The East Carolinian, October 27, 1983






She
Carolinian
Serving the East Caroline campus community since 1925
Vol.S8Noy icj
Thursday, October 27,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Troops To Stay Until Situation Is 'Stabilized
WASHINGTON (UPI) � The 1,900 U.S. troops
who invaded Grenada Tuesday will remain on the
tiny island until there are "assurances that there is
stability down there White House spokesman
Larry Speakes said Wednesday.
"Our goal remains to get out as soon as possible
Speakes said as administration officials reported
scattered fighting continued in the eastern Caribbean
nation.
Defense Secretary Caspar Weinberger, however,
suggested the duration of the American occupation
may be linked to edtablishing a new, democratic
government on the island.
President Reagan, in letters to the leaders of the
House and Senate, said Tuesday it is not possible to
predict how long the American Marines and Army
Rangers will stay, but pledged they "will remain only
so long as their presence is required
Reagan made the statement in a letter of formal
notification, required under the War Powers Resolu-
tion, about 12 hours after the U.SIed multinational
force landed on Grenada and moved to overthrow
the island's Marxist rulers. In justifying the move,
Reagan cited "a vacuum of authority" on the island.
The Pentagon said late Tuesday six Americans
were killed and 23 wounded in the battle for control
of the island. About 300 troops from Caribbean
states joined the American forces in the operation.
The invasion put U.S. troops into direct conflict
with some of the 600 Cubans working on a new
10,000-foot air strip on Grenada, and administration
officials said there were about 30 Soviet advisers in
the country.
Reagan plans to deliver a nationally broadcast ad-
dress Thursday evening to explain both his decision
to act in Grenada and the situation in Lebanon,
ECU Faculty Members
Speak Out On Invasion
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
Staff Writer
Reactions by ECU ad-
ministrators and professors to
Tuesday's U.Sled invasion of
Grenada were mixed.
One question which has been
raised is whether there is a
similarity between this invasion
and the Soviet invasion of
Afghanistan.
"They're both actions that the
two states took without using
machinery that might be available
in international organizations
said ECU Chancellor John
Howell. "That's not the first time
that sort of thing has happened of
For student reaction to the
Grenada invasion, see the opinion
survey, page 5
course. There has been less and
less reliance on international
organizations Howell added.
"We do have a situation in
Grenada where there was a coup
and an argument could be made
for a similarity said Tinsley
Yarbrough, chairman of the ECU
political science department.
Lon Felker, assistant professor
of political science, disagreed.
"It's an entirely differem o.tua-
tion he said. "This (the inva-
sion) is strictly to establish the
safety of American citizens and to
provide order in a situation that
had gotten disorderly he said.
"I think there are all kinds of
differences said Sandra Wurth-
Hough, assistant professor of
Middle East, African and interna-
tional politics. "If you want to
draw a similarity between
Afghanistan and the Carribean
situation, it appears from the
limited information we have that
in both instances the so-called
'super-power' was requested to
come in
Concerning the way in which
the situation in Grenada was
handled, Howell said, "It's hard
for somebody sitting up here the
����� way I am to give
" any expert opi-
nion on it other
than to say, in a
general sort of
way, that that is
��bimmmb not the way I
prefer to reslove international
issues. I prefer to resolve them in
a more orderly fashion according
to the machinery that has already
been established
Howell also commented on the
fact that the Reagan administra-
tion is not the only administration
to respond in this manner. Howell
specialized his studies in interna-
tional organizations and the
United Nations law.
"If you lack communication
and transportation, and
everything is unreliable, then the
Sandra Wurth-Hough
different from Afghanistan
typical thing for a decision maker
is to fall back on what they can re-
ly upon, and that ends up being
the U.S. Marines sometimes
said Wurth-Hough.
She said she felt the Carribean
situation could be better explained
than the situation in Lebanon
because of foreign policy objec-
tives. "The objectives are to pro-
tect a core territory and the Carri-
bean is a heck of a lot closer she
added.
"The Reagan administration is
trying to protect Americans and
trying to say that it will not
tolerate further Soviet expansion
in the Carribean Yarbrough
said. He said he could see where
the situation would look like an
exaggerated response, but said he
could see President Reagan's
point.
"It seems to be a situation that
is more unsettled than anything
else Felker said. "I can't say
what is happening there, nobody
really knows
Radio Station Salaries
Cause Disagreement
By ANDREA MARKELLO
Staff Writ
In responding to the resignation
of Jim D. Ensor, Jr former
WZMB general manager, Media
Board Chairman Mark Niewald
said there was a problem with
budget monies and expenditures.
The issue of WZMB budget
revisions, presented at the Media
Board's September meeting was
sent to the WZMB advisory com-
mittee for consideration. Revised
budget sums consist of original
budget sums plus carry-over funds
left from the previous year.
Vice Chancellor of Student Life
Elmer Meyer said each of the five
campus media organizations has a
See WZMB, Page 5
Mark Niewald
Young Democrats Endorse PIRG
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
The ECU chapter of the Young Democrats releas-
ed a proclamation Wednesday pledging their support
to the establishment of a Public Interest Research
Group at ECU.
"We felt we had to come out and make a commit-
ment one way or the other said Buddy Conner,
president of the ECU Young Democrats.
Conner said Jay Stone, a PIRG supporter, came to
a meeting of the Young Democrats to explain the
essentials of the organization and answer questions
raised by members of the Young Democrats about
PIRG.
Conner said his organization was most concerned
about the type of funding method, known as a
"negative check-off that PIRG hopes to use at
ECU.
PIRG's negative check-off plan has received
strong opposition from ECU's chapter of the College
Republicans. The plan would allow funds for a PIRG
to be included in student registration fees. Students
not wishing to support PIRG would be free to re-
quest a refund of the fee, which would be from $1 $3
per semester.
Conner said he was assured by Stone that PIRG
would take strong measures to assure that enrolling
students be notified of the funding plan. "He (Stone)
assured us that they would well publicize the system
of how to get a refund Conner said. "This would
include publicaion of an information sheet to be in-
cluded in the students' registration packet
In their proclamation, the Young Democrats
wrote: "Whereas, PIRG groups on other campuses
across the United States and North Carolina have
been shown to do positive, supportive action on
behalf of students be it resolved that the East
Carolina University Young Democrats come out in
active and unqualified support of the establishment
of a PIRG on the East Carolina University campus.
Interest in an ECU PIRG began last spring when
consumer activist and PIRG founder Ralph Nader
visited ECU. PIRGs support student research on
consumer issues from an advocacy perspective.
"The concept of PIRG is hard to argue with
Conner said. "It's good to get stuents more involved
in public research. It's good to get ECU more involv-
ed in public research, and we believe PIRG has in
other areas, and would here, accomplish these objec-
tives
"I'm really happy that they decided to support
PIRG Stone said in an interview Wednesday. "I
think it shows wisdom and a concern for students
Stone added he viewed the attempt to establish a
PIRG as a non-partisan issue. "PIRG has gotten
support from Republicans such as Sen. Charles Percy
of Illinois Stone said.
where more than 200 U.S. servicemen were killed
Sunday in a terrorist bombing.
The president canceled a campaign-style trip to
Dallas and Las Vegas, Nev Thursday and Friday.
While Republican and Democratic leaders on
Capitol Hill indicated their support for the military
action in the Caribbean, rank-and-file members were
up in arms Tuesday. Many were baffled. Rep. Paui
Simon, D-I1L, said the "military solution seems to be
an automatic reflex" under Reagan.
Other members complained of the president's
"cowboy mentality or branded him as "trigger-
happy
"We want to get out as quickly as possible
Speakes said today of Grenada. "I think what we
would like to do is have some assurances that there is
stability there, and I think we'll make our judgments
as time goes along
Former Grenada Resident
Although Reagan's stated goal is to "restore law
and order" to Grenada in the aftermath of a brutal
coup by elements he described as "leftist thugs
Weinberger indicated a longer-range goal.
"We don't plan to stay a minute more than we
have to to get a government that is chosen by the peo-
ple back in power he said on NBC's "Today"
show.
Servicemen injured in Grenada were flown back to
Fort Bragg, home of the 82nd Airborne Division,
Wednesday, an Army official in Washington said.
The official, who asked not to be identified, said
the wounded were being treated at Womack Army
Hospital. He said he was unsure how many of the 33
servicemen wounded in Grenada arrived Wednesday
and where other servicemen would be taken.
Act Seen As Imperialistic
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
A UNC-CH graduate who
spent a year living in Grenada
called Tuesday's U.S. invasion of
the small Caribbean nation an act
of "blatant imperialism" and
called for an immediate pull-out
of U.S. forces.
"Thr (U.S. officials) say
they're going in to protect
American lives, but really all it is
is just a pretense to form a new
government. It's just blatant im-
perialism said Doug Rector, a
chemist who spent 1980 in
Grenada doing research with an
enviornmental group.
"I just keep drawing the
parallel with Afghanistan Rec-
tor said. "We condemn the Rus-
sians and here we go and do the
same thing to Grenada with even
less pretense than the Russians
had
Rector, now living in Mobile,
Ala said he wasn't surprised by
the U.S. actions. "I even had a
dream about it, that the United
States was going to invade Rec-
tor said.
Rector said he was shocked
when he heard about the Oct. 19
assasination of Grenadan Prime
Minister Maurice Bishop only a
day after scores of Grenadan peo-
ple stormed a building temporari-
ly freeing Bishop, who was under
house arrest.
"Maurice Bishop was a really
good guy � really popular Rec-
tor said. "I know 90 percent of
the people supported Bishop and
his policies when I was there
He added that the actions of the
people to free Bishop indicated
that Bishop was still popular
before his death.
Rector said Bishop received
most of his support from people
living in the island's urban
centers, where the majority of the
Grenadan population is based.
"The people living in the coun-
tryside probably would support
the United States Rector said,
noting that greater numbers of
U.S. citizens live in the rural
areas.
Rector agreed with former U.S.
ambassador to Grenada Sally
Shelton that the recent construc-
tion of an international airport on
the tiny island was not necessarily
done for military purposes. "A
long runway would have been
needed to accomodate jets from
Europe Rector said. "It's not
an extraordinarily long runway
Shelton said Tuesday the U.S.
should not over-react to the con-
struction of the airport. "There
are at least four other countries in
the Caribbean which have run-
ways considerably longer than
that of Granada Shelton said.
"One should not necessarily jump
to conclusions abou the use to
which that airport would be put
The Reagan administration
claims the invasion was necessary
to protect the lives of the more
than 1,000 Americans living on
the island, many of whom are
enrolled in St. George's Universi-
ty Medical School.
The airport has also been con-
troversial among U.S. officials
who have questioned the motives
for the airport's construction.
Analysis
Rector said the airport issue was
controversial when he lived there.
"I feel more sorry for the peo-
ple who are just caught up in the
crossfire down there Rector
said. "They're just really simple
and happy people. That's the
thing that impressed me the whole
time I was down there All
that's going to change now; it'll
be just kind of like Vietnam or
Cambodia after we leave
Rector believes that Bishop was
overthrown by forces who Mt he
did not have close enough ties
with Cuba. "I imagine Cuba had
a lot of influence with the new
government; whether it was back-
ed by Cuba or not I couldn't say,
but they were definitely going
toward that direction
Rector said he hopes the United
Nations will take action deman-
ding a U.S. pull-out from
Grenada. "I don't see how they
(U.S. officials) can justify it at
all Rector said. "There's no
justification for it at all
