The East Carolinian, October 25, 1983






3fje lEaai (Earalmian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 NofT
Tuesday, October 25, 1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Search For Bodies Continues In Lebanon
Rl Lebanon (UP1) I s Marines and
Fre ps pulled more bodies Monday from
a I S headquarters and a French bar-
) two suicide bombings that killed at
� and 41 French troop.
leagan dispatched Marine Comman-
Kelly to fly to Beirut to reiew security
the Marines following the bloodiest
c ag S servicemen since the Vietnam
v a
n, outraged congressional leaders
s peace-keeping troops should
�vmon despite the president's vow not to
nal terrorism.
French President Francois Mitterrand arrived in
Beirut for a surprise visit and met with President
Amin Gemayel before touring the bomb-flattened
French building and the Marine headquarters three
miles away.
Terrorists, striking a minute apart, crashed two
trucks loaded with thousands of pounds of explosives
into the Marines' BattaJlion Landing Team head-
quarters and the west Beirut building housing French
paratroops.
The massive pre-dawn explosions razed both
buildings, sending tons of concrete and steel on the
sleeping American and French peace-keeping troops
Working around the clock, soldiers and rescue
workers used bulldozers, chisels and axes to cut
through concrete and twisted slabs of steel in an ef-
fort to reach more bodies.
The Pentagon said Monday 191 Marines were kill-
ed in the bombing, which leveled the four-story
Marines headquarters building with about 300 U S
soldiers inside.
Marine spokesman Maj. Robert Jordan said more
than 80 Marines were wounded in the blast In
Washington, a Pentagon spokesman said 75 seriously
wounded Marines were airlifted to military hospitals'
There was no count of those missing because roll
call records were destroyed in the blast, the
spokesman said.
Professor Believes
Marines Should Stay
B 1'UKK K O'NEILl
m "on

j in Mid
N' a
Unite it of 1 ebai
proper response
She
vai . ates to
I icks in the
uld
ecaus to so
m o� � than
Jeer
Ea

hing is to have a measured
reaction thai
emotionalism, and that's whar the
nresicienf s doins "
WnTth-HonsVi �aid -One
Reagan's . . �
� . the �
ana able re
for the present
'This was a terr rist g
tempting to influx jr political
authority Wurth-Hough said,
adding he justifies the current
role of U.S. forces in Lebanon on
the basis of national interest
"It doesn't necessarily mean I
support it or don't support it
she said.
You have to establish the
priorities, and if the priorities are
to keep the conflict from
escalating, then we should main-
ur presence there Wurth-
Hough said.
"Our foreign policy objectives,
which include the protection of
ntries that we have a long-term
relationship with, like Israel, and
(those countries that offer us) a
source of oil, dictates that we have
a presence in the Middle East
Wurth-Hough said U.S foreign
polic) is determined by President
Reagan and his foreign policy ad-
and that military presence is
a "kind of last way" we have of
tching our foreign policy objec-
our diplomacy doesn't
rl en we use military
forces Vv urth-Hough said. She
other techniques used
beore military action include
economic responses and profes-
sional diplomats for ncaotialion.
tV :rth-Hough cautioned that
Americans may have to expect
more of the same type of violent
attacks against U.S. troops sta-
tioned in Lebanon because forces
opposed to the U.S. presence
would continue to resist that
presence.
When asked if she thought it
would be a rough road ahead for
the U.S Wurth-Hough respond-
ed: "That's part of our history
"We plan to continue going as long as there is
hope of pulling out someone Jordan said after
daybreak today.
At the flattened eight-story building that housed
troops from the French 6th Regiment Infantrv
Paratroops, the death toll rose to 41 dead as rescue
workers retrieved more bodies today from the
10-yard-high mound of rubble.
A previously unknown group calling itself the Free
Islamic Revolution Movement claimed responsibility
for the bombings in a telephone call to the Beirut of-
fice of the Agence France Presse news agencv
The caller to AFP identified the two drivers died
trying oust "imperialists
ECU Students React
To Sunday's Incident
B TINA MAROSCHAK
st�ff rt!rr
RO� POOL! - ECU Pfcoto Le
Leaders Discuss Student Life
Hags around the country were flown at half mast Monday out of
respect for the U.S. Marines and French paratroopers who lost their
lives in Sunday's explosion. A previously unknown group known as
the Free Islamic Revoultion Movement claimed responsibilitv for the
bombings.
Student reactions to the explo-
sion in Beirut that killed at least
191 U.S. Marines and injured
more than 80 others were fairh
mixed Monday, with some sup-
porting an increased role for the
marines in Lebanon while others
advocated withdrawal of U.S.
military forces. Sunday's early
morning attacks caused the worst
loss of U.S. military lives since the
Vietnam War.
Senior political science student
Gary Williams said, "I'm
especially upset since I'm in the
PLC officers program � I'll be
going into the Marines after col-
lege graduation. 1 feel that
something should be done on the
part of the Marines as far as of-
fense goes. Thev should take the
initiative and retaliate
Williams added that a lot of
lives were taken needlessly.
"Something should be done,
iefinitely. ;o make up for those
lives that were lor
Dwayne Benfield. a corrections
student, also said action should be
taken. "I feel that if we're going
to stay over there then we should
take the initiative instead of being
sitting ducks. If we're not going to
do something then we should pull
out � we shouldn't be over there
at all he said.
A previously unknown group,
called the Free Islamic Revolution
Movement, claimed responsibility
for the attacks. "I think it was the
UNC Vice Chancellors Hold Meeting
Bv AM)Rr.MARKKI.LO
suff W n lr
The autumn C hiet Student Af-
fairs conference for the vice-
chance - the 16 universities
in the -m met last week
me on the ECU cam-
pus.
The three-day meeting allowed
the vice-chancellors from all parts
" 'he state to catch up with events
occurring in the university system.
According I i Dr. Elmer Meyer,
I ' I � ce-chancellor for Student
Lite, the primary purpose of the
meeting was to discuss programs
in the area ot student life.
The program, sponsored by
Meyer's department, allowed the
vice chancellors for the first time
to hear students voice ideas on
campus student life. Six ECU
students who head major campus
organizations presented their
views on "The Role and Mission
of Student Leaders" and
answered questions about their
duties on campus.
Paul Naso, representing the
SGA, said the meeting gave
students the opportunity "to
question major issues bothering
students, such as how the new
drinking law effects campus
events Naso said. "The con-
ference gave the vice-chancellors a
chance to see student perspectives,
and why we are student leaders
Darryl Brown, managing editor
of The East Carolinian, said it
was important for ad-
ministarators dealing with student
life to hear student opinions. "We
were well received. I think they
realized the value of giving
students a voice in a conference
about student life he said. "I
can't believe they haven't done it
before
Mark Niewald, representing
Student Residence Association,
said the conference was successful
and gave other administrators the
WZMB's General Manager Resigns;
Cites Pressure Of Job As Reason
opportunity to see what ECU had
to offer.
"I'm glad I was asked (to
speak) Niewald said. "ECU is a
vital part of the UNC system, and
I'm impressed with the entire
UNC system
Other students speaking includ-
ed Jimmie Hackett, head of the
Society of United Liberal
Students, Hope Root, president
of the Panhellenic Council and
Bobby Pierce, president of the
Inter-Fraternity Council.
Administrators received a tour
of the ECU campus and heard
presentations on such topics as
"academically related programs
t
Jim O. Ensor, Jr general
manager of ECU's radio station,
WZMB, announced his resigna-
tion Monday citing academic and
health reasons. Ensor is the se-
cond media head to offer his
resignation
this month.
On Oct. 7
Fielding
Miller, general
manager of
The East
Carolinian
resigned his
post.
In a letter to
Media Board
Chairman
Mark
Niewald, Ensor
"deepest regrets"
resigning. "I have
tenure at WZMB
perience that I have gained he
wrote.
"I was shocked when I received
Jim Ensor
offered his
that he was
enjoyed my
and the ex-
"Jim has done a fine job and I
know he will do well in his future
endeavors
In an interview Monday Ensor
cited the "immense pressure of
the job" as the reason underlying
his decision to resign. He at-
tributed the pressure to a Media
Board decision to not allow sta-
tion announcers (disc jockeys) to
be paid for their work. Ensor said
his entire staff of about 30 an-
nouncers was working as
volunteers. "Volunteers can't be
expeted to fulfill the work re-
quirements of such difficult posi-
tions Ensor said. "You simply
can't expect as much of volunteers
as you can of paid people
Ensor said that without finan-
cial incentives for workers, the
two-year-old station is unable to
function at its fullest potential.
The dilemma has resulted in a
heavy work load for WZMB's ex-
ecutive staff. "Because the an-
nouncers aren't paid, a lot of
loose ends have to be tied together
by the executive staff Ensor
said. "As a result, the members of
the executive staff don't have
enough time to complete all of
their duties
In his letter of resignation, En-
sor said he would be willing to
"help in any way possible" during
the transition and selection of his
replacement.
As of Nov. 1, WZMB Assistant
General Manager Gregory
Watkins will assume the duties of
general manager until the Media
Board chooses a replacement. En-
sor said he will assume the assis-
tant's role "to aid in the transi-
tion
Niewald said he is unsure when
a replacement for Ensor will be
selected, but applications for the
post would probably begin being
accepted in November.
Applications for The East
Carolinian positions are also still
being accepted.
Elmer Meyer
in residence halls "health ser-
vices" and "services for han-
dicapped students
A profile of ECU's intramural
program was considered outstan-
ding by many administrators
terrorist group � it was obviously
directed toward us That gives us
all the more reason to take the in-
itiative and be offensive Ben-
field said.
Kelly Dawson, a comp
science major, disagreed. "1 don
think the Iranians had anything I
do with it she said. "I do thii �
however, that they should bring
all the Marines home msteac
sending more over there
Computer science ma
Stephanie Waugh said. "1
that if the marines are going
stay over there then we should
protect ourselves She added
that "if Reagan will not allow
them to effectivelv pro"
themselves then he should bring
them home
In reaction to the I tai
education t u d e n t G1�
Maughan said, "It's bad news
everyone concerned It widens the
conflict there and makes i
out of the Rejj
administrate 1 s previous
statements that the Marines arc
not in a combat situatii
�Maughan said that the wl
multinational force nee :
reevaluate their whole -
being in I ebanon
Graduate si
Wynne said, "I'm not ak
ding more troops over there
bottom line, however, is u
they should be over there in
first place. I don't think thei
enough information to rake a i
stand except to say that I'm
that it happened
Daniel Gives
Lecture On
Female Brain
By ANDREA MARKF.LLO
�MTWMh
Females tend to have propor-
tionantly larger brains than men,
to process information using their
brain more fully, and are being
improperly evaluated in higher
education, said an ECU professor
last week.
The University Women's Net-
work, an informal group
developed for professional
See WOMEN. Page 6
High Flying Pirate
OARV PATTMSOM � �CU PlMto L
David B. Stevens Jr son of university attorney, David Stevens, and a 1973 ECU graduate, flew the foot-
ball team home from Saturday's contest against the Folhda Gators. For details , tee SPORTS, page 10.





?liiEAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 25 1
983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS NEW AMBASSADORS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
prmteo m the announcement
r�n please type ,t on an an
nouiifment form ano send if to
The tast Carolinian m care f
ttse produ t,on manager
Announcement toi ms jre
available at the East Carolinian
Off c� n �ne Public ations
Bu'ding Flyers and nancfwnt
V" OpY �- odd s'led paper can
not be � � .v �
,ff i H .natge for an
vv l ements tiut spae is often
� . 'heretore we Ljnno'
c ongi �dulationj new Am
budorsl We are realty look
Ing forward to you lolnlng our
organlialtonl we need for you to
call or coma by tha
T ay lor Slaughter Alumni
Center before Nov 4m to con
firm your membership We will
KxA forward to seeing you at our
Nov �tt maatlng Look for fur
thar datallt In future an
nouncaments Again, con
graduations and welcome-
k ,v t V, �� yOi ' .1'
(1 ' run .t- ong
tia - B s. ogest tna' yi
rely soft . -n tn,s i oi

