The East Carolinian, October 20, 1983






(Bhz Saat Carolinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No15 '
Thursday, October 20,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Fund Raising Drive
Brings In $61,776
By JENNIFER JENDRASIAK
SteffWriter
The ECU National Alumni
Telefund raised $61,776 this
semester in its annual fund raising
drive, surpassing its goal of
$55,000.
The drive was conducted by
telephone and lasted from Sept.
12 through Oct. 6. Pledges were
collected from alumni living out-
of-state and in areas without
alumni chapters. According to
Douglas Moore, director of in-
stitutional advancement, the
number of pledges this year was
2285, and 435 of those were new.
Money collected in the drive is
used to support 100 merit based
scholarships as well as other pro-
grams that can't be supported
with state funds, Moore said.
Telephone calls were made by
more than 225 ECU students who
participated in the drive. Most of
the students were from the ECU
Ambassadors, but students from
other campus organizations also
helped. There were three captains
appointed every night, each of
whom was responsible for pro-
viding nine people to man the
telephones. Howard Lipman was
the telephone chairman. "I at-
tribute most of the success to
Howard Moore said. "He and
the captains did a super job
This is the drive's fifth year and
the amount of money raised has
increased each year. "We're
showing real growth and
progress Moore said. "This
gives us a great start
The telefund last year raised ap-
proximately $45,000. The tele-
fund is part of the institutional
development department's year
long effort to raise funds for
ECU. The department last year
raised about $250,000 for the
university.
� CU NfW) BUKCAU
Manning telephones during the university's 1983 National Telefund campaign, ECU students succeeded
in raising $61,776 in pledges from alumni.
Resident At
Med School
Found Guilty
A former physician doing his
residency at the ECU School of
Medicine was found guilty of il-
legally prescribing drugs and
given a suspended five-year
sentence.
Dr. John Lee Waeltz pleaded
no contest to several counts of
fradulent possession of a controll-
ed substance and writing forged
prescriptions.
Judge Charles Winberry of
Rocky Mount sentenced Waeltz to
five years in prison but then
suspended the sentence. Waeltz
also received a $5,000 fine and
lost the right to practice medicine
in North Carolina.
During a routine audit of a
pharmacy in Farmville, the State
Bureau of Investigation found a
prescription written by Waeltz
which was questioned. They then
surveyed 18 pharmacies in Pitt
County, finding 46 allegedly il-
legal prescriptions written by
Waeltz. Some were written
in his name while others were in
the names of friends and relatives.
U.S. Senator
East Speaks Out
By DENNIS KILCOYNE
Staff Writer
At a local press conference last
Friday, U.S. Sen. John P. East
(R-N.C), a Greenville resident
and former ECU political science
professor, discussed several topics
under consideration by the
Senate.
Among the uead-and-butter
issues, East stressed the impor-
tance of protecting the tobacco
program, wiici supports tnc
main cash crop of North Carolina
farmers and which he considers
crucial to the state's economy. He
scoffed at predictions that fellow
Sen. Jesse Helms' (RN.C),
crusading on issue such as op-
position to the proposed national
holiday to honor the Reverend
Martin King, would jeapordize
the tobacco program.
"Last week's vote (57-33 in
favor of the leaf-support pro-
gram) showed there's no truth to
that East said. "Sen. Walter
Huddleston (pro-tobacco
Democrat from Kentucky) told
me that that was the best pro-
tobacco vote we've ever had
East met head-on the emotion-
charged issue of the King holiday.
In a guest editorial in the Raleigh
News and Observer, East called
for a national commemorative
day for civil rights in general in-
stead of a King holiday. He cited
the controversial nature of King's
reputation, and he reminded
readers of the cost of a paid holi-
day, an estimated $5.2 billion per
year for the federal government.
"We are not talking about a
merely honorary occasion but a
major economic sacrifice for the
country East said. "It was not
until 80 years after his death that
Congress honored George
Washington wfth a paid nollUoy In
his name. It's been only IS years
since King's death, and the emo-
tions and controversy have not
yet allowed us to measure his
achievements accurately or
honestly
East suggested a holiday should
wait until the FBI data on King,
presently under seal of a federal
judge's order,is released. "Then
we can weigh his legacy with more
objectivity he said.
The senator said he supports
the risky peace-keeping mission of
the U.S. Marines in Beirut. "The
potential for increased Soviet
domination (of Lebanon) through
Syria is the major threat East
said. He believes, however, that
President Reagan should carefully
reconsider the presence of the
Marines in the strife-ridden coun-
try if the situation there
ECU Graduate Student Believes
Donations Influence Legislators
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUf f N rllrr
Sea. John East
deteriorates Into comtmi. "TTir
Israeli army Is capable of
preventing Soviet domination
he said. "The major burden
should fall on Israel, with our
moral and logistical backing
East voiced support for Presi-
dent Reagan's Central America
policy, saying it was "on the right
track He fears, however, that
some congressmen are unconcern-
ed about the threat to American
security in the region. "There are
too many congressmen who are
indifferent he said. "If Con-
gress will support the president's
policy, it will succeed
On a personal note, the Senator
rejected recently published
rumors that said he was planning
to change his image. "I have some
fundamental convictions, and 1
intend to keep them he said.
"There is no 'new-image' effort
An ECU graduate student, working for a national
lobbying organization, says the Congressional Club
and other special interest political action committees
(PAC's) may be influencing legislators by making
large financial donations to their political campaigns.
Speaking at a press conference Friday in the
auditorium of ECU's Belk Building, environmental
health student Larry Martin kicked off a "People vs.
PAC" campaign being organized �y Common
Cause, a non-profit citizens' lobbying group based in
WashingtonD.C. Martin is Common Causes' citzen
activist for North Carolina's First Congressional
District.
Martin said Common Cause is attempting to in-
form the American electorate of the dangers increas-
ing numbers of special interest PAC's represent to
representive democracy. "The question is whether or
not this money being funnelled into various cam-
paigns is undermining representative democracy and
disenfrancising the individual Martin said.
"Voters need to be alerted to the threat PAC's repre-
sent
Common Cause is aiming its national campaign at
voters, hoping to inform them about the impact
PAC's may have on the 1984 elections. "In 1982,
some 3,400 PAC's contributed more than $83 million
to Congressional races Martin said. "The question
boils down to whether or not our legislators can be
bought
According to figures released by Common Cause,
there has been a 500 percent increase in the number
of PAC's since 1974. Together they have increased
by 560 percent their investments to Congressional
campaigns.
Common Cause claims that in the last election
PAC's contributed $1 for every $3 received by Con-
gressional candidates. The North Carolina-based
Congressional Club, which Martin calls a "right-
wing ideoloaical P C has been active in suppor-
ting conservative political candidates both in and out
of North Carolina. Martin claims the organization
works to further the political views of Sen Jesse
Helms (R-N.C).
Martin said each PAC is limited to making a max-
imum donation of $5,000 per-primary for the general
election for each candidate. "PAC money is usually
directed at members of select committees which will
consider legislation important to a given special in-
terest Martin said. "However, there is no limit or
spending by PAC's for a given candidate if the
money is spent independently of the candidates of-
ficial campaign
Martin said a possible solution to PAC "influence
peddling" is to put limits on special interest funding
of congressional races and possibly introduce fun-
ding methods of these elections through taxes similar
to the type used in presidential elections.
New Noise Ordinance Affects
ECU And Student Activities
ROB POOL! - �MM U
And The Winner Is
ECU Students are voting this week for the ECU Homecoming Pirate. Selecting the Pirate Is one of many
activities planned for the university's Homecoming, Oct 29.
By ANDREA MARKELLO
Staff Writer
A new ordinance to control
noise in the city of Greenville that
began last in July has had some
effect on ECU and student ac-
tivities, angering some students
while not bothering others.
The ordinance applies to
residential, public, commerical
and manufacturing occupants
who are restricted under the or-
dinance to specific sound level
limits, measured in decibels, dur-
ing aaccrding to the time of day.
"Outdoor Amplifed Sound
Permits" and "Permits to Ex-
ceed" specified noise levels may
be purchased through the city
manager, but are not available to
residential houses, except frater-
nities and sororities. Fraternities
and sororities are allowed one per-
mit during the fall semester and
one during spring semester under
the ordinance.
According to the Greenville
police department, if a complaint
for noise is made, an officer will
go to the dwelling and take three
readings on a sound level meter
measured from the property line.
If the limit is exceeded, the
violator is given a warning but
may also be given a citation. Any
violation subjects the offender to
a civil penalty in the amount of
$50, a violation exceeding the
85dB sound level subjects the of-
fender to immediate revocation of
the permit and a $20 civil penalty.
One member of Sigma Nu
fraternity said, "The law was
made directly at certain groups, is
unconstitutional, and is being us-
ed to shut us down. Until it begins
to be enforced, however, no one is
being charged
A Sigma Phi Epsilon member
wasn't too worried. "We are at
ease he said. "If we disturb the
neighbors they call and we keep
the noise down. It's not too much
of an inconvenience. We're not
too much against it, and it
shouldn't change in the near
future. Most of the neighbors are
used to the noise that goes on
around the house anyways
Inez Fridley, area coordinator
for residence life on college hill,
said the area she works with has
few problems with excessive
noise. "There is a constant check
on noise and rarely is there
enough noise to disturb those
beyond the property line
Fridley said permits are obtain-
ed for outdoor dorm concerts
which limit bands to 85dB. Accor-
ding to Fridley, the concets are
now more enjoyable as perviously
the bands played at 110-115dB
and "blasted the socks off
everybody
Fridley said noise inside the
dorms was a problem. She sug-
gested implication of a noise or-
dinance similar to the one
established at Duke University in
which campus security enforces
the noise ordinance through an
outdoor sound meter reading,
relating to music coming out
dorm windows.
Some exceptions contained in
the Greenville noise ordinance,
which may exceed the limit
without penalty, include sound
from outdoor athletic events,
noise from safety signals, parades
and lawn equipment used during
specified daylight hours.
The noise ordinance also relates
to operation of motor vehicles
with relation to speed limits modi-
fying exhaust systems and remov-
ing mufflers.
Special Homecoming Edition
See Pages Six And Seven For Candidates For '83 Homecoming Court
m






THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 20, 1983
Announcements
ANNOUNCEMENTS
' vou v yOUf oryan.zation
would t-Ki? to have an item
, iVd in 'he announcement
nn please type it on an an
ement form ano send ct to
lit- fcas' Carolinian in i.are of
�tie production manager
Annotnc ement forms are
�r.ie a' "ie � as' Carolinian
)fi c� n trie PuM'ijtions
6a'iJinj n�pri anti rtandwril
ten topy on odo sueo paper can
not be a, tepteo
1 c s v hai .je tor an
n ory tM S03CC S Otten
led Therefore we cannot
v. 'amee iat ,ou' announce
i'ent vv'll run as vny as 01
inds jo. stfhaty�
. s. . v jn fh s n � -
" "� lea . � in
r � ntS �� I I
" t I i � � �� . �. � and 3
A- ' �esda� '�" 'ne Tnurs
�� aper No jnnounl pmep
lea � '� �
HOLY COMMUNION
a sfud�nt Ep-scopai service o
Communion will be
letorated on reaav evening
I n tne chapel oi St
Paul Episcopal Church 40 4�"
i- (one b'ock from Garrert
- ne service will be a'
5 30 D m witn the Episcopal
� lsapt�m theR�v 8 n Madden
� letora'ing
INTERVIEWING
SKILLS
WORKSHOPS
j,r�e P'ann.ng and Place
merit Service n 'he B'okTop
'�xv s 9Ker rvg tese one hour
sessions �c a c you In developing
,n Intar v.ewing skills for use
- our ,ot aearcn
October 24 AAonoay 3 00 p m
Nvemoar 3 Thursday 3 00
0 ft
A film and discussion of inter
viewing rnrovgn tna Career
f toning and Placement Ser
? �ce win be snartO
RESUME
PREPARATION
WORKSHOPS
'he Caree' Pls-irty and
. g fi-�r' S�r i � ;� ih
� - se i c�ring "le fol �
�v g riot i vi ons to help yoc-
�parr- �.v w- -esome
�r-e ' 'oesdav 3 M c -
ami Wednesday 3 00
'hose senors or graduate
nil � nlsMng mis year and
. 1 - -ig ro 'egiste wm us art
i -gee to attend You may come
-he B'Oxton Mouse at any at
ma shove times
SOCIETY OF
UNITED LIBERAL
STUDENTS
Minor t, s'jflfrs 'here will
� eet ng of lie SOUS at
' X c m 'odaT n -oom 221
Tha.
EPSILON PI TAU
EPT will be having a dinner
meeting al western Staer on
Thursday Oct K at 5 p m Tha
Dean o' Industrial Technology
will be the guest speaker, all In
feresfed members are urged to
attend
SIGN LANGUAGE
CLUB
Monday's meeting on Oct 24
will be held In Brewsfer B 205
People interested in sign
language and activities related
to it are invited to come See you
there!
BIOLOGY CLUB
Dr Linda Splno from ttve
Center for Student Opportunities
and a medical student will ad
dress the topic Marriage and
the Professional Career at the
meeting on Monday Oct, 24. at 7
pm in BN 102 All members and
interested persons are urged to
attend
EURHYTHMICS
IMPROVISATION
Eurhythmies Improvisation
Expressive Body Movement"
When Oct 26. 1��3 at 5 p m
vVhere Room 101 Fletcher
Music Building
What to Bring Yourself and a
friend (wear loose domes)
Patti Weeks an ECU dance m
structor will be the presenter
Sponsored by the ECU Musice
Therapy Club Refreshments
will be served1 Everyone Is
welcome
S A B MEETING
There will be a S A B Meeting
Monday Oct 24 In Mendenhai'
Student Center The room
number is not available at prin
t'ng
MOST ELIGABLE
BACHELOR
Delta Zeta congratulates Sig
Ep joe Leonard ECU'S most
el gable bachelor Thanks
everyone for your participation
in help.og us raise $185 00 for
Gaiiude' School of the Deaf
I.V.C.F.
nter varsity would nke to in
y te you out on Wednesday
-ughts to join us In tun and
fellowship We are usl a group
of college stuaent, whe come
�ogether to praise e Lord ana
grow closer to Hif
CO-OP
The National Institutes of
Health seeks students to be
employed as full time assistants
to NiH professionals during the
spr ng semester Majors in
B'Oiogical. Physical. Chemical.
Mathematical and Engineering
Sciences as well as Nursing
Business and Conputer Science
are eligible Students must have
8 2 0 GPA and have finished X
semester hours Salaries range
form I 70 per hour to 15 'XJ pe-
hour See the Co oc office tc app
'v 313 Rawi Building
MARCH ON
RALEIGH
Join the many others form
Greenville who will be attending
Saturdays (Oct 22) march on
Raleigh
"Tell mem North Carolina
wants peace, is the theme for
the march and rally which
organizers hope will attract
1000-1
The four themes of me event
are "Stop first strike weapons
In Europe. Reverse the arms
race, Freeie nuclear weapons
and fund human needs "
It you would like to attend or
can drive please meet at the
ECU Catholic Newman Center
953 E 10th ST at V a m Satur
day or Call 75 4906, '52 4216 or
752 5724 PEACE
APPLICATIONS
The deadline for Honor Board
applications is Friday at 5 p m
You can get applications from
the SGA Office on the second
floor of Mendenhall
HELLO
Do you want to know you ftavt
the power knowledge, and abili
ty to help yourself and other
people (I Timothy 4 8 16) Do
you want to be free from fear
and have true love in your life I I
John 4 16 18) To get this, you
must be able to read The Bible
God's Word, with understanding
s o
you can accurately apply if in
your Mil (II Peter 1 2 4) For
mroe Information on reading
and understanding The Bible
stop by ttve booth on the first
floor of Mendenhall Student
Center Friday. Oct 21, between
5 and 11 p m
SCEC
The Student Council For Ex
ceptional Children invites all
members and those interested to
tome and find out about adap
Monday Oct 24 at 4 p m Speigh'
129 Come Join Us1
GAMMA BETA PHI
The next general meeting of
Gamma Beta Phi will be Thurs
day. Oct 20 1983 n Jenkins Art
Auditorium at 7 p m Please At
tend'
AKDMEETING
There will be an AKD meeting
Wed Oct 26 at 1? noon In
Bewster D 303 The agenda will
include plans tor the sprng pan
quet and fall ou'ing All m
terested students and tacuity
are encouraged to attend this
meeting
SIGMA TAU
DELTA
The English honor society w �
meet TONIGHT" Meetng
begi ns at 7 30 pm in
Mendenhall profcahiy trie Cot
teehouse Check at 'he mtorma
fion desk for the room Be there
We've got to get this Hai'oween
party on the road'
BACKGAMMON
TOURNAMENT
All full time ECU students
with a 20 GPA are eligible to
compete In the All Campus
Backgammon tournament on
Tuesday, October 25. 1983
Registration forms are
available at the Mendenhall Stu
dent Center Billiards Center All
Interested persons must
register by Sunday. Oct 23 Win
ners will represent ECU at me
ACU i Regional Tournament in
Charlotte
PRIMETIME
Campus Crusade for Christ is
sponsoring "Prime Time" this
Thursday at 7 p m in the Nurs
mg Building, room 101 Please
ioln us for fun. fellowship, and
Bible study We art looking for
ward to meeting you
CONTEMPORARY
GOSPEL SHOW
Tune in to WZMB's contem
porary Gospel Show this Sunday
morning from 6 10 a m and hear
the latest music from artists like
the Second Chapter of Acts,
Keith Green, etc This week s
special artist is Amy Grant we I!
be playing her music from 8 9
a m tor all to hear Give us art
ear at WZMB 91 3 FM
YARDSALE
Alpha Xi Delta is having a
yard sale Saturday, Oct 71
beginning at 8 a m Odds and
ends and who knows what else'
Come out and see what you can
find 508 E 11th Street See you
there!
BIOLOGY CLUB
Biology Ciub members (alias
members of the Collegiate
Academy of Science) who are in
terested in the Chimney Rock
Park trip should come to the
Oct 24 Biology Club Meeting tor
details The trip Is scheduled for
Oct 28 30 The Club s handling
most of the expense so come anc
nguire
� m i
I hr Fast Carolinian,
ind
� �� -
. " �
Subscription WhV s; . � a I
The East Carolinian olf c�
are located m the oid South'
Buildinq on the rjmot
ECU Gre�nvili, N C
I ' V fi
.
r