Corporate Funding Needed
By WILLIAM WILSON
Staff Writer
Don Leggett, director of Alum-
ni Relations at ECU, and F. Mar-
vin Slaughter Jr president of the
ECU Alumni Association, attend-
ed a White House briefing during
National Higher Education earlier
this month.
The briefing of Wednesday,
Oct. 5, was conducted in conjunc-
tion with a weeklong workshop
series sponsored by the Council
for the Advancement and Support
ECU Alumni Attend Briefing
of Education.
Jim Coyne, special assistant to
the president and director of the
Office of Private Sector Initiative,
spoke at the briefing. In his
30-minute presentation Coyne
stressed the need for the involve-
ment of the private sector, most
notably corporate funding, in
support of colleges.
The Office of Private Sector In-
itative was set up under the
Reagan administration to provide
a channel by which the private
sector may become involved in
support of higher education.
Leggett agreed with Coyne, ad-
ding that although state funding
provides a base for education,
funding from the private sector is
essential to an institution's viabili-
ty.
The CASE workshop series, an
11-year-old organization, has seen
the rise of corporate involvement
in higher education rise from
three corporations extending sup-
port to over 90 corporations.
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If vou or your organization
wou'd like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nounoement form and send if to
The East Carolinian in care of
the u'Oduction manager
Announcement forms are
ava lable at the East Carolinian
oft e n the Publications
Building Flyers and handwr.t
ten i opy on odd sued paper can
not re accepted
Te is no charge tor an
i-ments but space is often
limited Therefore we ijnno'
una vitee thst youi announce
men' wui run as long as you
want and suggest that you do not
� . solely on this column for
Put) '
r h� deadline tor an
"oon, ements is 3 p m Vonoay
e Tuesday paper and 3
p m Apcinesday for the Thurs
day paper NO announcements
re.e ed after hese deadlines:
M printed
space is available to a"
- organizations ana
oep.i' tmenfs
PT, OT,
NURSING?
Do you have a friend in these
ma,or� or in Medical
Technology. Social Work
Special Education. Medical
Records Recreational Therapy
Die'etics Community Health
SLAP or Child Development? if
so. make sure they knovy to
come to both HEALTH
CAREERS DAYS Nov 4 from
9 30 12 30 in the Nursing
Bu'lding Nov 7 from 1 30 4 30
in the Allied Health Building ap
prox;mately 50 agencies will be
represented
GAMMA
OMICRON DELTA
Gamma Omicron Delta, a
Chr-sfian service organization,
- oid a meeting Thursday
Oct 77 at 4 p m in Mendenhaii
room 221 Everyone is welcome'
Core and find out all about this
organization and how you can be
involved
SURFING CLUB
There will be a meeting for the
Surfing Club on Thursday Oct
27 at Mendenhaii In the coffee
house at 7 p.m Everyone please
try to be there, this is an impor
tant meeting.
THE HEART AND
MINDOFMAN
Everybody wants to unders
tand why people think and do the
things they do By knowing and
understanding God's Word, the
Bible, you begin to understand
"the thougts and intents of the
heart (Hebrews 4:12) By
knowing God thru his Word, the
Bible, we can live dynamically
and change our thoughts so we
can be our best (l Corinthians
2:4 Romans I 37 and 12:2)
Come by the booth In front of the
student supply store Friday. Oct
2S for more information
PRCCLUB
The PP.C club will meet Tues
day, Nov 1, at 7 p m in room 244
Mendenhaii Plans for the up
coming State conference will be
discussed All members please
attend
BIBLE CLASS
Did you know that by
understanding the Bible, you
unlock God's power in your life?
You then have the knowledge
needed to do what is right to
make good things happen in
your life and in others. Come by
and check out a segment of our
Bible class that teaches what
God has given us as sons of God
(I Timothy 2 3,40 Call 355 2633 or
752 0424 by Oct 31 for more infor
mation
4HCLUB
MEETING
There will be a meeting of the
4 H Club Tuesday Nov. 1 at 8
p m it will be held at
Mendenhaii Student Center In
quire at the information desk for
room number Everyone
Welcome! 11
PHI SIGMA PI
Brothers the convention had
to be experienced to be bellev
ed! Denials of guilt are to be ex
pected, but those rowdier
brothers know who they are I
Contact our tearless leader tor
group seating football tickets
for Homecoming And don't
forget the Pig Plckln' Saturday
tUpm at David's. Guy is col
lecting the money for the food
and drink ail week pay the
man I Due to unfortunate clr
cumstances, we won't know
about the Torshia Award for a
few weeks but keep your
fingers crossed!
Conventioneers sleep this
week, since nobody did in
Philadelphia, and Homecoming
calls for resourceful time
management!
THANK YOU
Alpha Xi Delta would like to
thank Kappa Sigma for a great
social Also, thank you to Lamb
da Chi Alpha for allowing us to
participate in their Field Day
events Thank you to Sigma Phi
Epsilon for allowing us to par
tlcipate in the volleyball games
We had a great time and we
hope to see you at the events
next time
INTER-VARSITY
inter Varsity is a Christian
Fellowship that meets on
Wednesday nights at 6 30 p m
in Jenkins Auditorium Come
and ioin us for a time of fun,
fellowship, and praising the
Lord!
PRIME TIME
Campus Crusade for Christ is
sponsoring "Prime Time" this
Thrusday at 7 p m. in the Nurs
ng Building Rm 101 Please
join us for fun, fellowship, and
Bible study We are looking for
ward to meeting you
CONGRADULATIONS
The sisters of Alpha Phi would
like to say congradulations to
our 33 new big brothers
Welcome Guys!
NCSL
NCSL Remember next weeks
meeting will be Wed. at 5:30 In
Mendenhaii Rm. 312 Also our
1st Ann'uo nomecoming
Tailgate party will start around
11:30 a.m. Saturday morning In
the parking lot next to the
elementary school beside the
stadium. Look for the NCSL ban
ner Joe's Truck all Interested
students and members ere
welcome (BYOB and Please be
legal!)
PHI
BETA SIGMA
The XI Nu Chapter of Phi Beta
Sigma Fraternity, Inc will be
having a SLAVE AUCTION on
Thursday, Oct 27 at 6 p m. The
auction will take place on the
mall
PI
KAPPA PHI
The Brother of PI Kappa Phi
hopes everyone will have a great
Homecoming It should be
greati
Thanks to all of the little
sisters for making "Big Brother
Little Brother Week" fun and
successful
SRACARD
It's never too late to get an
SRA card Just see your
Residence Director and don't
miss the fun
COOPERATIVE
EDUCATIN OPPOR
TUNITY
tre National institute of
He&.th seeks students to be
employed as full time assistants
to NlH professionals during the
spring semester Maiors in
Biological, Physical, Chemical,
Mathematical and Engineering
Sciences as well as Nursing,
Business and Computer Science
are eligible Studens must have
a 2.0 GPA and have finished 30
semester hours Salaries range
from $4 70 per hour to 5 90 per
hour See the Co op office to app
ly, 313 Rawl Building.
UNITEDLIBERAL
STUDENTS
Society of United Liberal
Students are having a meeting
at today at 7 p m. in room 221
attendence is very important.
CENTRAL CAMPUS
HALLOWEEN PARTY
Free costume party for Cen
trat Campus SRA card holders
and guests. Costume contest
with CASH prizes. Jarvis Cour
tyard is the place to be on Sun
day, Oct 30 from 7 12 p.m. for
free refreshments and a D J.
playing your favorite songs.
SILENT
DINNER
This coming Monday (Hallo-
ween) the Sign Language Club Is
having a silent dinner at
Marathon Resturant at 6:30
p.m. Come down to 560 Evans
Street and sign with us. It's fun
and exciting See ya there
SIGN
LANGUAGE CLUB
Tonight there will be a
covered dish dinner at Mike Cot
ters' house for the clubs friends
and members. Anyone is
welcome but please bring
something with you Dinner will
be at 7 p.m. at 113 East 9th
Street Come ioin us.
ART SCHOLARSHIPS
The School of Art Is offering 2
scholarships for art students of
junior, senior, and graduate
rank These scholarships are in
the amount of $250 00 renewable
and 1353 00 renewable and are to
be awarded shortly after the 1st
of January To qualify, a student
must have an overall grade
point average of 3.0 Included
with the application there must
be a resume giving honors,
awards, andor other evidence
of scholarly and artistic pra
wess. and a portfolio of at least 5
slides of current work Forms
may be obtained from the School
of Art office The deadline for all
completed applications Is
November 30. 1983
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may use tre form at right or
tie a sepsra't srteet of paper if
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units per line Each letter, punc
nation mark and word space
counts mi one unit Capitalize and
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reserve the rignt to reject any ad
All ads must be prepaid. Enclose
7J� per Inc or fraction of a line.
"ac print lefibly! Use capital and
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T
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Address.
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at 75C per line S.
.No. insertions.
.enclosed.
Return to the
secretary b 3 p.m
publication.
Media Board
the da before
III! �1 �i 1 1. 1 J i 1 � i11 � , J - - j
PREPROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
The Preprofessional Health
Alllanc will meet Thursday, Oct
27 at S:30 p.m. in the Ledonla
Wright Cultural Center.
The guest speaker will be
Wanda Bennett, a registered oc
cupalton therapist at Pitt Coun
ty Memorial Hospital. All
members and others are
welcome to attend.
ACCOUNTING
SOCIETY
The Accounting Society will
meet on Wednesday, Nov 9 at 4
p.m. In Mendenhaii Rm 244.
"Accounting In Industry" is the
theme Dr J.Kevin Green from
ECU will speak on the CMA re
qulrements. Jude Plaweckl,
Controller, and Joseph Dobbyns,
Accountant, from Stanadyne
(Fortune 500) will speak on their
Industry experience
Refresments will be served
afterward. Members and pro-
spective members please at
tend
PROSE CONTEST
The REBEL Is offering dollars
for your writing Enter the Pro-
se or Poetry contests and be
eligible for an U0 First prize or
a $25 second prize. Bring typed
entries by the media board or
REBEL offices by Nov. 7. In
elude your name, address, and
phone number. Prize money
provided by the Attic and
Budweiser
PHI ETA SIGMA
There will be a meeting on
Thursday, Oct 27 at 5 in room
212 Mendenhaii We will discuss
plans for Halloween and
Homecoming All members are
urged to attend.
The East Carolinian.
Vt'M'u iht iwwjmt uinTunn
imr 1925
Poblished every ruesda
and Thursday dur ng the
academic year and ever
Wednesday during the sun
mer
The East Carolinian is the
offx.al newspaper of E st
.Carolina University, owned,
operated, and published for
and by the students of Last
Carolina University
Subscription Rate $20 year'y
The East Carolinian offices
are located m the Old South '
Building on the campus uf
ECU, Greenville, N.C
POSTMASTER Sena ad
dress changes to The East
Carolinian Old South
Building, ECU r.reenille
NC 27834
Telephony 7S7 616 6347.
4309
BUYING
LOANS
TVs, Air Conditioners.
Stereos, guns, gold a silver,
diamonds, cameras and
equipment, typewriters,
kerosene heaters,
refrigerators (dorm size on
ly), video games 4 car
tndges, power tools,
musical instruments,
microwave ovens, video
recorders, bicycles, and
anything else of value.
Southern Pawn Shop,
located 405 Evans Street,
downtown 752 2444
76oude of 76aU
40 S. IVANS ST.
�ftfENVtUi, N.C
Latest Styles in
Ladies Hats and accessories
1Q;WAM-SH)PM
rl Students & Faculty
Lowest Prices In Town
��$"2�"DiIc"ount
On Complete
Expires Nov 30th 63 Single Vision Eye glasses
(Not Good With Any Other Specials)
$
15
00
Discount
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20
DISCOUNT FOR
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This Ad Must Accompan, Ode
GREENVILLE STORE ONLV
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315 Partvww Commons
Across From Doctors Park
Open 9 A M -5 30P M Mop -Fn
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CAll US f 2f AN
c�t i iAM STlON
�-�- tob
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Cap'n Crunch
UNCC
CHARLOTTE i"
(UPI) � Univensty of cafetel
North Carolina at ing thj
Charlotte students Smith!
have discoered a Qua
sugar-coated cereal marki
designed to appeaJ to Paul
children is good an rm
time of the da and n
are consuming 90 find H
pounds of it each peaJn
week, officials say. Ba
Charley Smith, cere.
UNCC's director of aaila
boarding operations. S!nce
said the students eat �nl t
Cap'n Crunch cereaJ JP W1t
for breakfast, lunch h�
and dinner. The also are
eat it for dessert and collegl
put it on ice cream ant
When compared to
other cereals offered
Nuclear
A contingent cf� )ul
Greenville residentsFor
including ECUjl
students and facultyJO"
joined more than 400j
other North Caroli-srr 1
nians at Saturday'sz:i
"March on Rale'hopi
to protest nuclearT1
weapons.�)Caw Cl
The statewide rall.
organized by :he N.C
Peace Network.ar.
four themes: to
first strike nuclearra
weapons in Europe.tc J
reverse the arms raceM 11
freeze nuclear.c 4
weapons and to t
human needs.
The March onw i
Raleigh was organizederrJ
to correspond � "mezn
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later this vear.J
Speakers atnu. a
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1

