER Send ec
dress changes 'o The Ef
Carolinian. O'd Sou"
Building. ECU Greenv He
NC 27834
Telephone TV �J� O'
�309
KNOX'84
On Thursday Dec 1 at 5 p.m
there win be an organizational
meeting to form a student group
to support the candidacy of Ed
die Knox tor governor of North
Carolina See Thursday's paper
for meeting place or call Chris
at 355 4410 tor more info
GAMMA
BETA PHI
The next general meeting of
Gamma Beta Phi win be held on
Dec I, at 7 p.m. in Jenkins Art
Auditorium Please attend!
Final Plans for the inductions
ceremony will be announced
double-spaced, typed statement
of goals as an English malor (4)
submit the names of two pro-
fessors who are willing to
recommend you. (5) submit a
completed application form,
available at the department of
flee.
The deadline for application is
Monday. January 9, 1984. All
materials should be addressed
to the Student Services Commit
tee. UBE Scholarship, and turn
ed in to the Department of
English. Austin 124.
For more Information, con-
tact: Dr. Joyce Pettls, Chair,
Student Services Committee
English Department
The East Carolinian is now
Accepting Applications For
News Writers and Editors
Apply in person at The East Carolinian offices on
the second floor of the Publications Building,
across from the entrance of Joyner Library.
512 E. 14th Street
n hirwks West of Mens Dorms)
1AM-8PM
Daily
All You Can Eat
Vegetables, Bread, Tea,
and 1 meat
$3.85 tax
Daily Special $1.99 tea tax
Phone
752-0476

s-
Z$fS$j.
TWO
to
"LAS VEGAS"
t3 Days, 2 Nights)
Sigma Nu and the
PRESENTS
Ladies Lock-in
FEA TURING
A MALE STRIPPER
While Ordering Your
Official ECU Class Ring
Door Prizes
The Aerobic Workshop
Quicksilver Records
Apple Records
Plain Jane's
Marsh's Surf-n-Sea
For Heads Only
Bonds-Hodges Sporting Goods
Date - Tonight
8:30 � Ladies Lock-in
9:30 -Male Stripper
10:30 - Men Admitted
11:30- Door Prizes
DATE: Dec. lit2nd TlME:9:00-4:00p.m
PLACE:
Student Supply Store - Wright Building
9
HBRFF JONES
Division of Carnation Company
Check Our Low Prices on ALL Official styles!
'Hint tmmmmmmmmmm
� ��.� �
4 �� � n " ' "
� J
Space Sh
Rockets I
Orbit; Ne
Mission
UPI NEWS AT A C
CAPE CANAVERAL
shuttle Columbia rocket ec
preliminary orbit Mondaj
new $1 billion European-
research station and a rec
on a nine-day mission to
of experiments. Flight i
Young reported all was e
rocket freighter passed K
foundland
TOKYO � Prime Mi
Nakasone dissolved Japar
of parliament Monda
with the opposition, fo I
tions Dec. 18 and putti
government to its fir j
test, following the 0
tion of former Prime
Tanaka.
WASHINGTON
and Israeli Prime Mmiste:
conferred Monday on a i
an administration of'
to closer strategic militi
between the two countri
suggested the new relatioi
ly from "the increase i
and assertiveness
MEJORADA DEL C
Investigators today orl
charred bodies and deter:
ombian jumbo jet flipped j
ed into a hillside in flam
airport, killing 185 peot
ficials expressed hope
flight recorder recover
provide some answers
WASHINGTON -
announced Monday it
American tourists ma
Cuba � a law the Reagj
says is important to
ings with enemy nationj
agreed to examine a
troom use of material r
ly.
CHICAGO -Aw
millions of ThanksgiMnl
highway and contributf
traffic death count that
people, according to a
national count early M
had the most traffic
followed by Florida wi
with 21.
ST. LOUIS - Ali
U.S. Circuit Court of
the landmark metro
school desegregation a
hearing including an
hours of oral argument
torney general claim?
state to pay most oi thj
BONN, West Germ
Chancellor Helmut KoJ
received a letter from
Andropov indicatinj
return to the Geneva
United States. Kohl si
letter was a signal the
contribute to the c
weaoons.
WASHINGTON �j
Lavelle trial Monday
videotape of the fi1
testimony to congress
this year. Miss LaveB
perjury and obstructinj
vestigation into the
waste cleanup prograij
WASHINGTON
Federal Trade Commil
his agency to decide wf
joint proposal by
Toyota to build a ne
federal anti-trust stati
James Miller also saj
participate in the case
NEW YORK � Tt
ed from a three-weel
prices heading slightlj
active post-Thanksgij
mining stocks were stl
soared on internatioif
ing the weekend theft
worth of gold bars u
SCOTTSDALE,
drilled a 5-foot bin
17th hole worth $15C
in history and a
$170,000 in the $3
Saturday at Desej
Course. Arnold Pi
and picked up a ch
WEATHER
dumped up to 2 f
Rockies to the Missi
fk across much of tl
moved into the Gr
people died in acci
storm that first hit
Thursday.
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Space Shuttle
Rockets Into
Orbit; New
Mission Begins
UPI NEWS AT A GLANCE
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. - Space
shuttle Columbia rocketed smoothly into a
preliminary orbit Monday carrying the
new $1 billion European-built Spacelab
research station and a record crew of six
on a nine-day mission to conduct dozens
of experiments. Flight commander John
Young reported all was well as the winged
rocket freighter passed 82 miles over New-
foundland.
TOKYO � Prime Minister Yasuhiro
Nakasone dissolved Japan's lower house
of parliament Monday in a compromise
with the opposition, forcing general elec-
tions Dec. 18 and putting his year-old
government to its first crucial popularity
test, following the Oct. 12 bribery convic-
tion of former Prime Minister Kakuei
Tanaka.
WASHINGTON � President Reagan
and Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir
conferred Monda on a long agenda that
an administration official said could lead
to closer strategic military cooperation
between the two countries. The official
suggested the new relationship stems part-
ly from "the increase in Syrian strength
and assertiveness
MEJORADA DEL CAMPO, Spain �
Investigators today worked to identify
charred bodies and determine why a Col-
ombian jumbo jet flipped over and slamm-
ed into a hillside in flames near the Madrid
airport, killing 185 people. Aviation of-
ficials expressed hope the "black box"
flight recorder recovered Sunday would
provide some answers.
WASHINGTON � The Supreme Court
announced Monday it will decide whether
American tourists may travel freely to
Cuba � a law the Reagan administration
says is important to its foreign policy deal-
ings with enemy nations. The court also
agreed to examine a rule barring cour-
troom use of ma'erial police gather illegal-
ly.
CHICAGO � A winter storm caught
millions of Thanksgiving travelers on the
highway and contributed to the holiday
traffic death count that rose to at least 345
people, according to a United Press Inter-
national count early Monday. California
had the most traffic deaths with 48,
followed by Florida with 26 and Texas
with 21.
ST. LOUIS � All 10 judges of the 8th
U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals will decide
the landmark metropolitan St. Louis
school desegregation case after an unusual
hearing including an extraordinary two
hours of oral arguments. The Missouri at-
torney general claims the plan forces the
state to pay most of the plan's costs.
BONN, West Germany � West German
Chancellor Helmut Kohl said Monday he
received a letter from Soviet leader Yuri
Andropov indicating Moscow might
return to the Geneva arms talks with the
United States. Kohl said he thought the
letter was a signal the Soviets still want to
contribute to the control of nuclear
weaDons.
WASHINGTON � The jury in the Rita
Lavelle trial Monday viewed a 90-minute
videotape of the fired EPA official's
testimony to congressional panels earlier
this year. Miss Lavelle faces charges of
perjury and obstructing a congressional in-
vestigation into the EPA's Superfund
waste cleanup program.
WASHINGTON � The head of the
Federal Trade Commission says he expects
his agency to decide within two months if a
joint proposal by General Motors and
Toyota to build a new line of cars violates
federal anti-trust statutes. FTC Chairman
James Miller also says he has a duty to
participate in the case.
NEW YORK � The stock market paus-
ed from a three-week rally Monday with
prices heading slightly lower in moderately
active post-Thanksgiving trading. Gold-
mining stocks were strong as bullion prices
soared on international exchanges follow-
ing the weekend theft of nearly $40 million
worth of gold bars in London.
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz. � Gary Player
drilled a 5-foot birdie putt on the par-5
17th hole worth $150,000, the richest putt
in history and a take-home pay of
$170,000 in the $360,000 "Skins Game"
Saturday at Desert Highlands Golf
Course. Arnold Palmer finished second
and picked up a check for $140,000.
WEATHER MAP � A blizzard that
dumped up to 2 feet of snow from the
Rockies to the Mississippi, paralyzed traf-
fic across much of the Plains Monday and
moved into the Great Lakes. At least 17
people died in accidents blamed on the
storm that first hit the Pacific Northwest
Thursday.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 1983
Operation Santa Claus Campaign In Process
By JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
The Pitt County
Mental Health
Association has begun
its annual Operation
Santa Claus Cam-
paign. The purpose of
the campaign is to col-
lect gifts and money
for patients at Cherry
Hospital in
Goldsboro, residents
at the Caswell Centei
for the mentally
retarded in Kinston
and various agencies
throughout the coun-
ty which work with
the needy.
"There are no state
funds that provide
gifts for patients
said Brenda Gray, the
executive director of
the Mental Health
Association. "We do
this program to make
sure they are not
forgotten at
Christmas she said.
ECU's residence
halls, fraternities and
sororities are suppor-
ting the program and
have done so in the
past. Last year all 15
residence halls and a
dozen fraternities and
sororities contributed.
"The campus itself
has been very suppor-
tive Gray said.
The Mental Health
Association is funded
through United Way
and contributions of
its members. The
Operation Santa
Claus Campaign was
first instituted in Pitt
County in 1958 and
has received much
praise for its work in
bringing Christmas
joy to people who
have to spend the
holidays in institu-
tions.
Mrs. Zula Rouse of
Greenville is the Pitt
County chairwoman
of this year's drive.
Mrs. Gladys Howell,
the wife of ECU
Chancellor John
Howell, has
volunteered to be the
honorary chairwoman
for the drive.
This is Howell's se-
cond year as
hono'raary chair-
woman. Her job, she
said, is to try to in-
terest the community
in the project, rather
than doing actual
soliciting. She will ap-
pear on local televi-
sion stations with
Rouse to promote the
campaign. A kickoff
tea was also held at
her residence. "We
had a great number of
student volunteers
who came to the
reception and who
have been very
helpful she said.
Suggestions for
gifts include clothing,
records and games.
Cash donations are
also accepted. The
gifts are divided ac-
cording to �ap-
propriate age-groups
and patient needs.
Cash donations are
useful, Gray said,
because "patients
may ask for particular
gifts and we try to
make sure they receive
one that is on their
list
Another program
the MHC offers is and
adoption program for
"forgotten patients
Individuals and
groups are invited to
participate in the pro-
gram in order to pro-
vide spending money
for these patients.
Gray said that several
groups from ECU
have sponsored pa-
tients in the past.
Anyone ishing
more infc. nation
about Operation San-
ta Claus or the adop-
tion program is asked
to call the Mental
Health Association at
752-7448.
Schools Paying More To Attract Professors
Cont'd From Page 1 linois. "Our money lost 12 faculty posi- frame over which it tions to meet evaluate their course sity, for exa-
just doesn't buy as tions over the past was created he said, demands. offering in term, nf lost 10
Cont'd From Page 1
earn more than
veteran faculty
members in other
departments, a situa-
tion that causes
morale problems.
"We haven't been
cutting dollars for
faculty, but we
haven't been able to
keep pace with the in-
crease in salaries
laments Vernon Zim-
merman, dean of the
College of Commerce
and Business Ad-
ministration at Il-
linois. "Our
just doesn't
much
Zimmerman used
to hire beginning ac-
counting instructors
for $20,000. "In the
next year he says,
"it will be $36,000 to
$38,000. If we don't
pay it, other schools
or industry will hire
our people. The ero-
sion of our faculty
comes because the
same number of
dollars won't buy as
many teachers
Illinois, he says, has
lost 12 faculty posi-
tions over the past
five years because it
can't fund them.
"We just don't
have the faculty or the
classroom space" to
accommodate all the
students who want to
take the "meal
ticket" courses,
Berkeley's
said. "And we don't
have the faculty
because we don't have
the money
"The severity of the
problem is new
because of the time
frame over which it
was created he said.
"In the past, interest
in certain majors
developed gradually.
But interest in these
subjects has grown up
over a period of three
or four years. We
haven't had time to
find facilities and
Sprecher recruit faculty
Peltason thinks
facilities and lack of
equipment may be
one of the most im-
portant reasons
schools can't create
enough course sec-
tions
demands.
"Equipment pre
blems are serious n.
science classes he
said. "If laboratory
equipment is old-
fashioned or obsolete,
that affects courses
For whatever
reasons � equipment,
faculty shortages or
some combination of
the two � J.D. Con-
nor of the Association
of College Registrars
and Admissions Of-
ficers find "many
schools are having to
evaluate their course
offerings in terms of
lume
Some are doing
more re-evaluating
than others. Private
colleges, which are
generally more flexi-
ble and can more
readily tap endow-
ment funds, seem less
drastically affected by
the shift in course de-
mand.
But public colleges
in depressed areas are
having probably the
worst time coping.
West Virginia Univer-
sity, for exa
lost 106
members ir
year, largel
it didn't ha
money to oft
'e, has
ulty
past
-cause
e the
r com-
petitive salaries, Kid-
der said.
West Virginia's
course shortages,
moreover, run deeper
than the "meal
ticket" classes, he
adds. The school has
had to cancel classes
in such basic
freshman courses as
psychology and
English composition.
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OHie Eaat (Harultinan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Hunter Fisher. g��w
Darryl Brown. ���&��
J T. PlETRZAK. Doctor of AdvtrnsiHs ClNDY PLEASANTS. Sports Editor
Robert Rucks. Bust �J)WKf Greg Rideout. Editor pa Editor
ALI AFRASHTEH. Ok Wr- GORDON IPOCK, Enttrtaimment Editor
Geoff Hudson, omwm towi�r Lizanne Jennings, so ����
Michael Mayo. r�i��isupervaor ToddEvans, product��
November 29, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Government
Rental System Rightly Checked
H ty seems to be the trend in
all le s of government these days.
Congressional reforms hit the
books in the '70s. Controls on the
executive bureaucracy have carried
on through the '80s. And, with the
creation of a board to oversee the
dealings of the Refrigerator Rental
System, the Student Government
Association of ECU can be added
to the list.
During the past decade, the ren-
tal system has been plagued by
mismanagement and, in some
cases, outright fraud. State
auditors were even pouring over
the books at one time.
Refrigerators have been lost and
allegedly given away in return for
personal favors. One count, accor-
ding to a high-placed SGA official,
put at 94 the number unaccounted
for during one manager's tenure.
Reasons for the dubious record
of the rental system can be traced
to the fact the manager had no one
to answer to for his actions. He
uas appointed by the SGA presi-
dent and allowed to go on his
merry way. The manager, in other
words, set policy and then ad-
ministered it. There may have been
guidelines he was supposed to
operate by, but without a check on
his actions, he could almost ignore
them. And the facts show some
managers did.
The board the SGA created
eliminates this problem. When
January rolls around, the board
will be able to make guidelines for
the revenue generated, and the
manager must abide by them. The
present manager, Tory Russo,
helped to establish the board.
Credit should go to him and other
SGA officials for their foresight.
Russo's style of management did
not need such a board. But, as all
followers of politics know, it takes
someone who needs reform least to
advocate it.
And, as if the board weren't
enough, the makers of the govern-
ing body have put in a provision
Campus Forum
that their recommendation of how
to spend excess rental revenue be
approved by the Legislature. This
step will prevent little cliques of
power hungry SGAers from con-
trolling the rental show in the
future. This, of course, is not the
case now. But, as observers of the
SGA scene for the past few years
know, a situation like it can
become a reality very quickly. The
provision shows considerable
political savvy.
The Refrigerator Rental System
generates all of its revenue through
its renting of refrigerators and the
use of copying machines. No stu-
dent funds are given to it. The
system could use the money to fur-
ther its own ends. But, under the
guidance of Russo, money has
been used to finance the downtown
bus shuttle project and Pirate
Walk jackets.
These deeds are commendable,
and with the help of the board
from January on, we are sure the
money will be used for other wor-
thwhile student projects. Maybe an
expansion of rental services could
be in order.
We feel whatever is done with
the money will be the right thing.
Becuase of the healthy set of
checks and balances being im-
plemented in true democratic
form, money and refrigerators will
end up in the right hands. No
system of government should be
allowed to exist without a check on
a powerful position. We applaud
the Legislature. Its members have
done the right thing. Students
should be glad to know that good
government is alive and well on
campus.
Good Afternoon
Nothing could be as funny as an
ECU student trying to pack for
Thanksgiving Break. One student,
rumor has it, in a rush to get home,
actually packed his books. It's the
truth.


