The East Carolinian, November 8, 1983






�Jj� lEast (Earolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 NoJrX
Tuesday, Novembers, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Combatting Apathy
Naso Gives 'State of University' Speech
By GLENN MAUGHAN
A precedent-setting "State of
the University" address was
delivered by SGA President Paul
Naso to the SGA legislature Mon-
day night. Naso outlined a six-
point plan to combat student
apathy, a major problem on cam-
pus according
to Naso and
one vowed to
fight since
taking office.
'�Making
students
aware and in- 'jfl
ooiem on ca
volving them
are difficult
tasks he
said. Naso
gave two
reasons for
student apathy. "We are a decen-
tralized campus; most of the stu-
Paul Naso
dent body do not live in dorms
he said. Students are also more
career orientated and not general-
ly interested in any issues other
than those that will help them get
a job, he said.
"How will students be able to
function outside the university en-
vironment if they are not made
more aware of what's going on0"
he asked. Naso said it took him
some time that getting an educa-
tion is more than studying. "Our
social and emotional growth will
not take place by merely reading a
book he said.
Improving communications will
be a major factor toward fighting
apathy, according to Naso. He
asked the legislature to start
writing letters to various campus
leaders and to become informed
on student problems and issues.
Citing the recent meetings
across campus on raising the
drinking age, Naso said it was a
good example of a communica-
tions network in action. "We
managed to get people together to
hear what was happening
Naso also suggested a student
hotline. "Much information
could be taped and heard over the
phone that would give out any
message concerning students he
said. Naso added the service could
expand into a referral or informa-
tion center.
"If students were having room-
mate problems, needed a
counselor or tutor, they, especial-
ly new students, could get their
answers from one location he
said. "It's important to provide
several ways to communicate.
"Let's also utilize the groups
we fund Naso said. He asked
that music groups provide enter-
See NASO, Page 6
Reagan Visits N.C.
QARY PATTERSON - ECU Photo Lab
President and Nancy Reagan attended a memorial service at Camp Lejeune Friday in honor of the 230
U.S. troops killed in Lebanon. Approximately 5000 people attended the service in spite of cold
temperatures and a steady downpour of rain. Afterwards, Reagan met with relatives of Marines killed in
MSt t0 POl0t' NC Whe� tddressed crowd at the Cnerry Polnt Marine Corps
Soap Box Forum Draws Crowd, Strong Reactions
�or roovR � rcu rttm. ia�
Unlucky Break
This fellow takes a much needed
rest from trying to manage both
books and crutches.
For the second day in a row the
subject of Grenada invited an
emotional response among ECU
students as approximately 200
students gathered in front of the
Student Supply Store Thursday to
listen to participants in the ECU
Soap Box Forum. More than a
dozen speakers presented their
views for and against last month's
invasion of the small Caribbean
nation.
An equal number of forum par-
ticipants took positions that were
generally for or against the inva-
sion, while observers appeared to
overwhelmingly back the presi-
&SLi� JE?5T.htJormal event
tasted tot about 90 minutes but
the discussions lasted longer when
students broke into smaller
groups to continue debating the
issues.
The event was abruptly ended
when an unidentified male angrily
disconnected the electical wire
from the loud speakers.
Speaking first and opposing the
invasion was social work student
Mickey Skidmore. Comparing the
Grenadian invasion with the 1979
Soviet invasion of Afghanistan,
Skidmore asked, "Why is their
action one of barbaric com-
munism and our action one of
righteousness?
"It is a sad day when no other
country in the world can condone
our action, yet the majority of
de?!Sve�Iand Impress&e mifitar?
victory
Supporting the invasion,
marketing student Stephen Sher-
bin said for more than 100 years
the U.S. has had a policy to pro-
tect the security of the Western
Hemisphere from external aggres-
sion. "President Reagan has pro-
ven that Cuban and Grenadian
national forces were actively sup-
ported, supplied and being led by
the Soviet Union Sherbin said
adding later that America should
not be expected to "tuck its tail
between its legs and run at the
first sign of trouble
Political science student
William Wilson disputed
Reagan's excuse for invading to
rescue American citizens in
Grenada. "Why had the ad-
ministration decided by October
&V
four days before the assasination
of Grenadian Prime Minister
Maurice Bishop.
Wilson said the First Amend-
The East Carolinian
General Manager Named
Bv PATRICK
Suff Writer
East Carolina Business
Manager Hunter Fisher was
unanimously selected by the ECU
Media Board in closed session
Monday as The East Carolinian's
new general manager. Fisher
replaces Fielding Miller who
resigned Oct. 7.
In an interview following his
selection, Fisher said he was "very
excited" to be picked for the post.
"I'm looking forward to the
challenge and responsibility that
the newspaper has to offer
Fisher said. "I see this as an ex-
cellent opportunity
Equally pleased with Fisher's
selection were Media Board
Chairman Mark Niewald and
Director of University Unions,
other Media Board news, page 5.
Associate Dean S. Randolph
Alexander. "I was very pleased
with his selection Niewald said.
"He's going to bring stability to
The East Carolinian. He's a hard
worker, a really dedicated person
and very conscientious
' 'Hunter was an outstanding can-
didate for the post of general
manager and I'm sure he will do a
superb job Alexander said. "He
has a good understanding of
management as well as business
and he is rapidly learning about
the editorial side of The East
Carolinian
Fisher, 22, had been assuming
the duties of the GM post since
Miller's resignation. Miller resign-
ed because he was no longer
enrolled as a full-time student.
Fisher, a native of Chapel Hill,
thanked staff members of The
East Carolinian for supporting
him during his campaign for the
post. "I enjoy the commradery
among the staff of The East
Carolinian Fisher said. "I'm
looking forward to working with
them
Fisher is a double major in
pshchology and business. He is
planning to graduate in December
of 1984 to pursue a career in in-
dependent real estate marketing.
Fisher first joined The East
Carolinian staff in March of this
year as a billing clerk. In May
ment had been "squashed" when
the news media was not allowed to
cover the invasion. "We did not
allow a free press to record the
events of the invasion Wilson
said. "Thus we have squashed the
first amendment and employed
the rationale of the end justifying
the means, the very same practice
we vehemently criticize others for
doing
"Our leaders have traded 18
Americans dead and 70 wounded
for unarticulated goals Wilson
added.
Eric Tilley, a political science
student supporting the invasion,
said it was unfortunate America
lH8ftic9fla?:TllrOan ��
when "fantasy reigned supreme
"The aftermath of that decade
and the type of thinking it produc-
ed have seriously weakened this
nation's capacity to meet its
responsibilities in the world
Later, Tilley said preserving
liberty was a "moral goal as is
avoidance of war. "But failure to
take whatever means necessary to
preserve freedom is an act of
moral abdication he claimed.
Both Sherbin and Tilley were
interrupted several times as the
audience gave them loud ap-
plause. Other speakers in support
of the invasion received similar
reaction from the crowd, while
those opposed to the invasion ap-
peared to have little support.
against the invasion on religous
grounds, was the lone exception.
"I think they were listening to
me Shondell said
Students Contribute To
County's United Way
Hunter Fisher
Fisher was promoted to business
manager. Because of his promo-
tion, Fisher will now have to select
his own replacement. "I know
who it will be, but I can't say
yet Fisher said regarding the
business post.
"He's as capable a businessman
as we've had since I've been
here said East Carolinian
Managing Editor Darryl Brown.
"I can't thing of anyone more
qualified or capable
By TINA MAROSCH AK
Staff WrMar
ECU has collected approx-
imately $29,400 for the Pitt Coun-
ty United Way campaign, just
$600 short of the $30,000 goal, ac-
cording to the faculty professor
who served as chairman of the
campus effort.
Fred Broadhurst, general cam-
pus chairman and a professor of
industrial and technical education
said, "There is every expectation
that we will exceed that amount in
post-campaign contributions
Student contributions totaled
$119.36 � $69.36 from Chi
Omega sorority, $25 for the
Parks, Recreation and Conserva-
tion Club, and $25 from Sigma
Sigma Sigma sorority. The SRA is
also conducting a raffle this week
for a colored television set and
will donate proceeds to the United
Way.
Last year's student contribu-
tions totaled $25. "This was the
first year that, in our campus
campaign, we assigned a special
person to work with student
groups � Nancy Ball
Broadhurst said. "As a result of
this being the first try, I think we
have gotten a start in the right
direction Broadhurst said that
if given the opportunity, many
students would feel good about
contributing to Pitt County since
many are from this area. "All the
students benefit from the
support he said.
See STUDENTS, Page 5
College Honors Programs
Classes Attract Students
�aav PA-rraasoN � mev
Loyal Fans
Pirate supporters at Saturday's game against Miami included tome loyal ECU alumni. Pictured from the
left are 1982 graduates Nancy McOoskey and Jo Beth Rambo along with former ECU student Akia
Register. The trio, from Ft. Pierce, Florida, traveled to ail three of the Pirates Florida
From Staff Report And
Campus Digest Newi Service
Gifted students looking for a
challenge in college can combine
the benefits of private liberal arts
colleges with the less-expensive
public institutions by par-
ticipating in honors programs at
state colleges and universities, in-
cluding ECU.
Small classes, the institution's
best instructors and interaction
with talented peers draw students
to these special progams, accor-
ding to the October issue of The
Forum for Liberal Education, a
publication of the Association of
American Colleges. The article
describes programs at several state
colleges and universities and in-
cludes reports of the efforts of
sereral private colleges which are
challenging their best students.
"Economic factors play a par-
ticularly interesting role in the
(college) choices made by gifted
students writes C. Orey Austin,
Ohio State University honors
director, in an essay. Austin says
52 percent of the 4,930 1981 Na-
tional Merit Scholars enrolled in
institutions which did not fall into
the "most prestigious" or "highly
competitive" categories in Bar-
ron's Guide.
A recent study at an open-
admission state university reveal-
ed that 71.8 percent of the more
able freshmen considered cost a
decisive factor in their college
decisions, while only 20.9 percent
of all students considered it im-
portant. Able students, assured of
access to high quality programs in
both public and private institu-
tions, choose primarily on the
basis of costs, Austin says.
This isn't to say that talented
students will suffer academic
deprivation, Austin stresses. In-
stead, many students are enrolling
in the honors programs now
found at more than 32 percent of
the country's colleges and univer-
sities. Says Austin: "After
graduation, many of them will
move on to prestigious graduate
and professional schools to
discover that their abilities in
speaking, writing and critial
thinking are as sharply focused as
those of their fellow students who
have an Ivy League education
Admission to honors programs
is usually based on high school
grades, college entrance examina-
tion scores and lettes of recom-
mendation. Honors courses at
ECU are limited to students with a
See SEMINARS, Page 6
Correction
On Thursday The East Caroli-
nian erroneously reported the
the Greenville Peace Commit-
tee protested the U.S. invasion
of Grenada in front of the Stu-
dent Supply Store. Members
of the group were involved in
the demonstration, but the
committee itself has not taken
an official stand on the
Grenada action. We regret the
error.

