The East Carolinian, November 1, 1983






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a
(Earulinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.5 No jtf Xc
Tuesday, November 1,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Representative Martin
Attends Homecoming
Festivities Saturday
By ELIZABETH BIRO
Staff Writer
Gubernatorial candidate and
Republican favorite Rep. James
G. Martin attended ECU
Homecoming festivities and held
a press conference here on Satur-
day, Oct. 29.
Martin, who served as national
president to the Beta Theta Phi
fraternity, also visited the ECU
Beta house on Ninth Street.
Martin has served in the House
of Representatives for 11 years.
He currently serves as a senior
member on the House Ways and
Means Committee. Martin is the
most celebrated gubernatorial
GOP candidate since Jim
Holshouser.
At the press conference, Martin
discussed a number of issues and
spoke about plans for his cam-
paign. He said his campaign
would be broadly based, and he
said he wanted to deal with the
issues as openly and candidly as
he could.
Martin focused on issues con-
cerning education and fiscal
policy in North Carolina. Concer-
ning a pay increase for teachers,
Martin said teachers should
receive more money as they im-
prove their teaching ability.
"If we want to get public sup-
port for higher teacher pay there
has to be education reforms which
better prepare students to read
and write English and do math
Martin said. "We can't just do
this with computers. If we do that
then we might as well just give our
children four quarters and send
them to the arcade he said.
According to Martin, he does
not want to raise taxes in order to
reform education. He agreed with
President Reagan's policy of more
emphasis on state and local
government to better education in
the states. "We need to look
where we are spending our
money Martin said. Only 33
percent of North Carolina's ap-
propriations to schools goes to
teacher pay.
Martin also commented on do-
ing away with North Carolins's
"intangible" tax and the tax on
manufacturers' inventory. He
said the intangible tax was inviting
retirees to leave North Carolina
and the inventory tax was
discouraging industry from com-
ing in the state.
Martin said he wanted to see a
strong two-party system
throughout the state. "I have
made it a practice with any oppo-
nent to respect their campaign ef-
fort, no matter if they were
Democrat or Republican he
said. Martin said he wanted to
emphasize issues instead of par-
ticipating in "mud slinging
When asked about his reaction
to recent events and U.S. policy in
the Middle East and Grenada,
Martin said he strongly supported
the president's policies.
After the conference, Martin
attended the ECU Homecoming
game.
MICHBAL SMITH
Number One Administrator
ECU's number one administrator, Chancellor John Howell, presided
over Saturday's Homecoming activities. As part of the celebration,
Howell presented awards to three distinguished ECU alumni for their
outstanding personal achievements.
Outstanding Alumni
Honored At Luncheon
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
Staff WrMar
At Saturday's Homecoming
awards luncheon of the ECU
Alumni Association, three ECU
graduates were honored for
outstanding achievement in their
fields. The awards were presented
by Chancellor John Howell.
The luncheon was part of the
Homecoming Day activities,
which included a parade, the foot-
bail game, dances and other
special events, including a musical
concert by one of the award reci-
pients.
Burlington native Lester
Ridenour Sr. received an Outstan-
ding Alumni Award for his
achievements in secondary educa-
tion. Ridenour, who retired in
1979, was a high school educator
and administrator for 36 years.
Ridenour was also an ac-
complished Pirate athlete. He
won numerous letters in football
baseball, basketball and tennis
and was named to the ECU Sports
Hall of Fame in 1979.
Lawrence Atkinson, a 1974
graduate, received an Outstanding
Alumni award for his ac-
complishments in the field of
journalism. As a national cor-
respondent for the Kansas City
Times, he won the 1982 Pulitzer
Prize for two series of articles.
One concerned water resource
management, and another
reported the impact of the Viet-
nam War on the U.S. Military
Academy's class of 1966.
Atkinson is now a reporter for
The Washington Post.
Pulitzer prizes are awarded an-
nually to journalists who have
done outstanding work in writing
and reporting.
Loonis McGlohon, an Ayden
native who now resides in
Charlotte, was awarded for his
achievements in music. A 1942
graduate, he is an accomplished
piano soloist and has played at
concerts around the world.
In addition to recording more
than 20 albums, he has composed
hundreds of pieces in popular,
jazz, choral and religious music.
He also hosted a popular musical
series for National Public Radio.

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" Atajt
ROt POOLE � ECU
n M � Job Search
meUinBt!r7J? �T 2 J� Cr Md PUCe" " heIP - " �P in" ��� � employment after
ment Center, located at Bloxton House on campus. Seniors hope the graduation. Any senior who has not registered with the center is urged
N.C. Lieutenant Governor todoso
Green 9s Political Career In Question
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Now that he has been acquitted
of bribery charges, the fate of Lt.
Gov. James C. Green's political
future is becoming a big question.
State democrats have breathed a
sign of relief that Green did not
become the first statewide elected
official to be convicted of a crime
in 75 years.
Democratic insiders close to
Green say he is likely to join the
large field running for next year's
democratic governatorial nomina-
tion. Oriwn maid he plans an ar�-
nouncement regarding his
political future sometime next
week.
Despite his acquittal Friday
afternoon. Green is still facing
criticism from those who believe
his actions in the bribery case were
not those appropriate to a high
public office holdeT. On Satur-
day, the Raleigh News and
Observer � traditionally a
democratic party supporter in its
editorials � called a third time for
Green's resignation.
In Pitt County, the head of the
democratic party said the Green
case would not hurt the state
Democratic party as a whole, ad-
ding that she had no opinion
about how the public would res-
pond to Green's ordeal. "I have
tried to personally assess the situa-
tion (but) it's very difficult for me
to have any opinion on it said
Katheryn Lewis, chairwoman of
the Executive Committee of the
Pitt County Democratic Party
and project director of the ECU
Rural Education Institute.
"Public reaction is difficult to
gauge.
"In my opinion Jimmy Green
has had his entire private life and
public life exploded rather fully in
the media He has come out of
that explosion with a jury of his
peers saying that he is innocent of
any wrongdoing I personally
believe he ought to carry on
Lewis said.
Many of Green's ardent sup-
porters are urging him to run for
the state's top post, hoping he will
be able to play to the sympathy of
a public who may believe Green
was treated unfairly throughout
his ordeal.
"They feel he has been unjustly
accused and unjustly
prosecuted said former state
Rep. C. Kitchin Josey, a long time
friend of Green, in a recent inter-
view. "It is natural in this country
to jump on the side of a person
that has been treated that way
Joaey Is ursine Green to run for
governor.
Lewis wouldn't speculate on
Green's intentions, but she said
she supports Green's right to run
for governor. She said the public's
reaction to his case could go either
way if Green decides to run. "The
Democratic Party cause, for all
people, is too great to be hurt by
the events in the life of one per-
son Lewis said.
David Price, chairman of the
state Democratic Party and a
political science professor at Duke
University, agreed with Lewis that
the Green case would not hurt the
state party. "It should not affect
one way or the other on the
Democratic party Price said
Monday.
I'm very happy for him and his
family because of (the
acquittal) Price said. "The
judicial process has worked and it
has worked very well
Price said he expected the ver-
dict and that Green's name had
been cleared of any wrongdoing.
"We've all tried our best not to
bring politics into this situation
Price said.
Price said the Green case raised
a lot of questions regarding the
tactics used by the FBI in the in-
vestigation of Green and several
others during its undercover in-
vestigation, dubbed Colcor, into
corruption in Southeastern North
Carolina.
Two Drinks Double Chances Of Wreck
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Mm
A substance abuse counselor
speaking to a meeting of ECU
students claimed that after two
drinks a person's chances of hav-
ing an automobile accident
doubles, and a person registering
a blood alcohol content of .15
percent has a 25 times greater
chace of having a car accident. A
person driving with an alchol level
of .10 percent � the level
denoting legal impairment � has
a 7 times greater chance of having
an accident.
Tony Simeone, a staff member
of the Tideland Mental Health
Center in Washington, N.C,
spoke about substance abuse last
week at an educatinal meeting
sponsored by the ECU Newman
Center.
Simeone gave students a
12-question test to determine their
knowledge of substance use and
abuse. The test quoted statistics
which show alcohol is a factor in
half of all traffic fatalities. The
statistics also show the effects of
alcohol are most dangerous dur-
ing "unexpected emergencies
Simeone said alcohol, because it is
a depressant, effects a person's
sense of judgement before other
impairments occur. "Once im-
pairment begins, it increass
drmatically as your drinking in-
ceases Simeone added.
"Some people who have one or
two drinks shouldn't drive Si-
meone said.
He noted there is a direct cor-
relation between a person's
tolerance to alcohol and their
body weight. A lighter person has
less blood and succombs more
quickly to intoxication, Simeone
said.
A 12-ounce can of beer, a one-
ounce shot of 100 proof whiskey
and a five-ounce glass of wine all
have about the same level of
alcohol content Simone said. He
added a person should wait bet-
ween one and two hours before
driving for each ounce of
whiskey, or its equivalent, con-
sumed.
Simeone defined an alcoholic as
a person who is "unable to con-
trol how much he or she drinks
adding that only 3 percent of all
alcoholics are people living on
"skid row
"Time" is the only way for a
person to sober up from alcohol
consumption, Simeone said. He
added that because the liver pro-
cesses between 90 and 95 percent
of the body's alcohol, it has a
limited capacity to filter alcohol
out of the blood.
Simeone noted that each person
has different tolerance levels for
alcohol and varied capabilities for
controlling alcohol consumption.
"Coming off alcohol usually
leaves a person at a high anxiety
level Simeone said. "In a
hosplital, alcohol withdrawal is a
medical emergency
He added that withdrawal from
alcohol is more often fatal than
withdrawal from heroin.
Simeone also advised students
to not operate a motor vehicle
while under the influence of mari-
juana. "Your perception of reali-
ty is changed when you use mari-
juana Simeone said. "It also
slows your reaction time
Simeone said research has
shown marijuana may cause ir-
reversible brain damage for long-
term heavy users. He added such
research is still inconclusive, but
that current research on mari-
juana use has been improving.
Simeone warned that because
of the passage of the Safe Roads
Act, the legal risks of driving whle
impaired is greater. "With the
new law in effect he said, "if
you're going to go out drinking,
take a person along who doesn't
drink to do the driving
Committees Search For
Persons To Fill Posts
By MILLIE WHITE
Two major administrative posi-
tions are currently available at
ECU. The application deadline
for one of the positions, director
of the university's computer pro-
gram, is today, while the search
for a person to head the ECU
School of Medicine's Radiation
Center is just beginning.
Vice Chancellor of Business Af-
fairs Clifton G. Moore is now
overseeing the computer services.
The former director, Glenn
Crowe, resigned last month to ac-
cept a better paying position.
According to Moore, adver-
tisements for a computer program
director were placed in various
computer magazines; apprix-
imately 55 applications for the
position have been received.
Moore said it would take several
weeks to review the applications
and he hopes to have someone
hired before Jan. 1.
A national search is standard
for faculty and administrative
post ions at ECU.
Dr. Edwin Monroe, associate
dean of the ECU medical school,
said a search committee has been
appointed to find a director for
the Radiation Center, which is
now under construction. The
center is due for completion next
summer, and Monroe said the
position should be filled by that
time.
Deforces Wortkington,
ting Aycock Dora wa
Homecoming Pirate at
Saturday's Homecoming football
On The Inside
Announcements2
Editorials4
Entertainment7
Sports10
Classifieds11
� For the story on ECU's
Homecoming victory over East
State, see Sports,
7.
� For energy-saving tips and
Information on Greenville
Utilities' energy awareness
week, see story, page 3.
� For a profile of the
political party, SEEDS, that b
influencing student govren-
ment at UNC-Ckapd HIS,
pageS.
Sophomore Ricky Ni
this year's Fast Fare
3.
- - -
iaaw-W
32CZ
I





