The East Carolinian, November 3, 1983






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�hc iEast (Eantltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No�!9 A I
Thursday, November 3,1983
Greenville, NX.
Leadership Conference Held
Legislators Unified
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
More than half of the newly
elected SGA legislators turned out
Monday for a Leadership Con-
ference held in Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. SGA President Paul
Naso said he organized the con-
ference to unify the new
legislators and give them a com-
mon bond in their work.
"The leadership conference was
designed to help legislators to do a
more effective job Naso said,
"and to give them some insight on
what student government is all
about. I hope it excites them
about what the SGA is
Following a social hour and
welcome from Naso, Associate
Dean and Director of University
Unions, S. Rudolph Alexander,
presented a history of the SGA
and its place in the university
system. "The SGA has done a
great job over the years, (it) has a
seriousness of purpose and a real
interest from the students Alex-
ander said. "The SGA has made a
significant contribution to this
university
Following Alexander, Vice-
Chancellor for Student Life,
Elmer Meyer, addressed the topic:
SGA: How it Works. Meyer
praised the SGA as a group saying
although individual legislators
sometimes disagreed on an in-
tellectual basis, they respected
each other's opinions.
Meyer reminised about an SGA
race held several years ago when
two parties, the Open Party and
the Blankey Party, squared off in
a match-up that produced much
student participation. The
Blankey party promised to "cover
�ii issues while the Opens claim-
ed they had "nothing to hide
Meyer said the SGA supports a
bus system unmatched and unlike
any other in UNC the system.
"The SGA helps student
organizations to carry on their
programs Meyer said, adding
that the SGA helped to develop
good citizenship.
Legislators then broke into two
groups to hear lectures from two
ECU staff members. Residence
Hall Director Don Joyner discuss-
ed group behavior and Ed
Wheatley discussed "being pro-
fessional
Joyner told the group that com-
munication is the foundation of
every interpersonal relationship.
"Communication is the glue that
holds families together (and)
holds groups together he said.
Joyner also conducted some in-
tergroup exercises on one and
two-way communication.
Wheatley said the definition of
a professional is someone who
behaves in a professional manner.
He said it was the duty of an SGA
representative to "become in-
formed and stay
informed Wheatley said
vitality is a key asset for profes-
sionals, that professionals are
good listeners and should always
be punctual.
The conference also had
workshops for four SGA commit-
tees: appropriations, rules and
judiciary, student welfare, and
screening appointments. Each
committee chairperson also gave
their committee reports.
Because of time limitations,
Naso and SGA Speaker Chris
Townsend were unable to make
their closing remarks which have
been re-scheduled.
10 Pages,
Circulation 10,000
Game Room Provides
Funding For Hospice
Dear Mom,
� OS POOLS �
ECU Photo Lab
These ECU females seem to have the right idea � take good notes and
make great grades. But are they taking notes or writing letters?
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Staff Writer
The Student Residence Associa-
tion announced Wednesday that it
plans to donate all proceeds ob-
tained from the game room in
Aycock Dormitory on the first
Wednesday of every month to the
Hospice of East Carolina pro-
gram.
"As students, we have an in-
terest in the community said
Mark Niewald, president of the
Student Residence Association
Governing Board. "We felt that
Hospice was a worthwhile
organization and it accomplishes
a lot for the residents of this com-
munity he added.
Proceeds from two days of
game room operations were
donated last year and, according
to Niewald, the donation
amounted to approximately $700.
"Without their donations we
probably wouldn't be able to
operate Beverly Burnette, direc-
tor of the program, said.
Hospice began operating in
February of 1982, and is designed
to provide support and palliative
services to advanced cancer pa-
tients. Support is provided
psychologically and emotionally;
the palliative treatment is to pro-
vide comfort rather than a cure.
The initial funding for the pro-
gram came from the ECU School
of Medicine's Department of
Surgery which still provides par-
tial funding. The United Way
also provides some funds. All
other financial support is provid-
ed by organizations such as the
SRA.
Most of the work in the pro-
gram is done by a network of
volunteers. "We have had
volunteers for just about
everything you can imagine
Burnette said.
ACLU Gives Civil Rights Information
By GLENN MAUGHAN
Staff Writer
Two members of the ECU com-
munity say the American Civil
Liberties Union is an excellent
way for students to inform
themselves about civil rights. The
pair hold newly elected positions
in the ACLU's eastern North
Carolina chapter.
Scott Lyman, ECU associate
professor in allied health, is the
newly elected president of the
group. "The basic concept of
ACLU is to protect and promote
civil liberties. We try to keep the
guarantees given to citizens
through the Bill of Rights and the
Constitution intact he said.
Elected as the group's new vice-
chairperson, Jeane Mills, an ECU
graduate student studying com-
munity health, said her interests in
civil rights got her started. "I took
it as an opportunity to get involv-
ed, to do something positive. If
we are not aware of what our
rights are, how can we know when
we've had our rights abridged?"
she asked.
Lymmn said a priority or thr
ACLU is to defend end provide
Reagan To Visit Camp Lejeune On Friday
WASHINGTON (UPI)- Presi-
dent Reagan will attend memorial
services Friday at North
Carolina's Camp Lejeune in
honor of Marines who died in
Lebanon and the invasion of
Grenada, the White House an-
nounced.
After services in the camp's am-
phitheater, the president and Nan-
cy Reagan will visit privately with
the families of the Marines who
were killed in the recent terrorist
attack in Beirut, a spokesman said
Tuesday.
The Reagans are then scheduled
to travel to Cherry Point, the air
base linked to Camp Lejeune,
where the President will address
the troops and their families
before flying back to Washington.
A truck loaded with explosives
crashed through the barracks at
the Beirut Airport Oct. 23, killing
230 men. The Defense Depart-
ment said 18 Marines were killed
and 91 wounded in the invasion of
Grenada, which began two days
later.
legal assistance in cases that have
far-reaching legal implications.
"We try to protect the 1st Amend-
ment and 14th Amendment
freedoms he said. The 1st
Amendment gives every person
residing in the U.S. freedom of
speech, while the 14th ensures
people the right of due process
through the courts.
Another goal is educating
citizens Lyman said. "Through
various educational programs, we
try to inform citizens of their
riant, sad (tett tntm) it their
rights have been infringed upon
he said. Lyman cited a recent T. V.
poll of 1,000 people who were
read the Bill of Rights. "The ma-
jority didn't know they had those
guarantees he said.
According to Lyman, the
ACLU is a non-profit, mostly
volunteer organization. "There
are about 75 people in our chapter
and we are still developing, still
growing he said. "Anyone can
join the organization he added.
One of the more celebrated
cases involving the ACLU hap-
pened during the '70s when the
government arrested thousands of
citizens involved in anti-Vietnam
war protests. Litigation continued
for ten years and the government
was eventually fined over $2
million for infringing upon the
rights of protestors.
"The ACLU gets involved in
many ways; we can offer advice to
people and refer them to sym-
pathetic attorneys Lyman said.
The ll�� coutw of action Tor ine
ACLU is to hear a case, consider
its merits and see what kind of
assistance can be provided,
Lyman said. "An important
thing for people to remember is
that if we don't take an active in-
terest in our rights, we run the risk
of losing them he said. Accor-
ding to Mills, knowledge of your
rights is a key factor. "Then you
can take steps to rectify the situa-
tion and regain your rights she
said.
Demonstrators Pro-Con Grenada Invasion
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Pros
(SON � BCU ��� Lab
Members of the ECU chapter of the College Republicans came ont
Wednesday in support of the U.S. invasion of Grenada. The
demonstration took place in front of the bookstore.
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Writer
At high-noon Wednesday the
College Republicans squared-
off against the Greenville Peace
Committee in a showdown over
the U.S. invasion of Grenada.
The Greenville Peace Com-
mittee initiated the protest out-
side the campus bookstore. The
eight demonstrators, including
several students and a faculty
member, protested the United
States' role in the recent inva-
sion of Grenada.
Approximately 15 minutes
after the demonstration began,
nine members of the ECU Col-
lege Republicans entered the
forum bearing signs in counter-
protest.
Steve Ellis, a supporter of
the Grenada invasion, said the
main reason for his support
was to ensure the safety of the
U.S. citizens overseas. "It is
important to show that we will
protect our citizens abroad
he said.
English instructor Edith
Webber, a member of the Peace
Committee,disagreed. "I don't
like the overthrow of the
government in Grenada any
more than anyone else does.
(But) I don't approve of our
country going out and invading
a sovereign country Webber
said.
Stephen Sherbin, a member
of the College Republicans,
said, "Grenada should be free
because those are the principles
this country was founded on
Grenada invasion protestor
William Wilson said, "We
want to dictate the countries in
the Western Hemisphere to
follow our policy
Several local television sta-
tions covered the event.
Cons
�aev �ATTISSO � ecu
Squaring off against the College Republicans were members of the
Greenville Peace Committee who protested against the invasion.
College Hill Gets
An Improved Look
By MILLIE WHITE
College Hill received a face-lift
last Friday night when four ECU
students painted the new pirate
logo at the top of the hill. In-
dustrial technology major Danny
Wolfe drew the emblem. Wolfe
was aided by Debbie Gembicki,
Ronda Hall and Jack Whittemore
who helped paint the pirate.
According to Gembicki, the
foursome worked on the logo for
almost 12 consecutive hours; they
began working at 2:30 p.m. Fri-
day and finished up at 2 a.m.
Saturday. Wolfe drew the emblem
and the others took turns painting
it. "The whole time we ran back
and forth getting paint brushes
and pizza Gembicki said.
Wolfe, a former art major,
copied the logo from a 6-inch pic-
ture then enlarged it to scale of 43
feet. "It was a challenge he
said. "I wanted to do something
that would be there a while
Originally, the four had plann-
ed to paint the emblem at the bot-
tom of the hill but, in order to do
so, they would have had to block
off the entire hill from traffic.
While they painted, traffic was
rerouted around Aycock dorm.
Wolfe said students passing by
were friendly. "Everybody was
supportive, we had a lot of people
come by and wanted to know if
we needed any help
According to a Carolina
ECU students have been
System Is Violated
By ANDREA MARKELLO
Telegraph representative,
tbasiag long distance services.
Students living on campus who
pay for dorm room telephones
are exploiting the service, accor-
ding to a representative from the
local phone company, Carolina
Telephone and Telegraph.
Difficulties are arising because
students abuse their long distance
contracts made with the universi-
ty, CTAT representative Ruth
Hathaway said. Students are
charging long distance phone calls
to their room number when they
aren't contracted to do so.
Hathaway said this is a serious
issue and violating students can be
issued a warrant, charged with
fraud and taken to court.
The phone company sends the
violators a bill and grves them five
days respond, Hathaway said.
Failure to do so results in revoca-
tion of the student's phone service
with a $17.40 service charge to
reinstate the phone service.
"High toll users require a
deposit depending on the toll
Hathaway said. It may be as high
as $200 but we try to keep it to a
minimum to recoup losses, she
said.
On The Inside
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Editorial 4
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1983