T he oeaa line r
ements is 3 p m v
tuesday paper and 3
, - a. dnesda � - n rrturs
� �. papei �. . - p.iis
��' tries etaiinej
"Ounce
as . ou
a n
� . - g
ciepa- fme its
pie to a"
" s ana
PICTURE
TAKING DAY
intramural Picture Taking
Day will ba on Friday. October
7t between 3 30 and 5 30 In
Memorial Gym All Divisional
team winners and In
dividual'dual champions's ara
encouraged to attend Any
teams wtto hae participated dur
ng me fall semester and want a
memento of the season are also
welcome For more information
call 7S7 43J7
ASPA
Tn American Society of Per
sonne' Administration will have
a meeting on October ?� a' 3
C m In Rawi Building rm 20
This weeks speaker will be Jim
Wes'moj-eiand from me Career
banning ana Placement Ser
Ai members are urged to
��n and participate In order
c es'ab"Sh a tinal'ied member
i r tor 'he 1983 84 academy
� f�' Hooe to see yoc tbere!
CHEMISTRY
SEMINAR
l . 1815 0 Burroughs
mpe)ny . ren. ?
so -� � present a
v- 'a' en� "eo Automation
- a Mooe pharmaceutical
aboratory jnFi jay October
21 9t3 a' 2 c �" n Flanagan
- torn M' Refresh
r� seeo n room 204
n� nt the sf'nar
GEOGRAPHY
MAJORS ANDMINORS
. ranter Scholarship pro
les S35G 'c-�arc one student �
pal sn n "ie Spr-ng 19�4
Costa Rica S'udy Abroad Pro
Sec. ements sophomore
10 G p A n a
a' on and in
St rxti available
rs s nor Qsigr or ph i,p
- -� aptly and Planning,
i-227 Dead -e
- .�- jef � lyvgj
PREPROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
The Pi-eproess.onai Health
a a- e will meet Tncirsday
� Kjer V a' 5 M p m In the
Ladonia Wr.ght Cultural Center
"V goes' speaker will be
�io� Bennett a 'eg.stered oc
ca onai therapist at Pitt
ntry femora nosp tal All
members a-c; others are
�.� Mna ' c�no
AMBASSADORS
All Ambassadors are remind
ed that ttvare will be a general
meeting held on Wednesday. Oc
�otter 2. in the Multipurpose of
Mendenhall Studetn Canter The
meeting win begin at 5 p m All
members are encouraged to at
tend
GAMMA BETA PHI
FUND DRIVE
Ten prizes will be given out to
participating individuals for a SO
cents donation Prizes Include
Two portable cassett players
with stereo headphones.
Carolina East Man 25 00 Gift
Certificate. Art and Camera or
UBF 12S 00 Gift Certificate,
oreat Expressions Hairstyle.
Buccaneer Movies five pairs of
tickets Ail donations benefit the
Gamma Beta Phi scholarship
fund Tickets are available
from Gamma Beta Phi
members until Nov 3
Aon
The AOi I's are having another
bake vaie Come by me Student
Store on Tuesday. October 25,
from I 30 2 00 ano get some of
our delicious homemade mun
chies
INTER VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Can to repentance. Inter
Varsity Christian Fellowship
would Hke to Invite you out on
Wednesday nite at � 30 to hear
Doug Gome speak on Repen
�ance Come ;oln us in Jenkins
Auditorum for a talk which is
beneficial to all
TUPPERWARE
PARTY
There will be a tupperware
pa'�y at the AOH house on
hcrsday October 27. 7 30 p m
Refreshments will be served
and prizes will be given away
PSICHI
November 11 Is the deadline
tor accepting applications Into
Psl Chi, ma National Honor
Society of Psychology How do
you know If you qualify? Are you
In the top M percent of your
class? Have you takent at least I
hours In psychology or you will
have at the conclusion of the
semester? Than you qualify for
membership In Psl Chi pick up
your application In the Psl Chi
Library (Speight 202) during
library hours Hurry, because
there isn't much time lettl 11
All members who haven't fill
ad out a locator card, please stop
by the office to fill one out
Also Attention, there will be a
meeting this Wednesday night,
and we will have a guest
speaker Please get in touch
with Trlna for more Info , or lust
call tha Psl Chi office,
Remember these speakers are
for all of us. so come enjoyl
CENTRAL CAMPUS
HALLOWEEN PARTY
Central Campus Halloween
Party Sunday October 30 at
7 00 p m In the Jarvls Court
ward Costume Contest with big
cash prizes Favorite
refreshments Must bring Cen
tral Campus SRA card and ID
Sponsored by Central Campus
ARC
BASKETBALL
OFFICIALS
The department of
Intramural Recreational Ser
vices will begin training clinics
for intramural Co Rec basket
ball officials Monday October
31, 19�3 at 6 p m in Room 102 of
Memorial Gymnasium Rules,
Interpretations ano mechanics
will be discussed Officials will
be hired based on practical and
written tests Co Rec Basket
ball Officials Clinic, Mon Oct
31. 1W3 Rm 102. Mem Gym
PHI ETA SIGMA
There Will be a mee'mg on
Thursday, Oct 27 at 5 in room
212 Mendenhall We will discuss
plans for Hal'oween and
Homecoming All members are
urged to attend
INTERNAL
MEDICINE
Dr Mark Severance. Internal
Medicme resident and first AED
president, will be guest speaker
at the AED meeting on Tuesday .
October 25 at 7 x p m In
Flanagan 307 His topics will in
elude Aspects of Internal
Medicine" and How AED Can
Help You Get into Medicai
School" AM members ano
guests are encaoraged to attend
BEER BLAST
Phi Alpha Theta is sponsor ng
a cookout with keg on Oct 2 at
4 30 Tickets are $1 50 for
members and 12 00 for non
members and faculty and can be
picked up at me History Office
Tuesday through Friday
WOMEN'S BILLIARDS
All full time, female ECU
students art eligible to par
ticlpate In the All Campus
Women s Billiards Tournament
on Thursday. October 27. 1983 at
6 00 p m In Mendenhall Student
Center Woman wishing to par
ticlpate must register by
Wednesday. October 26th In the
�SC Billiards
Center winners wll compete in
tha ACU I Regional Tour
naments in Charlotte In
February For further Intorma
flon and rules, call 757 Mil ext
239
ALPHA
KAPPA ALPHA
The Theta Alpha Chapter of
Alpha kappa Alpha Sorority on
h campus of East Carolina
University presents the ECU
Homecoming Jam starring The
Howard Unlv Electric Poppers,
New York City Break Dancers,
Michael Jackson Clone,
Delphlne the Songstress. Mr
Freak, the man with the sexiest
body in the USA. Ms
Brlckhouse 1983. and America's
top D J s with a 5000 watt sound
system October 79 1983 10 pm
until 2 am 14 00 admission
Memorial Gym
SOCIETY FOR
THE ADVANCEMENT
OF MANAGEMENT
The Society for the Advance
ment of Management will hold a
meeting Tues Oct 25th at 3 p m
in Rawl 103 Our featured
speaker will be Mr Burk Barber
from Wachovia Bank on
"Careers in Banking " All In
terested persons are invited to
attend All who are interested In
becoming new members are
urged to attend this meeting
COLLEGE
REPUBLICANS
The CR s wll mee' tonight
Tuesday October 25 at 5 30 In
Rm 212 Mendenhaii
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may us� m� form at riQht or
us a separata sfteaf o paper if
you-nead more lines. Thare f 3)
units per line. Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitatite and
"ypnenate words properly. Leave
P�ce at end of line if word
ooesn't fft. No ads will be ec
cepted over me phone We
rnasrve the right to reiect any ad.
All ads must be prepaid Enclose
75� per line or fraction of a line
Pkasc prim leaibly! Usr capital and
lower cast letters
Return to the Media Board
secretary h 3 p.m. the day before
publication.
Name
Addles
CityState.
No lines.
,zp.
.Pfcoaa.
at 7M per lute S.
.No lascrttoa.
.eadoacd
Lit
�it
REBEL
Win cash prlies for your
talents Enter me REBEL art
and literary contests. Poetry
and prose deadlines November 7
and art contest entry date
November 14 Literature entries
must be typed and Include
author's name, address, and
phone number Art entries must
be brought by the conference
room in Jenkins between 10 am
and 5 p m on November 14 wltti
a $1 entry fee per work Prize
money provided by the Attic and
Budwiser if you have any ques
�ions, call or come by the
REBEL office, 757 6502
EPISCOPAL
STUDETN WORSHIP
A serv.ee of Holy Communion
wili be celebrated on Tuesday
Eve October 25 in the Chapel of
St Paul's Episcoal Church at
40� 4tr, Sf (One block from Gar
ret Dormi Service will be at
5 30 The Rev Bill Madden
Episcopal Chaplain to studetns
at ECU will be the celebrant
SRACARDS
SRA cards ara still avalliabie
from Residence Directors Don't
be left out l
CARNATIONS
Beta little sisters are selling
carnations for Homecoming in
front of the Student Supply Store
today The carnations are 13 00
CROSS
CAMPUS RACE
Two Cross Campus races will
be held Homecoming Day Satur
day Oct 29 A 2 5 mile race will
start at 9 am and a 5 0 mile
race will start at 9 30 a m Both
races start near me bleachers at
me ECU varsity track. Bunting
Field The race course is 95 per
cent on grass and traverses in
and about the area surrounding
Minges Coliseum, Picklen
Stadium, Bunting Field. Hjf
� ngton and ttie women's softban
field The races, which are spot
sored by me Department of
intramural Recreational Ser
vices, are open to participation
by all ECU students, staff anc
ECU alumni.
BAPTIST
STUDENT UNION
Every Tuesday evening tbe
Baptist Student Union has an In
formative program caned
SPARK On October 25 at 5 �.
Sister Helen Sbonoell will be our
special guest speaking on "Cen
tral Ameica A Cause for Con
cern " SPARK is followed by a
�2 home cooked meal The Bap
list Student Center is located at
511 East Tenth Street, next door
to Wendy's
EURHYTHMICS
IMPROVISATION
Eurhythmicsimprovsa'on
Express e BoOr Movement
When Oct 26 19�3 a' 5 P m
Where Room ioi Fletcher
Music BuilOrng
What to Bring yourself and a
fr.end wear loose ciomes
PartIWaaka an ECU dance n
ttrucfor aril) be me presenter
Sponsored t 'he ECU MuSlce
Therapy Club Ret'esnnnents
will be served Ee-�ooe s
welcome
KC63
KC83 s a na' ona conteente
for college student, tnat win be
neir: - �j-m c fy V: from
Dec 2' 1913 .an I, I9t4
HOMECOMING
DINNERS
Homecoming D,rne'S .
i-a abie on Sav:a.
Tte dmne's sponsrxe
P tt Count. A UIWI ' �
art be se ed a � By irnet
Fourteenth see1 a:
Boulevard P' es � -
barbecue or rei cti �e
- -j� 14 Se' . ng � V
a m ano contlnua � t i
SNOW SKIING
ttent,or snow s� entt � �
There w ' oe a ee' ng I �
nte'evec n a trip K �
A .A OVW �"8!3rfj. y
2 5 4 3 0 e �" room
Me nnor a G y �" Contact
SaurJeri a" T5f �O0C � x�
fa
I he Kasi Carolinian,
Pol
XEROX COPIES
Subscription Ratt- 120 yearly
The East Carolm an offices
rfr located m the Old South
Buildmq on the campus it
ECU Greenville N C
r
Telephone " 636 6J6'
630
KASH&
KARRY
14th & Charles
ioii don't wdnf to mis our.
mowEM-foiEcowm
SIDEUALK SALE
Ua6Qct26,
301440
C tton Candy
pco rn
Candy Apples
15c Pepsi
WE "RE COMBINING
TWO BIG EVENTS
FOR THE GREATEST SALE EVER
IN STUDENT SUPPLY STORE HISTORY
Ra i n Datc
hursdax , Oct .
SELECTED MERCHANDISE
PIRATE PLAQUE
STADIUM CUP
STADIUM CUSHION
PIRATE POSTER
PENNANTS
FOOTBALL CLOCK
BASEBALL CLOCK
REG.
PRICE
SALT.
1 b . 9 5
. 7 5
3. 75
3 . 0 0
S . 9 5
3 7 . 9 5
29.95
PRICE SELECTED MERCHANDISE
4
9 . 9 5
.50
I . 9 5
. 9 5
� r
. . -
2 9 . 9 5
2 3 . 9 5
14 oz. GLASSES
CERAMIC MUGS
MARBLE ASHTRAYS
HI RAIL CLASSES
INSULATED MDC
ECU ORNAMENTS
REMAINDER BOOKS
REC SALE I �rrrr-p
JRKlni
2.70
10.95
16.00
3. 50
4 . 9 5
6. SO
1 . 50
5 . 9 5
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HOODED SWEATSHIRTS
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V-NECK JERSEYS
BASEBALL JERSEYS
RAINWEAR
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 23, 19�3
w.
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l( N DINNERS
Homecom "fl 0'inert will be
- � � itvroay, Oct. 79
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Mumn Chapter
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teentl act �nc Cheries
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VA nat sreak on Oct
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NDNFWS
nngenter
4f-9:30PM

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1 3
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5
29,1983
Escort Service
Offers Security
By TINA
MAROSCHAK
SUM Writer
The ECU Pirate
Walk officers are
campaigning to pro-
mote greater program
awareness among
female students. "All
we can do is let the
girls know that the
service is here. I don't
think they know how-
dangerous it could be
walking alone
Michael Pitts, direc-
tor of Pirate Walk,
said.
As part of the cam-
paign, the ECU house
council is circulating
pamphlets about the
service to all women's
dorms, and the Pirate
Walk officers are
distributing posters
and flyers across cam-
pus. Starting Wednes-
day, escorts can be
identified by their
gold jackets embossed
Companies React To Charges
with the Pirate Walk
logo, "Pirate Walk �
ECU Escort Service
Pitts said the
number of females us-
ing the service has
neither increased or
decreased since its
beginning. "We're
having the same tur-
nout this semester as
last semester he
said.
By GLENN
MAUGHAN
Staff Wittar
Responding to
charges of negligence,
three companies have
stated that residents
of the Village Green
apartments sustained
injuries in the March
2 explosion by conti-
nuing to live in the
building even after
they were aware of a
laundry room gas
leak. The companies
maintain residents
had knowledge of a
dangerous situation.
In a report by the
Raleigh News and
Observer, defendant
company Fenwal,
who manufacture a
spark ignition system,
stated residents
were aware or
should have been
aware for some time
that there was a gas
leak from the laundry
room and con-
tinued to reside in the
apartment complex
with full knowledge
of the unreasonable
dangerous
condition
The explosion,
caused by leaking gas,
killed one ECU stu-
dent, David Martin,
and injured 12 others.
The companies which
filed the legal
responses stated
tenants brought risk
upon themselves by
continuing to live in
the building. The
responses were filed in
Pitt Superior Court in
Greenville last week.
A trial date for the
lawsuits demanding
$7 million in damages
has yet to be deter-
mined.
Interested In Law?
Service Offers Help
Frat Members Plead No Contest
A major new ser-
vice for students who
are thinking ahead to
decisions about post-
graduate and profes-
sional degrees and
future careers has
been announced by
the Law School Ad-
mission Council and
the Law School Ad-
mission Services.
Developed by the
organizations that ad-
minister the Law
School Admission
Test, the new service
is called The Law
Package.
A four-part pro-
gram of pubheati
services and self-
evaluation materials,
The Law Package will
help students explore
and evaluate their in-
terest in law school.
Students can take a
"tryout LSAT" and
request that the Law
School Admission
Services score it for
their eyes only. They
can use the results to
evaluate their strong
points and weak
points.
The Law Package
wi7 also help students
explore questions
about the admission
process and law
school, the aims of
legal education and
the range of careers
available with a law
degree. To assist those
who decide to apply
to law school, the
package provides a
guide to the admission
process.
The Law Package is
designed to acquaint
students with the
analytical thinking
and problem-solving
abilities they will
develop in law school
and help them decide
whether they really
want a career in law.
Available from the
Law School Admis-
sion Services for $10,
the package includes:
� You, The Law
And School, a book
that describes legal
career options and
what to expect in law
school; key facts
about U.S. and Cana-
dian law schools; a
bibliography of
prelaw readings;
preparation materials
for the LSAT. in-
cluding details about
the nature of LSAT
questions; and a sam-
ple LSAT with an
answer key for self-
scoring.
� a tryout LSAT
that students can take
and return to the ad-
mission service for a
confidential analysis
of their test results.
� information On
Five Law Schools that
students designate on
the package's data
form.
� Admission Pro-
cess: A Guide, a
booklet that describes
major factors law
schools consider in
reviewing applicants,
financial aid informa-
tion and additional
sources of informa-
tion relative to legal
education and the ad-
mission process.
Students who desire
more information can
request "The Law
Package Brochure"
by writing to: Law
School Admission
Services, Box 500,
Newtown, Penn
18940.
By GLENN
MAUGHAN
Staff Writar
No contest pleas
were entered Wednes-
day in Pitt County
Superior Court by
two of the 15 Omega
Psi Phi Fraternity
members charged
Call Pirate Walk 757-6616
This weekend!
Be There
f
I
I
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756-7097
HOURS: SUN-THl RS llam-9pm
FRI&SATHam-lOpm
Rib-Eye Steak
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mho Open Fri. and Sat.
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COM Cl-J � UD V(v � � w. vvui
SHONEYS
IF THERE'S LEADERSHIP
INYOULOCS
CAN BRING IT OUT.
OCS (Army Officer Candidate School)
is a 14-week challenge to all that s in you. the
mental, the physical, the spirit that are part of
what makes a leader
It OCS were easy, it couldn't do the job It
wouldn't bring out the leader in you, or help you
discover what you have inside
Rut when you finish and graduate as a com-
missioned officer in the Army, you'll know You'll
know you have what it takes to lead And you'll be
mm, alert, fit, and ready to exercise the leadership
skills that civilian companies look for
If you're about to get your degree and you
want to develop your leadership ability, take the
OCS challenge
Call your local Army Recruiter, and ask
about OCS.
If Tkatv't I wtmdmM la Yoa,
OCS Cm Ma� It Oat.
Interview At Bfautoa Hoaac
Oct 241
l:MAM4MPM
Or Cal Cp(. MatalH TS2.29M
ARMY. Bt ALL YOU CAM
with assault in con-
nection with a hazing
incident last
February.
Reginald L. McNeil
and Michael Swan
entered the pleas as
part of a plea bargain
arrangement. The ar-
7S2-7M3
rangement called for
the hazing charges to
be dropped and for
the two to be charged
with simple assault.
Their defense lawyers
requested that Judge
Charles B. Winberry
Jr. grant a prayer for
judgment continued.
The request was ap-
proved and the defen-
dants were ordered to
pay court costs.
A prayer for judg-
ment continued
means that sentencing
is indefinitely
delayed.
Seabolt Improving
Ricky Seabolt, ECU student severely in-
jured in the March 2 explosion at Village
Green apartments, returned to Greenville
Oct. 21. It marked the first time Seabolt
has traveled alone since his extensive
hospitalization following the blast.
Seabolt is recovering from a "closed-
head injury" that paraLzyed the right side
of his body and injured the left side of his
brain. He continues his twice weekly out-
patient therapy sessions at Memorial
Hospital in Chapel Hill.
According to Seabolt's mother, Doris
Ann Seabolt, Ricky still has some
weakness on his right side but he can drive
a car. "I was pretty nervous letting him go
on his own to Greenville, but he's been
bored staying around here she said.
'I'm doing fine; my progress is good
Seabolt said when contacted in Greenville.
"During the week, I'm sitting in a
marketing class at UNC-CH and will pro-
bably audit a class there next semester
he said.
Seabolt plans to return to classes at
ECU next summer "As soon as I can, I'm
coming back to ECU and graduate. That
will be in the summer of '84 he said.
J
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9K ADM
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REDlCXD ADMltHftS?tavCT3rVrT,�V
SUN. MOVIES
iV
2nd Anniversary
November 2nd
"Watch For Details"
7M-IIJ7
Tho kit
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All Bur9�r Arm 4 lb
Pur Boat Ground trash.
Doily Fro OvoHooa.
Bring ttua o4-10 Off
Any Ice Caaaaa Selection
Soft ke Croon Cono Floor
At
W� HtMtt Nit JO c�m AM
Mila. Ww A4� wMfc ECU ft)
TW CmOmmm ��� SO c�
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Fri. IrW W �� W��a Par 7fX
caNkallMaa.
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9:00 TIL 2.40
NlgbtiWaScbadula
Gold:
FlemingSofter hour
English Annex JO after hour
10th A the Hill .13 after hour
College Hill 15 after hour
Stratford Arms Apts. U hour
Harg'tt S Drugs25 til hour
Home Federal 15 til hour
Purple:
Univ. Condo10 after hour
Cannon Court .12 after hour
Eastbrook 13 after hour
Rtverbluff20 after hour
kings Row h hour
ytillage Green25 til hour
College View24 tit hour
Cypress23 til hour
Home Federal 15 til hour
"Te�6
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o�n 7 da v v �(���
A PfUVATf CLUB HOT Off N
to txi of hi ral rutuc
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751-OOM
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WED. and FRI.
4K - 9:00 as DfftAPT
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Tues Oct. 25
LADIES NIGH!
with
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Special AB Yoa Caa Eat
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purchase to . �
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Send. hot pots to.
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Please alto 6-8 weeks lor processing. Otter v�d where prohtbiter taxed or
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Otter expires June 30,1984
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STL -
VWfC