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State Secrets Land In Jail
Under the "No one is perfect" rule,
the State Department sent over a file
cabinet full of top-secret papers to the
Lorton Reformatory in Virginia. Lorton
has a contract with the department to
repair Foggy Bottom's furniture, but the
State Department rules say the files are
supposed to be empty before they leave
the building.
You can imagine the excitement at
Lorton when one of the inmates opened
up the cabinet and discovered it fully
loaded with the innermost secrets of our
government.
Art Buchwald
"Hey, guys, look here. There's a
bunch of papers in this cabinet
"I'll be damned. What kind of
papers?"
"Don't know. This file says 'For Eyes
Only What does that mean?"
"Guess it means you supposed to read
it. What are your eyes for? Here, give
me that. Man, this is hot stuff. It looks
like a telegram from some State Depart-
ment cat asking for $50 million to buy
off some dude in Central America who
wants to knock off another dude who's
running the country
"Here's another one. It's marked
'Top Secret, Return After Reading It's
a letter from the Secretary of State to a
dame named Margaret Thatcher telling
her how to fuse a cruise missile. What's
a cruise missile?"
"Beats me. Let me see what else they
got in there. This one says they broke the
diplomatic code of Bulgaria and they
know the order of battle of the Warsaw
Pact nations
"Boy, this stuff is boring. It don't
have anything in there about how we can.
break out of here, does it?"
"Don't expect so. They got lots of
maps of prisons in foreign countries
showing how the prisoners can break out
from there, but none for Lorton
"What's in that confidential folder?"
"Just a bunch of stuff about death
squads knocking off the peasants, and
how to handle it if the press stans asking
too many question
"You mean they're cooling it when it
comes to death squads in other coun-
tries?"
"Sure looks like it
"Then why am I doing 20 years for
just shooting my wife's boyfriend?"
"State Department don't get involved
with what we do in this country. They
just supposed to protect criminals in
other countries from going to jail
"Hey, Jeeter, you used to work in the
government before you heisted the credit
union. You think this stuff got anv value
for us?"
"It sure does. When they find out
their files are missing, they're going to
go ape until they get them back. What I
suggest we do is divvy up the top-secret
folders amongst ourselves and then deal
with them
"How do you mean deal?"
"Well, let's say I'll give them back
their plans for supplying the rebels in
Nicaragua, if they take five years off my
sentence
SOMETIMES �ff NOT
"Maybe they'll give us five vcars more
for having the top-secret folders m our
possession
"They won't if we tell them we'll bio
the whistle to '60 Minutes' on what the
State Department really thinks of Pierre
Trudeau
"Is that in the files?"
"It's right here in this top-secret
folder on psvehiatric profiles of heads of
state
"Hey, man, give me a real good one I
got a parole hearing coming up soon,
and if I give them back something they
really need, the secretary of state might
appear himself to recommend it
"Sure, Shorty. Here's a game plan on
how the State Department is going to
shaft the secretary of defense with the
White House. They'll do anything to get
that one back. Don't shove, there's
enough to go around for everybody, but
hide them good because they're going to
tear this joint apart to find them "
"Hey, we forgot something We're
supposed to repair this cabinet
"Don't give it no mind. No one at the
State Department is ever going to want
to see the outside of this cabinet again
�l 1MJ. lot Vngetet Tubo Svixiicau
Ed Page 'Uncluttered By Fact Cluttered By Dolts, Clods
As usual, I was pleased to recieve
(sic) the latest edition of The East
Carolinian. Being absent from the
University, the E.C. is of special in-
terest to me in its theraputic (sic) value
for treating seperation (sic) anxiety.
But I am disappointed that the paper is
slipping into the hands of dolts and
clods. All idealogical (sic) considera-
tions aside, the E.C. has fired one of its
strongest writers and most able
newsmen. Patrick O'Neill, for all his
decidely liberalprogressive ideals and
strong commitments to expression, was
a capable writer with a respect for fact,
though perhaps a flair for colorful
elaboration. Patrick would research a
topic not familiar to him.
So who stays on as editorial page
edi'or? Greg Rideout, who, I reiterate,
is . clod. Why he felt called to remark
on something he apparently knew
nothing about; i.e. erronously (sic) in-
forming us that Jesse Jackson is the
first Black (sic) to seek nomination to
the Presidency (sic) (Nov.l) is beyond
me. Hell, if he had been alive in 1976,
he would have at least heard about it.
Do you remember Shirley Chisolm?
(Editor's Note: Chisolm ran in 1972
not 1976.)
I write this letter to question the opi-
nions on the editorial page, which from
some indications is falling into the
genre of uninformed rhetoric from the
minds of dolts with brains uncluttered
by fact.
Larry Martin
Alumnus
(Editor's Note: Thank you for your
constructive criticism, Larry. Inciden-
tally, the editorial read, Jackson
wants to be president. And Sunday, he
said he plans to officially announce his
quest for the Democratic nomination
on Thursday, trying to make himself
the first black ever nominated for the
nation's highest office)
Grenada Again
Thank you for printing the correc
tion to your story about an on-campus
action three weeks ago concerning the
Grenada invasion. Until two Fridays
ago, the Greenville Peace Committee
took no position on the U.S. action.
The group recognizes and expresses
strong reasons for and strong reasons
against the military invasion and tem-
porary occupation of Grenada. While,
on the basis of available information,
our conclusion is that the U.S. action
was a serious mistake, in my opinion
taking no action at all might also have
been a mistake. Imaginative, informed
diplomatic and economic alternatives
were needed.
Carroll Webber
Greenville Peace Committee
Good Moving
Please allow me to take this oppor-
tunity to applaude the decision to
remove Pat O'Neill from the staff of
The East Carolinian. It seems to me
that a university newspaper should be
used primarily to hone the talents of
STUDENTS who aspire to become
journalists.
I learned some time ago that Pat
O'Neill was not a student and have
since been puzzled as to why his per-
sonal views have appeared so often in
The East Carolinian. I would assume
that there are many capable students
who would be delighted to write for the
newspaper and earn a few dollars at the
same time.
In college athletic programs, non-
students are relegated to spectator
status. I propose we employ a similar
policy with regard to our newspaper.
Lest I be misunderstood, I am not op-
posed to an occasional article from an
outside source when it is of obvious im-
portance.
Craig Collie
Greenville
Pirate In Pain
I am angry. I hurt for the players,
coaches and staff of the 1983 ECU
Pirate Football team. Without doubt
the finest assemblage to ever wear pur-
ple and gold, their accomplishments
will go unrewarded during the upcom-
ing bowl games. At one time, before
television began to wield its powerful
financial influence, bowl bids were ex-
tended based on won-lost records and
strength of schedule, among other
criteria. When teams with 6-5 records,
such as Notre Dune and Mississippi,
or those in season ending slumps such
as North Carolina and Kentucky, are
invited to participate in post-season
competition, it makes a sham and
mockery of the bowl selection process.
ECU may lack the media attention
and name recognition of an Alabama
or Texas, but they would be a worthy
participant in any bowl game this year
because of its exciting, aggressive style
of play. The media, especially televi-
sion, exerts too much power today in
events ranging from politics and
government to athletics and entertain-
ment. When a talented group of winn-
ing young athletes is ignored because
of television's obsession with high
ratings and even higher advertising
revenues, it places college football on a
par with the professioanl game, remov-
ing some of the lustre and excitement
from amateur athletics.
With hard work and a dedication to
excellence, ECU will soon be among
college football's elite. The ground-
work has been laid, and with many
talented athletes returning in 1984, it
will be impossible to overlook this
deserving program once more. A very
proud voice cries out from the East. In
the not too distant future, the entire
nation will know what so many others
already doIt's great to be a
Pirate and it's getting even better.
Charles D. Shavitz
Greenville, N.C.
Thanx, Prof
On Saturday, Oct. 29, a history pro-
fessor at ECU came to our rescue when
our car stalled in a parking lot on cam-
pus. The professor, a native of
Canada, saw us in need and gave us ad-
vice. Then she took us where we need-
ed to go to get the car started. Further-
more, she waited until we were on our
way to Jackson before departing.
Our lives were made richer and fuller
by her kindness. The world would be a
better place to live if there were more
kind deeds like hers. I truly hope this
lovely person will have a long and hap-
py life when whe retires in England.
Thank you very much "Good
Samaritan
Olivia Cheek
Marian Stukes
Jackson, N.C.
Judge Remembered
In last Tuesday's article about the
winners of the Rebel contests, one of
the judges' names was inadvertently
omitted. Julie Fay was also a poetry
judge, and we would like her to be
recognized for the time she spent help-
ing us pick the winners. It means a lot
to have cooperation and assistance of
faculty members because the more in-
put we get seems to make the Rebel
more of a campus effort. Thank you.
Ellen Moore
JbM Editor
Students
Teach in
Receive
English
Writing
B TINA
MAROSCHAk
The ECt
nculum Cor
estabhshec rwc
lions �hu'
into effect oexi fa
appro ed b)
Faculty Sc
mine anc
John H r
first add
gram -
English d
called the
Community
Efforts To
Some
munch
making ire
tons to �
their studerr
transfer b �
ing the:r aca
program - � d
ding wo:ik in
arts,
analytical si
Institutio
ticipating in this
Ieg:ate urban rt
are using dee
grants from the F
Foundation.
has esta- : I v2 !
million program
ed at mcreasii -
number of stuc
who transfer
eventually grad
Of particular concern
because of their
enrollments are
students from
income famil es
minority groups
The average ae of
these student- 2fl
BUYING
LOANS
T s � C I I '
Ste'efli l- 9� t
titmeiisi c�
'frqr9or oo m v : or
dec a k '
�.l ;l - - " i
recorder o �: � . � �
anvTtiixg e)v� � -
�oc�r mi E.� I
SELF SERM
41M
i wli tfefe coapon
hi w�il�iMiin� � ' '�miiMi'piiimWN�
�� a MMMtVi M H
t �� IMMMP
��� ,Jt t mi� tttmt �� mm �� ��� "
Open 13
Mond3
Friday 1-7
TWOLO
The Geor3
Pitt Piazj
'v