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER I, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
it you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column please type it on an an
nouncement form and send it to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
ottice m the Publications
Building Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd sued �aper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements but space is often
hmited Therefore we cannot
guarantee trial your announce
rrtent will run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column tor
publicity
The deadline for an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
tor the Tuesday paper and 3
r m Wednesday for the Thurs
day paper No announcements
rece.ved after �hese deadlines
will be printed
This space is available to ail
v.ampus organizations and
oepartments
G.I. BENEFITS
Attention students receiving
G I benefits It you are a double
maior or want to double major
please contact Mrs Slay
Jackson. Room 104, Whichard
Building, as there has been a
change in the VA regulation
LEGAL
ASSISTANT
On November 10. Meredith
College's Legal Assistants Pro
gram will have a representative
at the Career Planning ana
Placement Service On
November 11, the National
Center for Paralegal Training o�
Atlanta Georgia will have a
representative to talk with any
maior interested in their post
graduate program You shold
sign up in advance at the Career
Planning and Placement Ser
vice
SPECIAL
EDUCATION
SCHOLARSHIPS
The Scholarship commifee of
the Department of Special
Education rS now accepting ap
niica'ons for a scholarship to be
awa'ded for the 184 Spring
Semester The scholarship will
ba awarded to a rising junior,
senior or graduate student who
las oeen accepted for admission
or wtio is currently enrolled full
time in the Department of
Special Education at East
Carolina University Applica
?on materials are available at
137 Speight All applications
must be turned in by Monday,
November 21 1983
LIBERAL
STUDENTS
The Society of United Liberal
Students will have a meeting
Thursday, November 3, 19�3 at 7
p.m. It will be held in Room 221
at Mendenhall Your attendance
is very important GET IN
VOLVEOII
YOUNG
DEMOCRATS
There will be a meeting of the
ECU Young Democrats on
Thursday Nov 3 at 7 p m at 238
Mendenhall Student Center
New members are urged to join
DZBIG BROTHERS
Let's Party! To show our ap
preciation for your support,
we're having a party! Tonigh
8 00 Pantana's, be there, Aloha!
Thanks to the Kappa Alpha's for
a terrific Halloween Social
ADULT
EDUCATION
ASSOCIATION
The East Carolina University
adult education association will
hold its first meeting of the new
school year on Tuesday.
November 15, 19t3 The meeting
will be held at the Western
Sizzlin Steak House. 2903 East
lotti St . Greenville. NC from 6
p.m. p.m
The program will feature Dr
Paul F. Fendt, Associate Pra
fessor of Education. UNC
Chapel Hill who will discuss
"Adult Education: Looking For
ward To The Future"
The meal will consist of a rib
eye steak dinner with all the
trimmings.
The cost including social, din
ner, and the program is sa .SO per
person, inclusive All members,
guests, and interested persons
are invited to attend. Please
send your check (made payable
to ECUAEA) to Dr Leonard
Lliley, Office of Adult Educa
tion. School of Education, ECU,
Greenville, NC, 27834 no later
than Nov. 14th If you have ques
tions or wish further details
about the association, please
call Phil Martin (919 757 6143).
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
Tonight, at 5:30, the College
Republicans will meet in the
Mendenhall Coffeehouse. At
8:00, NC GOP State Chairman
David Flaherty will address the
Pitt County Republicans. All
CR's are urged to attend
PHI
BETA LAMBDA
The Omlcron Chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda will hold its next
meeting Wednesday. November
2, at 4 p.m in Rawl 341 There
will be a guest speaker at the
meeting.
CADS MEETING
The newly formed Computer
Applications in Decision
Sciences Club will have its mon
thly meeting Thursday.
November 3 in Rawl 103 at 2
pm All interested Business ma
jors and MBAs are invited to at
tend
Hunger Fast
All Students are urged to par
ticipate in this years OXFAM
Fast for a World Harvest" on
Nov 17 Participants are asked
to give up fool on that day and
donate the money they save to
OXFAM's self help hunger
relief programs Groups are
welcomed to participate Just
call 752 4216 for more informa
tion or attend the weekly ECU
Hunger Coalition meetings on
Thursdays at 7 30 at The
Catholic Newman Center (953
East 10th St.).
INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGE
ORGANIZATION
The International Language
Organization wl b maatino on
November ?, l��3 et 3 p.m. In
BC 301 all members are en
couraged to attend this meeting
Any interested persons are
welcome to attend this meeting
ECGC
The East Carolina Gay Com
munity will have a potluck din
ner Monday, November 7. at
7 30pm The dinner will be held
at me Catholic Newman Center.
953 E 10th St. (at the bottom of
College Hill) Just bring your
favorite dish All interested per
sons are cordially invited to at
tend
FIGURE
DRAWING
CLASSES
The Greenville Museum of Art
is offering figure drawing
classes. Wednesdays from 10 12
at the Museum 802 S Evans St.
The instructor is Robert Daniel
and the cost is $20 (7 remaining
classes) and a model fee. The
class Is open to the public. Call
the Museum at 758-1946 for more
information
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusdae for Christ is
sponsoring "Prime Time" this
Thursday at 7 p m. in the Nurs
ing Building Rm. 101. Please
loin us tor fun, fellowship, and
Bible study. We are looking for-
ward to meeting you.
BAKE SALE
Gamma Beta Phi ticket-bake
sale For a fifty cent donation
participating individuals may
win these prizes: Two portable
stereo casssette players with
headphones, 825.00 gift cer-
tificate for Carolina East Mali,
825,00 gift certificate for UBE or
Art and Camera, Hair style by
Great Expressions, five pairs of
movie tickets for Buccaneer
Theater. Look for the Gamma
Beta Phi table at the Student
Supply Store Wednesday, Nov.
2. Tickets and baket goods (by
our lovely ladies), will be
available.
CONGRATULATIONS
The Sisters and Pledges of
Alpha Xi Delta would like to con
gradulate Delor�s Worthington
on being chosen Homecoming
Queen We're proud of you
GRANADIAN
INVASION
If you are opposed to last
weeks invasion of Granada, we
ask you to join us in voting your
objection to US actions. All
students, faculty, ECU staff
members and the general public
is asked to assemble at the Stu
dent Supply Store on Wednesday
at noon for a one hour
demonstration For more infor
mation call 758 4906 or 752 5724
MASSAGE CLINIC
Physical Therapists rub you
the right way The Physical
therapy club will sponsor a
massage clinic Thursday. Nov
3, 1983 from 6 30930 p m Cost
is 81 00 per 10 mln massage
Location first floor Belk
Building in Physical Therapy
Dept
GAMMA
BETA PHI
The next general meeting of
Gamma Beta Phi will be held on
Thursday, November 3, 1983 at
7 00 p m in Jenkins Art
Auditorium This will be the
deadline tor ticket sales, please
have money and ticket stubs
ready.
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATION
OPPORTUNITY
The na tonai institutes of
Health seeks students to be
employed as full time assistants
to NIH professionals during the
spring semester Majors in
Biological, Physical. Chemical.
Mathematical and Engineering
Sciences as well as Nursing,
Business and Computer Science
are eligible Students must have
a 2.0 GPA and have finished 30
semester hours Salaries range
from 84 70 per hour to 15 90 per
hour See the Co-op office to app
ly. 313 Rawl Building
VOLUNTEERS
NEEDED
The Greenville Utilities Com
mission Is seeking student
volunteers to help with a winter
weathenzation project for low
income and elderly Greevilee
residents. If you have time to
help please call Susan Susan
Blzzaro at 752-7166 before 5 p.m.
PI KAPPA PHI
The Brothers of Pi Kappa Phi
hope everyone had a great
Homecoming. We sure did. WE
GOT DOWN 11 Homecoming was
a great success. Many thanks to
Brian McGann for working so
hard.
HOW TO AVOID
TEST ANXIETY
A mini-series offered at NO
COST by the University Counsel
ing Center. How To Avoid Test
Anxiety, Tuesday, Nov 8 from
3 4 p.m. in 305 Wright Annex
(757-6661)
CADP
There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol and Drug Pro-
gram on Tuesday, November 1
at 4:00. All interested persons
are invited to attend
PEACE
"There is no way to Peace
Peace is the Way If you're In-
terested in learning more about
Peace, then come to the Green
vllle Peace Committee every
Friday at 6:30 p.m at 610 S Elm
St All are welcome 758 4906
HOW TO SUCCEED
IN COLLEGE
A mini series offered at NO
COST by im � Ji, veristy Counsel
ing Center. How To Succeed in
College And Still Have Fun.
Monday, Nov 7, from 4 5 p m in
305 Wright Annex (757 6661).
ECONOMICS
MINOR
An Economics Minor is now
bting offered by the Department
of Sociology, Anthropology, and
Economics II involves 18 hours
of course work beyond the two
introductory courses In
termediate and advanced
courses which will be offered in
the future include both
m ic roeconomic and
macroeconomic theory, an
titrust and regulation, industrial
organization and structure,
econometrics, international
trade, money and banking, and
business cycles and economic
forecasting The minor is
especially recommended for
students in business, computer
science, and math For more in
formation contact Professor
Carson Bays, Coordinator of
Economics. A 413, Brewster
Building. 757 6883
YOUNG
DEMOCRATS
There will be an important
maatlrte of tho East Carolina
Young Democrat on Tuesday.
Nov 1. at 7:30 in Mendenhall
238 The agenda will include
possible speakers and organiz
ing a group to head fund raising
Please attend irrespective of
your political views Meetings
are help the first Tuesday and
third Thursday of the month
AOII RUSHI
Sisters and pledges of Alpha
Omicron Pi would like your
presence ai art ice cream party
on Nov 2 from 7 8 p m at 805
Johnston ST. For a ride and
more information, call 757 0769
How to have class between classes.
T
Indulge yourself in a warm cup of Cafe Vienna. It's a light and cin-
namony touch of class. And just one of six deliciously different flavors
from General Foods
International Coffees.
@3
GENERAL FOODS INTERNATIONAL COFFEES
AS MUCH A FEELING AS A FLAVOR
! Name
CLASSIFIED ADS j
sm � w�m� p� H ��� -�
yuu neea more unn. i ner art jj "�� � ���� units per line. Each letter, punc- N TSeptr line i�oI cadoea
luamtrn mri ana worn ssmcv j counts .s one unit. Capitalize end
Hyphenate words properly. Leave space at end of line if word doesn't fit. No ads will be ac- cepted over the phone. We reserve the right to reject any ad. All ads must be prepaid. Endow j 75 per line or fraction of a line. Please prim legibly! Use capital end lower case tellers. Return to the Media Board 1 I secretary by 3 p.m. the day beore !