-
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2 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 8.19t 3
?
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
wouic Ilka to hava an itam
printec In tt�e announcamant
column, dimm typa It on an an
nouncamant form and sand It to
Tna East Carolinian In cara of
ma production managar.
Announcamant forms ara
available at tha East Carolinian
office In tha Publications
Building Flyers and handwrlt
tan copy on odd sized papar can-
not ba accepted
Thara Is no charga for an
nouncamants, but space Is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
ment will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
The deadline for an-
nouncements Is 3 p.m Monday
for the Tuesday paper and 3
p.m. Wednesday for the Thurs-
day paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
will be printed
This space Is available to all
campus organizations and
departments.
FOREIGN
LANGUAGES
LECTURE
The Oepartment of Foreign
Languages is sponsoring a lee
ture bv D r Bode Nischan of the
history department on Martin
Luther The lecture will be Nov
10, the SOOth anniversary of
Luther's birth It will be held in
the Mendenhall coffehouse at
7 30 p m. The public is invited
ENTERTAINERS
WANTED
The Department of University
Unions Is looking for students or
local talent to perform in the
Madrigal Dinners on Nov 29, 30,
Dec I. 3, and 5, 19�3 The per
formers would also be expected
to attend the dress rehersal on
Nov 78 We are especially In
terested in hiring tumblers, ven
triloqulsts. and jugglers if you
are Interested in applying for
any of these positions, call the
program Office in Mendenhall
Student Center at 757 4611 ext.
113
SOCIETY OF
UNITED LIBERAL
STUDENTS
The Society of United Liberal
Students will meet Thursday,
Nov 10 at 7 p.m The meeting
will be held In room 221
Mendenhall Your attendance is
very important Please get in
volved!
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be a meeting
Thurs Nov. 10 at 5 p m. In room
112 Mendenhall We will discuss
protects for Christmas and
Thanksgiving We need alt me
members mere to supply their
Input and dees Please attend
this meeting and become active
mmech.
Announcements
�cu
AMBASSADORS
A general meeting of the ECU
Ambassadors will be heM on
Wed Nov. � at I p.m. In ream
231 Mendenhall. We will be
welcoming all of our new am-
bassador and all members ere
urged to attend. The by lews will
be discussed and Ambassador of
the Month will be announced.
This meeting will a is� serve m a
training session for all of the
new ambassadors.
GAMMA BETA PHI
Gamma beta Phi will
orientation sessions on Tuesday,
Nov I at a p.m. and Wednesday,
Nov. v at 15 p.m. In 144
Mendenhall. Membership It
open to any person maintaining
a 3.0 GPA. National dues �f
Slt.OO. local dues �rn S4.00. If
you have any further questions.
please call Nennette Brett at
752034
RSI CHI
Time is running out! if you
want to loin the National Honor
Society for Psychology, Psl Chi
you have to hurryl Do you
qualify? You do if you ere In the
top 35 percent of your class end
after this semester you will have
at least � hours In psychology
You can pick up applications for
membership In the Psl Chi office
(Speight 202) during office
hours. The deadline for applica-
tions In Nov. 11, so pick-up your
application today, fill It out and
join Psl Chill
This is the final week to apply
for membership to Psl Chi, the
National Honor Society In
Psychology Applications ere
available in the Psychology
department office or in the Pi
chi library. If you have already
applied, you will be notified this
week as to whether or not you
have been accepted. If you plan
to be a member, the member-
ship fee of S35.00 must be paid on
or by Monday, Nov 14. initiation
will be held on Wednesday, Nov.
14. You will be notified where
and when this will take piece.
You can not be initiated unless
you have paid your lifetime
membership feel If you have
any questions, call Trine Har-
rison at 75 4553
HOSPICE
Beverly Burnette of the
HOSPICE of Greenville will
speak to the East Carolina
Music Therapy Club on caring
for the terminally III. She will
speak Wednesday, Nov. at S
p.m. at the A.J. Fletcher Music
Center, room 101. All interested
persons are welcome to attend I
Refreshments will be served
afterwards.
PHI
SIGMA TAU
The Philosophy club will be
having a meeting on Thursday,
Nov 10 in Mendenhall room 241
Jay Stone will present a paper
entitled: Politics of Con-
sciousness and vice-versa: the
students's role. Everyone Is
welcome
DfABSTBS
"Haw ta take charga of your
diabetes Monday, Haw. 14 at�
p.m. m tha student Health
CaWvsJJC CBRfBfBfKB exsjalsff, ThrB
n H spanaersd by ttu-
The
IETA
PHI BETA
' � Iota Phi Beta Sererl
ty, inc. wanes' like ta can-
� BJeVBBfB) BBJr feeMe svOfVlBVB Of
the XI Nw Chapter of Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity, Inc. As our
family grows, aa daaa eur unity.
We wautd alee like to say
THANK YOU to all who sup-
P�TlesJ Vb �" ! HMB)C�Mlllf)Q
Greek Black Show
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
The fountain at IMe Christian
fellowship will be sponsoring a
fall revival on the is. if. and 10th
of Mouomaer in tha art building
on tha campus of East Carolina
University. Service will begin
each night at 700 p.m. With the
mama: "There la true victory In
praise" We cordually Invite
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
inter Varsity Christian
nights at JO p.m. In Jenkins
Auditorium This weak, Greg
Kennedy will spesk on Godly
Male-Female fteUttonships Br-
ing a friend I
BAKE SALE
A bake sale by tha AOIl't will
ba In front of the Student Supply
Store an New. ig from 1:30 a.m.
ta J e� p.m Yet wa will hava
rice krlgpla treat
PI KAPPA PHI
The PI Kappa weuM Ilka to in-
vite ovorvowo ta came out to
Papa Kati Tuesday Night and
tha Ctba Ream Wednesday
Night far our happy hour Come
out to party with the PI Kappa
and find out what we're alt
"PI Kapp Day" is Nov w.
This It the designated day
dedicated to all tha PI Kapps.
Look and listen for Itl I it will be
wild because we will "get
ACCOUNTING
SOCIETY
The Accounting Society will
meet an Wednesday, Nov. � et 4
p.m. in Mendenhall roam 144.
Accounting In Industry" It the
memo. Dr. J. Kevin Green from
SCU will apeak an the CMA re-
quirements Jude Plawecki,
Controller, and Joseph Oebbyns,
Accountant, tram Stenedyne
(Fortune JBO) will speak en their
Industry experience
will bi
and pro-
et-
COLLEOE
REPUBLICANS
Tonight at 5:30 p.m the ECU
College Republicans will meet In
the Mendenhall Coffeehouse.
CR't and persons Interested In
loinlng the College Republicans
are urged to attend
VETERAN'S DAY
CEREMONY
The Army Air Force ROTC
will loin In a ceremony honoring
American Veterans.
Tha ceremony will be held in
front of Joyner Library at 11 00
a.m. on Friday, Nov. 11. the
general public Is invited end en
coureged to attend.
ECU MARAUDERS
The Department of Military
Science invites you to par-
ticipate In the ECU Marauders,
and organization oriented
toward leadership development
through adventure training,
military tactics, and other out
door activities.
AM students are welcome. The
Fourth meeting will be held on
Tuesday, Nov. 7 it I p.m. In
room 231, MendenhaM Student
Center. For more information.
Contact CPT Lllvak, at 757-4947
CO-OP
Northern Telecom, Research
Triangle Park, will be hiring co-
op students beginning Spring
194. Students hired will be
working In the Accounting Of
flee and assisting in assembling
current Information for cost
model, review sales proposals,
assist In new product summary,
and reviews. Prefer
sophomores, but will consider
lunlors. Must have 3.0 GPA or
higher end be willing to work
three co-op terms. For more in-
formation students should con
tact the Co-op office, 313 Rawl.
NASA Headquarters,
Washington, DC will be hiring
co-op students beginning Spring
lft4. Undergraduate Juniors
malorlng in Accounting or MBA
students should apply. Job will
entail a variety of duties but will
be adapted around students' mo-
tor. Students who have a 3.0
GPA or higher are urged to app-
ly. Salary level will be $11,949
for undergraduate lunlors and
$11449 for MBA students. In
terested students should contact
Mrs. Carolyn Powell, 311 Rawl
Immediately to apply.
G.I. BENEFITS
Attention students receiving
G.I. benefits. If you are a double
major or went to double major
plaate contact Mrs. Slay
Jackson. Room 104, Whichard
Building, as there has been a
change in the VA regulation.
FREE CRUISE
The Cruse Family will be
"Live" In Greenville on Friday,
November 11, In the Wright
Auditorium. Concert starts at
7,30 p.m. and admission is free
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$195.00 AbortJoa froes 13
to 18 weeks at eddidcHtaJ
cost. Pregbbo rest, sBrtfe
�Coatrol, wed ProBlt�th
frtptarj CouasettBf. For
further informstioa
132-0535 (Toll Free Ni
�fsft.221.25bJ)
A.M. and S P.M.
RALEKaHSWOMfpTS
HfcALIM
ORGANIZATION
917 Wes Merge St
Raleigh. N.C
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
�It Greenville hhrd.
7S4-3t�3 � 24 MRS.
'SI PLAZA SHELL
24 hour Towing Service
U-HbuI Rentals
Available
Howtobearoirianfc
Take some time to smell the roses. Pour yourself 4 warm cup of Cafe Amaretto. Smooth
and creamy rich, with just an almond kiss of amaretto flavoring, ifs a taste of la dolce vita
And just one of six deli-
riously different flavors
from General Foods
International Coffees.
GENERAL FOODS' INTERNATIONAL COFFEES.
AS MUCH A FEELING AS A FLAVOR.
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may wee the) Perm at raahf �r
uaa a laparata thai a paaar W
you need more tinea. Thar ara SS
units par line. Sack �attar, punc-
luetion mark end ward space j
counts ta em unit. Cap4taetaa and j
Hyphenate word property. Leave j
space at and of line M ware) 1
doesn't fit. No eds w�M be ec j
cepted aver tha phone. Wa
reserve the rfajiat h ralact any as).
an ads ataat a pnpoU
75� per Bss or fraction of a
Mease print IreiMyl Use capita
lower cast tetters
Retara to the Media Beard
secretary by 3 p.se. the day btfort
publication.
N
etTjeptf hats.
Baa.









1J
BINGO-
ICECREAM
The Department of University
Unions is sponsoring another
BingoIce Cream Party on Nov.
at 7 p.m. in the Mendenhall
Student Center Multl Purpose
room. Pley eight different Bingo
games, win prizes, and eat
delicious Ice creem. Admission
Is only � cents. Bring a friend
because all ECU students, facul-
ty, staff, their dependents and
guests are welcome
SGA DORM
REPRESENTATIVES
Are you Interested in becom-
ing a SGA Dorm Representative
for White, Cotton, Flamming,
Belk or Aycock Go by the SGA
office in Mendenhall and pick up
an application.
ADULT
EDUCATION
ASSOCIATION
The East Carolina University
adult education association will
hold its first meeting of the new
school year on Tuesday,
November 15, 193. The meeting
will be held at the Western
Sizzlln Steak House, 1903 Eest
10th St Greenville, NC. from 4
p.m9 p.m.
The program will feature Dr.
Paul F. Fendt, Associate Pro-
fessor of Education, UNC
Chapel Hill who will discuss
"Adult Education: Looking For-
ward To The Future
The meal will consist of a rib-
eye steak dinner with ell the
trimmings.
The cost including social, din-
ner, and the program Is St.50 per
person, inclusive. All members,
guests, and interested persons
are Invited to attend. Please
send your check (made payable
to ECUAEA) to: Dr. Leonard
Lllley, Office of Adult Educa-
tion, School of Education, ECU,
Greenville, NC, 27S34 no later
than Nov. 14th. If you have ques-
tions or wish further detolls
about the association, please
call Phil Martin (919-757-4143).
HOW TO AVOID
TEST ANXIETY
A mini-series offered at NO
COST by the University Counsel
ing Center. How To Avoid Test
Anxiety, Tuesday, Nov I from
3-4 p.m. In 305 Wright Annex
(757-4441)
SPECIAL
EDUCATION
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Scholarship commits of
the Department of Special
Education Is new accepting ap-
plications far a scholarship to be
awarded for the 1904 Spring
Semester. The scholarship will
be awarded to a rising iunior,
senior, or graduate student who
has bean accepted for admission
or who is currentty enrolled full
time in the Department of
Special Education at East
Carolina University. Appllca
tion materials ere available at
137 Speight. All applications
must ba turned in by Monday,
November 21, 1903
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
The Greenville Utilities Com
mission is seeking student
volunteers to help with a winter
weatherizatlon project for low
Income and elderly Greevilee
residents. If you have time to
help please call Susan Susan
Blzzaro at 752 7144 before 5 p.m
CCNVSPEAKER
Harold Moss, a member of the
Weshlngton DC based COM
MUNITY for CREATIVE NON
VIOLENCE, will be speaking
Thursday at the Beptlst Student
Center at 8:00 p.m. CCNV is na
tlonally known for its work with
homeless people in our nations
capital
The public is Invited to attend
free of charge. Moss will also be
available to speak in classes or
other meetings. For an appoint
ment call 752 4214, 752 5724 or
7514904.
SIGMA THETA TAU
Sigma Theta Tau, the honor
society of nursing, will hold its
fall meeting on Thursday, Nov
10, at the Greenville Country
Club Or Mi Ja Kim. R.N. Ph
D, from the University of II
linoiv College of Nursing, will
speak on "The Impact of Nurs
ing Diagnoses on the Nursing
Profession " The program will
begin at 6 30 p.m. with a wine
and cheese reception for Dr
Kim Registration fee is S3.50.
Colleagues, students, spouses,
and friends are invited
UGLYMAN PRIZES
Consulation prizes for the
uglyman on campus can be pick
ed up at the AOII house.
PEACE
"There is no way to Peace.
Peace is the Way " if you're in-
terested in learning more about
Peace, then come to me Green-
ville Peace Committee every
Friday at430pm at 410 S Elm
St All are welcome 75S-4904
The East CaroHaie
rr iii, viwpw�?watt, tf
uih 192!
Pabi'Shed every Tuesdey
and Thursday dur-ng the
academic �w mrx every
Wednesday during me sur �
mer
Tte East Carolimen is me
offtr al newspaper of Ejst
.Carina University, owned
ope'rt'rd and published �or
and by iha students of tes�
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Subscription Pete: SM yearly
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ECU, OreenviH. N.C.
POSTMASTER Send ad
dress changes to The East
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Building, Et u r.reewvilte
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Accepting Applications For
News Writers and Editors
Apply in person at The East Carolinian offices on
the second floor of the Publications Building,
across from the entrance of Joyner Library.

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Job,
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Lib
Opini
Dece
Staff -
Recently the
Commence ml
Committee has
discussing the
and cons of hoj
graduation exe:
in December as w�
in May Stuck
tions to the ide�
mixed.
Lisa Rob
Senior Class
dent, said, "
that commence!
exercises in Decer
would probi
please those
graduated a:
time. But, or.
other had, it -
the university
money than they
want to spenj
Roberts said
doesn't think it's
problem
December graa
Need a
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8, 1983