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ABORTIONS UP
TO 12TH WEEK
OF PREGNANCY
H�5 00 Prenawcy Teat. tT
Central ad Prnblaaa
Pregnanc. Counseling For
lurmer information call
132 0SJ5 iTo�l Free Ngtsbrr
MO 221 2544) between 9AM
� nd 5 P M Weekday)
RALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
917 Weit Morgon Sf
Roligh. NC
Tackle
A Pizza
AtGatti's.
A great way to have a great time.
You already know who has the winning
pizza. You, with your favorite Gattis.
$2.00 Off
Save $200 on any large
Mr. Gattis Pizza of your
choice. Present coupon.
Offer expires 10-31-81
Corner of Cotanche and 10th
The best ptssa la town. jl
EM?
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may us� the hym �t riflht or
um s separate �be�f of paper if
vou need more lines There �rt 33
units per line Each letter, punc
tuation mark and word space
counts as one unit. Capitalize and
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BAGEL LUNCH
Hlllel sponsors bagel lunch
All you can eat Lox, Bagels and
Cream Cheese Plus all the gar
nishes Oct 23, Sunday. In
MendenhaM's Coffee House at
1 15 3 00 p m Cost is 14 general
public S3 students and $2 50
Hillei members Come on out
and munch EVERYONE
WELCOME
GAMMA
OMICRON DELTA
On October 21 at 5 p m Gam
ma Omicron Delta will hold a
meeting Gamma Omicron
Delta is a non denominational
Christian service organization
Come ioin us and see how you
an help with our service pro
iects
CARWASH
The pledge class of Gamma
Sigma Sigma Service Sorority Is
sponsoring a carwash at the cor
ner of 14th St and Greenville
Blvd Saturday. October 22, 10
am 3 p m Price is $1 50 per
car
KC83
KCR3 is a national conference
for college students that will be
held in Kansas City. Ml from
Dec 27. 1983 Jan 1. 1984 its
purpose is to help ignite a
spiritual revolution among col
lege students that could alter the
course of history You cant af
ford to miss this once in a
lifetime event For more infor
mation. come by PRlAAETiME
every Thursday at 7 p m , Rm
101 in the Nursing Building, or
can Bobby Medlin at 752 9653
HOMECOMING
DINNERS
Homecoming Dinners will be
available on Saturday. Oct 29
The dinners sponsored by the
Pitt County Alumni Chapter
will be served at the corner of
Fourteenth Street and Charles
Boulevard Prices for the
barbecue or fried chicken plates
will be 14 Serving will start at 11
a m and continue until 1 p m
PI KAPPA PHI
Pi Kappa Ph Fraternity
would Mfce to welcome everyone
back from Fan break e hope
everyone had a nice break Con
gratvlaitons to the P. Kapp B
?oot&ali earr m i.mshmg second
i the fraternity division Good
work fellows' Aiso to the
pledges Keep up fne good
work I One day you may become
a brother r the best fraternity
on campus P Kappsno li
SILENT
CAMPING
Anyone nters'ed A O rj
me Sign language CjC or lha
camping It p IHH Mi"C
should irwa at '3 E � S'
tonight at 7 p m It yrxi m1" "
ioln us but can t mane me
meeting cai' Michaei Cotter a
757 1620 We leave tomorrow
afternoon i lpr� and win be
signing most at me w�eeod
aaoaaaoaoppnooB
COUPON-COUPON -COUPON
OFFER GOOD THRU
November, 12 1983
UCOURON-COUPON-COUPO
HAVING PROBLEM
with
DBUGST- ALCOHOL? FAMILY?
W Can HelpH
Students helping St ode at s
CAMPUS ALCOBOLfttXtM
MMSEnvtaaU
Tf7-4rtl
m�mmm�mamma�j�m�mm�ma�ai
Dampe: Central America
lASUALTlf OF WAR IS THi
��V
E GENE HA!
-JOANNA �A$SD
A LION'S GATE FILM
"UNDER FIRE" JEAN-LOUIS TRINTIGNANT RICHARD MASUR
ED HARRIS�o JERRY GOLDSMITH, WPATMETHENY
Direr tf Ftotagraptl) JOHN ALC0TT Km Eimitue Produm EDWARD TEETS
i RON SHELTON ami CLAYTON FROHMAN CLAYTON FROHMAN
I,JONATHAN TAPLIN dm ROGER SP0TTISW00DE
ORIGINAL S01NOT1ACI AVAILABLE
ON WAJtNEtnOS nCOajKATAriS
eissjiNDrtFiMASsoruTEb A0��fBEiR,B�iniHe.p�rrM�it �LiuiTsMitjlvEr'
� urno �����
C
OPENS FRIDAY AT A THEATRE NEAR YOU.
Biblical Scripm
Si
�yTLNA
MAROSCHAJf
I
On Fnda, Oct 4
an eleven member
Committee of Scrip-
ture and English
scholars revealed a
112-page lectio-
which portravs Go
as both Father
Mother
readings, entitled
"Inclusive Lanj
Lectionai
make the scrip
lesson inclusi-e
both men and o-
Reverend B.
den, EC'
Episcopa. (
Combined Fore
New Pa
Bv PATRK KO'NKIl
vj Vknwr
A group ' ��
iege studer
puses have
publish a prog
newspaper
Combined Forces
issue of the oc �
nevws star.a- at
campuses in tin
state, Lnciud i -
Chapel Hill, Dul
sities and S: Aug
Neii G � - .
student in
four-page
coregro�r I
hope will expai
near future
Goldberg,
African, said re - a
find so litle interest
college stud
of printed rr.
change of aea- an d
was no s: u z i
(here) Goldberg
AS
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1M3
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EAR YOU.
Biblical Scripture
Scholars Seek To Include Women
By TINA
MAROSCHAX
On Friday, Oct. 14,
an eleven member
Committee of Scrip-
ture and English
scholars revealed a
112-page lectionary
which portrays God
as both Father and
Mother. The
readings, entitled the
4' Inclusive Language
Lectionary" seek to
make the scripture
lesson inclusive of
both men and women.
Reverend Bill Had-
den, ECU campus
Episcopal Chaplain,
said, "I'm very sym-
pathetic with the
feminist movement. I
feel, however, that it
gets a little ridiculous
when every sentence
and paragraph has to
reflect changes in at-
titude and at-
mosphere. Revisions
sometimes go to ab-
surd lengths to fit col-
loquial language and
ideas Hadden add-
ed that he feels that
we should be able to
live with and ap-
preciate the good
changes that have
come into effect with
male-female relation-
ships without "but-
chering" all the tex-
tbooks.
The lectionary
alters various
masculine references
to God. For example,
"Lord" becomes
"Sovereign One
"King" becomes
"ruler" or
"monarch and
"Kingdom" becomes
"realm In reference
to Jesus, "Son of
God" becomes
"Child of God" and
"Son of Man"
becomes "Human
one
Sister Evelyn Mat-
tern of the N.C.
Council of Churches
said she is in favor of
the changes. "I know
that language has an
effect on people emo-
tionally she said.
"Because of the struc-
ture of the English
language and that of
other languages we
use 'he' to refer to
God � that puts the
subconscious idea in-
to people's heads that
God is a male. I think
the committee is try-
ing to find a way of
consistently talking
about God as a person
- not a male or
female
Methodist campus
chaplain Dan Ear-
nhardt said that he
sees no problem with
the changes. "I
would prefer they use
inclusive words in the
reading anyway he
said.
"I like the idea of
using more inclusive
language said Sister
Helen Shondell of the
ECU Catholic
Newman Center. "I
think that it can be
done gracefully in a
lot of places, but I
think sometimes it's
too stilted
Mike Williams, a
member of the cam-
pus group called The
Way, disagreed with
the revisions. "Men
and women are not
the same � they serve
different functions.
Implying that they are
the same is a distor-
tion of God's word
he said.
The three church
publishing houses �
John Knox Press of
Atlanta, the Pilgrim
Press of New York
and Westminster
Press of Philadelphia
� are issuing the lec-
tionary.
Applications now accepted for
position of
General Manager
of The East Carolinian
Business training or experience required. Pick up applications from
the office of the Media Board secretary, on the second floor of the
Publications building, across from the entrance of Joyner Library.
Combined Forces
New Paper Established
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writw
A group of North Carolina col-
lege students from several cam-
puses have joined together to
publish a progressive campus
newspaper appropriately named
Combined Forces. The second
issue of the new publication hit
news stands at several colleges
campuses in the central part of the
state, including N.C. State, UNC-
Chapel Hill, Duke, Shaw univer-
sities and St. Augustine colleges.
Neil Goldberg, a Duke graduate
student in design, is editor of the
four-page tabloid that he and a
core group of "five or six" others
hope will expand in size in the
near future.
Goldberg, who is South
African, said he was surprised to
find so litle interest among U.S.
college students in the publication
of printed material for the ex-
change of ideas and views. "There
was no student movement
(here) Goldberg said Tuesday.
"Combined Forces is essentially a
tool for organizing and bringing
progressive people together
In its banner edition Combined
Forces included news stories and
editorial comment about issues
ranging from the Aug. 27 march
on Washington to the interview of
a UNC-Chapel Hill student who
had visited Nicaruagua.
"Combined Forces will work to
help build a campus political and
cultural movement to meet the
challenges of the 1980s stated
the paper's first editorial in its
Sept. edition. We shall provide a
forum for lively and open discus-
sion by covering what the other
newspapers do not, and by being a
voice for progressive trends
Goldberg claims the progressive
movement in North Carolina is
fractured and in need of more
cohesiveness. He hopes Combined
Forces will "create an atmophere
that's conducive to organizing"
the different progressive student
movements in the campus arena.
m
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�J?e �aat (ttarnlmtan
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Darryl Brown, Manage Ed�o,
Huntfr Fisher, -
All AFRASHTEH. Crrdu Manager
Geoff Hudson. om,w�����,�
Michael Mayo, r�r��ws�-
Cindy Pleasants, spom Editor
Greg Riueout, rd Pae Ed�o,
Gordon I pock, &
Lizanne Jennings, s,�rfior
TODD EVANS. Produoon Manager
October 20, 1983
Opinion
Pagt 4
Sen. Helms
Shames North Carolina Again
Our senior senator is at it again.
It seems that if he's not trying to
force archaic moral standards on
the nation's citizens, he is at least
trying to defame a national hero.
Although we object to his being
from North Carolina, and wish the
citizens of this state would come to
their senses and put somebody in
office with views more in tune with
the times and the people, we can-
not be against his right to speak
out in the U.S. Senate. Yet, we can
only pray that someday he'll quit
spouting ludicrous rhetoric on the
Senate floor.
Mr. Helm's privilege to speak
for the state of North Carolina
could be used more wisely than to
call the late Rev. Martin Luther
King a communist and a leftist
subversive. During the debate on
whether King's birthday should
become a national holiday, Helms
not only attacked the late
preacher; he smeared the names of
fohn and Robert Kennedy. Is this
something North Carolinians can
be proud of?
We disagree with our senior
(senile?) senator on almost
everything. But. this time he has
made us mad and ashamed. His
diatribe delivered two days ago
reminded many people, including
those of us who are old enough to
remember, of the bitter civil rights
fights in the 1960s. Some of those
uho opposed the legislation then
now see its wisdom, yet Jesse and a
handful of others are still living
with a plantation mentality.
Helms has carried his fight
beyond the point when even he
knew any good could come of it.
But, one more time, to prove he
has the "ability to take stands on
unpopular issues and face rebuke
for following his conscience" (or
some such bull to hide his John
Bircher intentions), he fights to the
end.
We all know he is just trying to
solidify his support among a small
group of staunch, conservative,
mostly racist supporters, and is
abandoning the black population
of the state. Helms knows that
blacks realize he will never repre-
sent them in Congress, so he has
abandoned any attempt to display
an interest on their behalf.
Helms, by opposing King, is
resisting the changing of America
into a truly free country. The King
holiday is not only an honor for
the man, but the remembrance of
an era, and more importantly, of
principles of equality for all people
for which this country stands. For
far too many years, we have been a
de facto racist country. Now, just
as that chapter of our history is
about to be closed, our senator is
trying o turn back the pages of
time.
So, it seems we as North Caroli-
nians must carry a common
burden: Jesse Helms is our
senator. From Maine to Oregon,
people associate North Carolina
with our men in the Senate. Mr.
Helms and our distinguished alum
Mr. East are making us the
laughingstock of the nation. We
are embarrassed to admit we live in
this state, and we're mad that we
have ta be. Let's remember what
Sen. Helms has done when we go
to the polls next year.
Hello Havana
The EPA warned Tuesday that a
warming of the Earth known as the
"greenhouse effect" would pro-
duce major changes in the climate
around the world. New York City,
they say, will turn into Daytona
Beach. We are against this, and
feel the Reagan Administration
should do something about it.
We like things the way they are.
And besides, if New York turns in-
to Florida, then that means Green-
ville will become Havana. Havana
isn't a nice place to live, consider-
ing they're communist and all. So,
we urge the president and all his
science advisors to get on the ball
and straighten this tempaturc mess
out. We know its not his fault. We
realize what the past administra-
tions have done.
We recommend first to stop all
pollution. Scientists tell us that its
the culprit. So Ronnie, you better
get on it or shuffle off to Buffalo
in your Bermuda shorts with the
Cubans on your tail.
Oh yeah, and while your at it
Ronnie, bring some ice. The
refreshments get hot real easy here.
FALL &��. 7" �TC O
H�M.
��
College Press Service
IS HrmYnGUReDan'HCWTOCURfcWlMSOHMlA.J USfeN
totwsof my wm&ww&if)V�
U. S. Demands Free Press
By GREG RIDEOUT
Every so often there comes a time
when freedom of the press must be
defined and defended. People on cam-
pus seem to forget that we live in a
democracy where the right to express
one's opinions is protected by the Con-
stitution. Someday, those students
whose opinion is now the majority might
find themselves in the minority, and
then, to be sure, they'll remember that
Thomas Jefferson once said it is better
to have a free press than a government.
A completely free press is a rarity in
the world; we are one of the few coun-
tries that enjoy such a privilege. The
media in America is allowed to question
everyone one and everything from the
county supervisor to the president. My
definition of a free press is very simple:
The right of a newspaper to print what it
wants. Of course, there are qualifica-
tions and journalistic guidelines that
must be followed, but the heart of the
matter is the right to have a newspaper
unrestricted by the state.
We at The East Carolinian believe
very strongly that every student on cam-
pus has the right to express him or
herself via this newspaper. Staff
members are given the opportunity to
write columns and editorials expressing
their viewpoint on different situations.
The opinions of our staff range from no
PIRG to no military, and from stay in
Viewpoint
Campus Forum
Beirut to get out of Nicaragua. People
who are given space on the editorial page
have worked for that right.
Yet, as stated, each student on cam-
pus, as well as professors and staff
members, can criticize, praise or con-
demn the newspaper or the world by
writing a letter to the Campus Forum.
There are rules for the forum, just as
there are rules for staff written
editorials. But. there is not one rule a lot
of people think we should have: censor-
ship. We will not edit anyone's opinion,
no matter how crazy or weird.
We who go to the nation's universities
and colleges are tomorrow's leaders of
the free world. We should look at dis-
sent with the attitude it should be pro-
tected rather than persecuted. If history
has taught us one thing, it is that we
should question our institutions, for
even if they have done no wrong, at least
we will know that one thing.
These notions that embody the
essence of American thinking on a free
press in the end enable me to do what I
am doing at this very moment. The right
to question, probe and print enables The
East Carolinian to find out what the ad-
ministration is spending your student
dollar on. Freedom of the press is one
reason students of the '80s are allowed
to voice opinions on university activities.
The clamor by many students for a
restriction of the opinions of this
newspaper will never be heard. I only
wish to say one thing: Please, by all
means, disagree with but don't try to
silence- tho�f who ttifftrr from yoct. Ttrn,
are to many people in higher positions
than you who want to curtail the press's
freedom. I hope, and hope you hope,
they don't succeed.
Cadet Speaks On Freedom
I would like to do something many
people have the impression cadets have
no right to do: voice my opinion. Mind
you, this is a cadet's and not Air Force
policy being quoted. It deals with a
broad subject that can narrowly be
defined as freedom. One POW from
the Vietnam War was quoted "you can
never know how truly valuable
freedom is until you have it taken from
you
Individual freedom of speech is very
important, and never had this become
more evident to me until this past week
when I witnessed a protestor on cam-
pus next to a Marine Recruiting team.
The protestor was displaying his disap-
proval of the government and more
specifically, the Marines' involvement
in the Middle East and Central
America.
After attempting to conduct a civiliz-
ed, intellectual conversation with the
man, I noted a sense of hostility com-
ing from him (perhaps my AFROTC
uniform was the catalyst). He began to
rapidly recite his well rehearsed lines,
typical of protestors anywhere. Unfor-
tunately, I had the responsibility of at-
tending classes, so I was forced to
leave. I left with an uneasy feeling.
Something just did not seem right, but
it was not until later that I was able to
put my finger on the irony.
What bothered me was the fact that
this man was protesting the military in-
stitution which enabled him to exercise
his freedom of speech and peaceful
demonstration. The contrast was made
clear; the military, represented by the
recruiting team who devoted their lives
to the ideals of our country (that of
freedom and equality), and the pro-
testor having nothing but contradic-
tory statements about our government
and the military which maintains his
freedoms. Maybe when that freedom is
offered and insured to all in Central
America and the Middle East, then we
can bring our boys home. I am sure
they would be as eager as the protestors
to be out of hostile environments and
home to a country insured of freedom.
I pray that no one tries to stop the
protestors from utilizing their right to
freedom of speech. These people are an
important link u? our democratic cycle
of existence. I myself plan to devote a
lifetime to the protection of the
freedoms that our government (of the
people, by the people and for the peo-
ple) has given us. I feel fortunate that I
was able to figure out the irony of my
encounter, and thanks to that one pro-
testor, I have found even more mean-
ing and incentive for my career and
life.
The next time you see a demonstra-
tion occurring in the United States,
whether you agree or disagree with
what is being said, remember this: the
message of freedom is being expressed
and also what the cost of that freedom
has been, then thank God that your
freedom does not have to be given up
to appreciate it. Or does it?
Daniel J. Monahan
AFROTC Cadet
Protesting O'Neill
I write in protest and criticism of the
editorial by Staff Writer Patrick
O'Neill on Oct. 13. I have rarely read
an article so biased against the
military; its statements reveal not only
a strong leftward bias but also an ap-
palling ignorance of the very institu-
tion that Mr. O'Neill so vehemently
damns.
To begin with, it is simply not true
that AROTC cadets "often walk
around in almost full combat gear
The typical dress of these cadets is the
same worn by active-duty soldiers on
peace-time base duty. Surely Mr.
O'Neill does not think that soldiers on
barracks-policing (i.e cleaning-up)
duty wear dress blue uniforms! Only
once have I seen a cadet in anything
resembling combat dress, and even
then he was only wearing a helmet and
(empty) cartridge belt.
Aside from inaccuracies in matters
of dress, Mr. O'Neill makes some un-
founded � and shocking � inferences
about Ai. .y ROTC, and about the
American military man in general.
First of all, he casts aspersions upon
the motives of the cadets by suggesting
that, by "defending American prin-
ciples they mean imposing the
United States' will upon a weaker na-
tion. While there is not time to delve
into the intricacies of the Central
American situation here, permit me to
say that Mr. O'Neill's implication is ut-
ter bull.
Second, Mr. O'Neill claims that
ROTC implants "blind obedience to
authority" and implies that the typical
order of an American military officer
is akin to one given by a Nazi SS of-
ficer or a Soviet officer. I find this ut-
terly insulting to the whole of the U.S.
Armed Forces. He also says that
ROTC-provided leadership is "void of
moral guidance And he claims that
cadets are "brainwashed If this is so,
how does he explain the many ROTC
cadets who turned against the Vietnam
War?
I suggest that before Mr. O'Neill
writes anything more on ROTC, he sit
down and have good, long, penetrating
talks with the people in question. I also
sugget that he sit down and read a basic
work on American military history.
Joe Admire
Once More
Patrick O'Neill has once again made
a laughing stock of himself among the
more knowledgeable people on cam-
pus. When I say, "knowledgeable I
am referring to the people who choose
to deal with the realities of this world
and not some Utopian dreamland that
we will never see. At least, not in our
lifetimes.
Yes, it is sad that the world we live in
is not a peaceful one. I am sure that if
everyone in this world thought the
same way that Mr. O'Neill does, then
we wouldn't have anything to worry
about. But the simple fact is that they
don't. I'm sure the Russians didn't
think about peace being "the way"
when they invaded Afghanistan and
especially when they shot down flight
007 killing everyone on board.
A standing army is vital to the
security of this country. In order to
have a standing army, that army must
have leaders. The kind of leaders that
military academies and ROTC
detachments help to create; good,
responsible ones.
Besides the fact that Mr. O'Neill
isn't even a student at this university,
he should be damn thankful that there
are "brainwashed, narrow-minded"
cadets willing to lay down their lives in
order to protect his right to make such
asinine statements. Freedom is a fragil
privilege which must be protected at all
costs. It is a shame that some people
tend to abuse it quite a bit. Patrick,
you don't know just how lucky you
are.
EricTiliey
Junior, Political Science
Chancellor Horn
Returns To Wor
Chancellor John
Howell reports that
his recent surgery to
remove a growth
known as a polyp was
"painless" and that
he came back to work
in his office Mondav
Howell had the
benign polyp removed
Oct. 3 and spent
about one week
rccouperating and
conducting his work
from his Fifth Street
home. "I have not
really had much pain
from this Howell
said Wednesday "I
don't jump around
any
Howell did
that he occassi
feels "washed
and is tmng
easily than usul
as a little 1
with paperw
Howe said
I'm about cau$
with it right no
He credited
surgeons ii
School of M
for their
painless"
"I looked
o b 11 u a r
every night
name's not
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?