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, Igfj

CPS
Tail
us five years more
Jc ret folders in our
ell them we'll blow
mutes' on what the
la thinks of Pierre
n this top-secret
profiles of heads of
ie a real good one. I
ig coming up soon,
ack something they
�tary of slate might
�commend it
rre's a game plan on
iment is going to
defense with the
do anything to get
n't shove, there's
for everybody, but
tuse they're going to
o find them
something. We're
us cabinet
mmd. No one at the
eer going to want
'his cabinet again
I men vndKait
P
lods
to our rescue when
larking lot on cam-
r. a native of
and gave us ad-
us where we need-
started. Further-
we were on our
5 re departing,
je richer and fuller
world would be a
if there were more
I truly hope this
ive a long and hap-
tires in England,
rv much "Good
Olivia Cheek
Marian Stukes
Jackson, N.C.
membered
fs article about the
contests, one of
was inadvertently
was also a poetry
uld like her to be
time she spent help-
taers. It means a lot
fn and assistance of
cause the more in-
to make the Rebei
effort. Thank you.
Ellen Moore
Rebel Editor
Students Who Enter
Teaching Field May
Receive Scholarships
(CPS) � To help at-
tract qualified
students to the
teaching profession,
U.S. Representative
Ron Wyden (D-Ore.)
is lobbying for an
educational scholar-
ship fund that would
pay students' tuition
in return for two years
of teaching in public
schools after they
graduate.
"The concern we're
addressing in the bill
is that the best and
brightest are not look-
ing at the education
and teaching fields
said a Wyden aide.
While the bill is still
in the planning stages,
according to Wyden's
office, the idea does
have the support of
the National Educa-
tion Association and
the American Federa-
tion of Teachers.
Both groups are
conferring with
Wyden's office to nail
down details for the
proposal, which the
congressman plans to
introduce when the
House reconvenes in
January.
"The final legisla-
tion might well be dif-
ferent the aide said,
"but it will essentially
be a federally-funded,
state-administered
program that would
provide scholarships
for students who
agree to teach for a
certain number of
years upon gradua-
tion
Wyden's plan calls
for as many as 10,000
such scholarships a
year, and is expected
to receive general sup-
port from the Reagan
administration as well
as teachers' associa-
tions and education
groups.
"The idea of the
legislation is to ad-
dress the quality of
the person entering
the teaching profes-
sion today Wyden's
aide said, "and the
idea of offering
scholarships is a time-
proven way to attract
qualified people into
certain fields
Wyden's proposal
arose from his work
on the House Educa-
tion and Labor Com-
mittee's National
Merit Pay Task
Force, whose recom
mentations President
Reagan has also en
corscd.
nt
J
English Department Proposes
Writing Curriculum Additions
By TINA
MAROSCHAK
SuflKito
The ECU Cur-
riculum Committee
established two addi-
tions which should go
into effect next fall, if
approved by the
Faculty Senate Com-
mittee and Chancellor
John Howell. The
first addition is a pro-
gram within the
English department
called the "certificate
in business and
technical communica-
tion the second is a
master's program in
"technical and pro-
fessional writing
Students seeking
the communication
certificate will be re-
quired to complete a
five-course program
and must maintain at
least a B average in
each course. William
Grossnickle, chair-
man of the cirriculum
committee and
psychology professor,
said that student
transcripts will not
acknowledge the earn-
ing of the certificate.
William A. Blood-
worth, chairman of
the English depart-
ment, said that new
M.A. concentration
will require 30
semester hours of
course work � 12 in
writing, 12 in
literature, three in
composition theory
and three in thesis.
Students will be re
quired to take i
foreign language ex
amination and a com
prehensive exam ii
both technical an
professioanl writinj
and literature. The:
will also have t
prepare a thesis an
take a final oral exan
on it.
The Faculty Senat
Committee will mee
Dec. 6 to discuss fin
approval of the net
programs.
NOW Wants Participation,
Support For Women's Issues
NOW believes it is im-
portant to stay involv-
ed. Advice has come
from the state chair-
man emphasizing the
need for NOW to stay
involved.
By ANDREA
MARKELLO
John Howell
Staff Wrtaw
Enthusiatic com-
munity members sear-
ching for a way to get
involved and par-
ticipate in women's
issues are encouraged
to join NOW, the Na-
tional Organization
for Women.
With the inaugura-
tion of its new presi-
dent, Fran Parrott,
the local chapter of
the group is
reorganizing and sear-
ching for new sup-
port. Standing
members who have
worked hard on old
issues, such as passage
of the ERA.
Parrott said the
group is looking for
all types of potential
members. She said
few men are involved,
so the group would
like to increase male
participation and
develop a better cross-
section of members.
With the election
year approaching,
Parrot has sug-
gested that those in-
terested in becoming
members get in touch
after Jan. 1 to take a
poll and decide what
nights are best to
meet. In the past,
meeting have taken
place every other
month.
Community Colleges Increase
Efforts To Prepare Students
Campus Dijesi New� Service
Some urban com-
munity colleges are
making ircreased ef-
forts to better prepare
their students for
transfer by overhaul-
ing their academic
programs, often ad-
ding work in liberal
arts, sciences and
analytical skills.
Institutions par-
ticipating in this col-
legiate urban renewal
are using development
grants from the Ford
Foundation, which
has established a $2.5
million program aim-
ed at increasing the
number of students
who transfer and
eventually graduate.
Of particular concern
because of their large
enrollments are the
student from low-
income families and
minority groups.
The average age of
these students is 28.
BUYING -
LOANS
TVs. Air Conditioners.
Stereos, guns gold silver,
diamonds, cameras and
equipment, typewriters,
kerosene heaters,
refrigerators (dorm site on
ly), video games A car
tndges, power tools,
musical instruments,
microwave ovens, video
recorders, bicycles, and
anything else of value
Southern Pawn Shop,
located 05 Evans Street,
downtown 752 J444.
They have jobs,
families � more
responsibilities than
the typical college stu-
dent. Higher educa-
tion often must take
low priority in their
lives.
Of the nearly five
million enrolled for
class in U.S. two-year
colleges, about 30 per-
cent are actually in
academic programs,
planning to transfer
after two years of
study. According to
the American
Association of Com-
munity and Junior
Colleges, fewer than
10 percent actually do
transfer.
Reasons for the low
rate include lifestyle
pressures, inadequate
preparation and
backgrounds which
do not emphasize in-
tellectual and
academic inquiry.
At the Community
College of
Philadelphia, em-
phasis is being put on
humanities and social
sciences based on a
humanities honors
program. Seventy per-
cent of their students
are from minority
groups.
Overall, with the
decreasing number of
college-age people, in-
stitutions of higher
education are making
greater efforts to en-
sure the success and
happiness of the
students they have
enrolled.
East Carolina University's
STUDENT UNION
is taking applications for
STUDENT UNION PRESIDENT
for the 1984-85 Term
Any Full-time student can apply,
applications available at Mendenhall
Student Center's Information Desk.
Deadline: December 2,1983
Your Christmas Party
Headquarters
Make our Ambassador party department your first
stop for hofiday parties You 11 find everything you
need-from the invitations to matching plates, cups
and napkins. There are even festive decorations
And when the party is over, dean-up is easy, too!
C t92 Amoassado' Cards a division ot Hallmar Cards mc
i
Stsdent Suppty Store
Owned and operated by East
Carolina University
m� PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALLGOLD&SILVER
SILVER COINS
CH'NA&CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
i & RING
OF � StCS CO � ��C
401 S: EVANS ST. openJ�,3.�on.sat.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
"YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
How To Ease The Burdens
Of Campus Life.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S.I9V00 Abortion from 13
to 18 weeks at additional
cost. Ptnman. T ad Birth
Controi. and Problem
Pre�nan Counseling. For
further information call
832-0535 (Toll Free Number
800 221-25b8 between
9A.M. and 5P.M. weekday
RALEIOKVdOMCM'S
WEALTH
ORGANIZATION
f,7Wt�tMorta"S'
� � M j��
. lOa, . � �� ����
Word Processing Secretarial Services
Termpapers - Manuscripts
Resume Package:
Resume andor individually
addressed cover letters and
envelopes
�$�
riifci
SELF SERVICE COPIES
41M each
(wtththtocoapoa) Expire. Dec 15
LUNCH SPECIALS
$2.50 and Under
Open 13 Hours Daily
Monday - Thursday 9-9
Friday 1-7 Saturday 9-2
TWO LOCATIONS
The Georgetown Shops
Pitt Ptaza (10-6)
CHECK OUT OUR
DINNER SPECIALS
Try our New Fruit Bar
and Improved Salad Bar
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd 7564040
2903 E. 10th St. 750-2712

-
m?"
�4k- � � ��� -
� ��'
mm "��m�"ii





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 1983
The East Carolinian is beginning a new feature today �
a crossword puzzle, provided by the United Features Syn-
dicate. If popular, a similar crossword puzzle will run once
a week, on Tuesday. The answers to the puzzle will be
printed in the Thursday edition. Student comment on the
puzzle is welcome; write to the Campus Forum of The
East Carolinian.
Local Cerebral Palsy Telethon To Return
ACROSS
1 Self-esteem
6 Falls in drops
11 Censures
12 Ensnare
14 Note of scale
15 Nuisances
17 Piece tor one
18 Goal
20 Danger
22 Hawaiian
dish
23 Withered
25 Challenges
27 Preposition
28 Chinese coin
30 Flag
32 God of love
34 Play leading
role
35 In addition
38 Pope's veil
41 Spanish
article
42 Fisherman
44 Black
45 Swiss river
47 Mediter-
ranean vessel
49 Drunkard
50 Break
suddenly
52 Rude hut
54 Symbol for
tellurium
55 Occupant
57 Rubber on
pencil
59 Powders
60 Sufferer from
Hansen's
disease
DOWN
1 Woodwork-
er's tools
2 Sun god
3 Demon
4 Profound
5 Ancient
chariot
6 Cravings
7 MD's aide
8 Possessive
pronoun
9 Support
10 Tavern
11 Consecrated
13 Tip
16 Ambush
19 Evaporates
21 Slow mus
24 Uncanny
26 Springe
29 Protuber-
ances
31 Bedouins
33 Chooses
35 Animal
36 Kite
37 Bristle
39 Plunderer
CROSS
WORD
PUZZLE
Jim Everest, Ex-
ecutive Director of
United Cerebral Palsy
of North Carolina,
and Jim Fischer, a
National Director of
United Cerebral Palsy
Association, Inc
have announced that
"Weekend With the
Stars Telethon for
Cerebral Palsy
aired in January of
1983, was one of the
most successful in the
nation, received na-
tional recognition and
will return on January
14-15, 1984.
"Monies and
pledges in excess of
$81,000 were receiv-
ed, 93 percent of
pledges collected,
with 75 percent re-
maining in Greenville
to support and im-
prove our Greenville
Cerebral Palsy
Center, located at
1111 Greenville
Boulevard Everest
said.
The center, under
the direction of Bar-
bara Thurber, pro-
vides services to
children and parents
in six counties.
Since 65 percent of
all our funds come
from public dona-
tions, only a suc-
cessful telethon can
ensure that the ser-
vices continue
Everest said. "The
telethon enabled us to
add to staff members,
increase speech
therapy and purchase
equipment for the
center. Community
support, hundreds of
volunteers, center
staff and parent sup-
port, and a good
coordinator made all
this possible
Mrs. Paul (Nita)
Rasbcrry of Green-
ville will coordinate
the telethon again this
year, according to
Everest. "She's
positive, has expertise
in television, great
leadership, (and)
believes in this
cause he said.
The telethon will be
aired from the Green-
ville Moose Lodge
Auditorium over
WITN-TV. Paul
Oughton is producer,
and members of the
Eyewitness News
team will help pro-
mote events and par-
ticipation for the
telethon throughout
the viewing area.
WITN-TV staff
members are donating
their time. Network
stars will again visit
Greenville to host.
and names will be an-
nounced at a later
date. Twelve phone
centers will be set up
in various areas to
take pledges during
the telethon.
Many businesses
and clubs have com-
mitted to fundraising
events and other par-
ticipation. Mr
Everest urges those in-
terested in supporting
the telethon or par-
ticipating to contact
the telethon office at
756-5390.
Auditions
Local auditions for the national tcletnon,
"Weekend With the Stars for Cerebral
Palsy have been set for Dec. 6 and 7. To
schedule an audition, cal) the talent chair
man at 756-5390 between tr.e hours 4 p.m.
and 6 p.m or write to Nita Rasbcrry, Coor
dinator, P.O. Box 3271, Greenville, North
Carolina 27834, and the talent chairman will
j return your call.
-5-5�!??
40 Go in
43 Revolu-
tionary
46 Genus of
frogs
48 Country of
Europe
51 Crony:
colloq
53 Short sleep
56 Tar heel
state: abbr.
58 Compass
point
PET VILLAGE