�t-C�U





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Th� Fastaroliaia
� V" evffy
"C "V Sur
�rol�nt�n i� "
fea 'or
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o'on Hal t� vwn,
ha tn' ,j'��i�i���Htcrt
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8, ki�� am � cmpv� J�
ECU Gr���viH N C
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now
is For
Editors
an offices on
ons Building,
ibrarv.
o
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ur
Ring
If F JONES
)i Carnation Company
styles!
Jobs Up For
Students In
Liberal Arts
Campus Dtf est News Service
There's hope for
liberal arts graduates
in the job market,
even though the big
demand is still for
technical and business
people. According to
a number of
employers, hiring
liberal arts graduates
has become increas-
ingly popular.
"The more
sophisticated the com-
pany is generally, the
more it will hire
liberal arts
graduates says
human resources con-
sultant Andrew A.
Sherwood, "They feel
the liberal arts
graduate has plenty of
balance personally
During the past
year, on-campus
recruiting gave more
job offers in the
humanities than any
other area. A survey
by the College Place-
ment Council showed
a salary increase over
last year for
humanities graduates
� 7.6 percent to
$16,560.
Money is an impor-
tant factor in hiring,
as flexible graduates
often can be trained
to do jobs such as
running computers. A
computer science grad
might start at
$35,000, but a liberal
arts grad can be hired
for less than $25,000.
A 1983 Peterson's
Guides survey showed
even 14 percent of
computer-related
companies were very
interested in hiring
liberal arts graduates.
American
Telephone and
Telegraph, in a
20-year career study,
discovered that well-
rounded graduates
were promoted faster
and performed better
over the long term.
AT&T cited motiva-
tion, flexibility and
ability to accept
change as assets in
favor of these
employees.
Other companies
showing strong liberal
arts hiring tendencies
include General Elec-
tric Co. (about 25 per-
cent of their
workforce), Control
Data Corporation
(sales, strategy and
business planning)
and Lehman Brothers
Kuhn Loeb Inc
which found that
liberal arts graduates
make better liaisons
between data process-
ing and other divi-
sions.
There are some
drawbacks that poten-
tial employees should
be aware of
Employers say
mistakes are more
common, computer
programs are often
written with too mam
options, and of
course, training is
necessary. Even so,
the future looks pro-
mi sing .
Opinions Mixed On
December Graduation
Staff Writer
Recently the ECU
Commencement
Committee has been
discussing the pros
and cons of holding
graduation exercises
in December as well as
in May. Student reac-
tions to the idea are
mixed.
Lisa Roberts,
Senior Class Presi-
dent, said, "I think
that commencement
exercises in December
would p r o b a b 1 y
please those who
graduated at that
time. But, on the
other had, it will cost
the university more
money than they may
want to spend
Roberts said she
doesn't think it's a big
problem for
December graduates
to return in May. "If
the average student
(one who starts col-
lege directly after high
school graduation)
finishes in four years,
then they will
graduate in the spr-
ing she said.
Senior Debbie
Kinlaw said, "If
there's enough people
graduating in
December then they
should be able to go
through the com-
mencement exercises
like those that
graduate in the spr-
ing She said funds
should cover all who
graduate, whether
they graduate in the
spring or fall.
Mark Niewald, Stu-
dent Residence
Association president,
said, "I'd be against
spending the extra
money on it. The peo-
ple that graduate in
December have the
right to come back in
the spring
Minda White, a
senior, was for a
December gradua-
tion. "I think it would
be worth the extra
money. If there's just
as many people that
graduate in December
as there are in May,
then I definitely think
it would be a good
idea
Junior Class Presi-
dent David Brown
said he thinks it is an
individual decision.
"It seems that a stu-
dent forum should be
held to find out what
the students think
Brown said. "I'd be
interested in finding
out how they handle
the situation at other
universities he con-
cluded.
Jobhunting is Difficult
For Some Professors
Robert White will speak on Central America Wednesday night
Former Ambassador To Speak
Need a ride? Try the classifieds
The East Carolinian can work for you.
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Staff Hritef
ECU students will
have the opportunity
to hear a voice of ex-
perience on Central
America Wednesday
night when former
U.S. ambassador to
Central America
Robert White speaks
in Hendrix Theatre on
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Crises in Central
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served as ambassador
to El Salvador during
the Carter administra-
tion. He has also serv-
ed as a diplomat in
several Central
American countries,
senior fellow at the
Center for Policy
Development. He is
serving as a commen-
tator on Central
American affairs and,
because of his
including Nicaraqua, background, is able to
Honduras, the provide an insightful
Dominican Republic
and Grenada.
White, the first
speaker on the
University Unions
Lecture Series this
year, is currently a
analysis of current
events on the region.
Tickets for the lec-
ture are $1.50 for
students, 52.50 for
faculty and staff and
S3.50 for the public.
Students aren't the
only ones who find
job hunting a
traumatic experience.
Even college pro-
fessors have pro-
blems.
Jobseekers say the
process is demoraliz-
ing for a number of
reasons. A seemingly
endless number of ap-
plication letters and
resumes must be sent
out first.
Frequently these
letters are received by
insensitive search
committees, who
often require can-
didates to travel at
their own expense
(difficult for giad
students fresh out of
school), ask irrelevant
questions or worse
yet, already know
who they're going to
hire before the adver-
tisement is placed-a
contradiction of true
affirmative-action.
Travel may include
attending a profes-
sional convention,
enabling interviewers
to see a group of
finalists at th least
cost. Time with
potential employers,
however, is often
severely limited at
these meetings. On
the positive side, can-
didates, too, can use
these opportunities to
schedule more than
one interview with
potential employers.
Even when a one-
or two-year job is of-
fered, moving costs
aie involved. And the
letter-writing process
begins again almost as
soon as it ended. "I
don't think univer-
sities realize what a
great expenditure of
energy it is to apply
for jobs says Margo
Persin, assistant pro-
fessor of Spanish at
Rutgers.
Female jobhunters
report frequently be-
ing asked irrelevant
questions about mar-
tial status, children
and child care �
queries put to women
but not to men, which
can be illegal under
equal-opportunity
guidelines.
On the other hand,
search-committee
members defend their
actions saying that
choosing approp:
finalists is a diffi
task with limited
funds. Some admit
feeling biased toward
candidates who have
paid their own way to
campus for an inter-
view .
Their suggestions to
applicants include ex-
cellent advice for anv
jobseeker: know as
much a pos:
about the institution
(and read faculty
members' published
works, if available).
send personalized
cover letters and make
sure resumes are con-
cise, easy-to-read and
error-free
Applicants
English positions par-
ticularly are adv
to have collegueb ?r
job counselors review
their letters before
sending them out.
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SHje East �arnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Hunter Fisher, g�w
Darryl Brown, ,���,�� &�
Greg Rideout. Editor m &��
ALI AFRASHTEH, CrtdttMvmfr
Geoff Hudson, amd wo�a�
Michael Mayo, r�cw shw
Cindy Pleasants, spans Eduor
GORDON IPOCK, Emlertmtment Eduor
Lizanne Jennings, so Editor
TODD EVANS, Product Mmagtr
November 8, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Speaking Out
Students Use First Amendment
Boy, were we ever surprised. All
those people in one place talking
about a current event. At ECU.
Well, it sure did happen, and those
200 students who showed up at
Thursday's Soap Box Forum to
debate the merits of the Grenada
invasion should be congratulated
for their political awareness. More
than 20 speakers took their turn at
the podium and showed their con-
cern for United States' foreign
policy.
Students seemed to realize how
serious an issue the use of military
force is in today's world. We were
glad to see the apathy gone and
hope the experience encourages
students to speak out more often.
Those who spoke brought out
the usual facts and figures about
the situation, but the most impor-
tant aspect of the afternoon was
definitely the students themselves.
Here they were, constituting by far
the largest gathering on campus
for a political affair in years, ex-
cercising their freedom of speech.
Those of us who use the First
Amendment tool for a living
respect and admire our fellow
students who got out and gave
their feelings on the Grenada situa-
tion.
The '80s is not a time of discon-
tent. And ECU is not Berkeley. In
fact, most of the students who
spoke Thursday applauded the
president's move to take over the
island and install a democratic
form of government. But, we as
students on today's college cam-
puses should realize we are the bas-
tion of political awareness. We
who are supposedly tomorrow's
intellectual leaders will be called
upon in the future to do what our
200 fellow students did Thursday.
So, even if we all agree, which we
won't, let's talk about it. Even if
we all love Ronnie, let's at least
discuss what he's doing.
There are so many things that
will face the adults of the 21st cen-
tury. There is poverty in the
world's streets and technology fac-
ing tomorrow's businessman.
There is an arms race among na-
tions that could possibly end the
world. We should learn to com-
municate our feelings in the open,
in meetings designed to welcome
all points of view where all can say
what they feel. Only then can our
problems be solved. This is the
lesson we must learn from the
forum.
You know, Mark Twain once
said that reports of his death were
greatly exaggerated. Well, we
think the death of ECU's
awareness is definitely in the same
boat.
The Internal Revenue Service
has released figures that indicate
that taxes on cigarettes have slow-
ed down the pace of smoking. The
tax is at present is 16 cents per
pack. This is encouraging; it shows
that a regressive tax can help stem
the public from purchasing items
that are harmful to its health.
We all know that smoking is
hazardous to our health. But,
somehow, it is conviently forgot-
ten when the urge comes to light
one more up. But this is not the
point. The point is that the govern-
ment who taxes tobacco also warns
us against it and subsidizes those
who farm it. Why is there such a
contradiction?
Here in Pitt county, tobacco is
big stuff; so big that our university
� all the state's universities for
that matter � is dependent on the
tobacco tax dollar. We say let's
start now to eradicate this. In an
era of fitness awareness, its time to
shed the plantation. If our govern-
ment stops, maybe we people will.
PERSONALLY I IMP THE W AIRLINES WERE BEFORE DEREGULATION,
Grenada Poses Questions
By WILLIAM WILSON
Had President Reagan been at ECU's
Soap Box Forum Thursday, he would
have been overjoyed. He had written the
script, and ECU students were following
it to the letter. The forum provided an
opportunity for approximately 20
students to debate the U.S. led invasion
of Grenada. Although Reagan originally
labeled the action of Oct. 25 an inva-
sion, he later toned it down to read
"rescue mission
Some serious questions have been pos-
ed by the incredible lack of finesse ex-
hibited in handling the public relations
aspect of the entire affair. The most
distressing facet (after the loss of lives by
both sides) was the muzzling of the
press. In a democracy, the most vital
condition is freedom. You may physical-
ly constrain an individual, but when you
chain his mind, you are engaging in the
most heinous crime of ail � the final
supression of the last bastion of free
will.
In a society such as ours, a relatively
unbiased news media plays a vital role in
giving us the opportunity to exercise
freedom of choice. For a period of six
days the American public chowed down
what the White House told them. What
a chilling example of Groupthink pro-
phesized by George Orwell.
The original motive of rescuing the
Americans on the island was lost in the
stampede of boots hitting Grenadian
soil. Oddly enough, the neat juxtaposi-
tion of after the fact rationales was not
harmful to Reagan's domestic standing.
It really couldn't and didn't matter
because most Americans' minds had
already been made up. Not until six days
later when contradictory evidence was
available did we get a chance to examine
the larger issues involved. It was largely
an academic question by this time
because for a vast majority of
Americans their support was solidified
for the invasion.
The crowd that witnessed the forum
was reflective of this distressing mental
manipulation. The atmosphere assumed
the trappings of a redneck bar. These
people are supposedly today's intellec-
tuals and definitly tomorrow's leaders,
yet when several students screamed "kill
all commies" and "America love it or
get the hell out the crowd roared its
approval. I leave it to the reader to
decide if this is reflective of the vital
qualities embodied in a university. Ar-
ticulate argument against the invasion
fell on deaf ears while the most impas-
sioned polemical diatribes were greeted
by overwhelming approval.
ceptable. The question this raises is what
is the essential cost-effectiveness equa-
tion utilized in deciding to overthrow
one government and not others. The ob-
vious answer is whatever we can get
away with the least cost. If the govern-
ment had been honest and said, "What
the hell. No smokescreens here. We
don't like that country's government �
it's in our hemisphere so we'll overthrow
it This, of course, is naive and ob-
viously would not be supported by a
democratic populace.
Why weren't domestic avenues
employed to extricate the students
The crowd that witnessed the forum was reflective of this
distressing mental manipulation. The atmosphere assumed
the trappings of a redneck bar. These people are supposedly
tomorrow's leaders, yet when several students screamed
"kill all commies" and "America love it or get the hell
out, M the crowed roared its approval
Why are people who criticize the
policies of their government (a light
responsibility of citizens of a
democracy) denounced as subversive
elements? Instead of immediately offer-
ing your unquestioning support of your
government's action, you have a respon-
sibility to stand back and look at the en-
tire issue. You must learn to practice
eclecticism � the examination of each
issue on its individual merits and pro-
blems. Unfortunatly, most Americans
do not seem sufficiently energetic to
engage in the mental gymkhanas; it is
simply to taxing to make an effort to
become sufficiently informed. This is ex-
istence not living.
On the plus side, it is true that the
Grenadians will probably now enjoy
more democracy than under Bishop's
regime, but why did we wait until a
bunch of "Leftist thugs" overthrew his
Marxist dictatorship? The answer lies in
what Reagan felt would be politically ac-
peacefully? Because the original ra-
tionale of the invasion would disappear.
The true rationale of overthrowing
"Marxist times would �ta.rt to look like
the dichotomous rationale of end-means
justification and thinly disguised im-
perialism.
Thus to rally support domestically,
the public had to ultimately believe it
was purely a rescue mission, but "Golly
gee whiz folks once we got there you just
wouldn't believe what we found. You
never seen so many AK-47s and ammo
in your life. Folk's you can rest now; we
just got there in the nick of time
Granted, this is perhaps unusually
cynical, but sometimes we can't see the
forest for the trees. You owe it to
yourself to examine the real reasons for
the invasion, and are the ultimate
ramifications of this as perhaps a policy'
setting issue? Ronald where do you draw
the line here?
Campus Forum
Soap Box Forum Brings Out Both Sides Of Issue