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viiaroimtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Darryl Brown, �.��� ,
Hunter Fisher, mm mmp
ALI AFRASHTEH, Ow� Marnier
Geoff Hudson, 0� ���f
Michael Mayo, r�-�-a sper�uor
Cindy Pleasants, spom u�or
Greg Rideout, �f�w � &�.
Gordon Ipock, e�- ��
Lizanne Jennings, & �d��-
Todd Evans, product� wa
October 25, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Research Banned
Conflicts With Constitution
Cambridge is at it again. A cou-
ple of years ago, this township on
the edge of Boston, the harbor of
Harvard, voted in a city ordinance
banning biogenetic research, for
mostly moral reasons. Man
shouldn't be re-creating creation,
they must have figured, at least not
by rearranging chromosomes.
Well, this fall they have another
referendum facing voters that
would ban all research and con-
struction of technology used to
make nuclear weapons.
The city ordinance would make
it a crime, punishable by fine
andor imprisonment, to work at a
facility involved with nuclear
weapons. Cambridge is a leading
area for such res earch and
development, and the law would
dissolve a leading industry and
about 1,800 jobs.
Of course, we know the real
issue isn't jobs. Citizens of Cam-
bridge want to send a message to
Washington and the nation that
they oppose nuclear weapons and
the arms race, and they won't help
make them in their community.
The ordinance is symbolic for
sure, and most citizens realize that.
The industry will only be inconve-
nienced in having to relocate
somewhere else, and only Cam-
bridge's economy will suffer from
the loss of the high-tech, high pay
industry. Still, that is a loss many
citizens (at least those who don't
work for the nuclear industry) are
willing to endure.
The real problem, as we see it, is
larger: Can a group deny in-
dividuals (or companies) the right
to free, scientific research if they
are morally opposed to it?
Americans, under the First
Amendment, have the right to
freedom in academic, intellectual
and scientific pursuits, even if the
majority are opposed to it. Cam-
bridge is trying to limit that in-
herent right, on the moral objec-
tion of some of its citizens.
The Nazi party and the Klu Klux
Klan are certainly organizations
the majority of Americans morally
oppose. Yet, they have the right to
exist and carry out public ac-
tivities, even run for public office.
The Cambridge ordinances against
scientific and industrial research
are too similar to the censorship
objectives of the Moral Majority.
In each case, a group tries to im-
pose its morals, convictions and
values on others by limiting the ac-
tivities or freedoms of the
citizenry. The Moral Majority for-
bids Americans access to certain
books in public libraries; Cam-
bridge citizens censor industrial
and scientific activity. In either
case, we feel individual freedoms
are violated.
The basic question is whether
it's more important to take a sym-
bolic stance expressing moral or
political beliefs or to preserve con-
stitutional rights on freedom of ex-
pression and activity. One group's
morals are not those of all people,
and one group, even a majority,
should not have the power to stifle
the convictions, attitudes or ac-
tions of others. In Cambridge, the
right to uncensored research,
whether applied to genetics and
nuclear weapons, is more impor-
tant than the right to express per-
sonal opinions.
Beirut Bomb Changes View;
Impact Of TV Unforgettable
By GREG RIDEOUT
The TV mesmerized me. If seemed to
throw pictures at anyone in front of it.
Barren hills. A torn airport. And lastly
the shattered Marine barracks. There, all
was said without words. Men and boys
reaching through gaping holes in collaps-
ed concrete, vainly searching for signs
their comrades were alive. Some cried,
some cursed; all were stunned.
Viewpoint
Only now am I old enough to unders-
tand what the TV feeds me. I know of the
Vietnam conflict through books and
teachers, and, until now, thought I
understood it as well as if I had lived
through it as a comprehending adult. I
found out this weekend I was Wrong.
I have followed the escalating situation
in Lebanon and the Middle East during
my four years in college. Feelings and
facts molded my mind. Classes con-
tributed to the way I understand things.
Teachers shaped my viewpoint. My small
but growing amount of journalistic
knowledge helped me assimilate what the
world's presses spit out at me. With all of
these tools at my disposal, an opinion
formed in my brain and articulated itself
in my writing. I wrote it was okay for
Marines to be in Lebanon. Television and
the dead changed my mind.
As I watched the young corporals and
privates digging among the rubble of what
once was their home away from home, I
could not help but guess their ages. 18,19,
21. I experienced for the first time the
horror that is war. The impact of what I
was seeing zoomed through my brain and
left me speechless. Sometimes, I am sure,
there is a reason for our brothers to die in
war. But, now, I could not find one here.
Most Marines enthusiastically told the
cameras what they are doing is right. But,
helplessness covered their boyish faces
and betrayed them. I still believe the end
of this conflict in this perplexing, far-
away country will be Soviet control of the
area. Yet, unless Mr. Reagan redefines
our objectives and is willing to kill almost
all the people in the troubled region who
oppose American plans, we must gather
our dead and come home.
I say no honor will be lost if we work
for a diplomatic answer to the problem,
but my breath will not be held waiting for
peace, for I would surely turn blue. The
television that brought the Vietnam War
into living rooms and caused people to
turn to the streets to stop it has asked me
to question what I believe. Death for no
reason, senseless and wasteful, has chang-
ed my mind and made me question our
role in the Middle East.
Worldwide Starvation
Jesse's Stand Fit For King
By GORDON IPOCK
Though some might argue Jesse
Helms enjoys playing devil's advocate
for the U.S. Senate, still he reaps a great
deal of harsh criticism for his often con-
troversial stands. The scathing censure
he drew for opposing a national holiday
for Martin Luther King is a prime exam-
ple.
Helms was blasted by every leading
liberal in the Senate. Edward Kennedy
and Daniel Moynihan charged Helms
with attempting a "smear campaign"
and disseminating "filth Joseph
Lowery of the Southern Christian
Leadership Conference indirectly called
Helms a racist. The editorial pages of
North Carolina's newspapers were just
as critical. The Raleigh News and
Observer accused Helms of "character
assasination, extremism, smearing
King's name, innuendo and McCar-
thyism Our own East Carolinian lash-
ed Helms even harder saying our senator
is an embarrassment who is making us
the "laughing stock of the nation
Because he opposed the holiday, The
East Carolinian claimed Helms was at-
tempting to return the nation to the days
of Jim Crow racism.
Curiously, all of Helms' liberal critics
ignored his cogent arguments against the
King holiday. Rather than debate issues,
they chose to discredit Helms. But
Helms' character was not the issue �
King's was. By attacking the man rather
than his argument, Helms' critics hoped
to avoid the truth, embarrassing as it
was.
And what about those questions?
Charges that King had communist ties
were a ploy by Helms to force public
disclosure of the sealed King files. The
FBI never found evidence strongly link-
ing King to communism, but wiretaps
and electronic bugging of the civil-rights
leader did reveal he was a lady's man.
The files were sealed as a courtesy to
King's family, his amours an embarrass-
ment to his wife and the movement.
Liberals charge that attempting to br-
ing the sordid elements of King's life to
public scrutiny was pure meanness on
the part of Helms. They also say that
Helms' reminding us it was Bobby Ken-
nedy who sanctioned the wire taps was
equally mean spirited.
I must disagree.
Helms wasn't motivated by meanness
or racial bigotry, but by a dogged belief
that the truth should be given to the
American public. Anyone who has taken
the time to read more than the usual in-
vective Helms' critics have heaped on
him will also agree. Helms' book When
Free Men Shall Stand should be required
reading for anyone who attempts a criti-
que or analysis of the man. It reveals a
super patriot whose fundamental beliefs
rest on a bedrock of Christianity,
republican democracy and free-
enterprise capitalism � traditional
American values.
It was these values that Helms' was
judging King by, that he would judge
anyone regardless of race who Congress
proposed to elevate to a secular deity.
George Washington, the only other man
to have a national holiday in his honor,
is indeed a secular diety. The white-
wigged, tight-lipped, pious-looking
Washington is a guiding spirit of the na-
tion and seems no more human than an
icon. As the "second father of his coun-
try according to Edward Kennedy,
King is being elevated to that same role!
Whether King is worthy of the role is
not for his peers and his contemporaries
to decide. The men who marched with
King and the men who opposed him can-
not judge King any more than they can
judge themselves. How can his wife,
who has championed the holiday, objec-
tively decide her husband's and her own
place in history? That is the task of a
later generation.
In Orwell's 1984, the past is written
and rewritten to suit the political expe-
diency of the moment. Heroes are
created one day and turned to n'Himi
the next. The same is true in the Soviet
Union, an Orwellian nightmare if there
ever was one. Even before his death,
Joseph Stalin was written up a national
hero. No doubt, some of the truth was
printed about Stalin, but embar-
rassments were effaced. Not many years
after his death, the Soviet bureaucracy
was compelled to tear down the Staiin
monuments and rewrite their textbooks
and encyclopedias The Crvta. x
present rewriting Chairman Mao's
legacy to suit their present political
needs.
No one can argue that the exponents
of the King holiday have not siezed a
propitious moment to further their
cause. Supporting the holiday is a
politically expedient move for politicians
facing re-election. It is a racial litmus
test necessary for black votes. It is
Orwellian.
Will Rogers once said about Con-
gress, "Somebody better keep an eye on
that crowd I'm proud North
Carolina's Jesse Helms has the guts to
do it.
Campus Forum
Concert Doesn't Measure Up
Hats off to Sandy Grant for in-
telligently criticizing the scheduled
homecoming concert. I agree with San-
dy that the choice of Charlie Daniels
and Marshall Tucker reflects a
tasteless, primitive, smoke-a-cigarette,
red-neck, wear-a-hat, weehah type of
mentality by the selection committee. I
wonder how many ECU students,
faculty and staff really care about
hearing the stupid devil going back to
Georgia?
Like Sandy stated, last year we got
.38 special (A group named after a gun
playing music on a peace-loving
university campus, honestly.) And, this
year we get another "southern
anachronism Well said, Sandy.
I think it would be a wonderful idea
for the selection committee to consider
improving the scheduling. If they did
so, we wouldn't have to get in
murderous cars and drive to the univer-
sities in the middle of the state in order
to hear The Dead, Talking Heads,
Joe Jackson, etc.
I would like to mention that things
weren't always this dismal, at least as
far as concerts are concerned. Back in
the late 60s and early 70s, when ECU
students were a tad bit more
heterogeneous, and perhaps a bit more
musically esoteric, we had excellent
major concerts. Here is a listing of a
few that I, personally, enjoyed: Richie
Havens, Strawberry Alarm Clock,
Jethro Tull, The Steve Miller Band,
Seals and Croft, Iron Butterfly, Curv-
ed Air, Chicago, West, Bruce and La-
ing and, even, The Guess Who.
I have talked with a few other "old
timers" who mention that things have,
indeed, gone down hill. Are the present
tastes of the concert scheduling com-
mittee in their respective feet? I guess
Mother's Finest is, once more, next,
followed by Brian Huskey barefootin'
on the mall.
I guess I'll have to give my
homecoming concert money to
downtown Greenville, go to the New
Deli and listen to Little Feat on tape.
Hal J. Daniel III
Professor
ROTC Defended
This letter is in response to Patrick
O'Neill's article concerning the ROTC
program.
It is true that people in the ROTC
may have to fight in a war someday,
but the same is true for everyone else
who has registered for the draft. The
ROTC has as much right to be on this
campus as any other ECU organiza-
tion.
I don't know about you Mr. O'Neill,
but I am proud to be an American. I,
too, am a Christian, and I do not want
to kill anyone either, but I would if
necessary to protect my country and
the "American principles" you are "so
nervous" about. Your idea of "achiev-
ing peace through non-violent means"
sounds good, but it is unrealistic. One
reason why Hitler was able to have so
many Jewish people killed was because
they did not fight back.
Mr. O'Neill, how can you be so
naive as to think that the U.S. govern-
ment is supporting covert operations to
overthrow the Nicaraguan government
because the United States doesn't like
them? The government is trying to pro-
tect the "American principle" of
freedom and security by attempting to
stop communist expansionism.
Jeane Kirkpatrick, the U.S. Am-
bassador to the United Nations, has
stated that "Nicaragua's Sandinista
leadership has agreed to serve as a con-
duit for an arms-trafficking system of
unprecedented proportions,
originating outside the hemisphere
Even one of the leaders of Nicaragua
has admitted that "Nicaragua is the
first domino in Latin America and the
revolution will eventually spread
through the rest of Central America
Therefore, I do not agree that
Nicaragua should be "free from out-
side interference
Mike Mills
Junior, Accounting
Thanx, ECU
On Sunday afternoon, Oct. 9, my
14-year-old son was injured in a bicycle
accident on campus near Memorial
Gym. Four ECU students were kind
enough to take him and his badly
damaged bicycle to my house. While I
do not know who the thoughtful in-
dividuals are, I very much appreciate
what they did for my son. My son, of
course, was also very grateful. I am
certain that each one is an outstanding
representative of the students attending
Donald T. Dunlap
ECU Staff
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail
them to or drop them by the
newspaper's offices on the second
floor of the publications building,
across from Joyner Library
For purposes of verification, all let-
ters must include the name, major and
classification, address, phone number
andsnature ofauthorfs). Letters are
limited to two typewritten pages,
double-spaced or neatly printed
Chan
duct
predi
woull
yea
estu
tualh
tion
Bauj
worli
popi
Di
Bau
billu
Acc(
Hunj
tioni
millij
from
"ThJ
28 e
chile
Bv PA IRK KO'NEOJ
An ECU physician in the Divi-
sion of Family Medicine claims
the problem of worldwide starva-
tion can be prevented if people
throughout the world nave a
change of will.
Speaking dunng the School of
Medicine's Grand Rounds lecture
series, Dr. David Baughan outhn
ed some of the reasons why one
out of every four people in the
world are hungry.
Baughan said studies ind.
that a global program to end
hunger would cosl S: ilion a
year until the year 2000. He noted
citizens in the United States spend
more than $50 bill ear on
alcohol and toba.
Part of the reason .
tists believe the hunger problem is
preventable stems from the recent ChinJ
decrease in the population Hji
Baughan noted that studies con- da
Hunt Builds
Around Four
B Mil.I tt WHITi
AMWTfi Sr�i MiitK COn
are
In the past fev- - (
Gov. James B. Hunt Ir
urging state Democ
focus on issue ronll
during the 1984 eir
Although he has no
his candidancv. Hunt is expected Care
to campaign next ea i Hi
Sen. Jesse Helms I n the tratii
U.S. Senate. can
Hunt's campaign iii t
centered around what he calls runs
"the four Els" � the ec
education, the elderlv and the en- ca (
vironmen. will
Lynne Garrison. Hunt's assis- nson
tant press secretary sa.J a re- sh i
Advertise With The E
glvr
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Buy One Piza At Roqular Price
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J COUPON-COUPON-COW
WHEN ARMY NUI
MOVE THEY TAKI
THEIR SENIOr-
WITH THEM.
Army nurses are "
lose status K mo ing asso xrten happen
civilian hospil �
Intact, the Arm) en ges :N
and growth Y �u re t rag wi
your education u
as Intensive Care, OR Pediatrics OB
Anesthesia and to attend conferer 15
inside and outside the Army
If you have a BSN and ai
to practice in the US or Puerto Rico, or
you're still a student, talk to an Armv
Recruiter
It could be a very happy move
Wfca Amy Nvbm Men. Ttt? Take
TfciH lirtirrrj ��
OrtXkHwi�U�AM4�PM
or CM C. Hmntm ���
ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN
'
� t
� '