1 publication
L i,J
JUNIOR
PANHELLENIC
Junior Panhellenlc will be
sponoring a bake sale on Nov. 3,
Thursday, outside of the
Croatan and the Student Supply
Store from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. All
items will be fifty cents.
FRISBEECLUB
Tuesday night at 8:30 p.m. in
room 248, Mendenhall mere will
be a frisbee club meeting. There
will also be an extra practice
this Wed. night at 9 p.m. at the
intermural fields next to the
stadium. Regular practice is
every Tues, Thurs and Sun. at 4
p.m.
INTER-VARSITY
Attention! Wednesday night at
6 30, Paul Leary will speak Self
Image In Jenkins Auditorium.
Come and enioy Inter Varsity's
Christian fellowship
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art is offering 2
scholarships for art students of
junior, senior, and graduate
rank These scholarships are in
the amount of 8250 00 renewable
and 8353 00 renewable and are to
be awarded shortly after the 1st
of January To qualify, a student
must have an overall grade
point average of 30 included
with the application there must
be a resume giving honors,
awards, andor other evidence
of scholarly and artistic pro-
wess, and a portfolio of at least 5
slides of current work. Forms
may be obtained from the School
of Art off Ice The deadline for all
completed applications is
November 30. 1983
PROSE CONTEST
The REBEL Is offering dollars
for your writing Enter the Pro
se or Poetry contests and be
eligible for an 880 First prize or
a 825 second prize Bring typed
entries by the media board or
REBEL offices by Nov 7 In
elude your name, address, and
phone number Prize money
provided by the Attic and
Budwelser.
PRCCLUB
The PRC club will meet Tues
day, Nov 1, at 7 p.m in room 144
Mendenhall. Plans for the up-
coming State conference will be
discussed. All members please
attend.
ACCOUNTING
SOCIETY
The Accounting Society will
meet on Wednesday, Nov. 9 at 4
p.m. in Mendenhall Rm. 244.
"Accounting in Industry" is the
theme. Dr. J.Kevin Green from
ECU will speak on the CMA re
quirements. Jude Piawecki
Controller, and Joseph Dobbyns,
Accountant, from Stanadyne
(Fortune 500) will speak on their
Industry experience.
Refresments will be served
afterward. Members and pro-
spective members please at-
tend
PT, OT,
NURSING?
Do you have a friend In these
malors or In Medical
Technology, Social Work,
Special Education, Medical
Records, Recreational Therapy,
Dietetics, Community Health,
SLAP, or Child Development? if
so, make sure they know to
come to both HEALTH
CAREERS DAYSNov 4 from
9:30-12:30 In the Nursing
Building Nov. 7 from 1:30-4:30
In the Allied Health Building ap-
proximately SO agencies will be
represented.
4 H CLUB MEETING
There will be a meeting of the
4 H Club Tuesday Nov 1 at 8
p.m It will be held at
Mendenhall Student Center In
quire at the information desk for
room number.
Happy Birthday Nut!
444 �?? ??
KrrKl H I'
14 789 lo eooat i.m - an tuCtact
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Published every Tuesday
and Thursday dur ng rhe
academic rear anc every
Wednesday dung the sun
mer
Ti'� Eas' Carol,nan is the
ofti' al newspaper ot EjSf
.Carolina University owned,
opeira and published tor
and tr me students of Las'
Carolina University
Subscription Rate: 120 year'y
The East Carolinian offices
are located in the Old South
Building on the campus uf
ECU, Greenville, N.C.
POSTMASTER sr��J m�
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Carolima Old Sooth
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Telephone 757 A3aa. 437,
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approved by the American Bar Association.
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� Bachelor s degree or attorney sponsorship required
� Day and Evening classes available
� Employment assistance.
� Classes conducted in Atlanta
Meet us on Campus:
Friday, November 11
Placement Office
9:00-4:00
(404) 266-1060
Name
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Greenville Utiliti
Enen
By PATRICK O'NEILL impel
Man eduef
can
Five years ago throi
many Americans had or
to wait in long lines to efficil
purchase fuel for their Bij
automobiles. At the orga
same time, the price eenl
of gasoline and home "Ami
heating tuels was Aa
skyrocketing. whicl
Now that fuel duni
prices have leveled off Oct
and there are no lines said
at service stations, the wa
energy issue is not as Am
prominent as it once "rec�
was. But Susan Biz- emb,
zaro, an en ergs 197Q
educaiton specialist their
with the Greenville effor
Utilities Commission,
says energy is still an no
Tuition Gi
Held Last F
Sophomore
B ANDREANarn
MARKELLOnever
MafT MniCTlike t
Fa
For the second con-divil
secuthe vear. 1 1Leon
Greenville Fast Faresaid
stores have conductedawav
their ECL" tuitionidea
give-away.olv
Prize paymentswith
were presented lastTh
Fndav to this vear'sawav
winner. Rickv J. Nar-botl
ron, a sophomoreChec
music education ma-the v
jor. "I think it's greatthe c
and so do m folksd a
Approximate 35 percen
cancers are directly related :
use of tobacco alone or
bination with excessive consi
tion of alcohol, warns
TTn�can Caincet S�.v. vel
� ECT Students A
Lowest Prices
12
00
Disi
Eipi'es No 30th 13 - : �
s Goc: a iri t
15
00
D
Expires Nov.MHh 1983
,Not Good With kr
on o
,CU 0 SENIOR
sr Good n - "
This A3 v -
clear
v VUE
3"EES
t
puci
3i5P�r�Ye Cmmtm
Acrossf'c- Decten -
BMCrtar KW a, DUpl H�H 0P�
TRIP PLANNED T
The Student I nil
City during Thanks
has been a great si
year.
The trip includes
of Broaday forl
Trailways buses, al
also provides sugg
galleries, and depaj
The price for the
rooms. Other rooi
The deadlirt for
November 1, to
Thanksgiving
For further iiift
Mendenhall
.
�-
v






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Greenville Utilities Commission
THE EAST CAROI INIAN
NOVEMBER 1.1983
Energy Conservation Still Important
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUff Writer
Five years ago
many Americans had
to wait in long lines to
purchase fuel for their
automobiles. At the
same time, the price
of gasoline and home
heating fuels was
skyrocketing.
Now that fuel
prices have leveled off
and there are no lines
at service stations, the
energy issue is not as
prominent as it once
was. But Susan Biz-
zaro, an energy
educaiton specialist
with the Greenville
Utilities Commission,
says energy is still an
important issue and
educated consumers
can save money
through conservation
or "energy
efficiency
Bizzaro helped
organize the local
events surrounding
"American Energy
Awareness Week"
which was proclaimed
during the week of
Oct. 24-29. Bizzaro
said the national event
was designed so
American's could
"recall the (Arab) oil
embargo" of the
1970s and "recharge
their current energy
efforts
"Energy issues are
no longer popular
Bizzaro said. "Energy
Awareness Week was
designed to make peo-
ple aware of energy
issues once again in a
very positive way
Bizzaro says there
are many ways for
consumers to save
money and energy
without having to
sacrifice. As an exam-
ple, she pointed out a
GUC service known
as the "Energy Check
Program a program
which provides local
consumers with free
energy check-ups for
their homes.
According to Biz-
zaro, a state-certified
auditor will visit a
consumer's home and
evaluate their energy
use. After the evalua-
tion, the auditor will
make energy saving
suggestions to the
homeowner.
Bizzaro noted that
homeowners often
have their hot water
heaters set at temper-
tures of up to 160
degrees when a setting
of 120 degrees is suffi-
cient for most homes.
She said it is also
important for con-
sumers to learn how
to read their own
energy meters so they
will be able to keep
track of their usage.
"Keeping a check on
your own meter
makes for an
Tuition Give-A way
Held Last Friday;
Sophomore Wins
By ANDREA
MARKELLO
SUff Writer
For the second con-
secutive year, 11
Greenville Fast Fare
stores have conducted
their ECU tuition
give-away.
Prize payments
were presented last
Friday to this year's
winner, Ricky J. Nar-
ron, a sophomore
music education ma-
jor. "I think it's great
and so do my folks
Narron said. "I've
never won anything
like this before
Fast Fare stores'
division manager,
Leonard Edmundson,
said the tuition give-
away was a marketing
idea to financially in-
volve the business
with ECU.
The tuition give-
away totals $706 for
both semesters.
Checks are written in
the winner's behalf to
the clerk at the ECU
Admissions Office, to
Edmundson gives check to Narron.
cover full time tuition
and fees.
According to Ed-
mundson, both years
the winning students
have needed the tui-
tion money. Narron
was cnosen at random
from approximately
1000 entries.
Approximately 35 percent of
cancers are directly related to the
use of tobacco alone or in com-
bination with excessive consump-
tion of alcohol, warns the
A.mnricmn 7mncr Soiiry.
Facts About Cancer
ping, markedly increase the user's
risk of developing cancer of the
mouth.
Smoking is responsible for
about 75 percent of lung cancer
overal
I
AMERICAN
ECU Students & Faculty
Lowest Prices In Town
M20"DiIc"ount"
On Complete
I Expires No 30th "83 Smqle Vision Eye giasses
(Not Good With Any Other Specials
$1 500 Discount
On Complete
Expires Nov. 30th 1983 Bifocal Eye Glasses
(Not Good With Any Other Specials)
OAO DISCOUNT FOR
ZU O SENIOR CITIZENS
(Not Good With Any Other Specials)
This Ad Must Accompany Order
GREENVILLE STORE ONLY
JJ (ClgAR Phone
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
$195.00 Abortion from 13
to IS weeks mt additional
coat. Pregnancy Teat, Birth
�Control, and Problem
Pregnancy Counseling. For
further information call
832-0535 (Toll Free Number
MMV221-256S) between
9 A.M. and S P.M. weekdays
RALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
f 17 West Morgan St.
�i�iat. N. c
COUPON-COUPON -COUPON
421 Greenville BKd
Phone 756-0825
VUE
v
pucians
752-1446
' CALL US r0� AN
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WITH THE DOCTOR
0p�n 9 A M -530 P M Mon -Frf q- TOUR CHOICE
Beecher Klrtlay Dispensing Opttclsn i
315 Psrkvlew Commons
Across From Doctors Psrfc
21
i SPECIAL
(Pizza Only)
OFFER GOODTHRU
November 19,1983 1983
Buy One Pizza At Regular Price
And Get Another Of Same Value'
Or Less Free j
U COUPON -COUPON-COUPO
TRIP PLANNED TO NEW YORK DURING THANKSGIVING BREAK
The Student Union Travel Committee has planned a trip to New York
City during Thanksgiving Break from November 23-27. This annual trip
has been a great success in the past and will be just as entertaining this
year.
The trip includes room accommodations in the Hotel Edison (just west
of Broadway for four days and three nights), transportation by
Trailways buses, and baggage handling charges. The Travel Committee
also provides suggestions to New York's famous restaurants, museums,
galleries, and department stores.
The price for the trip is only $99.00 per person for quad occupancy
rooms. Other room arrangements are available for slightly higher prices.
The deadline for registering for the New York City Thanksgiving Trip is
November 1, so hurry if yon want to "Be Where It Is" during
Thanksgiving Break.
For further information contact the General Ticket Office at
Mendenhail Student Center, 757-6611, ext. 266.
flnjanjittii ym0t�Qvr �
educated consumer �
a consumer who's in
control Bazzaro
said.
Bizzaro quoted
Energy Secretary
Donald P. Hodel who
said "conservation is
a continuing
resource one which
we will mine for
decades to come
"During Energy
Awareness Week,
Greenville Utilities
highlighted ongoing
conservation pro-
grams designed to
help customers use
enery more efficient-
ly Bizzaro said.
Free classes in
reading a utilities
meter were held dur-
ing awareness week
activities. A poster
contest for Greenville
schools was also spon-
sored by the GUC.
Bizzaro made an
appeal to ECU
students who are in-
terested in volunteer-
ing their time to help
with a winter
weatherization pro-
gram to aid local low
income and elderly
families. Students are
also welcome to sign-
up for the Energy
Check Program by
visiting Bizzaro at the
GUC Energy Services
office at 200 W. 5th
Street or by calling
her at 752-7166.
Students Can Voice
Opinions On Issues
In Separate Events
By JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
Staff Wrttar
ECU students will
have the opprotunity
the voice opinions this
week in two separate
events focusing on the
U.S. invasion of
Grenada.
On Thursday, Nov.
3, from 11 a.m. to 1
p.m. there will be a
Soap Box Forum in
front of the Student
Supply Store concern-
ing U.S. action in
Grenada.
Soap Box Forum is
an open-mike plat-
form designed to give
people an opportunity
to debate topical
issues. Any person
wishing to express an
opinion may speak
for up to five minutes.
Speakers may also re-
quest rebuttal time.
The forum is spon-
sored by the ECU
Catholic Newman
Center and the selec-
tion of topics is coor-
dinated by Mickey
Skidmore.
Skidmore plans to
voice his opinion at
the Thursday event
and hopes others will
do the same. "I know
others will disagree
with me, but that's
the main reason we
have it (the forum) �
to bring about in-
tellectual discussion
On Wednesday,
Nov. 2 at noon there
will be a demonstra-
tion in front of the
Student Supply Store
protesting the inva-
sion.
"I am not proud of
the way my country
has acted said ECU
English instructor
Edith Webber, one of
the organizers of the
deomon s t r a t ion.
Webber added that
participation in the
demonstration is open
to anyone who wants
to express a feeling
about the invasion
last week.
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English Annex 10after hour
I0th & the Hill 13 after hour
College Hill15 after hour
Stratford Arms Apts . � hour
Hargett s Drugs25 til hour
Home Federal 15 til hour
Purple:
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Cannon Court 12 after hour
Easthrook13 after hour
Riverbiuff20afterhour
Kings Row M hour
Villtage Green25 til hour
College Ktew24 til hour
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"