Announcements
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Happy Birthday Nut!
POETRY FORUM
ECU Poetry Forum will meet
III pm on Thursday m room
148 Menderhaii Those planning
to attend should bring six or
eight copies of each peom to be
discussed Meetings are open to
anyone interested in getting
feedback on their work or to
anyone who simply wants to
listen poetry being read
SGA DORM
REPRESENTATIVES
Are you interested in becom
ing a SGA Dorm Representative
tor White. Cotton Flemming.
Bern or Aycock Go by the SGA
office in Mendennall and pick up
an application
BIOLOGY CLUB
The Biology club will meet
Monday Nov 7 at 7 p m in Rm
105 Dr Lawrence Harris, a Pitt
County Medical Examiner, will
address the various aspects of
Forensic Pathology A question
answer period will entail most of
the evening Refreshments w:l
be served am members and in
teres'ed persons are asked to at
tend
BIBLE STUDY
Everyone it invited for Bible
study and fellowship at the next
King Youth Fellowship meeting.
Thursday night at 8 p m in MSC
room 247
KARATE CLUB
The East Carolina Karate
Club will compete n the Joe
Dion Karate Tournament on
Nov 19 Any club member
wishing to compete must attend
the Monoar and Thursday
workous
PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers of Pj Kappa Phi
Fraternltv would like to invite
�v.ryon. �o com �o JOO ���
every Tuesday night for PI Kapp
Happy Hor
Congratulations to 'he Pi
Kapp "A soccer 'earn tor a
grea? sfa'f Keep I up fellows
P S if anyone finds one
bracelet, one shoe one coat and
one contact lens please get in
touch w h Newsome
Newsome s aate 'got down "
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next general meeting of
Gamma Beta Phi will be held on
Nov 3 at 7 p m in Jenkins Art
Auditorium Please attend and
bring tickets and money This is
the deadline! Look lorward to
seeing you there
CONTEMPORARY
GOSPEL SHOW
This Sunday on WZMB s Con
temporary Gospel Show our
spotlight artist will be The Cruse
Family So before you head out
to church this Sunday morning,
flip your radio dial to
91 3 WZMB
FREECRUISE
The Cruse Family will be
"Live" in Greenville on Friday.
November 11. in the Wright
Auditorium Concert starts at
7,30 p m and admission is free
ZBTLITTLE SISTERS
TheZBT ittie Sisters are sell
mg engraved glass mugs Only
5.00 each Great Christmas
Presents See any Little Sis'er
for details
BALLOONS!
BALLOONS!
BALLOONS!
A gift for all occasions Today
and Friday From 10 00 a m to
3 00 p m. at Student Store We
Deliver!
INTERNATIONAL
STUDENTS
ASSOCIATION
There shall be a meeting on
Thursday Nov 3 at the
Mendenhail Student Center
(check room number at desk)
please bring along your copy of
the constitution1! All members
are urged to attend
SCEC MEETING
The Student Council for Ex
cepfional Children is having a
business meeting and slide
presentaifon on a severe and
profound group of individuals,
Monaay. Nov 7. at 4 p m in
Speight 129 all members and
those interested ji-e welcome
�??��
SIGMA THETATAU
Sigma Theta Tau, the honor
society of nursing, will hold its
fall meeting on Thursday, Nov
10, at the Greenville Country
Club. D.f Mi Ja Kim. RN. Ph
D , from the University of II
linois. College of Nursing, will
speak on "The Impact of Nurs
Ins Diagnoses on the Nursing
Profession " The program will
begin at A 30 p m with a wine
and cheese reception for Dr
K.m Registration fee is $3 50
Colleagues, students, spouses,
and friends are invited Contact
Marty Engelke at the School of
Nursing or any Sigma Theta Tau
member
FOUNTAIN OF LIFE
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
The Fountain of Lite Christian
Fellowship will be sponsoring a
fall revival on November 18 20 in
the art building on the campus of
ECU Service will begin at 7
p m with the theme "There is
true victory in praise " We cor
dially invite everyone to attend
FOREIGN
LANGUAGES
LECTURE
The Department of Foreign
Languages is sponsoring a lee
ture by D r Bode Nischan of the
history department on Martin
Luther The lecture will be Nov
10, the 500th anniversary of
Luther's birth it will be held in
the Mendenhail coffehouse at
7 30 p m The public is invited
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
The Greenville Utilities Com
mission is seeking student
volunteers to help with a winter
weatheriiation project for low
� ncomo and �Mwtv OrMvlla
residents if you have time to
heip'piease cell Susan Susan
Biizaro at 752 7166 be.jre 5pm
CONGRATULATIONS
The Sisters and Pledges of
Alpha Xi Delta would like to con
gradulate Delores Worthingfon
on being chosen Homecoming
Queen We're proud of you
KKSKArU H IWI'KKS
�uh $? cx rt�a currant 306 . �ge ���
Cusioeit 'ataa'ch 4 thesis ���
taatee ao � -��-�- �
Weoeorra. M 3J2 i(jg.o A�g a0�WA.
l-v AfaaaAH CA900? 213�J,7 82�
LIBERAL
STUDENTS
The Society of United Liberal
Students will have a meeting
Thursday, November 3, 19S3 at 7
p m. It will be held In Room 221
at Mendenhail. Your attendance
is very Important GET IN
VOLVEDH
PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers of Pi Kappa Phi
hope everyone had a great
Homecoming. We sure did. WE
GOT DOWN Homecoming was
a great success. Many thanks to
Brian McGann for working so
hard
ADULT
EDUCATION
ASSOCIATION
The East Carolina University
adult education association will
hold its first meeting of the new
school year on Tuesday,
November 15, 1983 The meeting
will be held at the Western
SlXZlIn Steak House, 2903 East
10th St . Greenville, NC from 6
p m 9pm
The program will feature Dr
Paul F Fendt Associate Pro
lessor of Education, UNC
Chapel Hill who will discuss
"Adult Education Looking For
ward To The Future"
The meal will consist of a rib
eye steak dinner with all the
trimmings
The cost including social, din
ntr. and the program is $8.50 per
person, inclusive All members,
guests, and interested persons
are invited to attend Please
send your check (made payable
to ECUAEA) to Dr Leonard
Lilley, Office of Adult Educa
tion, School of Education, ECU,
Greenville, NC, 27834 no later
than Nov 14th it you have ques
tions or wish further details
about the association please
call Phil Martin (919 757 4143)
HOW TO AVOID
TEST ANXIETY
A mini series offered at NO
COST by the University Counsel
mg Center How To Avoid Test
Anxiety, Tuesday, Nov 8 from
3 4 p m in 305 Wright Annex
(757 6461)
1 j �wwiavnR1
HOW TO SUCCEED
IN COLLEGE
A mini series offered at NO
COST by the Univeristy Counsel
Ing Center How To Succeed In
College And Still Have Pun,
Monday, Nov 7, from 4 5 p.m. In
305 Wright Annex (75761)
JUNIOR
PANHELLENIC
Junior Panhelienic will be
sponorlng a bake sale on Nov 3,
Thursday, outside of the
Croatan and the Student Supply
Store from 9 am to 3 p m. All
Items will be fifty cents
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusdae for Christ is
sponsoring "Prime Time" this
Thursday at 7 p m in the Nurs
ing Building Rm. 101. Please
join us for fun, fellowship, and
Bible study We are looking for
ward to meeting you
AOII RUSHI
Sisters and pledges of Alpha
Omicron Pi would like your
presence at an ice cream party
on Nov 2 from 7 8 p m at 805
Johnston ST For a ride and
more information, call 757 0769
CADSMEETING
The newly formed Computer
Applications in Decision
Sciences Club will have its mon
thly meeting Thursday,
November 3 In Rawl 103 at 2
p m. All interested Business ma
iors and MBAs are invited to at
tend
SPECIAL
EDUCATION
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Scholarship commitee of
the Department of Special
Education is now accepting ap
plications for a scholarship to be
awarded for the 194 Spring
Semester The scholarship will
be awarded to a rising lunior,
�rlor. or graduate stuocnt wtw
has been accepted for admission
or who Is currently enrolled full
time in the Department of
Special Education at East
Carolina University. Appllca
tion materials are available at
137 Speight All applications
must be turned In by Monday,
November 21, 1983
����������?����?�
403 S. IVANS ST.
agjBiviUi. n.c
Latest Styles in
Ladies Hats and accessories
10:00AM-y-MPM
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ANNOUNCES
NEWHOURS 8 A.M. - 8 P.M.
Closed Saturdays
Beginning Nov. 1,1983
Bring this ad and get
our Famous Chicken Breast
Filet, an order of Fries, and
a 16oz. Tea for $1.89 plus tax.
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LEGAL
ASSISTANT
On November 10, Meredith
College's Legal Assistants Pro-
gram will have a representative
at the Career Planning and
Placement Service. On
November 11, the National
Center for Paralegal Training of
Atlanta. Georgia will have a
representative to talk with any
ma or Interested in their post
graduate program You shotd
sign up In advance at the Career
Planning and Placement Ser-
vice
G.I. BENEFITS
Attention students receiving
G. I. benefits, if you rt a double
major or want to double major
please contact Mrs. Slay
Jackson. Room 104, Whlcherd
Building, as there has been a
change in tne VA regulation.
KCS3
It will be something that you
have never experienced before!
Do not miss this once in a
lifetime opportunity! For more
Information call 753 9653 and ask
for Bobby I
LIBERAL STUDENTS
There will be a meeting of The
Society of United Liberal
Students on Thursday,
November 3, 1983 at 7 pm in
room 244 at Mendenhail Student
Center. Your attendance is very
Important GET INVOLVED
KAPPA SIGMA
The Kappa Sigmas are off to
another good start in the race
for the coveted Chancellor's
Cup. So far we appear to be In
first place, but the year isn't
quite over.Good luck to
everybody competing for the
cup Thank GOD we won our first
soccer game yesterday
Wiikens did if again Halloween
night when he passed out onthe
floor of his kitchen. He was
astonished the next morning
when he opened his eyes to find
himself In a bed with two other
girls Now for a word to Ployd
and Scott, the Brothers know
that this is a delicate
situation But we're gonna get
ye Happy Birthday goes out to
NUT
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This year,
some of our graduates
willbcrcmeiiiiercd
under the following
yearlHwkheadijig
Those Not Pictured.
Don t be a blank spot" Your coiJege
yearbook is a lasting memory of a
great part of your life
For your sake, and others,
get your picture taken
� 1982 Varden Studios. Inc
Sign ap ia the hall oatakle the Baccaaeer Office, picture will he
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Rape
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(CPS)� Lawyers for a
woman raped in a col-
lege dorm in 19"6
went back to court
last week to try to
make the college itself
pay her damages for
the incident
Madelyn Miller
alleged!) was raped in
a dorm at the State
University of New
York-Stony Brook in
1976, an incident she
claims would not have
happened if the
university had kept
her dorm's doors
locked, according to
Martin Rubinstein,
her lawver,
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U.S. Campus N
Drinki
� A higher drinking
age has helped
crime at the I
t y of Marv
College Park b)
percent,
Chancellor Cha
Sturtz claims
"No one knows ex-
actly why" the crime
rate fell, he
Maryland's regc
but "a ver :g
cant contributor is the
reduction of akohol-
mduced incidents in
dorms and on cam-
pus
The state's legal
drinking age wen. ap
to 21 last year.
� Students from 20
states met at New
York University to
plan a massive new ef-
fort to force more
shcools to sell stocks
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1983
J Rape Victim Wants College To Pay Damages
uck
BUYING
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NEW YORK, NY
(CPS)-Lawyers for a
woman raped in a col-
lege dorm in 1976
went back to court
last week to try to
make the college itself
pay her damages for
the incident.
Madelyn Miller
allegedly was raped in
a dorm at the State
University of New
York-Stony Brook in
1976, an incident she
claims would not have
happened if the
university had kept
her dorm's doors
locked, according to
Martin Rubinstein,
her lawyer.
Rubinstein filed an
appeal of the case in a
New York state court
last week. .In
September, a lower
court ruled the univer-
sity hadn't been
negligent in leaving
the doors unlocked.
Still earlier, another
court had held the
school liable, and
awarded Miller
$25,000 in damages.
The case could help
make all colleges
responsible for certain
violent crimes that oc-
cur on their cam-
puses, suggests
Leonard Territo, a
criminologist at the
University
Florida.
Territo
of South
says col-
leges themselves have
been held liable in
such cases "more and
more in the last six or
seven years
Courts have blamed
rapes on colleges colleges pay damages
recently because the to the students. For
high-crime campus
areas, or because they
left employees work-
ing alone at night in
unlocked buildings,
Territo says.
When the courts do
blame the schools,
they usually make the
schools didn't ac-
curately train their
security officers,
because they
schedualed night
classes in isolated
areas that "leave
females in a highly-
vulnerable position
because they failed to
redeploy police to
example, the Hasting
Law Center in San
Francisco paid
damages of $215,000
in 1980 to a student
raped in a women's
restroom. Catholic
University in
Washington, D.C.
paid damages of
$20,000 in 1976 to a
student raped on its
campus.
In New York,
Miller originally ask-
ed for damages of
$500,000. When the
Court of Claims gave
her only $25,000,
lawyer Rubinstein ap-
pealed. But an ap-
pellate court in
September cancelled
the award, and ruled
the university wasn't
responsible for the
unsafe conditions.
But the dorm,
Rubinstein says, "has
quite a number of en-
trances and exits, and
they were never kept
locked. It was a kind
of dimly-lit place, and
was an easy place to
enter and exit
In all, it was
"something of a
magnet for criminal
intrusion he main-
tains.
Knowing that,
Stony Brook should
have kept its dorm
doors locked, he con-
cludes. Landlords,
whether private or
public, should be "ex-
pected to have (the
building) properly-
secured
New York Assistant
Attorney General
Jeremiah Jochnowitz,
who represented the
university, argued in-
stead that Miller
could not sue the state
because of the legal
doctrine of
44 sovereign
immunity
The concept, accor-
ding to Rubenstein,
effectively prohibits
people from suing
governments over cer-
tain governmental ac-
tions.
However Territo, in
reviewing campus
rape court cases,
found that courts
seem to be "shrinking
the sovereign immuni-
ty doctrine" as it ap-
plies to state colleges
and universities.
Colleges, he says,
will "never be able to
totally prevent all
crime on a campus,
but they can react to u
with" precautions
such as licking
building doors, re-
keying other locks,
and expanding and re-
training campus
security forces, and
holding crime preven-
tion seminars for
students.
If they don't res-
pond, "there's now
enough case law in the
United States to hold
the university respon-
sible he says.
Territo agrees that
most campuses "were
not designed for
security purposes, but
the question now is,
does that relieve them
of the civil liability"
for crimes committed
on them?
Rubinstein expects
the New York Court
of Appeals will decide
the Miller case by next
Januarv.
U.S. Campus Notes
Drinking Age
Cuts Crime Rate
� A higher drinking
age has helped cut
crime at the Universi-
ty of Maryland-
College Park by 17
percent, Vice