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 25. 1983 5
'0 RUN THE
PEBWMENTWI7H
IENATONAL
ASENCV
A .&&
or King
Edward Kennedy,
ited to that same role.
i worthy of the role is
peers and his contemporaries
Tien who marched with
Tien u ho opposed him can-
. fi m more than they can
How can his wife,
ed the holiday, objec-
isband's and her own
That is the task of a
IV84. the past is written
I the political expe-
moment. Heroes are
and turned to villians
ame is true in the Soviet
in nightmare if there
Ken before his death,
� en up a national
�me of the truth was
-alin, but embar-
sa Faced Not many years
� death the Soiet bureaucracy'
Dmpeiiec to tear down the Stalin
uments and remc their textbooks
tpedia- The 0Mes �i� ml
I hair man Mao's
resent political
hat the exponents
ihday have not siezed a
mem to further their
�ing the holiday is a
� expedient move for politicians
m. It is a racial litmus
ir tor black votes. It is
Rogers once said about Con-
better keep an eye on
od I'm proud North
c Helms has the guts to
ure Up
� outside the hemisphere
one of the leaders of Nicaragua
dmitted that "Nicaragua is the
domino m Latin America and the
Hution will eventually spread
ugh the rest of Central America
refore, I do not agree that
Lragua should be "free from out-
interference '
Mike Mills
Junior, Accounting
Thanx, ECU
fn Sunday afternoon, Oct. 9, my
Irear-old son was injured in a bicycle
pent on campus near Memorial
In Four ECU students were kind
ugh to take him and his badly
paged bicycle to my house. While I
jnot kno who the thoughtful in-
Iduals are, I very much appreciate
� they did for my son. My son, of
rse, was also very grateful. I am
am that each one is an outstanding
resentative of the students attending
Donald T. Dunlap
ECU Staff
he East Carolinian welcomes letters
tressing all points of view. Mail
m to or drop them by the
spaper s offices on the second
of the publications building,
sfrom Joyner Library.
tor purposes of verification, ail let-
must include the name, major and
stfication, address, phone number
signature of authorfs). Utters are
ited to two typewritten pages,
lie-spaced or neatly printed.
Worldwide Starvation
Change Of Will Needed
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writ
An ECU physician in the Divi-
sion of Family Medicine claims
the problem of worldwide starva-
tion can be prevented if people
throughout the world have a
change of will.
Speaking during the School of
Medicine's Grand Rounds lecture
series, Dr. David Baughan outlin-
ed some of the reasons why one
out of every four people in the
world are hungry.
Baughan said studies indicate
that a global program to end
hunger would cost 525 billion a
year until the year 2000. He noted
citizens in the United States spend
more than $50 billion a year on
alcohol and tobacco.
Part of the reason why scien-
tists believe the hunger problem is
preventable stems from the recent
decrease in the population rates.
Baughan noted that studies con-
ducted in 1960 erroneously
predicted the world's population
would swell to 7 billion by the
year 2000. But more recent
estimates claim the figure is ac-
tually around 5.6 billion; a reduc-
tion of "two or three India's"
Baughan added, referring to the
world's second most heavily
populated nation.
During his presentation,
Baughan said that "as many as 1
billion of us are undernourished
According to statistics from the
Hunger Project, a hunger educa-
tional organization, "15 to 20
million" people die each year
from starvation and hunger.
"That is, 41,000 of us everyday;
28 every minute, 21 of whom are
children Baughan said.
"The worst earthquake in
modern history killed 242,000 in
China in 1976 Baughan said.
"Hunger kills that many every six
days
Baughan noted that current
world food production is capable
of feeding 7 billion people if it
were properly distributed. He also
noted that the rate of increase in
food production is 2.8 percent an-
nually, well ahead of the popula-
tion increase figure which stands
at about 2 percent annually.
Baughan called the distribution
problem "a major logistical
nightmare" because of the fact
that it is difficult to distribute
food to the more than 2 million
rural villages in developing coun-
tries, many of which are inaccessi-
ble by road.
Baughan noted that nations
with infant mortality rates of 50
or so or more per 1000 live births
had the most serious hunger and
malnutrition problems. He show-
ed examples of how 13 nations us-
ing a diversity of solutions within
varied political systems were able
to lower mortality rates to less
than 50.
Applications
now accepted for
General
Manager
of
The East
Carolinian
Applications will be accepted
until Thursday, Oct. 27 at 3
p.m. Apply at the Media Board
office on the second floor of
the Publications building,
across from the entrance of
Joyner Library.
presents
Draft Nite
Tues Oct. 25,1983
9:00-2:00 AM
Adm $1.50 IOC Draft All Nite
18 $1.00
Come Early
Hunt Builds Campaign
Around Four Issues
B Mil I IE WHITE
totouai Hmm Erflior
In the past few weeks, N.C.
Gov. James B. Hunt Jr. has been
urging state Democratic leaders to
focus on issues, not personalities,
during the 1984 election.
Although he has not announced
his candidancy. Hunt is expected
to campaign next year against
Sen. Jesse Helms for a seat in the
U.S. Senate.
Hunt's campaign will be
centered around what he calls
"the four Es" the economy,
cent interview, "The governor is
concentrating on issues he feels
are critical to North Carolina,
issues that people are concerned
about right now The economy,
education, the elderly and the en-
vironment are the four key issues
that Hunt really feels are
critical to the future of North
Carolina, Garrison said.
Hunt believes that by concen-
trating on the issues, cadidates
can avoid making personal at-
tacks on their opponents.
"The governor has said if he
runs he will make the differences
between him and the opposing
education, the elderly and the en- candidates very clear, but there
vironment. will be no personal attacks Gar-
Lynne Garrison, Hunt's assis- rison said. "The campaigns of'84
tant press secretary, said in a re- should be issue-oriented
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rfHEN ARMY NURSES
MOVE THEY TAKE
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Army nurses .ire officers. They never
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In tact, the Army encourages mobility
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as Intensive Care, OR. Pediatrics, OB or
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t
AND
MARSHALL TUCKER
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28,1983
8:00 P.M.
MINGES COLLISEUM



1










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lAtMntMlfc
Oet M MM � AM -4M TM
ofur:pi.M�i�7Sl-2
ARMY. BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
Combination Special
Trout, Shrimp, Deviled Crab
$3.99
TUES WED THURS.
Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327 -
t ECU STUDENTS: $9.00 NON-STUDENTS: $10.00 J
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR: $10.00
i












Tickets available Central Ticket Office, October 14, 1983
until sell out!
�������������������������1
??���'
Tickets also avattabh at Both
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. . � " ������
P





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 23, 1983
Women Use Both Sides
Of Brain; Men Playing
With Half Of A Deck
I ont. From Page 1
women on the ECU campus,
sponsored a lecture last week by
Professor Hal. J. Daniel 111,
SLAP adjunct professor of an-
thropology, entitled "The Female
Brain: Implication for Higher
Learning
Females tend to process infor-
mation differently by using both
sides of the brain, where males
tend to localize information
Dainel said. Hormonal dif-
ferences begin in genes which in
turn trigger responses in the brain
and hape behavior.
As a result, men tend to be
more violent and egocentric in all
societies whereas women tend to
re more nurturing. Research in-
volving the effects of sex steroids
on behavior of the sexes was also
discussed.
Daniel referred to an article in
science magaine, August 1982,
entitled Sex and Handedness
Differences in Cerebral Blood
Flow which discusseed women
having a higher rate of blood flow
per unit weight of brain as well as
findings showing that, compared
to males, females tend to have a
higher percentage of grey matter.
According to the article, left-
handed females have the highest
percentage of grey matter.
In addition, Daniel also
presented research showing the
portions of the commissural fiber
of the brain are larger in females.
He explained these brain fibers
are responsible for transmitting
information from one hemisphere
of the brain to the other.
Daniel also discussed the place
of women in higher education. "It
is possible that women aren't be-
ing properly evaluated for the
creative things they do best
Daniel said. "The process of
evaluation should be changed and
looked at through differing types
of creative activities rather than
perhaps simply the number of
papers published. Every
bureaucracy needs to have input
from both sexes; males should not
be dominant over females in
academic departments
According to Daniel, the at-
titudes of women in education
have changed. "In the late 60's
and early 70's women had less in-
terest in graduate work and were
coming to college simply to find a
husband I'm sure it's different
today Daniel said.
"In the next five years I will do
everything I can on this campus to
help women achieve equality in
academic positions as well as
make provocations against ig-
norance, discrimination, and
stupidity of all types Daniel
said.
Professor Daniel has published
extensively in the areas of
auditory pathology and anatomy.
In the late 1970's, he began
research in sexual dimorphism.
The East Carolinian
is accepting applications for
News Writers
Applv at The East Carolinian offices, second floor, Publications
building, across from the entrance fo Joyner Library.
CONTACT LENSES
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C.D.B. Re
Ready To
By GLENN MAI (,HAS
This year's homecoming
cert features an encore preser
tion from a band that liters
rocked Minges Coliseum
years ago. Spurred on by a
ing fiddle and burning guitars
cheering crowd couldn'
enough Southern boogie
night. So break out the J D an
prepare yourseKe for ano"
vasion by the Charlie I
Band with special guest Man
Tucker.
"Tell Greenville we
and we're going I rock
socks off Daniels said. If
an indication for son
jams then H o m e c o m i
Halloween weekend promi
be a special treat th
Daniels played before a
audience in '81 and rem
the show. "We had a grea .
time in Greenville, and the!
looking forward to pla-
again he said.
Some special sig
ded for this concert
Ronsta
liflfe u

2 BLOCKS
FROM ECU
211 JARVISST.
Supermarket, Inc
CORNER
3rd AND
JARVIS STJ
PIRATES
Shop Overtoil's For Your Homecoming Week Party Supplies
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Linda Ronstadt sings old loe baJla
By MIKF HA MLR
Linda Ronstadt used
with her father, a guitar pia
high school in the ear & B
the mid-60s she as sing
fessionally and by 196" she ha
hit single. "Different D:
with the Stone Poneys from
album, Evergreen. Her
LP was Hand Sonn.
Grown which came on
Ronstadt has been a name
in this country for some tune
so we hear about her or. the media
� Linda off on a jaunt -
Jerry Brown. Ronstadt a open
ta singer in 'Pirates
Penzance Ronstadt tours
South Africa. One would be reaJ
WM� 0m iNttrtnl
. -M .





arly
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ise.
reakcst daihn
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THf EASTtAROIINIAN
Entertainment
OCTOBER 25, 1983 Page 7
C.D.B. Returns To Greenville
Ready To Do It To Us Again
By GLENN MAUGHAN
sun write
This year's homecoming con-
cert features an encore presenta-
tion from a band that literally
rocked Minges Coliseum two
vears ago. Spurred on by a cook-
ing fiddle and burning guitars, a
cheering crowd couldn't get
enough Southern boogie that
night. So break out the J.D. and
prepare yourselves for another in-
vasion by the Charlie Daniels
Band with special guest Marshall
Tucker.
"Tell Greenville we're coming
and we're going to rock their
socks off Daniels said. If that's
an indication for some kick-ass
jams then Homecoming-
Halloween weekend promises to
be a special treat this year.
Daniels played before a sold out
audience in '81 and remembers
the show. "We had a great, great
time in Greenville, and the band is
looking forward to playing there
again he said.
Some special significance is ad-
ded for this concert since it is
Daniels' birthday. Charlie will be
47 on Oct. 28, the night of the
show. Fans could be in for a super
celebration.
North Carolina is also a
homecoming of sorts for Daniels
since he grew up in Wilmington.
"I got started in music playing in
bars and taverns in Jacksonville
and Fayetteville he said.
'Those places were plenty
rough, lots of fistfights, people
throwing up on the floor, that sort
of thing he said. That was in the
early '50s, and bluegrass influenc-
ed Daniels then.
"People like Flatt and Scruggs
impressed me, but then along
came Elvis Presley, and he show-
ed the way after that he said.
Two decades later Daniels record-
ed the million-seller hit "Uneasy
Rider It was a parod on hip-
pies and launched the CDB into
the gold and platinum arena
reserved for the best artists. With
15 albums and numerous awards
behind them, CDB is ready to
showcase their talent for Green-
ville.
"We'll do everything Friday
night. There'll be something old,
some new stuff too Daniels
said. That means fans will pro-
bably hear chart toppers like
"The Devil Went Down To
Georgia which won CDB a
Grammy Award in 1979.
More tunes in CDB's repertoire
are sure to bring out the boogie
from anyone. "The Lady in
Red "The South's Gonna Do It
Again "Long Haired Country
Boy" and "In America" will pro-
bably have CDB's fans yelling for
more.
"In America a condemnation
of Russia, is a tune with renewed
meaning. Given the KAL 007
debacle, "In America" delivers its
message at a time when American
outrage is at another peak. The
song, however, was written during
another crisis, American hostages
in Iran.
Perhaps more controversial is
"Still In Saigon a Vietnam
veteran's lament. Daniels remains
active in veterans' causes and is
especially concerned with the
agent orange question. "The
studies our government has done
Charlie Daniels and his boys with guests Marshall Tucker Band are ready to ride into Minges Coliseum
for some down home Southern boogie.
on orange are a whitewash. Viet- ed ud bv Trvl "Ta7" r�;�, -r .
But that rWK. r i . �dwards or� percussion, Tom Mendenhall. Student nri
ZLlZZZZZSZt L� T-TX5S so?d$ird; lhota
anyone on tne scene today. Back- voice to a non-stop jam. $10.00.
Ronstadt, Simon, Davis Sing Old, New Songs
i" n
LJnda Ronstadt sings old love ballads on her newest LP.
j2
Cariy Simon's newest LP doesn't live up to this singer's potential.
By MIKE HAMER
Linda Ronstadt used to sing
with her father, a guitar player, in
high school in the early 60s. By
the mid-60s she was singing pro-
fessionally and by 1967 she had a
hit single, "Different Drum
with the Stone Poneys from their
album, Evergreen. Her first solo
LP was Hand Sown, Home
Grown which came out in 1969.
Ronstadt has been a name artist
in this country for some time, and
so we hear about her on the media
� Linda off on a jaunt with Gov.
Jerry Brown, Ronstadt as operet-
ta singer in "Pirates of
Penzance Ronstadt tours in
South Africa. One would be ready
to write her off as another artist
who had achieved such fame that
she would choose to straddle the
middle of mainstream pop music
and remain there. But Ronstadt,
who has embraced folk, country
rock, rock, and new wave in the
past, has given us a taste of yet
another style in her latest record,
What's yew, on ElektraAsylum.
This album, which is dedicated
to Ronstadt's father, is a new
departure for the artist. The songs
are all sentimental love ballads
from the 30s and 40s written by
such notable songwriters as
George and Ira Gershwin, Sammy
Cahn, Irving Berlin and Bing
Crosby. Linda is accompanied on
this effort by the Nelson Riddle
Orchestra � yes that's right,
Nelson Riddle.
Ronstadt, who has been com-
pared to the great French song
stylist, Edith Piaf, shows that she
can handle this older material just
fine. These songs call for a con-
siderable amount of variation and
subtlety in phrasing, and
Ronstadt is able to accomplish
this.
"What's New the title cut, is
my favorite here. Ronstadt goes
from a near whisper to the power-
ful last lineI still love you so
which sends chill bumps up my
spine every time I hear the song.
Irving Berlin's "What'll I Do"
and Sigman and Russell's "Crazy
He Calls Me" are also excellent
The Motels don't shack up � they move on their latest release
cuts.
This is not an album that will
have a hit single. But if you're
looking for a record that your
grandparents or your parents
would enjoy, this may be the one.
Carly Simon's latest, Hello Big
Man (Warner Brothers), features
some of the hottest musicians in
the business including bassists
Tony Levin and Robbie
Shakespeare, guitarists Andy
Summers and Eric Gale, drum-
mers Rick Marotta andSly Dun-
bar and saxophonist David San-
born; but even these profes-
sionals, assisted by the production
expertise of Mike Mainieri, can-
not make hits out of a batch of
mediocre songs.
Like Linda Ronstadt, Carly
Simon has been in the recording
business for awhile. She began by
singing folk songs when she was in
high school and college, and by
the mid-60s she had recorded an
album with her sister, Lucy, en-
titled The Simon Sisters. Her first
solo LP was Carly Simon, releas-
ed in Januray, 471. "You're So
Vain" and "Legend In Your Own
Time both of which came out in
'72, have probably been her big-
gest hits so far.
Although this isn't one of
Simon's strongest efforts, there
are three cuts on the album that
are worthy of mention. "You
Know What To Do" is a good
song about a woman's
'Brainstorm' A Brick
Wood plays industrial designer Karen Brace in Brainstorm.
By MICK LASALLE
Staff Writer
Sex, real man-woman sex is
what's missing from Brainstorm.
I saw the picture for free, and I
was still pissed off.
Why do they make pictures like
these all special effects, all
machines. When I go to see a
movie, I want to see broads.
Yeah, I admit it. Mick LaSalle's a
sucker for a love story.
The best movies, the ones we
remember, are the ones that deal
with people who are living in-
tensely. When we recall Gone
With the Wind, we don't
remember it for the then special
effect of Atlanta getting cooked.
We remember what went on with
Scarlet and Rhett, and how he
should've left her after two hours
screen time instead of four. (We
also remember that wimp Ashley
who Alan Alda will probably play
if they ever do a remake.) That's
the stuff that stays in mind.
The world throws a ton of gar-
bage at men and women, and still
they manage to stay together.
Sometimes the garbage is internal,
like when one or both of the
lovers believe in all that phoney-
ass sociological garbage that
passes for enlightenment today.
At other more basic times, the
obstacles are external. Either way,
the best movies are about men and
women. The people who made the
great movies know that.
Mick LaSalle
Movie
Review
In Casablanca for instance, In-
grid Bergman has a problem.
Without being a slut, she's
managed to fall in love with two
guys. The greater of the two guys
is Rick Blaine, played by Hum-
phrey Bogart. When Bogart and
Ingrid seperate, probably never to
�see each other again, we walk out
of the theater like we just got hit
with a ton of bricks. But we learn
something about what being a
man is all about. Bogart, after all,
was the Mick LaSalle of his time.
In striking contrast to a real
man-woman flick like Casablan-
ca, Brainstorm is one of these
technically slick films like Star
Wars or E. T. But technical effects
is all it has. Most of the picture is
made up of different computers
operating on screen. For the first
three quarters of the movie, the
computers are working fine. For
the climax, the computers go wild.
And we're supposed to care,
right?
Brainstorm has two things go-
ing for it. First, this is Natalie
Wood's last movie. She died
before the film was completed.
Second, the film was shot in
North Carolina. But this isn't
enough to save it. Unfortunately,
Natalie was a few years too old
for the part she played, and we see
little of North Carolina. Most of
the picture takes place in the
lab. The movie has one of those
fake inspirational endings that
makes me sick. Science and
religion merge, and we get a peck
into the afterlife. But all the
afterlife amounts to is a laser
show, a bunch of lights thrown on
the screen for 60s rejects to get
flashbacks over.
The bottom line is this:
Brainstorm was a lousy idea
without a scrap of human emo-
tion to fill in the empty spaces. I
had to see it. That's my job. But
you don't have to.
helplessness to stay in c
when her special man shows up.
This tune features some fine
guitar work by Police gu
Andy Summers and some
cellent synthesizer work b pro-
ducer Mainieri.
"Mememsha" is ai
song that celebrates both
desire and a seacoast town Here
Simon has a batch of he
tions, including several ch
helping out on the chorus. &
fine Caribbean rhythm go
throughout, and Don Grolnick's
steeldrum synthesizer playing,
song works.
Although Simon's cover er-
sion of Bob Mariey's "is Thi�
Love" is a bit too smooth for my
taste, it does show us once again
what a fine songwriter Marley
was.
I would hate to believe :ha:
Carly Simon has alreadv given
listeners the best that she c
deliver, but she'll have to come up
with much better songs than she
has delivered on Hello Big Man
While Ronstadt is singing oldies
and Simon is using folk and reg-
gae arrangements, the Motels'
Martha Davis is still rocking hard
Davis is another veteran, having
played professionally since 1972.
Little Robbers, the Motels
fourth album (Capital) is a strong
one. Producer Val Garay helps
the band to get a cutting edge that
sounds good on MTV and car
stereos. There is an urgency � a
tension � that sets this record
apart from Ronstadt's and
Simon's albums.
Davis sets up the tension on the
first cut of the record "Where Do
We Go From Here(Nothing
Sacred)" as the chorus rings out,
"Where do we gofrom here? One
thing is clearnothing's sacred
anymore "The Isle of You"
features some of Martha Davis'
best singing on the record. The
tension here comes from the
desire to escape from a lover's
grasp. In "Monday Shutdown
the tension comes from the battle
between the sexes and from the
dichotomy between innocence and
experience. In "Trust Me" and in
See ALBUM REVIEWS, p. g
- .