1983 Unrted Feature Syndicate. �nc
WITH THIS COUPON � �
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W�
FILM
WE'LL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
Salt Water Set-ups
on Sale
45 gal. Hexagon wstand $241.80
27 gal Hex. wstand $192.95
55 gal w out stand $229.90
30 gal w out stand $148.47
Light, Filter, and necessary equipment
MENDENHAt
SNACK BAR
�������
salad bar
hot sandwiches
daily specials
conveniently located
continuous service
7 30 am- T- 30 pm
���������
east caroima
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILM SENT TO COLORCRAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
1 Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50c OFF Developing Any roll slide film
50c OFF Any Color 5x7 Enlargemen'
$1.00 OFF Any 8x10, 8x12,11x14 Color Enlargement
oftcoecro hop
" ��� Mm fflTiHOC STREET
Kodak
BIS SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
OnEENV�.LE. NX. 27834
Limit otieloupon per oroer-coupon expires 6-T-84
Copyright 198
Kroger sav on
Ouanmy Rights Reserved,
None Sold To Dealers
iTEM
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
Dec 3, 1985
Open Mon. thru Sat. Sam to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED
POLICY
Eacri o' tese ad�er
dsed items s 'e
qui'ed to be 'ead.iy
avaaDie tor sale m
eac K'oger Sav on
e�cept as speoticaiiv
noted 'n this ad 11 e
do 'un out ot n ilem
e ei .ou fOu'
choice o' a co"1
; a'ab'e iterr hen
available reflecting
The same savings or a
'd'nehec hh a
entitle yOu to Dur
chase the advertised
item at the advertised
price with.n 30 days
Asfc��
oupon per ord
rrWffJ,JJ,J,r3J311J3JJJJ���MJJJJJB
phone
752-3172
Located 1 mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. Ext.
CUffs
Seafood
-Specials
Monday thru Thursday
ASSORTED VARIETIES
POLAR PAK
ice
Cream
loKi:
DIET COKE, TAB OR
coca
Cola
2-itr.
V2-cai.
ctn.
Btl.
TROPICANA OR KROGER
Orange
Juice
KROGER
Multigrain Bread
24-02.
Loaf
V, Tropical

REGULAR OR LIGHT
Michelob
Vi-Gai.
an.
LIMIT 2 PLEASE
VIVA
Paper
Towels
12-Oz.
N.R.
BtlS.
vV
Popcorn Shrimp
$2.95
Ocean Perch $1.99
jumbo
Roll
KROGER V7
Lowfat
Milk
$�159
Gal.
U.S.D.A. GOV'T INSPECTED
GENUINE
Ground
Chuck
Lb.
3-LDS.
Or More
4S&
' �M
Seafood Cakes $1.99
tot
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted for slaw 3s- extra
TAKEN BAKE
Deli Fresh
2JB
FRESH BAKED
ICED
Cinnamon
RONS
THE EAST( AiOII�

Laura Leigh Qubenberry an
Playho
Poodle pins and tassle
go-go boots and miniskirts
Beatles and the Beach Boy, j
Dylan and James Dean
parallel the emotional evoij
of four teenagers in David
mer's rueful comed hit Albt
be presented by the East Q
Playhouse. December 1-3,
All performances will bet
8:15 p.m. in McGinnis Theat
the ECU campus in Greenvij
Diveded into eight scenes
span their years at Marti
Buren High School, the
Cheers
Wil
B CRI Y
r
Can "Cheers NBC
survive the most potential
to television prime time? Or
the dial looking for an antij
For romance � Prime '
has elbowed its way behm
"Cheers an ensemble s
mode by "Taxi" creators
and James Burrows
"Cheers one of NB
series, relied in us first s
egoes, impossible differen
sexual tension between the
small-time baseball pitcher
at Cheers and his stuck-up.
ly identified by bar regular
smart). Viewers like
dialogue, well-tuned actm
bar philosophers.
But they were intrigued
duels between highbrow Di
each appeared to live by
fall for you if you were the
the actors played up a phj
intellectual revulsion betw
the end of the program's
was on.
Historically, that's bad
a show's momentum � an�
tagonism between the sexej
of male female leads, thef
kill off the series is to haj
love. Television's been usj
tuckered-out comedies tori
Remember "Get Sman
developed and written I I
Henrv teamed inept but
well Smart, with sexy
(Agent 99) as governmenj
to foil (what else?) the bi
and 99 maintained a resj
ed ridiculous cases during
but in its final seasons
switch and to a blossomil
even a baby boy. Not onlj
career dead in its track n
And who can forget �
� "Mork and Mindy?'
show revolved around Re
goofiness and the trials of
took him in. But ABC, u
cess, tinkered with the fc
the third year network exl
revive it was to marry thej
a child: Jonathan Winterl
for good.
The list could go on an
Milk" fell victim to Prii
1970 after two hit year
jokes. Only Scruffy, hoi
Looking for sometl
py hour this Friday? J
the knot after four y
tempts to break a haw
some astronaut on
Dream of Jeannie")
. �-
r
1
V