Chancellor Charles
Sturtz claims.
"No one knows ex-
actly why" the crime
rate fell, he tells
Maryland's regents,
but "a very signifi-
cant contributor is the
reduction of alcohol-
induced incidents in
dorms and on cam-
pus
The state's legal
drinking age went up
to 21 last year.
� Students from 20
states met at New
York University to
plan a massive new ef-
fort to force more
shcools to sell stocks
in companies that do
business in segrega-
tionist South Africa.
They'll hold a series
of protests and cam-
pus presentaitons to
regents form March
21 through April 4
next spring.
The aim is to force
more schools into
stock divestitures,
says American Com-
mittee on Africa cam-
pus coordinator Josh
Nessen.
� More logo wars:
After regent pressure'
a campus vote, the
University of New
Mexico finally drops
Swastika as the name
of its yearbook.
The new yearbook
editor decided to do
it, but only after 9
months of battle
begun by a student
vote to keep the
name, originally
adopted in 1908
because of its Indian
heritage.
In May, the regents
finally ordered a
name change. A com-
mittee has chosen
"The Pheonix
� Student gets
angry over geeting an
"A" in a University
of Minnesota math
class she stopped at-
tending before it was
half over.
Kris Waskosky says
Professor Steven
Gaal's grade damages
the credibility of the
whole math depart-
ment.
Gaal gave an "A"
to all but 2 of the
students in the class.
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They both got a "B
But Gaal and the 2
highest math depart-
ment officials refuse
to change the grade.
"I still stick with
(the 'A'), Gaal told
the Minnesota Daily,
"if she wants a 'F' she
should bring me to
court, and she will be
charged with court
costs. She just doesn't
want to leave me in
peace
� Two physicists tell
the government a
small nuclear reactor
at U.C.L.A. is unsafe
and shouldn't be
relicensed.
U.C.L.A. has run
the reacotr, used at its
medical center, safely
for 23 years, but
scientists from the Ci-
ty University of New
York testified an acci-
dent could poison an
area of 50 miles
around the campus.
� Notre Dame Pro-
fessor protests
Christie Hefner's
campus lecture visit
for "Failing to live up
the the ideals of the
Church
Law Professor
Charles Rice wants
alumni to help end
"such lectures
Hefner showed up
last week anyway to
tell business school
students about
"changing sex and
social roles
�Reaa�
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2U East (Earoitman
Serving the East Caroline campus community since 1925
Darryl Brown, ��&,�,
Hunter Fisher, mm m,
ALI AFRASHTEH, oamm
Geoff Hudson, noi.no. m.�
Michael Mayo. I srw�-
Cindy Pleasants, m &�,
GREG RIDEOUT, Editorial Pag' Editor
Gordon I pock, mr
Lizanne Jennings, at wtor
TODD EVANS, Production Manager
November 3, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Security
Let's Lessen Restrictions
Almost two weeks have passed
since the Beirut terrorist attack
that claimed the life of more than
230 Marines. The act itself seems
to evade description. We can only
express sorrow and heartfelt sym-
pathies for the sisters, brothers,
parents, children and wives of the
those who gave their life for
America. We in spirit join Presi-
dent Reagan this Friday as he
honors the dead at a Camp Le-
jeune ceremony. But, the time has
come for answers to the security
question.
The commandant of the Marine
Corps, Paul X. Kelley, defended
Monday the security provisions for
Beirut. He said "no reasonable or
prudent commander" would have
expected the kind of attack that oc-
curred. We have no qualms with
that statement, for the crashing of
the gate by a driver on a suicide
mission is almost certainly indefen-
sible. What we do have questions
on is the unnecessary restraint put
on the peacekeeping forces. Why
was the sentry not allowed to have
bullets in his gun? What sense doer
that make in a warzone?
The Marines themselves at first
only felt slightly hindered by the
extraordinary amount of limita-
tions placed on them. But now
after they have seen more than 200
of their buddies die, they are it-
ching to go out get revenge and are
mad at the rules. We, of course,
cannot formulate U.S. military
rules, but we hope in our own
small way we can make the
military and political leaders of
our country think about the securi-
ty of our military when they are
sent on missions to faraway lands.
So, in the final analysis, what it
amounts to, unfortunately, is a
costly learning process. We must
now take the experience and apply
it to the safeguarding of the other
Marines who continue the job of
peacekeeping for the president.
Our condolences go to the families
of those who have died; our con-
cern to those who are still there.
SOME W Wm TO KNOW IF VOU'VE HEARP ABOUT A
NEW ANTI-HERPES VACCINE THAT WORKS ON MICE j
U.S. Invasion Deplorable
Military Invasion Justified;
Grenada Situation Different
By CARL T. ROWAN
WASHINGTON � A lot of people
have telephoned or stopped me on the
streets to ask whether I'm assailing the
Reagan administration for "gunboat
diplomacy" in invading tiny Grenada.
Some express shock when I say no.
"For more than a year you opposed
Reagan's policy in Central America one
woman said. "You argued for months
that the Marines ought to be pulled out of
Lebanon. Did the fat cats finally buy you
off?"
I hung up on her, which 1 regret. I
should have devoted a few sentences to
trying to explain to her that there are
pragmatic, moral, legal and other dif-
ferences between what the United States is
doing with the Marines in Lebanon, what
it is doing in Grenada and what it is trying
to do clandestinely with proxy forces in
Central America. Since I refuse to make
knee-jerk reactions to cliches like "gun-
boat diplomacy I weigh each of these
actions on their merits.
Let's look at some moral distinctions
first.
In Central America, in the name of
anti-communism, the United States has
been allying itself with ruthless oligarchs
who use murder squads to retain power
and privilege. It has tied democracy's
future to the predators who have kept the
masses in poverty and serfdom through
the generations.
In Lebanon, the Marines were given the
role of helping lift to nationwide power a
weak Christian minority regime that is
gated for many reasons by many
Lebanese, not the least being because of
the Christian Phalangist role in the
massacre of Palestinians in the Sabra and
Shatila refugee camps just more than a
year ago.
In Grenada, in a distinction that is
crucial, the United States has not moved
to keep in power some cutthroat oligarch
whose claim to our support is that he is
"anti-communist This time, the United
States has moved to depose a band of
ruthless murderers who were denying
every semblance of freedom to the
100,000 or so people on the island. Marx-
ist murderers, yes. But so what?
A student teiephoner asked me, "Well,
what about your stated opposition to the
U.S. behaving like the Soviet Union and
intervening in the affairs of a sovereign
nation?"
I know that in the strictest legal sense,
Grenada is a sovereign nation, and like
Dominica, Barbados, St. Lucia, a
member of the United Nations. But the
network of uncles, brothers, cousins
reaching from island to island in the East
Caribbean attests to the practical truth
that this is one community. So does the
treaty that locks them together in the
Organization of East Caribbean States.
The Reagan administration could obey
the law of common sense to conclude that
it could honor a cry from five-sixths of
the organization that Grenada was being
raped and the United States must come to
the rescue.
My concerns about "foreign interven-
tion" were further diminished by the
overwhelming evidence that the rapists
were not Grenadians with a claim to
legitimate power, but ruthless killers do-
ing the bidding of Havana and Moscow.
Leaders of neighboring islands said, in
so many words: "We don't want domina-
tion by any big power, including the
United States. But when Russia and Cuba
are actively trying to impose
totalitarianism upon us, we don't expect
the great power that is our neighbor and
friend, the United States, to watch and do
nothing, even when we cry for help
I cannot bring myself to say that in the
name of "non-intervention" the United
States should have said to this little Carib-
bean community, "Sorry, our hands are
tied
I know, the professional anti-
communists will say, "Rowan, the danger
of a communist takeover in Central
America is far greater than it was in
Grenada. Why won't you endorse a U.S.
invasion of Central America?"
Part of the answer is that I don't believe
the danger is so great. Neither do Mexico,
Panama, Colombia, Venezuela, Costa
Rica and other countries in the area. No
responsible leader is saying urgently to the
United States that the Soviets and Cuba
are moving in El Salvador in a way that
imperils his country. The rest of the
answer is that it is counterproductive to
use U.S. troops to "oppose communism"
by fighting to keep in power some dictator
who doesn't believe in freedom any more
than Stalin did.
Which brings me to the point of
pragmatism.
I oppose leaving the Marine garrison in
Lebanon because it is still in a foolish no-
win situation. We are slinging a fly swat-
ter at cobras and making a lot of Moslem
enemies unnecessarily.
This administration's policy in Central
America is also counterproductive
because we persist in taking the side of
special privilege, of acting as the gen-
darme of the status quo. We are trying to
do through the clandestine support of
mean mercenaries and slimy soldiers of
fortune what never can be done that way.
In Grenada we have done openly and
honestly (ignoring some phony rhetoric
about protecting American lives) what we
could do with success. And we have done
it as a good neighbor who will win friends
in the Caribbean if, as we promise, we
quickly get out and let the people of
Grenada have another go at constitutional
government � and if the administration
does not assume that support for the
Grenada operation is a license to invade
Nicaragua and other countries.
Cart T. Rowan is a respected liberal col-
umnist. This editorial is printed with
special permission from Field Enterprises,
Inc.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
A week ago President Reagan ordered
a United States military invasion of the
sovereign state of Grenada. Reagan's ac-
tions were clearly violating international
laws. "All around the world our allies
are furious with us said Sen. Daniel
Moynihan, D-N.Y a former United
Nations ambassador.
A headline in Thursday's Daily
Relector stated, "World Reaction
Strongly Against U.S. Invasion Not
even Great Britain � a nation with its
own interventionist history � could br-
ing herself to side with the United States
in last week's Security Council vote. The
Council voted 11-1 to "deeply deplore"
the U.S. invasion. The lone vote against
the resolution was cast by the United
States. Britian abstained.
Despite international outcry, the
American people have been behind
Reagan, giving support to his gunboat
diplomacy and possibly giving him just
the incentive he needs to take similar ac-
tions in Nicaragua. When American
citizens rally behind a president's
military imperialism, a return to a
military draft won't be far behind. It is a
sad time to be an American.
In 1979, the United States led an out-
cry against the Soviet Union for their in-
vasion of Afghanistan. We even boycot-
ted the Moscow Olympics. Like the
United States in Grenada, the Soviets
said they were invited into Afghanistan.
Americans practice a double standard in
their policies and our actions will
seriously damage our credibility
throughout the world.
It's hard to know what really happen-
ed in Grenada because the Penatagon
ordered a convenient media blackout of
the invasion. Surely if Reagan was in-
terested in proving that American
citizens in Grenada were in danger, he
would have allowed the press to come in.
In Grenada, Reagan claims he was
trying to protect American iives. As of
Monday, 16 Americans are dead, three
are missing and 77 are injured.
Wouldn't a simple evacuation of U.S.
citizens via commercial jets have ac-
complished the same ends with possibly
no loss of life? This action was suc-
cessfully taken by the Canadians to
evacuate its citizens. Why didn't Reagan
try this option before he used military
force?
Reagan and other high government
officials have said the Grenadian inva-
sion was undertaken, in part, to avoid
another Iranian hostage situation. But
let's look at the facts. In Iran, our
hostages were held for 444 days until we
reached a "negotiated settlement Not
one hostage died! Yes, the Iranian situa-
tion was a tragedy, but negotiation
worked. When we tried a military solu-
tion in Iran, eight U.S. servicemen were
killed. If their mission had been "sue
cessful" and they reached Tehran, how
many hostages might have been killed in
the ensuing battle?
What about the rights of the Grena-
dian people? All too often the super-
powers view their policies from a purely
selfish perspective. "What's in it for
us?" they ask, not even ment: .he
rights of the attacked and invaded na-
tions. Do Americans or Reagan really
care about the people of Grenada? It
would appear not. Last Monday Robert
J. Myers, a former director of Reagan's
national commission on Social Security,
was able to safely leave Grenada on a
chartered plane carrying about 30people
� the next day US forces ;nvaa5�T
rescue Americans.
It is clear to me that the true motive of
the invasion was not to liberate captive
Americans claimed by Reagan. But
rather it was an opportunity to crush a
government we did not approve of. Our
actions are an international crime. I
repeat that "it is a sad time to be an
American
Campus Forum
Pirates Performance Praised
I would like to take this opportunity
to congratulate all of us fans who
helped set a school record at
Saturday's homecoming game against
East Tennessee State. I for one am very
proud of the way the Pirates have
played this year.
I wish coach Emory and the Pirates
the best of luck against Miami; they
deserve the respect and honor they
would gain by winning down in
Florida.
Robert Smith
Junior, Business
King Revisited
Congress once again has shown it
does not represent all the people of the
nation but only special interest groups
that bring pressure to force minority
opinion upon all the citizens.
By the designation of a national holi-
day for Martin Luther King Jr. due to
pressure from minority groups, Con-
gress has insulted the majority of the
people.
Congress has insulted the memory of
Thomas Jefferson and his work in star-
ting this nation on the road to freedom
for all its citizens. It has insulted the
memory of George Washington Carver
who did more for the welfare and bet-
terment of Negroes than King did.
Congress is telling us that if you
want to be a successful and recognized
group you should encourage people to
ignore and break laws. Which is more
important, doing something for the
betterment of all citizens of this coun-
try or what?
Sen. Jesse Helms was right in trying
to delay this action by Congress which
more legislators should have con-
sidered more carefully.
Milton Fogleman
Forum Rules
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ine tcu campus.
??????????�.???