It takes two to argue. That is what
Patrick O'Neill had in mind when he
staged yet another soap box forum. I
got the chance to walk and talk with
him after the forum was over. His
views on current events and politics
were frightening and somewhat sur-
prising.
First he stated emphatically, "I am
not a communist which surprised
me. I found out that he admired the
empathy the Soviet Union has for
South and Central America which
frightened me. I also found that his ac-
tions were aimed at eradicating the ig-
norance college students have of their
government's actions in South
America. I got the idea that he felt the
forum was a no-lose situation. That is,
whether or not the students and
speakers completely disagree with him,
the forum leaves them questioning
their own ideas about their govern-
ment's actions.
I agree with Mr. O'Neill on this idea
� opening the student's mind. On Mr.
O'Neill's other ideas we are like night
and day. But I urge others to rise up
and get involved with current events as
Mr. O'Neill has been doing for years.
If students are interested, ECU has
both Young Republican and Young
Democratic organizations. For Mr.
O'Neill, I say keep reaching for the
stars but please, please keep at least
one toe on the ground.
David Pere
Senior, Business Admn.
Editor's Note � Mr. O'Neill did not
stage the Soap Box Forum. It is spon-
sored by the Catholic Newman Center.
Secondly, he does not admire the
Soviet's "empathy" for South and
Central America. He believes neither
the United States or Soviet Union puts
the needs of the people of the region
first.
Soap Stained
What started out as a lone speaker
and a handful of spectators turned into
vocal abuse of ideologies and an angry
mass mob. The debate on the issue
started out intelligently. Facts and
figures were presented in relatively
diplomatic ways. Yet, as the speakers
spoke on, persons in the audience
jumped up on the soapbox. The
relatively calm speech exploded into
angry shouts. Facts became more
vague. Stands became confused, and
the audience fell into a let's-kill-those-
commies fever. All hope of an intellec-
tual and meaningful debate was aban-
doned.
This was exemplified by the ag-
gresive actions of a presumed professor
who unplugged the mike and threw the
extension cord at some of the speakers
telling them to shut up.
It is appalling to think that college
students, who are labeled as our up-
coming intellectual public, can allow
themselves to pull the wool over their
eyes in order to accept the easiest solu-
tion. Admittedly, I know of no one
who wouldn't prefer an easier answer.
Yet, in the interworldngs of interna-
tional politics the "easy way out" has
become archaic.
The interpolitical system is just too
complex and touchy to accept a solu-
tion that the average, not very
knowledgeable person on the subject
can deduce. The general public has a
tendency to grasp hold of the ideas to
which they can relate and spit out and
reject the more definite facts that back
up each side of the issue. The situation
in front of the student store on Thurs-
day pertaining to the Grenada debate
resembled the adding of water to solid
soap only to create bubbles.
LisaDwyer
Freshmen, Pols
Cold On 'Chill'
I was deeply offended by Mick
LaSalle's attempt to review the recently
released Big ChiU. Firstly, Mr. LaSalle
did not review the movie. He gave us
his own opinions, nauseating though
they may be, on the '60s era of history,
Marxism, reptiles, Gilligan's Island,
male impotence, and the normal aging
process. It seems the subtlety and art-
ful nostalgia of the "Big Chill"
escaped LaSalle entirely.
Granted, I did not grow up in the
'60s; however, it seems any ignoramus
can place him or herself within the
framework of reliving a college ex-
perience. It is inconceivable to me to
find that, given the role of movie
reviewer, Mr. LaSalle comments solely
on the characters' looks and sexual
proclivities. (Considering LaSalle's
previous articles; however, it becomes
a touch more conceivable.)
This movie is one with believable
characters, a touching theme, very art-
ful camera work and a fantastic sound-
track. LaSalle, it seems, is only able to
define these characters as nymphs,
"Meg's good friend "Sara's
hubby "snakes "a real slime "a
gymnast (she's a ballet dancer) and
"a real man Come on, LaSalle!
Where's your perception? In-
tuitiveness? Sense of artistry? Where's
your sense?
Mick LaSalle's limited scope
prevents me from accepting a single
idea he's presented. His only saving
grace is his comedy. This guy's a joke.
Barbara Dobyns
English
Radio Wrong
This past summer, as I made three
trips to and from the Midwest, I
became more and more aware of a
phenomenon which has continued to
perplex me. It was this: as I traveled
and listened to the FM band, I heard
on the college and university stations
not rock or pops, but rather a fairly
consistent affiliation with National
Public Radio and its dedication to
quality news, panel discussion and a
variety of fine music programs.
I would like to list for your interest
the station whose names I can recall:
UNC-Chapel Hill, Wake Forest.
Davidson, University of Tennessee-
Memphis, University of Tcnnessce-
Knoxville, Eastern Kentucky State,
Morehead State, University of Ken-
tucky, University of Cincinnati, In-
diana University, Butler University, In-
diana Central College and even the In-
dianapolis Public Schools' station.
I know that I may have ommitted
some names, but the point is dear,
large or small, public or private, the
college and university stations in other
areas are attempting to offer
something more than a mere repetition
of that which is so plentifully available
on commercial radio. Why has ECU
alone of those mentioned not attemp-
ted to raise expectations and stan-
dards? For a university community to
have a quality reputation, it must show
as high a degree of regard for the
cultural as for the academic and
athletic.
Charles W.Moore
School of Music
O'Neill No Puppet
I had a hearty laugh at Charles
Shavitz's letter characterizing Patrick
O'Neill as a puppet. I wasn't alone.
Remember the spring of 1982 when
Mr. O'Neill joined three students from
Chapel Hill in a symbolic blockade of
Ft. Bragg? Remember how he went on
to serve out two more months after the
Chapel Hill students paid court costs,
accepted probation and were released?
He was no puppet then, and he hasn't
become less independent in the months
since. After sharing space with men
judged to be society's most dangerous
criminals, he should also be safe from
any implication of cowardice.
It's a sad day for the country and,
especially, the university when its
students can only respond to reasoned
argument by name-calling. Perhaps it's
a result of war mentality. When the
guns begin to go off and our people are
killed, an unconscious compulsion
takes over. The war drums set an insis-
tent beat and everyone is required to
keep step with it.
In my own behalf and that of others
who generally agree with Mr. O'Neill
but lack his credentials, I ask, "What's
so courageous about sending young
men out to die?" and "What's so un-
patriotic about wanting to save our
civilization and our species from
nuclear destruction?
Edith Webber
I
ECU Mea,
D:
B PATRK K
O'NEII I
The ECU M
Board Mom
selected former
Carolinian N
Editor Err-
"Buddy' tonne:
its day representatj
Conner, a veteran!
ECU student poln
will serve on
board for the
mainder of
Ex-Re
B PATRK
O NFII I
B
standards Hi
Moss a
tative of a pei
had mi
goals A g.xd
den: M
his doctor
bioche
Cathci L c J
and late: eai
coveted pos I
cancer res c i
the National
of Hea
UNC
Write
Bv PATRICK
O'NEILL
A group of law
fessors at the Umi
sity of of "l
Carolina-Chap?.
have written a I
President Reagan
testing the Ui
States milita i
sion of Grenada
Among the ?
17 signees were
neth S. Brow-
of the UNC
School. Hairj
Groves, former
Lai
Ladies
m
PW
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,
ECU Media Rnnrri
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER g. 13 S
8SS8a
SUIATION.
ons
ion this raises is what
hst-effectiveness equa-
feciding to overthrow
d not others. The ob-
natever we can get
i cost. If the govern-
jr.est and said, "What
lekescreens here. We
tntry's government �
lere so we'll overthrow
irse, is naive and ob-
N be supported by a
:e.
domestic avenues
ttncate the students
reflective of this
sphere assumed
are supposedly
dents screamed
or get the hell
mse the original ra-
asion would disappear.
nale of overthrowing
� uouJH start to Joolr hke
rationaJe of end-means
thinly disguised im-
upport domestically,
uJtimately believe it
- mission, but "Golly
e we got there you just
hat we found. You
ny AK-47s and ammo
s you can rest now; we
le nick of time
jis perhaps unusually
Itimes we can't see the
rees. You owe it to
ie the real reasons for
id are the ultimate
11s as perhaps a policy
laid whfc do you draw
mtation, it must show
of regard for the
the academic and
Charles W. Moore
School of Music
No Puppet
ty laugh at Charles
characterizing Patrick
ippet. 1 wasn't alone,
spring of 1982 when
lied three students from
symbolic blockade of
lember how he went on
more months after the
lents paid court costs,
ion and were released?
rt then, and he hasn't
rpendent in the months
ing space with men
:iety's most dangerous
ox6 also be safe from
of cowardice,
for the country and,
university when its
ly respond to reasoned
le-calling. Perhaps it's
mentality. When the
off and our people are
ronscious compulsion
war drums set an insis-
�eryone is required to
it.
malf and that of others
agree with Mr. O'Neill
ientials, I ask, "What's
about sending young
' and "What's so un-
wanting to save our
our species from
on?"
Edith Webber
Day Representative Is Chosen
�y PATRICK
O'NEILL
9M Writ
The ECU Media
Bfard Monday
selected former East
Carolinian News
Editor Ernest L.
"Buddy" Conner as
its day representative.
Conner, a veteran of
ECU student politics,
will serve on the
board for the re-
mainder of the
academic year.
"I'm pleased to
have been selected
said Conner, a
military veteran who
served six years in the
U.S. Army. "I hope I
can use some of my
experience in jour-
nalism to leave a
positive mark when I
leave my post in
May
Conner is a political
science major and
journalism minor and
plans to graduate in
the spring and attend
law school.
"He brings with
him a lot of media ex-
perience, and we're
happy to have him on
the board Media
Board Chairman
Mark Niewald said.
The Media Board
oversees and sets
policy for all of the
campus medias with
the exception of
editorials.
"Ernest had very
fine credentials to
support his candidacy
a� day student
representative said
Director of University
Unions S. Rudolph
Alexander.
Alexander praised
Conner for his "fine
academic standing"
and his previous
media experience at
ECU and while in the
military. Conner was
selected by the board
after its closed session
Monday.
Niewald also an-
nounced that applica-
tions are being ac-
cepted for the WZMB
general manager's
post which was
vacated October 1.
When Jim O. Ensor
resigned the position,
Niewald said applica-
tions would be ac-
cepted for one week
WZMB staff member
Greg Watkins is cur-
rently assuming the
GM post at the cam-
pus radio station.
'� pus raaio statioi
Ex-Researcher Helping The Homeless
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
SttffWrter
By most people's
standards Harold
Moss was represen-
tative of a person who
had met his personal
goals. A good stu-
dent, Moss received
his doctorate in
biochemistry from
Catholic University
and later earned a
coveted position as
cancer researcher at
the National Institute
of Health.
"Almost im-
mediately I realized
that I was getting a lot
of benifits from socie-
ty and many people
around me were get-
ting nothing. I began
to see that when you
cure poor people of
cancer, they're still
poor. I wondered if a
better way of healing
people might be to im-
prove their social
situations Moss
said, expressing his
reasons for becoming
an activist for the
homeless and
downtrodden masses.
Moss is now a live-
in member of the
Community for
Creative Non-
violence, a
Washington D.C.
based organization
that doubles as a soup
kitchen and advocacy
group for the
homeless. Moss will
be in Greenville this
week to speak about
his community and
the difficult plight of
poor Americans.
The CCNV has
often found itself at
odds with the powers
that be during its 12
years of service in the
nation's capital. The
community often sup-
ports members of its
group who are serving
prison sentences for
acts of civil disobe-
dience protesting the
problems of the