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Bring your game ticket stub for
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In Cash and Prizes
for Best Costume
and the musical treat is
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(Get It TRICKS for treat-HA! HA!)
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ip Mil fa kw
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Fleming5 after hour
English Annex 10 after hour
10th & the Hill13 after hour
College Hill15 after hour
Stratford Arms Apts 'A hour
Hargett s Drugs25 til hour
Home Federal15 til hour
Purple:
Univ. Condo10 after hour
Cannon Court 12 after hour
Eastbrook13 after hour
Riverbluff20 after hour
KingsRow 'A hour
Villiage Green25 til hour
'College View24 til hour
Cypress23 til hour
Home Federal15 til hour
U-
1 i

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THE
Place To Be On
HOMECOMING
Special Prize for Best
Costume of a Comic Strip
Character on Monday.
A Private Club for members and invited guest only.
x
THUK 5D AY
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celebration if
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to HALLOWEEN
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for Ladies
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Treat
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HALLOWEEN
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Sat. night after ECU's
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"DEAL OF Tl
Executive Pro
Produced by BIT) YORKIN
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ifter ECU's
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UNCC Students Love Cereal
CHARLOTTE
(UPI) � Univeristy of
North Carolina at
Charlotte students
have discovered a
sugar-coated cereal
designed to appeal to
children is good any
time of the day and
are consuming 90
pounds of it each
week, officials say.
Charley Smith,
UNCC's director of
boarding operations,
said the students eat
Cap'n Crunch cereal
for breakfast, lunch
and dinner. They also
eat it for dessert and
put it on ice cream.
When compared to
other cereals offered
in the school
cafeterias, it's outsell-
ing them three to one,
Smith said.
Quaker Oats Co.
marketing manager
Paul Baron said the
firm doesn't know
why college students
find the cereal so ap-
pealing.
Baron said the
cereal has been
available to the public
since 1963 and "the
only thing I can come
up with is the children
who grew up with it
are now adults and in
college. Maybe they
want to recapture part
of their childhood as
they're going into col-
lege and adulthood
He also suggested
students may be
eating Cap'n Crunch
as an act of rebellion
against natural foods
trends.
The cereals content
includes 43 percent
sugar, along with corn
and oat flour.
Baron noted the
firm began marketing
the cereal differently
about a year ago. He
said it began offering
the cereal in bins with
large placards bearing
the name and picture
of Cap'n Crunch, the
cartoon sea captain
that serves as the
cereal's trademark.
Previously, the
cereal was sold to
cafeterias in small,
single-portion packs.
The new method in-
creased the product's
visibility, thus in-
creasing sales, he said.
Officials said the
cereal has been the
students' choice since
its first offering at the
university last
January.
"If you have to
have a new campus
fad, I guess this is as
innocent as they
come UNCC
spokesman Ken San-
ford told the
Charlotte News.
Nuclear Weapons Protest Held
A contingent of
Greenville residents
including ECU
students and faculty
joined more than 400
other North Caroli-
nians at Saturday's
"March on Raleigh"
to protest nuclear
weapons.
The statewide rally,
organized by the N.C.
Peace Network, had
four themes: to stop
first strike nuclear
weapons in Europe,
reverse the arms race,
freeze nuclear
weapons and to fund
human needs.
The March on
Raleigh was organized
to correspond with
similar demonstra-
tions held around the
world Saturday pro-
testing U.S. plans to
deploy new cruise and
Pershing II missiles
later this year.
Speakers at the
Raleigh gathering in-
cluded religious,
eductional and
political leaders from
throughout the state.
Former N.C. State
University Chancellor
John Caldwell said
the group, though
small in numbers,
represented the
"hopes of millions
"These rallies for
peace are an appeal to
our nation's cons-
cience and intelligence
and in my view they
are acts of high
patriotism Caldwell
told the crowd.
"Millions of people
and ernest leaders in
postions of power and
responsibility in this
world have allowed
themselves to be
mezmerized into
believing that nuclear
arsenals can be a
means for preserving
national security, can
be a means for main-
taining peace in the
world and even that a
nuclear war could be
containable or1 e
winnable
"The central object
of this rally is to help
break this
mesmerism he said.
Following Caldwell
was Col. James F.
Berry, a West Point-
educated career
soldier and veteran of
two wars.
Berry criticized the
military claiming that
by its policies it was
no longer pursuing
peace. "They have
got some terrible com-
mitment to nuclear
weapons Berry
said.
John Wilson, a
member of the ex-
ecutive committee of
the National Educa-
tion Association, told
the crowd that
children were the vic-
tims of U.S. military
policies. He claimed
children were doing
with out handicap ser-
vices, classroom
assistance and nutri-
tional school lunches
"so that Ronald
Reagan can have his
toys of war
"When scientific
power outruns moral
power we end up with
guided missiles and
misguided people
said Mickey
Michauex, a former
U.S. attorney.
"We must
therefore work pas-
sionately to seek to
bridge the gulf bet-
ween our scientific
progress and our
moral progress he
said.
"We are here to re-
pent the fact that we
are a superpower
whose power has gone
to its head said
Sister Evelyn Mattern
of the N.C. Council
of Churches. "Like
some monsterous oc-
topus with army, navy
and air force tentacles
we now have the
Nicaraguan people
surrounded �
Other groups
representing causes as
diverse as Right to
Life and the situation
in Lebanon attended
the march.
DEAL
OF THE
CENTURY
Chevy Chase and his partners are arms dealers.
They sell second-rate weapons to third world nations.
But they're not out to stick it to anyone.








CHARLIE DANIELS BAND
AND
MARSHALL TUCKER
HHHHHHHHMHHHHHH,
????????????????���


???�??????�????�
? ?
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28,1983
8:00 P.M.
MINGES COLLISEUM





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CHEVY CHASE
SIGOURNEY WEAVER GREGORY HINES
A WILLIAM FRIEDKIN FILM A STEVE TISCH-JON AVNET PRODUCTION
IN ASSOCIATION WITH BUD YORWN PRODUCTIONS
"DEAL OF THE CENTURY" Music by ARTHUR R RUBINSTEIN
Executive Producers JON AVNET, STEVE TKCH, RUJL BRICKMAN
Produced by BUD YORK1N Written by PAUL BRICKMAN Directed by WILLIAM FRIEDKIN
u��oiHiiwiirBt
1�5
WARNER COMMUNICATIONS COMPANY Q
ECU STUDENTS: $9.00
OPENS AT A THEATRE
NEAR YOU NOVEMBER 4i














I
NON-STUDENTS: $10.00
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR: $10.00


Tickets available Central Ticket Office, October 14, 1983
until sel! out!
Tickets also available at Both
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V