N.C. W
RALEIGH. NX ga:
(UPI) � Leaders of mee
the Governor's Con-
ference on Women Wed
and the Economy say pr :
they hope to form a me:
plan of action to im- img
prove the weU-being toft
Of North Carolina
women. i.
Participant i 7:ern
OPES 8:30-5:30
Monday-Saturday
-Closed Wednesday;
Caii rl
BULLOCKS B
1210 West
Cosmotologists:
Janet, Dezzie, & R,
For Curls, Perms. G
Styles, and ManicurJ
WEHAVEACOMPL.
VVVVVVVVVVVVVVVu
FRIDAY, NOV.
COLLEGE
NIGH1
wDJ DON V1CKE1
Top 40, Beach & Dai
Doors Open 8:30
Happy Hour till 9
OMING NEXT Tl
"Where The
0�XL
DOC
�.� �






THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1983

V

RP ABOUT A
5 OM MICE ?
arable
settlement Not
the Iranian situa-
but negotiation
: a military solu-
s servicemen were
sion had been "suc-
eached Tehran, how
t have been killed in
1c?
i the Grena-
too often the super-
licies from a purely
tive. "What's in it for
even mentioning the
tacked and invaded na-
-ms or Reagan really
pie of Grenada? It
Last Monday Robert
rmer director of Reagan's
commission on Social Security,
to safely leave Grenada on a
fed plane carrying, about 30 people
�: tt day US forces in-aj5fc
Americans.
ric that the true motive of
to liberate captive
ned b Reagan. But
unity to crush a
d noi approve of. Our
a rial crime. I
I sad time to be an
Ax�irs
aised
or drop them by the
oerS offices on the second
1 the publications building,
from Joyner Library,
purposes of verification, all let-
jsi include the name, major and
fonon, address, phone number
Mature of author(s). Letters are
to two typewritten pages,
spaced or neatly printed. All
ire subject to editing for brevi-
kmty and libel. Students, facul-
haff writing letters for this page
irtded that they are limited to
rv five issues.
Icampus forum is a regular
of The East Carolinians's
page which allows students,
nd area citizens to express opi-
I current issues. It is a visible
fective vehicle for expressing
and communicating ideas on
campus.
Student Opinion
Invasion Support Varies
Harris
Argent
By THERESA Dl I SKI
StaH Writer
The U.N. Secruity Council voted
11-1 to "deeply deplore" the U.S. in-
vasion of Grenada. International
response has also been strongly critical
of the U.S. action. Students were asked
if they thought the events in Grenada
would tarnish the reputation of the
U.S.
Julie Harris, Drama-Speech, Junior
� "The people in Grenada accepted
the U.S. and didn't retaliate the U.S.
being there although they were armed
to. The biggest problem is that the
media wasn't allowed into Grenada for
such a long time. We didn't know what
was going on because our view of the
situation could be distorted
Robert Holberg, Physics,
Sophomore � "The invasion was
justified but it didn't tarnish the image
of the U.S. I don't think the image of
the U.S. was that good to begin with.
World opinion comes second to na-
tional security
Joe Argent, English, Graduate �
"We will be seen more as an imperalist
country. I have mixed emotions. I wish
we could find a better way to go about
the situaiton than actually invading the
island
Renee Oakley, Nursing, Freshman
� "It was a good idea to protect the
Americans but that's all they should do
is to get the Americans out. If the na-
tional defense believed American lives
were in danger then they should have
gone in and done something
Oakley
N.C. Women Discussed
RALEIGH, N.C.
(UPI) � Leaders of
the Governor's Con-
ference on Women
and the Economy say
they hope to form a
plan of action to im-
prove the well-being
of North Carolina
women.
Participants
gathered for the last
meeting of their three-
day conference
Wednesday and set
priorities of recom-
mendations sought to
improve the economic
lot of North Carolina
women.
A survey of
preliminary reports
indicates the top
recommendations in-
clude more money for
education, better
career counseling in
non-traditional jobs
and better day care.
Other recommen-
dations include a
statewide directory of
businesses owned by
women and better
small business
development educa-
tion.
Conference leaders
said they now will
evaluate all the
recommendations and
prepare a final report
GO PIRA TES!
OPEN 8:30-5:30 BT MIAMI!
Monday-Saturday Daniel Bullock, Sr. Owner
-Closed Wednesdays Ms. Patricia Bullock, Manager
Call for appointments - 758-6498
BULLOCK'S BARBER SHOP & HAIRSTYUNG
1210 West 5th Street- Greenville, NC 27834
-SEE-
Cosmotologis ts:
Janet, Dezzie, & Royettee
For Curls, Perms, Cuts &
Styles, and Manicures
Barbers:
D. Bullock & Jerome
For all Modern Cuts and Styles!
liJ CARE PRODUCTS
rPAPA"
3C
KATZ
THURSDAY, NOV. 3rd
Doors Open 8:30
Happy Hour till 9:30
FRIDAY, NOV. 4th
COLLEGE
NIGHT
wDJ DON VICTORS
Top 40, Beach & Dance
Doors Open 8:30
Happy Hour till 9:30
SATURDAY, NOV. 5th
JOHN MOORE'S
BEACH PARTY
Doors Open at 8:30
"The Best in Beach"
OMING NEXT THURSDAY NIGHT JANICE
"Where The Night Life Comes Alive"
Talk Given On Central America
By JENNIFER
JENDRAS1AK
Central America
was the topic of a talk
given Tuesday at the
Baptist Student
Center by ECU
Catholic Campus
Minister Sister Helen
Shondeil.The talk was
presented at the in-
vitation of Baptist
Chaplain Bob Clyde.
Shondell visited
Central America on a
fact- finding trip in
1982. During the trip
she observed many of
the economic and
social conditions of
Central American
countries.
One topic address-
ed by Shondell was
the U.S. policy for
dealing with Central
American countries.
"I think that we're
making a terrible
mistake and we're do-
ing it so we can con-
tinue our way of life
without any pain to
us she said.
Shondell advocates
economic aid rather
than military in-
tervention as a way of
ensuring friendly rela-
tions with Central
American countries.
"I think if we went in
there with concen-
trated economic aid,
if we helped them
with schools, with
water supplies, with
roads, with land
reform, with any kind
of technology that
would help them to
develop a middle
class, then they would
be our friends she
said.
Economic condi-
tions in El Salvador
were used as an exam-
ple by Shondell. She
said that a small
minority of the
wealthy citizens con-
trols the country,
while the poor are
unable to support
themselves. "The
poor peasants have
not been able to grow
beans and corn and
the things they need to
survive on, to live
on she said. She
added that most of
the land is devoted to
the production of
crops for export.
"Land reform is
one of the biggest
desires that the poor
people have she
said. "When you
read that rebels are
killing, it's not
because they are
Communist or Com-
munist sympathizers,
it's just for basic
human needs
Walking alone at night?
call Pirate Walk
757-6616
Can We Talk
I have left George Coiffeur's
to join the professional design
staff of
La Kosmetique Inc.
on East 10th Street
Cut St Blow Dry
$10.00
Jerome Dixon
also open 2 nights a week for your
convenience
For appointment or consultation
Contact me at 752-3419
7.
.ADULTS $2.00 TIL 530 � �g5511
BUCCANEER MOVIES
RICHARD FHYOR
HERII NOW
1-3-5-7-9 -R-
1RA1N STORM
1:00-3:05-5:10-
7:15-9:20 R
FINAL TERROR
110 3:10 5:10
7:109:10 R
!W?i'fl
mbum 1-3-5-7-9
Filmed
la North Carolina
CHfllSTOPH�R WRIK6N
NRTRU6 WOOD
BRAIN
TORM
1:00-3:05
lUA -5:10-7:15
9:20
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H� W
ItlllllMIIIIMIIIIIIIMIIIIIIIIIIIIIilllllMIIIMIIIUill
LATE SHOWS
FRI & SAT AT 12:00
1 RICHARD PRYOR
-2 EDDIE 4 THE CRl ISERS
� iiiiiiiiiiiiiilliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiitiiiiiiiiiMtiiiliiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiinti
3 BRAIN STORM
fiff
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-HatdRK-
MakeYour
WA
I
I
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Mushroom 'N' Swiss Burger
Large Fries & Large Soft Drink
Plus Tax
SSiSE?? FridaVi November
through Midnight, Sunday, November 6,1983.
1
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.