needy.
Moss himself has
been arrested on
several occasions for
his protests. He
UNC Law Professors
Write Letter To Reagan
recently took up
residence in a card-
board box outside a
government building
in Washington to pro-
test the lack of
shelters available for
the city's homeless.
His Greenville visit
is being sponsored by
the ECU Catholic
Newman Center. Dur-
ing his visit, Moss
plans to speak to
several ECU classes
and at public meetings
on Wednesday and
Thursday nights.
Student United Way contributors with Niewald.
Students Contribute Money
Cont. From Page 1
� Broadhurst said
that the schools of
nursing and education
did "outstanding"
work. The School of
Nursing exceeded
their goal by 50 per-
cent and contributed
Use the
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
Staff Writer
A group of law pro-
fessors at the Univer-
sity of of North
Carolina-Chapel Hill
have written a letter to
President Reagan pro-
testing the United
States military inva-
sion of Grenada.
Among the letter's
17 signees were Ken-
neth S. Brown, dean
of the UNC Law
SchooL Harry �.
Groves, former dean
of the N.C. Central
University Law
School, constitutional
law scholar Daniel H.
Pollit and 14 other
law professors.
In the letter dated
Oct, 27, the pro-
fessors said they were
"deeply anguished"
at the president's
move. "The unilateral
action in Grenada is
the kind of armed in-
vasion we rightly con-
demn when done by
others the letter
stated, "it gives
substance to the tradi-
tional Latin-
American lament
In an interview with
The East Carolinian,
Pollitt said he drafted
the letter out of
"anguish and anger
"The president is not
God Pollitt said.
"We went through
this in Vietnam and
now we're going
through it again
Pollitt claimeed the
invasion was a viola-
tion i h� War
Powers Act . v
�3 S. IVANS ST.
MEfNVtLU. MX.
Latest Styles in
Ladies Hats and accessories
COUPON-COUPON -COUPON
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Announcements
of The East Carolinian if your
campus group or organization
tias a meeting or project of in-
erest to ECU students.
And don't forget
The Classifieds
At just 75 cents per line,
classified ads in The East
Carolinian are the best way inj
tbfwn to advertise to the campus I
community.
more than any single
school or department
on campus.
The School of
Education achieved
100 percent participa-
tion and doubled last
year's total contribu-
tions.
The campus goal of
$30,000 was 15 per-
cent higher than last
year's goal.
The United Way is
a non-profit organiza-
tion that helps fund
such local and
regional organizations
as the REAL Crisis
Center, Salvation Ar-
my, Hospice of East
Carolina and the Red
Cross.
Campus represen-
tatives of the United
Way drive include
Edith Barefoot, Mary
Draper, Nancy Ball
and Vanessa Weaver.
The East Carolinian
is accepting applications for
Director of Advertising
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h-





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8, 1983
Tutorial Services Available
The following departments at ECU are offering tutorial services to interested students.
Please contact the departmetn office for further information.
Telephone
757-6718
757-6227
757-6041
757-6232
757-6230
757-6360
757-6587
757-6461
757-6428
757-6030
DepartmentLocation
BiologyScience Complex
ChemistryFlanagan
EnglishAustin
Foreign Languages and LiteraturesBrewster
Geography and PlanningBrewster
GeologyGraham
HistoryBrewster
Mathematics and Computer Science PhysicsAustin Science Complex
Political ScienceBrewster
Honors Programs
Seminars Provide Alternative
Cont. From Page 1
3.5 gpa or who in-
dicate a special in-
terest and obtain per-
mission from the
ECU Honors Progam
director, David
Sanders.
Sensitive to past
charges that honors
programs are elitist,
directors may also
consider personal in-
terviews, essays and
extracurricular ac-
tivities in their deci-
sions. Directors have
also discovered that
students' desire to
participate in an
honors program may
be more important
than past grades.
Hor. as courses are
The following student organizations offer tutorial services. Please contact the depart-
ment office for further information about the organization.
Organization
ECU Biology Club
Phi Sigma Tau
viety of Physics
Students
Lambda Alpha Beta
Alpha Phi Sigma
Pre-Professional
Health Affairs
Design Associates
Accounting Society-
Phi Sigma Pi
ECU Music Therapy
Department
Biology
Philosophy
Physics
Anthropology
Correctional Services
Center for Student
Opportunity, med school
Communication Arts,
School of Art
Accounting
Decision Sciences
Music Therapy
Location
Science Complex
Brewster
Science Complex
Brewster
Belk
Brody
Jenkins
Rawl
Rawl
Fletcher
THE
Wed. Nov. 9th
Happy Hour
feenFea,urin ,he
NORTH T A MSf
H.H. 4:30-7:30
Band 7:00 -11:00-
All College Students with College ID Free til 7.00
After 7:00 Ladies $1.00
Men $4.00
Free Hot Hordes
mWFOOD
Qon'lx&farpit-
cooked u armed ner
vA rOfQt Red barkers
) m hau a fresh alternative
at Sanaa: (mrden fresh lettuce
tumatoes � inn ins and all the 'Anns art foe
Choice sin ed meats and cheeses. ze:rhot meat-
��. md mmgt and freshh baketl fool-long
t A Mom vndu ichor salad a'Subutn is
made to war order not made in adi ance
u
E. 5th St.
�SUB
E. 5th St.
Telephone
757-6718
757-6121
757-6428
757-6883
757-6961
757-2500
757-6665
757-6055
757-6893
757-6851
not necessarily more
difficult than stan-
dard college offerings
but rather are
organized in a way
that appeals to the
talented student look-
ing for a challenge.
Good honors instruc-
tors, says John Portz,
former president of
the National Col-
legiate Honors Coun-
cil, suppress their
desire to lecture and
instead create a
dialogue with their
students. Thus,
honors courses are
often small group
seminars, individual
tutorials or indepen-
dent study projects.
The ECU Honors
Program is offering
five special topic
seminars next
semester. Most are
team taught by two
faculty members and
emphasize discussion
rather than lecture.
The program is also
offering several
honors sections of
regular, general col-
lege courses.
The honors pro-
grams at other col-
leges are as varied as
the institutions which
offer them. For exam-
ple, students in the
University of Utah
honors program begin
with a three- or five-
course sequence
which traces Western
intellectual traditions
from antiquity to
modern times.
Honors students ma-
joring in non-science
subjects complete a
three-course series on
calculus.
To earn an honors
degree at Utah,
students must finish
eight honors courses
and a senior project in
their major discipline.
Honors courses in-
clude an examination
of the Vietnam War
from both American
and Southeast Asian
perspectives and a
preprofessional
course in medicine,
which includes actual
clinical experience.
Undergraduates in
the University of
Maryland at College
Park honors program
may enroll in one of
the many inter
disciplinary seminars
offered each semester
For example, in a
course called
Mysteries, students
study sleuths and
sleuthing in the fields
of science, history,
anthropology,
psychology and art.
They also examine
cultural attitudes
toward mystery as
reflected in various
cultures' religion, art
and philosophy.
Naso Suggests Idea Exchange
Cont. From Page 1
tainment in front of the Student
Supply Store. "The university
could also use some more input
from honor fraternities he add-
ed. Open forums to exchange
ideas could provide legislators
with much needed information,
according to Naso.
Speaking directly to the
legislators, Naso said they needed
to be aware of their respon-
sibilities. "You have a very
responsible job; you speak for the
13,000 students on this campus.
"You also have the ear of the
university's Board of Trustees and
have an opportunity to enhance
the education of every student. To
aid, service and direct students
can be your job Naso said.
Chris Townsend, newly elected
speaker of the legislature, thanked
Naso for his comments and added
the leadership conference held last
week can be a prime motivating
factor for the group.
Other SGA business included
the funding of Alpha Phi Omega;
the service organization received
$75 from the SGA. The quorum
also approved an appropriation of
$273 to pay for the leadership
conference. Those funds were
transferred from the SGA
refrigerator rental account to the
SGA executive council account.
Walking alone at night?
Call Pirate Walk
757-6616
Thanksgiving Break officially begins
in 15 days. Classes will be dismissed
Wednesday, Nov. 23 at 10 p.m.
Students will have Thursday and Fri-
day off.
Pre-Thanltsgiving Party
for the needed
with all proceeds going to
the needy in the community.
Date: November 11th
Price: $1.00 donation for admission
Place: Memorial Gym
Time: 9:00 - 1AM
Music: The Dream Team
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Thurs Nov. 10 Doors Open: 7:30 P.M.
Must Be 19 To Purchase A Ticket
Tickets Available At:
Record Bars, Greenville � Apple Records
� Bonds-Hodges Sporting Goods � Greenleat
For Tickets Call 757-3107
THE EASTCAROI INIAN
Hagler B
By GLENN MAUGHAN
StaH Writer
It is the major boxing event of
the year. Two of the sport's
premier athletes meet Nov. 10 at
Ceasar's Palace, Las Vegas,
Neveda for the world mid-
dleweight title. Scheduled for 15
rounds, champion Marvelous
Marvin Hagler will defend his
crown against Roberto Carlos
"Manos de Piedra" Duran.
The event is a first in many
ways. These two boxers have
never met in the ring before
Duran has never fought in this
divison, and it will probably be
the biggest purse ever offered for
a middlewight fight.
These two outstanding boxers
bring incredible records into the
ring. Hagler (61 bouts�-57 wins,
48 knockouts, 2 losses, and 2
draws) will defend his crown for
the third time this year. Duran (80
bouts�76 wins, 57 by KO, four
loses and 0 draws) enters the ring
after demolishing junior mid-
dleweight champ Davey Moore in
8 rounds.
Called today's best fighter at
any weight by Ring Magazine.
Hagler has earned the title by
finishing opponents in a burr)
Since 1978, his 21 opponents have
averaged a total rate of eight
rounds per match. Hagler's op-
ponents hae averaged only five
rounds per match since he took
the title from Alan Minter on
Sept. 27, 1980. His last seven title
defenses ere all decided by a
knockout.
Similar "be fighter" ac-
colades were bestowed on Duran
when he fought as a lightweight.
He kept the light v. eight crown
through 12 successful defenses, 11
by KO. Now the owner of 3 world
titles, Duran will go for an un-
precedented fourth title against
Hagler. This will be the first and
maybe last attempt by Duran to
achieve that goal.
Oddsmakers give Hagler a
3-to-l nod, and most are probably
looking aTj
paper, phj
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this part of the game's the best. 1
admit it: Mick LaSalle likes
broads better than football.
You watch them. They're
young. And they look happy. Not
only that, they're gorgeous. Sure,
from the stands it's hard to see
their faces. But when 40 smooth
young legs go up in the air at
once, you give these girls the
benefit of the doubt.
Pom-pom girls isn't their name
anymore. As of this year, they're
Golden Girls. They leave their
pom-poms in the stands. They
think of themselves as a dancing
group, "a visual aid to the band's
music says Golden Girl Wendy
Wood. As part of the band, they
perform at various shows.
They also perform by
themselves doing community-
minded benefits. Picture this: the
canned music is turned on and in
come 20 girls, smiling and kicking
those legs in the backyard of the
old folks' home. I know; it makes
you m
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Park honors program
ina enroll in one of
the many inter-
disciplinary seminars
ottered each semester.
For example, in a
course called
Slvsteries, students
studj sleuths and
sleuthing in the fields
of science, history,
anthropology,
sychology and art.
The also examine
cultural attitudes
toward mystery as
reflected in various
cultures' religion, art
hilosophy.
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616
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needed
fieds going to
community
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last C arolina
Track Team.
ON IP
WELL
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DEALS
color
iRCRAFT
iny 24 or 36
Hor Film
-oil slide film
niargemen'
cior Enlargement
expires 6-1-84
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pTM( MOMC 1
Tickets $20.00
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port. Greenville N C
jpen: 7:30 P.M.
Ticket
pie Records
s � Greenleaf
7-3107