8
1 HI EAS1 CAROLINIAN
OCOTBER25, 1983
Local Band Glisson Rooted in 60s
B I ISA NORTON
Mff Writer
Doesn't it seem like every time
you turn arund there's a new band
ng to burst onto the music
ne and knock the audience
right off their feet. You'll hear the
lio announcer say something
"Alright, here's some new
- lss rock'n'roll from the
Lednecks Five. I know your're
dig it Great. It ends up
indmg like 50 other songs with
the guitarist using four
- instead of three.
recently heard a Greenville-
md play at a local club
as pleasantly surprised to
ne originality in their style.
a three-piece band com-
lom Glisson on lead
d vocals, Rich Chapman
mar and Kyle McBride
Although being a
e hand has stunted their
lal appeal, they have no
compromising their
become the biggest
band in North
do the intend to make
world of generic music
to leader manager
n, being a success is a
ate and doesn't
mean being known
sp ke with Tom,
me through the mo-
�� the band and what
thej will encounter try-
. into the music scene.
st organized
he group consisted of
members except
;d was on bass
� - rhe unofficial
ai ted ut in the sum-
in a battle-of-the-
r nsored bv the
cees and WSFL
e tor the winnig
,500 which was a
' e anticipated gate
turned out that
money was brought
)ated, so we never
The Jaycees took it all,
� nothing. We sued
; 1,800 and ended up
� $500
events prompted
he club scene. "At
. all originalsex-
plained Tom. "Sometimes it was
hard to get signed, but we had an
agent, and within a year-and-a-
half we had a tour in eight states.
Our exposure was at its peak then.
We ha to play some cover
material (non origianls) to keep
the clubs interested. We were
playing 15 to 20 nights a month
then.
In November 1982, Fred left the
group and Rich Chapman joined
and Filled the bass position. Since
then, Tom has taken over as
managerarrangerproducer.
"I like booking the band's
dates myself because I feel it helps
our reputation said Tom. "I
can get us to an audience that will
appreciate our sound I asked
Tom if he found it difficult chang-
ing bassists after knowing Fred's
style so well.
"No, there's no negative
change in our sound. In fact, I
think now the band has a more
contained, unified sound, more
acceptable to the audiences we
have to play to in the clubs
Although Glisson plays the club
Album Review
Tells Like It Is
Cont. from page 7
"Suddenly last Summer the
tension comes primarily from the
fast paced, hard edged music
rather than from the lyrics.
The tension continues on side
two of the record. The title song,
"Little Robbers speaks about
the frustration involved in getting
ripped off. Here Davis sings,
"Work so hard to get ahead
Maybe just give it to them in-
stead Little Robbers "Into the
Heartland which Davis co-
wrote with Bernie Taupin, the
man who used to collaborate with
Elton John, is a well-written song
about a couple of outlaws who
steal a car and head into the desert
with reckless abandon.
If the Motels can maintain their
edge and the clean production
work they have used on this
record. I predict they will con-
tinue to have hits.
Records provided courtesy of
Record Bar,
circuit, they direct their music at a
distinct audience. "We play high-
energy rock and roll said Tom.
"Therefore, we don't attract the
teeny boppers and pop rockers.
Our audience is more of an older
crowd that knows what they're
going to hear before they come.
Many people in the audience have
heard us before. They know what
they're listening to. Our style
originated in the late 60s from
bands like Jimi Hendrix, Creem
and Grand Funk Railroad, and
that's what we're going to con-
tinue to play
In a usual set, Glisson plays
about 20 percent original
material. Club audiences,
however, don't always want to
hear origianl music from a local
band.
"People don't want to think
about song lyrics in a club at-
mosphere explained Tom.
"Their first reaction is to sing
along, and if they don't know the
tune they lose interest in the band.
We don't go out of our way to
duplicate cover material. That
makes the originals harder to
force, and the originals are what
we want them to hear
Glisson's future is uncertain,
although relocation is a possibili-
ty. "We were thinking of a less
commercial area said Tom.
"Preferably, the northeastern
part of the country. 1 would really
like to locate in London and tour
the American military bases in
Europe. Over there, they're sign-
ing new acts and looking for new
sound. A new band is more likely
to get a positive response from a
foreign label or audience. Many
American bands try it out abroad
and then bring it home
Presently the group is working
on the release of their new album
Glisson, featuring five original
pieces and a remake of the
popular Jimi Hendrix hit "Hey
Joe Local record stores should
have the album by mid-
November. Glisson will play at
the Rathskellar on Friday and
Saturday, October 28 and 29.







HOMECOMING CORSAGES
Plain Mum $5.00
wTootbaU $6.00
wpin & Football $7.00
EXTRA FANCY $10.00
20 or more 202of f
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503 E THIWO ST
GREENVILLE N C
PHONE 75.2 3JI1
Tl I E L�r inUI )'IG CENTER
GREENVILLE N C
PHONE 756






-�






w
.Vbrdei

W4,
i
m
sfa
sy
�&&
cm,
,w
i
i
MAKETRACKS FOR THE
BEST EAWALL AROUND!
The next time you stop by for the Best Eatin. bring f
along this money-savin' coupon. 1
sTemkI'esFbTscuhTmd i
0rmmge juice $1.29 i
I
I
Please present this coupon before ordering One coupor per customer per
visit please Customer must pay any sales tax due This coupon not good m
combination with any other otters Otter good during regu a- trea�ast ours
only at participating Mardee s Restaurants
through May 31 1984
Vfardezr
he 1983 Harden Fcm tSlCJICrlb �
UBVUMloUTlSMiiDmm KBuuJn
I
From left to right: Kyle McBride, Rkk Cfcapmaa, Tom
Glisson look toward the future while keeping their musical
roots deep in the past.
FUESt MEDIUMSOnMHK$1,79
Please present this coupon before ordering One coupon per customer per
visit please Customer must pay any sales ta due This coupon n0t good m
combination with any other otters Otter good attar 10 3C AM only a
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c 1983 Hardees food Stf-s r�c
Harden
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CADE YOU CAN
IKMOH a dtmojit ctec-
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t� lfc-rvin of fts t- lon-xno C�rf ar Coumelofi an�
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ad by �� caring jtoff a me P�ming Center
SWVtCO � jeOoy - Saturday AfoorTton Ap-
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Weens � t-ee Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
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T012THWEEK
OF PREGNANCY
Jits 00 triniicy T�f,
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tyi tfc.i m�rwt�t�ow call
135 CS35 (Toil Free Mwaiber
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and i p M Weekday).
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Biggest Sale Ever!
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Uptown
Homecoming Sale
'Fwht
1 RIP PLANNED TO NEW YORK DURING THANKSGIVING BREAK
The Student Union Travel Committee has planned a trip to New York
City during Thanksgiving Break from November 23-27. This annual trip
has been a great success in the past and will be just as entertaining this
year.
The trip includes room accommodations in the Hotel Edison (just west
of Broadway for four days and three nights), transportation by
Trail ways buses, and baggage handling charges. The Travel Committee
also provides suggestions to New York's famous restaurants, museums,
galleries, and department stores.
The price for the trip is only $99.00 per person for quad occupancy
rooms. Other room arrangements are available for slightly higher prices.
The deadline for registering for the New York City Thanksgiving Trip is
November I, so hurry if you want to "Be Where It Is" during
Thanksgiving Break.
For further information contact the General Ticket Office at
Mendenhall Student Center, 757-6611, ext. 266.
All Art Supplies 2(of f
Sportswear Coupon Sale
See Homecoming Insert for
Details
4 Days only!
Wednesday - Sat. of this week.
Two Germa
Movies Set
For Hendri
This week's Hen-
drix Theatre double
feature will spotlight
two masterpieces of
the New German
Cinema which were
directed by Werner
Herzog. Heart of
Glass will be shown at
7:00p.m. on Wednes-
day, and Aguirre, The
Wrath of God will
follow at 9:00 p.m.
Werner Herzog's
films are characteriz-
ed by their willingness
to go off the deep
end, but Heart of
Glass goes even
deeper than usual.
During the filming,
Herzog hypnotized
his actors in order to
help convey what the
director describes as
"an atmosphere of
hallucination, of pro-
phecy, of the vi-
sionary, and of collec-
tive madness
Set in the pre-
industrial past, the
story tells of a small
German town that
loses the secret of
making its unique
Ruby glass. The
townspeople turn to
madness, murder, and
magic in a desperate
effort to recover the
pure ingredient the
have lost. In the
1960's, this mixture of
mysticism, arcane
symbology, and
apocalyptic grandeur
would have been call-
ed a "head film at
times, it resembles a
Hawthorne story of
hallucinogenic trance
In particular, the in-
credibly photograph-
ed eschatologicaJ vi-
sions that begin
and
end the film rank
possibly the mos!
awesome passages
Herzog's .areer
In the mid-1500
large Spanish expeoJ
t-on searching for ij
mythical lost
El Doradt
an advance pa
explore a tribu
the Amazor i
never returne
Werner Herzog hi
extrapolated �-
obscure histor
cident into Aguim
The W rath of God
spectacular!) horni
ing chronicle of
penaiism gone ar
In Herzog'
sio n, the c o
quistador's expeditiojj
falls into the hands
one Don I ope
Aguirre, a pc I
driven lunatic whl
dreams of stealing
entire contme- I
Klaus Kinski deliver
a magnificent pe- i
mance as Ag
creating a funny-
quintessence
menacing
malev olence
Richard II -
tila the Hui gu
is filled with
thai - �
uon and I
for i
Stunning!
photographed
hazardous
Aguirre, The W ral
of God takes
viewei c a
and r
one of Edga
Poe
epics
i. jco er
ECU'S
Su
CALL EARLY
LET I
7
Z- �
�ftti'jMiii mm m





CORSAGES J
.5.00
.00 �
lihall $7.00
(Y $10.00
20U)ff
be attached ?
�S GIFTS
SOTTWE
11 MOUND
coupon
iTscbTMD "
WE $1.29
I
i
.HardenJ
immmkk kbulaTi
vt am st. 79
I
HardeerJ
iTANCHE
ILLE, N.C.
le
off
Sale
Isert for
ays only!
is week.
THE FAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 2 1983
Two German
Movies Set
For Hendrix
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
This week's Hen-
drix Theatre double
feature will spotlight
two masterpieces of
the New German
Cinema which were
directed by Werner
Herzog. Heart of
Glass will be shown at
"00p.m. on Wednes-
day, and Aguirre, The
Wrath of God will
follow at 9:00 p.m.
Werner Herzog's
films are characteriz-
ed by their willingness
to go off the deep
end, but Heart of
Glass goes even
deeper than usual.
During the filming,
Herzog hypnotized
his actors in order to
help convey what the
director describes as
"an atmosphere of
hallucination, of pro-
phecy, of the vi-
sionary, and of collec-
tive madness
Set in the pre-
.ndustrial past, the
story tells of a small
German town that
loses the secret of
making its unique
Ruby glass. The
townspeople turn to
ir.adness, murder, and
nagic in a desperate
effort to recover the
pure ingredient they
have lost. In the
1960's, this mixture of
mysticism, arcane
symbology, and
apocalyptic grandeur
would have been call-
ed a "head film at
times, it resembles a
Hawthorne story of
hallucinogenic trance.
In particular, the in-
credibly photograph-
ed eschatoiogical vi-
sions that begin and
end the film rank as
possibly the most
awesome passages of
Herzog's career.
In the mid-1500's, a
large Spanish expedi-
tion searching for the
mythical lost city of
El Dorado detached
an advance party to
explore a tributary of
the Amazon; they
never returned.
Werner Herzog has
extrapolated this
obscure historical in-
cident into Aguirre,
The Wrath of God, a
spectacularly horrify-
ing chronicle of im-
perialism gone amok.
In Herzog's ver-
sion, the con-
quistador's expedition
falls into the hands of
one Don Lope de
Aguirre, a power-
driven lunatic who
dreams of stealing an
entire continent.
Klaus Kinski delivers
a magnificent perfor-
mance as Aguirre,
creating a funny-scary
quintessence of
menacing
malevolence, part
Richard III, part At-
tila the Hun. Aguirre
is filled with images
that seize the imagina-
tion and follow one
for days afterward.
Stunningly
photographed in
hazardous locations,
Aguirre, The Wrath
of God takes the
viewer on a mad
voyage as frightening
and entertaining as
one of Edgar Allen
Poe's maelstrom-bent
epics of demented
discovery.
Each of these advertised 'terns is required to be readily available for
sale at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store except as
specifically noted in this ad
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU Sat Oct. 29 at A&P in Greenville, NC
ITEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
y
Scenes from Heart of Glass, above, and Aguirre, the Wrath of God,
below.
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FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEN0, WE WILL DOUBLE
5 MANUFACTURERS COUPONS, EXAMPLE. $10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS.
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS, $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS.
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE'
Between now and Oct 22. w will redeem national
manufacturers cents oil coupons up to SO for
double their value Offer good on national manu-
facturers ceots-off coupons only (Food retailer
coupons not acceptedCustomer must purchase
coupon product in specified size Expired coupons
will not be honored One coupon per cuatomer per
item No coupons accepted for free merchandise
Offer does not apply to A4P or other store coupons
whether manufacturer Is mentioned or not When
the value of the coupon exceeds SO or the retail
of the Item, this offer is limited to the retail price
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j