?
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
style
NOVEMBER 3, 1983
Pa�e6
Southern Gospel
Take A Cruse
PMt �V Lmrry Doom
'The Cruse Family'
The Cruse Family composed of members performing their own style of sout! erncountry gospel, Is coming to Greenville.
The Cruses' energy and wide
spectrum of talent has been enter-
taining and captivating audiences
around the country since friend
and fellow performer Larry
Gatlin introduced them to Duane
Allen of The Oak Ridge Boys in
1971.
Their high-spirited, exuberant
manner is clearly displayed in live
performances and studio sessions.
They have compiled a disco-
graphy of over fifteen LPs, in-
cluding "Transformation
which received two Dove Awards
for Contemporary Album of the
Year and Best Liner Notes in
1978, and "Harmony" and "For
Every Heart which also
garnered attention with a number
of Dove Award nominations.
Their current LP, entitled simply
Cruse, is on the CBS priority
label.
The vivid history of this perfor-
ming family reveals a dynamic
growth process. The children have
literally grown op on the road;
and, with the recent additions of
spouses and grandchildren, the
family size has increased as well.
Further growth can be seen in
their music-rooted in southern
country gospel, The Cruse Family
sound has matured into
something "completely contem-
porary Their ministry, too, has
grown since the family first
started touring. Yet, the reason
they're singing still remains un-
changed!
The Cruse Family has also been
seen in television appearances on
Praise the Lord Network, The
Grand Ole Opry, The 700 Club,
The Trinity Broadcasting Net-
work, as well as many other syn-
dicated series.
Their style of "positive" music,
which is both traditional and con-
temporary, mild and hard-
driving, will surely be a blessing to
everyone that has an opportunity
to be a part of their ministry and
witness a family that lives with a
purpose; that purpose being to
convey what Jesus Christ really
means to them.
"I believed in the Cruse Family
the first time I heard
themenough to sign them to a
contract and record several
albums. I felt strongly enough
about them later to release them
to a major label so their careers
could keep exploding. Today, I'm
still a fan of the group and would
do it all again said Duane Allen
of the "Oak Ridge Boys
With a myriad of opportunities
awaiting them, The Cruse Family
continue the furtherance of the
Gospel message in their own uni-
que way. They sing
onwardlooking forward to
more concerts, more television,
more colleges, more churches,
more festivalswith "a common
vision and desire to serve the Lord
as a family
CCNC Happy To Dispose Of James Watt
Bv EMILY CASEY
Sun Writer
Litter bags sporting a bright
yellow happy face and bearing the
artion "Happiness
is DISPOSAL of James Watt"
were available at the fall meeting
of tVe Conservation Council of
North Carolina (CCNC). They
reflected the optimism by en-
vironmental activists that an in-
creasingly informed and concern-
ed public is making its will known
and achieving results.
The CCNC is a statewide coali-
tion of environmentally oriented
organizations and concerned
citizens dedicated to promoting a
healthy natural environment in
North Carolina. Formed in 1969,
it has grown to include over 20
member groups and about 500 in-
dividuals.
The governing board met last
weekend at Camp New Hope in
Chapel Hill for its 14th annual
Fall-Meeting to install new of-
ficers and to consider resolutions
to guide Council priorities and to
coordinate the membership's ac-
�v ities in the upcoming year. The
CCNC has become a recognized
force in environmental law mak-
ing and regulation setting. With a
paid lobbiest in the N.C. General
Assembly and active members
with access to regulatory agencies,
the Council's resolutions will be
studied by State regulators and
legislators.
Unlike local single issue groups,
the CCNC is active in all area of
environmental concern, helping to
unify effort and provide leader-
ship when indicated. The broad
scope of the Council's concern is
perceived as a strength by en-
vironmentalists in the state. It is
seen by members as enhancing the
effectiveness of citizen groups
working on local issues.
Past CCNC President Jane
Sharp stated "We approve of
local concern and encourage local
action. Our presence in the
Raleigh Area enables us to carry
environmental concerns to State
agencies, hearings and the
legislature. Since most en-
vironmental concerns seem inter-
related it is useful to have a broad
based environmental organization
responsive to a wide variety of
citizen conservation concerns
The agenda for the Fall-
Meeting was representative of the
broad scope of issues which con-
cern the environment in NC, and
which the Council addresses
routinely. A panel discussion
Saturday explored the possibilities
of what volunteers can do and are
doing to protect the environment.
The discussion ranged from issues
such as exploring and prospecting
the mountains, to river quality
and coastal area management,
uniting representatives from
across the state in constructive
dialog. Other issues discussed in-
cluded: land use, air quality,
energy development and utility
rates, hazardous waste, and
points of citizens action such as
organizing and lobbying.
The theme of the Fall-Meeting
was "volunteer for the environ-
ment When asked what
students could do to participate in
promoting environmental issues,
Robert Conner of high Point, a
founding member of CCNC,
responded: (they)could get in-
volved with streamwatch (This
is a state agency sanctioned pro-
gram where citizen groups
monitor water quality in a given
river basin.)
In Greenville, the Tar River
basin is not currently being
monitered by any volunteer
groups, and one is need. In-
terested persons can contact Meg
Cerr in Raleigh at 733-5083. Con-
ners added that "there are things
that students of all statue can do
with North Carolina's State
Parks. In the off-season they have
only nominal staff with an inter-
mittant need for additional
maintenence work or a naturalist
to provide tour services. Class
research can also be useful said
Conners. "White papers and en-
vironmental monographs could be
coordinated with the Council to
support their stance on en-
vironmental issues and before
hearings
Major emphasis is being given
to threee topical aras of concern
by the Conservation Council in
1984. In these issues of "Stream
Watch energy development and
hazardous waste were the subject
matter of workshops on Saturday.
From the workshops come the
resolutions which were considered
by the new officers and board on
Sunday.
Incoming CCNC President Dan
Besse attached much significance
to water quality monitoring and
hazardous waste management,
saying, "water pollution is attrac-
ting attention again, after the
folks in the '70s thought the pro-
blem was licked and relaxed their
guard. Concern now is primarily
aimed at enforcing laws on the
books Regarding hazardous
waste, Besse said, "We're looking
at a year in which the legislature
will adopt a very important piece
of legislation for handling hazar-
dous waste. The law which is
enacted will be critical for setting
the state's direction for years to
come
Besse's remark reflects the in-
creasing attentionwhich political
and legislative activity has been
receiving fom environmental con-
cerns.
movement has been active in not
only legislative law making but in
elections as well. Bill Holman,
President of the League of Con-
sevaiton Voters, lobbiest for the
Conservation Council, and board
member observed that "CCNC is
an advocate for environmental
protection, and has had a role in
writing many environmental laws.
Our handywork is visible in the
Waste Management Act of 1981.
The 1982 law limiting construc-
tion work in progress charges for
elective utilities (limits what costs
utilities can pass on to consumers
for construction of plants not yet
producing electricity) and in the
1983 bills that strengthen the
Coastal Area Management Act
In concluding and summarizing
the resolution generated in the
workshop, Holman noted that
hazardous waste would be a ma-
jor concern of the upcoming year
for the Conservation Coucnil and
other member organizaitons such
as the Citizens Against Toxic and
Chemical Hazards (CATCH).
CATCH President Wes Hart, in
attendence at the Saturday
workshops, stressed the need for
local grass roots organizing on
health issues concerning hazar-
dous waste. "North Carolinians
need to know that their voice and
actions can make a difference and
that there is a framework in place
See CCNC, page 7