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1983
KIA.J LISRH
GOTDBep
Press
row's leaders of
A uld look at dis-
k i! should be pro-
secuted. If history
ng it is that we
istitutions, for
Aong. at least
rhi no
embody the
thinking on a free
. � me to do what I
� moment. The right
e and print enables The
-uan to find out uhat the ad-
pendmg your student
eedom ot the press is one
the '80s are allowed
university activities.
- b) many students for a
he opinions of this
tkx Aili never be heard. I only
sa one thing: Please, by all
disagree with but don'v try to
tK ,m V�o d��� ����� v��- ���
many people in higher positions
a ho want to curtail the press's
I hope, and hope you hope,
cceed.
dom
ovict officer. I find this ut-
sulting to the whole of the U.S.
Forces. He also says that
rovided leadership is "void of
f lance And he claims that
�'brainwashed If this is so,
5 he explain the many ROTC
I ho turned against the Vietnam
I i efore Mr. O'Neill
E thing more on ROTC, he sit
ind have good, long, penetrating
th the people in question. I also
ne sit down and read a basic
.an military history.
Joe Admire
Once More
:ici 0 Neill has once again made
hing stock of himself among the
knowledgeable people on cam-
hen I say, "knowledgeable I
ferring to the people who choose
i th the realities of this world
ome Utopian dreamland that
til never see At least, not in our
ies
it is sad that the world we live in
a peaceful one. I am sure that if
one in this world thought the
way that Mr. O'Neill does, then
wouldn't have anything to worry
It. But the simple fact is that they
I'm sure the Russians didn't
about peace being "the way"
they invaded Afghanistan and
rially when they shot down flight
kiiling everyone on board.
A standing army is vital to the
jnty of this country. In order to
a standing army, that army must
leaders. The kind of leaders that
tary academies and ROTC
:hments help to create; good,
msible ones.
iides the fact that Mr. O'Neill
even a student at this university,
lould be damn thankful that there
brainwashed, narrow-minded"
tts willing to lay down their lives in
pr to protect his right to make such
ine statements. Freedom is a fragil
hiege which must be protected at all
Is. It is a shame that some people
to abuse it quite a bit. Patrick,
don't know just how lucky you
Eric Tilley
Junior, Political Science
Chancellor Howell
Returns To Work
Chancellor John
Howell reports that
his recent surgery to
remove a growth
known as a polyp was
"painless" and that
he came back to work
in his office Monday.
Howell had the
benign polyp removed
Oct. 3 and spent
about one week
recouperating and
conducting his work
from his Fifth Street
home. "1 have not
really had much pain
from this Howell
said Wednesday. "I
don't jump around
any
Howell did admit
that he occasionally
feels "washed out"
and is tiring more
easily than usual. "1
was a little behind
with paperwork
Howell said. "But
I'm about caught up
with it right now
He credited the
surgeons in the ECU
School of Medicine
for their "fairly
painless" treatment.
"I looked at the
obituary column
every night and my
name's not in it
SERVICE
610Gre�nv,lieBId
PLAZA
24 hour Towing Service
U-Haul Rentals
pilable
I
STEAK HOUSE
LUNCH SPECIALS
$2.50 and Under
CHECK OUT OUR
DINNER SPECIALS
Try our New Fruit Bar
aad Improved Salad Bar
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd 7 54-0040
2903 E. 10th St. 752711
Organizers Think Big
John Howell
Local organizers
are hoping that 50-100
Greenville residents
and ECU students will
participate in Satur-
day's anti-nuclear ral-
ly in Raleigh. Among
the speakers is former
N.C. State University
Chancellor John
Caldwell. He will be
joining seven others
before the group
begins a march to the
state capital.
The event, billed as
a "March on
Raleigh is designed
to coincide with other
Oct. 22 demonstra-
tions throughout the
world opposing the
deployment of cruise
and Pershing II
missiles in Western
Europe.
The Raleigh even
was organized by the
North Carolina Peace
Network, an
amalgamation of
more than ISO peace,
religious and political
organizations
"We're really hop-
ing for a big
turnout said ECU
English teacher Edith
Webber, one of the
organizers of the local
contingent. "We want
to bring the message
'North Carolinians
want peace' to our
leaders
SRA Homecoming Dance
The SGA will sponsor a homecoming dance for all
residence hall students on Saturday, Oct. 29. The dance
will be held at the Ramada Inn, Highway 264, from 8
p.m. to 1 a.m.
Tickets will cost $1 with an SRA card and $3 without
one. Food and beverages will be catered by the Ramada
Inn, and music will be provided by the Elbo Room.
Mark Niewald, president of the SRA, said that the
transit buses will run on the hour from Ramada Inn to
main campus. "We hope that the dance will benefit a lot
of students and start a trend toward more student in-
volvement with campus organizations he said.
PAPA KATZ
Your Adult Entertainment Center
Presents
Thurs. "The Fantastic
Shakers"
Doors open: 8:30
Band Starts 9:30
Members Free till 9:30
&4
i.

A
yi
ul
tl� " n�
I
at. John Moore's Beach Party
Lady Members Free All Night
H. H. till 9:30
MAKE TRACKSF0RTHE
BEST EATMALL AROUND!
The next time you stop by for the Best Eatiri,u bring
along this money-savin' coupon.
" "sTElHSEefBTscuifM
0MH6E JUICE $1.29
I
I Please present this coupon before ordering One coupon per customer per I
visit, please Customer must paY any sales ta� due This coupon not good in I
I combination ith any other offers Offer good during regular breakfast hours .
only at participating Hardee s Restaurants a a a f
through May 31 1984 iHHViPP C
'iiSuuyMw'sMomm kbuuuI
I HUES i MEDIUM SOFT MM S1 78
I
I
Please present this coupon before ordering One coupon per customer, per
visit, please Customer must pay any sales tax due This coupon not good m
combination with any other offers Offer good after 10 30 AM only at
participating Hardee s Restaurants through
May 3V 1984
1383 Hardee -
ttadeer
i
i
9ot, Cct 2Zij9: SCAH'A X
STUDENT UNION MAJOR ATTRACTIONS
COMMITTEE
t&P6CK3 .90X
1A&CMS .101.00



�aataaMM�M�M�Mi�im�������� presents
� A HOMECOMING SPECTACULAR
�a4MF t�
Ii
t CHARLIE DANIELS BAND J
mm
Combination Special
Trout, Shrimp, Deviled Crab
$3.99
AND
MARSHALL TUCKER






���.��
IF THERE'S LEADERSHIP
IN YOU. OCS
CAN BRING IT OUT
OCS (Arms Officer Candidate School
is , 14-week challenge to all that s in you the
mental, the physical, the spirit that are part ot
what makes a leader . ,
If OCS were easv. it couldn t do the 10b It
wouldn't bring out the leader in you. or help you
discover what you have inside
But when you finish and graduate as a com-
missioned officer in the Army, you'll know You'll
know you have what it takes to lead And you 11 be
mm. alert, fit. and ready to exercise the leadership
skilk that civilian companies look for
If you e about to get vour degree and you
want to develop your leadership ability, take the
OCS challenge
Call your local Army Recruiter, and ask
about OCS
If Tlm'i LuiiiiMp !� Yo�,
OCS Cm Mag It Oat.
�c Shrimp Lovers �
TJ5 whytravel 10� miies to th
0 beach and pay high prices
family Restaurants for fresh shrimp
AWNAIJOFAMEAL "

FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28,1983
8:00 P.
MINGES COLLISEUM
laierrfewi At Btaxto Heeot
QctKbf wlJtAM-WPM
Or Col Cp. Monta TSUMo
ARMIBEALLYOUCAN
wim








I ECU STUDENTS: $9.00 NON-STUDENTS: $10.00 J
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR: $10.00
f2


� Tickets available Central Ticket Office, October 14, 1983
P until sell out!
TUES WED THURS. tfc
Banquet Facilities Available A lit
�fcwi�R Tickets also available at Both
Record Bars in Greenville and Apple Records.
Tarlanding seafood
is offering a special
Combination Special
Trout, Shrimp, Deviled Crab
$3.99
i
I
m ���. �
4 11
mujK,tmm,
P





THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 20, 1983
Candidates For '83
Ho
Cisi Bolton
Tennis Team
Lisa Burgwyn
Sigma Sigma Sigma
Elizabeth Carson
Slay Dorm
i Iff J,
Angela Cash
Clement Dorm
Sandra Caskey
Umstead Dorm
Jennifer Cooper
Varsity Cheerleader
f
41