Sire Eaat (Earoltnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Darryl Brown, Mommm, Editor
Hunter usher, �,�� m
ALI AFRASHTEH, Owftr Manager
Geoff Hudson, arcukmon M����r
Michael Mayo, th supervisor
Cindy Pleasants. sporu Editor
Greg Rideout, ��(�� &��
Gordon I pock, buftwrntato
Lizanne Jennings, ,��,
Todd Evans, p�,
October 27, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Civil Rights
Reagan Slides Between Headlines
President Reagan ain't no fool.
At least not when dealing with the
public. When would be the best
time for Reagan to announce that
he is firing three members of the
Civil Rights Commission and put-
ting the board out of business tem-
porarily? Now, that's when. The
move was sure to draw criticism
and national attention, but, alas,
Ronnie decided to tell Americans
of his decision on the day the
United States invaded Grenada
and two days after more than 200
marines were killed in Lebanon.
The banner headlines of
newspapers and the bulk of
teievison news coverage will surely
go to the military invasion in the
Caribbean, followed by updates on
the Beirut situation. This, of
course, is rightly so, but because of
the shrewd maneuvering the little
ol civil rights story is guaranteed
to be back-page material.
On almost any other day,
Reagan's move would have been a
lead story � one scrutinized con-
siderably. Reagan, despite storms
of protest from civil rights groups,
has already stacked the board with
three conservative ideologues. He
has now fired the three other
members, appointed by presidents
Ford and Carter, and has
nominated staunch conservatives
for the openings he created.
The president's actions are op-
posed both in Congress and in
public. Congress is now consider-
ing a restructuring of the board to
eight members selected by the
House and Senate, instead of the
present system. We endorse the
proposal because it seems the only
way the commission can avoid
abuse from the executive branch
and remain, as it was designed to
be, an independent body to
observe civil rights policies, and
not a puppet to endorse a presi-
dent's beliefs.
Defense Deplorable
If you smell gas in your apart-
ment building and don't move out,
it's your own fault if you get blown
up in an explosion. Such was the
response of companies indicted in
lawsuits stemming from the Village
Green tragedy last March. The best
defense those companies could
come up with was to say, if people
knew there was a dangerous gas
leak, they should have moved out.
To say that the companies and
owners are not responsible for
allowing a dangerous situation to
exist, but rather it's the tenant's
fault for not getting out before
they were blown out, is ridiculous.
The companies are responsible for
their equipment and facilities and
will be held accountable for them.
ECU and its students suffered
enough last March, and we will not
let the memory of our dead be tar-
nished by the insane defense being
offered by the companies responsi-
ble. There is not enough money in
the world to bring back one dead
student and uninjure the others,
but we will never let the people
responsible call them fools. It is
the companies we now call fools.
Wise up, Mr. Gas people and give
to our fellow students what they
are due.
South Africa Referendum
Won't End Racial Question
By DARRYL BROWN
As students at UNC-Chapel Hill strug-
gle with their administration over
divestiture from companies in South
Africa, the nation next week faces what
could be a watershed decision in its
history. South Africa, the nation with the
dubious distinction of having the strictest
policy on race in the world (every citizen is
legally classified in one of four racial
categories: white, coloured, Asian or
black African), will hold elections Nov. 2
on whether to allow non-white representa-
tion in the government. Whites as present
rule the 82 percent non-white country.
Vernon Rose, a South African
classified coloured who lives in Durham,
N.C talked earlier this month at UNC-
Chapel Hill on the coloured population's
mixed feelings about accepting (possibly
token) representation in their govern-
ment. South African voters, all white of
course, will decide whether to increase
their bicameral parliament to a tri-
cameral one, creating a chamber for col-
our eds and Asians (12 percent of the
popluation), but still excluding the 70 per-
cent of the nation who are black Africans.
Rose and many coloureds are not sure
they want that voice in the government.
Like many coloureds, Rose does not
believe in the government's racial
classifications, but considers all non-
white, and thus oppressed, peoples to be
black. (Coloureds are light-skinned blacks
of mixed race; black Africans are natives
of the African continent.) Asians and col-
oureds enjoy many more civil rights and
liberties than Africans, though they are
not legally equal to whites. All four race
classes are separated into geographic
regions and even neighborhoods within
South Africa, with whites controlling the
valuable lands and pleasant communities.
Rose is afraid the liberalization of the
government will be more cosmetic than
substantial and will do more harm to the
black cause than good. The executive
branch is a strong one and must be white.
Too many are afraid the opaque relaxa-
tion of the racial restrictions will pacify
outside opposition to the white regime.
More importantly, at least to Rose, is
the decision the coloured community will
have to make should whites allow them
into the parliament and what effect that
would have on the black cause. Rose
suspects whites will approve the non-
white parliament not only to quell objec-
tions from Western nations but also to
consolidate their power in South Africa
by appeasing coloureds and Asians. If
coloureds and Asians accept the govern-
ment voice and increased benefits,
perhaps opposition to the white oligarchy
from the outside will subside, making the
government complacent and less eager for
drastic social change. Rose suspects the
whites are hoping to create a coloured and
Asian middle class that will support the
white minority rule and will feel more in-
clined to side with the whites than the
Africans.
Rose explains the dilemma among
blacks: Whether to accept the white con-
cessions and cooperate some, and perhaps
work for slow change within the system,
or to reject accommodation and work for
a complete restructuring of society. Rose
admits the temptation of a comfortable
life and realizes coloureds and Asians
could lose their solidarity with blacks.
He explained that growing up as a col-
oured in Capetown (where most coloureds
are permitted to live), one enjoys enough
privileges and is so indoctrinated into the
racial system which maintains coloureds
are superior to blacks but a little inferior
to whites, that it is hard to see the real in-
justice of the system; one is almost con-
vinced it's all right. It is only when one
meets those who are really struggling, or
talks with people from other nations, that
one realizes how bad the system really is.
Next week, if news hits the papers that
South Africa has liberalized its racial
restrictions in the government, it may not
be as clear a blessing as it seems. The press
and Americans have a way of looking for
improvement and seeing a small change as
more significant than it is. If the non-
white representation is granted, the dilem-
ma for coloureds and Asians in South
Africa may be just beginning, and at any
rate it will be more of a mixed blessing
than it seems.
Campus Forum
Blame Beirut Deaths On Brass
More than 200 American men are
now dead in a foreign land, where they
proudly served their country. This is a
sad fact which can bring tears to the
eyes of many patriotic Americans. But
I see a question here that is not being
asked. That is, who is wrong? Who is
at fault? Is it the "martyr" fighting his
"jihad" (holy war) who gave his life in
the bombing incident? Is it Iran? Is it
Syria? Who is it?
Having served in the military for
seven years and seeing how it operates,
I feel if we look at the situation, we can
see that the Marine colonel who was in
charge of the troops in Lebanon must,
and I stress must, be held accountable.
There is absolutely no excuse for hav-
ing practically an entire company of
Marines sleeping in the same building
when they are occasionally suffering
mortars and artillery attacks. This is
inviting danger, as any competent
military person would know.
When a lot of people cluster around
one area in a battlezone, then a lot of
people die when that area is hit.
Futhermore, I ask where were the extra
precautions that would have prevented
a truck full of explosives from coming
through the main gate and making it to
the garrison. Why wasn't a truck or
other heavy piece of equipment placed
in the driveway, only to be moved after
the entering truck had been cleared?
Where were the guards, and why
weren't they armed with something
that would stop a moving truck such as
a LAW or bazooka?
I was only a staff sergeant in the Ar-
my, yet these are steps I was trained
were necessary in such a situation. I am
confident that the Marine colonel and
the generals above him were trained in
more methods than these. My only
question here is, why in the hell weren't
these methods employed? The way I
see it, the Marine colonel and those
directly above him who were in charge
of the American presence in Lebanon,
should be brought up on negligent
homicide charges.
But even more basic to the question
than this, is why are we in Lebanon. Is
it to keep the peace? If so, where is the
peace? The president said we are in
Lebanon to insure foreign troop
withdrawal. If so, then when are the
foreign troops leaving? Syria said it
wouldn't leave. It has been there for
years. Are we going to be there for
years also? Obviously not, so I ask
What will it take, how many more lives
will be lost, how many more tears are
going to be shed before we get the
message that we must leave Lebanon?
I don't recommend that we pick
right up and leave the area tomorrow. I
say we give the United Nations 30 days
to put the UN forces there and then we
leave, holding our head up, proud that
we know when we don't belong in so-
meone else's war.
Ernest Conner
Senior, Pols
No 'Heads' Facts
Gary Patterson's article on the Talk-
ing Heads show in Chapel Hill was
nothing more than an attack on the
UNC Concert Committee. His report
had little, if anything, to do with the
Talking Heads' performance. Seeing as
how Mr. Patterson knew very little
about the 'Heads he didn't know
what to say about them, filling in his
large gaps of ignorance with
derogatory comments.
Therefore, a few facts need to be
made clear to Mr. Patterson.
FACT: David Byrne is not married
to Tina Weymouth, or anyone else for
that matter. Tina is married to Chris
Frantz. They do have a child that they
let David hold from time to time.
FACT: Even though the band didn't
sound as great as they would 've in
Carnegie Hall, they never sounded like
"an old eight-track player with a
speaker missing
FACT: Here in 1983, there's a cer-
tain tendency to have pronounced bass
lines in popular music. At no point did
the bass drown out the guitars � this
was a phenomena that only you ex-
perienced.
FACT: "Burning Down The
House" did not close the first set. The
song was "Life During Wartime Not
knowing song titles is no excuse for
altering a band's song list.
FACT: The Talking Heads have
recorded more than one album. You
don't seem to have heard many of
them.
FACT: The adverse conditions were
in no way the fault of the band. David
Byrne even twice took time out from
the show to ask the audience to move
back and maybe find seats. Yes, Gary,
there were seats available, and yofa and
your suffering gym floor audience
could've sat in them.
FACT: Forty minutes before the
show we heard an announcement on
the radio saying that tickets were still
available. If this were true, the concert
did not sell out "early in the month
This seems to constitute a gross inac-
curacy in reporting.
FACT: We and everyone we've talk-
ed to thought the Talking Heads were
fantastic. David Byrne is the consum-
mate showman. And you, Gary Patter-
son, seemed to miss out on that.
In conclusion, Gary, you cannot give
a competent review without knowing
the FACTS!
Jim Johnson,
Business
Sandy Jarrell,
Art
Greg Herrin,
Business
Charlie OK
We would like to reply to Hal J.
Daniels' letter in the Oct. 25 issue. In-
stead of criticizing the selection of
Charlie Daniels and Marshall Tucker
for Homecoming, Professor Daniels
should be impressed that these popular
bands are willing to perform before
such a small audience. Both of these
bands have numerous opportunities
for crowds twice the size of East
Carolina's. The point is these
"redneck" musicians are Southern
born, and a Southern boy never forgets
his home.
Furthermore, we have seen several
of the bands that Professor Daniels
mentioned, and although we will
refrain from stereotyping their music;
however, we do question their musical
talent. How many big hits have they
had and are they still producing hits
year after year like Daniels and Mar-
shall Tucker.
Everyone has the right to his or her
musical taste, so don't "put down"
something you don't understand.
Charlie Daniels' music deserves more
than the derogatory, one sided com-
ments it received in earlier letters. We
think the professor should take
Charlie's advice and "leave this long-
haired country boy alone
Bobby Hopkins
Junior, Ind. Tech.
Mike Holloman
Junior, Ind. Tech.
Gators Gutless
After reading Cindy Pleasants' in
teresting behind-the-scenes article on
"Florida's Dirty Play I was not the
least bit surprised that a Charley Pell
team performed in the manner that
they did.
If class was a prerequisite to be in the
top ten, Florida would be in oblivion.
There are two reasons why I was not
shocked at Florida's blatant display.
First, during Pell's tenure at Clemson,
the Tigers also had a reputation for
taunting and unsportsmanlike
behavior. The most obvious example
occurred as a national television au-
dience looked on.
A few years back, when Clemson
played Ohio State in the Gator Bowl,
Woody Hayes gained notoriety for
punching a Clemson player. But.
although an inexcusable act, anyone
watching the entire game saw Clemson
taunt and take cheap shots at the
Buckeyes. The result was Hayes' in-
famous, angry poke.
Also, with Florida facing
Southeastern Conference powerhouses
in the following weeks, and the fear
that the Gators would look past
Cinderella East Carolina, Pell needed
to motivate his team by some method
� a method not very laudable, but
nevertheless profitable on one's home
field and with biased officials.
There is a difference between having
a "fired up" pre-game attitude and
having malicious intent. Pell doesn't
seem to know or care about the dif-
ferentiation.
I am anxious for the day in which w�-
play those crocodiles at Ficklen
Stadium. We will play with integrity,
and will annihilate them.
Ed Nicklas,
Political Science,
Senior
Help Asked
I would like to introduce you to two
children. Their names are Misty and
Daniel. Misty is two years old, and
Daniel is almost four. They are brother
and sister and best friends. I'd like to
introduce you to them in person, but
it's impossible right now.
Misty and Daniel were in a fire Fri-
day that almost took their lives. We
don't know how the fire that trapped
the children inside a car started, but
that's not important now. These
children are in Pitt County Memorial
Hospital fighting for their lives, and
they need our help.
As we all know, hospital bills add
up. Throughout the three years I've
been here, I've seen how caring we
ECU students can be. Please show
these two little friends of mine that we
care. We're all on a budget, but we can
all spare some change. If you can't af-
ford a small contribution, please in-
clude Misty and Daniel in your prayers
tonight. I'd like to introduce you to
them personally someday. Thank you.
Send donations to Nelli Cuthrel,
PCMH, PICU, Greenville.
Cheryl Krakowcr,
Senior, Social Work,
752-1959
Ipock Naive
I was amused by Gordon Ipock's ar-
ticle in defense of Jesse Helms' attack
on the King holiday. The naivete with
which he idolizes George Washington
would probably make the old general
do a flippity-flop in his grave.
Doesn't Mr. Ipock realize that
Washington was not always that
"white-wigged. tight-lipped, pious-
looking guiding spirit of the nation"
that we have made into an icon?
My point is not to discredit the im-
age of our first president. Rather, I
would seek to clear up Mr. Ipock's
rosy view to force him to face realitv.
Yes, Martin Luther King probably did
have human frailities and shortcom-
ings. What leader does not? The key
word is "human
What I prefer to see in the King holi-
day is not so much a tribute to a man as
to the ideal for which King stood. For
me, he represents one of those "tradi-
tional American values" on which our
nation was founded � equality for all
its citizens. " .
Lucy Pake
English Department
Student Opinion
Gren;
invi
Gr
agrf
nor
fi
the!
the)
dor
ten
us
Pfhol
fi
sh

Le
:
Le
Ml
Harper
Alumna
By TINAWa
MAROSCHAK
MHMicea
comes
ECU alumna Annetraimri
F. Barefoot was oneed at E
of 104 teachers whoi d
received the 1983- I
Presidential Awardfor i
for Excellence ineducar,
Science andBare
Mathematicsher
Teaching. BarefootWashi
received the award on"whirl
Oct. 19 at a Whitetic
House ceremony inReagaj
JTRIP PLANNED TO
The Student Union
City during ThanLsgp
has bttn m great su
year.
The trip includes ro
of Broadway for fi
T railways buses, and
also provides suggest)
galleries, and departi
The price for the trij
rooms. Other room ar
The deadline for regisi
November 1. so hui
Thanksgiving Break
For further informl
Mendenhail Student Ci
I jk'S
m tmmmmm
m '�ii'Wi i i�iim�i�i�M��wan�
ECU
STUDEN
PROSE
1st prize
2nd prize $
D
Submit ty pe
offices by N