Believe It Or Not, A Few
Didn't Party Homecoming
By ROBIN AYERS
Staff Wfttv
I had to read the newspaper to
know what went on during
homecoming weekend.
What, what's this? Is there so-
meone so unfaithful, lacking so
much in purple and gold loyalty,
that she has to find out from
secondary sources what the
greatest weekend in Greenville is
all about?
Yep. In the flesh. I understand
there was a gubernatorial can-
didate present, there were dances,
a parade, and even a game; foot-
ball I think it was.
So what did this Benedict Ar-
nold do while the patriots flew
their colors and paraded their
loyalty? She was reading a good
novel. She took a hike. Yeah, you
say, a hike out of town on a rail.
While the rest of Greenville was
showertg, primping and powder
puffing itself for The Big Game, I
was sleeping late. When I finally
arose, I turned on the T.V. and
was entertained by my old frinds
Daffy Duck and Speedy Gon-
zalez. Alter a leisurely brunch, I
picked up a novel and began
reading. Admittedly, it was
assigned in class but, the story, on
time travel, was good, and I
escaped for awhile into 1882 New
York City.
In the early afternoon, while
ECU was whooping it up at
Ficklen, a friend and I decided to
do something energetic. Buzzing
off for a beautiful day, we ex-
plored the woodland behind our
apartment building. That's right,
Greenville, alias Apartment City,
is not all cement and brick.
While enjoying the sunshine
and good conversation, we gatherd
wildflowers dried in the Indian
summer sun, and an assortment
of other woodland vegetation
(weeds to city slickers).
Afterwards, we returned to the
clamor of hell-raising Pirate fans
(is that what they're called?)
celebrating the victory.
And then I cleaned my room
after avoiding it for no matter
the time. At least now I will leave
my door open.
Did I not "celebrate"
anything? Yes. All day long. I
celebrated a day without classes,
tests or papers due. I celebrated
the day for it's own sake and the
exhilerating powers of nature.
Then, Saturday night, I joined
the throngs of people downtown
and celebrated the pleasure of
good friends, good music and the
good folks of Greenville.
Didn't I miss Homecoming a
little? No. Maybe next year I'll
give it a tryit'll be something
different.
Increasingly, the environmental
What's Up
Rick, from the future, checks oat Greenville's downtown party Halloween night.
.inniiHiitiiiiiniiiimmninimmmiimiiuniiMM(
Furnitu
(UPI)� This season's furniture
shoppers care more about meeting
their needs than following a par-
ticular style, industry experts say
Manufacturers preparing for
the Southern Furniture Market,
which began Thursday
throughout central North
Carolina, said furniture buyers
are spurning established design
rules.
Instead, consumers are looking
for furniture and accessories with
a touch of class that suit their
tastes, finances and shrinking
homes. Mixing furniture styles
isn't taboo as long as the decor ac
complishes what the buyer wants
"Consumers still seem to be
non-faddish in terms of selecting
Theatre Arts Pre
A
The Alvin Aile) Ri
Ensemble, a fine, profess
group of dancers whose e
and style is world renc a
open the East Carolina '
Unions Theatre Arts Se-
concert will be held M
November 7, at 8:15
McGinnis Theatre on the E
campus.
One of America's mos
young dance companies he A
Ailey Repertory Ensen
East Carolina I nivenii? I ni
MMMMMMN
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ii m. la-jfr i�ij�i
cooked, uarmec aw
storo-pocted burqen
You hat a fresh abemAt
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Once sari meets and cteea xn hoii
Ml and sausaft and heshh 2�e
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made to war order madeffia once
E. 5th St.
:�aaffgT.
fa





agc f
Cruse
rme Family has also been
i i television appearances on
I ord Network, The
Opry, The 700 Club.
rinitj Broadcasting Net-
aN many other syn-
: 5ti r positive" music,
� iitional and con-
mild and hard-
will - be a blessing to
is an opportunity
wt of their ministry and
nily that lives with a
that purpose being to
Jesus Christ really
them.
ed in the Cruse Family
rie I heard
gh to sign them to a
an record several
i felt strongly enough
em later to release them
abel so their careers
ploding. Today, I'm
f the group and would
-am said Duane Allen
ak Ridge Boys
a rmnad of opportunities
them. The Cruse Family
the furtherance of the
lessage in their own uni-
They sing
looking forward to
more television.
more churches,
vith a common
d desire to serve the Lord
r
att
- and summarizing
ion generated in the
Holman noted that
aste would be a ma-
rn of the upcoming year
onseration Coucnil and
ember organizaitons such
"uizens A.gainst Toxic and
kaJ Hazards iCATCH).
n President tt'es Hart, in
nee at the Saturday
stressed the need for
roots organizing on
-sues concerning hazar-
I North Carolinians
nou that their voice and
lean make a difference and
re is a framework in place
CCNC. page 7
0 8 0 o o q a a o g , , , fl , .
5
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1

THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 3, 1983
Furniture Market Consumers Non- faddish
(UPI)� This season's furniture
shoppers care more about meeting
their needs than following a par-
ticular style, industry experts say.
Manufacturers preparing for
the Southern Furniture Market,
which began Thursday
throughout central North
Carolina, said furniture buyers
are spurning established design
rules.
Instead, consumers are looking
for furniture and accessories with
a touch of class that suit their
tastes, finances and shrinking
homes. Mixing furniture styles
isn't taboo as long as the decor ac-
complishes what the buyer wants.
"Consumers still seem to be
non-faddish in terms of selecting
what they want said Fred Starr,
president of Thomasville Fur-
niture Industries. "They want
good classic designs and they're
really not going to take a flyer
Robert G. Leonard, spokesman
for Bassett in High Point, N.C
said no style category dominates
the nine-day fall market, where
retailers buy much of the fur-
niture that will appear in the na-
tion's furniture showrooms this
winter.
Industry spokesmen said tradi-
tional, contemporary, country,
18th century, French and other
categories remain strong in their
appeal to consumers. Other in-
dustry spokesmen said manufac-
turers and dealers remain cautious
Theatre Arts Presents:
about unproven, avant garde
designs because the industry still is
recovering from an economic
slump that ended early this year.
In all categories, consumers
primarily look for quality and
function.
"If anything, the consumer is
more interested in quality than
perhaps in the past said Harley
Shuford Jr president of the Fur-
niture Factory Marketing
Association, which sponsors the
market. "Perhaps they've gotten
through the mass advertising and
gotten disappointed in products
they've bought in the past, but
this is purely speculation
Leonard said functional items
such as wall units, overhead
lightboards and armoires � large
and usually ornate cupboards �
are "very, very strong in all
categories
"They (consumers) are looking
for more natural quality material
defined with function he said.
"They are forced to look for
multi-functional because of the
space limitations
Shuford said he does see an in-
crease in contemporary wooden
furniture's popularity this
market.
"I think the contemporary
look, perhaps with some Oriental
designs that have been quite suc-
cessful, is coming on strong
now Shuford said. "Country
has always been there and, again,
was
Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble
The Alvin Ailey Repertory
Ensemble, a fine, professional
group of dancers whose energy
and style is world renowned, will
open the East Carolina University
Unions Theatre Arts Series. The
concert will be held Monday,
November 7, at 8:15 p.m. in
McGinnis Theatre on the ECU
campus.
One of America's most exciting
young dance companies, the Alvin
Ailey Repertory Ensemble was
established as a performing com-
pany for vital and talented young
professionals. Under the artistic
direction of Sylvia Waters, a
former Ailey dancer, the company
has committed itself to the
development of young dancers
and choreographers alike. The
Ensemble has a unique and ex-
citing repertoire of ballets by such
famed choreographers as Donald
McKayle, Talley Beatty, Dianne
Mclntyre, and Mr. Ailey himself.
The Alvin Ailey Repertory
Ensemble also seeks, and has
developed, new dance audiences
through its community services
and children's program. With its
regularly scheduled engagements
at colleges, universities, and civic
centers from coast-to-coast, the
Ensemble has drawn popular and
critical acclaim in all of its perfor-
mancs. The result is a company
which leaves its audiences begging
for more, leaves them smiling,
joyous and exultant.
Tickets available from the Cen-
tral Ticket Office, Mendenhall
Student Center, (757-6611, ext.
266). The ticket office is open
Monday-Friday, 10 a.m 4 p.m.
Ticket prices are $5 for ECU
students, $7 for youths (age 14
and under), and $10 for ECU
faculty, staff, and the public.
The next performance of the
1983-84 Theatre Arts Series is
January 16, 1984 with the presen-
tation of Pat Carroll in Gertrude
Stein, Gertrude Stein, Gertrude
Stein.

East Carolina University Union Theatre Series presents The Alvin Ailey Repertory Ensemble, Nov. 7, at 8:15 p.m. !� McGtMfa Theatre.
that's an element that
stronger some time ago
Starr said the only trend he can
detect involving wooden furniture
would be toward lacquer.
Nancy High, a spokeswoman
for the Southern Furniture
Manufacturers Association, said
she believes country furnishings
are a big seller because of the way
they meet younger families'
lifestyles and attitudes.
"It's a very comfortable, easy,
casual way to dress your home
Ms. High said. "The people who
are establishing households now
are fiercely family-oriented.
Those people have a greater pur-
pose of family and they want to
create a home that has a warmth
about it
At the same time, she said, con-
temporary furnishings are chipp-
ing away at the popularity of
country furniture. And in both
styles, she said, more and more
buyers are seeking a dash of
elegance.
Colors play a part in that trend,
industry spokesmen said. Colors
have taken on a soft, elegant look,
with an assortment of grays tak-
ing the place of earth tones as the
primary background colors.
"We are moving now from that
palate of neutrals Ms. High
said. "You really can't say this is
what is hot because there are so
many people out there doing
things. Almost always there's a
neutral standing there and you
plug in the color around it
More subdued colors appear to
be in this lineup for upholstered
goods, according to the 1984-85
predictions from the Color
Association of the United States,
Leonard said.
"Nothing is real bright and
garish he said. "Most of them
look fairly gray, subdued and
conservative. They seem to be
very pleasing, more of a soothing
conservative look. Something that
looks quality
VAV

� �
�:����
ocsm uTvu jbsu laic Toi Gui � mum Mr m� jttjimm
��.��� mnua q
Tootsie' shows tonight, Friday and
Saturday nights at 7 and 9:30 p.m. in
Hendrix Theatre.
CCNC
Preserve
Enviornmeni
Cont'd from page 6
to maximise any in-
dividuals effort.
Tough laws against
poor waste manage-
ment will hinge on
public support for
them, "said Hart in an
interview.
Interested people
can learn more about
the Conservation
Council by writing
307 Granville Rd
Chapel Hill, N.C.
27514 for a brochure.
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
S195.80 Abortion from 13
to 18 weeks at additional
coat. Pregnancy Test, Birth
Control, and ProMesn
fret Coanseiint For
farther information caJT"
832-0535 (Toll Free NunshVr
MO-221-25�S) between
9 A.M. and 5 P.M. weekdays
RALBGHSWOAUM'S
HEALTH
OaSANIIATlOH
f 17 Wast Mhwajan St
�atansfe u. c.