4
�te �aat (ttarnltman
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Darryl Brown, w,n�f,�a.or
Hunter Fisher, m.
All AFRASHTEH. CnduSfntr
Geoff Hudson, om
Michael Mayo, r�-��i si�-
Cindy Pleasants, .w,w
Greg Rideout, &W0� a ��
Gordon Ipock, &�rr�m.�� &���
Lizanne Jennings, so�
Todd Evans, product,� ,�,
November 1. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
1
Press Freedom
President Forgets In Grenada
To say that freedom of the press
is part of our national heritage is
definitely stating the obvious. We,
as a people, have used the fourth
estate to inform the American peo-
ple and keep a check on the
government. Our democracy
demands that the media have ac-
cess to newsmakers and news
scenes, for only then can we be
well-enough informed to par-
ticipate in public affairs as our
founding fathers wished.
Somehow, during the Grenada in-
vasion, our press lost its freedom
among the military's battle plans
and President Reagan's thirst for
victory,
Reagan is big on freedom. He is
always talking about our great,
free nation. (Which it is.) And our
great free people. (Which we are.)
But, when he gave the military the
go ahead to keep reporters and
photographers from experiencing
first-hand the invasion, he damag-
ed part of the nation he professes
to love. His reasons for keeping
the press off the island for three
days were not adequate. The press
did not want to be in on the plans;
they just wanted to be given the
ability to report in a timely fashion
to the American people.
In all other wars, the American
press has been allowed to cover the
war unhindered by the govern-
ment. Reporters were in the tren-
ches during WWI in Germany and
were hitting the beaches in WWII
France. There was censorship at
times, but rarely an outright bann-
ing of the press from whole battles
or regions. Some reporters even
gave up their lives in pursuit of in-
forming the American public. The
presidents and politicians of the
time, although leery of the press,
recognized its right to be free and
did not try to prevent it from hav-
ing access to where the news was
happening.
Yet, the generals and colonels
who planned the Oct. 25 Grenada
invasion are those who learned
first hand of the power of the press
during the Vietnam war. It seemed
they were all of the impression that
if the press went in alongside the
Marines and Army rangers, public
approval of the move would be
low. They knew that its not nice to
see young men dying in your living
room. But, if our political system
is to remain free, we must allow
the electronic media as much
leeway as the newspaper was given
years ago.
A free press is a relatively new
entity in the history of man, and it
is still fragile, needing nuture. We
must urge our leaders to respect its
rights in the name of democracy.
For if a nation is to remain truly
free, as we and the president wish,
its presses must roll unhindered by
the heavy hand of government.
Jackson Candidacy
The Rev. Jesse Jackson wants to
be president. And Sunday, he said
he plans to officially announce his
quest for the Democratic nomina-
tion on Thursday, trying to make
himself the first black ever
nominated for the nation's highest
office. We definitely feel it is time
for a black to run for the office,
for someone has to break the bar-
rier, but the reality of the situation
is what must be addressed.
Jackson, by seeking the presiden-
cy, will hurt black people more
than help them.
The reverend's name on the
ballot will attract black voters, and
thus unintentionaly but
unavoidably, take votes away from
the one man with a chance for the
presidency who can truly help
Jackson's race � Walter Mondale.
Jackson has no chance of being
president in today's society. He
doesn't have the political base or
the fundraising capabilities. And
he is black. For sure, this is a sad
statement on the current national
situation, but alas it is true. Most
white people are not going to vote
for a black candidate, and they
are, after all, the majority.
This is not to say we are against
Jackson's candidacy, or any black
candidate for that matter. In fact
our position is one of ambiguity;
we want him to run, in fact we urge
him to run. But, black people
across the nation must be willing to
put up with a Democratic nominee
who is not as in tune with their
issues as is a candidate the caliber
of Mr. Carter's vice president.
With Jackson's candidacy now
assured, we foresee the Democratic
nomination going to John Glenn,
the candidate who has the right
stuff but no substance. Jackson
will take votes away from Mondale
in the those crucial primary states
where blacks make up a large
percentage of the population. And
with the race probably going neck
and neck between the astronaut
and the professional politician, we
see the Senator from Ohio beating
out Mr. Mondale in the end
because of Jackson's candidacy.
So, with our grip on what is real
firmed, we endorse what Jackson
is about to do. We only wish it
wasn't so hard.
ROW REK&N
MUST REfkLW U)VE
THE POOR
UNC St
Clark Unfit For New Job
By HENDRIK HERTZBERG
Can you imagine what would have
happened if my old boss, Jimmy Carter,
had suddenly and without a word to
anyone decided to yank Zbigniew
Brzezinski off the national security desk
in the West Wing and appoint him
secretary of the interior? Or if Nixon
had done the same with Henry Kiss-
inger?
Can you picture the flap that would
have touched off? There would have
been an immediate spate of columns
speculating about the president's "grow-
ing isolation" and "increasingly erratic
behavior followed by editorials about
"disarray" in the White House and the
cabinet, followed by anxious bulletins
from Europe detailing "mounting
fears" of American "instability
followed by more columns and editorials
about the "firestorm" of criticism.
There has been no such reaction to
President Reagan's bizarre appointment
of William Clark to succeed James
Watt. Why? The answer can only be that
everyone � the press, Congress, foreign
governments and of course the State
Department � is overwhelmed with
relief that "Judge" Clark is to be
removed from anything to do with
foreign policy. It is a field to which he
brought primitive urges of the "peace
through strength" variety, untempered
by knowledge or experience.
The "Judge" is nearly as unsuited to
his new post as he was to his old one, but
putting him in charge of American's
precious, irreplaceable natural heritage
seems a small price to pay for getting his
finger off the button.
Listing the qualifications of the
Campus Forum
secretary of the interior-designate, the
president called him a "Godfearing
Westerner" and a "fourth generation
rancher Perhaps these qualities help to
explain why Reagan chose Clark rather
than Kissinger or Brzezinski, both of
whom are available. Kissinger has
described himself as the Lone Ranger,
but his family has never been heavily in-
to ranching. I once saw Brzezinski in
chaps, boots, spurs and ten-gallon hat
(this was at a party for the movie "Ur-
ban Cowboy"), but the preposterous
getup only made it more obvious than
usual that he is not a Westerner. And it's
likelier that God is Zbig-fearing than the
reverse.
Still, can anyone seriously doubt that
either Kissinger or Brzezinski would
make a far better secretary of the in-
terior than Clark or anyone else who is
likely to get the nod under this ad-
ministration? Apparently Reagan can-
not conceive of a secretary of the In-
terior with a foreign accent, even though
the greatest man even to serve in that
post, Carl Schurz, was a German im-
migrant who made Kissinger sound like
Don Pardo.
No, a Reagan secretary of the interior
must be a natural-born American who
sits tall in the saddle as he gazes out over
Yellowstone, murmuring to God in
laconic, Gary Cooperish tones about
free enterprise and mineral rights.
� I9�?. L ruled Features Syndicate. Inc
Soccer Players Poor Sports
I attended the soccer game between
ECU and Methodist College on Sat.
Oct. 22. I had considered myself lucky
to be in Greenville when ECU had a
home game. I'm an ex-ECU student
that has been involved with soccer
since 1966 on all levels: player, coach,
and referee. My enthusiasm for this
game soon left me after it began. I'm
all in favor of good, hard aggressive
play; that's part of the spirit of the
game, but what I saw displayed by the
ECU team throughout the entire game
was unnecessarily rough. It added
nothing to the game.
The ECU players on many occasions
intentionally kicked the Methodist
players. On three separate occasions,
an ECU player bumped or kicked the
Methodist goalie after he controlled
the ball. Well into the second half, an
ECU player kicked a Methodist player
when the ball wasn't in their area. On
this occasion the head referee finally
took action and awarded a yellow war-
ning card to the ECU player. In my
opinion, it should have been a red
card, and the ECU player should have
been ejected from the game.
On two other occasions ECU players
had their names and numbers recorded
by the referee and were warned for
unsportsmanship conduct (foul
language). There were many, too
many, similar situations that went un-
checked by the officials. One particular
situation occurred close to the stands,
close enough to hear what was said.
After some aggressive play between
ECU player number 10 and Methodist
player number six, the Methodist
player gained control of the ball from
ECU player number 10. After the
Methodist player passed the ball, the
ECU player number 10 said to the
Methodist player number six, "Next
time I'm going to kick your ass Is
this sportsmanship? I say no. I also say
that the coach is at fault for this bad at-
titude of his players. Their bad attitude
is probably responsible for their
pathetic record of 3-11. I feel t is time
for ECU's soccer program to grow up.
What I saw displayed on the playing
field was a disgrace to ECU.
Michael Hays
Graduate
Pake Mistaken
Lucy Pake misread Gordon Ipock's
reference to George Washington and
based a campus forum letter around
that misreading.
When Gordon said that Washington
has become "a secular diety he
wasn't being naive. That "tight-lipped,
white-wigged" saint is what we think
of when we think of old George. The
point is not that Washington was a
saintly man, but that, when a guy gets
his own holiday, he becomes a saint in
our minds.
The facts are in on Washington.
True, he was no saint. But face it:
There aren't any secret files on the man
to maybe embarrass us later on with
just how human he was.
Jesse Helms isn't the kind of guy you
want to agree with. He's not smooth.
He's not good-looking. And it's not
cool to like him. But this time �
despite how undiplomatic he was �
Helms was right.
Gordon should be pleased with
himself that he's got the guts to say so.
Al Agate,
Grad Student, English
Commie, Pinko, etc.
Patrick O'Neill's "analysis" of the
Grenada invasion is nothing more than
a blatant attempt to editorialize, as he
so often does, his left-wing, pinko opi-
nions into supposedly unbiased news
articles. Clearly, Patrick is nothing
more than a mere puppet of Edith and
Carrol Webber and the Greenville
Peace Committe. I am one American
who is damn sick of his constant wail-
ing about U.S. military policy abroad;
a policy designed to insure peace
through strength.
What Mr. O'Neill fails to com-
prehend, through his rose-colored
glasses, is that a show of force is
sometimes necessary to impress upon
others the strength of our beliefs in
freedom and democracy. President
Reagan's decision to invade was based
on well-founded fears of communist
intentions to further develop military
capabilities in the Caribbean Basin. As
an example, Cuban workers were
heavily armed, and supported by more
than 1000 Cuban troops advised by the
Soviets, while the workers built an air-
port runway designed for "tourism
Liberals such as Patrick O'Neill
abuse the power of free press to sway-
public opinion. These cowards hide
behind their pens, while communist in-
fluence in our hemisphere continues to
increase. This avoid-war-at-any-cost
mentality is too expensive, as it will one
day cost us our FREEDOM. Instead of
being allowed to complain, whine, and
whimper about our strength, why
don't we airlift all these yellowbellies
to Cuba or North Korea, where they
could live in "peace" with their
cohorts the communists.
I am proud to know that America
still has the power and resolve to take
necessary military actions. The
peaceniks have not yet weakened us
that much, as they would like.
Charles D. Shavitz
School of Business
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail
them to or drop them by the
newspaper's offices on the second
floor of the publications building
'
��
&�mmm&
' '
I �� t" -
B JA sr(m
A new student
political party has
recentlv burgeoned on
the campus of the
University of North
Carolina at Chapel
Hill, charging that
student government is
not responsive to the
needs and interests of
students
The new par
christened Student-
Effectively
Establishing a
Democratic System,
will focus on issues
that Student Govern
ment has avoided ir.
the past, according to
SEEDS spokesman
Marty Lean
"I feel that our par
t will plant the seed
for a new progressive
consciousness at
UNC said Leary. a
freshman.
Two SEEDS
sponsored candidate
seals ol
Govern!
UNC
gov er
spc
week
current
savs he
the .
Dur;
paigns
oardidi
Solow
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SHONE1
H�r ' i