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
NOVEMBER 8, 1963
P�e7
Hagler Battles Duran For Middleweight Title
By GLENN MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
It is the major boxing event of
the year. Two of the sport's
premier athletes meet Nov. 10 at
Ceasar's Palace, Las Vegas,
Neveda for the world mid-
dleweight title. Scheduled for 15
rounds, champion Marvelous
Marvin Hagler will defend his
crown against Roberto Carlos
"Manos de Piedra" Duran.
The event is a first in many
ways. These two boxers have
never met in the ring before.
Duran has never fought in this
divison, and it will probably be
the biggest purse ever offered for
a middlewight fight.
These two outstanding boxers
bring incredible records into the
ring. Hagler (61 bouts�-57 wins,
48 knockouts, 2 losses, and 2
draws) will defend his crown for
the third time this year. Duran (80
bouts�-76 wins, 57 by KO, four
loses and 0 draws) enters the ring
after demolishing junior mid-
dleweight champ Davey Moore in
8 rounds.
Called today's best fighter at
any weight by Ring Magazine,
Hagler has earned the title by
finishing opponents in a hurry.
Since 1978, his 21 opponents have
averaged a total rate of eight
rounds per match. Hagler's op-
ponents have averaged only five
rounds per match since he took
the title from Alan Minter on
Sept. 27, 1980. His last seven title
defenses were all decided by a
knockout.
Similar "best fighter" ac-
colades were bestowed on Duran
when he fought as a lightweight.
He kept the lightweight crown
through 12 successful defenses, 11
by KO. Now the owner of 3 world
titles, Duran will go for an un-
precedented fourth title against
Hagler. This will be the first and
maybe last attempt by Duran to
achieve that goal.
Oddsmakers give Hagler a
3-to-l nod, and most are probably
looking at the decided, if only on
paper, physical advantage Hagler
owns. The statistics:
HAGLER
29
160
5'9 "
75"
15"
12"
40"
30"
22"
15"
16"
12"
DURAN
AGE
WGT.
HGT
REACH
BICEPS
FOREARM
CHEST
WAIST
THIGH
CALF
NECK
FIST
32
156
5'7 "
67"
12 "
13"
38"
32"
20"
12 "
16"
10"
True weight to be dtermined at of-
ficial weigh-in ceremony.
Boxing a taller, longer-reaching
adversary is nothing new to
Duran. He out dueled Sugar Ray
Leonard for the welterweight title,
(only to lose it in a rematch) and
easily won his junior mid-
dleweight crown from the taller
Davey Moore. But many are ask-
ing if Duran's comback is for real.
After losing to Leonard in the
celebrated "no mas" debacle,
Duran has struggled. The Nov.
25, 1980 bout had many wonder-
ing if Duran was finished.
Three lackluster fights in 1982
could have ended Duran's career.
A loss in 15 rounds to Wilfred
Benitez on Jan. 20, and a horrible
showing in a loss to Kirkland La-
ing on Sept. 4 had many thinking
it was the end. A pot-bellied, flab-
by Duran took on Jimmy Batten
Nov. 12, and Duran won in 10,
but there was little to celebrate.
The comeback wasn't working.
Then came two stunning trium-
phs in '83. First, the near perfect
boxing display in a fourth-round
KO of former welterweight champ
Pipino Cuevas on Jan. 29. Se-
cond, a national T V audience
witnessed Duran punish World
Boxing Association junior mid-
dleweight champ Davey Moore,
finally dumping Moore in the
eighth.
Two questions remain for
Duran to answer. Is the comeback
complete? And, can he stay in the
ring with a middleweight like
Marvin Hagler?
Marvelous Marvin Hagler will
have to work Nov. 10 if he wants
to keep his title. 1983 has been an
easy year for the champ. He has
fought twice and on each occasion
breezed through his opponents.
On Feb. 11, Tony Sibson lasted
only six rounds with Hagler in
what looked like a training session
for the champ.
Next came Wilford Scypion on
May 27. At 2:47 of the fourth
round, Hagler finished Scypion
with a flurry of punches coming
from every direction. Scypion was
never in the bout and probably
should have remained in his dress-
ing room. Form the opening bell it
was all Hagler's show.
These two opponents were not
"journey-man" punching bags
thrown into a wolf's den. Ring
Magazine continues to rate the
pair in the top five of world-class
boxers. As was the case with
Mustafa Hamsho and Fulgencio
Obelmejias, Hagler simply
destroyed his opponents.
There are few if any major
questions Hagler must answer on
Nov. 10. Unlike Duran, Hagler is
the undisputed champion and not
a doubtful performer. He is in
peak shape and in his prime. Only
the fight's setting is a source of
negative deja vu for the champ.
It was in Las Vegas that Hagler
boxed to a draw with then mid-
dleweight champ Vito Antuofer-
mo after 15 tough rounds. Vito
kept the title as a weary Hagler
waned in the closing rounds on
Nov. 30, 1979. Hagler's other
Vegas match, a 10-round decision
over Marcos Geraldo on May 17,
480, was not his best, but it served
as a tune-up for his victory over
Alan Minter.
The Minter bout won Hagler
the middleweight crown on Sept.
27, '80. Minter lasted only 3
Marvelous Marvin Hagler shows why he is called the best fighter in the
Can 'Hands of Stone Roberto Duran do the impossible and crush middleweight champ Marvin Hagler?
rounds as Hagler took control
early and never let up. That fight
was stopped to prevent further
harm to a bloodied, battered
Minter. Druken fans, irate at the
call, trashed the ring with
anything that could be thrown.
Chairs, bottles, and bricks nar-
rowly missed Hagler, and he was
lucky to escape the crowd without
being hurt.
Hagler hasn't had any close
calls since then; there have been
no more riots to contend with,
and the opposition, except for
Hamsho, has proven ineffective.
Duran will be Hagler's next test.
Can the "Hands of Stone" stop
the world's best boxer?
The Undercard: Roldan vs. The
Animal
on the same bill with Hagler-
Duran, Frank "The Animal"
Fletcher will meet Juan Domingo
Roldan. There is no title at Make
for their bout, but the winner has
been guaranteed a match with
whoever holds the middleweight
title after Nov. 10. Fletcher is a
highly regarded middleweight
known for his strength and
stamina rather than his finesse in
the ring.
Ranked third in the world by
Ring Magazine as of October,
Fletcher has performed in
numerous televised bouts.
Followers of ESPN, the sports
cable channel, will remember Flet-
cher as the winner of that net-
work's middleweight title in 1980.
"The Animal" has fought twice
in '83.
After losing the NBC televised
bout with Wilfred Scypion in 12
rounds, Fletcher regained his
form by stopping Curtis Ramsey
on July 5 in eight rounds. "I stop-
ped him with body shots Flet-
cher told the East Carolinian.
His upcoming bout with
Roldan does not have him wor-
ried. "The guy can't fight; I'U
knock him out in the sixth
round said Fletcher. The
natural southpaw from
Philadelphia feels his style is a
definite advantage.
Juan Domingo Roldan is a
relatively unknown middleweight
boxer, although the Argentine
champ is rated the World Boxing
Association's number-one con-
tender. Roldan has fought three
times in '83. One bout was his
debut in America, and this fight in
Vegas marks the third time he has
been on an undercard with
Hagler.
On February 11, Roldan KOd
Wilbur Henderson in eight prior
to the Hagler-Sibson match. His
second appearance in the U.S.
saw him outpoint "Irish" Teddy
Mann on May 27, Hagler-Scypion
being the main event.
Many experts viewed the match
as unimpressive. If Roldan is to
one day challenge the likes of
Hagler, he'll have to improve
against Fletcher, according to the
"experts
Wi iti ft for tti0& ' MMkte
"The Bible Of Boxing Nigel
Collins sees their match-up a less
than artistic show. "It will be a
strength rather than skill
contest he said. "Roldan's
number one rating by the WBA is
a political decision more than
anything else he added.
Whatever the outcome for Flet-
cher or Roldan, the winner gets a
guaranteed match with the mid-
dleweight champ in 1984. Neither
has fought for a world title
before. The prospects could make
each boxer hungry for the glory
and money associated with a
world crown.
Tough Ghetto Kids
The careers of Hagler and
Duran follow a typical pattern ex-
perienced by many boxers. Hagler
is a product of a Newark, N.J.
ghetto. He survived the slums by
his involvement in athletics.
"Sports kept me away from drugs
and the gangs when I was a little
kid in Newark Hagler said in an
interview.
"I wanted to be a Mickey Man-
world at any weight.
tie, a Floyd Patterson one of
the best athletes ever he said.
Hagler left the ghetto and moved
to Brockton, Massachusetts at 17.
Under the tutelage of Goody and
Pat Petronelli, brothers and ex-
boxers, Hagler began his road to
the championship.
It was Hagler who told the
brothers, "I was born a cham-
pion Struggling for money and
recognition, the trio made it
through some lean years. Often
receiving purses of $50, $100, or
$200, Hagler's career took off
when Steve Wainwright, a
Brockton lawyer, entered his life
in 1978.
Hagler won the U.S. mid-
dleweight title that year from
Doug Demmings on April 7.
Later, he KOd former Olympic
gold medalist Sugar Ray Scales in
round 1 on Febuary 2, '79. That
year also brought Hagler into the
ring for a shot at the world title.
After 15 punishing rounds, the
match was scored a draw, and
Vito Antuofermo retained the ti-
tle.
That blemish, along with
another draw and two losses, have
all been removed. In rematches
with those opponents, Hagler
scored impressive KOs against all
four.
Hagler considers himself a
hungry fighter � hungry for
money and the fame that general-
ly eludes boxers even with
distinguished careers. "I still fight
like a challenger because it took
me a long time to get the title he
said.
This will be a big payday for
Hagler, the first since winning the
title. The winner will reportedly
receive $12 million. It will give
Hagler the financial security he
has sought.
"I'm trying to make as much
money as possible for the security
of my wife and kids he said.
Boxing is Hagler's life.
Hagler's challenger, Roberto
Duran, began his life in a ghetto
similar to the champ's. Duran was
See HAGLER, page 9
Golden Girls More Than Halftime Leg Show
By MICK LASALLE
Staff Witter
So you go to the football game.
Halftime comes, and 20 girls in
mini-skirts and go-go boots run
out onto the field and start kick-
ing their legs up in the air. For me,
this part of the game's the best. I
admit it: Mick LaSalle likes
broads better than football.
You watch them. They're
young. And they look happy. Not
only that, they're gorgeous. Sure,
from the stands it's hard to see
their faces. But when 40 smooth
young legs go up in the air at
once, you give these girls the
benefit of the doubt.
Pom-pom girls isn't their name
anymore. As of this year, they're
Golden Girls. They leave their
pom-poms in the stands. They
think of themselves as a dancing
group, "a visual aid to the band's
music says Golden Girl Wendy
Wood. As part of the band, they
perform at various shows.
They also perform by
themselves doing community-
minded benefits. Picture this: the
canned music is turned on and in
come 20 girls, smiling and kicking
those legs in the backyard of the
old folks home. I know; it makes
you wanna laugh. Still, there's
nothing to be cynical about.
Living at ECU is like living in-
side one big Elvis Presley movie.
There are beautiful girls
everywhere. And everybody's
looking for a good time.
Our rivals at State and UNC say
"EZU" and "party school"
because they resent us for having
what they don't have. ECU has
got sex and sex appeal. And so do
the Golden Girls.
College football games are like
the old Roman Coliseum shows.
The contest is to show which
school has the strongest men.
Then halftime comes, and we see
who has the prettiest women.
When I saw the Golden Girls
routine at homecoming,
something clicked for me. I realiz-
ed that these girls represent what
ECU is about far better that any
team does. They represent a time
of life and a way of thinking: that
Golden time in every woman's life
between virginity and cynicism.
That time when the future looks
promising and the girl really
believes she's in love with that
jerk back home And where is
home? Usually some little town
the other side of Smithfield.
Most girls become Golden
Girls because they want to per-
form. As kids, they took lessons:
dance, clarinet, piano. And they
grew up getting lots of positive
reinforcement for being pretty
and for being good in school.
They get that reinforcement now
from the fans at Ficklen. Several
of the girls called the feeling of
performing at the games "ex-
hilarating Wendy Brown says,
"The crowd just grabs you and
it feels so good to be out there
But all the girls downplay the
sex stuff. Peggy Walker laughs at
the notion of the Golden Girls be-
ing sexy. But most are a little
defensive about it. "I don't think
that has anything to do with it
says Terri Creech. "That's not
our intention
There seems a deliberate effort
on the part of the Golden Girls to
keep their image clean and
wholesome � as if the sexuality
they inevitably display is
something bad or wrong. Kacky
Rhett, head Golden Girl, at a
photo session with me and the
other girls, made sure that no pic-
tures were taken until all the
Golden Girls finally took their
See MICK LASALLE, page 9
Formerly called the Marching Pirate Pom-Pom Girls, these
Are they sym bob of Pirate pride and ECU school spirit, or are they j sat aex
beauties are sow the
symbobMkk LaSale
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBERS, 1983
Chevy Chase Sells Arms To Marxist Rebels
By GORDON IPOCK
The Deal of the Century is a
screwball flick that takes a few
fast swipes at the military in-
dustrial complex. Whether it suc-
ceeds depends on your point of
view, whether you're a College
Republican or a member of the
Greenville Peace Committee.
Called a "dark comedy" by its
makers, the film shifts from com-
edy, to drama, to utire. Even
director William Friedkin admits
the balance between comedy and
seriousness is a major problem
with the film.
The movie begins in a provin-
cial town somewhere in Central
America. Cynical wiseguy Eddie
Muntz (played by a thick-waisted
Chevy Chase) sets the opening
tone by saying, "It's only my se-
cond day here, and already I'd
like to hitchhike to Jonestown
Muntz is a second-hand weapons
dealer peddling small arms to all
parties in this bannana republic.
He sells pistols, automatic rifles
and hand grenades to peasant
rebels one day, and sells more
guns and ammo to the military
government the rebels are attack-
ing the next day.
Just before a meeting with rebel
buyers, Muntz mutters, "When
the going gets tough, never
underestimate the power of a
demonstration We see what a
"demonstration" is in the next
scene. Like a slick-talking vacuum
cleaner salesman, Muntz clinches
a sale by demonstrating a Tank-
Buster bazooka on a government
jeep parked across the street from
the cheap hotel he's operating
from. He obliterates the jeep, and
the bazooka rocket's exhaust
nearly obliterates the rebels stan-
ding behind him.
By chance, Muntz stumbles into
big-time arms dealing. After
waiting six weeks in a sweaty hotel
room for a contract-clinching
phone call that hasn't come, the
sales rep for Luckup Aerospace
Industries blows his brains out
with a .38 revolver. Before the
sales rep's corpse is even cold, the
phone rings, and Muntz steps in
and makes the multi-million
dollar arms sale.
At this point the plot twists.
Comedy gives way to a sfange
mixture of satire and drama as
Muntz moves higher in the world
of international asms marketing.
Ray Kasternak (Gregory Hines),
Muntz's partner in arms peddling,
begins to question the morality of
their business as the deadliness of
their weapons increases. Muntz
counters, "All we're doing, Ray,
is selling a commodity, like Coca
Cola. If we don't make the sale,
somebody else will
Becasue of his smooth expertise
with the Latinos, Muntz becomes
Luckup's new sales rep for the
"Peacemaker a deadly
computer-controlled drone air-
craft. Fellow opportunist
Catherine DeVoto (Sigourney
Weaver) joins Muntz in his quest
for the big bucks. ECU students
may remember Weaver as the pas-
sionate British attache Jill Bryant
in The Year of Living Dangerous-
ly which recently showed at Hen-
drix Theatre.
Muntz, DeVoto and Ray, along
with the corrupt military dictator
and profit-crazed arms execs all
wind up in Southern California at
a miliatry arms show called,
"Arms for Peace 84 The ex-
travaganza is modeled after real
arms shows such as the Aldershot
held each year in England. Often,
sworn enemies shop side-by-side
at these shows.
This show is complete with film
footage of real weapons, jet air-
craft, missiles, artillery, etc as
sales clips for buyers. The bottom
line is sales and money. Luckup
marketing v.p. Frank Stryker
(Vince Edwards) expresses this
succinctly when he says, "We're
not competing against the Rus-
sians. Our advisary is Northrop,
Rockwell, McDonald Douglas
and all the other corporate arms
manufacturers.
Ray finally turns against the
arms business. He accepts Jesus
and is baptized in a hotel swimm-
ing pool. Muntz, however, even
goes so far as to pimp girlfriend
DeVoto to the dictator to finalize
the Peacemaker deal. But by the
movie's end, even Muntz sees the
insanity of the business and swit-
ches to the used car game.
Despite the confusion in Deal
of the Century over just how
seriously it takes it's own
message, the film does avoid
moralistic lecturing. Rather than
preaching against corporate arms
merchants, it uses low-key satire.
For example, a powerful Arab
arms dealer explains to Muntz
about the business acumen of sell-
ing arms to Third World coun-
tries: "Whoever wins, we win.
Whoever loses, we win And in a
telephone conversation with a
Third World buyer, Muntz says,
"You need 500 anti-tank
weapons! Expecting an invasion,
colonel? Oh, you say the whales
are coming too close to your
coast
Gun peddler Chevy Chase gets a ballet in the foot from Sigourney Weaver In Deal of the Century, a dark comedy about international arms saies.
The connection bet-
ween the Peacekeeper
missile and the
Peacemaker drone
aircraft is un-
mistakeable.
Money pressures
everyone in the film to
keep up the arms
sales. Tens of
thousands of jobs, the
nation's GNP and
balance of trade are
all used to justify
building and selling
more arms. Third
World conflicts bet-
ween U.S. and Soviet-
joking. With a topic
this serious, straight
drama would prove
more thought provok-
ing.
Though it's not
sure what it wants to
be or say, this movie
deserves attention for
Epic Film 'Gandhi9 At Hendrix
It took one
remarkable man to
defeat the British Em-
pire and free a nation
of 350 million
peopleGandhi! His
history.
"Once in a long
while, a motion pic-
ture so eloquently ex-
pressive and
technically exquisite
dealing with timely 8� was freedom fcr comes along that one
is tempted to hail it as
being near perfect.
Such a film is
Gandhi . '
Gandhi is this
weeks feature film at
Hendrix Theatre.
Shows start at 5:00
and 8:30 p.m.
November 10, 11 and
12. Admission is by
student I.D. and ac-
tivity card.
and important sub-
jects. Because of the
comedic aspect, we
can shrug off this
criticism of the
military industrial
India; his strategy was
peace; his weapon was
his humanity.
Director Richard
Attenborough worked
poc
one
DOC
DtKZ
oac
3C
IC
3i�C
KJJ
PIRATES LANDING
The whole carnival atmosphere backed clients merely complex as a joke, or for nearly 20 years to
at Arms for Peace 84 upbraids
such arms shows. There is even
TV footage of President Reagan
justifying the MX missile, the mis-
sle he dubbed the "Peacekeeper
"We're building missiles to
preserve the peace he says. The
connection between the
Peacekeeper missile and the
Peacemaker drone aircraft is un-
mistakeable.
Money pressures everyone in
the film to keep up the arms sales.
Tens of thousands of jobs, the na-
tion's GNP and balance of trade
are all used to justify building and
selling more arms. Third World
conflicts between U.S. and Soviet-
backed clients merely serve as
testing grounds for proving the ef-
fectiveness of the weapons.
serve as testing
grounds for proving
the effectiveness of
the weapons.
As a comedy, Deal
of the Century would
work better if Chase
we can take the saitire
seriously. In this man-
ner,Deal of the Cen-
tury works as light
entertainment, or
serious satire. Again,
it depends on your
point of view.
and company remain- Perhaps concerned
ed in the jungles of campus politicos and
8.99 list on salt for 3.99
Paul McCartney
Bob D? Ian
Super Grit
Big CaUl
Bine Dytter t alt
Eddie Mosey
Mode Crae John Coafar
Talking Heads AMo Nova
PoU� Caharedab
Lloael Richie Teddy Peadergratt
The Doon aad more
Motels
Watch for aew Rolling Stoaea album oa Nov. 14th.
Central America. It's
possible to laugh at
mere hand grenades in
Gautamala. But when
the theme becomes
global sales of
massively destructive
weapons, the film
doesn't have the
courage � or audaci-
ty � to maintain its
activists can see the
movie and debate the
film at their next
soap-box forum.
bring to the screen
this extraordinary
motion picture epic
about the Indian
leader who changed
the world forever.
British actor Ben
Kingsley as Gandhi
captures the very
essence of the Mahat-
ma in what is possibly f
the greatest
biographical perfor-
mance in screen
Student housing with private rooms
available in December. Off Reade Circle
Clark-Branch Managment
756-6336
ASK FOR KATHY
g�H�C
3C
K
:x�c
3x:
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EVERY WEDNESDAY
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5 P.MCLOSE
ALL-YOU-CAN-EAT
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$3.99
(Choice of 3 Sauces)
with Garlic Bread
wy&
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$4.99
cvnv rvoAv
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3.99
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nightsmidnight 3a.m.
Breakfast Bar open 6:00am.
5H0NEYS
Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
Combination Special
Trout, Shrimp, Deviled Crab
$3.99
TUES WED TOURS.
(Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327
RIBS!
RIBS!
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Every Monday and Wednesday from now until Nov. 30th between
5:00-10:00 Darryl's 1907, Greenville is celebrating the Holiday Season
early with an ALL YOU CAN EAT FEAST of our tender, juicy beef ribs
for the unbelievable price of $7.95. Well even include a free salad!
SO . . . COME AND GET A TASTE OF
800 East 10th St Greenville
Hagl
Agai
Coat, from page 7
was the second of nine
children in a family
that scratched out a
living in Guarare.
Panama. The street
gangs Hagler tried to
avoid became Duran s
training grounds He
calls a 90-minute
brawl fought
Panama's streets
toughest fight
scrappped as
10-year-old, saagei
defending the fish and
mangoes he would
steal to survive Shin-
ing shoes and dancing
for small change kept
Duran going while he
learned to box
Duran turned pro
his
He
a
Mick
Raps
Goldd
Cont. from page .
hands off me It made
me feel real bad for
them.
Even the name.
"Golden Girls is
pan of the effort to
get rid of the image of
the "dumb and sex
Pom-pom girls says
Wendy Wood. Bu:
behind that remark is
the assumption that
dumb and sew
necessarily have to go
together.
None of the girls I
interviewed for this
article seemed
anything less than
bright. They're school
oriented, into those
"extra-curricular ac
tivities But pa
ttmt. cmctt of them has
something inside of
her that draws her out
� that makes her
want to go out and
show she can dance,
that she's pretty, that
she has sex appeal.
Golden Girl Pegg
Walker told me that.
in the future. gus
!��.?�����������
KKSKAKt H I'AFKKS
oo Cum -���? 4 "��� �
t��?????�??�?���
II
520 W. Gf
7!
HOURS: SUN-1
FR1
Rib-Ej
Salad
Potat
and