4M
V





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 27, 1983 $
am
ITSA
MOVIE ABOUT
JESSE HELMS
rass
a ion for
manlike
is example
ion au-
- hen Clemson
Bowl,
for
aver. But,
anyone
. lemson
at the
Haves' m-
la facing
�erhouses
weel he fear
k past
: . Pell needed
ne method
but
me
' een having
game attitude and
us intent. Pell doesn't
or care about the dif-
he da in which �e
at Fick
� h integrity,
Politi
klas,
cience,
Senior
ip Asked
tUO
i are Mists and
�� year
ld
and
rother
ike to
l, but
miel ve- fire Fri-
k their lives. We
'rapped
ie a car started, but
iportant now These
ut County Memorial
ling for their live and
I
hospital bills add
e three years I've
f seen how aring we
can be. Please show
rnends of mine that we
Dn a budget, but we can
:hange. If you can't af-
:ontribution, please m-
Damei in your prayers
ce to introduce you to
someday. Thank you.
Ins to Nelli Cuthrel,
, Greenville.
Cheryl Krakower,
Senior, Social Work,
752-1959
:k Naive
by Gordon Ipock's ar-
of Jesse Helms' attack
Ihday The naivete with
pes George Washington
make the old general
p in his grave
Ipock realize that
as not always that
tight-lipped, pious-
ng spirit of the nation"
de into an icon?
ol to discredit the im-
I president. Rather, I
clear up Mr. Ipock's
Irce him to face reality.
Ither King probably did
ailities and shortcom-
ier does not? The key
to see in the King holi-
ch a tribute to a man as
Jv-hich King stood. For
(ts one of those "tradi-
values" on which our
�ded � equality for all
Lucy Pake
English Department
Student Opinion
Grenada Invasion
Pfbol
Harper
On Monday the United States forces
invaded the Caribbean Nation of
Grenada. Students were asked if they
agreed or disagreed with the U.S. ac-
tion.
Delise Pfohl, general college,
freshman � "I don't understand why
they went over there in the first place. If
they haven't done anything to us, I
don't see why we should invade their
territory. 1 don't want them to do it to
us
Michael Shank, biology, senior �
"The public doesn't know anything
about what's going on. The public
knows only what they want us to know.
There is a lot more than feelings Per-
sonally I don't like fighting at all. You
don't know what's really going on
Sherri Harper, computer science,
freshman � "1 don't feel that they
should have gone into Grenada because
we already have enough problems in
Lebanon. I don't think our Marines
should be over there in Grenada or
Lebanon. We shouldn't send any more
Marines over
David Fid ridge, senior, business �
"We had a good excuse to go in there
and I'm glad we did it. The main reason
I feel this way is because the Cubans
and Russians would use this island as a
basis for future operations in that
region of the world
Shank
EMridge
Nursing Professor Named
Society's Region Coordinator
ECU nursing pro-
fessor Eldean Pierce
was elected to the na-
tional office of region
coordinator for Sigma
Theta Tau, the nurs-
ing honor society, at
the organization's bi-
annual convention
held this month in
Boston.
Pierce is co-
ordinator for Region
7, which covers
Georia, Florida, the
Carolinas and Puerto
Rico. Her duties will
include developing ac-
tivities for her region,
reporting activities of
the region to the na-
tional chapter,
publishing a newslet-
ter and keeping in
touch with the other
six areas.
Pierce came to
ECU as an
undergraduate in 1971
and graduated from
the School of Nurs-
ing. She joined the
faculty in 1974.
-Employment Avaiiable-
Housecleaning workers needed
who have 4 hour blocks of time
between 8 a.m. and 6 p.m
MonSat. Need car, telephone,
good references. General
references should be within 150
miles of Greenville. Prefer age 20
and up, workers who will be here
through the summer. Call
752-4043.
WZMB Disc Jockeys
Not Paid For Working
Cont. From Page 1
budget, and policy exists where
unspent money from the previous
year may be returned to the media
to cover current operating ex-
penses.
According to Meyer, Ensor had
wanted to use some of the funds
to create salaries for previously
unpaid WZMB disc jockeys. En-
sor later rescinded the proposal
stating the sum wasn't large
enough to provide sufficient
salaries for the disc jockeys.
Niewald supported Ensor's deci-
sion, saying the sum wasn't suffi-
cient to provide an adequate in-
centive for the workers.
Final budget figures show,
however, two morning salaries
were added, along with pay raises
for general managers. Other
figures were categorized into con-
tracting services, supplies, prin-
ting, binding, equipment and an
employee party.
COMPLETE
AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICE
410 Greenville Blvd.
7S6 3023-24HRS
PLAZA SHELL
24 hour Towing Service
I -Haul Rentals
Available
Alumna Wins President's Award
By TINA
MAROSCHAK
Staff Writer
ECU alumna Anne
F. Barefoot was one
of 104 teachers who
received the 1983
Presidential Award
for Excellence in
Science and
Mathematics
Teaching. Barefoot
received the award on
Oct. 19 at a White
House ceremony in
Washington, DC.
"Much of the suc-
cess that I have had
comes back to the
training that I receiv-
ed at ECU Barefoot
said. She also at-
tributed her success to
former teachers in the
education program.
Barefoot described
her four-day
Washington visit as a
"whirlwind of recep-
tions President
Reagan spoke to the
guests at the Tuesday
morning reception,
and, according to
Barefoot, thanked
them for their dedica-
tion and hard work.
During a Thursday
honors workshop the
teachers reviewed the
needs of science and
mathematics teachers
and discussed ways to
get more students into
the teaching field.
Barefoot said she
felt very humble,
along with a feeling of
great responsibility,
after receiving the
award. "I feel more
than ever that I need
to do the very best job
I can in the
classroom she said.
Barefoot received
her bachelor's degree
in 1956 and her
master's in 1960. She
is currently teaching
at Whitevillc High
School.
iTRIP PLANNED TO NFW YORK DURING THANKSGIVING BREAK
The Student Union Travel Committee has planned a trip to New York
City during Thanksgiving Break from November 23-27. This annual trip
has been m great success in the past and will be Just as enlerfainlrJE this
year.
The trip includes room accommodations in the Hotel Edison (Just west
of Broadway for four days and three nights), transportation by
Trailways buses, and baggage handling charges. The Travel Committee
also provides suggestions to New York's famous restaurants, museums,
galleries, and department stores.
The price for the trip is only $99.00 per person for quad occupancy
rooms. Other room arrangements are available for slightly higher prices.
The deadline for registering for the New York City Thanksgiving Trip is
November 1, so hurry if you want to "Be Where It Is" during
Thanksgiving Break.
For further information contact the General Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student Center, 757-6611, ext. 266.
AMERICANfir GREET IV 6
far that special pi rv n
Spook it up among
friends and family with
Halloween
Cards
Student Supply Store
bright Buildino
s
�y.
presents
THE KILLER
Bal
v;A
t
jfe
rum
:dch
ATTIC
JERRY LEE LEWIS
Friday, Oct. 28
Limited advance tickets on sale now
The only North Carolina Appearance this tour.
ECU's Literary-Art Magazine
STUDENT WRITING CONTEST
PROSE
POETRY
1st prize $80
2nd prize $25
1st prize $80
2nd prize $25
DEADLINE NOV. 7
Submit typed entries to Rebel or Media Board
offices by Nov. 7. Include name, address, and
phone number.
-and a-
HALLOWEEN COSTUME PARTY
Saturday, Oct 29
with
CIMMARON from Roanoka, Virginia
1st PRIZE $500.00
2nd price $100.00
3rd prize Carolina Opry House Satin Jacket
Bring your ECU Homecoming ticket stub and
get in absolutely FREE!
ENJOY OUR SUPER HOMECOMING HAPPY HOUR
8:30-10:30
COMING WEDNESDAY, NOV.2:
CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD
For further information call 758-5570
ThcCaroiiM Opry Hou8� is a private dub for members and guests. AD ABC permits
-K
i





i J t S1 i R Ol INI A N
i l R :
ia.fi' �
Bowie 9s Talents ExcelIn'The Hunger'
, � - h horror
len rs talk
. ��� thas not a
1'irroi movie
i�t mo le, it's
�e fo med and

h the two
iam (Catherine
ith the gitt of
and lonn (David
me a vounc
a N York disco.
an, Miriam
kills the man. and together they
destroy the bodies in a furnace in
the basement of their palatial
townhouse
Miriam cannot give everlasting
life to her lovers, onlv add some
two or three hundred years to
then expected life span. Bowie, as
John, accepts this but in 1982 he is
reaping the disaster that befell his
predecessors, the onslaught of age
is taking its toll over two days.
The next morning John
discovers he's aging rapidly, a
process that should have been
cured by the drinking of human
blood Reali'ng his time is runn
ing out, John visits Sarah Roberts
(Susan Sarandon), a doctor
researching the effects ol aging
Sarah dismisses John as a crank
and as he sits in the waiting room
he deteriorates into a withered old
man. Sarah sees him and realizes
he's not a crank, but John now
runs away.
The story, continues on with
love, lust and murder in Tonv
Scott s u lusual twist to the an-
cient legends ol vampires. And
after all, it is Halloween
David Bowie is
disiplined and
responsible
David Bowie i� a self-created
enigma, seldom giving interviews
and able to pass unnoticed at will
in the crowd With an insight and
intelligence not associated nor-
mally with pop stars, Bowie has
maneioered his career through
the disaster-strewn waters of im-
mediate success or failure that is
the high tech world of present day
fame
In The Hunger, the role of John
Blaylock seems to fall within the
spectrum ol Bowie's other excur-
sions int.) acting. In his earlier
films The Man Who tell To
Earth and Just a Gigolo, he
played a stranded alien and a
gigolo respectively; on Broadway
he Md.red a- the deformed hero of
The Elephant Man and on televi-
sion recently he took the title role
in Brecht's Haul as the anarchic
poet singer who is indifferent to
human feelings. I hese characters
�i
are nothing it not extraordinary,
and all inhabit a world outside the
normal
Similarly, Bowie the person has
taken himself beyond the norm
The public view of Bowie with his
masculine approach to sex and
highly charged and flamboyant
stage performances is one full of
attraction.
Privately, he seems withdrawn
to the point of what one assumes
is shyness, but this distance, one
quickly, realizes, is a deliberately
placed space between you and
him.
He avoid- direct contact, seem-
ing to prefer to relay his thoughts
through an associate; but when
challenged is acticulate with a sure
and accurate knowledge oi what
he wants to sav
As an actor he displays a
careful discipline and responsi'r
ty to his work. On The Hunger,
Bowie was punctual and suffered
without complaint the four or five
hours in the make-up chair
necessary to turn him into a 90
and 150-year old
Also tor his role a 'ohn
Blaylock. Bowie teamed to play
the cello. His teacher was impress-
ed with his dedicated concentra-
tion and the degree of proficiei
he achieved in ma-tering the
strument in a short time no e
task for anyone To tr and hrea�
his voice down to an anc �
quaver when placing an old.
man. Bowie stood by the . .
the River Thames m the darrr
night a i. shouting lil
Richard" numbers Tour:
passing pleasure 1 no dc
saw htm as the B:
Board manifestation oi
Enghsh eccentric
Bowie's home is
calm of Switzerland but he a. :
to liking the energ a
New York, saying. ' 1 hketr
tion. That's what I � I �
city. In a city like New
vs Berlin, the have the i .
kind o push I can't wi
peaceful atmosphere ai
V riting he saj
he wants to do again "I ha
en anything for ear
Bowie is also a pa.nTer "f
album I've m " n I've g
of four paintings to g. -
well His picture- are all
i and n ol his :
poranes hut they wi
seen bj the public "The i
much too personal he say
f