IHL t-ASTC AKOl INI AN
Sports
OCTOBER 25, 1983
Page 10
Bucs Say Gators More Like 'Crocs'
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Sports KaUtof
In front of a homecoming
crowd of 73,943, the Florida
Gators saved face by escaping
with a 24-17 win over the Pirates
� stopping what could have been
the biggest collegiate upset of the
season.
Gator tailback Neal Anderson,
who rushed for 118 yards against
the Pirates, ran six yards to score
the Gators' winning touchdown
with 6:23 left in the fourth
quarter.
The Pirates followed by moving
the ball to Florida's 34-yard line,
but came up one yard short in a
fourth-and-four situation.
ECU regained possession with
:49 left in the game, and despite
two 27-yard passes from Kevin In-
gram to Stephon Adams, the Bucs
only got to Florida's 40 before In-
gram, was sacked. That last scor-
ing drive was indicative of how
the Pirates tried to overcome a
game full of adversity.
After the homecoming queen
had been crowned and the
balloons had swept away, many
believed the Pirates were the ones
who had earned a victory.
�'I think we deserved to win
Emory said after the game.
"There's no question that our
kids worked harder and had more
invested. Thev (ECU) had more
want power.
We just came up a little short,
and we're disappointed about
that
Leading 10 at halftime, the
Pirates had a difficult time
holding off the Gators at the start
of the second period.
After the first few plays, ECU
freshman strong safety Gary Lon-
don intercepted quarterback
Wayne Peace's pass, but Ingram's
pass was then picked off by
Florida strong safety Randy
Clark.
The Gators took the turnover,
marched down to ECU's two-yard
line, but could only manage a
19-yard field goal. Billy Ray-
mond's kick tied the game, 10-10
with 5:26 remaining in the third
quarter.
The Pirates, with Byner and
Branch on the carries, were
plagued with a 10-yard holding
penalty, followed by Ingram's
eight-yard loss keep after running
out of bounce and into the side of
the stadium wall.
Gator qb Peace then dished off
to runningback Lorenzo Hamp-
ton who threw a 47-yard pass
fullback John Williams for a
touchdown. That TD gave Florida
a 17-10 lead�their first of the
game.
Clint Harris, who had three in-
terceptions and one fumble
recovery against Florida, caught
his third one with 3:26 left in the
third quarter.
With Ingram running the ball
and Walden rushing despite his
broken hand, the Pirates wound
up on Florida's 15-yard line early
in the fourth period. Walden then
ran down the middle for a 15-
yard touchdown run to tie the
score. 17-17.
During Florida's next scoring
drive. Harris intercepted a
2yard pass. A pass interference
penalty, however, on Calvin
Adams nullified the Pirates' first
down on the 40-yard line. Emory
was furious about the penalty.
"That was a very bad, prejudiced
call he said. 'The terrible thing
about that was when Calvin
Adams put his hands on the guy,
he was on the 47-yard line, and
they threw a flag and the boy
hadn't even thrown the ball.
"Clint intercepted the ball and
then they gave them the ball on
the 3vard line, which was a
10-yard difference from where the
flag was and where they put the
ball. The officials just threw the
flag down and wherever it landed,
that's where he put the ball(See
related article.)
On the next play, Williams ran
33 yards to the Pirates' 7. Ander-
son then ran six yards to score the
winning TD.
Florida's Charley Pell said he
was surprised at at how good this
year's homecoming opponent
turned out to be. "This was a
great team victory against a very
fine football team he said.
X
4
OAKY PATTERSON � ECU Pfcoto Lab
ECU Linebacker Chris Santa Cruz sacks Florida quarterback
Wayne Peace during Saturdays game.
"East Carolina played well. Our
team had to fight harder than we
have had to all season. I mean
more times and more situations.
They played us tougher and better
for four quarters than any team
we've played
Emory said the Pirates certainly
have nothing to be ashamed of.
"We can play jaw to jaw with
anyone he said.
In the first quarter, the Pirates
drove 80 yards and Byner carried
to score a 13 yard touchdown with
10:03 left. No previous opponent
had scored a touchdown against
Florida in the first quarter this
season.
With a 7-0 lead, the Pirates
stunned Florida's homecrowd
even more when, after two
Florida fumbles, Jeff Heath
booted a 48-yard field goal early
in the second quarter to give ECU
a 10-0 lead.
Harris intercepted another
pass, but the Gators regained
possession with 6:02 remaining
before halftime. On ECU's 10,
Florida advanced to the five-yard
line after an offsides penalty on
the Pirates. Anderson ran in for a
touchdown with :46 left to make
the score 10-7 � giving Florida its
first points of the game.
After a 47-46 loss to Florida
State, another Florida loss was
even more bitter for the Pirates.
According to Emory, a win over
fifth-ranked Florida could have
been icing on the cake for ECU's
program. "A win would've given
us the things we need, probably a
top twenty ranking and a bowl
game, but nothing comes easy for
us
Two Citrus Bowl represen-
tatives, who were there scouting
both the Pirates and Florida, were
impressed with ECU's showing.
Scout Butch Van Weller said ECU
is definitely a team to be sought
after. "Win or lose this game
(against Florida) ECU has bowl
potential he said. "It's not a
very good year for major in-
dependents, so it's good for the
other teams
How does a trip to Orlando on
Dec. 17 sound to Coach Emory?
"We'll go to the Citrus Bowl or
Peach Bowl or anywhere else he
said, "but that's a long way off
"They (scouts) did come talk to
us and were very complimentary.
They said we had great team speed
and a great coached team.
"They thought we were a very
exciting football team, and said
they'd see us again later in the
year. We just hope and pray we'll
win the next four, and they'll con-
sider us so we can go some place
tMt MtoUmmFVortaa
18FirM Downs�
51-199Ruih� Yardaje50-25!
111PiiS.r.a Yard)IM
25Return Yards�
18-11 1Passing: :
iPunts Average:4 �
4-1Fumbles-Lost' :
6-5Penalties Yards3 13
� rTime of Possession2N 4'
)m 1 irntu1 3t 1 n
Florida 0 1!� 1 -14
Vnrg
ECt - Byner13 run. Hcatf. kick
Pel He�:h 48 FG
FTa � .ivierson raa iRa�-moiKi kickt
Fl� Ramond 29 FG
n � l�jij 4-pass frorr Hampton (Raymond 1 l
ECX - Vktlden 15 mn iHeatft bet
FU Vvier�or i run 1 Raymond kick)
ladmataal MaOaOa
Rushing ECL - Ingram 124 '� Bvner 16-9" B-�-
12 � aJer. 11-44; Hi - Peace M-tll Anderson
23 118. fciihams 17 IW, Hampton 6-18. HendeTvr.
Passing �CV - Ingram 18-11 121-1-0. Fla - Place
23 !l 139-4-0 Ha.T.rn 1 1-4O-l
Receiving fcCL - Bvner 2-4. Niches 2 26 Vasal
UMM v90. Ha Lang 2 94. natiei 4-38 Vnc-
Sea. : 13 Hanptoa :�� Williams 2 2"
A "V943
Emory Not Surprised By Florida 9s Dirty Play
Things just went wrong from
the very beginning.
Leaving Kinston Airport at 3:15,
the ECU football team was sup-
pose to land in Gainesville around
4:30 p.m.
That would give the Pirates
enough time to go to Florida field
and have a light workout before
Florida's homecoming "Gator
Growl" show at 7 p.m.
When the plane reached
Gainesville, however, the pilot in-
structed boarded members that air
traffic was too heavy and that we
would have to go to Jacksonville
to refuel before returning to
Gainesville.
The plane finally touched down
at 6:30 p.m.
Emory, knowing these elements
were out of his control, bit his lip
and proceeded to take the team to
a local high school field to prac-
tice. The high school field turned
out to be a parking lot. Touche'
But if enough wasn't enough,
the ball game turned out to be the
biggest disaster of all.
Along with the noisiest crowd
ever, the Pirates had to deal with
questionable calls by officials and
constant harassing by Florida
players. One player said Florida is
the dirtiest team he's played
against during his four years of
play at ECU. "I just can't unders-
tand why a team ranked fifth in
the nation has to play like that
the player said, "to verbally abuse
and play dirty
Head Coach Ed Emory said he
wasn't surprised. "I expected it to
be worse than it was he said,
"but it will cost them down the
line when they play away from
home. If you do that in somebody
else's ball park, you've got pro-
QABY PATTERSON � ECU WtoKi Lab
After a late airplane landing in Gainsville, the Pirates had to settle
for a parking lot for Friday night's workout.
blems.
"They've got to play at Auburn
and against Georgia, so that will
catch up with them
CINDY PLEASANTS
A Look Inside
Emory's main gripe, however,
was the game officiating. Emory
questioned one offside penalty
that gave Florida a chance to
score its first touchdown. The
other major call was a pass in-
terference penalty on Calvin
Adams after Clint Harris in-
tercepted a 27-yard pass.
"I've looked at the film a 100
times, and I've had people who
are not as biased and prejudiced
as I am because I'm very one way
and that's Pirate way.
"There's no question that it
was not a fair- officiated game.
I'm not making excuses for los-
ing, because we should have done
some things in the second period
when we got the ball in good field
position, but the officiating was
very one-sided
Emory said Florida was pro-
bably the most undisciplined
defensive squad ECU has ever
met. "They were really cheap-
shot artists, and I was very disap-
pointed because I don't think
there's a place in football for that
kind of stuff
One incident Emory particularly
pointed out was when Kevin In-
gram ran out of bounce with the
ball and fell against the stadium
wall. Offensive linebacker Wilbur
Marshall came over and started
verbally abusing him.
The officials were a split crew
� made up of Southeastern con-
ference and ECAC conference of-
ficials. Emory said the ECAC
crew called one penalty�a delay
of game�against Florida.
"I'm gonna taik with the com-
missioner of our ECAC
officials Emory said. "We've
got to do something about them.
We've got to at least have a fair
� -�
�ABY PATTSBSON � ECU
Safety Clint Harris appears to have made a 27-yard pass intercep-
tion on this play, but a pass interference penalty nullified it.
Golfers Place Eighth In Fall Finale
By JIMMY DON ATELLI
Sun Writer
The East Carolina golf team
completed its 1983 fall schedule
with an eighth-place Finish in the
Hargrove B. Davis Invitational,
hosted by Campbell this weekend.
The tournament was held at
Keith Hills Country Club and 18
teams were in competition. The
Pirates finished the three-day-
event with a 911 total, twenty-five
strokes behind front-runner
Duke.
The Pirates began the tourna-
ment with a 294 total on the first
day, their best score this season.
That put them in third place, just
two strokes off the lead and ahead
of ACC powers Duke, UNC and
N.C.State.
David Dooley led the Pirates
for the tournament with a three-
day total of 222. He was followed
by Mike Helms at 226, Chris Cza-
ja at 231, freshman John Faidley
at 235, and David Waggoner at
237.
The Pirates will take two weeks
off before beginning practice for
their spring schedule, after having
missed twelve school days this fall
due to competition.
Coach Jerry Lee was pleased
with his team's performance dur-
ing the fall We achieved what
we set out to do he said.
"Everyone on our team got to
play in at least two tournaments.
"The experience and exposure
was very important for our
freshman who got their first taste
of college golf. We also got a
chance to discover our strengths
and weaknesses, which we will be
able to work on before the
spring
The team's best finish this fall
was at Methodist College, where
the Pirates took second place.
Another bright spot for ECU was
the play of freshman Mike
Bradley. He played in three tour-
naments, finishing first on the
team twice, and second the in the
other invite.
Looking ahead to the spring
schedule, the Pirates will carry
what is believed to be the best
team in their history to the eight
tournaments they compete in.
Two of these tournaments will be
held at the Brook Valley Country
Club in Greenville. The Pirates
will host the first ECAC-South
Conference tournament, as well
as the fourth annual East
Carolina Invitational.
The team has set high goals for
becoming the first Pirate squad in
history to gain an NCAA berth,
but they will have to beat some of
the toughest teams in the
southeast this spring to ac-
complish that goal.
shake.
"It's not crying over spilt
milk he continued, "because
we're 5-2, and some of the best
teams in the country are not 5-2.
"The officials have got to pro-
tect our kids, and 1 was upset
about that. They didn't protect
them from getting hit from the
back
Emory said he still isn't making
excuses. "We lost the game
because we didn't play well
enough to win it, but in the close
ball games in the Southeastern
conference, you better be two
touchdowns better
Emory and the Pirates also had
to fight against the noise of the
band seated directly behind their
bench and 73,943 screaming fans.
"In a ball game like that, officials
have got to control the crowd.
There was complete quiet when
quarterback Wayne Peace was
under the ball.
"Rules of the game should be
made equal for each team. I told
Ingram not to back out, or they'd
just get louder.
"Before the game, the official
assured me that if it got too loud
he would stop the crowd. Not one
time did he make an effort to
quiet the crowd down. I just
thought it was a very unprofes-
sional job by the referee, but the
rules aren't the same when you
play down there
Emory has had to play Florida
State, Missouri, N.C. State and
Florida away, and he's getting a
little frustrated because the
Pirates never have a chance to
play them on their home turf.
"I'd like for Charley Pell (Florida
coach) to come to East Carolina
and play with the band in his ear
and all that purple and gold in his
ear and see if that makes a dif-
ference.
"It's not fair to our players.
From the board of trustees to the
chancellor to the athletic director,
they've got to do something about
that. "We've got to have an
equal chance, and it's not equal
right now
WTien the Pirates head for
Miami in two weeks, they should
have enough motivation after suf-
fering two heartbreakers in the
sunny state. In fact, like Missouri.
Florida didn't seem to know
where ECU was located. At the
end of halftime when the Bucs
began running out onto the field,
the announcer on the PA system
said, "Here they come, the
Pirates of East TennesseeEast
Carolina
Miami, look out.
arson is
gv RANDY MEWS
� .I I BEE t ill
ajter 17 years as
�coach of the men's
Lack team, Bill Car
Icon now has the add-
led responsibility of
handling the women
squad.
Last year s coach.
pat McGuigan, left
ECU immediately
following the spring
season after being i
cused of tamperir
I her player's personal
lives.
Carson was
Iffjth a disencha
team in which fi
only 14 c!l
athletes returned
F u r
M. .
done
for
sea
coa
I
JPPb" PP6

?

-

Ml Run
DdUS
Sofi
0
�Y�C
phone
752-3172
C
Se,
Sp
Monday
Popcol
Ocean
Seafood
French Ft
Tossed MM may be

? 1 � EfliMffaMi
I
1





1
rocs'
oi lose this game
da ECl has bowl
he sa d "li' not a
major in-
- good for the
Vlando on
rid to Coach Emory?
e iurus BoI or
where else he
h il - a long a off.
come talk to
vetc er complimentary
adg earn speed
earn.
a er
and said
later in the
prav e'i!
riey'llcon-
ne place

HornU
; -4v
3 0
" 1�
.
S-91 B i
fcndcnoa
� : -
FU Peace
� - : :�
y Play
over spilt
. mtinued, "because
: some of the best
antry are not 5-2.
als have g I I pro-
: upset
at. The didn't protect
h jetting hi! from the
n't making
"We lost the game
eil
t it sn the close
in the Southeastern
you better be two
� etter
t and the Pirates also had
. linst the noise of the
� behind their
lining fans.
I gam like that, officials
I � ntrol the crowd.
. j;er when
erba. Wayne Peace was
all.
game should be
ide equal for each team, I told
n not to back out, or they'd
ouder.
Before the game, the official
i me that if it got too loud
would stop the crowd Not one
he did he make an effort to
iet the crowd down. I just
ught it was a very unprofes-
job by the referee, but the
es aren't the same when you
town there
Emory has had to play Florida
I Missouri, N.C. State and
i awav, and he's getting a
' jstrated because the
rates never have a chance to
them on their home turf,
"d like for Charley Pell (Florida
ich) to come to East Carolina
play with the band in his ear
d all that purple and gold in his
and see if that makes a dif-
lence
not fair to our players,
the board of trustees to the
mcellor to the athletic director,
ve got to do something about
"We've got to have an
chance, and it's not equal
ht now
hen the Pirates head for
ami in two weeks, they should
e enough motivation after suf-
ing two heartbreakers in the
my state. In fact, like Missouri,
h-ida didn't seem to know
ec ECl was located. At the
of halftime when the Bucs
an running out onto the field,
announcer on the PA system
"Here they come, the
ites of East TennesseeEast
rolina
vliami, look out.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 23, 1983
11
Carson Named Women's Track Coach
B RANDY MEWS
After 17 years as
coach of the men's
track team, Bill Car-
son now has the add-
ed responsibility of
handling the women's
squad.
Last year's coach,
Pat McGuigan, left
ECU immediately
following the spring
season after being ac-
cused of tampering in
her player's personal
lives.
Carson was left
with a disenchanted
team in which five of
only 14 eligible
athletes returned.
rmore,
had not
recruiting
upcoming
F u r t h e
McGuigan
done any
for the
season.
"I wasn't named
coach of the women
until after their state
meet Carson ex-
plained. "We went
after some good pro-
spects, but it was just
too late in the season
to recruit anyone
The lady tracksters
currently have seven
members on the team,
with the additon of
walk-ons Valerie
Finley and Jenny
Holson who joined
the team this fall.
"What wer'e trying
to do with the
women Carson
said, "is to make up
teams in the 4x100
and 4x400 relay
events
Regina Kent, Cathy
Leeper, Finley,
Teressa Hudson and
Jamie Cat heart, along
with Delphine Mabry
(following basketball
season) will make up
those two relays.
There's a spot open
on each team, but it
has been decided that
Mabry will only run in
the 4x400, while Kent
particpates in just the
4x100.
Individually, ECU
will be led by
Cathcart. Carson
describes her as hav-
ing great athletic abili-
ty and expects her to
qualify for the na-
tionals in the
400-meter event.
Othe people Carson
expects to do well for
the Pirates include
Leeper in the long
jump and Kent in the
100-meters.
First-year runner
Jenny Holson is
another person who
has impressed Car-
son. "She's been run-
ning right along side
the men in practice
he said, "and I look
for her to have a good
season
Mabry will not be
able to compete for
the Pirates until the
outdoor season
begins, but she is con-
sidered to be an
outstanding runner in
the 800-meters.
Carson has a long-
term goal of building
ECU into a powerful
track team within
three years. "I'm
already doing some
recruiting now, and 1
hope to bring the
team to 12-14
members by next
year he said.
Carson isn't expec-
ting that much from
this year's team, but
hopes for the relay
teams to have a
respectable year, and
for Leeper, Kent and
Mabry to qualify for
the nationals.
The Pirate's first
meet this season will
be the George Mason
all-comers meet, an
event Carson feels will
help his team con-
siderably. "No ponits
arc awarded, but it
allows us to run
everybody and see
how they do in com-
petition
-ww MX KK w -MW- " KH
PIRATES LANDING
i
L
Student housing with private rooms
available in December. Off Reade Circle
756-6336
ASK FOR KATHY
X
x
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
new �k M 31K fcj
C
f
THE
C2 and
6ueen
LADY'S NIGHT
NORTH
H. H. 4:30-7:00 Free hot H'ordes
Lady's Free all night
No admission with College ID until 6:00
DJ 4:30-7:00 "NORTH TOWER" 7:00-11:00
Homecoming Spectacular
Oct. 29th w"The Fabulous Keys"
Doors open 4:30, ticket available at
King & Queen North, For further info: call 758-9714
STYR0F00D
' - - � � bunien
� �. � ���
. � �:��
������ ����'
�meats and cfswts a rt �meo
��: - � ;� .
� � �
H