i
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1983
mnri'tTiiim
Job
Brzezinski would
secretar) of the in-
anyoiie else who is
nod under this ad-
Vpparentl) Reagan can-
retar) of the In-
gi accent, een though
rven to serve in that
vas a German im-
-inger sound like
secretar) of the interior
rn American who
tddle as he gazes out over
luring to God in
perisfa tones about
ninerai rights.
A - .
KVCk. 24LYMjauz
rts
and the Greenville
tte. I am one American
ick of his constant wail-
military policy abroad;
gned to insure peace
n
) Neill fails to com-
ugh his rose-colored
a show of force is
pessary to impress upon
ingth of our beliefs in
democracy. President
ion to invade was based
td fears of communist
further develop military
the Caribbean Basin. As
Cuban workers were
and supported by more
in troops advised by the
the workers built an air-
esigned for "tourism
:h as Patrick O'Neill
r of free press to sway
These cowards hide
bis, while communist in-
hemisphere continues to
avoid-war-at-any-cost
expensive, as it will one
FREEDOM. Instead of
o complain, whine, and
it our strength, why
t all these yellowbellies
rth Korea, where they
peace" with their
lmunists.
to know that America
Iwer and resolve to take
flitary actions. The
not yet weakened us
hey would like.
Charles D. Shavitz
School of Business
m Rules
jolinian welcomes letters
points of view. Mail
drop them by the
Jfices on the second
publications building.
UNC Students Form New Political Party
By JAY STONE
Staff Writer
A new student
political party has
recently burgeoned on
the campus of the
University of North
Carolina at Chapel
Hill, charging that
student government is
not responsive to the
needs and interests of
students.
The new party,
christened Students
Effectively
Establishing a
Democratic System,
will focus on issues
that Student Govern
ment has avoided in
the past, according to
SEEDS spokesman
Marty Leary.
"I feel that our par-
ty will plant the seeds
for a new progressive
consciousness at
UNC said Leary. a
freshman.
Two SEEDS-
sponsored candidates
won vacant graduate
seats on the Central
Government Council,
UNC's student
government, in
special elections last
week. In addition, a
current CGC member
says he plans to join
the organization.
During their cam-
paigns, the SEEDS
candidates, Carol B.
Solow and Bill
Barlow, proposed
passing a symbolic
resolution declaring
UNC a nuclear-free
zone, establishing a
water conservation
plan for the universi-
ty, expanding UNC's
anti-discrimination
policy to bar
discrimination based
on sexual preference
and forcing the
university to rid itself
of holdings in com-
panies operating in
South Africa.
SEEDS members
have charged that the
Central Government
Council is a self-
serving body, reluc-
tant to tackle con-
troversial issues. They
have also alleged that
many CGC members
are more interested in
padding their resumes
than in serving
students.
"I don't think the
CGC is expansive and
responsive Solow, a
first-year graduate
student in the School
of Social Work, said.
"UNC is not a
Carolina blue vacuum.
What happens outside
affects us. What we
do can affect the real
world
In response to these
allegations, CGC
speaker James Exum
cited the CGC's
passage of a divest-
ment resolution, its
efforts to halt a fee
charged to students
who stayed in
residence halls over
fall break and its con-
tinued funding of the
Black Student Move-
ment Gospel Choir as
evidence of the coun-
cil's willingness to
take on controversial
issues.
SEEDS members
are presently organiz-
ing a convention they
will be holding at the
end of this month.
They are also prepar-
ing for the upcoming
CGC general elections
which will be held in
February.
According to
Leary, SEEDS plans
to have several can-
didates for the
February election,
however there has
been talk among cam-
pus conservatives of
forming their own
party to counter
SEEDS.
The chairman of
UNC-CH College
Republicans, Garth
Dunklin, said he
could not predict
whether campus con-
servatives would form
a political party in
response to SEEDS.
But he said that some
action should be
taken to counteract
the new progressive
party.
"In the past a lot of
people bitched that
the CGC was too con-
servative Dunklin
said. "We didn't like
to see that change
In spite of this,
SEEDS members re-
main optimistic about
the future of the
fledgling organiza-
tion.
"There is a feeling
on the part of some of
our members that we
want to form links
with other schools on
certain major issues
Leary told The East
Carolinian.
I.e added that
SEEDS would at-
tempt to get represen-
tatives of student
groups from some of
the state's major cam-
puses to attend their
November convention
to plan an inter-
campus agenda and
discuss strategy.
Walking alone at night?
Call the campus escort service
Pirate Walk
757-6616
Need a Ride Home?
Try advertising in
The Classifieds
Get results with
The East Carolinian
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� r� - m
i





I
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
NOVEMBER 1, 1983
Durham Mayor
Calls Jackson 9s
Speech Racist
STANLIY LKARY � CU PHOTO LAS
Hive you ever wondered how the light bulbs in the campus street lights get changed? Well,
now you know. This brave man goes all out just so we students can see at night.
'Final Notices' Are Being Sent
To Men Unregistered For Draft
By ANDREA
MARKELLO
suff Wriiw
Males who have
failed to register for
the draft are being
sent "final notices"
from the U.S. Selec-
tive Service, but the
letter is not an actual
last warning, accor-
ding to a represen-
tative of the Draft In-
formation Service.
Barbara Mann of
the N.C. Draft Infor-
mation Service said a
final warning would
be in the form of a
registered letter from
a local attorney, and
the the names of those
who fail to respond to
the letter will be sent
to the Department of
Justice.
A recent article in
The Daily Tar Heel,
the student newspaper
of the University of
North Carolina at
Chapel Hill, stated
failure to respond to
the letter would lead
to a personal visit by
an FBI agent Mann
said this is not true,
and that no one is
under legal obligation
to talk to an FBI
agent. She advised
people to contact a
lawyer or a draft
counselor for legal ad-
vice.
Mandy Carter of
the War Registers
LeagueSoutheast,
said the Selective Ser-
vice is concerned
about the huge
number of males not
registering. "The let-
ters are a 'shakeup'
due to the massive
number of males
refusing to register
Carter said. "The
'Final notice' letters
are sent, and if no
reply is given after ten
days, the names are
sent to the Depart-
ment of Justice.
Carter said the odds
of indictment are
small, and only about
16 out of 750,000 men
CREDIT F
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have actually been in-
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that one should know
the law, that fines are
strict.
Addresses of those
failing to register are
being obtained from
driver's licenses, col-
lege student aid
forms, and social
security numbers.
Carter said. She add
ed there is a lot of
cooperation from
organizations in-
cluding high schools
and businesses where
unregistered males
have Filled out ap-
plication forms.
By TINA
MAROSCHAK
Staff Write
Durham Mayor
Charles Markham
resigned his faculty
position in N.C. Cen-
tral University's law
department because
of what he termed a
racist speech given at
NCCU by Rev. Jesse
Jackson, a black
presidential candidate
for next year's elec-
tion. He also accused
Jackson of endorsing
Asa Spaulding Jr
Markham's opponent
in the November city
elections.
Markham said
Jackson suggested
replacing or removing
white ofFice holders
and replacing them
with blacks. "Racism
has no place, whether
before a white au-
dience or a black au-
dience Markham
said. "When he at-
tacks politicians, he's
obviously attempting
to stir up the au-
dience
Leroy Walker, in-
terim chancellor ot
NCCU in Durham,
disagreed with
Markham. "1 thought
his remarks were ill
founded. It is my
responsibility to
welcome individuals
to this campus,
whether I agree with
them or not Walker
said.
Markham, who did
not attend the speech,
based his claims on
newspaper accounts
and an Oct. 19 press
"Thel
what
conference
point is not
Jackson said, butl
what people perceive!
that he said. It's very
devisive, I think, for!
him to make those!
kinds of statements
Markham said. "I
think he had nol
business using that
kind of rhetoric, and
he certainly has no
business intruding
himself on the local
political scene he
said.
Walker said
Jackson made only a
few political
references in his
speech. "All of the
comments must have
been made in the press
conference Walker
said. "I thought it
was a disservice to the
university, condoning
racism he conclud-
ed.
Mark Adams,
editor of the NCCU
student newspaper the
Campus Echo, said
that the general con-
sensus among
students is that the
situation is a "joke
"Nobody is paying at-
tention to it.
Markham made no ef-
fort whatsoever to
talk to the students
and let them know
what he stands for
Adams said.
Law Department
Dean, Charles Day,
refused to comment
on the situation, say-
ing only that he is very
sorry that Markham
resigned.
THE
kJ and
Oueen
NORTH
Wed. Happy Hour
All Ladies Free All Night
Free Admission with
College ID till 7:00
Free Hot H'ordes
H.H. 4:30-7:00
'The CataUna's" 7:00 -11:00
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THE EAST CAtOl INIAN
�� .
JefTy Lee Lewis was rockln' end roltin
The Killer played old favorites and nej
AI Gre
Bv GORDON IPOCk
�iMMor
Ever wonder what happened to
Al Green, the last of the great soul
singers? Ten years ago Green was
riding the crest of success, one of
America and the world's most
popular male vocalists. A string
of million-seller hits catapulted
Green to fame in the early 0s.
Songs like "Tired of Being
Alone "Let's Sta Together
"Look What You Done For Me
"You Ought to Be with Me
"Cal Me "Here I A.m ,Coirc
and Take Me)" and "I'm StiU in
Love with You" were just some of
his chart toppers.
Like Little Richard and man
other popular black singer.
Green got his first taste of singing
in church. And like Richard.
Aretha Franklin and others, after
a stint in popular music Green
returned to his gospel roots. In
1977, Green quit popular music to
take up the cloth. He now pastors
the Full Gospel Tabernacle in
Memphis, Tennessee. But he
hasn't quit singing or making
music. Fll Rise Again. Green s
third gospel L.P is his best-
selling gospel album yet.
Though many of the album's
song's have a distinct gospel
message and a traditional gospel
sound, some of the songs are
straight urban contemporar
Several cuts are embellished with
synthesizer, just enough to let us
IT���fTTTT
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0
Mezzo-topraao Jeaaa Smha
mater, for � recital st Heodrix
p.m. Mi. PtlMd to taldKI � '
where she b currently singini in
of Tht Barber of SevW �d the
docttoa of Der Rosenkavatier.
fs degrees from the
h aillog roles m F
Ms. ����"� Hi