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8, 1983
ebels

out international arms saies.
t Hendrix
Hendrix Theatre.
Shows start at 5:00
and 8:30 p.m.
Na ember 10, 11 and
12. Admission is by
student l.D. and ac-
tivity card.
D KZ
:xc
:XK2J
DING
private rooms
)ff Reade Circle
lagrnent
6
VTHY
xc
dkkt
nh between
iday Season
i . beef ribs
'e salad1
OF
11
'V
. t
Hagler Defends Title
Against Roberto Duran
Coat, from page 7
was the second of nine
children in a family
that scratched out a
living in Guarare,
Panama. The street
gangs Hagler tried to
avoid became Duran's
training grounds. He
calls a 90-minute
brawl fought on
Panama's streets his
toughest fight. He
scrappped as a
10-year-old, savagely
defending the fish and
mangoes he would
steal to survive. Shin-
ing shoes and dancing
for small change kept
Duran going while he
learned to box.
Duran turned pro
at age 16 and quickly
became the class of
the lightweight divi-
sion. Duran KOd
most of his op-
ponents, 23 of 27,
before taking the
lightweight title from
Ken Buchanan on
June 26, 1972. Duran
was in control from
the opening bell and
dropped Buchanan in
the 13th, but
observers claim his
KO punch was below
the belt.
The string of vic-
tories ended for
Duran that year when
Esteban DeJesus eek-
ed out a 10-round
decision over Duran
on Nov. 17. That loss
was avenged by two
KOs of DeJesus in 474
and '78. The 478 fight
gave Duran the un-
disputed world
lightweight crown,
KOing DeJesus in
round 12 on Jan. 21.
Then came the "super
fights" with
welterweight cham-
pion Sugar Ray
Leonard. Fighting for
big money, Duran
decisioned Leonard in
a late-round slugfest
on June 20, 80.
A rematch on Nov.
25 cost Duran his
world welterweight
crown and all but put
an end to his career.
The bout was called
the "no mas" fight.
Duran never answered
the eighth-round bell.
He claimed stomach
cramps prevented him
from continuing.
Duran never
entered the ring
against Leonard
again, and many
thought his days were
numbered. A 1981
comeback produced
two victories over
Nino Gonzalez and
Luigi Minchillo;
neither was im-
pressive.
Next came a stunn-
ing loss to Wilfred
Benitez last year.
Duran was "too old
and out-of shape" ac-
cording to the experts,
and the come back
was in jeopardy. But
1983 has been a turn-
around year for
Duran, and he should
not be counted out
before he steps into
the ring against
Hagler.
Both matches will
be shown live on
closed-circuit televi-
sion. Greenville fans
will have a taste of the
live action at the
Greenleaf Restaurant.
Shown on a 15 X 15
screen, the Vegas
bouts will begin at 9
p.m. Unless one can
afford the $50-$600
seats and the trip to
Vegas, local fans are
sure to enjoy this bat-
tle.
Mick LaSalle
Raps About
Golden Girls
Cont. from page 7
hands off me. It made
me feel real bad for
them.
Even the name,
"Golden Girls is
part of the effort to
get rid of the image of
the "dumb and sexy
Pom-pom girls says
Wendy Wood. But
behind that remark is
the assumption that
dumb and sexy
necessarily have to go
together.
None of the girls I
interviewed for this
article seemed
anything less than
bright. They're school
oriented, into those
� "extra-curricular ac-
tivities But past
4Mh. ��eVi of tfaem Has
something inside of
her that draws her out
� that makes her
want to go out and
show she can dance,
that she's pretty, that
she has sex appeal.
Golden Girl Peggy
I Walker told me that,
I in the future, guys
may be able to join
the Golden Girls on
the field. But just the
thought of Golden
Guys writhing around
in jockstraps makes
me want to throw up.
I asked Peggy what
she thought about
"Golden Guys" in
our future. She
answered, "Well, at
least it'll give the girls
something to look
at
The fact is, the
Golden Girls are nice
to look at � and the
girls want to be,
whether they admit it
or not.
A Golden Girl can
talk about school
spirit all she wants.
Just like Miss
America can talk
about America all she
wants. But when you
take away that wrapp-
ing of school spirit or
patriotism, what you
get is a girl who is
pretty and sexy and
wants everybody to
know it.
��.�??�??�
KKMAKfH t'Ai'KKS
Bu t?or � cu"l 306 D9 r.l.
too CwsIom ���� :� 4 r�sts ��
. �to ���-��.
��. � M2 -iv ��� C20CW.
C900?5 2'3 477 �J2�
t�
4� � ������ ��M
BUYING -
LOANS
TVs. Air Conditioners.
Stereos, guns, gold A silver,
diamonds, cameras and
equipment, typewriters,
kerosene heaters,
refrigerators (dorm siie on-
ly), video games A car-
tridges, power tools,
musical instruments,
microwave ovens, video
recorders, bicycles and
anything els of value.
Southern Pawn Shop,
located 40S Evans Street,
downtown. 752-2444.
XEROX COPIES
KASH&
KARRY
14th & Charles
�� PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD& SILVER
SILVER COINS
CH'NA&CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
eoi��Wiji4j
401 S. EVANS ST. open �3�$:3qmon. sat.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHONE 752-3866
"YOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
PHI SIGMA PI
Presents
wf
V
THE 2ND ANNUAL
T? BEST MALE
LEGS CONTEST
Tuesday November 8th 1983
doors open at 8:30
1ST PRIZE-$75 and Dinner for 2
at King and Queen North
2ND PRIZE-
$25 Compliments of UBE plus
3RD PRIZE-) over $60 in prizes
Over $70 worth of prizes
Sponsored by:
� King and Queen North
H.L. Hodges � UBE
Plain Janes 3 Steers
Pizza Hut PTA
Subway Tne sPa
All proceeds go to the American Cancer Society.
For more information call 758-7167
Marsh's Surf and Sea
Blue Moon Cafe
Record Bar
� Tree House
Beef Barn
Marathon
Darryl's
phone
752-3172
Located I mile pas!
Hastings Ford an
10th St. Ext.
Cliffs
Seafood
Specials
Monday thru Thursday
Popcorn Shrimp
$2.95
Ocean Perch $1.99
Seafood Cakes $1.99
FrtncM Friat or Baked Potato.
TottadSalmimay b mbttttuttdfordaw JJ-��
I
i
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily available for
sale at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store, except as
specifically noted in this ad.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU Sat. Nov. 12 AT A&P IN GraeaTiMe, NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
DOUBLE COUPONS
FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEND, WE WILL DOUBLE
5 MANUFACTURER'S COUPONS, EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS,
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS, $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS.
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE!
Between now md Nov. 12. we wW redeem national
manufacturer s centa-off coupon up lo SO for
doubt their valua. Offar good on national menu-
facturara' canta-off coupons only (Food retailer
coupon not accepted.)Customer must purchaas
D
product In apacHtad strs Expired coupons
wW not be honored. One coupon par customer par
Hem No frtHfPftft accepted for tree men, hai wiles
Offer does not apply toTaP or other store coupons
whether manufacturer la mentioned or not. when
trie valua of the coupon exceeds 50 or the retell
of the Nam, this offer la limited to the retail price.
Ssrmmsm
oouki SA
COUPON
-
2S�
COUPON B
18
COUPONC
50"
COUPOND
7V
-i�
firaaf wit ASF's
roraicoupoa
25'
1S
T-Bone Steak
289
SAVE 70
Fryer Drumsticks
U.S.D.A. INSPECTED FRESH
10 lbs. or
more
SAVE 30 LB.
Smoked Picnic
A&P QUALITY
Ann Page Biscuits
BUTTERMILK � HOMESTYLE
Bonus
Pack q �
I
I
I
I
I
I

I
(PD A&P COUPON)
Senior Citizens Discount
5 Off Total Purchases
On Wednesdays
AV
WITH THIS COUPON AND l.D.
Greenville Square Shopping Center
703 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, N.C.
�. � .�
���� r i ii niaii i� ta).ii mm ���
P





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Pirates Now 6-3
Sports
NOVEMBER 8. 1983 Page 10
Miami Loss Most Bitter Of All
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Never has there been such a
heartbreaking loss as the one the
Pirates experienced against fifth-
ranked Miami this weekend at the
Orange Bowl.
Hurricane freshman Bernie
Kosar sailed a 52-yard pass to
wide receiver Ed Brown to put
Miami on the 13-yard line.
Moving within inches of the
endzone after a few plays,
Miami's Kosar kept and ran in for
a touchdown with 1:04 left, giving
the Hurricanes a 12-7 lead. That
proved to be the winning
touchdown.
After Miami failed to score a
two-point conversion, the never-
dying Pirates fought back. With
four seconds left in the game,
Kevin Ingram threw a victory pass
to Stephon Adams who was on
the edge of the endzone, but
Pirate tightend Norwood Vann
knocked the ball out of Adams'
hands as he came down.
An emotional Ed Emory
couldn't find the words to express
his feelings after his third loss in
Florida this season. "I've got a
speech defect he said to a
Miami reporter. "How do you ex-
pect me to tell you the frustration
I feel?
"The players and I are getting
tired of getting so close. I don't
like it one bit. I'm not going down
there to gain credibility and get a
pat on the back for playing hard.
"I want to go down there and
win
Emory explained what went
wrong on the last play of the
game. "We threw a victory pass
to the left, and Stephon Adams
just stretched his body out. Nor-
wood Vann and Ricky Nichols
were down there, but the ball was
suppose to go to Stephon.
"They're (Vann and Nichols)
down there to catch any kind of
tips. Norwood was running the
post, and he ran of his course, but
he sure didn't mean to hit
Stephon.
"It was just one of those things,
like it wasn't meant to happen.
Everybody was trying to win there
in the last few seconds, and
Stephon had that ball. His
momentum carried him into the
endzone. It just wasn't mean to
be
The Pirates, who appear to be
jinxed every time they set foot in
Florida, went into the second half
with a 7-0 lead. The Pirates also
had halftime leads against Florida
State (losing 47-46) and Florida
(24-17) this season.
With 9:40 left in the second
quarter, Ingram found Vann wide
open in the endzone for an
18-yard pass touchdown.
But the Hurricanes held off
their storm until the second half.
With 4:48 left in the third quarter,
Kosar threw a four-yard pass to
fullback Albert Bentley for a
touchdown. ECU's Kevin Walker
then blocked Rick Tuten's extra
point kick, and the Pirates still
led, 7-6.
With less than five minutes re-
maining in the fourth quarter, the
Bucs were positioned on Miami's
four-yard line. The Pirates,
however, were unable to get the
ball in. "I don't think we had very
good play selection at that time
Emory said, "and we probably
should've changed personnel to a
certain extent
But even worse, placekicker
Jeff Heath came in and kicked a
21-yard field goal attempt wide
right. Heath also missed a 49-yard
field goal late in the first half.
Emory said Heath may have
been distracted by the loud boom
of Miami's cannon while he was
kicking. By regulation, Miami is
only suppose to fire off the can-
non, which was located by the
endzone, after a team has scored.
"That should have been a 15-yard
penalty Emory said.
Miami coach Howard
Schnellenberger had nothing for
compliments for the Pirates after
the game. "Our hats are off to Ed
Emory and his fine football team.
"I said all week how good they
were and that if the names on
their helmets had been Penn State
or Texas, there would have been
70,000 fans here screaming their
hearts out.
"East Carolina is that good
But only 39,255 fans found
their way to Miami's Orange Bowl
to watch their team battle out one
of their toughest wins to date.
In the first quarter, the Pirates
landed on Miami's 23 yard line,
but Jimmy Walden fumbled and
defensive back Kenny Calhoun
recovered at Miami's 14.
The Pirates also came close to
scoring again in the second
quarter when the Pirates marched
down field to Miami's 32-yard
line with just seconds remaining in
the quarter. But Heath's 49-yard
kick was unsuccessful, and the
Pirates went into the locker room
with a 7-0 lead.
Emory said this game has been
the toughest of the Pirates' three
losses in Florida this year. "We
won the ball game for 59 minutes
and when you lose in the last
minute, it's very discouraging and
heartbreaking he said. "We
should've won that football game.
I take full credit and responsibility
for the loss because we should've
won that game, but there's no
time for self pity in football
coaching
Defensively, the Pirates had
proven themselves against top
Division-I opponents, and Emory
said the team did it again in
Miami. "We gave up a 52-yard
pass late in the game, but a team
with a quarterback like Bernie
Kosar is going to do that.
"I just wish it would have come
early in the first half instead of
late in the second half
Emory described the Miami-
ECU game as one of the Pirates'
"most physical battles of the
season
That so-called battle took a toll
on the Bucs. Freshman right
tackle Joe Grinage was lost in the
first quarter, as well as runn-
ingback Jimmy Walden. Walden,
who has been playing for the past
few weeks with a broken hand,
was nauseous before the game.
Maury Banks was also suffering
from some type of virus on Satur-
d a y .
Cornerback Walker broke his
nose, and defensive tackle
Lawrence Brooks was unable to
play after suffering a head injury
last week. Brooks got in a scuffle
with freshman Ray Taliaferro at
the training table last week, and
Taliaferro broke a bottle over
Brooks' head. Brooks is expected
to play on Saturday.
Defensive tackle Steve
Hamilton reinjured his ankle but
managed to play. "He really suck-
ed it up with great deal of guts
Emory said. "We've never had to
face such adversity with our
lineup as we did against Miami
The Pirates, now 6-3, return to
Ficklen Stadium to take on
William & Mary this Saturdav at
1:30 p.m.
19FirsJ Down16
so-irRiuha yards36-U1
151 1Pawns yardi Return vardi20-1
12 22-0Panes :�.
6-43 1 11Punis Fumbla-Lost�-40 fc 1-0
9-50Penalties yards5-�l
32 55Time of potsr� o?
EaMCaraMw�70� � T
mjmm ru �01� -12
EC � Vann It pass from lnTam (Heath kuckl
L'M � Bentiey 4 pan from Kotar (kKk blocked)
I'M � Koaar 1 run (pau failed)
la�m4�ai xatntjo
Ruihinj EC - Walden 13 52. lnjram 6-29. Byner
12-49. Branch Z-6. Baker 16-45 Vann i-0. CM � GrifTfa
20-�9 Bentley 9-22. Dcnnuon 1-3 Hi�hsmith I). Koaar
5K-3)
Pauinj EC - In�ram 22-12-0-151-1. CM - Kosaz
25-15-0-2CT 1
Recemnj EC - Walden 18. Vann 3 S3. Black 1-9
Nichols 1-15. Pope l-�. S Adams 4-54 Bvner 12. CM
� Bemley 6-83. Denmson 4-32. Brown 2-68. Griffin
2-11. Shakespeare 1-13
A - 39.255
Soccer Team Faces Obstacles
By RANDY MEWS
Tightend Norwood Vann scored the Pirates' only touchdown against Miami. Vann caught an 18-yard pass
from quarterback Kevin Ingram in the second quarter.
Emory Urges Spectators To Show
Pirates That Effort Is Appreciated
The ECU soccer team traveled
to Newport News, Va this
weekend, dropping a 1-0 decision
to Christopher Newport.
"This was a very disappointing
loss head coach Robbie Church
said. "We lost the game on a
penalty shot with twenty minutes
remaining in the contest
Six starters were out of the
game due to injuries or
disciplinary action, but Church
thought the team still played well
as a whole.
"We were around the goal so
many times, but we just weren't
able to put the ball in the net he
said. "It came down to whoever
got the breaks, and we haven't
gotten any breaks all year
Church said the Pirates were
also impressive on defense, and
credited midfielder Danny
Whelan, fullback David
Henenlotter and goalie Grant
Pearson with outstanding games.
Church considers Wrhelan to be
the most improved player return-
ing from last year. He's a very
hard worker and has been in-
valuable to this year's team.
Henenlotter is in his first year
with the Pirates. A transfer from
Nassau Junior College, Church
says he has made the transition to
Division-I soccer very well.
Pearson is a freshman from
Freehold, N.J and has been the
starting goalie for the Pirates all
season long. According to
Church, he has the chance for an
accomplished career at ECU.
Church said forward Alan
Smith played a good game offen-
sively. Smith is also a freshman,
and in high school scored an in-
credible 34 goals in 13 games, a
See CHURCH, Page 11
The Pirates simply played their
hearts out.
Even though there were those
Miami fans who threw bottles at
tiie Pirates when they headed to
their locker room, there were also
those who came around to say
how much they were impressed
with "the team that should be na-
tionally ranked
Everything was on the line for
the Pirates � a national ranking
and an automatic bowl bid. And
because of that, the 12-7 loss will
be a hard one to get over.
Especially for ECU head coach
Ed Emory.
CINDY PLEASANTS
A Look Inside
"It (the Miami loss) probably
cost this school a million dollars
because of a bowl Emory said,
"and it also cost us a national
ranking. But I tell you this, if
Miami's fifth, then we ought be to
sixth.
"We should have beaten Miami
just like we did Missouri
Do the Pirates still deserve a na-
tional ranking and a bowl bi�
Emory named quite a few reasons
why the Pirates do. "I think we're
probably one of the best 6-3 teams
in the country he said. "We
probably play the toughest
schedule in America with seven
road games.
"Getting on that plane every
week, playing on their field with
their officials, their crowd, their
noise, their bands � it's not an
easy thing to do.
"We're the only Division-I
team in the country to play seven
teams like we're playing on the
road, and the players have played
very good. We should have and
could have won all three
Emory said a bowl bid is still a
strong possibility. "Hey, we've
played teams in the top 20 this
year, and some of our neighbors
(UNC-Chapel Hill) have only
played two teams (Clemson,
Maryland) ranked in the top 20
In order to get a bowl bid,
Emory and the Pirates will have to
soundly defeat William & Mary
this weekend and then finish the
season with a win against strong
Southern Mississippi.
"We want to finish 8-3 he
said. "We've got a chance to beat
William & Mary at home
If the Pirates do beat top rival
William & Mary, they will be the
tenth team in the last 20 years to
go undefeated at home.
But the Indians are averaging
nearly 20 points per contest this
year. This week, W&M pounded
Marshall University, 48-24.
"They've been a thorn in my
side Emory said. "They do a
great job throwing the football,
but this game is so important to
us. We have to get this Miami
game out of our system, and
that's hard to do
"It's hard to forget. It's more
than just a game. You don't play
football because you love it. You
play football to accomplish things
in life and for the university it
represents
The Pirates have had several
opportunities to play in front of
big crowds and have seen just how
much fan enthusiasm and support
can benefit a team playing at
home.
Emory believes his team
deserves the same kind of treat-
ment. "We've got a great football
team he said. "When William &
Mary comes in here, let's get on
them. Let's give them a hard time.
"Let's be good sports and be
clean and fair, but let's pull for
our team. Let's let the people
know that we are Pirates. We
don't want them to come in here
thinking we're friendly. This is
not a social event.
"We're there to win a football
game. I hope our place in Ficklen
Stadium gets tough to play in . I
hope our students have some of
that crowd noise that we've been
hearing all across the country
Emory said the Pirates will have
to play well offensively if they're
going to eliminate William &
Mary. "We're gonna have to
score some points he said. "On
Saturday, we didn't have very
good field position. When we
went to Miami, we knew it was
gonna take more than seven
points to win
Emory said he believes Satur-
day's game will be wide open, and
he encouraged the student body to
attend.
"I think it is very important this
week if we want to do something
(bowl bid) with this football team
that every student possible try and
be there on Saturday.
"I think we need the students
now more than we've ever needed
them
That's a small request to ask
after watching the Pirates' perfor-
mance against Miami. The Bucs
may have come up a little short on
three occasions, but they've done
it against three of the top 10 teams
in the country.
A little appreciation? It's the
least we can do.
Free Safety CHnt Harris (48) beads toward Miami
to pull the Hurricane rasher off bis feet.
fallback Kdtb Griffla as
�A V MTTMiow,
Tyro Jobtaoa
Lamas,
Fall Sho
By RANDY MEWS ,
Co
The ECU women's EC!
volleyball team drop- ly,
ped matches to the
William & Mary and losij
Virginia Com- 0-1
monwealth this said!
weekend at the had!
William & Mary in- sevi
vitational Volleyball goo
Tournament.
"We should have I
won both matches Mai
Coach Imogene wei
Truner said. "We mai
weren't able to mam- pers
tain our intensity, and don
that has been our pro- pres
blem all year long
The Lady Pirate bu
dropped their fii
match to Wilham I
Mary 18-16, 1-
15-13, 6-15 and 7-15
"Lita Lamas had an co
excellent game.
Turner said, "and at
one point in the - a I
she strung out 12 con-
secutive serve
Church,
Forward
Cont'd From Page 10
feat that was noted in
Sports Illustrated
ECU drops to 3-15
with the loss
Newport, but Churc
is optimistic that this
season will help the
Pirate soccer program
in the future.
"I think this year
will be good for us
down the road he
said. "More then half
I
� i
I
i lj
i
an
Warwick Product
& The Zodiacs'
Country C
Fri. Nov 18th at 1
Located 6 miles out
Take a nght at Caul
2 ShoHsl
Show &
Tickets Availabt
tMi
locatecJ
east caro.
Free Pitcl
Beverage
Large Pi;
Lunch Buffet!
Daily etc.
$2.99
Happy Hou
9
o
The
�MNP
� ��?