OAHY PATTMK
ECU Runningback Reggie Branch
�cu
Lab
208
E. 5lh t.
Copyrignt 1983
Kroger Savon
Ouantitv Rights Reserved
None Sold To Dealers
items and Prices
Effective Thru sat
Oct. 29, 1983.
phone
752-3172
Located I mile past
Hastings Ford on
10th St. Ext.
Monday thru Thursday
Popcorn Shrimp
$2.95
Ocean Perch $1.99
Seafood Cakes $1.99
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Salad may be substituted for slaw J- extra
Open Mon. thru Sat. 8am to Midnight - Sun. 9 am to 9 pm
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
POLICY
Each of these adver
tised items is re-
quired to be read'ty
avadabie for sale m
each Kroger Savon
except as specifically
noted m this ad l� we
do run out of an item
we will offer you your
choice of � com
parable item when
available reflecting
the same savings or a
ramcheck which will
entitle you to pur
chase the advertised
item at the advertised
price within 30 days
KROGER OR
CITRUS HILL
Orange
Juice
DIET COKE,
TABOR
coca cola
12-cai.
Ctn.
2-Ltr.
N.R.
Btl.
LAYS
Potato Chips
ASSORTED VARIETY
JENO'S
Thin & Crispy
PREMIUM
coors
Light
8-0z.
Bag
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Pkg.
$489
KROGER
Multigrain
Bread
KROGER
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2 Lowfat
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Gal. �
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ILDS.
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BUfc
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HALLOWEEN
Cat Cakes
Ea.
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DOUGHTIE'S
Roast Beef
$399
SAVE
90
m �'1MIMW
F�Mll -I





12
T
�kr-
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 25. 1983
Frosh Leads
Bucs To Win
Freshman Allen
Smith scored two
second-half goals to
lead East Carolina to
a 3-2 soccer victory
over Methodist Col-
lege on Saturday.
With the score tied
at two in the second
half, Smith rebound-
ed a Jeff Langrehr
shot off the goal post
to score the game-
winning goal.
The Pirate's other
goal came from David
Henelotter, who was
the only person to
score in the first half.
ECU improved its"
record to 3-11 on the
season, and will travel
to Norfolk, to playj
Virginia Wesley an on
Wednesday.
:i
i �
��
���� rTTBKSON � ecu ���� Lab
Pirate Fullback Ernest Byner
Classifieds
SALE
MOVING SALE Coffee taMa
and 2 and tables Slto.aa,
Stuoeef Msk tis nlftitttanU
in 00. headboard SM.M, lamp,
duboa. ate. Call jgjg.
ITS A STEAL: Sony catunt
deck, Toshiba racalvar, I Sony
� att ipeakers All In �xc.
cond Only 1350 00 Pho-
757-0141
LOST AND
FOUND
list hundred of US Campania
Organizations with worldwide
oeeratiem. For further infer
malton call H4-73a-si3,
COLLEGE IIP WANTED to
dlttrlbuta "Student Matt"
subscription card at this cam
pos. Good Incetne, no selling in
volved. Far Information and ap-
plication writ to: Allan S
Lowranca, Director, 251 Oian-
wood Drlva, Meeresvllle. NC
ww,
HOUSE-SITTE WANTED tor
Christmas and Ntw Yaarj
Holidays Suburban Oreenville
Ra�pond to ttta ECU Madia
Board Office 7S7-MP.
2 FEMALE ROOMATES
wanted tor Jan: Geortefewn
Apt. sTVsstearaa ptm 14 etilHiee.
C�H TS0-S434.
LOST UK peM rope Cham
braciet. in downtown area, if
found call 7SO-000. REWARD
OFFERED
MISC.
LOST CAT vicinity of First St
Fat stack Cat with white fiee
cellar, wttite fuu under neck
and back leas Fart of the fami-
ly, and greatly mitsed. Musing
�ince Saturday If found, phone
7S7-PM3 after 5 M
LEGAL HASSLES' Call
Howard J. Cummlnot attorney
at Law. No chare for initial j
consultation for ECU Students.
Call 711 mi.
WANTED
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
campus Include experienced
professional work. Pro
ofreedwra, spelling and gram
matlcal cerrectlons 1SS-474I
after t.OO.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
1SS-4V74
ROOMATE NEEDED: to share
Duple. Stancill Or huso men
- one half utii petsi Great loca-
tie call 7$t-4fl4. Leave
trossago.
JOES OVERSEAS MF (In
dudinf Australia. South Pacific,
Europe. Africa, Alaska. Cruise
Ship, Airiines). Temporary and
full time, sm.oos to sacaoo call
nowl 74734-5101 E�t. US.
INTERESTED IN JOES
Overseast There's a company in
Centralia, WA. that publishes an
international empfayment direc-
tory. Cost si. Their directory
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SIONAL typing Call Julia
Bleodworth at 744-7074.
TYPING.
754-43).
TERM. THESIS.
IP INTERESTED in onioning a
loco for a new retail store call
Nancy Christian WMEJE.
PROFESSIONAL TYPING
servlce-exeerlenca, quality
work, I EM setectric typewriter.
Call Lanie Shiva 7SO-5301.
QUALITY TYPING TbM
typewriter, is years of ex-
perience. Full time typing for
faculty students call 7S4-J440.
�0000000000000000000000000tttttft$A
.��"� Services Urulrnlted?
treat Pflfn 1ft iUn. m f ��.ii. 1 11 r,
�;��
� � aW�oro threat POIflaj 1M Ueon. M C 37AM(�IS)��?�
IS YOUR PROFESSOR PARTICULAR?
jME YOU ALL THUMBS AT THE TYPEWRITER
�ROVIDES PROMPT, PROFESSIONAL TYPING
AT REASONABLE RATES
CALL US AT
(919) 237-8428
m . mam a.
waTJaBtVEUI, MX.
Latest Styles in
Ladies Hats and accessories
eJfcT
FUU. SERVICE COPIES
AS LOW AS
212$ each
(self service 60
Open 12 Hours Daily
Monday - Thursday
Friday 9-7 Saturday 9-2
TWO LOCATIONS
The Georsetown Shops
Pitt Plaza (10-6)
USOA Choice Beef Round
FOOD LION
SAo?
w Site.
10-12 lbs. Average
Slice: FREE!
These prices good thru
Saturday, October 29, 1983
Lb.
USOA Cheiea Bitf Round - Full Cut
Round
USOA
CHOICE
Steak
Lb.
USOA Ck�ie. 8f Ckiiek � Baaalatt
Chuck
Roast
t ' 5aSt
15 Lb. Bag
us�i
White
Potatoes
2 Liter
Taylor
Milwaukee Calif. Cellars Wine
Pk�. of 6 -12 0z. Com
1.S Liter - LI. Ckablit, Rhino Roil j 1,5 Liter - Lanbruto Bianco Rosats
22 Ounce
N
Liquid m
Why Pay -1 19
49 Ox. - W Softener
6.5 0. It. Chak Tina I. Oil
Why Pay (2.S3
E�
97 Sheets 2 Ply
Towels
Why Pay 99'

�fay Fay1.09
299
I U. F� II

w2�
Margarine Quarters
$2"
W�
Half Gallon � SO Off
Liquid Wisk
7.15 Ol. � FJ U
Macaroni & Cheese
24 Or - Caet!e�e.rry
Beef $tev
M 0i. Cat Food - livor ft Chicken Ten
Beef ft Liver Beef ft Chicken
Bright Eyes
289
17 0x. - Whole Cream Style
Del Monte Golden Corn
Half Gallon White Hease � i
Apple Juice
u
279.
16 Or � French Cut
Pel Monte Green Beans
I
fjij
4 Roll Pack
Waldorf I
Toilet Tissue
.o:
Del Monte
10 Ounce
.
Jenos i?S�
Why P,y t 19
lutsnf)
NT-
Why Pn 1 05
Why P i 29
TASTY
. .

�aWte-n �
�� ���� m im





u ptoWn
wgry
f
ir
V
�)
TREMENDOUS
SAYINGS
25 UPTOWN
STORES
TM
WED. OCT. 26 thru SAT. OCT. 29
f
f
V

&
w
v
INC
Sponsored by
Downtown Greenville Association





. . . you could cad this a
regular price sale! This
is the best assortment
of young men's cloth-
ing, at the very best
price, that we can find
in the market. We know
that, if you will com-
pare, you will agree that
the price � value rela-
tionship on this selec
tion of clothing is
outstanding.
Selections of Harris
Tweed Sport Coats
Selections of.Shetland
Sport Coatb
Our year-around weight
Navy Blazei
$165.00
$129 50
$165 00
� 100 cotton khaki pants.
Duckhedds 2 pair for 37.95
� Corduroy pants in both
wide and narrow wale 36.95
� A selection of fine
Shetland Sweaters 39.95
� The classic Dirty Buck" shoe 50.00
� Oxford cloth shirts in
solid colors 2 for 57.95
� A selection of plaid sport shirts 32.50
� A Baracuta style jacket 45.00

V

Clothing
At All Our Fine Stores
o&maris
MENS WEAR
Downtown Greenville
Carolina East Mall
Tarrytown Mall Rocky Mount
art camera
526 SOUTH COTANCHE STREET
GREENVILLE N C 27834
20 OFF FRAMED
POSTERS
25 OFF FRAMED
WILDLIFE PRINTS
20 OFF UNFRAMED
WILDLIFE PRINTS
20 OFF ALL
UNFRAMED POSTERS
20 OFF ALL
NIELSEN CHROME
FRAME KITS
20 OFF ALL
READY MADE
FRAMES
20 OFF ALL
COMPLETE FRAMING
ORDERS
20 OFF ALL
UNFRAMED PRINTS
IN STOCK
SALE PRICES GOOD
OCT. 26-29 ONLY
art camera
frame �hop
&
fit BOO
�t
&
o
eCBAFTlv(
Cr 209�OFF
HALLOWEEI
YELLOW ENAMEL)
HALLMARK CANI
ALL NATURAL Wl
CONVENIENT Rl





4ED
AMED
: PRINTS
iFRAMED
PRINTS
FF ALL
D POSTERS
FF ALL
CHROME
E KTS
LL
FRAMING
DERS
OFF ALL
1ED PRINTS
STOCK
ICES GOOD
I6-29 ONLY
sierci
Shop
fy Gallery

GPET SCTON
CHiLDRENS
AND MORE
Prices Good
Wednesday Sat
HALLOWEEN SPECIALS
YELLOW ENAMELWARE . V2 PRICE
HALLMARK CANDLES 'jOFF
ALL NATURAL WICKER 25 OFF
CONVENIENTREARENTRANCE open 930530
OOK
rn
114 E. FIFTH ST.
GREENVILLE, NC 27834





JLarsh
SURF N SEA
206 E. 5th Street
Downtown Greenville
752-7711
Date:
Wed 26th-Sat, 29th
60 OFF Remaining OP Shorts & Bathing Suits
50 OFF Selected OP Sweatsuits
50 OFF Selected Women's Ocean Pacific Shoes
30 OFF On All Boat Accessories
30 OFF Short Sleeve T-Shirts
30 OFF Timberland Boots
30 OFF Children's Long Sleeve T-Shirts
20 OFF Super Nice Wool Rich jackets
20 OFF Ocean Pacific Sweaters & Pants
20 OFF l.ont Sleeve T-Shirts
20�o OFF Portsider Shoes-Men's & Women
10 OFF Anything Else In The Store!
Oapswlt Vesims
Interiors � Accessories � Specialty Gift Shoppe
222 E. 5th Street � Downtown Greenville
Homecoming Sale
Wednesday thru Saturday � 26th-29th
50 OFF ECU Items: Frames . Glasses . Mugs
50 OFF Baskets . Picture Frames � Folk Art
50 OFF Silk Flowers � Miniatures
� Stuffed Animals
50 OFF Embroidered Hand Towels � Hankerchiefs
10 OFF ENTIRE STOCK
Brass � Glassware � Crystal
� Music Boxes � Lamps
� Accessories � Furniture � Pictures
� Ceramic � Brass Flatware
� Prints � Lampshades � Scented
Soaps � Potpourri � Candles
� Windchimes � Kitchen Accessories
� Hand Carved Ducks � Baby Gifts
� Plexiglass Serving Pieces
� Christmas Items, etc.
v �
r
� - -e
k
SUITS 10 OFF
FALL PANTS 13 OFF
BUTTON DOWN SHIRTS
$18.00
EARLY FALL DRESSES
TO 12 OFF
LEG WARMERS $5.00
'rjLf- SET l
fflST- COTTON TRAPUNTO
i yj - ?4 ��M�m&xtL BELTS
REG. $8.00
NOW $5.00
r"�- v.
V
.v1"
m
Mi
iYv" v-
HOME COMING
SPECIAL!
Free Bowl of Homemade
Soup with any sub or
sandwich purchase
Oct. 26 to 30
205 E. 5th St.
5th & tvans 5
9:30
Won. Sa
WELCOA ies
PARENTS , STUE
ALUMNI, & FRIE
To Our
ECU HOA1ECO
SALE
15 TO 40
DISCOUN
ON
LADIES BLAZERS
SKIRTS
SLACKS
SELECTED BL0LSES

EN'S OXFORD CLOTH
BUTTON DOWN COLLAR S -
LADIES PETER PAN E BUTT
DOWN OXFORD CLOTH S
LADIES CHAMOI CLOTH SI
Sale Days
Wed. Oct. 26th
thru
Sat. Oct. 29th
9:30 - 5:30
No Exchanges Or Refunds On Sale IterJ
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING OPPOSITE EVAN:





-JSC'
4f
� A

HKRV
SUITS 10 OFF
FALL PANTS Vs OFF
BUHON DOWN SHIRTS
$18.00
EARLY FALL DRESSES
13 TO 12 OFF
LtG WARMERS $5.00
COTTON TRAPUNTO
BELTS
REG. $8.00
NOW $5.00
fiM:
SO, ��'�
S
LUE
MOON
CAFE
ME COMING
ISPECIAL!
owl of Homemade
with any sub or
ich purchase
ct. 26 to 30
b05 E. 5th St.
I
DIRECT MERCHANT
5th & tvans Stree
9:30 5:30
Mon .
Sat
WELCOMES
PARENTS , STUDENTS,
ALUMNI, & FRIENDS
To Our
ECU HOMECOMING
SALE
15 TO 40
DISCOUNT
ON
LADIES BLAZERS
SKIRTS
SLACKS
SELECTED BLOUSES
MEN'S OXFORD CLOTH
BUTTON DOWN COLLAR SHIRTS
LADIES PETER PAN & BUTTON
DOWN OXFORD CLOTH SHIRTS
LADIES CHAMOI CLOTH SHIRTS
Sale Days
Wed. Oct. 26th
thru
Sat. Oct. 29th
9:30 - 5:30
No Exchanges Or Refunds On Sale Items
PLENTY OF FREE PARKING OPPOSITE EVANS STREET
Gourmet International.
We are located at 117 E. 5th Street,
in the old Book Barn space and we
are biqqer and better than ever.
Our varied selections of gourmet
foods, herbs and spices, bulk grains,
aromatic teas, fresh roasted bean
coffees and wonderfully delectible
chocolates are sure to please your
taste buds.
COME BY TODAY!
Store hours: Monday thru Saturday
9:30 - 5:30
HOMECOMING SPECIAL!
Bring this ad for 10 Discount on any
grocery item in our store. October 26 - 29
ourine
Seroati
752-3411 117 E. Fifth St.
Convenient parking at the rear entrance.
If your wondering what kind
of services Curry can offer
you, fret no more
CURRY CAN DO
� instant offset printing
� binding & finishing services
� photocopies
WE ARE:
� inexpensively quick at
reasonable rates with reliable
results

CURRY 11 7 52-1233
COPY
CENTER OF GREENVILLE
V.
�� f4 �lrl Mill. Sr��rMt, NX. 17�4





POSTUREPEDICj TWIN SIZE
MODEL EACH PIECE
(Reg
ROY ALE W Sale
Firm ��
99"
Reg S
249 .
Reg
PREMIERl23n s
119
Extra Firm
ale
95
Reg
PRESTIGE269 s
134
Regular Firm
95
Reg
FULL SIZE
EACH PIECE
QUEEN SIZE
2PIECE SET
KING SIZE
a-PIECE SET
124
95
Reg
599 �
299
Reg
289 �
144"
Reg
I6999 "�
349"
Reg
15995
SECOND uHm s�
CENTURY! Y4995
E'ia Firm
1
Reg
174'5
95
-7
Reg
� Sale
39995
Reg. .
&99�Sa,e
44995
Reg
399
Sale
Reg
959
479
Keg"
1079 L
539"
Reg
H99S.le
59995
9att
90 Day Cash Plan With No Finance Charge
Free Delivery Within 100 Miles At No Extra Charge
Layaway Plan
FURNITURE CO.
S35 Dtcklnaon Av�nu� Downtown GraanvMIe
752-5161
IS Years of Conttaaoa Servkt to Eattera Nortk Carolina
Ptenty o4 Free Parking aem to car Store
SEIKOSPORT�TECH
Seiko welcomes you to the 21st century.
At your Authorized Seiko Dealer.
SEIKO
Floyd G.
ROBINSON
JEWELERS
407 Evans Mall
Uptown Greenville
758-2452
Your Independant
Diamond Jewelers
t � f � I'i'i mi
HOMECOMIN
I
20 O
SWEATE
&
BLOUSE
C. WEBER Ti
419 Evans St.
Salute
the
PIRATES
Sale Oct. 26

. ;�T
�� �
VdStpM
AVAILABLE SECOND
� Private Rooms
� Cooking Facilities
� Cable T.V. Available
� Private Baths
� Central Air
� Exterior Deck wBarbeque Grill
� Partially Furnished
� Convenient Location and Parking
� Economical$150 per month
� Lease Discount prior to Dec. 1st
For Rental Informati
Clark-Branch Mana
756-6336