I


i
A
5il
Bonie At His Best
�ni l�v,r R.mie star as lovers kept eternally youthful through her marahre secret of
Hui t n,Kh� Friday and Saturda nights at 9 p.m. in Hendrix Theatre.
Miriam iDeneue and John (Bowie) hide their bizarre secret of everlasting life
Hollywood Starlet Doesn't Mind Exploitation
irual ex
� . er rH�re' a
. .i od
�� at ill
m Steel, the
:ar i in i'ne new
i Honor TV series
uncierwav and
is hollering for more
id honor in her role.
i Honor is a TV
�e hit movie An
1 (jentlemen. Set in
an Army airborne
leals with con
i mlisted men and of
�somen. Much of
around romantic
j with town girls.
Sf a not-
11 'we: having an
w 11r one of the
le, mmnn to
ne 1 parts, treats
ali . unrealistically
much emphasis on
tue
lays g people have
sexual relationships very early in
life said Amy, her blues eyes
glinting rebellion "They get in-
timate in a hurry
"But TV covers it up by having
actresses in their 20s playing all-
American girls who make a big
point of their virginity. When sex
scenes come along they cut away
from them.
'Two more mature characters
in our show have some hot sexy
scenes But my sex scenes are
unrealistic. They have my
boyfriend walking away at crucial
moments.
"I'm not talking about playing
scenes in a bikini or walking
around like a Barbie doll in a
spandex jumpsuit with gobs of
makeup
"TV should show us without
makeup and looking attractive
and sexy just as we really are.
Some movies do a better job of
portraying young sex
realistically
"But in TV, girls my age are
either bitchy and sleezy or sweet
and perfect
"I'm playing a 23-year-old, but
the writers a'cn"t girls and the 'r
not 2?. They mav have daughters
tha' age but thev don't know what
is going on in :he young female
mind
"Thev don't ea've sex is nor .t
moral issue with young women to
day. My generation is more open
and easy going, we accept more
challenges, including sex, with our
making it a big deal
"In today's societ) of a
divorce, people living togethe-
and contraceptives, my generation
moves faster and isn't a
judgemental on morality. Virgini
ty isn't important. It's not valued
or even discussed
"I understand censorship
prevents TV from treating sexua'
relationships realistically but the
nightime soaps are getting into
bedroom scenes moie often than
other shows
Amy doesn't pretend to be a
spokeswoman for her generation
but she is certain American
females in their 20s resent the wa
they are represented on the tube.
"Sharon, the girl I play, is sup
e an incredible sex
life but it is alwav- masked or on-
fus-d with love' Amv went
;iii In'1 i ur to the
writers that a good girl . ouid be
interested in se for its own
ake "
"Thev e sanitized and idealiz-
ed young couples by having them
run through fields of daisies
hoid:ng hands. That's B.S. I ife
isn't like that. It's unrealistic I've
never run through a field of
Daisies and I don't know anvone
who has
"You have to be an adult at 23
these days, growing up faster
because of the increased competi
tion out there I know that from
personal experience
'u've gotta grab oppoi
tunities, go after them whether
they're personal, professional
exual or whateve"
Amv modeled ad worked in
TV commercials n New York
refusing to come to Hollywood
until she had a job It turned
See PIOTN, page 7
Halloween Ball Welcomes
The Outrageous Sat. Night
p m Saturday, and will cost $5
per individual. The Ball itself will
go from 7 p.m to 1 am.
This year's Ball will feature
four local bands: the Too Met to
Plow String Band, who bring
back old-time music, the
Amateurs, who play original
rock; Tandy Spain and PBS,
whose music consists of rhythm
and blues and soul, and The
lemon Sisters and Ruiaag
Brothers who combine a mixt
of swing, rockabilly, rhvthm arc
blues, and 60's soul
The Roxy Masquerade Ball has
been a great success in the past
and this year it is an event not to
be missed
ECU School Of Music Alumna
Returns To Perform Recital
Jeanne
will return to
Ur ty, her
for a recital
Smith
F-?st
alma
rental and
m?si d r a break 't1 her
t-pera perfor
al is set for
2, at 8 p.m. in
Iheafre, and the
a .for Thursday at 1:30
iI Fletcher Music
opeai
Her rec
, Nov.
ma"
w
H

t c e
Both programs are open to the
publi without charge
Ms Piland. who graduated
wh bachelor's and master's
dea " from the ECL School of
Music, has performed leading
roles at some of the world's
foremost opera houses, including
la Scala. the Vienna Volksoper,
the Zurich Opera and the Grand
Theatre du Geneve. She is now
singing in the Hamburg Opera
production of The Barber of
Sevill and the Deutsche Oper am
Rhein production of Der
Rosenkavalier.
She has also performed with the
New York City Opera, the
Chautaugua Opera Festival and
with the Baltimore, Minnesota
and Cincinnati opera companies.
A native of Raleigh, Ms. Piland
began her performance career as a
five-year-old member of
Geraldine Cate's Cherub ('hoir.
She went on to private study with
Miss Cate and completed voue
studies at St. Mary's College ir.
Raleigh.
When she came to East
Carolina, her original intention
was to enroll in a few music
courses as a sideline.
Hearing her sing, ECU voice
professor Gladys White said to
her, "My dear, with a voice like
that, you have no choice but to
See PILAND, page 7
B MIKEHAMER
The Roxv Music Arts and
- rafts Center, a non profit
,r inanimation promoting the arts in
Greenville, will hold its 9th An-
nual Halloween Masquerade Ball
r his Saturdav night at the
Greenleaf, located near the Pitt-
Greenville Airport
"The Roxy Halloween Mas-
querade Ball has always been one
of the big community events of
the year. Many ECU students and
faculty come as well as people
who live and work around Green-
ville, said Bill Sheppard, a Roxy
Organizer "People often come
back to Greenville specifically for
the Masquerade Ball he added
Proceeds from the Halloween
Ball will go toward sponsoring the
annual Clogger Day, a traditional
music festival which is held on the
first Saturda in December.
When asked if there were any
highlights to tne Ball, Sheppard
�eplied, 'Sure. I think the
costume contest is a highlight
every year The fi, st prize is usual
ly $100 � as it is this year � and
people really go all out. There
have been some outragiously
orginal costumes in the past
The second prize this year will be
$50.
Registration for the costume �.
contest will take place from 8-10 This cute coudI imhm f�r m.
" cuie couP'� P��� for the camara at Roxy's Ball.
Piland
i ont'd from ,
major in m
Recall; .
Piland Mi
�"It l rarr
is affordc
working -
the ar' I . .
is S
part
this an
proud
In
singe-
one
Alu:
reg
spor
Ass
ing,
Na'
tior.
This coupk tk rnughi
The Ball
yL-yiM
EATRES
i ENDSTODvv
TO WaTC
RATED X
1
Starts TOMI
Bang the adver
whose princip.
ultra-violenc
� V "mt � P.fK Maee I
AdnemeCom
-
FRISAT. MTK
?





unger'
degree oi proficiency
ed in mastering the in-
eni in a short timeno easy
anyone To trv and break
down to an ancient
en plaing an old, old
od by the banks of
Thames in the damp
shouting "Little
bcrs. Tourists on
are boats no doubt
the British Tourist
ation of a genuine
s in the placid
and but he admits
� . ncrg) of a city like
g, I like the fric-
s what 1 look for in any
ke New York or
have the right
1 can write in a
ne'e at all
ays, is something
igain. T haven't
foi oer a year
a painter. "Every
n Ie got three
igs to go with it as
tures are all por-
oi his contem-
thev will never be
ne public. "They are
personal he says.

mm-
Lsting life
itation
- 'a grab oppor-
after them whether
're per�onal. professional,
whatever
lodeled and worked in
TV commercials in New York,
g to come to Hollywood
until she had a job II turned out
See PI OTS, paKe 7
comes
. Night
and soul; and The
lemon Sisters and Rutabaga
Brothers who combine a mixture
ng, rockabilly, rhythm and
es, and 60's soul.
The Roxy Masquerade Ball has
een a great success in the past,
and this vear it is an event not to
be missed.
4F
Piland To Sing
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27. 1983
WITH THIS COUPON
Cont'd from p. 6
major in music
Recalling her work with Jeanne
Piland, Mrs. White commented,
"It is rare that a teacher of singing
is afforded the opportunity of
working with someone who pro-
ves to be superior in all aspects of
the art of singing. Jeanne Piland
is such a person. If I have had a
part in the total development of
this artist singer, I am extremelv
proud
In 1976, ECU recognized the
singer's accomplishments with
one of its Ourstanding Young
Alumni awards. Her other honors
include numerous national and
regional awards in competitions
sponsored by the National
Association of Teachers of Sing-
ing, the metropolitan opera, the
Natinal Opera Institute, the Na-
tional Federation of music Clubs
This conple thoroughly enlov themselves at
The Ball
and the Rockefeller Foundation.
Ms. Piland's career has includ-
ed teaching at the Shenandoah
conservatory, Winchester, Va.
She is scheduled to perform there
also, during this visit to the U.S.
Dr. Charles Swchwartz, dean of
the ECU School of Music noted
that the mezzo-soprano's ap-
pearance "would be a highlight of
any concert season
"The fact that she is returning
to her alma mater adds a special
aura to this performance for
students and faculty in the School
of Music and the university as a
whole.
Ms. Piland's ECU program will
feature operatic areas from
Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro
and Strauss's Ariadne as well as
songs by Handel, Mozart,
Strauss, Respighi and Copland.
Pianist Ann Beckman will be ac-
companist.
Plots Unreal
Cont'd from p. 6
out to be the short-
lived Powers of Mat-
thew Star series.
To her chagrin,
Amy played the
quintessential
squeaky clean,
virginal high school
cheerleader. By com-
parison, her part in
For Love and Honor
is a giant step toward
realism. But it's still
not good enough for
the young actress.
"Until writers and
producers start pro-
viding realistic, fully
rounded young
women on TV, we'll
continue to play
female stereotypes
that have nothing to
do with what women
my age are re0y all
about
GIVE US
FILM
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILM SENT TO COLORCRAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50c OFF Developing Any roll slide film
50 OFF Any Color 5x7 Enlargement
$1.00OFF Any 8x10, 8x12, Uxl4 Color Enlargement
WE'LL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
art j( cQwcro hop
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVULC M.C 27834
752-0888
Limit one coupon per oroer- coupon expires 6-1-84
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
I
g Homecoming Speciala
Purple & Gold
Bouquet of Balloons
$15.00
Balloons Over Greenville
752-3815
We have a large supply of Halloween Balloons!
You may pick up individual balloons for gifts or decorating!
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���� . ; -�





8
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCOTBER27, 1983
����������
TSaTtST-�"�
CARE YOU CAN Aaotnow omcurrc�
DEPfMDON. �onmorifrv-io��c��tv
the woman or the l-ternnQ Center. Counseton cm
ovaftabietfoy r"K H sjpoort and under
stand you Your safety, comfort and privacy aw
auured bv �?� cartog itaff o� m� Rming Oritar
�act � Tuesday - Satvifdav Abortion Ap-
potn�m�nt�a 1tt ft 2nd TrtmMtw Aboitiorw up to
18 Waefci � Ffee Pregnancy Tests � Vary forty
ftegnancy tes � ai tnctusrve Fee � insurance
CAU 7t1-MM DAY Of MONT �
touW com coun�ling
and education tor wo-
THE FLEMING
ABORTIONS UP
TO 12th WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
JIW M AfcorOoM trvm 13 u 1�
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ptm, M �����"�'
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m-uiuai �!���� M
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
t!7 W�J Morf�$�
� ���� N C
papa.
KATZ
SUNDAY OCT 30th
featuring the
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COSTUMES WELCOME

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discovered
lights, v r. �
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ASSORTED END
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.$3"
SAVE
90

Noseguard Iwtrrs Roger
da's game Rogers a v
ful this season.
Harris D
Leading
v. Span �
Now in his 1
irtCT or. ECU i
All-A
establishing riimst
premier defensive
football.
A- pros
turned in his besl
the year in Sa
to fifth-ranked Y
school record witf
lions. recover ec
made several tot
tackles
"I a - rea
Florida Harr. sa Vs j
Peace (Florida QB was
to be one of the ber . i
in the country, and everyone k
we had to plav the - -tie
our careers
Mthough Harris & Co wo
quite able to suppress 'he
offense. ECU plaved wdl enouj
to get the attention of -ever
bowl scouts The Citrus bo-
especially interested and taik
with Coach Emor after
game.
"Getting to a bowl game is oj
of the goals the team has set tj
itself Harris said. ,4W� have
win the rest of our games to get
invitation, and I know we can
it
ECU faces sevenih-ra b
Miami of Florida in two ween
and Harris said the Pirates are n
going to lose another gamj
"We've lost two games in Floni
this year that we shouldn't havl
he said. "We weren't given brcal
in either of those games, anc
think next time the officials wj
know they have to respect us
.
� �.