(
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Entertainment
NOVEMBER I, 1985
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Jerry Lee Lewis was rockin' and roHiiT. practically baraing the Carolina Opry House down last Friday night.
The Killer played old favorites and new country songs for an enthusiastic crowd.
By MIKE HAMER
Staff Writer
I went to the Carolina Opry
House on Friday night wondering
if Jerry Lee Lewis, who has
played literally thousands of one
nighters since 1957, could still
deliver the goods. I came back
feeling I'd heard one of the most
natural and yet strongest singers
I've ever heard sing rock and roll
and country music.
Jerry Lee Lewis has been sing-
ing since 1956 when he got on the
Sun Roster in Memphis with Elvis
Presley, Carl Perkins, and Johnny
Cash. With Sam Phillips at the
controls, these four men shaped a
new kind of pop music that took
the country by storm. Legend has
it that there is a recording
somewhere of the four of them
singing gospel songs together.
Elvis became the King of rock
and roll; Lewis became the punk
� the player of the devil's music
� the Killer. Jerry Lee's most
famous hits tumbled out of Mem-
phis in 1957. "Whole Lot of
Shakin" was followed by "Great
Balls of Fire "Breathless and
"High School Confidential
Carl Perkins has told the story
that Jerry Lee, on his first tour
with Perkins and Johnny Cash
after "Crazy Arms" had been
released, had trouble with
shyness. "John and I told
himrecalls PerkinsTurn
around so they can see you; make
a face! So the next night he car-
ried on, stood up, kicked the stool
back, and a new Jerry Lee was
born
In 1958, Lewis married Myra
Brown, his young third cousin,
and he was subsequently
blacklisted from radio stations
around the country. He kept play-
ing one-night stands, and in 1968
Jerry Lee got himself back on the
charts as a country singer.
Lewis has had more than his
share of media attention and more
than his share of marital problems
and personal tragedies. But the
Killer showed his fans he can still
sing. He opened up his show with
"Shake, Rattle and Roll" and
followed with a country tune en-
titled "Who Will The Next Fool
Be?" This became a pattern for
the performance: Lewis alter-
nating rockers with haunting
country melodies. My favorite
song of the evening was "Mona
Lisa a song recorded by Nat
'King Cole in the 50's.
At 48, Jerry Lee's age is show-
ing; he didn't kick his piano stool
back. But Lewis did show the
flamboyance that is his
trademark, playingthe baby grand
with his feet and slamming the lid
over the piano's keys up against
its sound board.
Lewis' band played well, con-
sidering they never knew exactly
when a song was going to end.
Jerry Lee would suddenly raise his
left arm, and the band would have
to be ready to take the cue and
end the song. His guitar player
looked like a country boy who
had just stepped out of a tobacco
warehouse on Dickinson Avenue,
but he unravelled classic rockabil-
ly licks with ease.
The Killer still plays the pump-
ing piano style that stood out in
his early recordings, mixing in a
healthy number of flashy glissan-
do runs with his boogie-woogie
bass.
I'd never seen Jerry Lee before,
but seeing him Friday night con-
vinced me Lewis has been one of
the greatest influences on white
rhythm and blues and country
singers since the rock and roll ex-
plosion began almost 30 years
ago.
Al Green Rises Again On New Gospel L.P.
Bv GORDON IPOCK
Ever wonder what happened to
Al Green, the last of the great soul
singers? Ten years ago Green was
riding the crest of success, one of
America and the world's most
popular male vocalists. A string
of million-seller hits catapulted
Green to fame in the early '70s.
Songs like "Tired of Being
Alone "Let's Stay Together
"Look What You Done For Me
"You Ought to Be with Me
"Call JVfe "Here 1 Am (Come
and Take Me)" and "Tm Still in
Love with You" were just some of
his chart toppers.
Like Little Richard and many
other popular black singers,
Green got his first taste of singing
in church. And like Richard,
Aretha Franklin and others, after
a stint in popular music Green
returned to his gospel roots. In
1977, Green quit popular music to
take up the cloth. He now pastors
the Full Gospel Tabernacle in
Memphis, Tennessee. But he
hasn't quit singing or making
music. 77 Rise Again, Green's
third gospel L.P is his best-
selling gospel album yet.
Though many of the album's
song's have a distinct gospel
message and a traditional gospel
sound, some of the songs are
straight urban contemporary.
Several cuts are embellished with
synthesizer, just enough to let us
immn
know Al Green is hip with the
'80s. The other noteworthy
characteristic is the Memphis
Symphony Orchestra string sec-
tion on several songs.
However, the soulful horn ar-
rangements that were a trademark
of Green's popular hits in the 70s
are sadly missing on this album.
All of Green's earlier recordings
were with Hi Records of Memphis
and were produced by Hi's Willie
Mitchell. No doubt, Mitchell was
influenced by the Memphis soul
sound of another famous Mem-
phis label, Stax Records. Stax
produced Sam and Dave, among
others, and they defined Memphis
soul, a sound that relied heavily
on horns. Perhaps on 77 Rise
Again Green has decided horns
are inappropriate for gospel and
instead, strings are used.
Personally, I always liked
Memphis soul, particularly
because of its emphasis on horns,
and the string arrangements here
prove a weak and out-of-
character substitute. Symphonic
strings are naturally alien to black
American music. Ray Charles'
popular hits in the '60s used str-
ings to broaden audience appeal.
Although Charles gained a white
audience, his music was weaken-
ed. No doubt, many listeners will
like the chorus of violins on this
album, but they compromise and
betray Green's music just as they
did Charles
Side one of 77 Rise Again
opens with "It Don't Take
Much The production is superb
with the strings expertly laid over
a funky bass and guitar. The
lyrics, however, are weak. Green
repeats, "It don't take much
almost incessantly with only occa-
sional breaks for falsetto croons
and wails. A pleasing but forget-
table number and a weak opener.
Song two, "Jesus Is Coming
(Back Again) begins with the
Reverend Green quoting the first
few verses of Psalm 100:
In my father's house,
Are many mansions.
If it were not so,
I would have told you
I go away to prepare a place for
you
That where I am,
You may be also.
This proves to be the most
religious song on the album with
prophesies from the book of
Revelation and constant
reminders that Jesus is coming
back again. The lyrics are
thoughtful in this slow-tempo
number. The song's intensity,
however, builds near the end with
a series of hallelujahs by Green.
"Leaning on the Everlasting
Arms" is one of the most stirring
songs on the album. Green gets
back to his black-gospel roots
here. There are no syrupy strings
to mar the song, just a crisp
acoustic guitar played in the style
of traditional Delta blues. An
organ fills in with a strong chur-
chy style. Green's voice is superb,
rich with conviction, and the
background vocals swing in an
easy gospel cadence. This number
rates a soulful "amen
With "I Close My Eyes
Green reverts to elevator music.
The strings are the problem again.
The song has none of the feeling
for traditional black gospel that
the preceding number has so
abundantly.
On "Ocean Blue (I'll Rise
Again) Green starts slowly with
a beat and sound reminiscent of
"Look What You've Done for
Me However, there's something
restraining Green. The song seems
ready to take off any minute, but
Green never pulls all the stops out
the way we know he can. A camp-
meeting fervor does build
gradually by the song's end,
though.
Side two is stronger than side
one (no elevator music), and it's
more diverse, more interesting
and more danceable. It starts with
"Look at the Things God Made
Green begins this song talking �
rather, preaching � about the
things God made compared to the
things man made. It's a bright,
up-tempo number. The chorus of
clapping hands gives a real chur-
chy touch, and again, Green's
vocal delivery is rich and clean.
Tmjrrh.
Reverend Al Green tells it like it is
With "I Can't Make It By
Myself Green gets back to
Delta-style gospel. This song has a
strong, solemn cadence much Uke
a New Orleans funeral dirge, but
with hot licks from an electric
blues guitar added for snap. The
song packs a wallop, and like
"Leaning on the Everlasting
on his latest gospel L.P.
Arms isn't marred by ex-
traneous string arrangements
just the basics: guitar, organ and
bass. Green's voice ranges from
gutsy growls to shrill falsetto.
This song rates an "amen" and a
"hallelujah
See AL GREEN, page 8
Mick LaSalle:
The 60s Make Me Puke'
M�c-�opro Jean Saaith M Nt� ����,�
JSeTfoTTreci at Headrbt Theatre Wednesday, Not. 2, at S
n m m� Plliad Is taking a break la the European opera season
w�re she IStaf � tie Hambarg Opera prodactJoa
LttoVof Der Rosenkavalier. After receiving her bachelor's
l��JILVtov fro- the ECU School of Mask, she has
nrnMH uadiac roles la Earope and America's foremost
iJTtr'pC Helrix recital b free to the pablic.
XXX
By MICK LASALLE
Staff Writer
The Big Chill (like) is about a
bunch of college friends (like)
who get together 15 years later for
a friend's funeral (like). They
hang out (man), party some joint?
(man), and get into these heavy
rap sessions (like wow). Then they
pair off in the sack. I almost puk-
ed.
It makes me real glad I wasn't
around in the 60s. The 60s were
garbage � and if you're playing
with a full deck, you don't need
Mick LaSalle to tell you that.
It was about time we had a sex-
ual revolution, and the 60s gave us
one. But the 60s generation was
embarrassed by all the sex it really
wanted. So it always came up with
a phony higher motive.
It's like when a guy tells you
he's a Marxist and believes in
"free love You hear this, but
you know what he really means is
he's lonely � and probably
deserves to be.
You can laugh at one guy kid-
ding himself. But when a whole
culture churns out self-deceivers
you want to bang your head
against the wall. That's how I felt
watching The Big Chill. In spots,
the picture was entertaining. But
the people in it � with two excep-
tions � were jerks.
For instance, Meg, played by
Mary Kay Place, wants a baby.
But from her actions, it's clear
what she wants even more is what
she has to do in order to get a
baby. Sara, Meg's good friend,
volunteers her own husband to be
the stud for Meg's child � pro-
bably in order to feel justified for
having cheated on him previously.
And Sara's husband jumps on �
and I mean on � the chance.
So the touching climax of this
sick flick has hubby welcoming
Meg into his bedroom. He has the
pressed pajamas and the con-
tented smile of a guy who knows
this time he can get away with get-
ting his rocks off.
These people are snakes. They
should be shot.
Mick LaSalle
Reviews
'The Big Chill'
There are other characters in
the movie. Jeff Goldblum plays a
writer for People Magazine whos
a real slime. Other characters are
the TV star, the discontented
housewife � everybody but the
Professor and Marianne.
And then there's Nick and
Chloe. Nick's lost his faith in the
60s nonsense, so he's the only guy
in the movie worth hearing. Chloe
is a 20-or-so-year-old gymnast
and the only thing worth seeing.
These two make the picture
bearable. But it's clearly not their
movie.
Chloe is often shown to be un-
caring and shallow. And while
Nick, played by William Hurt, is
likeable, the rest of the characters
treat him like a lost soul. And
we're expected to agree with
them.
Nick is a Vietnam vet who was
injured somehow and now can no
longer get it up. I can just guess
how the nerd writers came up with
that doozey. Beneath the surface
somewhere, they couldn't stand
having a real man in their movie.
So they had to take his manhood
away.
Yet, amidst this shlock, entire
moments are saved. Nick and
Chloe gradually seem to fall in
love. And it's enough to make you
feel something. You sit there and
root for them � and feel bad
'cause you know it's hopeless.
Not only are they in a hopeless
situation: They're stuck in a
hopeless movie.
If you ever worried about get-
ting older, go see The Big ChOl
and you'll become a basket case.
Mary Kay Place has aged so much
since she played that country
music singer on Mary Hartman,
Mary Hortmon that when I saw
her my hair almost turned white
from shock. There's one scene
where she gets up in the morning
that made me real glad I'm not
married to her.
Nature gangs up on us and
forces us to sleep with ugly peo-
ple. That's part of life. But if you
gotta get old, you don't have to
stay stupid. The people in The Big
Chill are just as lost as they were
15 years before. What's even
worse, the clowns who made The
Big Chill are just as lost as the
clowns in the movie.
Take it from Mick LaSalle and
chill The Big Chill.
Jim
Whittington
Revisited
In September, the East
Carolinian ran a humorous
review that focused largely on
Greenville's TV evangelist Jim
Whittington. Recently, it came
to my attention that the Whit-
tingtons are major supporters
of ECU athletics through the
Pirate Club. With a proper
sense of fairness, I
acknowledge their generous
support of this university.
Bravo Whittingtons.
Gordon Ipock
� M � g
4K
� w mm i
� m m � �� � m I