eturn
eJ to fundraising
and other par-
p a t i o n. Mr.
r ;ges thosein-
Ited in supporting
elethon or par-
jating to contact
telethon office at
wo
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
NOVEMBER 29. 193
Ptgel
IS
itional teletnon,
t tor Cerebral
c 6 and 7. To
e talent chair-
irs 4 p.m.
a-err, Coor-
renville, North
: chairman will
Lted
�'1
Daytime Soap Operas
Wallow In Nastiness
Love in the afternoon was all
right with Mick LaSalle long
before they started with those
commercials. So when I decided
to check out the soap operas, it
seemed only natural to choose the
ABC biggies: Att My Children,
One Life to Live, and General
Hospital. I figured I'd give them a
month and see what I thought.
Mick
LaSalle
ay
toyCAHLTOM IINI
Laura Leigh Qnisenberry and Erie TIBey rehearse for upcoming comedy Album.
Playhouse Presents 'Album
Poodle pins and tassle socks,
go-go boots and miniskirts, the
Beatles and the Beach Boys, Bob
Dylan and James Dean � all
parallel the emotional evolution
of four teenagers in David Rim-
mer's rueful comedy hit Album to
be presented by the East Carolina
Playhouse, December 1-3, 5�6.
All performances will begin at
8:15 p.m. in McGinnis Theatre on
the ECU campus in Greenville.
Diveded into eight scenes which
span their years at Martin Van
Buren High School, the play
'Cheers'
chronicles the coming of age of
two teenaged couples during the
turbulent 60s. The language is
frank, but often funny, as the
four struggle with impending
adulthood and their awakening
sexuality. The action ranges from
summer camp, to dormitory
bedrooms, to senior proms with
the popular music of the period �
the Rolling Stones, Del Shannon
and Johnny Rivers � ever present
as a telling counter point to an
emotional anchor for the lives of
the young foursome. As the years
spin by it becomes apparent that
maturity will bring differing perils
and problems for each person,
although they will all continue to
recall the special excitement of
those last few carefree years
together.
Tickets for Album are now on
sale and may be purchased at the
McGinnis Theatre Box Office,
corner of Fifth and Eastern
Streets in Greenville, Monday
through Friday, from 10:00 a.m.
until 4:00 p.m or may be reserv-
ed by calling 757-6390.
Will NBC Hit
Bv CARLYN EBERT
Staff Writer
Can "Cheers NBC's hit successor to "Taxi
survive the most potentially lethal plot twist known
to television prime time? Or will fans get twitchy with
the dial looking for an antidote?
For romance � Prime Time Love Syndrome �
has elbowed its way behind the Boston bar housing
"Cheers an ensemble sitcom cast in the "Taxi"
mode by "Taxi" creators Glen Charles, Les Charles
and James Burrows.
"Cheers one of NBC's few successful recent
series, relied in its First season on the conflicting
egoes, impossible differences and � yes indeed �
sexual tension between the main characters, a retired
small-time baseball pitcher who owns and tends bar
at Cheers and his stuck-up, academic waitress (usual-
ly identified by bar regulars as, "That's Diane. She's
smart). Viewers like "Cheers" for its fast
dialogue, well-tuned acting and diversified cast of
bar philosophers.
But they were intrigued as well by the smart word
duels between highbrow Diane and wolfish Sam, who
each appeared to live by the old credo, "I wouldn't
fall for you if you were the last person on earth But
the actors played up a physical attraction despite an
intellectual revulsion between Diane and Sam, and by
the end of the program's first season the romance
was on.
Historically, that's bad news. When a good part of
a show's momentum � and laughs � depends on an-
tagonism between the sexes or on a contrasting pair
of malefemale leads, the surest way its writers can
kill off the series is to have the unlikely duo fall in
love. Television's been using this ploy to finish off
tuckered-out comedies for years.
Remember "Get Smart?" The late '60's spy spoof
developed and written by Mel Brooks and Buck
Henry teamed inept but enthusiastic Agent 86, Max-
well Smart, with sexy, competent Susan Hilton
(Agent 99) as government intelligence agents trying
to foil (what else?) the bad guys at K.A.O.S. Smart
and 99 maintained a respectable distance as they solv-
ed ridiculous cases during the show's first four years,
but in its final seasons succumbed to a network
switch and to a blossoming romance, marriage and
even a baby boy. Not only did Baby Smart stop 99 s
career dead in its track but the series as well.
And who can forget - though so many have tried
- "Mork and Mindy?" During its first season the
show revolved around Robin Williams's frantic aben
goofiness and the trials of the nice Earthling girl who
took him in. But ABC, unsatisfied with MlrivtMC-
cess, tinkered with the formula each season untd in
the third year network execs decided the only way o
revive it was to marry the two off and bless thenvwrth
a child: Jonathan Winters, no less. Viewers tuned out
for ffood
The list could go on and on. "The Ghost andiMn.
Muir" fell victim to Prime Time Love Syndrome in
1970 after two hit years of nasty, practical ghost
jokes. Only Scruffy, however, objected.
Looking for something strange to dnmVtoj hap-
py hour this Friday? Jeannie and Major
the knot after four years of the jealous gemesat-
tempts to break a hands-off pohey wrth hand-
some astronaut on Dec. 2, lJt jf8l
Dream of Jeannie") ended six months later.
Affairs with ghosts, genies and aliens aren't the
only ones susceptible to PTLS's death dart: After
four years of incredibly bland courtship, Andy and
schoolteacher Helen Crump got married and moved
away from Mayberry to give CBS plausible reason
for ending "The Andy Griffith Show" in 1968. And
when that venerable rock of '70s spinoffs, "Happy
Days sent its teenaged Joanie and Chachi off to
make it on their own in Chicago, most viewers over
the age of 13 didn't even tune in to wave good rid-
dance.
But the "Cheers" format, you'll notice, is a lot
different from that of these family or slapstick-based
sitcoms. It follows a different TV formula for prime
time success: it's based on the relationships people
form at work, not at home or in the "Twilight
ZoneAnd so any possible romantic entanglements
on the job aren't primarily last-ditch efforts to pah-
characters up in a happy ending like the fifth act of
an Elizabethean comedy.
But the question still stands: can "Cheers" over-
come workplace romance? Previous on-the-job com-
edies rarely chanced co-worker hanky-panky,
although fans with good memories will remember a
sadly touching episode of "The Mary Tyler Moore
Show" in which Lou Grant made a pass at Mary, as
well as a hilarious "Taxi" that ended with Elaine and
Alex, after a date staged to impress Elaine's friend,
kissing goodnight for real. And that caution,
perhaps, can be traced to the predictable outcomes of
so many office romances � the affair ends abruptly
and the lovers act like a pair of wary cats turning
work into a cold war battleground. In other words,
it's impossible � and uncomfortable � to work with
someone you've just broken up with. And even
harder to do it on television.
Aha. That must be what I've been thinking all
along. Diane and Sam don't stand a chance, do they?
Or will "Cheers" let their romance play on
realistically?
Since they've started messing around, their weekly
prime-time bickering has become, if anything, fun-
nier, more frequent, and more personal. "I get along
better with my wife, and we've exchanged gunfire
observes one cynic intent on breaking Sam and Diane
apart. This romance in close quarters is quite
believable. The show hasn't sacrificed the contrast
between the two for the sake of love and honor, and
points it up with constant references not to their emo-
tional life, but to their sex life.
Last week, when Sam told Diane that part of his
life was still "hands off to her questioning, she
responded icily, "And from now on, part of me will
be hands off to you
"Just my luck it'd be one of the parts I care
about Sam shot back, his comebacks getting better
and better with practice. But he delivered his snappy
line to an empty bar, because she'd already sailed off
the set in miffed dignity.
The rest of the "Cheers" cast treat the relationship
as passing fancy, sheer bedroom antics or repulsive
slime. "If you two are gonna do stuff like
that, "groans Karla, the other waitress, "at least have
the decency to do it out by the garbage
Much of the show's future depends on whether or
not the writers can sustain the tension between Sam
and Diane without letting hokiness overtake the
romance and romance taking over the show � and
on whether viewers continue to enjoy the battle.
I liked One Life and General
Hospital. But I couldn't go the
distance with All My Children �
despite Jenny, who's the sweetest
thing on TV, and despite a plot
that started to suck me in about a
Grace Kelly-type (Nina) going
back with her jerk husband
(Cliff). I'm too nice a guy to have
to sit through Opel and Ericka. As
long as those two are on the show,
All My Children will never appeal
to me.
Every year the woman who
plays Opel Gardner gets one of
those Day-time Drama Emmy's
� which only tells me that all the
judges are from the Bronx. Opel is
a nasty parody of a Southern
woman. And nice people in New
York and Boston watch her and
truly believe that Southern women
are like that. Then your mother
goes up North, gets treated like a
moron and you wonder why.
As for Ericka, let's be honest:
she has a face that could haunt a
house. Yeah, I know it's not her
fault. But come on � as long as
I'm not forced to look at her, I
won't.
In soap operas, adults live like
college students � and they're
good at it. Nobody works. And
everybody's after everybody else.
The only concerns are sex, love,
who's going with whom, who's
pregnant by whom, who's
cheating on whomever, and "Are
we gonna tell Bo it's his kid � or
what?
The shows are fantasies. Yet
they provide role models. And
this is where things can get con-
fused: A guy who does great with
the broads of General Hospital
might bomb out in real life using
the same approach.
That's why it's time Mick
LaSalle checked out the techni-
ques of the male soap opera
characters.
Marco Dane. Marco was arguing
with his girlfriend Edwina. He
had rented a hall, invited guests
and hired a band for his and Ed-
wina's wedding before he had
even proposed to her.
Edwina went into a long thing
on how this action by Marco in-
dicated that he really didn't take
her seriously as a person. After
unsuccessfully trying to defend
himself, Marco looked at her and
said, "Can I just ask you one
question?"
Edwina: "What?"
Marco: "Is this something about
Women's Lib?"
Edwina: "No, Marco(And she
went into the same song and
dance.)
Marco: "All right. Look. This is
about Women's Lib. I'll tell you
what: Tomorrow, if you're in the
neighborhood, stop by at seven
o'clock and we'll get married
At seven o'clock the next day,
Edwina was there. In real life it
would've happened the same way.
Marco Dane is a street smart,
impulsive, New York-style
wiseguy in his early 30s who's
been everything from a movie
director to a hood. He looks like
an Italian version of Giligan, but
he's the coolest guy on One Life
to Live.
Asa Bucchanan: In real life,
billionaire oil tycoon Asa Buc-
chanan would do a lot better with
the ladies. Not only is he supposed
to be one of the richest men in the
world, but he's a strong looking
older guy with a little-boy en-
thusiasm women would like
anyway.
Bo Bucchanan: Bo Bucchanan, at
times, seems right on the edge of
being a little bit too nice. But he
backs hjmself up by insisting on
honesty from ms women. When
he discovered that his wife,
Delilah, had been lying to him
about just about everything. Bo
walked � and kept walking. If
he's kind, it's not out of
weakness; it's by choice. The guy
has standards and I like that.
Other men on One Life to Live
are Gary Corelli, who's making a
moron of himself with Cassie;
Clint Bucchanan, the kind of guy
who doesn't understand women,
so he wisely keeps his mouth shut
and comes off strong and silent;
and Herb Callison, the nicest guy
in the world, who's tough enough
to keep his beautiful, high-strung
wife (the infamous Dorian) in
line.
General Hospital
There are two kinds of women
who watch General Hospital: the
ones who've made the decision for
Luke, and the ones who've made
the decision for Scorpio. Sure,
many like both guys. But just like
in the '60s when you had to
choose between "John" and
"Paul every woman I've talked
to knows � has decided � which
guy she likes better.
Luke Spencer. He's got a bad
nose, a lousey complexion, and
hair like Bozo. He also has chap-
ped Ups 365 days a year. Admit it:
The guy's homely.
So what?
Bogart was thin, fairly short,
had a humongous vein coming
down the side of his head, spoke
with a lisp and had a twitch but
he was everything a man should
be � and women knew it.
If you watch General Hospital
for a week straight, it becomes
clear why many women find Luke
so attractive. Luke Spencer is
brave, straight-forward and car-
Se� ABC's, p. S
Spring Semester Films
Movies
Date Time
One Life to Live
Larry Wolek: Larry Wolek is a
divorced surgeon in his early 40s
who should do a lot better than he
does. He's not short on looks,
guts, or brains. But Larry is too
nice a guy. You know � the kind
of guy a woman calls sooh nice,
and gets rid of the next week.
A couple of weeks ago Larry
was sitting at a bar with a
beautiful nurse. He wanted to kiss
her, and she wanted to be kissed.
So what did Larry do? He asked,
with a cute smile, "Would you be
scandalized if I kissed you, right
here in this bar?" He killed the
woman's excitement. She was sit-
ting there wondering what was go-
ing to happen. And he wrecked it
by asking permission.
So he kissed her. Big deal. He
didn't even slip her the tongue.
As basic material, Larry isn't
bad. But he has to loosen up and
take some chances, or else it's all
going to go to waste.
Anthony McKonna: Anthony
McKonna is a mid-40s sleaze of a
businessman whose problem is the
opposite of Larry's. He's too
forceful. He's so insecure that
every time a woman does
something he doesn't like, he con-
siders it a challenge and hits the
ceiling.
McKonna and Delilah � his
latest interest � were in a
restaurant. Delilah's estranged
husband walked in, so Delilah
wanted to leave. McKonna almost
broke her arm trying to keep her
in her seat.
McKonna has a chip on his
shoulder. He doesn't like women.
Smart women can spot a guy like
this a mile away.
Twilight Zone, The MovieJan. 5-77:00, 9:00
Star WarsJan. 97:00, 9:30
The Wrong BoxJan.118:00
FlashdanceJan. 12-147:00, 9:00
The Bicycle Thief LaStradaJan. 187:00 9:00
Raiders of the Lost ArkJan. 19-217:00, 9:30
Trading PlacesJan. 26-287:00, 9:00
Evil DeadJan. 27-2811:00
Say Amen, SomebodyJan. 308:00
The ShiningFeb. 3-47:00, 9:30
King of HeartsFeb. 88:00
Blue ThunderFeb. 9-107:00, 9:30
Risky BusinessFeb. 16-187:00, 9:00
Joseph Andrews Tom JonesFeb. 227:00 9:00
Close Encounters of the Third KindFeb. 24-257:00, 9:30
The Producers Blazing Saddles High AnxietyFeb. 265:00 7:00 9:00
KagemushaMarch 148:00
Monty Python and the Hoty GraUMarch 15-177:00. 9:00
War GamesMarch 22-247:00, 9:30
A Boy and His DogMarch 23-2412:00
PsychoMarch 288:00
PsychoUMarch 29-317:00. 9:30
Silent Running BladerunnerApriM7:00 00
Richard Pryor: Hare and NowApril 5-77:00, 9K�
The Last WaveApril 118:00
JawsApril 12-147:00.9:30
GhnmaShokorApril 13-1412:00
Return of the Saemucus 7April 258:00
iwtc.April 26-287:00, �00