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OF PREGNANCY
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ORGANIZATION
tIT Wtlt Mor�n J�
t��� N C
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WELCOME
For Bet C ostume
1st prize S100.00
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llVATECLUB
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10th St Ext At
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except as specifically
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ime savings or a
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399
THE EAST CAROI INI AN
Sports
OCTOBER 27, 1983
Page 9
Emory: Bucs Can Be Success Story
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Although ECU head coach Ed
Emory has had a few days to cool
off after Saturday's 24-17 loss to
Florida, he is still steaming over
the Pirates' trip to Gainesville.
According to Emory, the
Pirates faced one obstacle after
another. After arriving two hours
late at the Gaineville airport, the
Pirates headed for a high school
stadium. Once there, they
discovered that there were no
lights, so they settled for a park-
m
ing lot and three street lights.
"Our whole normal routine was
rearranged Emory said. "We're
creatures of habit, and breaking
our routine made a difference. We
felt like the whole weekend we
were rushed, and we didn't get
enough rest. But I didn't hear one
of our players moan and groan
the whole time.
"Our team can handle adversity
probably better than any team in
America. I don't know any team
that would have held up under
those things
Emory said game officiating
was the Pirates' biggest adversity,
but he's hoping to prevent that
from happening again. He is plan-
ning to call the ECAC commis-
sioner about the officials not pro-
tecting his players. "On the first
play, Ricky Nichols got his brains
knocked out on a late hit he
said. "That happened all day. I
expected them to protect my kids.
"Every week we get a stranger
(official) from the ECAC. They
don't know who in the hell we are.
They have no allegiance to us
GAR Y PATTERSON KCU Phot Lab
Noseguard Gerry Rogers (53) plows through toward Florida's leading fullback John Williams during Satur-
day's game. Rogers, a 6-2, 250-pound senior, has been one reason why the Pirate defense has been so power-
ful this season.
Harris Dazzles In Hopes Of
Leading Team To Bowl Berth
SAVE
90
By RANDY MEWS
Ant.Sports Editor
Now in his fourth year as a
starter on the ECU football team,
All-America Clint Harris is
establishing himself as one of the
premier defensive backs in college
football.
As pro scouts looked on, Harris
turned in his best performance of
the year in Saturday's 24-17 loss
to fifth-ranked Florida. He tied a
school record with three intercep-
tions, recovered a fumble and
made several touchdown-saving
tackles.
"I was really ready for
Florida Harris said. "Wayne
Peace (Florida QB) was supposed
to be one of the best quarterbacks
in the country, and everyone knew
we had to play the best game of
our careers
Although Harris & Co. weren't
quite able to suppress the Gator
offense, ECU played well enough
to get the attention of several
bowl scouts. The Citrus bowl was
especially interested and talked
with Coach Emory after the
game.
"Getting to a bowl game is one
of the goals the team has set for
itself Harris said. "We have to
win the rest of our games to get an
invitation, and I know we can do
it
ECU faces seventh-ranked
Miami of Florida in two weeks,
and Harris said the Pirates are not
going to lose another game.
"We've lost two games in Florida
this year that we shouldn't have,
he said. "We weren't given breaks
in either of those games, and I
think next time the officials will
know they have to respect us
Respect is something Harris has
been getting as an individual since
he began playing football. At
Great Bridge High School in
Chesapeake, Va Harris was an
all-star performer in track and
football.
During his senior year, Harris
had four interceptions in one
game and went on to be named
player of the year. He was also
tabbed as a 'blue chip' recruit,
making him one of the most
iff . 1
Free Safety Clint Harris
sought after high school players in
the country.
Harris was equally impressive
in track, being named an All-
America. He set a state record in
the 100-meters which was record-
ed as the fourth fastest time in the
nation.
Upon completing high school,
Harris was recruited by such
teams as USC, UCLA, Perdue
and every school in the ACC. He
originally signed with North
Carolina, but at the last minute
decided to come here.
"ECU was the last campus I
visited, and I guess it just stuck in
my mind he explained. "I
thought I'd get a chance to play
here sooner, and it was close
enough to home so my folks could
come watch me play
Harris came to ECU as a cor-
nerback, but was forced into ac-
tion at the beginning of the season
when free safety Freddie Jones
was injured. Harris was an im-
mediate success and has started in
every game since.
"Clint is an extremely talented
athlete first year defensive back
coach Phil Elmassion said He's
so disciplined. I wish I had the op-
portunity to coach him for more
than a year
Harris currently leads the team
in tackles with 76 and has in-
tercepted four passes. One of
those interceptions was a 76-yard
return against Temple earlier this
season, which put him ahead of
Reggie Pinkney as ECU's career
leader for interception return yar-
dage.
It is the 'big play' along with his
blazing speed that have profes-
sional football scouts talking
about Harris. At 205 pounds,
Harris can run the 40-yard dash in
4.25 seconds, a time matched by
very few in the collegiate ranks.
Harris said he knows he can
make it in pro football, but for
right now his only concern is
finishing up the season with a
bowl victory.
If the free safety continues
picking off passes, that quest
should be no problem.
The Florida game was the most
costly loss for the Pirates this
season injury-wise. Tight end
Norwood Vann suffered a bruised
back in the first half, and
linebacker Larry Berry was lost
for the season with a knee injury.
Strong safety Randy Bost had a
hyperextended knee, but should
play in Saturday's homecoming
game against East Tennessee
State. Runningback Jimmy
Walden has a broken hand and
tailback Tony Baker some bruised
ribs, but both are expected to play
Saturday.
The Bucs will venture back to
Florida to face nationally-ranked
Miami in less than two weeks, and
split end Stephon Adams believes
the Pirates may enjoy this trip
more. "I'm looking forward to
going he said. "I think we're
gonna come back with a victory.
"Nine is the lucky number. We
want to win the rest, so beating
Miami is a must
Emory isn't talking about
Miami at this point in the season.
"I'm not talking to God or
anybody else about Miami he
said. "Right now, our most im-
portant game is East Tennessee
State
Emory said the team cannot
have a letdown against ETSU.
"They're capable of beating you
and embarrassing us he said.
"If we can beat them, we can be
6-2, and that we'll be one of the
better records in the country.
"We just can't feel sorry for
ourselves on Saturday
East Tennessee is now 2-5, but
Emory said that is no indication
of what to expect from the Buc-
caneers this weekend. "27 points
is the most that's been scored
against themhe said. "Defen-
sively, they're tough. They'll try
to come in here and do what we've
been trying to do
Emory, who has known ETSU
coach Buddy Sasser for 25 years,
said his longtime acquaintance
will have his team ready. "Coach
Sasser was the offensive coor-
dinator at Appalachian State
when so many passing records
were set by the Apps he said. "I
would expect to see the ball in the
air some Saturday.
"They have a trick) of feme
with their wing bone It's mi
like the wishbone, but has a I
variations to it
The Pirates had a
winning streak before the los-
Florida. However, Emor) &a
ECU has more .
ever. "We had five
weeks he said "1 still tl
we're a better fo
Florida and Florida v
can't dwell on that V.
top-20 ranking, a bowl gan
sellout crowds at oui
All those thing-
It's more even n.
We've got two at home
awav. We've never h
fair
The Pirate- were
last week's edit
lustrated.
Following 5a
Bucs travel to Miam
home to face Will
finish the season
Mississippi.
"East Car
success story of 1983
said.
East Tennessee Leads Series;
Pirates Named EC A C Pla yer
East Tennessee State Leads?
Yes, the figures are correct. ETSU
leads the Pirates in the two-team
series, 4-3-1, over the eight games
that have been played.
ECU has won the last three
meetings by substantial scores. In
1982, the Bucs won 30-0, followed
by a 66-23 victory in 1981. In
1974, ECU came out with a 24-8
win.
During the 50's and 60's, East
Tennessee was dominant over the
Pirates. They won their last game
against ECU in 1970, with a 10-0
score.
j Four Weeks In A Row ECU has
had the ECAC Division I-A
defensive player for four con-
secutive weeks.
Clint Harris captured the honor
for his superb play at Florida
which included three pass in-
terceptions to tie a school record,
a fumble recovery, six tackles and
three assists. "Clint Harris just
had a phenomenal day Emory
said. "I doubt you'll see a better
free safety than him
Prior to Harris, defensive back
Kevin Walker, who tied a school
record with three pass intercep-
tions against Temple; Chris Santa
Cruz and P. J. Jordan all won the
defensive player of the week.
ECU Players Of The Week Of-
fensive players of the week are
Terry Long, Ernest Byner,
Stephon Adams and Reggie
Branch. Byner had 97 yards
rushing and four yards in pass
receptions against Florida. "I
haven't seen a back I'd trade for
Ernest Byner Emory said.
Branch, nephew of New England
Patriot Tony Collins, had his
finest rushing day of the season in
his home state of Florida. Branch
ran 59 yards on 12 carries. It
seemed only fitting. Branch
celebrated his birthday on Satur-
day.
�r �
Defensive players were Jeff
Pegues, Hal Stephens and Clint
Harris.
Williams Still On Top Flanker
Henry Williams continued to lead
the nation in kickoff returns with
a 31.9 return average. Williams
was contained at Florida more
than any team he's been up
against this year. He gained 17
yards on two returns. Williams
moved to eighth on the punt
return list with his 13.4 per return
average.
CINDY PLEASANTS
A Look Inside
Which Adams Brother was it?
Split end Stephon Adams, whose
two brothers, Amos and Calvin,
are team members, had six catches
against the Gators for 90 yards.
Adams had three consecutive
catches for 58 yards in the Pirates'
last attempt in the fourth quarter.
"We had'em (Florida), but we let
it slip away Adams said.
The Adams brothers are from
High Point, and Stephon says the
three aren't as competitive against
one another as many people might
think. "We used to be in high
school he said, "andwhen we
played on little league teams. We
were all on different teams, so we
were always dogging each other
Heath On His Way Placekicker
Jeff Heath may soon become the
career record holder at ECU for
field goals. Heath has 24 field
goals to his credit so far. The
school record is 26. Bill Lamm
had 26 during the 1977 and 1978
seasons. Heath broke the single
season record for field goals last
year with 16. He has eight field
goals this season.
Byner In Top HJ Ernes
now in the top ten 1.
list at ECU. Thefulll
has 1,722 ��
him ahead oi
Strayhorn who had
from 190 to I
Ingram Make? Several Li
Quarterback kc
moving rapid,
two career cat g
school's top 10 lists
116 career compic:
number five. Ing .
number five in care
yards with 1586. In season
completions. Ingram hoi
ninth spot with 59 s
season. Ingram ha
passing this year to mc � -
number 10 on the
yardage list.
Pirate Offense Hurts Fl
The Gators' defensive -
quickly in the first qua
the Pirates. Florida wa
tionaliy, allowing but x ai
rushing per game 1
ECU game Ernes!
Reggie Branch gained v
the first nine rushing ar .
a team, the Pirai: � 1 s
yards per carrj
Florida allowance
carrv.
Pirates Hoping For hi i rovo
A crowd oi some 30,000 is ex
pected for th - . -v
homecoming. This year,
fourth and fifth largest crowds
school history watched the f:
two home games.
Road attendance ha also
high. The 73,943 !an a: Florid;
was the largest crowd ;he Pirates
have ever played m front of. Tha
was a Florida record as weil
" t
. �w
f �
. � Y
Chat Harris (a)
76 tackles.
to pat ait oa aa earner oppoaeat tali
�A�V "ATTKBMH CCU . .
. Harris carreatty leads the Pirates with
n��ann-i iTm i
� 1 ImiWMIlWtMMIWIi
.