I
I
12 THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 8.
Virginia Mustt
Stop Carolina
1983
CHARLOT-
TESVILLE, Va.
(UPI) � Virginia
Coach George Welsh
said Monday he wants
a defense that wins
games to go along
with his offense that
scores points.
Welsh's offense has
scored at least 21
points in all but one
of the Cavaliers' nine
games this season, but
Virginia is 5-4 because
in four of the last five
starts, the defense has
been purous.
"We have some
people who aren't
playing as well as they
can or aren't playing
as well as they did
earlier in the season
Welsh told reporters.
In it's last two
starts, Virginia's of-
fense cranked out 595
yards total offense
against Wake Forest
and 468 against
Georgia Tech. Yet the
Cavaliers lost to
Wake, 38-34, and to
Georgia Tech, 31-27.
"It's been different
things each week
said Welsh. "We've
had a lot of people
hurt and we've had to
switch some of our
people around. It's
affected our perfor-
mance
Five Cavalier
defensive starters
were injured and did
not play against
Georgia Tech. A
sixth, noseguard
David Bond, played
with a cast on his arm
to protect a broken
thumb.
"We're not holding
up well against the
run said Welsh.
"When you can't stop
the run, it causes you
real problems. If!
Geopgia Tech can run
the ball on us like they I
did, what's North
Carolina going to
do?"
The Tar Heels,
ranked as high as No.
3 nationally before I
suffering back-to-
back losses to I
Maryland and Clem-
son, visit Scott
Stadium Saturday to
play Virginia.
It will be the 88th
meeting in a tradi-1
tional rivalry that has
been dominated by'
UNC in recent years.
The Tar heels have'
beaten the Cavaliers
nine straight times.
"North Carolina
has outstanding per-
sonnel, better person-
nel overall than
anybody we've played
all year said Welsh,
"They have outstan-
ding skill people and a
big offensive line
North Carolina
leads the Atlantic
Coast Conference in
total offense and
rushing offense. "If
ever there were a
power football team
on offense, they're it.
They don't run out-
side much. You know
where they're going.
They just knock you
over said Welsh.
Virginia ticket of-1
ficials said Monday
less than 1,000 tickets
remained and a record
crowd of 40,000 was
expected.
Classifieds
FOR SALE
SCUBA EQUIPMENT: For
ul�. BC-backpack, witti alr-1
plus mark- regulator. Las than
ana yaar old Lew price. Call
WMjg, Ask tor Bruce.
FOX RADAR DETECTOR, only
S7I.ee. Call 757-141.
PERSONAL
HUNTER- Congratulations ait
becomina General l�n��mr. I
had confidence tat yen. I'm
behind you all the way I I love
you it Atecta.
LOST AND
FOUND
LOST: Canon AFlSntm Camera.
Vicinity Sigma Tau Oamma
Fraternity Party Oct. 31.
Reward offered. Call 7SI-U7.
LOST: Bracelet with red and
white stones. SMC reward. Call
7SS-U17.
WANTED
JOBS OVERSEAS MF (In-
cludimj Australia, South Pacific,
Europe, Africa, Alaska, Cruise
Ship, Airlines). Temporary and
fall time. SN,M hi ws.oes Call
mm ite-m-SlM Ext. US.
INTERESTED IN JOBS
Overseasr There's a company In
C entrails, WA. that publishes an
international employment direc-
tory. Cast Sit. Their directory
lists hundradi of US Companies
Oraanixattans wit worldwide
OfajTT ft TtfawfS
melton call Mo-7Se-S1M
E D for next semester may move
In now. Oeartetewn Apts. across
form campus. S71.7S. Call
7Se-4etS.
ARE YOU READY FOR A
CHANGE of pace For UI.JS
and 11 utilities and phone you
can move into a I bdrm apt. at
Laneston Park available In Doc.
Female protorod. Call 7SS-37S.
GOOD PAY processing mail
from home. No experience.
Start Immediately. Information,
sand self sddrened, stamped
envelope. W. S. Distributors.
Box 1Se7, Railway, New Jersey
mm.
WANTED: Student assistants to
evaluate research protect. No
special training is needed, but
science majors, musicians, and
visually Impaired students are
encouraged to apply Pay Is
U OS per hour Call David Lun-
noy at 7S7-471) or Robery C.
Morrison at 757-4711, or leave
your name and telephone
number in the Chonistry Depart-
RIDES
RIDE NEEDED: To Hilton
Head is. S.C. or down Its for
Thanksgiving bk. Please call
7SS-SSQ4. ask tar Lyam.
MISC.
LOWEST TYPINO RATES an
campus include experienced
professional work. Pro-
ofreading, spoiling and gram-
matlcal corrections SSS-474
altar S:�.
PROFESSIONAL TYPINO.
MMEPI
ACADEMIC AND PROFES-
SIONAL typing, call Julia
BllSdWirth gl 7SO-7S74.
TYPINO, TEEM. THESIS,
7Ie-oS33.
Par further Infor TYPINO): Rusk
COLLEGE EBP WANTED to
distribute "Student Rate"
subscription cards at this cam-
voJvad. Far information and ap-
plication write to: Allen S.
Lawrence, Director, 1S1 Oien-
waod Drive. MsorsivIHe, NC
mis.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: t ksdrum famish-
ed. Kings Row Apts. 11 root
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FEMALE ROOMATE NBED-
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QUALITY TVPINB: IBM
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TYPING, TERM, THESIS,
WMB
TYPING SBEVICB: fast
H Bj0SjVaBEB)BBBBf vJjp re MV aFa"0"JJ �
PROFESSIONAL typing ear-
USOA Choice Beef Chuck
FOOD LION
These prices good thru
Saturday, November 12, 1983
USDA
CHOICE
Lb.
Holly Firms - Grade A Chicken
Thighs &
Drumsticks
USOA Choice Beef Round - Bottom
Round
Lbs.
Golden
USDA
CHOICE
Roast
Bananas
Wine
2 Liter
1.5 liter - Rest, Fr. Coleahari Ck.in Bltsc
Milwaukee
$J79
Wt. of 12 -12 0i. Ceat
Kiunile
Wine
1.S liter � liNinseo Biaaes Rente D
ere
22 Ounce
Why Pay M.19
Z)fJtK'
399
10.7S Oi. - CiMtbill't
16 Ot. � Saataiae
ampfcii
Why Fay 89
299
1 U. - Fool1 llu

Margarine Quarters
tMl � Amrtri Tollot Tlttw
m
49 Or - VSaftaaar
White Cloud EJ Fab Detergent
7.15 Oi. - Food Ton
Macaroni & Cheese
Ma'01"
5 La - Plain Self Rule.
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289
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mmwmm M.1 � �� �
m�mmmm





!
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 8. 1983
11
f All
x o the pavt
.i broken hand,
. game.
� suffering
is on atur-
)ke his
tackle
lable to
id injury
ks g a scuffle
R raliaferro at
week, and
tie oer
5 expected
Steve
ankle but
ick-
� guts
evei ad to
a i h
Miami
trn to
take on
- � at
MlUB!
-

vr
' 23-e
�� -
1 0 0
0 0 � e i:
-
M
bstacles
r from
ege, Church
:ion to
Tom
een the
Pirates all
Ace rding to
.nance for an
i ' CL
Alan
: game offen-
a freshman,
scored an m-
� ili 13 games, a
CHI RCH. Page 11

�"�� Tyrone Johnson dlv

Lamas, Lady Pirates
Fall Short in Tourney
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU women's
volleyball team drop-
ped matches to
William & Mary and
Virginia Com-
monwealth this
weekend at the
William & Mary in-
vitational Volleyball
Tournament.
"We should have
won both matches
Coach Imogene
Truner said. "We
weren't able to main-
tain our intensity, and
that has been our pro-
Mem all year long
The Lady Pirates
dropped their first
match to William
Mary 18-16, 13-15,
15-13, 6-15 and 7-15.
"1 ita Lamas had an
excellent game
Turner said, "and at
one point in the match
she strung out 12 con-
secutive serves
Against Virginia
Commonwealth,
ECU had control ear-
ly, but once again let
the match slip away,
losing 15-6, 15-17,
0-15 and 7-15. Turner
said Ann Guida, who
had been injured for
several weeks, had a
good defensive game
for the Bucs.
Lorraine Foster and
Martha McQuillan
were both unable to
make the trip due to
personal reasons. "I
don't know if their
presence would have
made a difference,
but both are regulars
in the line-up
Turner said.
As far as individual
performances were
concerned, Turner
said that Lamas not
only had a good game
serving, but also led
the Pirates on offense
and defense. "Lita
just had an excellent
all-around game. She
had more kills than
anybody, and was
also the team leader in
blocks
Lamas is con-
sidered the most ex-
perienced member of
the Lady Pirate team
and acts as a coach on
the court. Turner says
she knows the game
exceptionally well and
has been invaluable in
her ability to instruct
the younger players.
While a player at
Miami Dade Com-
munity College,
Lamas led her team to
two state champion-
ships and a third and
fourth-place finish
nationally.
The Pirates will
play their final home
match of the season
tonight in Minges
Colliseum at 7:00
p.m.
Church, ECU Looking
Forward to Wolf pack
t. ont'd From Page 10
feat that was noted in
r Illustrated.
ECU drops to 3-15
'j. 11 h the loss to
Newport, but Church
optimistic that this
;eason will help the
Pirate soccer program
n the future.
"1 think this year
Aiil be good for us
down the road he
said. "More then half
the team is composed
of freshmen, and if
nothing else, this
season will be a good
learning experience
for them
ECU will play their
final game of the
season tomorrow at 3
p.m. against powerful
N.C. State. The game
will be played at the
varsity soccer field,
and Church is expec-
ting it to be the
toughest game of the
year for his team.
The Wolfpack have
three Nigerian na-
tional team members
and 11 full scholar-
ship players on their
squad. ECU is
budgeted less than
one full schrTship,
but Church said he is
still looking forward
to the game. "If we
get a few breaks,
anything can
happen
Warwick Productions Present: "Maurice Williams
& The Zodiacs" also Carson Kooncee & The
Country Caravan w Connie Owens
Fri. Nov 18th at D.H. Conley High School Gym
Located 6 miles nut of ,rrrn llle on 43 towards Vaneeboro,
Take a right at Caution Light.
2 Shows 7:00 pm & 9:30 pm
Show & Dance (Sock - Hod)
Tickets Available at J?�b'? "j � Greenville
Friendly Hair Designers - Greenville
Bowen's Open Air Market - Ajjtl
steaksandwiches
pizza, ice cream
convenient
fast service
located
east Carolina dining services
Coupon
Free Pitcher of your Favorite
Beverage wit h Purchase of
Large Pizza.
. � �TTH$OH-ICu Phot, L,0
Kelz� T�vzyn nnds ho,e down �o �� M"mi m�' �� � � � -
o
a
IM
Lunch Buffet
Daily etc.
$2.99
Dinner Buffet
Mon & Tues
$3.09
o
o
6
1
Copyright 1983
Kroger Savon
Ouantlty Rights Reserves
None Sold To Dealers
items and Prices
Effective Thru Sat
Nov. 15, 1983.
'EM
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED
POLICY
Each o these aaer
t'sea terns is re-
quired to be read.iy
avaabie for sale in
eac Kroger Savon
except as specifically
noted m this ad if we
do run out of an item
we win offer you your
cHoica of m com-
paraO'e item h�n
available reflecting
the same savings or a
ramchech which will
entitle you to pur-
chase the advert sed
item at the advertised
price withm 3C days
KROGER
Orange
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REG. OR SUGAR FREE
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1 $199
BOX �
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REG. OR BUTTERMILK
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DOS.
$469 $Z99
� U3. ,�SAVE
Lb. ,p SAVE
To89�Ld.





Title
The East Carolinian, November 8, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 08, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.300
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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