Amv Cox
Inter Fra-
Carmen Huriey
Scott Dorm
Tv.er Dorm
Cotten Dorm
Sherri Jourden
Alpha Omicron Pi
Ms SOULS
Pat Kingston
National An Educators Assn
Kathv Marshbum
.Ambassadors
Tina Pilati
DeKa Zeta
Cindy Pleasants
The East Carolinian, Photo Lab,
Buccaneer, WZMB
II a
Terri Reeves
Alpha Phi
Betsy Rivenbark
Clothing&Textiles Assn.
Alpha Xi Delta
Man Ann Sandell
Lambda Chj Alpha
Donna Sanderson
Medical Record Science
Saturday Homecoming Events For Alumni
Alumni Coffee Hour And Open House � TaylorSlaughter Alumni Center, 901 East
Fifth Street, at 9 a.m.
Campus-Wide Open House � 9 a.m. to 12:30p.m.
Art Exhibition � Gray Gallery
Cross-Campus Run � The Department of Intramural-Recreational Services is sponsor-
ing a cross-campus run. Both a 2.5 and a 5 mile run will be held with the races starting
beside Bunting Track. Various categories will be established and all ECU faculty, staff,
students and alumni are encouraged to participate. Starts at 9 a.m. call 757-6387.
Homecoming Parade � Theme is "A Pirate's Keepsake: Years To Treasure Fifth
Street, starting at 10 a.m.
Alumni Awards Luncheon � Minges Coliseum. The Outstanding Alumni Awards will
be presented at this occasion. Reservations at $7.50 per person are necessary.
Homecoming Tailgate Party � Ficklen Stadium parking lot off Charles Street, adjacent
to Harrington Baseball Field. First 300 people will receive special "tailgate" packages.
Come, bring your picnic and enjoy the fun.
Football Game � ECU Pirates vs. the Buccaneers of East Tennessee State University in
Ficklen Stadium. Starts at 2 p.m.
Traditional Alumni "Keg" Social � Greenville Moose Lodge, highway 264 at West
End. Admission is $2 per person. Entertainment will be provided by the "Monitors, "5-7
p.m.
Jazz Concert � Wright Auditorium. Featuring Loonis McGlohon (ECU '43), his trio
and vocalist Marlene Ver Planck. Admission is $3 for alumni, faculty and staff, $4 for the
general public, and $1 for students. Call the Central Ticket Office, 757-6611.
Band Day Contest � along with an exhibition by the Marching Pirates. Ficklen
Stadium, right after the football game. Admission is $1.
ECTC Club Banquet � Holiday Inn.
Carol Tait
Gamma Sigma Sigma
Pamela Wynn
Angel Flight
Pan Young
Softball Team
Special Events For Black Alumni
Friday, October 28
Friday, October 28
Saturday, October 29
Saturday, October 29
Saturday, October 29


Sunday, October 30
Wine and cheese at the Ledonia Wright Afro-American
Cultural Center
Greek Block Show
Eye opener (coffee and doughnuts) at 1801 East Fifth
Street
Brunch at 1810 East Tenth Street
Black Ahimni Dance at the Hobday Inn
Worship Hour with the ECU Gospel EnsemWe
Be sure t
football
Tennesse'
Pirates t
victory!
And be sun
around for
Band Day
after the g;
featuring �
Marching
-�&�.��





r '83
THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 20. 1983
Jennifer Cooper
scrr leader
N
Homecoming Pirate
i
1

Amy Cox
Inter Fraternity Council
Russell Ebelherr
Jones Dorm
"I
Lory Fernandez
J.V. Cheerleader
Sandy Gideons
Volleyball Team
Alpha Delta Pi
Jon Greif
Jarvu Dorm
Pat Kingston
X" tducators .Assn.
Kathy Marshburn
Ambassadors
Pamela McGimpsey
White Dorm
Michelle Mauldin
Fletcher Dorm
Gail Monroe
The Ebony HeraJd
Susan Moore
Kappa Delta
Fleming Dorm
Marv Ann Sandell
Lambda Chi Alpha
Donna Sanderson
Medical Record Science
Anne Shaw
Gamma Beta Phi
Na

Susan Thomas
Baptist Student Union
� Mm.
Jeanette Villines
Greene Dorm
Laura White
Chi Omega
Ddoroes Worthingtou
Aycock Dorm
Pam Young
Softball Team
lumni
Ionia Wright Afro-American
mghnuts) at 1801 East Fifth
Street
i
fe Holiday Inn
J Gospd Ensemble
Vote For Your Favorite!
Be sure to get your tickets for the
football game against East
Tennessee State Cheer on the
Pirates to another Homecoming
victory!
And be sure to stay-
around for the
Band Day contest
after the game,
featuring the
Marching Pirates.
I. II �� � I .I
i ii � .O "
��"�- 4Mfr�T' - �

i





THh HAST CAROL INJAN
Style
OCTOBER 20. 1983
Page 8
'Heads' Concert Not Worth Talking About
OARY PATTIKSOM � PI Lst
'Burning Down The House9
Daid Bvrne
Auditorium.
sings to the thousands of fans in C armichae!
By GARY PATTERSON
Staff Witt
The Talking Heads made their
first appearance in North
Carolina last Thursday night
; before a crowd of more than
1 9,000 fans at UNC's Carmichael
Auditorum. The nine-member en-
tourage began their show on time
in what was expected to be the
highlight of UNC's fall concert
lineup. Yet, sound problems, and
a total lack of crowd control mar-
red the band's talent and pefor-
mance.
Like an unfolding documen-
tary, David Byrne & Co. slowly
emerged one instrument at a time,
each given a moment to command
the spotlight. At 8 p.m. the stage
was still bare except for the
speaker columns to each side.
Byrne walked to the microphone
carrying an acoustic guitar and a
portable cassette player. With the
tape sputtering out some jungle
rhythm, Byrne accompanied it on
guitar for the entire first song.
Then wife and bassist Tina
Weymouth joined Byrne on the
second tune.
During this number, the roadies
began to wheel out the drums that
Chris Frantz played. Jerry Har-
rison walked on to play a guitar
and Frantz climbed aboard the
drum set. For the four original
members of the Talking Heads, it
was their first trip ever to North
Carolina, and they played a splen-
did oldie that had most of the
crowd dancing along.
Yet the core of the popular
group played only one song
together; most of the show was
devoted to premoting the Speak-
ing in Tongues album that is cur-
rently in fifth place on the Rolling
Stone record review. While
Speaking has already gone
platinum (their first) it wasn't too
long ago that the Talking Heads
were lucky to muster up 100,000
sales.
It is only recently that record
listeners have caught on to
Byrne's mixing of African
rhythm, Funk, and Rock into a
sound, that is quite original, and
uncopied in today's overnight
wonder music industry. Yet, if the
Talking Heads are a sucessful pro-
totype, there surely will be more
of their sound to appear on the air
waves from different artists.
After the four finished their
hero's welcome, the guest artists
appeared: Ednah Holt and Lynn
Mabry, backing vocalists; Bernie
Worrell-keyboards; Steve Scales-
Percussion, and Alex Weir-guitar.
Each artist emerged to render a
solo portion of a song. At this
midway point in the section there
were nine Talking Heads on stage.
It was also at this point that the
sound mixing became eratic.
Weymouth's bass and Byrne's
voice were so loud that the other
instruments came off as a
whimper in the background.
"Burning Down the House"
sounded like it was playing on an
old 8-track player with one
speaker missing. After "House
the band left for intermission and
we hoped for better sound in the
second and final set. This was not
the case as the reproduction
became worse. Byrne's
microphone seemed to be on full
reverb, ruining the impact of their
popular songs that are so crisp on
the new album, in particular,
"Slippery People"
and"Swamp In fact the only
good renditions in the second set
were "Take Me to the River
and "This Must Be the Place
The sound in the center of Car
michael Auditorum was as
mediocre as in the corners. While
the Talking Heads produced a lot
of anticipatory excitement before
the show, afterwards the $7.99
album seemed a much better pro-
duct that than the $10.50 concert
ticket.
OAKY PATTIRSON
UNC Camp
The Talking Heads along with some guest artist, try to put on a big performance despite conditions.
Was
B GARY PATTERSON
Miff W rtter
The general admission tickets to
the Talking Heads concert sold
out early this month. Yet, neither
Carmichael Auditorium
authorities, nor UNC campus
police did little to prevent a
dangerous situation from occurr-
ing at last Thursday night's show.
Ticket holders began their vigil
outside Carmichael's doors at
about 5 p.m. in anticipation of the
8 p.m. concert. By 7 p.m. the
crowd was in excess of 4,000 peo-
ple. The crush had already begun.
However, the UNC police force
neglected to alleviate the problem
outside the gates, opting to con-
trol the auto traffic instead.
At 7:30, when the doors did
open, the thrust of the crowd
forced the wind out of several
fans and left them visibly shaken.
Shoes and pieces of clothing out-
side the entrance were grizzly
reminders to the 1977 Who con-
cert in Cincinnati, where 11 died.
Inside the auditorum only two
policemen were visible, both pro-
tecting the stage wings. No aisle
security was provided. Once the
choice seats were filled, people
began to sit or stand in the aisles
(fire code violation). Shortly
thereafter the exits were blocked
with SRO fans (fire code viola-
tion).
On the floor the situation was
worse. There was no quota
system; it was left to the crowd to
decide just how many bodies
could squeeze into the space. At
times the whole mass could be
seen swaying back and forth like
palm trees in a breeze. On four oc-
casions during the show, the
crowd was asked to back up. This
stop-gap measure did little to
lessen the pressure or the heat on
more than 3.000 fans in front of
the stage.
During the seconu set, one
female crawled onto the stage.
Not to reach David Byrne, but to
reach freedom from the crush at
the front row. Two stage hands
carried the limp, exhausted girl to
the aid station.
Looking back, UNC and the
powers that be at Carmichael
Auditorum were lucky � VERY
LUCKY � that the situation
didn't become a tragic one. Any
kind of fire would have spelled
disaster as the bodies would have
piled up in the exits where fns
were standing to watch. Had there
been a fight or stabbing on the
floor � how quickly could the
police (who were not visible) have
responded? Had someone collaps-
ed � how quickly could a medical
team get through the crowd to
reach them?
It is unfortunate that it takes a
tragedy like the Who concert to
bring change to the system. Why
was the concert sold on a totally
festival basis? Why wasn't the
aisles and exits kept clear? A sim-
ple solution would have been to
reserve the semts and sell gcncrml
admission to the floor. This ar-
rangement would abide by the
state fire and safety codes.
Although the typical concert-goer
is unjustly protrayed as a drug-
crazed hippie, there are a great
many of us that would like to en-
joy the show in a safe and sane en-
vironment. It is unclear at this
point how future concerts will be
handled at the Carmichael, but
there is no doubt that all parties
involved were extrememlv luck v.
Have A Nice Day
k
The Chi Omega sorority pledges distribute balloons as one of their philanthropies given throughout the semester. Here, Laura White
and Carole Dvkstra five balloons to students wishing them a nice day.
'Rockinhorse' Plays
For Opry House
By ROBIN AYERS
�MNMMi
A versatile band Rockinhorse
played the Carolina Opry House
Friday and Saturday nights for
those who stayed in the Greenville
area during fall break.
The five member band can play
country or rock music, depending
on the style a club wants to hear.
The rule at the Opry House is
country and Rockinhorse pleased
a medium sized crowd.
This quintet is made up of
North Carolina natives; their wit
and humor is a part of the country
of which they belong.
Rockinhorse features three
guitarists who can alternate bet-
ween electric and six string
guitars. Al "Johnny Rex" Sim-
mons, Den Overman and Hal
"Doc" Smith play guitar in addi-
tion to singing. Dean and Al carry
most of the lead vocals.
Rhythm is provided by percus-
sionist Mike Hawley ("He plavs
drums too says Doc), and
bassist Scott Slack. Yes, they tell
me this is his real name. With the
exception of having various drum-
mers, Rockinhorse has maintain-
ed the same musicians for almost
five years.
Recently Rockinhorse won the
state Wrangler-Dodge Truck
Country Showdown, held about
three weeks ago at the Dixie
Classic Fair in Winston-Salem.
Beginning with district competi-
tion, the band progressed until it
had succeeded through three
levels in the state finals. This Siler
City band won the $1000 cash
prize.
In addition, Rockinhorse
received, as winneiS, the use of a
1984 customized van for one year
See ROCKINHORSE, Page 9
Acting Auditions Begin
Today For Next Play
Acting auditions for the East
Carolina Playhouse production of
David Rimmer's Off-Broadway
hit Album, will be held Thursday
and Friday, October 20 and 21, in
the Messick Theatre Arts Center.
The auditions will begin at 7:30
p.m. each evening in room 206.
Album is a rueful, perceptive
comedy about coming-of-age in
the turbulent early 1960's. Begin-
ning in 1963, when the innocent,
sunny sounds of the Beach Boys
became the anthems of youth,
Album follows the maturation of
four typical teenagers through
their high school years.
There arc four roles open for
casting, two men and two women
PUy scripts are available in the
o JoCT Librar r�ctvc
Room. Album will be the second
major production of the ECU
Playhouse season, and is schedul-
�d for performances on December
Ik t i? 6 m McGiMus Theatre.
ECU students, faculty, staff and
yg.1 tre all invited to
�udmon For further informa-
tion, call 757-6390.
i
Roc
Cont'd from par
The trip to Nashville's
Grand Oie Opry for
the national fir
also paid for The
finals will be he;
November
51 acts from
the United State-
compete for one
ten fmalisu
The grand p i
$50,000 and a re.
ding contra �
Dodge
schedule of 25
certs (as represen-
tatives of Wra
Dodge 7u �
also be aw a;
national win-
In
Rockinhorse
"smash'
original s .
four
"Somewhere D
Texas" is de
a tribute to Tea
most t
makes who
song: "The r
forever Ee: �
401 S. EVANS
iMARMOSY HOUSE
YOURPROFEsi
BUYING
LOANS
T � s i
Stereos gu"s 9-
retriererors dorm size on
iy �Mm games & CM
tf iflflti power toot
m u T c � i n . n. �n1
nvc'3i�a.e o.ens dec
f�:0f'i DicvOes ana
�n -9 e'se of �����
So - c - �
ioci'ed 0 Es See
Mwntown '53 2
Sam's Lock
And Ke Shoppt
757-00
18U4 Dtckinsen ive.
(across from Pepsi
Plant)
h
( ompiete
tnendly Sen
(she as form
with Forrest I . -
and ke � -
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KhSKARCH PAPERS
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m