10
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 27, 1983
Campus Run To Be Held
Sneaker Sam Sez
The annual Cross-
Campus Run will be
held on Saturday, Oc-
tober 29, and registra-
tion will be held from
October 26 through
race time. There will
be two races: a 2.5
mile race starting at 9
am. and a 5 -mile race
beginning at 9:30 a.m.
The race is open to all
ECU students, facul-
ty, staff, spouses and
Alumni.
The flag Football
Finals are finished,
and competition has
proved to be as strong
as ever.
In the Mens' In-
dependent Division,
Third Regiment beat
the Enforcers with a
final score of 18-12.
Anthony Martin and
David Covington
scored for the En-
forcers and Kevin
Williams, Jim Quinn
and Scott McCarroli
gained points for the
Third Regiment.
The untouchables
from Scott Dorm
defeated Jarvis's Love
Brokers with a final
score of 20-14 to take
the Mens' Residence
Hall title. It was a
close game, with the
winning touchdown
scored in the last
minute of the contest.
Scorers for the Un-
touchables were Mark
Whitman, Ray Carter
and Mark Pierce.
Mike Riley, Lenny
Holmes, and Mike
Mizzell scored points
for the Love Brokers.
The Fraternity
finals pitted the Kap-
pa Alphas against the
Lambda Chi Alphas,
with the KA's winning
30-16. The two teams
also met in a finals
match in 1979. The
KA's took the title
then as well.
In Women's com-
petition, the Heart-
breakers were scored
against for the first
time this season, but
they still soundly
defeated th T.As
50-6 in the Women's
Independent Division.
Scoring for the Heart-
breakers were Yvonne
Williams, Leslie
Bunn, Wendy Oz-
mont, Melody Ham,
Clara Alphin, Ginger
Rothermel and
Jeanette Roth.
The White Raiders
closed out the Slay
Stallions 20-0 with
Jennifer Jackson and
Gina Taylor scoring
in the Womens
Residence Hall Divi-
sion.
The Alpha Delta
Pi's defeated the
Alpha Phi's 14-8 in
thee Sorority Finals.
The ADPi's Cindy
Schumaker, Ginger
Sugg, and Cindy Her-
ring scored points and
Jane Cointer scored
for the Alpha Phis.
The first round of
the All-Campus
Men's Finals pitted
Third Regiment winn-
ing, 36-28. They will
face the KA's for the
championship.
The Womens All-
Campus Finals saw
the White Raiders
overtake the ADP's
20-12. The Raiders
will face the Heart-
breakers for the
championship.
???�???????
�Mb
�ulflJUir MM x�
" � � ��� � UMlll
l "1 MfMl C � MOM 2 i � r r H fj
HHP ???�????� ���"M
OCTOBER 29TH
Band - The Fabulous Kays
Playing From 9 1
LOU CLIMMONMCU �� Lab
An ECT swimmer gets ready for the Pirates' upcoming season. The swim team begins the 1983
schedule in November.
Main Dining Room:
Band - 509 North
Order Off The Menu
Hours - 4:30 Until
Banquet Room:
THE
yKD and
ueen
O NORTH
Tickets Avaiiabale At 509 N. Greene St.
Menu -
Prime Rib-8 Oz . Baked Potato.
Salad. Bread. Coffee & Tea,
Rainbow Sherbet. Or-
Stuffed Shrimp, Baked Potato,
Salad, Bread. Coffee & Tea,
Rainbow Sherbet. Champagne
For Two-Tax & Tip Inclusive
Dinner Hours: 4:30-8 00 Only.
$45 00 Couple
Coming Wed. Nov. 2nd -The CaUlinas
pfr ��c Shrimp Lovers
O ffi " H hy travel 100 miles to th
� beach and pay high prices
amity eiturantsorfresh'shrimp
Bars Will Open At 4 30
Happy Hour
4 30-8 00
a After 8:00
UCCfl Adms7oo
Couple
$4 00
Single
For Further Information Call 758-9714
Combination Special
Trout, Shrimp,
Deviled Crab
$3.99
0&
AvnHAlE'F AMEAL

Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
Combination Special
Trout, Shrimp, Deviled Crab
$3.99
TUES WEDTHURS.
Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327 v�r
c'W
1t�







HOMECOMING CORSAGES
Plain Mum $5.00
wTootball $6.00
w pin & Football $7.00
EXTRA FANCY $10.00
20 or more 20off
Greek letters may also be attached
JOHN'S
GIFTS
503 E THUO ST
GSEEMVILL.E N C
ONE 75-2 3J'
PW PLttrm Blf�ltfb CENTER
GREENVILLE W C
PwCNE 756 neo








512 E. 14th Street
(2 blocks West of Mens Dorms)
3.85 & tax
ALL YOU CAN EAT
vegetables, Bread & Tea
and 1 meat
TAKI OUT OtMIS
752-0476 ��
Sammy
I about a
I meal plan!
Daily Specials $1.99
" � " � iinmiifnimi EMWXMWMMX
4 l�.T! :�: i f- ,
yrt 'i7-v
Winterville J.C's
presents
7th Annual Haunted House
Oct. 27-31st
7:30 pm-until Nightly
Thurs. ECU Night
reduced Admission wID.
Located: 21 miles east of
Winterville on State Rd. 1709
;watch for signs.
HAcnAcnonc ornn
!�ILUMfUnUL flLUUi
mfagrL
MdiinWrift

QUIET RIOT METAL HEALTH ne ud ng Metai M�aHhCurp Op Fee. Tn� So e Do" � Wanna Let Xoi. Go Siicx Biac Cadritec e's 3t C'irv
�-
� iRecords
1 � HELIX 1 1 No Rest For The Wicked I wm?& Wm JmQUEENSRYCHi
LifJ

i ,Hxni AMERICA
$3.99 LP or TAPE $5.99 LP or TAPE
RECORDS, JAPES A A LITTLE BIT MORE
�VOItf THROUGH NOV. 2nd
PITT PLAZA
CAROLINA EAST MALL
f
f
ECl Kicker Jfff H
Classifi
PERSONA!
COX B��-
P�'Hiept. i ipeor1 .
t -�? ��
mpp � : i .
Mfl - E I �� �
CCSME i-
campus SBA i
9usn �-� i� -
���? - ����- � "
-
TO The OME �
�r MaHMaaa. �
WANTED
BCXDMATE SEETE c
Oupki S'�nc D- LSI
� ant kaM �. ��t i�
l.gn c�! "5� ' : - �� �
aw�ji
ss o.erseas m r
ciutfmg An�T-� .a Sc �
EOp� A ca A MM i
SI�iB A � ti " � ?�'� �-c
fwii Hmm ixwtMMc Cm
nteies'e: h joss
Owe Tkwi j � . � � -�� �
CwM�� A -t pat l �-
m��mffl�a. �mo :� neal 3"�
too Cos' �� rkaii 3-�-
llT� �l)��'��l 5' .S CM- �! A;
Oraan ia?.an �? �ro� �'O
.
-
For H.r-H- .ttr
IM'M CM1W rM SH
0LLESI IE WAK'EO �� -v��XJ
o(��a c �l.i w.H� aaa aa
BlVINcandIR
select titles vf magi
Selling all paper
Vx publisher pi
Forming Readei
READERS'EXCHA
Evans Hew & Us
321 Kan i Mall
M()N-1 �
With thi ad
lOoff your uiai pi
Expires 10
Spring Break Ci
X-
jlMarch 5ih-th c ruiNt Vro
asau Kreepori. S.S r
jIS515 per person 4 pc I
X-
K
X


For more int
Call dreermlle Travel
r
L1
raai
25 RESUM
(Linen Pa
D�
Typed $8
Typeset $2:
Open 12 Houf
Monday - Thui
Fnaay9-7 SarJl
The Georgetown Sr





tbination Special
rout, Shrimp,
Deviled Crab
$3.99
$
if. shrimp Lovers
� H hy travel 100 miles to th
beach and pay high prices
aur ants for fresh shrimp
)
MEAL
Handing seafood
ffering a special
mbi nation Special
Shrimp, Deviled Crab
$3.99
. YFDTHlRS.
facilities Available
58-0327
I- SALE

RIOT
-IEALTH
Fe Tie Noie
la Lei ou Go
BiacLets Get Oay
n
li& ! �5
STREAK
1 or TAPE
H NOV. 2nd.
PITT PLAZA
i EAST MALL
ECU Kicker Jeff Heath
Classifieds
PERSONAL
CONORAOULATIONS AMY
COX1 Best o luck on Saturday
Phi Kappa Tau is supporting you
all the way.
HAPPY list BIRTHDAY
MOLLIE, love Keith.
COSTUME PARTY: Central
campus SRA card holders and
guests art being treated to a
free Halloween party in the Jar-
vis courtyard on Sunday. Oc
tober JO at 7 p.m. Coma out and
HOULI
TO THE WOMEN of ECU: Kiss
or treat Halloween nita at suita
'1? H.H � "� loh�
wanteeT
plication write to: Allen S.
Lowranct, Director, 251 Olen-
wood Oriva, Mooresville, NC
UU�.
HOUSE-SITTER WANTED for
Christmas and Naw Yaar
Holidays. Suburban Greenville
Respond to the ECU Media
Board Office 717-
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: 3 bedroom furnish-
ed. Kings Row Apts. 12 rent
utilites. HBO, microwave. Call
a Her 0 p.m. 7S2-T7S7.
FEMALE ROOMATE NEED-
ED for next semester may move
In now. Georgetown Apts. across
form campus. S7J.7S.
FEMALE ROOMMATE
WANTED: S7 SO per. mo 12
utiiitas, private room(untur-
nishad) with dltchan
privlidges(NO art majors!
Phone 7S0-OO4 ask for Lisa
ROOMATE NEEDED: to share
Duplex Stancill Dr S112.M men
� one half util pets! Great loca-
tion, call 75t-4f2�. Laava
message.
JOBS OVERSEAS MF (in-
cluding Australia. South Pacific.
Europe. Africa, Alaska, Cruise
Ship, Airlines). Temporary and
full time S20.000 to SM.OOO. Call
now I 204-724-5103 Ext. US.
INTERESTED IN JOBS
OverseasT There's a company in
Centralia, WA. that publishes an
international employment direc
tory. Cost $1 Their directory
lists hundreds of US Companies'
Organizations with world wide
ap�raHoti�. For further infer-
�ml cm" �
CDU.EOK RKP-WANTCO a
distribute "Student Rate"
subscription cards at this cam
pus Good income, no sailing in
volved. For information and ap-
MISC.
LEGAL HASSLEST Call
Howard J Cummlngs. attorney
at Law No charge for initial
consultation for ECU Students.
Call 750 000s.
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
campus include experienced
professional work. Pro-
ofreading, spelling and gram-
matical corrections 355740
after 5:30.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING.
lSS-�74
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SIONAL typing. Call Julia
� loodworWi at 7S4-7074.
TYPING. TalStM, TMaTSIS,
IF INTERESTED in designing a
logo tor a new retail store call
Nancy Christian 752-0452.
BUYING and TRADING
select titles of magazines
Selling all paper backs
Vx publishers price
Forming Readers clubs
READERS' EXCHANGE, LTD
Evans New & Used Books
321 Evans St. Mall 752-3333
MON-SAT 9:30-5:30
With this ad
logoff your total purchase.
Expires 10-31-83
JLaaf aV t aV X" "J" X e " " X� Jtr "X P W Laaf
ft
X-
Spring Break Cruise

March 5th-9th Cruise From Miami to �
Nassau & Freeport, S.S. Emerald Seas
�$517.75 per person 4 people per room -X-

ft
For more info:
ft
ft Call Greenville Travel Center
ft
756-1521
l







25 RESUMES
(Linen Paper)
Typed $8.65
Typeset $22.15
Open 12 Hours
Monday - Thursday
Friday 9-7 Saturday 9-2
The Georsetown Shops
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 27. 1983 11
New Supply of
FRESH WATER FISH H
Special on variety of FINCH
(WAXBILLS)
also
GOOD SUPPLY OF REPTILES IN STOCK
Record Bar's biggest sale of the year.

fir r�Z-
CASSETTl

PRINCE CONTROVERSY
VAN HALEN FAIR WARNING
VAN HALEN women & children first
AMERICA HISTORYGREATEST HITS
B'52s B'52's
MARSHALL TUCKER greatest hits
JIMI HENDRIX SMASH HITS
BLACK SABBATH PARANOID
DOOBIE BROTHERS BEST OF
THE EAGLES GREATEST HITS 0971-75)
THE CARS THE CARS
BREAD BEST OF
GROVER WASHINGTON JR.
WINELIGHT
THESE AND MORE ON SALE
DURING THE EVENT 2.
ACDC BACK IN BLACK
LED ZEPPELIN LED ZEPPELIN
LED ZEPPELIN LED ZEPPELIN II
LED ZEPPELIN LED Zeppelin iv
BAD COMPANY BAD COMPANY
BAD COMPANY STRAIGHT SHOOTER
PHIL COLLINS FACE VALUE
CROSBY, STILLS, NASH & YOUNG
SO FAR
- 5.49 Ip or tape
Anyone who's anyone, on sale till November 2.
PITT PLAZACAROLINA EAST
C35aW
� Record Bar
RECORDS, TAPES AND A LITTLE BIT MORE.
The Music, The Stars, The Celebration Return
� ��- .����� L�
. BJ





12
! Ml I As 1 K MAN
in !i HI k 2 Wh i
I





Title
The East Carolinian, October 27, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 27, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.297
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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