SPORT'TECH
mes you to the 21st century.
ur Authorized Seiko Dealer.
OBINSON
JEWELERS
7 Evans Mall
town Greenville
758-2452
lependant
mond Jewelers
I
HOMECOMING SALE
20 OFF
SWEATERS
&
BLOUSES
C. WEBER FORBES
419 Evans St. Mall
Salutes
the
PIRATES 83
Sale Oct. 26-29
�Wfc"
AVAILABLE SECOND SEMESTER
n w B�MM i
Private Rooms
Cooking Facilities
Cable T.V. Available
Private Baths
Central Air
Exterior Deck wBarbeque Grill
Partially Furnished
Convenient Location and Parking
Economical$150 per month
Lease Discount prior to Dec. 1st
For Rental Information Call:
Clark-Branch Management
756-6336 asOerWuj
FAMILY NIGHT SPECIAL
Every Monday and
Tuesday Nights
Every Monday and
Tuesday Nights buy
any Large 2 or more
Topping Pizza and
get a Large 2 or more
Topping Pizza FREE.
757-1955
NO COUPON NECESSARY
grab a dollar or two
special coupon
$1.00 OFF any small 2-item Pizza
$2.00 OFF any Large 2-item Pizza
Expires 121583
757-1955
One discount per pizza


?
2 FOR 1
Buy any Large 2 or More Topping Piz- gp
za and get a Small 2 or more Topping k
Pizza FREE � a $6.50 value C
D
Expires 121583
757-1955
One discount per pizza
D





camera hoo
518 SOUTH COTANCHE STREe
GREENVILLE, N.C. 27834
752-0688
ALL 100 200
MACRO-
FOCUSING
ZOOM LENSES
IN STOCK
$79.95
PHOTOFINISHING SPECIALS
8 x 10 1.89
5x?$ .89
10 x 30 poster$ 1 2.00
NIKON FG50mmE
$249.95
plus $35.00 REBATE
NIKON FE50mmE
$289.95
NIKON FM50mmE
$239.95
SB-15 FLASH
$64.95
-�- -f�-
k
20 OFF
40 OFF
Vz PRICE
12 PRICE
20 OFF
10 OFF
20 OFF.
20 OFF.
BUY 4 ROLLS
20 OFF
�ALL ART SUPPLIES
� ALL ARTISTS PORTFOLIOS
ALL BINOCULARS &
SUNGLASSES
ALL KODAK DISC CAMERAS
ALL KODAK SLIDE PROJECTORS
ALL CANON & NIKON LENSES
ALL CAMERA BAGS
ALL ELECTRONIC FLASHES r
FILM AND GET $4.00 TOWARDS' Askfor
ALL NIKON AND CANON
ACCESSORIES.
AE-1 w50mm
f 1.8 LENS
$185.00
ALL CANON
ACCESSORIES
20 OFF
rL
VJ
Z-UL of) u
v
"N

L
J

Ix,
I NP
i T�- .
. 0 �
iu �
ariDoi
(
UL
; L.OO off i U
V Canon
rro3rammed Automation
Plus Srxjtter-Prioriry
Sophistication
System Inte3ratba
� PROGRAMMED AUTOMATION
-lust focus and shool1
� SHUTTERPRIORITY
AUTOMATION
� ' � automatic Hash pnotogra
ph, wth optional Speedite ;88A
� New spfcVmtcropnsm laser mane
antblackout viewfmder screen
standard-1 SX brighter
� Total ot 8 user interchangeable
focusing screens (optional)
� Optional Power Winder A2 A
and Motor Dr.ve MA available for
'apid sequence shooting
� I ED readout m viewfmder
� Manual mooe tor creative
pnotography
� Lightweight compact and easy
to use
� Accepts more than SO Canon
WKte angle telephoto and
oom lenses
SpffdMe 'saAancl
Pruw W.naer A2 shown opicnai
COME IN AND
REGISTER TO
WIN 35mm CAMERA
AND MANY OTHER
GIFTS & PRIZES
ac
E it
7,
AE-1 PROGRAM
w50mm f 1.8 LENS
$215.00
IT'S AUTOMATuTTirSPRICED RIGHT
M , AND, irS A NIKON!
Marvelously small, light, easy-to-use. the Nikon EM Qlves
you.p.cnjres with out-ot-th.s world quality - automatically
thplIr?"e0,ffip,iCe r rap.d-f.re action shots add
me matching low-cost MD-E motor dr.ve tor after-dark
photo fun, the inexpensive thynstor flash N.kon EM with
super-sharp interchangeable
Nikon 50mm fl 8 Series E
ctober
.
lens.
only
$139
PRICES GOOD OCT. 26-29
ALL SALES CASH OR
CREDIT CARD ONI Y
'
Urnu
save I
Sorry No Char;
PWJCOSanG ��
jS2T





PALS
1.89
.89
I DO
NIKON FG50mmE
$249.95
plus $35.00 REBATE
NIKON FE50mmE
$289.95
NIKON FM50mmE
$239.95
SB-15 FLASH
$64.95
C iion
-
AS
ICTORS
SES
AE-1 w50mm
f 1.8 LENS
$185.00
ALL CANON
ACCESSORIES
20 OFF
IT'S AUTOMATIC IT'S PRICED RIGHT
AND, irS A NIKON!
Morveiously small light easy-to-use, the Nikon EM gives
you pictures with out-of this world quality � automatically
r i down to-eo"h price For rapid-fire action shots, add
matctiing low-cost MD E motor drive for after-dark
photo fun the inexpensive thynstor flash Nikon EM with
super-sharp interchangeable
Nikon 50mm fl 8 Series E lens only
$139 00
26-29
OR
LY.
A?
9
M lb thru.
U.B.
Sat. l?
516 S. COTANCHE
GREENVILLE. M.C.
est sportsumr prices �
tK
i udar
u
I
r
lo0
feq.t�- is1 r
ISaswaCC '
SFiirts
ZOO offl&K&ui
Volfun HunH
Tops
�tL price
-i r
U:oo((�
TidZov&rs
�Rg 10.96"
-1
ft �&�
AS

r, wl coupon
z.

V

e.

W1 r'
prictfLspo,
�� i r
Zipper it. j r m
"I
iiiroiskitrs i i o , r. �
ZOO off J duueatsntrtd j
" "� si" r &&��
Sweaipcm&s i i Sueo-tshirts j
, m r,i, i 1.00 rff ! I Kt. price ucoupon
Z.OOciUcoup Lu,coupon j LOf?�A
Vv
HZI PiZZfc-
Octnor Zo
Sponsored, bu
OTUt &C& VMCW UUL
cnv
5
orry
No Charges Cxckmcp bud no rejundLs





u
1 Inc.
GCOllds
PRESENTS OUR
ALL
$8.98 List
ALBUMS & TAPES
$5.99
OLD & NEW!
Thurs. thru Wed.
- October 27 thru November 2 -
THIS SALE INCLUDES THE FOLLOWING
PLUS HUNDREDS MORE!
Police
Big Country
Motels
Robert Plant
Billy Joel
Loverboy
George Benson
Jimmy Buffett
Quiet Riot
- Moody Blues
- Fixx
- Hank Williams
- Bonnie Tyler
- Jackson Browne
- Rick James
- Zapp
- Jeffrey Osborne
- U-2
- Naked Eyes
- Joe Perry
- Genesis
- Motley Crue
- Aldo Nova
- Stray Cats
- John Cougar
204 E. 5th St.
Downtown Greenville
758-1427
Now offers the best in
American and Import Bikes
SCHWINN
TREK
ROSS
� LAY AWAY
530 Cotanche Street � Greenville, NC
WE REPAIR ALL MAKES
10 OFF ALL PARTS & LABOR WITH THIS COUPON
WHEN YOU NEED RESULTS
YOU CAN COUNT ON US !
Restaurants
- Menu Design
- Fast Service
- Lamination
- Guest Checks
Businesses
- Economical Forms
- Computer Forms
- Word Processing
- Brochure Design
Retail Stores
- Point of Purchase Aids
- Mail Order Printing
- L030 DesisnAd Layout
- Quality Printing
We Perform Miracles Daily!
Two Locations In Greenville, North Carolina
Downtown
The Georsetown Shops
521 Cotanche Street
Open Monday thru Saturday
Pitt Plaza Shopping Ctr.
264 By-Pass "
Open Monday thru Saturday
919758-2400 919756-8550
(It's worth the call)
� . - nXMMfe,
DOW
home!
Wool B
for J
Bro
Misses Cotton Sweaters
Nov S18.99
Dtu�V)W- - OO I w� V
100 i cotton ea-
'n fall color
34 lei .
sleeve.
Oxford Cloth Shirl
for Juniors
�eg. SI 8. 00
no $14.9
A wonderful basie t k
ties and vests in fal! -
colors .
Rain Slickers
In Red, Green and Yel
$15.99
Reg. $20
DOWNTOW





BICYttS
POS
Bikes
Fuji.
� BM
� REDL1NE
� DIAMOND BACK
� HITCH
� G T
� MONGOOSE
OPEDCEOT
E REPAIR ALL MAKES
I PARTS & LABOR WITH THIS COUPON
A
� MASTERCARD
irypnvilie "V
757-3616
iYOU NEED RESULTS
,N COUNT ON US !
4 fc
Businesses
- Economical Forms
- Computer Forms
- Word Processm3
- Brochure Design
Retail Stores
- Pint of Purchase Aids
- Mail Order Printing
- Logo Design Ad Layout
- Quality Printing
frform Miracles Daily!
nations In Greenville, North Carolina
Itown
own Shops
:he Street
thru Saturday
Pitt Plaza Shopping Ctr.
264 By-Pass
Open Monday thru Saturday
18-2400 919756-8550
(Its worth the call)
Wool Blazers
for Juniors
Brody's own wool
modified blazer the
untailored
styling.
Beautiful
solid fall
colors
Our Entire Stock of
Fall Nine - West Shoes
20off
reg. $70.00
$49.99
Misses Cotton
Sweaters
Now
S18.99
00
OoiilWt" scoop rn&cl
100 otton sweater
in fall colors . . .
3 4 length
sleeve.
Entire Stock of
J.G. HOOK
Sportswear
Save
20
Suede Clogs
In Navy , Wine, and brown
Reg. $29.00
$18.90
$19.99
Oxford Cloth Shirt
for Juniors
-eg. $18.00
No $14.99
A wonderful basic to mix with
ties and vests in fall's best
colors.
Rain Slickers
In Red, Green and Yellow
$15.99
Reg. $20
DOWNTOWN
Fashion Pants
for Juniors
reg. $28.00 Now$19.99
French canvas pants in
beautiful fall colors. A
great pant to coordinate
with this fall's exciting
sweaters.
Crazy Horse
Shetland
Sweater
reg. $2 5.00
FREE
MONOGRAM.
Great fall
colors in
this
beautiful
100o wool
Shetland
sweater.
Entire Stock of
ALL WEATHER
COATS
by London Fog
save 20X
Wool Blazers
for Misses
reg. $70.00 Now $49.99
Brody's own beautiful wool
blazer in great fall colors
navy, grey, black, & red.
LIFESTRIDE 'BETH $25. 90 !�"�??� �!
FOLDING UNBRELLAS
Reg. 8.00
$5.99
Entire Stock of
Pendleton
Sportswear
save
20
Plain pump in grey, black,
navey, wine, and taupe.
Reg. 32.00
ITIENNE AIGNER BAGS
20OFF
JACK ROGERS
"WEDGE"
$65.90
Heel in, toe out shoe.
In taupe, navey, and
grey suede.
Reg. $80.00
Chocolate Chip
'Famous Amos Cookies
$1.99
r
ATTENTION ALUMNI !
Register for a FREE GIFT at Brody's Downtown! Alumni having
traveled longest distance to ECU will receive a prize, courtesy
of our downtown store. Come by for details!
SERVING COLLEGE STUDENTS
FOR OVER 48 YEARS!
�.������ ��'� �
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UPTOWN GREENVILLE
October 26, 27, 28, & 29
DISCOUNT SHOE PRICES
Discounts On Brand Names Like NIKE, NEW BALANCE, ETONIC
& CONVERSE (Several Tables Will Be Filled)
T-SHIRT SPECIALS
GROUP A
CROUP B
GROUP C
1 pr. $15,
1 pr. $20.
1 pr. $25.
2 pr. $25
2 pr. $35.
2 pr. $45,
3 pr. $30.
3 pr. $45.
3 pr. $60.
SOCK SPECIALS
$1.50 a pair
3 STRIPE SOCKS BY RUSSELL NATIONAL
$6.95 ea.
(3 for S15.00)
Long Sleeve T Shirts
Screen Printed with Various
E.C.U. Logos L Designs
That Support The PIRATES
(Several Colors Available)
DISCOUNT SWEATPANTS,
SWEATSHIRTS, & GYM SHORTS
SPECIAL SHIPMENT OF 2nd's
PRICES REDUCED SIGNIFICANTLY TO SELL
LIMITED QUANTITY
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVE !
VISIT US THURSDAY (5:00)
DURING THE PEP RALLY
ILL. HODGES CO.
210 E.FIFTH ST. GREENVILLE
Biweekly
TH
ALTERN
- E TIMES ha
become lre area's 'aVxernat
reading anc advertising source
'act it provides the
coverage of life in Pitt C.
money can't buv . That - r
money can't buv it oei.a
no charge for . j
PITT GREEN . E TIMES
priceless
Origir.ailv reatc as I
for .nat i hot 3nc: nr,j- �
entertainment, dining, anc.
the PITT GREESv!lCe TIMES
expanded its editorial cove-a � I
include many new a-eas. These -
itures include
Levwis Grizzard. the c
calendar art ne.
oehind the headlines
nterviews restaurant p
entertainment a �
stories about life n D II Count)
ent highlights. a-tic!es feat
� ii "eighbors soo? I
�Tied ads home and
I 3 re .
Publish
.Vedn the PIT! REEN
ES na. consisl
a � � - � � � - -
ilks of Iife. h
- �
tabloid i divided
ck iocatior � � �
topics And a e sn't
RELAX





IXE
SHIRT SPECIALS
$6.95 ea.
(3 for S15.00)
Lc - eeve T Shirts
n Printed with Various
E. C.L. Logos & Designs
at Support The PIRATES!
(.Several Colors Available)
SWEATPANTS,
S, & GYM SHORTS
CANTLY TO SELL' !
FIRST COME, FIRST SERVE
URSDAY (5:00)
IE PEP RALLY
ESCO.
REEMVILLE
Biweekly
Ike uesC Iwag (�, Life, Ate Puee:


Priceless
THE
Feb. 22-Mar. 6
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ALTERNATIVE

November 1- 14Priceles
� f 4
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� PITT-GREENVlLLEi V � greenvi
1 MlMJ-O 1 !?�
April 19 Mas 1
Priceless
Now in its third year, the
PITT GREENVILLE TIMES has truly
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money can't buy it because there's
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Published every other
.VeUnesday. the PITT GREENVILLE
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magazine than a newspaper, the
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:uick location of your favorite local
topics. And as if the reading wasn't
already diverse enough, three new
surprises will be added in 1984!
Most PITT GREENVILLE TIMES
copies are scooped up within 72
hours after they are distributed.
Therefore, lots of readers can't
seem to find a copy each fortnight.
To solve this problem a subscription
offer has now been initiated. You
can now have each and every PITT-
GREENVILLE TIMES sent directly to
your mailbox for half a year at the
introductory price of only $5.00.
The new $5.00 (6 month) offer
is only charging for necessary
postage and handling. It is meant as
a convenience for PITT-GREENVILLE
TIMES readers and does not affect
the "complimentary" status of copies
left at the usual distribution points.
After all, the best things in life are
still free!
The PITT-GREENVILLE TIMES
is distributed at high-traffic locations
throughout Greenville and Pitt County.
Hotels, restaurants, shopping centers,
Carolina East Mall, nightclubs, shops,
convenience stores. East Carolina
University dorms, and the new mailed
subscriptions effectively distribute
the publication.
Good Times. Changing Times.
Fun Times. Meal Times. Night Times.
Old Times. Prime Times. First Times.
Three-Quarter Times. Record Times.
Glad Times. Scheduled Times. Best
of Times. PITT-GREENVILLE TIMES.
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� PITT-GRE
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111
May 17-29
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Sepi 6 - 19
Prieelesr
SUBSCRIBE!
NAME
Send us this coupon along with
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to P.O. Box 8373, Greenville,
NC 27835. to have us delivered
to your mailbox for 6 months
(cost covers postage, handling,
� applicable taxes). Subscribe!
ADDRESS
CITY.
STATE
ZIP

vVe now deliver to
your mailbox!





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zipper top with collar
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LADIES SIZES: 6 to 18
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Open: 1
Mon.





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MENS LEATHER
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M9.95
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Open: 10-5:30pm
Mon. - Sat.
Carolina East Mall
Open: 10-9:00pm
Mon. - Sat.





?&
r
&
rCO
Sm
Pep
Rally
m
Get your
HOMECOMING FESTIVITIES
started on the RIGHT TRACK.
Come out and meet COACH
ED EMORY and the
TM
TM
See what it's like to
CATCH THE
pirates attack.
at the Uptown
Pep Rally
On 5th street between Reade & Cotanche





Title
The East Carolinian, October 25, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 25, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.296
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/
Materials on this site may include offensive content, which does not reflect the opinions, values, or beliefs of Joyner Library. Public access is provided to these resources to preserve the historical record.

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