THE EAST CAROHNIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1983
1983
Page I
About
rie case as the reproduction
- cv a m e worse. Byrne's
nicrophone seemed to be on full
.verb, ruining the impact of their
popular songs that are so crisp on
I neu album, in particular,
Slippery People"
u Swamp" In fact the only
L od renditions in the second set
Iwere Take Me to the River
and "This Must Be the Place
The sound in the center of Car-
.chael Auditorum was as
ediocre as in the corners. While
p Talking Heads produced a lot
anticipatory excitement before
show, afterwards the $7.99
Ibum seerred a much better pro-
�i I that than the $10.50 concert
l. et
�of. .
V
OA�Y PATTttJON - 0H Lab
ormance despite condition).
ky
sies and exits kept clear? A sim-
e solution would have been to
?s-T"s'� �� ��ts and �e general
lmmion to the floor. This ar-
jgemem would abide by the
Ite fire and safety codes,
khough the typical concert-goer
unjustly protrayed as a drug-
zed hippie, there are a great
I f us that would like to en-
k the show in a safe and sane en-
fonment. It is unclear at this
int how future concerts will be
idled at the Carmichael, but
fcre is no doubt that all parties
rolved were extrememly lucky.
seJ Plays
ouse
Ihythm is provided bv percus-
nist Mike Hawley ("He plays
ims too says Doc), and
ssist Scott Slack. Yes, thev tell
this is his real name. With the
peption of having various drum-
p, Rockinhorse has maintain-
Jthe same musicians for almost
e years
tecently Rockinhorse won the
te Wrangler-Dodge Truck
junto Showdown, held about
ee weeks ago at the Dixie
ssic Fair in Winston-Salem.
jinning with district competi-
1, the band progressed until it
succeeded through three
els in the state finals. This Siler
band won the $1000 cash
ze
in addition, Rockinhorse
eived, as winners, the use of a
' customized van for one year.
ROCKINHORSE, Page 9
ons Begin
vet Play
typical teenagers through
I high school years.
f here are four roles open for
ting, two men and two women
y scripts are available in the
I Joyner Library Reserve
m. Album will be the second
3or production of the ECU
lyhouse season, and is schedul-
er performances on December
5 and 6 in McGinnis Theatre
' st"dcnts, faculty, staff and
residents are all invited to
won For further informa-
�. call 757-6390.
Rockinhorse Becomes A Full Time Band
Cont'd from page 8
The trip to Nashville's
j Grand Ole Opry for
the national finals is
also paid for. The
i finals will be held in
November.
51 acts from across
the United States will
compete for one of
ten finalists' places.
The grand prize is
$50,000 and a recor-
ding contract. A 1984
Dodge van and a
schedule of 25 con-
certs (as represen-
tatives of Wrangler
Dodge Truck) will
also be awarded the
national winnners.
In Nashville,
Rockinhorse will
"smash" three
original songs into
four minutes.
"Somewhere Down in
Texas" is described as
a tribute to Texas that
most every band
makes who writes a
song: "The rivers run
foreverEverv man is
freeSomewhere
down in TexasIs
where 1 wanna be
"Sticks and
Stones" and "Only
Love For You the
other songs to be per-
formed in Nashville,
were played for the
Opry House Friday
night. Both songs
were described by the
group as a "cry in
your beer slow song
and "up tempo
bluegrass respec-
tively. Dean Overman
and Doc Smith sing
harmony in each
song. "Only Love For
Me" featues a rolling
guitar melody that
reminds one of
Waylon Jennings.
In four years of
touring North
Carolina and South
Carolina,
Rockinhorse has per-
formed on the same
stage as Jerry Lee
Lewis, Delbert Mc-
Clinton, and Nitty
Gritty Dirt Band.
Rockinhorse has
played the Opry
House several times in
the past, each time the
crowd growing visibly
larger.
For the first time
members
How do they do it?
"We've got their
address and we know
where their children
go to school
In Rockinhorse's
Friday night, beginning, Al Sim
Rockinhorse perform- mons said, "We were
singer. Dean came
with a bluegrass
background said
Doc.
"We did nothing
but original stuff,
which didn't get us
far. We started learn-
ed a new song in
public called "Coun-
try Is As Country
Does Doc describes
it as a basic country
song with the basic
cliches. He's right:
"You'll never
be the man
your mother
was
Country is as
country does
Doc Smith is unof-
ficial spokesman and
chief entertainer. He
hams it up on stage to
get the audience go-
ing, and off stage to
get anyone going
who's listening.
Asked about the
longevity of the band,
Doc saidIt's hard to
keep the same
ing covers because we
trying to put together couldn't get by play-
a rock Top-Forty ing originals. As you
band. We had trouble get established you
can throw in original
songs he added.
The beginning of
Rockinhorse's career
started with gigs at
hosiery mills and
Thursday afternoons
at
clubs. Rockinhorse
feels that it is making
headway. For exam-
ple Doc said, "A year
ago we didn't come
off stage with 2,000
people wanting our
getting people to be
consistent (as far as
being dedicated)
Doc joined with a
background in folk
music.
"The band started
looking for a drum-
mer "We hit the
big time getting a
drummer. We needed
a drummer. Then we
were perceived as a
�real' band. We
started looking for a
autograph. We've
made slow progress
through the dips and
valleys
For a band that has
strictly been playing
weekends,
Rockinhorse has
come far. They were
once told, "If you're
not a full time band,
you're not good
enough to play
When asked about
their reception in
Greenville, Opry
House personnel pre-
sent, Doc said the au-
dience is great. But he
said, "The manage-
ment hassles you a
lot Chuckling, Doc
says, "See you,
Garg as the former
leaves the room.
Rockinhorse's
musicianship is strong
and stable. Vocals
could stand improve-
ment. For the first
part of the evening,
Al and Doc sounded
like they were warm-
ing up. It wasn't until
the end of the second
of three sets that they
began to show some
strength.
Rockinhorse per-
formed a double shot
of Alabama with
"Love in the First
Degree" and "Close
Enough I never
realized the close
resemblance of these
songs until they were
connected by a subtle
bridge arranged by
Rockinhorse. Dean
snad lead in each with
Al and Doc harmoniz-
ing. The songs were
admirably performed
but "Close
Enough's" Tin fall-
ing' vocal harmony
sequence left
something to be
desired. The quality
of a good three part
harmony was not pre-
sent.
Al sang a good lead
on Lynrd Skynrd's
"Sweet Home
Alabama" and "I
Know A Little
although the former
was slow for the spirit
of the song.
Rockinhorse is a
band that plays for
enjoyment but keeps
in mind that enjoy-
ment can make a nice
living. Doc said.
"We're going to starr
putting out self
produced forty-five's
next yearWe're
dedicated. We don't
want to play in bar.
all our life. We want
to be somebody
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
Emory Says Pirates Capable
Of Beating Top Florida Gators
By CINDY PLEASANTS
Spoftt Editor
East Carolina football coach
Ed Emory says he agrees that
Florida is deserving of its sixth-
place national ranking, but he
also says the Gators can be
beaten.
"We are capable of beating
Florida, if we play like we can
Emory said. "It we want it bad
enough, we can beat them. We're
gonna do everything in our power
to win. We feel like 90 percent of
the game is in our minds
Emory, who says he's already
"pumped up" to play at Florida's
homecoming game, is also being
realistic.
"The University of Florida is
the greatest challenge we've
faced he said. "They have some
of the finest athletes in America.
Their secondary players look like
linebackers
If the Pirates, now 5-1, are to
beat Florida, Emory said his
squad will have to be
overachievers.
"We've got to have more 'want
power' than Florida he said.
"But all of us have to want it, not
just Terry Long or Kevin Walker.
We've got to have 56 people who
want it
Emory said he believes the
Pirates will measure up to
Florida's lineup on Saturday.
"They won't line up any 11
athletes better than we will he
said. "They might have more
depth. Our kids will be prepared.
They'll know their Xs and Os, and
they'll know what Florida docs. I
guarantee you we'll outwork
them
Free safety Clint Harris, who
scored on a 74-yard interception
return to lead ECU to a 24-11 win
over Temple, said the defense will
have to be ready. "Their running
game has almost caught up with
their passing game Harris said
of Florida. "They're going to try
and run at us at First, and we're
gonna have to force them to
pass
Emory said Florida is better of-
fensively this year. "They get a lit-
tle conservative when they get
ahead he said. "But they have
the finest passer (quarterback
Wayne Peace) in the country
Peace completed 22 of 32 passes
for 214 yards and two
touchdwons during Florida's
29-10 win over Vanderbiit two
Saturdays ago. The Gators had an
open date this past week.
Although the Gators have had
two weeks to get ready for the
Pirates, Emory said he doesn't ex-
pect Florida to be overconfident.
"Charley Pell is too good of a
football coach to overlook East
Carolina Emory said. "He's
very defensive-minded, and he'll
want to win any day of the week
Emory said the Gators are po-
tent because they have so much
balance. "That's how they kill
you he said. "They're great
defensively, offensively and kick-
ing. We won't play against any
better talent than Florida
ECU's kicking game will also
have to be in order by gametime.
Sophomore Jeff Heath missed six
of seven field goal tries against
Temple, but Emory isnt worried
about Heath's ability to bounce
back.
"Because of the new turf (at
Philadelphia's Franklin Field),
the tee was three inches higher
rather than an inch Emory said.
"That gave Jeff problems and,
after he missed two or three, it
was all mental. He's too great a
kicker to have that problem
Junior fullback Reggie Branch,
who is from Sanford, Fla said
the Pirates' offense will have to
continue the stride it has set so far
this year.
Quarterback Kevin Ingram
"has got to keep on passing and
throwing like he has Branch
said. "We (the backs) have got to
keep on running and play with
unity. Unity is the key
Branch, whose birthday is
Saturday, knows exactly how he
wants to celebrate it. "Beating
Florida would be the best birthday
present in the world he said.
Although East Carolina has been
relatively free of injuries this year,
one of its coaches has managed to
get hurt without donning a
uniform.
Defensive coordinator Tom
Throckmorton suffered a knee in-
jury on the sidelines during the
Pirates' win over Temple. The
coach suffered torn ligaments
when his headset got twisted
around his ankle and was jerked
accidentally, throwing him to the
ground.
Throckmorton is in a walking
cast this week and may need
surgery. It isn't known whether he
will attend Saturday's game at
Florida.