Break Cruise










jMarch 5th-9th Cruise From Miami to
XNassau & Freeport, S.S. Emerald Seas J
jf$517.75 per person 4 people per room


For more info:
Call Greenville Travel Center
756-1521




jh
NO CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.
If you're a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
serious look at the Army.
Army bands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month. In every-
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Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel.
The Army has bands perfot .iiing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to play with good musicians. Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
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It's a genuine, right-now, imme-
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Compare it to your civilian offers
Then write: Army Opportunities, P.O.
Box 300, North Hollywood, CA 91603.
ARMTBAMDl
KALLYOUCAMBL
r-UJr
���
MMr
�� t i i�u ii r rr-T





i

I HE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
NOVEMBER 3, 1983
Page 8
Pirates Set Out To Tame The Canes
Bv CINDY PLEAS ANTS
SportoUtlor
ECU head coach Ed Emory
said the Pirates won't last too
long at Miami if the offense plays
like it did in Saturday's 21-9 win
over East Tennessee State.
The Pirates scored all 21 points
in the first half and came out a lit-
tle too relaxed in the second
period. The outcome was three
fumbles, two interceptions and no
points.
"If we play that way, it'll be a
Pirate blown back by a Hurricane
this Saturday Emory said.
"Coach (Art) Baker and I are
totally embarrassed about Satur-
day. We can't expect to have
seven turnovers and win against
anybody else we have to play this
season
The Pirates have a great deal
riding on this week's game, accor-
ding to Emory. If ECU is to get a
bowl bid, Emory believes the
Pirates will have to beat Miami.
"I don't think we should have to
beat Miami, but I think we'll have
to in the eyes of most people he
said.
"It's a great opportunity if we
can take advantage of it he said,
"but we are also more physically
beaten up than we've been all
season
Offensive guard Norman Quick
has an ankle injury, running back
Ernest Byner sprained his wrist
and has bruised ribs. Offensive
tackle John Robertson has a pin-
ched nerve in his shoulder, and
center John Floyd is questionable
after a stomach hit caused pain
where he had a recent appendec-
tomy. Defensively, the Pirates are
very healthy.
Emory praised the defense for
playing extremely well against
East Tennessee. ECU allowed no
first downs in the first half of the
homecoming game. "We pro-
bably played the best defense
Saturday since I've been here he
said. "When we lost to Florida
State, 47-46, everybody told us
how well we played, but when we
win 21-9, nobody says anything.
"Our defense took a lot of
criticism for giving up a lot of
points early in the season he
said, "but they didn't get any
credit for how they played against
East Tennessee
Emory said the defense will
have to continue its outstanding
play in order to beat fifth-ranked
Miami. "We're gonna have to
play extremely aggressive and stay
penalty-free on defense.
"The only statistic we're close
to with them is yards penalized
Miami, now ranked 8-1, has
beaten the last 23 of 25 teams
they've played at home. "Miami
is the best football team we've
played. They've got a great secon-
dary, and they're probably the
hottest team in the nation right
now
Offensively, Emory said the
Pirates must move the football.
"We've got to establish a running
game.Nobody's gone down there
and thrown the ball and won
Miami has beaten the two op-
tion teams on their schedule this
season. The Hurricanes trounced
Mississippi State, 31-7, as well as
Houston, 29-7.
"They're probably playing the
best football in the country
Emory said. Other Miami wins
this season are Notre Dame, 20-0,
Purdue, 35-0 and West Virginia
20-3. The team's only loss came in
the season opener against Florida.
The Hurricanes lost 28-3.
"Everybody's always talking
about the Miami passing game,
but their forte is defense Emory
said. "Coach Howard
Schellenberger has done a tremen-
dous job. I don't think he's gotten
the respect he deserves for turning
that ball club around, and he's
done it on defense.
"What he has done there is
more than anyone has done in the
country in the last decade
This will be the third meeting
between ECU and Miami. The
Hurricanes beat the Pirates,
23-10, in 1980 and had a 31-6 vic-
tory over the Pirates at Ficklen
Stadium in 1981.

A
W COUNWYfT
prU"i
Up, Up And Away?
MICMAIL SMITH tCU FtMtt Lt
Well, not exactly, but Coach Emory and the Pirates will certainly be 'up' for Saturday's game against
Miami.
Speedy Frosh Aid Veterans
MICHAEL SMITH-CCU Pftat Lb
ECU'S Hal Stephens (93) and Jeff Pegues (84) block East Tennessee
State quarterback Robbie White's pass in Saturday's game. The two will
be heavily counted on to stop Miami's effective passing game this
weekend.
Long Hawaii-Bound
As First In Hula Bowl
ECU offensive guard Terry
Long has received an invitation to
play in this year's Hula Bowl in
Honolulu on Jan. 7.
Long has indicated that he will
accept the invitation. This marks
the first time in school history that
an East Carolina player has been
invited to the Hula Bowl.
Long, the nation's strongest
football player, is completing his
senior season and look : the pro
draft for his future.
The Columbia, S.C native is
among those being considered for
the Outland Trophy and the Lom-
bardi Award for 1983, as well as
being a strong candidate for
several first team all-America ber-
ths.
"We are elated that Terry has
been invited to the Hula Bowl
Emory said. "He deserves this
and deserves to play in other all-
star games. "Terry is without
question the finest college lineman
in America
Football Pro Steers
Nephew To Pirates
By RANDY MEWS
a ttmmt Syorti mtf
Reggie Branch, who was once
overlooked by ECU recruiters, is
now considered one of the most
dependable running backs on the
Pirate football team.
Running back coach Robert
Barrow said Branch is the type of
player you can alsways depend
on. "He's such a hard worker we
have just as much confidence in
him as anyone on the team
In high school, Branch was
mainly a blocking back and didn't
gain many yards. "I wanted to
come to ECU after I graduated,
but they weren't interested in
me he said.
Branch was offered a scholar-
ship from Southwestern Lou-
siana, but at the last minute decid-
ed to attend West Virginia State.
"I thought WVSU was a big
school, but when I got there I was
really disappointed
Branch broke his ankle before
the season ever started and im-
mediately began thinking about
going some place else. "I looked
at a lot of schools he said, "but
I finally decided to go to New
Mexico
The summer before Branch was
supposed to leave for New Mexico
he was influenced by his Uncle,
A.C. Collins. A former star runn-
ing back for the Pirates, Collins
presently plays professional foot-
ball with the New England
Patriots.
"I was working for my grand-
father (A.Cs dad) in New
York Branch said, "when A.C.
convinced me to come down to
Greenville to visit some old
friends of his
Branch's trip turned out to be
more then just a visit when Coach
Emory asked him to play football
for the Pirates that fall.
"A.C. and I were lifting in the
weight room when somebody
came up to me and asked if I
would like to play football here
Branch explained. "I thought it
was just as assistant coach, but
A.C. came up to me afterwards
and told me who I had been talk-
ing to.
"When I was offered the
chance to play here I totally
forgot about New Mexico
Branch added. "Everybody was
so friendly to me; there was no
doubt in my mind this is where I
wanted to go
Emory promised Brach a
chance to play on the team, but
said he would have to earn a
scholarship. "I told myself I
could be as good as good as
anyone, even though I was a walk-
on Branch said. "I didn't have
the money to come for more then
one semester, so I knew it was a
do or die situation
Branch sat out the '81 season,
See BRANCH, Page 9
By CINDY PLEASANTS
�partifBS
After holding 20 practices so
far this year, ECU head basket-
ball coach Charlie Harrison said
he's finally beginning to see traces
of a real basketball team.
Harrison has eight veterans and
six freshmen recruits making up
this year's roster.
"We are so young Harrison
said. "In January or February, we
should merge into a good team,
but that doesn't mean I'll throw in
the towel before then
The Pirates finished with a
16-13 record last season � the
team's best mark in three years.
Two players who led the team on
their winning march were top
shooters and rebounders Charlie
Green and Johnny Edwards.
Edwards, who was having
academic trouble, transferred to
Indiana State, while Charlie
Green graduated. Green is now
one of Harrison's assistant
coaches.
Those two starting slots are
wide open, and Harrison is expec-
ting to use his freshmen recruits to
fill quite a few gaps.
According to the head coach,
the freshmen are the kind of
players he likes to work with.
"They're a much more attentive
group than last year's he said,
"and they don't have as many bad
habits, but you just can't replace
experience.
"I've never been around a team
this young, but we will not use the
freshmen as a crutch. I don't
know what our limitations are,
but I'm realistic. I don't know
how they're gonna be under
pressure
One of the players who does
know what it's like to be under
pressure is junior forward Barry
Wright. The Portsmouth, Va
native averaged 9.6 points last
season. "Barry played over 1000
minutes last year, and that's a
rarity playing in any league
Harrison said. "He's a much im-
proved ball player than last year. I
still think Barry might have been
the best defensive player in the
(ECAC-South) league last year
Junior guard Bruce Peartree,
who averaged 10.4 points last
season, has undergone knee
surgery and may not play until
after Christmas. Peartree had
floating cartilage removed from
under his kneecap.
Senior guard Tony Robinson
will add experience at the point
guard position. Robinson scored
5.5 points per game, had 81 assists
and was the second leading free
throw shooter with a 77.3 percent
average. "Tony has really given
good leadership that he's show
and exemplified to those young
kids Harrison said. "You can't
find a better guy to follow
Along with Robinson, both
Kurt Vanderhorst and senior
Herb Gilchrist are helping out at
guard. Vanderhorst played in 24
of 29 games last year. Gilchrist,
who has been used as a backup
guard throughout his career, is
described as a smart player with
strong leadership.
Another returner, 6-8,
220-pound sophomore center
Dave Harris, has made strides
since last season, Harrison said.
"He's really come back improv-
ed he said. "His footwork and
positioning are much better
Freshmen center Leon Bass, a
6-10, 180-pound Florence, S.C.
native, is expected to become the
Pirates' first seven-footer ever.
Bass averaged 15 points and 10 re-
bounds in high school, and grew
five and one-half inches between
his junior and senior season.
"Leon needs to be stronger
Harrison said. 'He's put on 18
pounds since he's been here. I
think he'll be a good ball player in
time
Harrison said the team's overall
speed is very quick, but he said
that may be because the freshmen
are a little hyper. "We had an
intra-squad scrimmage game, and
they showed up two hours early
he said. "These kids are so ex-
citable.
"They're good kids. They want
to be successful. They enjoy play-
ing, and that makes them my kind
of kids. They've been a fun group
to work with
With nine of the first 11 games
on the road, Harrison isn't quite
sure how the newcomers are going
to handle the tedious schedule.
"Because of their inexperience, 1
don't know how these kids are
gonna react on the road he said.
"They have a lot of energy, but it
has to be channeled in the right
direction
The Pirates play in the ECAC-
Conference league, along with
Navy, Richmond, James
Madison, George Mason and
William & Mary.
"Our league is very predictable on
how they Dlav Harrison said.
"You just don't know who
they're gonna play with
Harrison isn't exactly sure who
he's going to play with either, but
he's going to make sure his new
squad understands what to do
when they get on the court. "We
haven't even started on the zone
yet he said. "Most of these
players have never even played
man-to-man, so we're taking our
time.
I want them to learn to do it
right instead of just doing it
ECU basketball season tickets
for men and women are available
at the Minges Coliseum ticket of-
fice. The men's season ticket
package, which includes the
Yugoslavia exhibition game on
Nov. 15, is $50.00 for 13 home
games.
The women's package is $50.00
for 15 home games, including the
Lady Pirate Classic. The women
open the season on Nov. 20
against George Washington in
Minges.
Head Coach Charlie Harrisoa (center) said the
"They've been a fan group to work with he said.
freshmen on this year's teaai
are
far
Genti
Strenl
By KIRK STROLTJ
Staff �f�e
ECU strengi
coach Mike Genti
said some Pirate foe
ball players coul
start another athlel
career if thev want
to.
"If the) still I
the All-Amern
Strength Team,
would have a ii
chance to put fc
athletes on it G
try said. "We
strong as anybod;
know of
Gentry said def
sive players Ji
Pegues, Clint Han
Steve Hamilton
offensive guard Ter
Long ail could
made the team.
According to Ge
try, nine footbi
players can benl
press 400 or mq
pounds, and the te
Bran
Look
but did well enou
practice to ear-
Rick Bankson
for outstanding
team, play and -
awarded a v'
ship.
Now in
year at ECU, the 5-1
218-pound Brar.
says his uncle I
motivated
throughout his can
with the P:r
Branch ha riad
play in cne snadov
Ernest Byner for
last several vears, t I
�. � I . A V�
uTiilil
f If,
Snea
The regular seas
has come
for Co-Rec footbi
and 14 teams I
playoff bound
two favorite team
playoffs begin. Nee
to be the Spoile:
Third Regimen
However. the
destined for some s
competition from
Unknowns and
Slay Stalh v
Since the
Regiment took the
Campus Cham
ship in flag footbi
and there are K I
to be guys from
winning squad on tl
team, the compc
should be even mi
interesting to wat.
First-round acti
begins Monday, V
7 at 5 p.m. wrh I
semi-finals
Wednesday, Nov
and the finals slat
for Thursdav. Nd
10 at 7 p.m
Water, Water
Everywhere
Registration beg
Monday. Nov
runs through Wedn
day, No 9 for
swim meet i
dividuals as well
teams are eacooraf
to enter. To register
a team, an organi
tion must enter f
individual events
one relay.
Competition col
be fierce this yel
since achievemi
points will be aware
for the four
finishers in each d
sion. The meet
dudes 50-yard ev
in freestyl
backstroke and
terfly; 100-yard ev
in individual meM
backstroke
breaststroke, butt
ly and freestyle;
T-shirt relay, ini
tube relay, frees
relay and the m
relay.
So, get ready fc
splashing good timj
Minges Pool.
C���





T
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
ia 8
anes
Jone there is
ne has done in the
decade
he third meeting
and Miami. The
the Pirates,
tad a 31-6 vic-
he Pirates at Ficklen
t
MAIL JMtTMlCU �i�ao Lap
aturdav game against
ans
lonM know who
� ay uith
" exactly sure who
- d p!a with either, but
) make sure his new
ds wdat to do
e court. "We
ed on the zone
"Most of these
never een played
we're taking our
learn to do it
. ' doing it
reason tickets
men are available
in. ticket of-
season ticket
includes the
rion game on
00 for 13 home
I package is $50.00
e games, including the
Pirate Classic The women
n on Nov. 20
George Washington in
m
m
"i �ger for
Gentry Says Pirate
Strength Beats All
NOVEMBER 3. 1983
By KIRK STROUD
Staff WiMar
ECU strength
coach Mike Gentry
said some Pirate foot-
ball players could
start another athletic
career if they wanted
to.
"If they still hac
the All-American
Strength Team, we
would have a good
chance to put four
athletes on it Gen-
try said. "We are
strong as anybody I
know of
Gentry said defen-
sive players Jeff
Pegues, Clint Harris,
Steve Hamilton and
offensive guard Terry
Long all could have
made the team.
According to Gen-
try, nine football
players can bench
press 400 or more
pounds, and the team
has an overall bench-
press average of 290
pounds. The team's
hang-clean lift is 283
pounds.
"Our team strength
is very good, and our
squat lift average of
428 pounds is incredi-
ble
Gentry said the
Pirates have to use a
players believe the ex-
tra work pays off.
Defensive end Jeff
Pegues thinks so. "I
have made giant
strides towards suc-
cess Pegues ��id. "I
have gained weight
and gone from way
down on the strength
charts up to second
Gentry said the en-
different technique in tire strength program
order to edge out this has made great
year's Division-I op- strides, and he credits
ponents. the athletes for mak-
"We work the big ing ECU weighlifting
muscle groups he a success,
said. "If you want a
person to get bigger,
you must work the
lower body. That's
the difference bet-
ween us and the com-
petition. Most of
them are still working
the upper body
The team lifts
weights all through
the year, but Gentry
said he thinks the
"Our athletes are
easily motivated and
know they can achieve
success Gentry said.
"That's why our off-
season lifting and
summer running and
conditioning pro-
grams have helped so
much.
"They have such a
positive attitude
Classifieds
SALE
COtLJEM ��f WANTtO �
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MISC.
WANTED
Branch, Bucanneers
Look To Hurricanes
�Ot POOCB-KCU Pwato Laa
Pirate fullback Reggie Branch dives for yardage in ECU's 21-9 homecoming win over East Ten-
nessee State last Saturday.
JOBS OVERSEAS MF ft
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but did well enough in
practice to earn the
Rick Bankston Award
for outstanding scout
team, play and was
awarded a scholar-
ship.
Now in his third
year at ECU, the 5-11,
218-pound Branch
says his uncle has
motivated him
throughout his career
with the Pirates.
Branch has had to
play in the shadow of
Ernest Byner for the
last several years, but
believes his work has
paid off. He is look-
ing forward to assum-
ing a starting role next
season.
Branch has already
had one start in his
career, and that was
against the nationally-
ranked Florida Gators
two weeks ago. He
rushed for 77 yards in
place of injured
tailback Tony Baker.
"It was exciting to get
the start, but I didn't
react any differently,
and I was able to have
a good game
Branch said the
Pirates aren't going to
act any different for
fifth-ranked Miani
this weekend either.
"We've lost two
games in Florida this
year that we shouldn't
have he said. "If we
play tough and
eliminate our mental
mistakes, we should
be able to win
A.C. Collins was
the last person at
ECU to rush for over
1,000 yards, and
Branch hopes to
follow in his uncle's
footsteps next season.
NAVY NURSING: 2 CAREERS IN I:
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Sneaker Sam Sez
The regular season
has come to a close
for Co-Rec football,
and 14 teams are
playoff bound. The
two favorite teams, as
playoffs begin, seem
to be the Spoilers and
Third Regiment.
However, they are
destined for some stiff
competition from the
Unknowns and the
Slay Stallions.
Since the Third
Regiment took the all-
Campus Champion-
ship in flag football,
and there are bound
to be guys from that
winning squad on this
team, the competition
should be even more
interesting to watch.
First-round action
begins Monday, Nov.
7 at 5 p.m. with the
semi-finals on
Wednesday, Nov. 9
and the finals slated
for Thursday, Nov.
10 at 7 p.m.
Water, Water
Everywhere
Registration begins
Monday, Nov. 7 and
runs through Wednes-
day, Nov. 9 for the
swim meet. In-
dividuals as well as
teams are encouraged
to enter. To register as
a team, an organiza-
tion must enter four
individual events and
one relay.
Competition could
be fierce this year,
since achievement
points will be awarded
for the four top
finishers in each divi-
sion. The meet in-
cludes 50-yard events
in freestyle,
backstroke and but-
terfly; 100-yard events
in individual medley,
backstroke,
breaststroke, butterf-
ly and freestyle; the
T-shirt relay, inner-
tube relay, freestyle
relay and the medley
relay.
So, get ready for a
splashing good time in
Minges Pool, because
the captains' meeting
is scheduled for Nov.
9 at 7 p.m. in
Brewster C-103.
But NoSoap(s)
Also some bad
news. The Co-Rec
soap opera trivia con-
test had to be cancell-
ed for lack of en-
trants. Maybe next
year, all you GH and
GL fans!
Soft-Bailers
& Putt-Putters
We just realized
that we hadn't filled
you in on the winners
in the divisional
championships in
team putt-putt and
Co-Rec Softball. At
least it's easily
remedied.
In Co-Rec softball
competition, it was
the Mixed Sticks over
Baker's Bombers in
the season finale, a
game that went to the
wire with the two
teams tied up until the
sixth inning.
To get to the finals,
the Sticks had to first
defeat the Bomb
Squad in the semi-
finals. Both of these
teams had been
undefeated for the
season, but as can see,
only the Sticks kept
that record intact.
The Sticks had also
defeated the BCKGs
who had been the No.
1 pick for this sport.
The Bombers were
an underdog team
who defeated the
H.R.s in the first-
round playoffs, the
BCKGs in the second
round and the Hot
Riders to advance to
the finals.
In team putt-putt,
the divisional winners
were diverse and, in
some cases, unusual.
The Umstead Jocket-
tes took the women's
residence hall title by
forfeit. The Heart-
breakers defeated the
Sig Ep Golden Hearts
355-378 in the
women's independent
division. And it was
the Delta Zetas over
the Alpha Phis by a
final score of 346-357.
The DZs were leading
at the half by 13
strokes, so there was
little doubt from early
on as to the winners.
In the men's com-
petition, the Kappa
Sigma "A" team took
the fraternity division
championship from a
fiercely competitive
Kappa Alpha "A"
team. The final score
in that match was
270-276. In the "B"
division, it was the
Sigma Phi Epsilon
"B" team over the
Phi Kappa Tau "B"
team, 289-308. The
Course Force, led by
Chris Brown with a
score of 68, defeated
the Scott One team,
286-293, to take the
men's residence hall
championship. In the
independent division,
the people's choice
took the title over the
Dewey Do-Rights, by
a finul score of
279-280 � a close
one. The victory is
due, in part, to David
Strickland, who
brought in hos best
score of the year, a
helpful 66.
Miller Time
For Haggles
Congratulations are
in order for David
Ruggles, who was
elected Miller Player
of the Month for Oc-
tober. David is the
captain of the Scott
Scaggs and is also a
member of the
BCKGs softball team.
He is a junior accoun-
ting major from
Goldsboro.
Same Bat Time
Same Bat Station
Competition has
begun in a variety of
sports, so stay tuned
for the scores and
highlights of the
games.
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10
fHE EAST CAROLINIAN
M l-MHl K , 1
rhen get in on the ground tloor in our undergraduate officer
commissioning program. You could Man planning on a career like the
men in this ad have. And also have sonic great advantages like:
� Earning S100 a month during the school year
� s a hvshman or sophomore, you could complete your basic
training during two six-week siunmer
sessions and earn more than S1KK)
during each session
� Juniors earn more than S1(XK) dur-
ing one ten-week summer session
� You can take free civilian thing lessons
� You're commissioned upon graduation
If you're looking to move up quickly, look into the Marine Grps
undei)ym!iiate()fhcerc()mniissi()iiing program. You could start oil
making more than $r,(KX) a vear
t to move
up quickly:
May be you can be one of us.
The Fen. fjt
Ihethoud. ml
,
The Marines.
SSk

nfagBp


A�0
�xrzTZ
s
See your Officer Selection Officer, Captain John Robinson at the Book Store on
November 1-4, 1983 or call 1-800-662-7312
'





Title
The East Carolinian, November 3, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 03, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.299
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record. Items on this site do not represent the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library.

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