.1





I
8 THE EAST CAROLINIANNOVEMBER 1,
1983
Shakespeare Gives
Scoop On Jogging
Washington DC.
(UPI) Shakespeare's
paen to human diver-
sity � the one that
begins, "What a piece
of work is man" � is
nowhere more vividly
authenticated these
early autumn days
than by the joggers on
the Washington Mall.
Scores of
bureaucrats of every
sex, race, age and
physical configura-
tion appear each
noontide to lurch
along the greensward
between Capitol Hill
and the Lincoln
Memorial.
Some run with
graceful, purposeful
strides reminiscent of
Mary Decker Tabb.
Others plod gingerly
and tentatively along
as though stepping on
eggs and fearful of
breaking the shells.
And the amazing
thing is, no two are
alike.
But even so
unstructured a sport
as jogging is not
without controversy.
Sightseers complain
the solemnity, and
dignity of some of our
noble landmarks are
impaired by the
unavoidable view of
sweat-drenched
GS-lls in two-tone
running shoes.
I got a chance to
juge for myself the
validity of these pro-
testations recently
when I paid my first
visit to the Vietnam
Memorial that opened
this year along the
jogging trails.
1 must say I was im-
pressed by such a vast
outpouring of energy.
But for further par-
ticulation of the
sightseers' pique, let
us return to the Im-
mortal Bard:
Q. Holy mackerel,
Mr. Shakespeare,
where are all these
joggers coming from?
A. "O'er the dew of
von high eastern
hill. "
Q. That's the
Washington Monu-
ment you're pointing
at, sir. Do you, as a
sightseer, find joggers
distracting?"
A. "They pass me by
as the idle wind,
which I respect not. It
spoils the pleasure of
the time
0 Well, I've heard
that some civil ser-
vants jog in order to
lose weight so they
can win promotions.
A. "Ambition should
be made of sterner
stuff. What private
griefs they have, alas!
1 know not. There is
something in this
more than natural. "
Q. Just what are you
implying, sir?
A. "O judgement!
Thou art fled to
brutish beasts, and
men have lost their
reason, ft is not, nore
it cannot come to
good. A ngles and
ministers of grace de-
fend us
Q. Surely you aren't
suggesting that jogg-
ing on the mall be
prohibited?
A. "Let every man be
master of his time till
seven at night. "
Q. What about
women joggers?
A. "The wierd sisters.
Ally my pretty
children and their
dam in one fell
swoop. Man delights
not me; nor woman
neither. Too often
their buttons be
disclosed
Q. Ye but you'll
have to admit thai
some of them jiggle
quite nicely.
A. "How infinite in
faculty, in form and
moving how express
and admirable! In ac-
tion how like an
angel. "
Q. Spoken like a true
male chauvinist. Here
comes one now.
A. "One with
moderate haste, like a
puff'd and reckless
libertine, creeps in
this petty pace from
day to day
Q. Does that mean
that, on balance, you
had just as soon the
joggers found another
stomping ground?
What would you say
to them?
A. "Stand not upon
the order of your go-
ing, but go at once. "
Q. I gather from your
remarks that you
yourself are not a jog-
ger.
A. "I had rather be a
dog, and bay the
moon
Q. Thank you, Mr.
Shakespeare.
XEROX COPIES
KASH&
KARRY
14th & Charles
Six of the seven Samurai warriors return from their favorite Greenville
Halloween party.
'Seven Samurai9 Plays
At Hendrix Tuesday
THE SEVEN
SAMURAI-
Set in 16th century
Japan, Kurosawa's
action epic concerns
the recruitment of
seven sumurai war-
riors to defend a pea-
sant community from
the annual attacks of
bandits. When the
samurais arrive, a
spectacular series of
battles begin in which
a splendidly mobile
camera seems to be
everywhere, shooting
through foliage,
rainstorms, dust, and
wind. As in the best
films of John Ford,
the sense of spectacle
is combined with
compassion and the
ability to create vivid
characters. A year in
the making, (1954)
The Seven Samurai
was Japan's most ex-
pensive film to that
date and a triumph
worldwide.
Seven Samurai will
be shown Tuesday
evening at 7 p.m.
rather than Wednes-
day as previously
scheduled. Admission
to the Hendrdix
Theatre showing is by
student I.D. and ac-
tivity card.
Al Green: King Jesus
Will Make You Winner
font, from page 7
Green bounces
back to urban con-
temporary with "I
Know It Was the
Blood Green
recently sang this song
on Soul Train, and
the number proved
lively enough for
some inspired break
dancing. But despite
the up-tempo beat,
there's a strong gospel
pitch in the lyrics:
If you are a sinner,
King Jesus will make
you a winner.
With one drop of his
blood
He'll make you
whole.
The call and response
chants between Green
and his back-up
singers at the song's
end are a
delight:Thank-you,
Jesus; Thank -you,
Jesus; Thank -you,
Lord;Thank-you,
Lord, , they call back
and forth. This
dialogue is punc-
tuated with
rhythmical church-
choir hand clapping.
Another "amen" for
this number.
"Straighten Out
Your Life" maintains
the religious fervor
with more call and
response. Green sings,
You'll see the dif-
ference,You'll feel
the change,When
you straighten out
your lifeIn Jesus'
name, as his back-up
singers respond with
the same. Intensity
builds through the
song providing a
powerful ending to
the album. Another,
"amen
TO Rise Again is a
remarkable album. It
digs back perhaps 50
years and explores the
roots of popular black
music. Perhaps the
best cuts on the album
are done in the
gospelblues style that
emerged from the
Mississippi Delta
region early in this
century. Other songs
are right-with-the-
times urban contem-
porary. The only
weakness in the album
are the numbers on
side one that em-
phasize strings. But
throughout the
album, Al Green's
high, sensual voice is
as strong and soulful
as ever. It's a voice
that's been missing
from the charts too
long. If you liked
soul-singer Al Green,
you'll like this album
by gospel-singer
Reverend Green.
TO Rise Again pro-
vided courtesy of Rick
at Flamingo Records,
Evans Street,
downtown Greenville.
Deloris Elks of
THE NEW IMAGE
invites all ECU FACULTY
AND STUDENTS
to come in for their hair care
call for appointment today!
Also open nights by appointment
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m could he in charge ot a Much
nii.il Like ofl Harrier or one ot our
helicopters. nd you could do il h the time
! special commitment on vour
in ai
on to he
ii-
it our
undergraduate officer commissioning pn grains I
you iv a junior, check oul our graduate program.
Starting salaries are from SF,(HK) to Som
can count on going (arther faster
Ma ht on lju be t uu nt u
The Few.
ITic lrouil.
Tie Marines.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
I HE EAST CAROl INI AN
Sports
NOVEMBER 1. 1983
Page 10
No Smiles After Homecoming Win
By CINDY PLEAS ANTS
Sport Kdlioi
There weren't too many smiling
faces going into the ECU locker
room after Saturday's homecom-
ing game.
In fact, no one would have ever
known that the Pirates had just
beaten East Tennessee State, 21-9,
by the looks on some of the
players' faces.
With a record crowd of 33,767
on hand to watch their perfor-
mance, the Pirate offense was an
unhappy crew. After putting 21
points on the board in th first
half, the Pirates came out a litte
too relaxed in the second period.
The result was three fumbles,
two interceptions and no points.
Head Coach Ed Emory was ex-
tremely disappointed.
"The (offense) should have felt
dejected he said. "We didn't
play like we've been playing and
the offensive grades (from film)
reflects that.
"We had three offensive
linemen play the poorest they've
played this year
Emory said the points scored in
the first half may have come too
easily for the Pirates. "We got 21
easy points, and I think they
thought, 'hey, this is gonna be
easy today
The Pirates got a little help in
the first minutes of the game when
Buc punter Bobby Goodwin
shanked the ball for a six-yard
punt return to put ECU on East
Tennessee's 29-yard line.
Three plays later, tailback Jim-
my Walden ran 21 yards to score
the Pirates' first touchdown.
East Tennessee again had pun-
ting trouble, but this time the pro-
blem was caused by the ECU
defense. Defensive tackle Hal
Stephens blocked punter George
Cimadevilla's kick for a two-yard
punt return.
Sitting on ETSU's 44-yard line,
the Pirates quickly moved down
field. With 2:38 remaining in the
quarter, ECU quarterback Kevin
Ingram threw a 34-yard pass to
Ricky Nichols for a touchdown.
The Pirates led 14-0.
Star punt returner Henry
Williams, who has been the na-
tion's number one kick-off
returner for weeks now, had a
chance to do one of his notorious
flips after running 53 yards for a
touchdown late in the first
quarter.
But Williams' run was called
back after ECU was penalized 10
yards for defensive holding.
Emory said Williams was eager to
return, but he didn't get too many
chances. "I told Henry, 'hey
don't get disgusted, we'll take the
ball at the 40 or 50-yard line every
time Emory said.
The Pirates shook off the
penalty, however, and with 5:32
on the clock, Junior Reggie
Branch ran up the middle to score
ECU last touchdown of the day.
With a 21-0 lead, Emory put in
the second teams, including
quarterback John Williams. The
senior, however, needed some
warming up. Williams threw two
interceptions before halftime.
"John Williams is a super player,
and it's not fair to put him in
under those conditions.
"I changed personnel there too
early, and that hurt us. I take all
the blame for hurting momentum,
but I wanted to give some of these
other guys a chance to play. We
were trying to build some depth
The Pirate defense certainly
wasn't lacking momentum in the
second half. After stopping ETSU
from having one first down in the
first period, the strong Pirate
defense kept after the rejuvenated
Bucs in the second half.
ETSU controlled the ball r'or
the first 6:14 of the third quarter.
Placekicker Herbie Campbell
kicked a 27-yard field goal after
the Bucs were unable to move the
ball beyond the 10-yard line in
three plays.
In the fourth quarter, Williams
missed ETSU's punt and then
touched the ball on the six-yard
line. East Tennessee regained
possession. Runningback Frank
Armstrong strolled six yards to
score ETSU's first touchdown to
make the score 21-9 in the fourth
quarter.
Ingram had two passes in-
tercepted and one fumble, but the
defense held off the Bucs from
taking advantage with two
quarterback sacks and a strong
pass defense.
Emory was jubilant over the
defense's play. "Thank God for
defense he said. "I want our
students to realize that defense is
Kobe Looks To State
By RANDY MEWS
AUit Sport Mltor
The ECU swim team held their
annual Purple-Gold scrimmage
on Thursday in preparation for its
Nov. 16 season-opening meet with
N.C. State.
"This was a very encouraging
meet Coach Rick Kobe said.
"We beat every time from last
year, with the exception of one
event
Kobe said everybodv swam
well, but he was particularly
pleased with the performances of
Chema Larranaga, Stan Williams
and Kevin Richards.
irJ15183 won the 50� and
lOOO-meter freestyle events, while
also placing first on the 400
freestyle relay team.
Larranaga is from Lima, Peru
and is considered one of the better
distance freestyiers in the country
LOU CLCMMONS�SCU PUdte Lab
Diver Scott Eagle looks in top form as he and the Pirates prepare for
their season opener against N.C. State on Nov. 17 at Minges Pool.
He holds two Peruvian national
records and was a participant in
the 1980 Olympics in Moscow.
Willliams, who spent last yeai
in Texas, returns as the Pirates
top sprint freestyler. He won the
50 and 100 freestyle, while alsc
anchoring the 200 Medley relay
team to a first-place finish.
Richards, who Kobe calls one
of the most versatile swimmers or
the team, was the other Pirate tc
have an outstanding meet. He
teamed with Williams on the
medley relay and took individual
honors in the 200 backstroke and
the individual medley event.
Doug MacMillan was another
Pirate that Kobe said swam well.
He won the 200 butterlfy, an
event that he holds the ECU
record in.
Diver Scott Eagle, an NCAA
regional participant last season,
performed as expected. He easily
won the one and three-meter div-
ing events.
Freshman Caycee Paust led the
way for the women. She won the
200 individual medley, the 200
backstroke and was lead-off per-
son for the first place 200 freestyle
relay team.
Although Paust's finishes
aren't counted as official until the
season begins, she holds times
that are better than the current
ECU marks.
Jean Keathing established her
dominance in the freestyle, cap-
turing the 50 and 100 events, while
anchoring the 200 freestyle relay
team to victory.
Cindy Newman, who Kobe calls
the most versatile of the women,
took second place finishes in the
200 and 500 freestyle, and the 200
butterfly.
Although ECU is unsuccessful
against the Wolfpack in 33 tries,
Kobe thinks this year's team has
the best chance of all. "We've
been in extensive training for the
last month, and we were still able
to turn in excellent times he
said. "We're going to come out
well rested against State, and I
think we can win
JV Team Beats Fork Union
what you win championships
with. It's what you go to bowl
games with
Emory said running up the
score against East Tennessee
would not have accomplished
anything. "Yes, we should have
had 50 points at halftime, but I
don't think beating East Ten-
nessee 50-0 or 66-0 would make a
difference in bowl selection.
"I think we're gonna have to do
something at Miami (this
weekend) if we're gonna be con-
sidered for any top bowls
Did the ECU offense have
Miami on its minds Saturday?