icu
STAMLIY LBASY
ECL's Clint Harris said the defense is going to have to force the
Gators to pass if they're going to win on Saturday.
Bucs 'Most Underrated Team In Nation ?'
GAINESVILLE, Fla. (UPI)�
When Florida takes on unranked
East Carolina in the Gators'
homecoming game Saturday,
Florida will have everything to
lose, and East Carolina will have
everything to gain.
Traditionally, this is about the
time of the year when Florida
currently 5-0-1) begins to falter.
And this is the first time in 14
years that a Gator team has gone
unbeaten this far into the season -
six games.
Looking beyond ECU at tough,
must-win contests against
Southeastern Conference foes
Auburn, Georgia, and Kentucky,
Florida may be ripe for an upset.
The litle-known Pirates have
usually beaten up on middle-sized
teams, but this year they've added
wins over two of the big boys,
North Carolina State (22-16) and
Missouri (13-6), both on the road.
This also is the team that took
Florida State to the brink in their
first game of the year before bow-
ing 47-46 in a thriller.
But Florida is the Pirates' big-
gest challenge to date.
"They're bringing in the most
underrated team in the nation this
year Florida coach Charley Pell
said. "They're targeting this game
as their chance to go into the top
20
ECU coach Ed Emory, who
was an assistant at Clemson with
Pell before Pell became head
coach in 1976 and fired him, is not
talking about why the Pirates
should lose, but what it would
mean to them to win.
"I'd love it if our team would
win. No one deserves it more than
our men Emory said.
Florida will go with one of the
SI Features ECU
The ECU football team will be
featured in Sports Illustrated's
October 24 issue.
Here are a few excerpts from
the article written by Jaime Diaz:
"A team with two guys named
Quick �Norman and Greg � and
one named Speed � Darrel �
should be fast, and East
Carolina's option-I offense, led
by quarterback Kevin Ingram,
looks as if it could be programm-
ed into a video game.
"The Pirates' most impressive
speed is on the offensive and
defensive lines, where every
starter can break 5.0 in the 40, a
collective feat that is rare even in
pro football.
"Meshing that speed with
strength, East Carolina wins most
of its wars in the trenches.
Epitomizing the combination is
senior offensive guard Terry
Long, an Out land trophy can-
didate whom the Pirates bill as the
strongest college football player in
the nation.
You just don't see good col-
lege defensive linemen getting put
on their backs or driven five yards
off the line of scrimmage says
Pirate offensive coordinator Art
Baker, "but that's what Terry
does to people.
"Emory, who also weighs
about 280, is building his Pirates
on such pillars. In 1980, he suc-
ceeded Pat Dye, now the coach at
Auburn, who was 48-18-1 in six
seasons at East Carolina.
"Emory went through a rocky
4-7 that first year, but is now
21-18 overall. And there's good
reason to believe the best is yet to
come
Chariey PeU
better balanced offenses in the na-
tion. Through the first six games,
the Gators have averaged 398.7
yards total offense-202.4 rushing
and 196.3 passing. Florida has
scored 26.4 points per game.
Senior quarterback Wayne
Peace, who has a 63 percent com-
pletion rate, has a bevy of fine
receivers, even though the Gators
top wideout, Dwayne Dixon, will
be out with a knee injury.
The top runner for the Gators is
sophomore Neal Anderson, with
507 yards and a 5.6 yard per carry
average.
The Gators' defensive unit has
held five of six opponents to less
than 100 yards rushing and ranks
10th overall in the nation in
rushing defense (84.3 yards).
Florida's defense allows just 12.2
points per game. East Carolina
is noted for overall team speed-
not one member of the entire star-
ting squad runs slower tha 5.0 in
the 40 and their average time is
4.7.
The Pirates' offensive line, an-
chored by guard Terry Long and
tackle John Robertson, is pro-
bably one of the best in the na-
tion. Senior Kevin Ingram (5.0
yards per carry and 55.6 comple-
tion rate) runs the option-I forma-
tion.
East Carolina's leading rusher
is Earnest Byner, a 230-pound,
5-foot-ll fullback, who has 438
yards rushing and a 5.0 per carry
average.
Defense may be the Pirates' Ar-
chilles heel. They have been
outgained in total offense, 351
yards total offense per game to
the opposition's 391.
Florida has beaten Miami, 28-3,
tied Southern California, 19-19,
and downed Indiana State, 17-13,
Mississippi State, 35-12, LSU,
31-17, and Vanderbiit, 29-10.
Defense Dominates Temple
fMMPri4M-Ml
Put receiver Heary William broke free and ran 55 yards against
Temple to acore hit fourti touchdown of the year oi Saturday.
By RANDY MEWS
AaWul Sporu fAHor
Kevin Walker tied a school
record with three interceptions
and Clint Harris returned another
for a touchdown, to lead ECU to
a 24-11 victory over the Temple
Owls Saturday night in
Philadelphia.
"This was a great win ECU
coach Ed Emory said. "Clint and
Kevin both make big plays, and I
feel our defensive play is what
won the game for us
Offensively, the Pirates were
equally impressive as Kevin In-
gram connected on 12 of 19 passes
for 173 yards and Tony Baker ran
the ball 22 times for 117 yards.
Emory said the Owls were as
physical as any team the Pirates
have faced this year, and that was
most evident in the first half as
ECU only held a 3-0 lead midway
through the second quarter.
The turning point came when
Temple quarterback Tim Riordan
was intercepted by Walker, who
ran the ball 23 yards to the Owls'
43-yard line.
A 10-yard run by Baker and a
30-yard pass from Ingram to
Damon Pope quickly moved the
Pirates to the Temple three-yard
line. Baker and Ernest Byner each
picked up a yard on the next two
plays, and then Ingram lunged
over for ECU's first touchdown
with 4:34 remaining in the first
half.
On Temple's next possession,
Riordan, who was 24 of 48 for 281
yards, was intercepted again. This
time Harris was the culprit, carry-
ing the ball 74 yards for a
touchdown.
"This was definitely the
sweetest interception of my
career Harris said. "After I
turned the corner I saw two peo-
ple who had angles on me. It was
speed on speed, and I came out on
top because I happen to be the
fastest
The Owl's only scoring oppor-
tunity of the half came after Rior-
dan guided his team 58 yards in 10
plays to the ECU 20. With 17
seconds remaining, Mike
Abbott's 37-yard field goal at-
tempt sailed wide to the right.
Ingram came out throwing in
the second half, connecting with
Byner for gains of 7 and 14 yards,
and then hitting Norwood Vann
for a 31-yard gain to the Temple
25.
Ingram's next pass was to Ricky
Nichols in the end zone, but an
ECU penalty negated the effort.
Three plays later Jeff Heath was
called on to kick a 44-yard field
goal, but the attempt sailed left.
The Owls finally got on the
board with 8:03 remaining in the
third period when Jim Cooper
kicked a 43-yard field goal, the
first of his collegiate career.
After an exchange in posse-
sions, Temple made a big mistake.
They punted the ball to Henry
Williams. Williams received the
ball at his own 45-yard line and
raced all the way down the right
sideline to give ECU a comman-
ding 24-3 lead.
Williams had five returns in the
game for a total of 111 yards, and
the return was his fourth for a
touchdown this year.
After another Walker intercep-
tion, Ingram drove the Pirates 35
yards to the Owl's 36. The drive
took nine plays and was
highlighted by a 25-yard pass
from Ingram to Vann. After the
drive stalled, Heath was called in
for a 53-yard field goal attempt.
The ball came up short, but ECU
remained in command with a
21-point lead and just 14:08 re-
maining in the game.
The nightmare continued for
Heath as he missed field goal at-
tempts from 43 yards with 10:48
remaining, and one from 36 yards
with 6:58 left in the game.
The Owl's only touchdown
came with 57 seconds remaining
in the fourth quarter when Rior-
dan threw a 41-yard bomb to
Willie Marshall. Riordan passed
to Paui Palmer for the two-point
conversion, trimming the score to
24-11.
Temple then attempted the
"bamm-bamm" play, an on-side
kick ECU made famous in their
opening game at Florida State.
Emory was expecting the play;
however, and Harris scooped up
the ball before any of the Owls'
got a chance at it.
After collecting his fifth victory
in a row, Emory said he was glad
that the game was over. "Anytime
you have two touchdowns called
back and miss five field goals with
a great kicker like Jeff Heath,
you're lucky to escape with a
win
Emory said the defense won the
game for ECU, but Ingram was
the spark that got ECU going.
"Kevin was throwing the ball
when thay had eight people on the
line of scrimmage. He did a great
job, and I think he's one of the
finest quarterbacks in the coun-
try
The Owls opened the game in
the shotgun formation with Rior-
dan passing on eight of the first 10
plays from scrimmage. Temple
moved the ball 50 yards to the
ECU 37, but the Pirate defense
held and forced a Kip Schendeield
punt.
After ECU was unable to move
the ball, the defense came to the
rescue as Harris recovered a fum-
ble at the Pirate 42.
Ingram then got the offense
rolling with an 18-yard pass to
Stefon Adams. Baker picked up
an additional seven to the Temple
32, and Heath was called in for a
49-yard attempt.
Heath split the uprights with his
first attempt, and put the Pirates
ahead 3-0 with 7:14 remaining in
the first quarter. ECU had one
other scoring opportunity in the
opening period, but this tim�
Heath's attempt sailed wide to th
right.
Pirate Club
Offers Trip
On Charter
The East Carolina Pirate Club,
in conjunction with Seashore
Trail ways, is offering a round trip
bus charter to Gainesville, Fla
for the ECU-Florida football
game this weekend.
Cost is $125.00 per person and
includes a game ticket, two nights
motel lodging, plus snacks and
refreshments on the bus. The
game has been announced as a
sell-out, and tickets are available
only as part of this charter
package.
For more information, call
Charles Shavitz at the Pirate
Club, 757-6178.
Deadline for reservations is to-
day at 4 p.m. Friday night's lodg-
ing will be at the Holiday Inn,
1-95, Jacksonville, Florida,
vannah Georgia Quality Inn-
Oasis is the stopping point for the
Saturday night stay. Return to
Lady Pirates
our Tough
By RANDY MEUS
East Carolina's
olleyball team had a
frustrating fall break,
iropping matches to
ike, East Tennessee
itate, Virginia and
Villiam and Mar
On Saturday the
irates traveled to
'harlottcsville to
:ompete in the
Virginia quadrangular
olleyball tourna-
lent. "I was er
iisappointed with our
's play Coach
!Imogene Turner said.
: "I was looking f
po win two of the
;three matches, and we
came away �r
handed
ECU opened
.tournament aga
Duke, losing I
of-three match 15-0.
15-9. "We came
the first game as
as we've been ail
season Turnc
"We did bette-
second game.
were too do
mount a sei
eback
In
game,
the a
15-12
should
match,
"Vve
cor
througi
game
� '
anc -
get b
game
The
same
15
East
had .
the
coulc
EC
ma
Caro
Bucs End
By RANDY MEW
1 �nil eora i jjio�
The ECU me
tennis team f
Fifth among six t;
at the ECAC-So-
first-eer tennis I
namen: r.eid at Nav
this weekend.
"I was extras
pleased with
teams rerforma-
because this le
has teams that are as
r strong as any in the
region ECU head
coach Pat Sherman
said.
��.Ml but one of OUI
kids were unseeded,
therefore they drew
very strong opponents
in the first rou
Sherman added
"Everybody played
super, and we scored
many upsets
I
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCTOBER 20, 1983 11
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mg to have to force the
"Hturdav
tion ?'
41 and their average time is
ates' offensive line, an-
guaid Terry Long and
John Robertson, is pro-
� one of the best in the na-
Semor Kevin Ingram (5.0
is per carry and 55.6 comple-
tion rate) runs the option! forma-
: Carolina's leading rusher
nest Byner, a 230-pound,
-11 fullback, who has 438
rushing and a 5.0 per carry
.verage.
Defense may be the Pirates' Ar-
heel They have been
jtgamed in totaJ offense, 351
ards total offense per game to
he opposition's 391.
Florida has beaten Miami, 28-3,
: Southern California, 19-19,
downed Indiana State, 17-13,
ippi State, 35-12, LSU,
d:c Vanderbilt, 29-10.
mple
at the Pirate "2.
Ingram then got the offense
oiling with an 18-yard pass to
�?efon Adams. Baker picked up
additionaJ seven to the Temple
�2, and Heath was called in for a
49-ard attempt.
Heath split the uprights with his
attempt, and put the Pirates
ahead 3-0 with 7:14 remaining in
the first quarter. ECU had one
3ther scoring opportunity in the
opening period, but this time
Heath's attempt sailed wide to th
ght.
Pirate Club
Offers Trip
On Charter
The East Carolina Pirate Club,
n conjunction with Seashore
Trailways, is offering a round trip
bus charter to Gainesville, Fla
for the ECU-Florida football
game this weekend.
Cost is $125.00 per person and
ncludes a game ticket, two nights
motel lodging, plus snacks and
refreshments on the bus. The
game has been announced as a
sell-out, and tickets are available
only as part of this charter
package.
For more information, call
Charles Shavitz at the Pirate
Club, 757-6178.
Deadline for reservations is to-
day at 4 p.m. Friday night's lodg-
ing will be at the Holiday Inn,
1-95, Jacksonville, Florida!
Savannah, Georgia Quality Inn-
Oasis is the stopping point for the
Saturday night stay. Return to
Lady Pirates Drop
Four Tough Games
By RANDY MEWS
East Carolina's
volleyball team had a
frustrating fall break,
S dropping matches to
Duke, East Tennessee
State, Virginia and
William and Mary.
On Saturday, the
Pirates traveled to
Charlottesville to
compete in the
Virginia quadrangular
volleyball tourna-
ment. "I was very
disappointed with our
team's play Coach
Imogene Turner said.
"I was looking for us
to win two of the
three matches, and we
came away empty
handed
ECU opened the
tournament against
Duke, losing the best-
ot-three match 15-0,
15-9. "We came into
the first game as flat
as we've been all
season Turner said.
"We did better in the
second game, but we
were too down to
mount a serious com-
eback
In their second
game, ECU bowed to
the Cavaliers 8-15,
15-12 and 15. "We
should have won this
match Turner said.
"We had complete
control until midway
through the second
game. We lost our in-
tensity at that point,
and were never able to
get back into the
game.
The story was the
same in the Pirates
15-12, 15-10 loss to
East Tenn. St. ECU
had control early in
the contest but
couldn't hang on in
the end.
ECU was at home
to William and Mary
on Tuesday night, los-
ing the best-of-five
match, 15-12, 15-9
and 15-5. Turner said
Jennifer Jays played
well individually, but
the team as a whole
was very inconsistent.
The Pirates next
match will be tonight,
when the team travels
to Raleigh to play
powerful North
Carolina State.
Bucs End Fifth
V
f
By RANDY MEWS
uauni Sports Editor
The ECU men's
tennis team finished
fifth among six teams
at the ECAC-South's
first-ever tennis tour-
nament held at Navy
this weekend.
"I was extremely
pleased with our
teams performance,
because this league
has teams that are as
strong as any in the
region ECU head
coach Pat Sherman
said.
"All but one of our
kids were unseeded,
therefore they drew
very strong opponents
in the first round
Sherman added.
"Everybody played
super, and we scored
many upsets
Navy finished first
with 80 points, while
Richmond was second
with 66. William &
Mary came in third
with 40, James
Madison had 28,
ECU, 22; and George
Mason, 6.
In singles, Bill O'
Donnell reached the
semifinals before los-
ing to Navy's
Dashielli, 6-1, 6-3;
and Paul Owen lost in
the consolation finals
to James Madison's
Trinka, 6-3, 6-1.
In doubles, Doug
Otto and David
Creech beat Second
seeded Ciocco-
Chandell of JMU,
6-3, 3-6, 6-3, in the
semifinals and then
lost to number one
seed Dashielli and
Wagner of Navy, 4-6,
6-3, 6-2, in the finals.
ADVERTISED
ITEM POLICY
Each of these advertised items is required to be readily avail
sale at or below the advertised price in each A&P Store, exci
specifically noted in this ad
Florida offensive tackle Lomas Brown (left) and free safety
Tony Lilly are two All-America calibre players the Bucs will
face this weekend.
PRICES EFFECTIVE THRU S�t,Ort22 AT A&P IN GmvA
rrEMS OFFERED FOR SALE NOT AVAILABLE TO OTHER RETAIL DEALERS OR WHOLESALERS
YOUR BSN IS WORTH AN
OFFICERS COMMISSION
IN THE ARMY.
Your BSN means you're a professional. In the Army, It also
mean vou're an officer. You start as a full-fledged member of our
medical team. Write: Army Nurse Opportunities,
P.O. Box 7713, Burfoank, CA 91510.
ARMY NURSE CORPS.
BE ALL YOU CAN BE.
DOUBLE COUPONS
. FOR EVERY $10.00 YOU SPEiO, WE Will DOUBLE
5 MANUFACTURER'S COUPONS, EXAMPLE: $10 PURCHASE 5 COUPONS,
$20 PURCHASE 10 COUPONS, $100 PURCHASE 50 COUPONS.
ADDITIONAL COUPONS REDEEMED AT FACE VALUE!
BUmih nom end Oct. 22. we will unTs�I national
manufacturer i canta-off coupons up to SO tor
doubts their valua. Offer good on national manu-
facturer' canta-off coupons only. (Food lataWai
coupons not accepted.) Customer must purchase
coupon product In spscmsd size. Expired coupons
wW not be honored. One coupon per customer per
USM, No coupons accepted tor free merchendtee.
Offer doee not apply to AtP
whether manufacturer Is mentioned or not.
the value of the coupon exceed SO or the retail
of the Kern, this offer Is limited to the retail price
or other store coupons
M. When
Swims are Great with A&P's
DOUBLE SMUGS COUPQMS'
CtXTS Oft
TO COU�0�
. u-
COUPON A
25'
COUPON B
18
25'
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COUPON C
COUPON D
� .?.�?�.?�� W.� V�V. &. .7. ,W.t .W.t &&.mW.�t&�W.W&��9�T.�'T.u?F &jJH
756-9222