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8
THE EASTAROL1NIAN
NOVEMBER 22 1983
?
ABC's Soap Operas Naughty
Coot, from p. 7
ing. He's not afraid to
be himself. And,
maybe most impor-
tantly, he's a fun guy.
Robert Scorpio: Scor-
pio is witty, well-
I raveled and sharp.
He's the kind of guy
who goes over big
with women who go
for the charming type.
Despite the fact
that his face seems
locked in a permanent
smirk, Scorpio makes
big points in the looks
department. He looks
like an Australian
John Kennedy.
If he has any faults,
it's that he never
makes love to his
wife, Holly, on the
living room couch.
Sex seems a little too
routine � and too
ritual � for the Scor-
pios. I mean, how
many times is he go-
ing to carry Holly into
the bedroom with that
same solemn look on
his face?
A little more of the
Luke Spencer ("I'll
race you upstairs)
approach would give
Robert some of the
spark he's lacking.
Alan Quartermaine
and Rick Weber. Both
are good guys. But
both need to be more
forceful with their
wives. Monica is a
shrew. Leslie has a
gambling problem.
Both women don't
like themselves and
want to stop it. Both
husbands can help
them by getting
tough.
Grant Putnam: The
real Grant is dead,
and this Grant is a
former commie spy
turned nice person
who wants to go on
living the Grant life.
Don't try to make
sense out of all this.
Just check out
Grant's wife.
On Thanksgiving,
Grant saved the leg of
this foreigner who
had given him a lot of
trouble. The foreigner
asked Grant, "Why
did you help me?"
Celia, Grant's wife,
jumped in. "Because
he's a doctor and a
good one, and you
should be damned
glad he is
A woman who
stands by her man
knows what being a
woman is all about.
Celia Quartermaine is
the best part of
General Hospital.
Other guys on the
show are Brock, who
shows how a man can
be aggressive and still
be a good guy;
Blackie, an out-and-
out joke, who does
for New York boys
what Opel does for
Southern Women;
and Jimmy Lee, who
they tell me started
out like a lunatic and
has since redeemed
himself.
People who put
down soap operas are
usually found in one
of the following
categories: There are
the guys who resent
anything that women
like. There are the in-
tellectuals who
assume, like
everything else, soap
operas must be gar-
bage. There are the
fake intellectuals who
make a habit of put-
ting down stuff they
know nothing about.
There are the people
who don't want to
believe they're miss-
ing out on a good
thing � so they
decide the thing isn't
good. And there are
the people who secret-
ly do like soap operas,
but are afraid to ad-
mit it to the people in
the other categories.
But there is nothing
wrong with either of
these shows. One Life
To Live and General
Hospital are a lot bet-
ter than most of what
you find on prime-
time. Characters have
a chance to develop
on soap operas. And
since the writers have
a lot of air-time to
play with, dialogue
sounds more real on
these shows than
anywhere else on TV.
Eat
Walnettoes.
Walnettoes
Are
Good.
Bdusch&Lomb
Soft Lenses
GQMPIOE
99
00
OPIOMCTNC
OCCAftECQfTCR
Includes initial eye examination, lenses, care kit,
instructions and follow-up visits for the month
ECU students I.D. required.
22S GREENVILLE BLVD.
TIPTON ANNEX
756-9404
Dr. Pater Hoilis
Soprano- Pianist Duo Perform Recital
At ECU's Fletcher Music Center Hall
Glee Clubs Sing
Holiday Music
Traditional and
contemporary
Christmas choral
music will be per-
formed by the East
Carolina University
Women's and Men's
Glee Clubs at their an-
nual joint winter con-
cert Sunday, Dec. 4,
at Immanuel Baptist
Church on Elm Street
in Greenville. The
concert will begin at
7:45 p.m. and is free
and open to the
public.
The women's Glee
Club, directed by
Rhonda Fleming, will
present Gregor
Aichinger's "Regina
Coeli the Tohannes
Brahms "Ave
Maria three songs
from Hoist's "The
Princess "Fanfare
for Christmas" by
Llovd Pfautsch and
"Shepherd's Carol"
by early American
composer William
Billings.
Pianist Cheryl Kite
of Ernul will accom-
pany the Women's
Glee club.
The Men's Glee
Club, conducted by
Edward Glenn, will
present "Brothers,
Sing On" by Grieg,
Pitoni's "Cantate
Domino the Advent
hymn, "O Come, O
Come, Emanuel
"Ivy and Holly" by
Moeran and two
English carols, "Deck
the Hall" and "God
Rest Ye Merry,
Gentlemen
Pianist Scott Sward
of Virginia Beach will
be accompanist, and
soloists will be An-
thony Jackson of
Washington, D.C
Matthew Cox of
Manns Harbor and
Todd Barnhart of
Greenville.
Concluding the
program will be the
combined choruses'
performance of Healy
Willian's "Hodie
Christus Natus Est
J. S. Bach's "Break
Forth, O Beauteous
Heavenly Light
ShawParker a r -
rangements of "Bring
a Torch, Jeanette,
Isabella "Fum,
Fum, Fum" and
"Angels We Have
Heard on High and
Leroy Anderson's
"Sleigh Ride
Soprano Carla
Connors and East
Carolina University
faculty pianist Dr.
Timothy Hoekman
will perform in recital
Sunday, Dec. 4 at
3:30 p.m. in the Flet-
cher Music Center
Recital Hall.
Their program will
include five songs by
17th century English
composer Henry
Purcell, the Debussy
"Anettes Oubliees
an aria from Donizet-
ti's "Don Pasquale
songs by Granados
and Hugo Wolf, and
selections from
William Bolcom's
"Six Songs for
Medium Voice
Connors and
Hoekman have per-
formed widely as a
duo under the name,
"Andiamo Their
joint appearances in-
cluded a performance
at the 1982 World's
Fair.
Ms. Connors is a
doctoral student at
the University of
Michigan. She has
been a soloist with the
Detroit Symphony,
Szczecin (Poland)
Symphony and other
orchestras and has
sung leading roles in
various opera produc-
tions, including the
role of Anne in The
Rake's Progress pro-
duction directed by
Robert Altman.
Dr. Hoekman, who
studied at Calvin Col-
lege, Peabody Con-
servatory and the
University of
Michigan, has per-
formed as a soloist
and accompanist in
the U.S Canada,
Australia and Europe.
He was pianist in-
residence at the 1982
Grand Rapids Sum-
merfest where he
played for the Joffery
Concert Dancers and
performed with the
orchestra.
The Connors-
Hoekman recital is
free and open to the
public.
.Harde
Violinist Shipps
Gives ECU Recital
Violinist Stephen
Shipps, a faculty
member at the N.C.
School of the Arts,
will perform with
pianist Paul Tardif
and cellist Selma
Gokcen of the East
Carolina University
music faculty at a
Wednesday, Nov. 30
chamber music con-
cert on campus.
The concert, set for
8.15 p.m. in the Flet-
cher Music Center
Recital Hall, is free
and open to the
public. It is sponsored
by the ECU School of
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Music in conjunction
with several local
business firms.
Shipps is a graduate
of the Indiana Univer-
sity School of Music
and has performed
with the Cleveland,
Seattle and Dallas
Symphonies, in addi-
tion to serving as con-
certmaster for Casals
Festival and the Pied-
mont Chamber Or-
chestra.
A member of the
Fine Arts String
Quartet, he has
recorded for Angel
Records with flautist
Ransom Wilson.
The Nov. 30 con-
cert will include the
Claude Debussy Cello
Sonata Trio.
Co-sponsorship of
the concert was in-
itiated by Joseph
Gantz, president of
Empire Brushes, Inc
one of the sponsor
firms, and pianist
Tardif. Other spon-
soring Greenville
firms are TRW, Inc
Proctor and Gamble,
the University Book
Exchange, Piano and
Organ Distributors
and Central Book and
News.
I
I
MAKETRACKS FOR THE
BEST EATIN'ALL AROUND!
The next time you stop by for the Best Eat in bring
along this money-savin' coupon.
" IsTeakIE6FbTscu1tThd "
0mhge juice $1.29
p,ease present this coupon be'o'e ordering One coupon per customer per
visit please Customer must pay any sales ta� due This coupon not good m
combination with any other otters Otter good during reju'ar breakfast hours
only at participating Hardee s Restaurants
through May 31 1 984
I
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combination with any other otters Otter good after 10 30 AM only at
participating Hardee s Restaurants through
May 31 1984
VAardeci
i
i
i
J
Elizabethan-Era
Madrigals Sing
At Mendenhall
Student Condos
i
520 W. Greenville Blvd.
756-7097
HOURS: SUN-THURS llam-9pm
FRI&SAT lUm-lOpm
1
Student singers and
musicians from the
East Carolina Univer-
sity School of Music
will be featured at
East Carolina Univer-
sity's eighth annual
series of Christmas
Madrigal Dinners,
Nov. 29-Dec. 5.
A production of
ECU's Mendenhall
Student Center and
School of Music, the
dinners are modeled
after a Christmas
feast in an English
manor house of the
Elizabethan era. The
music, carols,
customs and
festivities of the
period are presented
by performers ands
hosts wearing
Renaissance
costumes, and a tradi-
tional roast beef din-
ner with wassail is
served by authentical-
ly clad servants.
Dr. Charles Moore
of the ECU music
faculty is director of
the dinner series.
Among the carols
to be performed by
ECU'S Madrigal
Singers this year are
"The Holly and the
Ivy "The Wassail
Carol "The Boar's
Head Carol "Tom-
morrow Shall Be My
Dancing Day
"How Unto
Bethlehem "We
Shepherds Sing
"The First Noel" and
"Good Christian
Men, Rejoice
The ECU Col-
legium Musicum, an
ensemble of
Renaissance in-
strumentalists will
present a selection of
compositions by early
English composers,
including a pavane to
be danced by the
singers.
Other entertain-
ment will be provided
by a court magician, a
juggler and a trio of
herald trumpeters.
Tickets for places at
one of the banquet
tables may be reserved
at the ECU Ticket Of-
fice in Mendenhall
Student Center,
telephone 757-6611.
r
i
i
i
Rib-Eye Steak
Salad Bar, Soup
Potatoe, Toast
$3.99
RINGGOLD TOWERS
At The Campus �East Carolina University
We're building a special place for East Carolina University students to live next to
campus in your own private, secure, air-conditioned condominium units. Surrounded on
three sides by ECU property, Ringgold Towers is closer to classrooms than some
on-campus dormitories.
Three floorplans are available, and units are completely furnished. Each unit will be
individually owned either by students and their parents or by investors renting to
students.
Recent changes in tax laws make ownership of this type property advantageous for both
investors and parents of students. We'd like to show you how Ringgold Towers can
provide a special place for you to live and provide your parents with an excellent
investment requiring very little down payment.
Ringgold Development Co Inc.
105 Commerce Street
P.O. Drawer 568
Greenville, NC 27834
(919) 355-2698
Vietna
Truth
InNe
(Berkley,
December, S3 50)
Hailed by the Arm
Times as "the best
damned book from
the point of vie of
the infrantrymen who
fought there The
Killing Zone c
five months in the life
of Frederick Downs
during which time he
was a lieutenant in the
Army and fough
combat in Vietnam
He was sent home
after accidentally trip-
ping a land mine that
tore off his left arm.
among other injuries
His diary tells of the
everyday life of an
fantry soldier, and
the decisions that a
man had to make dai-
ly in order to survive
in a land where
friends and enemie
looked alike.
Downs was onl-
when he enlisted
the Army. He ser-
in the northern region
of South Vietnam, a
well as the Central
Highlands as the co
mandcr of an in far.
plantoon 77ie Killing
Zone is his storj
war against a hidden
enemy in a hostile en
vironment � and i
what happened to
men who fought that
war. He tells of a wa-
in which the an:
communist forces
not control anyth
beyond the groL I
they stood on, gaining
control during the-j
daylight, only to I
it as soon as darknes;
fell. Roads that haj
been cleared of land
mines and sniper j
day were boobytrap
ped again the nev
While the American si
could win only
conquering,
enemy could win b
simply surviving.
Down also tells
his homecoming afte
his injury. On th
campus of a Colorodc
university where
was enrolled, a ma
Eva
50i
ear
lor

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It will be
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xcellent
J
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 1983
Vietnam War
Truth Told
In New Book
VIETNAM
PLATOON DELTA
ONE-SIX.
THE WAY IT
REALLY WAS.
(Berkley,
December, $3.50)
Hailed by the Army
Times as "the best
damned book from
the point of view of
the infrantrymen who
fought there The
Killing Zone covers
five months in the life
of Frederick Downs,
during which time he
was a lieutenant in the
Army and fought in
combat in Vietnam.
He was sent home
after accidentally trip-
ping a land mine that
tore off his left arm,
among other injuries.
His diary tells of the
everyday life of an in-
fantry soldier, and of
the decisions that a
man had to make dai-
ly in order to survive
in a land where
friends and enemies
looked alike.
Downs was only 23
when he enlisted in
the Army. He served
in the northern region
of South Vietnam, as
well as the Central
Highlands as the com-
mander of an infantry
plantoon. The Killing
Zone is his story of a
war against a hidden
enemy in a hostile en-
vironment � and of
what happened to the
men who fought that
war. He tells of a war
in which the anti-
communist forces did
not control anything
beyond the ground
they stood on, gaining
control during the
daylight, only to lose
it as soon as darkness
fell. Roads that had
been cleared of land
mines and snipers one
day were boobytrap-
ped again the next.
While the Americans
could win only by
conquering, the
enemy could win by
simply surviving.
Down also tells of
his homecoming after
his injury. On the
campus of a Colorodo
university where he
was enrolled, a man
approached him and
pointed to Downs' ar-
tificial arm. "Get that
in Vietman?" he ask-
ed. When Downs said
yes, the man
answered, "Serves
you right and walk-
ed away.
The Killing Zone is a
grueling, honest ac-
count of the physical,
emotional and
psychological
penalties paid by the
soldiers in a combat
zone where no civilian
was to be trusted,
death waited around
every tree and even
the trip home didn't
mean the battle was
over.
About the author,
Frederick Downs
was awarded four
Purple Hearts, the
Bronze Star with
Valor and the Silver
Star. Since he return-
ed from Vietnam, he
has been active in the
Veterans Administra-
tion acting as the
director of Prosthetic
and Sensory Aid.
"A tribute to the
courage and sacrifice
of human beings
under stress, which
must include the
author and the men to
whom the book is
dedicated, and also
their enemies
-The H ashington
Post Book World
"The best personal
narrative to come out
of the Vietnam War
likely to become a
classic.
Charles B.
McDonald, author of
Company Com-
mander
"Downs has withheld
his rage and written a
numbing book that is
as explicit, as honest,
as Ron Kovic's Born
on the Fourth of July,
but in a completely
different way 'This
is the way it was for
us he says simply,
'the platoon of Delta
One-six
-The New Republic
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'T'Wi���-�





r
THfc EASTCAROl INI AN
Sports
NOVEMBER 29, 1983 Page 10
Bucs Win Season Opener
?
Smith Proves Harrison Right
Now everybody can see why
ECU basketball coach Charlie
Harrison said he felt good about
starting freshman Roy Smith
before the team's season began.
The 6-7 12, 190-pound center
scored 18 points and pulled down
12 rebounds to lead the Pirates to
a 75-66 win over Campbell
University Saturday night in
Minges Coliseum.
I eading 45-32 at halftime, the
Pirates ran into some trouble
when they returned to the court
for final period play. During the
next 10 minutes, the Bucs made
only three baskets and a free
throw.
The Campbell Camels took ad-
vantage and cut the lead to just
three points, 51-48, with less than
11 minutes left in the game. ECU
freshman forward Derrick Battle
came to the rescue, however, scor-
ing on a three-point play to up the
Bucs" lead, 54-48.
The Pirate defense then con-
trolled the game and continued to
protect its lead offensively. With
2:58 on the clock, the Pirates were
ahead, 70-56.
Harrison's "defense wins
games" lectures apparently paid
off. "When they want to, they
can really 'D' it up, can't they0"
Harrison said. "If we had just
had some shots go early (in the se-
:ond half), it wouldn't have been
so tough.
"Then, the defense could have
gotten some momentum, but at
least the effort was still there
a hen things got rough
Harrison praised the defensive
play of freshman William Grady
and Curt Vanderhorst, as well as
the rest of the team. "They all
plaved hard, but I expect that
he said. "If they keep playing that
hard, they're going to get better
The Pirates blocked eight shots
and had 10 steals. "That's what I
want for 40 minutes Harrison
said, "but some of there guys are
young, and they still have mental
lapses
In the first half, the Pirates
jumped out to a quick lead and
the Camels never were able to tie
the game up. Campbell, however,
did cut the lead to one on three oc-
casions. Camel Harvey Smith
sank a 20-foot shot to narrow the
Pirates' lead to 17-16, but the
Bucs began pulling away. A
basket by Vanderhorst on a goal-
tending call and two free throws
by Wright gave the Pirates the
edge.
A long string of freethrows by
Barry Wright, Keith Sledge, and
David Harris allowed the Bucs to
gain a nine-point lead.
Then a streak by the Bucs with
Wright, Smith and Vanderhorst
scoring, extended ECU's lead to
41-24�the Pirates biggest edge
yet.
The Camels fought back and
cut the lead to 11 by halftime.
Harrison said the Pirates' 45-32
halftime lead should have been
even larger. "We could have
beenup by 20 in the first half
Harrison said. "Or we could have
built up a 20-point lead in the se-
OARY PATTMSOW��CU P��to Lab
Head Basketball Coach Charlie Harrison was somwhat pleased with
his team's defensive play, but said the Pirates need to be more consis-
tent in the games to come.
cond half, but we just couldn't hit
the shots
Harrison said he expected
Campbell to come out with a few
changes in the second half. "They
threw lots of junk defenses at us
and that broke our rhythm he
said. "We're playing a lot of
young kids and they was a dif-
ferent defense every time down
the court
Following Smith's 18 points,
Wright followed with 16 points
and Vanderhorst had 12 for the
Bucs.
Clarence Grier scored 25 for the
Camels, while Rene Parker added
12. ECU held Junior College
transfer Andrea McGce, who was
expecting to be Campbell's scor-
ing leader this year, to just four
points.
Now 1-0, Harrison said he saw
some things in this year's opener
that he didn't see last season.
"They went to the offensive
boards much better, and they
were defensively intimidating in-
side he said. "But at the same
time, they gave up too much more
easy stuff
The Bucs shot 30 percent in the
second half, but finished with a
43.9 overall percentage. In the
first half, ECU shot 59.3 percent
from the floor.
Campbell finished with a 47.4
shooting average, and ECU slight-
ly out-rebounded the Camels,
40-38.
The Pirates play Christopher
Newport Wednesday night, and
Harrison said the Bucs will have
to be more consistent in the games
which lie ahead.
"We've got to get more than six
or seven minutes of good basket-
ball in a row he said.
Gametime is 7:30 p.m. at
Minges Coliseum.
ECU forward Barry Wright, who scored 16 points, was the Pirates' se-
cond leading scorer against Campbell Saturday night.
Lady Rats Split Road Games
By RANDY MEWS
Ajatotaat Sport Editor
The ECU women's basketball
team split a pair of games over the
weekend, losing to Saint Peters,
77-52, and defeating lona, 51-39.
"We're very pleased with the
wav we came back after our loss
Saturday to St. Peters ECU
coach Cathy Andruzzi said. "We
needed to bounce back strong,
and we're happy to come out of
the road trip 2-1 ECU's other
victory was the previous weekend
against George Washington.
The Lady Pirates were in the
game against St. Peters until they
lost control midway through the
second half.
Sylvia Bragg connected on a
jumper with 13:25 remaining to
trim the score to 40-36, but the
Peahens pulled away with an 18-4
scoring tear over the next nine
minutes to put the game away.
ECU was led offensively by
Bragg with 17 points, while Lisa
Squirewell, Darlene Hedges and
Delphine Mabry all had eight.
Squirewell was the game's leading
rebounder with 11.
Against lona, the Pirates went
on their own tear, outscoring the
Gaels 18-2 in the game's final
minutes.
ECU led 24-22 at the half, and
the game remained clos until the
Pirate defense stiffened and shut
down Iona's inside game.
Andruzzi was very pleased with
her team's play after the game.
"There's such a team atmosphere
this season, and the chemistry is
what we want
Junior college transfer Anita
Anderson led the Pirates with 13
points. Squirewell had her second
straight 11-rebound game, and
now has 31 in just three games.
The Pirates' will be in action
again this Thursday when they
travel to play Fayetteville State.
Mabry Giant
By RANDY MEWS
VmMui Soorti EdMor
OARY ��ATTBH$OH��CU ��ll�tQ Lab
Sophomore Lisa Squirewell takes a jumpshot in the lane against a St.
Peters player during the Pirates' Thanksgiving trip to New York.
Squirewell scored eight points and grabbed 11 rebounds.
Long Becomes ECU's
First Kodak A-A Ever
ECU offensive guard Terry
Long has been named to the
Kodak First-Team Ail-American
squad � the first player in ECU
history to ever receive the honor.
Long was also an ECU first
when he was named to the Walter
Camp Football Foundation all-
America team last week. Long
and 23 other players from across
the country are on the squad. The
camp all-America team is the
oldest of all the all-star teams,
dating back to its start by a Yale
coach in 1889.
A senior from Columbia, S. C,
Long has been heralded all season
as 'the strongest player in the na-
tion
The 6-0, 280-pound senior
guard is one of 20 Pirate seniors
who led the team to an 8-3 finish
and a spot in the Associated
Ptcss' Top Twenty rankings last
week. The Pirates have been rank-
ed 19th twice in Sports Illustrated
this year.
Long was an honorable men-
tion all-America player last year
and was also named to the all-
Southern Independent team.
Long has been invited to play in
two all-star games. He will play in
the Blue-Gray Classic in Mon-
tgomery, Ala on Dec. 25 and
will appear in the Hula Bowl in
Honolulu on Jan. 7.
Long won the North Carolina
Powerlifting Championships in
1982 by lifting 837 pounds in the
squad, 501 pounds in the ben-
chpress and a dead lift of 865
pounds. Long's total of 2,203
pounds ranked as the third highest
total ever in the world.
Long, who can now benchpress
550 pounds, should reap even
more honors in the future.
With only 14 games of ex-
perience on the collegiate level,
sophomore Delphine Mabry is ex-
pected to be one of the star per-
formers on this year's ECU
women's basketball team.
As a 5-4 freshman, Mabry
wasn't expected to play basketball
for the Pirates at all. She came to
ECU on a track scholarship. "I've
always liked basketball more then
track explained Mabry, "bull
just happen to be best in track
Mabry liked basketball so much
better that she decided to sit out
the entire indoor track season so
she could try her luck as a walk-on
for the basketball team.
Mabry was an immediate suc-
cess, starting in 10 of 14 games for
the Pirates. She averaged 7.3
points per game while shooting 47
percent from the field.
Head Coach Cathy Andruzzi
called Mabry one of the biggest
suprises of last season. "She came
here with us not really knowing
what to expect from her and turn-
ed into a starter after just four
games.
"Delphine played behind some
great players in high school and
was never able to show her true
ability Andruzzi added.
Everything was going great for
Mabry until she was struck by an
injury in mid-season. "I was hit in
the hand when we were playing
Old Dominion, but I really didn't
think much of it at the time
Mabry explained.
She played with tape on her
hand for the next few games, but
it wasn't until Mabry lost control
of the movement in one of her
fingers that she decided to consult
a doctor.
The prognosis was torn
ligaments, and Mabry was faced
with her biggest decision while at
ECU. She could have surgery im-
mediately, or have her hand
heavily taped and have the opera-
tion at the conclusion of basket-
ball season.
"If I waited I would have miss-
ed three weeks of the track
season Mabry said. "I came
here for track, and since I already
missed the indoor season I decid-
ed to have surgery right away
Mabry was equally impressive
in her debut as a trackster, winn-
ing almost every meet she entered
in the 800-meters. At the George
Mason Invitational in Fairfax,
Va Mabry set a meet record in
2:11.6 and just missed qualifying
for the nationals by .01 of a se-
cond.
Although Mabry was con-
sidered a candidate for the 1984
Olympics, she's afraid the pro-
blems from last year are going to
carry over and affect her chances
of making it to the games.
Last year's coach, Pat
McGuigan, left ECU in a sea of
controversy after being accused of
tampering into her players' per-
sonal lives. Only five people
returned, and this year Mabry will
have to run in several events in-
stead of just concentrating on the
800-meters.
Although Mabry is still going to
try to make the Olympic team,
basketball is the only sport she's
concerned with right now. Mabry
is only one of four returning
players for the Lady Pirates, but
she she still thinks the team can
have a successful year.
"We should have an advantage
over the taller teams we play she
said. "We have a lot of fast
players, and our style of play is
geared to a quick tempo
Mabry's quickness is one of the
main reasons Andruzzi is having
her start at point guard this year.
"Delphine has all the tools to
develop into an excellent player
Andruzzi said. "She's a very hard
worker, and the only way for her
to go is up
One thing Mabry said she
would really like to get up is the
team's record. "Last year we
finished at 12-14, but I'm pretty
sure we can have a winning season
this year
If Delphine Mabry can continue
to play as she has in the past, a
winning record should certainly
be in the Lady Pirates' future.
Head Coach Cath nd
team's sta in New Y i
Pirates
B GARY
PATTERSON
jpirMl To rw tv arooaiu
Although the L
Pirate basketball team
was a long wa
home during
Thanksgiving
holidays, they still en-
joyed a heartv.a-
stay in Neu "t
In fact, when the
Pirates took on St.
Peters and lona. there
were just as ma
cheering
as the other
I
fans
ECU
teams
For
years.
the pav' '
the Presenta-
tion Sisters House has
been the headquarters
for the Lady Rats.
And each year,
nuns support the
Lady Pirates by cheer-
ing them on at their
games.
Freshman plaer
Lynn Nance said she
enjoyed the at-
mosphere and
fellowship of the -
Jordan, Hi
Chattanoo
CHAPEL HILI .
N.C. (LTD - T
ranked N
Carolina, sparked b
the spectacular dunks
of All-America
Michael Jordan, turn-
ed serious midwa
through the second
half Monda to break
open a one-point
game and went on to
beat Tenne-ee-
Chattanooga 85-63
Jordan finished the
night with 28 pom
20 of them in the se-
cond half. Brad
Daugherty and Sam
Perkins each had 16
The All-America
Perkins did not start
the game and sat out
the first five minutes
as punishment for be
ing five minutes late
to the pre-game meal.
Tennessee
Chattanooga as led
by Gerald Wilkms' 19
points. Willie White
had 12 points and
Stanford Strickland
had 11.
Trailing 33-30 at
the half, the Moc-
casins pulled to within
one point, 47-46.
before the Tar Heels
began pulling away.
North Carolina
outscored the Mocs
� i� m� .iHt
�pmp&l
iiiii i rtauMwriittTTT





f
T
t
I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 19t3
11
t

Its, was the Pirates' se-
night.
mes
was very pleased with
play after the game.
;ch a team atmosphere
and the chemistry is
ant
llege transfer Anita
: the Pirates with 13
resell had her second
rebound game, and
just three games.
tes' will be in action
Thursda when they
lav Favetteville State.
uad
id our style of play is
quick tempo
quickness is one of the
r Andruzzi is having
point guard this year.
has all the tools to
o an excellent player
ud. "She's a very hard
Id the only way for her
I Mabry said she
like to get up is the
rd. Last year we
12-14, but I'm pretty
have a winning season
ne Mabry can continue
jshe has in the past, a
:ord should certainly
dy Pirates' future.