The East Carolina JV football
team scored an impressive 28-14
victory yesterday against Fork
Union Military Academy. It was
the first time ECU has ever beaten
Fork Union.
Coach Ed Emory was on hand
and was very impressed with the
team's play. "I'm just tickled the
way our boys played, and I
thought our coaches did an ex-
cellent job also
The Pirates opened the coring
with 9:?6 remaining in the first
half on a one-yard run by Pat
Bowen, but the extra point was
missed on a bobbled snap. The
key play in the 80-yard drive was a
42-yard pass from Darrell Speed
to Chris McLawhorn.
A high snap from center on a
fourth-and-one, enabled the
Pirates to gain possession on the
Fork Union 17. From there it took
just four plays for the Pirates to
go up 12-0 on a two-yard run by
Bowen. ECU then connected on a
two-point conversion as Ike Hill
took the ball around the right end
for the score.
In the third quarter, ECU put
together a 79-yard drive which
culminated in a two-yard run by
Emory said that's a possibility.
"Psychologically, you never
know what a man might put in his
mind he said. "They can con-
trol that. They can kick anything
distracting out
Emory said the Pirates cannnot
make mistakes against Miami. "If
East Tennessee had been a good
offensive team, we would have
been in trouble he said. "We
had seven turnovers and nine
penalties he said. "You can't
win like that. It'll stop you every
time
Emory said the Pirates are hop-
ing to play better in Ficklen
Stadium agatnst William & Mary
in two weeks. "We never play as
good as we should at home he
said. "I'm disappointed that we
didn't excite the crowd. It was a
beautiful day, and I've never seen
that many people there (in Ficklen
Stadium) before. This is the third
time we've lost momentum, but
we just can't afford to anymore.
If you can't get fired up at home,
there's no reason to be playing
The Pirates, now 6-2, will play
fourth-ranked Miami this Satur-
day at 2 p.m.
OARY PATTERSON�ECU Poto Lfc
ECU runningback Ernest Byner makes his way down field, but three East Tennessee Bucs get ready to put the
squeeze on the Pirates' top rusher.
Miami Is The Game To Win
Miami. ECU head coach Ed
Emory has had the powerful,
defensive team on his mind for a
while.
Now that he's played East Ten-
nessee, he'll confess that when he
headed for his television show last
Saturday he took an information
folder on Miami rather than East
Tennessee State.
If there was ever a win that
could bring the East Carolina
Pirates what they want � a na-
tional ranking, a sure bowl bid �
this is the game to win.
Dwight Richardson. The key play
of the drive was a 37-yard run by
Richardson.
Fork Union then came right
back by marching 75 yards in four
plays. Their touchdown came on a
38-yard TD run by Rocky
Stockett.
With 44 seconds remaining in
the third quarter, Speed hit Amos
Adams on a 69-yard pass that
bolstered ECU's lead to 28-7.
The final score of the game
came when Fork Union's Stockett
took the ball 17 yards for the
score.
CINDY PLEASANTS
A Look Inside
"There is more pressure than
ever Emory said. "People ex-
pect so much from this football
team. They're (fans) already
packing their goods to go to a
bowl game instead of heading to
Miami.
"My God, this is our bowl
game. This is the Orange Bowl,
and it's gonna be one heckuva
battle.
"Miami is the best team we've
played against
The Pirates did eliminate one
pressure this weekend � a winn-
ing season. "It's great to get over
that hurdle Emory said. "Now
we've got to go down to Miami
and say 'hey, we're undefeated at
home. Let's go for the other
things, the national ranking, the
bowl bid. It's all out there for us
to take.
"We can go out now and relax
a little more because nobody's ex-
pecting us to beat them except
ourselves, and we're capable of
doing that
After losing twice in Florida,
once to Florida State (47-46) and
to the University of Florida
(24-17), Emory said the Pirates
should not have any trouble fin-
ding a motivation factor.
"I think our kids ought to be
pumped up he said. "I think
they should say that they're not
going down there and lose three
games in a row. I sure don't want
to be embarrassed three times. We
should have won the other two.
"We've got to play the best
game of the year, and we've got to
have the right frame of mind
Anytime you get bitten twice, you
should know better the third
time
How does Miami measure up to
Florida and Florida State? Accor-
ding to Emory, there's not too
much of a comparison. "There's
no doubt that Miami is the
toughest of the three he said.
"They (Miami) are much more of
a physical team.
"Miami's better defensively
than Florida and better offensive-
ly than Florida State, but Miami
has been fortunate with their
schedule.
Emory explained that Miami
has played teams which are usual-
ly very good but are having bad
seasons this year. "They've only
played two teams with winning
records he said. Miami has
beaten such teams as Purdue
(3-6), Houston (2-6). Louisville
(3-5) and Mississippi State (2-6).
Miami beat Notre Dame, 25-0,
and crushed nationally-ranked
West Virginia last week, 20-3.
Emory believes the Pirates are
playing Miami at an opportune
time this year. "I think this is the
best time we could play'em. West
Virginia was by far the best team
they've played, and they've got
Florida State right after us
Emory said the Bucs will have
to continue to play great defense
if they are to beat the Hurricanes.
"We're gonna have to control
(Miami quarterback Bernie)
Kozar. We're gonna have to play
extremely aggressive and stay
penalty-free on defense.
"We must have a great kicking
game, and offensively, we've got
to move the ball and move those
down markers.
"Coach (Art) Baker (offensive
coordinator) and I were totally
embarrassed about Saturday
(against East Tennessee) and the
way we played in the second half.
We can't have seven turnovers
and win
Miami lost two starters against
West Virginia. Senior fullback
Robert (Speedy) Neal and senior
middle guard Tony Fitzpatrick
have reportedly been operated on
this week. ECU didn't suffer any
major injuries against East Ten-
nessee, and runningback Tony
Baker is expected to be back for
the Miami game.
Following ECU's bout with
Florida, Coach Emory wasn't too
happy about the one-sided of-
ficiating in Gainesville. The head
coach is keeping his fingers cross-
ed on this trip.
"I think Miami uses Southern
Independent officials instead of
Southeastern conference
officials he said. "You know,
it's funny. After the Auburn
game, (Head Florida Coach)
Charley Pell said his players were
intimidated by SEC officals, and
when they go out of their
homepark, they are discriminated
against Coach Emory chuckled
and shook his head.
"I just hope they leave it up to
the two teams to decide which is
best
Then Emory leaned back in his
chair with a gleam in his eye. "In
one game, we could wrap up the
greatest season this school has
ever had
The Pirates leave Belk Dorm
Friday evening at 6:15 p.m. and
will arrive in Miami around 9:13
p.m.
Sneaker
Sez
honj
16:01
(17
b-
It was an energetic
way to start
Homecoming, but
this yeari ECl In-
tramural Cross Cam
pus Run was an even
greater success than
last year's event.
In all, about 80 run
ners participated in
the two events, in-
cluding a squad from
Army ROTC who ran
in formation chanting
marching songs The
race was open to ali
ECU student
ty. staff and alun
In the fiver
run, the winner
almost becorr
tradition w
Bill White �
the course first
with a time
an outstanding
He was followej b
studer. I H
Bothmar (28:24
BUI Sabino 21 49
Third place in the
dent division w?
Ron Hochm
(29:30). Top he
in the alumn; z
went to White, Ken
Murrav (30:23) a
Mike O'Ca. L
(32:14). Robert P '
rison (29:12
Lamb :
Morgan B a
(36:4) took
three spots
faculty-sta-
in the
competition,
students tc -
honors. Ellen b
finished first with a
time of 34:16 fol
ed bv Hannah Ad
(38:01) and I
Fowler (58 I -
Angela Smith was
first in the fac
staff division wit
time of 4S:4l,
In the 2.5 mih
GO
PIRATE
1 Classifi
r
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INTERESTED in
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international �mpwymm' direc
tory Coat Thai' director
lists hundreds o� US Com- �
Organizations �itfi �sy�e a z-
operanons Foe turtnef
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COLLEGE REP WANTED �c
distribute Stud Ra't
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oived For information and im-
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Drive Mooretvilte NC
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Trallwi
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SPECIAL STL DE
�rNrt





1
T

Win
v better in Ficklen
. linst William & Mary
eeks. "Ne never play as
as we should at home he
"I'm disappointed that we
the crowd. It was a
and Pve never seen
lat mam people there (in Ficklen
m) before This is the third
ne we"e lost momentum, but
n't afford to anymore.
gel fired up at home,
l&ere's cason to be playing
The Pirates, novs 6-2, will play
urth-ranked Miami this Satur-
i U 2 p.m.

GARY PATTERSON�ECU W�ot Lab
Minessee Bucs get ready to put the
To Win
remely aggressive and
malty-free on defense.
stav
'We must have a great kicking
me. and offensively, we've got
move the baJl and move those
markers.
'Coach (Art) Baker (offensive
?ordinator) and I were totally
iDarrassed about Saturday
gainst East Tennessee) and the
t) we played in the second half.
e can't have seven turnovers
a in
Miami lost two starters against
test Virginia. Senior fullback
lobert (Speedy) Neal and senior
Vddle guard Tony Fitzpatrick
�e reportedly been operated on
11 s week. ECU didn't suffer any
lajor injuries against East Ten-
"?ssee, and runningback Tony
iker is expected to be back for
e Miami game.
Following ECU's bout with
lorida, Coach Emory wasn't too
ippy about the one-sided of-
ciating in Gainesville. The head
)ach is keeping his fingers cross-
J on this trip.
T think Miami uses Southern
dependent officials instead of
butheastern conference
fficials he said. "You know,
s funny. After the Auburn
Ne, (Head Florida Coach)
larley Pell said his players were
Itimidated by SEC officals, and
en they go out of their
mepark, they are discriminated
kajnst Coach Emory chuckled
d shook his head.
"I just hope they leave it up to
U two teams to decide which is
I Then Emory leaned back in his
lair with a gleam in his eye. "In
W game, we could wrap up the
jeatest season this school has
jer had
The Pirates leave Belk Dorm
iday evening at 6:15 p.m. and
II arrive in Miami around 9:15
THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 1, 1983 11
Sneaker Sam
Sez
It was an energetic
way to start
Homecoming, but
this ycaii ECU In-
tramural Cross Cam-
pus Run was an even
greater success than
last year's event.
In all, about 80 run-
ners participated in
the two events, in-
cluding a squad from
Army ROTC who ran
in formation chanting
marching songs. The
race was open to all
ECU students, facul-
ty, staff and alumni.
In the five-mile-
run, the winner has
almost become a
tradition with alumni
Bill White finishing
the course first again
with a time of 27:27,
an outstanding time.
He was followed by
students Hans
Bothman (28:24) and
Bill Sabino (28:49).
Third place in the stu-
dent division went to
Ron Hochmuth
(29:30). Top honors
in the alumni division
went to White, Ken
Murray (30:23) and
Mike O'Callaghan
(32:14). Robert Mor-
rison (29:12), Thomas
Lamb (33:49).
Morgan Barclay
(36:47) took the top
three spots in the
faculty-staff division.
In the women's
competition, three
students took top
honors. Ellen Bond
finished first with a
time of 34:16 follow-
ed by Hannah Adams
(38:01) and Tricia
Fowler (38:19).
Angela Smith was
first in the faculty-
staff division with a
time of 48:41.
In the 2.5 mile race,
student Jeffrey
McLean took top
honors with a time of
16:02. Bobby Medlin
(17:12) and Michael
Beckman (17:34) took
the other top two slots
in the student divi-
sion. In alumni com-
petition Kent Ganzert
and Michael Heath
took second and third
places overall, respec-
tively with times of
16:25 and 16:45.
Third in the alumni
division was Ray
Spears (19:58). The
top three in the
faculty-staff division
were David White
(19:18), Mike Bishop
(20:58) and Heldur
Lilvak (21:05).
Only students par-
ticipated in the
women's division with
top honors going to
Donna Robertson
(18:30), Vickie Biagini
(19:58) and Michelle
Perna (21:05).
One of the unusual
aspects of this run was
that because of the
Army ROTC squad
running in formation,
14 people finished in
17 seconds between
21:05 and 21:22.
"This is a great lit-
tle race according
to alumni Murray and
a lot of people seem to
agree. The races went
smoothly with an in-
creased number of
participants.
"We wish we could
get 100 people out for
each race said race
coordinator Robert
Fox. Considering the
enthusiasm of this
year's participants,
that may be a definite
possibility for next
year.
GO
PfRATESn
Classifieds
SALE
SCUBA EQUIPMENT: For
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plus marta-0 regulator. Less than
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WANTED
JOBS OVERSEAS M F (in-
cluding Australia. South Pacific.
Europe, Africa. Alaska, Cruise
Snip, Airlines). Temporary and
full tint. SM,0M to $44,000. Call
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international employment direc
Tory Cost flf. Their directory
lists hundreds of US Companies �
Organizations with world wide
operations. For further infor-
malton call 304-734-5103.
COLLEGE REP WANTED to
distribute "Student Rate"
subscription cards at this cam-
pus. Good income, no soiling in-
volved. For information and ap-
plication write to: Alton S.
Lowrance, Director, 251 Glen
Drive, Moorosville, NC
30115.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: 2 bedroom furnish-
ed. Kings Row Apts. 12 rent
utilites. HBO, microwave Call
attr I p.m. 752-7757.
FEMALE ROOMATE NEED-
ED tor next semester may move
in now. Georgetown Apts. across
form campus. $73.75.
NEEDED NOW male roommate
private bedroom 13 utilities and
rent call 757-0454.
FEMALE ROOMATES needed
for next semester may move in
now. Georgetown Apt. across
from campus $73.75 Call
750-445.
MISC.
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
campus include experienced
professional work. Pro-
ofreading, spelling and gram-
matical corrections 355-6740
after 5:30.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING.
355-474
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1983
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t

1?THE EAST CAROLINIAN NOVEMBER 1. 1983
M
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Title
The East Carolinian, November 1, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
November 01, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.298
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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