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Safe
ft
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9
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511 S.EVANS
PET VILLAGE
New Supply of
FRESH WATER FISH
Special on variety of FINCH
(WAXBILLS)
also

i
1
8
tut
M
Q
Sliced Bacon
MARKET STYLE
I
GOLDEN YELLOW
Fresh With Quality
SAVE 24 LB.
Bananas
SAVE $1.20
Russet Potatoes
49

i
lbs. only1
U.S. 1
GOOD SUPPLY OF REPTILES IN STOCK 9
B
1
SAVE 40�
Romaine Lettuce
each
bunch
590
�5
SAVE 15
Savings A
SAVE 41
Flav-0-Rich Milk Margarine Qtrs,
HOMECOMING
SPECTACULAR
m) J and
� veenfeaturin8TheFabu,ousKays
��
NORTH
Dinner for two - champagne -Entertainment
tax and tip all for only $45.00 per couple
After 8:00 General Admission $6.00 per couple
$4.00 per single
HOMOGENIZED � LOVVFAT
Limit orve �ntri
additional 7 SO order
KRAFT PARKAY
v 1 lb.
Limit one wrt
sCotionai 7 50 orde:
T.
WHEN ARMY NURSES
MOVE,THEY TAKE
THEIR SENIORITY
WITH THEM.
Army nurses are officers. They never
b se status by memng, as so often happens in
civilian hospitals.
In tact, the Army encourages mobility
and growth. You're encouraged to continue
vour education in clinical specialties such
as Intensive Care, OR, Pediatrics. OB or
Anesthesia and to attend conferences both
inside and outside the Army.
It you have a BSN and are registered
to practice in the US or Puerto Rico, or
you're still a student, talk to an Army Nurse
Recruiter.
It could be a very happy move.
Wfcea Amy Smnm More, TWy Takt
TWlr Soatarity WUk Thca.
laurrtewi At �ultK Howe
Oct M ketwe. MM AM -4M PM
or Ca Cpt. Munlm TSMWt
ARMtKAUYOUCAMBt
1
SAVE 81�
Mayonnaise
KRAFT
32 oz.
jar
Lifntt ooa MR
880
SAVE 41
Cake Mixes
SvBETTY CROCKER
SAVE 20c
SAVE 5f
DONTMSSm
Annual HallowMfi Sidewalk Sal
v, (.� J ifv sj.i y, (V-1 �(� i : � ,
i
i ('II !uK t ill'K it !
Coca Cola Paper Towels
DIET COKE �
TAB
.99C 2 litre Bottle
GOOD ONLY IN Gfe�irtlle
P&Q BRAND
big
rolls
L.mit tniee �ntfi
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STUDINT SUPPLY STORE
Wv- I ' .H
.it I
(P)) A&P COUPON y
Senior Citizens
62 and over
. aj ox ana over
Discount
5 Off Total Pure
On Wednesdays
With This Cowm and I.D.
: ks;
iii�ag
c
Greenville SqWamSaMrfipinCenter
703 Greenville Blvd. Greenville, N.C.

� �i�v���M- i �i
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-





?
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 20, 1983
i
Golfers Place 16th
In Duke Tourney
By RANDY MEWS
Aaafctaat Haorti Editor
The ECU golf team
finished 16th among
24 teams in the Duke
Invitational Golf
Tournament this
weekend in Durham.
North Carolina
took the team title
with 876 strokes,
followed by Clemson
with an 881. Wake
Forest finished third
at 883, while South
Carolina shot an 885.
The hosting Blue
Devils came in fifth at
886.
The Pirates total
for the three-day
event was 923 strokes.
Chuck Taylor of
Duke captured the in-
dividual champion-
ship with a 209, two
shots ahead of North
Carolina's John In-
man at 211. Webb
Heitzman of South
Carolina was third
with a 214, while
Dillard Pruitt was
fourth at 215. Billy
Andrade of Wake
Forest rounded out
the top five with a
215.
ECU'S top five
finishers were Don
Sweeting at 224, Mike
Bradley, 225; David
Dooley, 235; Roger
Newsom, 240; and
Paul Steelman, 243.
The Pirates are cur-
rently participating in
the Campbell Invita-
tional in Buies Creek,
and will return home
today.
Classifieds
PERSONAL
MISC.
HOW ABOUT FREE CRUSET
NOV. II.
HAPPY BIRTHDAY dear
friandlll Wi still Luv you
Lotsin Gwtn and Kavin.
LOST AND
FOUND
LEGAL HASSLES? Call
Howard J. Cumminft, attorney
at Law No chars tor Initial
consultation for ECU Student.
Call 7$
LOWEST TYPING RATES on
campus include experienced
professional work. Pro-
ofreading, spelling and gram-
matical corrections 355 74l
after 5 �
PROFESSIONAL
3SJ-4�74
TYPING
LOST 14K gold rope chain
Oracle in downtown area If
found call 7U WOO, REWARD
OFFERED.
LOST CAT vicinity o� First St
Fat Black Cat with white flea
collar, white tun under neck
and back legs Part of the fami
ly. and greatly missed. Missing
since Saturday If found, phone
rjT-eiu after 5.00
ACADEMIC AND PROFES
SlONAL typing. Call Julia
Bloodworth at '5 7174
TYPING,
�V� 033
TERM, THESIS.
IN A PANIC ABOUT PUNC
TUATIONT Call Word for Word
tor all your typing and proles
sional needs. Georgetown shop,
ind Floor; Call 7S-�BM.
I WILL PAY SSt.M FOR A
113-14 EAST CAROLINA
UNIVERSITY STUDENT
PHONE DIRECTORY Call col-
lect at 4IS-S77 7137 after i p m.
V5!t
I
I
SET
I
NS HEALTH
CABEVOO CAN ABomoH: a dhiteutt deo
DEPEND ON. soomarsrfvx�eX3J�rrjy
?ne women 0 the i- lemtno Center Counselors are
Crvorfabfe doy and r�ght to support and under-
stood you Your safety comfort and pnvocv are
assured by the caring staff of the Retrying Center
SHrVlCfS: � Tuesday � Sctturdoy Abortion Ap-
porrtmentjgl 1st & 2nd Trimester Abortion up to
18 W�eks � r�ee Preanancy Tests � Very Early
rVegnancy Test � All inclusive Fees B Insurance
Accepted � CAU 74M-6S50 DAY O WOMt �
Hecjttti care, counsehny TUC O BaVJIiJa
orxleducottontdrwcv int rUfcMINy
EUANS N�U) & USED BOOKS
Reader s Exchange. Ltd.
20 CREDIT
for Vour Paperback Boohs
-We BUY or TRADE Comic Books and
Select Titles of Magazines
�wjns Mall 757 3333
Open Mon. Sal. 4:30-5:30
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i





Title
The East Carolinian, October 20, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 20, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.295
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
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