X
ATTCtOW��CU MM Ml
io�� ball in Saturday's
Advertise
Advertise
Advertise
Advertise
with the
East Carolinian
Head Coach Cathy Andnizzi serves a little holiday spirit to ECU players Sylvia BraggOeft) and Lisa Squirewell during the
team's stay in New York over Thanksgiving.
Pirates Enjoy Nuns
By GARY
PATTERSON
S����! To The EM I irofcuaa
Although the Lady
Pirate basketball team
was a long way from
home during the
Thanksgiving
holidays, they still en-
joyed a heartwarming
stay in New York.
In fact, when the
Pirates took on St.
Peters and lona, there
were just as many
fans cheering for
ECU as the other
teams.
For the past five
years, the Presenta-
tion Sisters House has
been the headquarters
for the Lady Rats.
And each year, the
nuns support the
Lady Pirates by cheer-
ing them on at their
games.
Freshman player
Lynn Nance said she
enjoyed the at-
mosphere and
fellowship of the con-
vent. "The sisters
make us so
welcome she said.
The team enjoyed a
lavish Thanksgiving
dinner with turkey
and all the trimmings
prepared by the nuns.
According to An-
druzzi, the yearly
Thanksgiving trip just
wouldn't be the same
without the convent.
"Once we did stay in
a hotel, and the kids
were miserable at four
to a room she said.
"There is no at-
mosphere at a hotel,
and here at the con-
vent we feel we are at
home.
"The fellowship the
sisters provide is an
important part of our
success here. I don't
know what we would
do without their sup-
port. We love them so
much
The Presentation
house is a facility for
sick and aging nuns.
They are taken care of
by the younger nuns
who are taking their
first vows with the
church.
According to Sister
Cathy Hollywood,
however, there is
always room for the
Lady Pirates. "The
Thanksgiving
holidays are a time of
togetherness and
prayer for the good
fortunes the Lord
provides she said.
The Lady Pirates
enjoy the family at-
mosphere we provide,
and the sisters enjoy
the company of the
girls.
" Some of the nuns
have no family to
share Thanksgiving
with, and they really
look forward to shar-
ing this special holi-
day with the Lady
Pirates
Coupon���-
Free Pitcher of your Favorite
Beverage with Purchase of
Large Pizza.
DON'T USE THIS COUPON!
$1.00 OFF
m
Any foot-Long Sub
Lunch Buffet
Daily etc.
2 $2.99
I
Dinner Buffet:
Mon & Tues
$3.09
Drink
Happy Hour Now: 7 nights weekly
9 pm til closing
Corner of CoUocbc and 10th
The be� ptiu ID town. tt�
with purchase of a Medl
JPjraDeci81J983j
3UB
758-7979
205 e. Fifth Street
Greenville N.C.
IF TOO MANY PEOPLE USE THIS COUPON,
WE'LL LOSE MONEY, SO USE IT ONLY
IF YOU NEED TO.
Coupon.
-H
Jordan, Heels Dunk
Chattanooga Mocs
CHAPEL HILL,
N.C. (UPI) � Top-
ranked North
Carolina, sparked by
the spectacular dunks
of All-America
Michael Jordan, turn-
ed serious midway
through the second
half Monday to break
open a one-point
game and went on to
beat Tennessee-
Chattanooga 85-63.
Jordan finished the
night with 28 points,
20 of them in the se-
cond half. Brad
Daugherty and Sam
Perkins each had 16.
The All-America
Perkins did not start
the game and sat out
the first five minutes
as punishment for be-
ing five minutes late
to the pre-game meal.
Tennessee-
Chattanooga was led
by Gerald Wilkins' 19
points. Willie White
had 12 points and
Stanford Strickland
had 11.
Trailing 33-30 at
the half, the Moc-
casins pulled to within
one point, 47-46,
before the Tar Heels
began pulling away.
North Carolina
outscored the Mocs
22-4 to make it 69-50.
Jordan led the charge
with eight points.
At the opening of
the second half, the
Mocs got two straight
baskets from Chris
McCray and Wilkins
to take a 34-33 lead.
A basket by Jordan
13 seconds later gave
North Carolina the
lead again.
Tennessee - Chat-
tanooga managed to
get the lead one more
time, 38-37, on a
basket by Wilkins
with 17:21 remaining,
but again, Jordan hit
a shot to give North
Carolina the lead, this
time for good.
In the first half,
Tennessee-
Chattanooga twice
managed to tie the
score but could never
take the lead.
A shot by James
Hunter tied it at 22-22
with 6:26 left in the
first period. Perkins
pulled the Tar Heels
ahead, but the Mocs
again tied it at 24-24
with 4:34 to go.
Kenny Smith then
hit two straight
baskets to put the Tar
Heels out of trouble
in the first half.
SOUTH PARK
MAYTAG
EQUIPPED
LAUNDRY
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
410 Greenville Blvd.
756-3023 � 24 MRS.
PLAZA SHEL
24 hour Towing Service
U-Haul Rentals
Available
JUNIOR EXECS
ARE YOU NEW IN THE JOB MARKET
SALARY
Starts" S17.2UO - S24.1UU increasing
annually to !?8,600 - $44,800 in four
years.
QUALIFICATIONS
College "yrads, H degrees and degree
levels considered. Recent grads looking
for first jon as well as those
contemplating a job change (under age
2H) are encouraged to apply. Required
to pass nental and physical exams.
BENEFITS
Full medical, dental, unlimited sick
leave, 30 days annual paid vacation,
post grad education programs and
retirement in 2l years!
,108
Positions are still available in the
following areas: Management (technical
and non-technical). Engineering,
Nuclear, Teaching, intelligence.
Aviation Management, Diving, Pilots,
Finance, Personnel Management. Worldwide
locations - we pay relocation expenses.
If you're interested in finding out
more, see the llavy Officer Programs
Team, they Ml he on campus jjMtoyemher -
1 0ocr�rer" "�t theTtudent Union IT "you
can't makVTt, send your resume or
transcripts to:
ROYSARVIS
U.S. NA VY OFFICER PROGRAMS
1001 Navaho Dr. Raleigh, NC 270
or call 1-000-442-7231
9am � 3pm, MON THURS
.75 Wash
.25 for 25 minutes on Dryer
Always clean, Air conditioned
35 Washers, 35 Dryers
L ow Prices Drop-off Service
OFFER LIMITED TO
PER CUSTOMER
ADDRESS
STATE-
ZIP-
DATE.
II store is unattended deposit coupon m special container provided Refund mm be mated
THIS COUPON REDEEMABLE ONLY AT
South Park Home Style Laundry
Coupon good only Tues. 29th thru FrL 2nd
Maytag DIAL-A-FABRIC equipped store
FofmCL-M
Located Behind
Ramada Inn next to
Sandwich Game
Video Arcade.
ea
St
"��
HI M�y0li �jp�A.�lUU
-It 3







i
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 29, 1983

ECU'S Long Makes
Ail-American Team
ROCHESTER,
N.Y. (UPI) -
Nebraska running
back Mike Rozier led
all vote-getters while
being named to the
American Football
Coaches Association
1983 All-America
football team for the
second straight year.
Rozier was joined
by two Nebraska
teammates, flanker
Irving Fryar and
guard Dean
Steinhuhler, on of-
fense. Other repeaters
on the AFCA team
are Brigham Young
tight end Gordon
Hudson, Georgia
defensive back Terry
Hoage and Arizona
linebacker Rickey
Hunley.
Rozier was follow-
ed in the voting by
Brigham Young
quarterback Steve
Young. Auburn's Bo
Jackson, the only
sophomore named to
the team, rounds out
thebackfield.
Rounding out the
offense were Baylor
wide receiver Gerald
McNeil and linemen
Bill Fralic of Pitt-
sburgh, Terry Long of
East Carolina, Doug
Dawson of Texas and
Tom Dixon of
Michigan. Bruce
Kallmeyer of Kansas
is the kicker.
Joining Hoage and
Hunley on defense are
linemen Ricky Bryan
of Oklahoma,
William Fuller of
North Carolina,
Bruce Smith of
Virginia Tech and
Reggie White of Ten-
nessee; linebackers
Wilber Marshall of
Florida and Ron
Rivera of Cal-
Berkeley; and backs
Russell Carter of
Southern Methodist,
Jerry Gray of Texas
and Don Rogers of
UCLA. The punter is
Randall Cunningham
of Nevada-Las Vegas.
Rozier averaged
over 160 yards
rushing per game
while leading
Nebraska to a No. 1
ranking all season
long and helped the
Cornhuskers become
the highest scoring
college team ever.
Averaging 7.8 yards
per carry, Rozier
gained 2,148 yards
and set an NCAA
record with 29
touchdowns.
Young, who leads
the nation in passing
and total yards, com-
pleted 70.3 percent of
his passes for 3,634
yards and 27
touchdowns. He has
also rushed for 450
yards in helping BYU
to the nation's top of-
fense in total yards.
Steinkuhler, at
6-foot-3, 270 pounds,
is a top candidate for
the Outland Trophy
and Lombardi Award
given to the nation's
top lineman.
Fralic is the only
junior on the offense.
Smith, Gray and Cun-
ningham are also
juniors. The rest ofj
the team, outside of
Jackson, are seniors.
Gray leads the
Texas defense that is
tops in the nation
while Smithl
spearheads Virginis
Tech's No. 1 defense
against the rush.
The AFCA All
America team is spon-
sored by Kodak.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
7S0-S434.
FO SALl: 1�71 Olds Oelfa M
�ir, new brakes, Sfeel r�dl�U.
very peed mchantci condition.
m. Can 11-rru.
FO� SALE: Perteole mini
stereo component system selllno
tor US. Call 7�0-e�77.
FOR SALt: One towiHi carat
diamond rtne wit M carat ooW
band. La�s that I yaar old Ek-
callont condition SIM. Call
7S1-4M1.
OKT IN SHAPE: YOU Ot 4
visits to each ot ttto prominent
health clubs in the Oroenvllle
art. Thets 14 visits lor only
Sl0.ee. Contact Kim C at
7S0-M01. .
FEMALE ROOMMATE:
wanted to share one bedroom
apt. prefer non-smoker and non
drinker. Mer part of rent,
telephone, and utilities would be
Site. per month. Two btockes
from campus. Telephone
750-177. Available immediate-
ly
MISC.
PERSONAL
Kappa Sta's. after 7ft Dmy Afttt-
party, ust a word to let all of
vev know that a pood planet Is
hard to find, lets net Mow this
one(we'li let David O. drive it).
Also, Formal Is this weekln I
don't want to see any mushroom
ctcuds or any sub-iero radioac-
tive fo laHlne near the beach
�� there or be sctepenal. Two
Fun Man.
THANKS) Anpn E Omous. Love
Yost. DJR
JANE: I nope I dent swtafl to
hard to break the vine. Yew
knew your nest H Me best. TAR
IAN.
"LOST AND
FOUND
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
campus include experienced
professional work. Pro
ofreadine, spelling and oram-
matlcal corrections JSS-4740
after i M
PROFESSIONAL TYPING.
35MW
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SIONAL typlnf. Call Julia
Bloodworm at 704-7074.
TYPING. TERM, THESIS,
7S4-04OJ
TYPING: Ru�" Jobs-Eveninfls.
Scientific symbol element. Pro-
feasional. Call 70417.
PROFESSIONAL Typing ser-
vice: ekperlence, quality war.
IBM selectric typewriter. Call
Lanle Shlvo 7S-SI.
ATTENTION ECU skiers and
sunbethers January Vermont
ski weeks from S171. Sprint
break Florida weeks from Sll.
Call far yourself or orlglnlte a
arowp and travel free. Luv tours
at-hi mi. Ask far Laura.
THE TECH SHOP: We're en the
corner of 144) and Charles. We
sail stereo maintenance service.
PALM READER, lne�pensivo
WMgjb
WIN sim.Mii Came to Hearts
YO. BVERYONEI ECU Hlllel
- �j a chanukah
at the Methodist stw-
LOST; East Atlantic Resorts tmi cmHr Mv M ,t 7:J p.m.
Mis hook; Mtnerta oelfwsiioHM j sjgkMsejMaR will Include me
attachment, no asset ens asked sjesjfjsjg of me mmera. Israeli
Wishjmad. eejfl Hebre feed and mesie and a
WANTED
of chanukah Find
what the festtvel of liebts is
?or Jen. Can move in end of Dee
�7S per month, one feerth
As Call
IS years ef
Call 7Se-eO.
. - - - -r
USDA Choice Beef Loin
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
Saturday, December 3,1983
Fresh Daily - 5 Lbs. Pack Or More
Ground
Lb.
USDA Choice Beef loin
T-Bone
Head
Crisp
Iceberg
Steak I Lettuce

Taylor
Calif. Cellars
Gallo
Wine
Pkf. of 6 12 0 Cans
Old Milwaukee
Pkf of 6 12 02. Coos
Pabst
2 Liter
1.S Liter � Beris.o Cfttbfit Cbeaie Blanc
Dry Roe. Dry tfbtie, ft. ColoMbord Rblae. Roto
Ziofu.ol
3 Liter -Cbablit Blade. Hty. BureuoaY Bureuody
Pink Cbablit. Rbi�o. Roe Rote, Vir Rote
Quart
6.5 0zLt.Ck.�kT.M,l0il
Chicken
Mayonnaise Of The
� SeaC
Wky Pay M.29
Why Pay '1.09
59
18.5 Oz. - BeHy Croekar
Cake Mixes
2109
30) Cm - Slakaly
FruU Cocktail
49 0�-ee
Cold Power
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Page Toilet Tissue
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589
4.S Oz. - Lioer ft Cbitkeo Tooe Beef ft Liver
Beef ft Cblcbtd
Bright Eyes Cat Food
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TASTY
14 0i. Oof Feo4 - Chaffta. oMlHwr ft Beef
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PIZZA
fc
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119 Skaatt � 1 Ply
Larfe Beaatlftl
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So-Ori iWU& HolMay " F,orida
Towels sJlkPainseHiasJfe Tangerines �
6800 EVERYDAY LOW PRICES
-
w ��- -v-v
- -





Title
The East Carolinian, November 29, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 29, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.305
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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