The East Carolinian, October 13, 1983






�he iEaat Carolinian
IL
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Vol.58 No.r
Thursday, October 13,1983
Greenville, N.C.
8 Pages
Circulation 10,000
?
Education School
ECU Ahead Of Other N.C. Universities
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When mo fibsofcrfdy.
PosiliveJy Have IV)
Score (to
Saiurday tuyU
Emory Receives T-Shirt
OB POOL! � MMo L�b
Scott Hall Head Resident Don Payne (far left) presents ECU Head Football Coach Ed Emory with a Scott
Hall T-shirt as house council members look on.
By TINA MAROSCHAK
Staff Wrttar
Despite the scrutiny that ECU's
School of Education has received
over the past few months, the
teacher education program has
upheld higher admission stan-
dards than those at many of the
other schools in the UNC system.
Over the next few years, North
Carolina hopes to upgrade its
teacher education programs with
a Quality Assurance Plan. The
plan will require, effective in July,
that students practice-teach for a
minimum of ten weeks. Previous-
ly there was no minimum require-
ment. ECU, however, has re-
quired ten weeks of student
teaching since 1977.
Many schools are not waiting
for the Quality Assurance Plan to
go into effect and are already
upgrading admission standards by
raising the required grade point
average from a 2.0 to a 2.2. ECU
has required a 2.2 average for five
years.
"At ECU we have recognized
academic excellence that others are
just now going to Charles Co-
ble, dean of the School of Educa-
tion, said. "However, we also
realize that there are other fac-
tors. It's not just grades that mat-
ter, as important as they are.
Teaching is a human enterprise
The teacher education program
at ECU has several unique
features. First, effective im-
mediately, all applicants are re-
quired to go through a screening
process. Three faculty members
will interview each applicant
throughout the semester to deter-
mine their suitability for the pro-
gram. "This will help us deter-
mine early enough if we have
identified any adverse
characteristics Coble said.
Applicants will also be required
to take a speech and hearing
screening test "to diagnose
physical disabilities so that we can
prescribe treatment or couseling
before entry into teacher educa-
tion Coble said. "We recognize
that teacher education is a human
enterprise that involves personal
transactions, and the nature and
quality of those transactions
should be an important part in
deciding whether or not that per-
son should teach
Coble said that the number of
persons entering teacher educa-
tion at ECU and at other univer-
sities has declined dramatically.
"We're on the verge of a teacher
shortage he said. He con-
tributed this to several factors, the
main point being that the number
of people entering the field has
declined at a faster rate than the
positions available.
Tax Refunds Kept If Loans Not Repaid
By STEPHEN C. HARDING
Staff Writer
The N.C. Department of
Revenue is allowed to keep an in-
dividual's state income tax refund
and apply it to any outstanding
debt to a state agency, and this
method is currently being used to
collect deliquent student loan
payments from former ECU
students, according to a university
business official.
The Set-Off Debt Collection
Act Of i 979 empowers the revenue
department to garner tax refunds
for debts to such state institutions
as public universities, courts or
hospitals.
According to Business Manager
Julian Vainright, the university
assists the state in finding those
who are deliquent on loan
payments. "We submit a list of
people to the N.C. Department of
Revenue about Nov. 20. When
the information here is merged
with the information of the
Department of Revenue, they
notify us. We notify the person
that we will take the refund unless
he gives a good reason he said.
George Davis of the individual
income tax division of the Depart-
ment of Revenue said an in-
dividual "then has 30 days to file
for a healing. Most times he
doesn't. In that case we apply it to
his debt
Grace Cannon, who handles
student loans at ECU, said her of-
fice contacts the attorney general
and files a legal suit. The interest
rate on the loan can then increase
from 3 to 8 percent on in-state
loans. Cannon said a collection
agency handles persons living out
of North Carolina, and the
federal government is called in for
tough cases.
if a student becomes a state
employee and is found to have a
deliquent bill, his job can be ter-
minated through the State
Employee Debt Collection Act.
Also, universities can refuse to
release transcripts on graduates
with outstanding debts.
The U.S. Department of
Education has developed a poster
that tells of the possibility of a
student not being able to receive
credit in the future if he does not
pay back his loan. A letter by Ed-
ward M. Elmendorf and James
W. Moore of the Education
Department said, "We believe
that the poster sends a strong
message: that there are serious
consequences in failing to honor
the obligations and respon-
sibilities a borrower accepts when
receiving an education loan
ECU has a low rate of delin-
quent loan payments, according
to Cannon. She said the default
rate through the Student Loans
Office is less than 6 percent. "The
low deliquency rates reflect the
quality of East Carolina's
students. Most of our borrowers
are willing to repay their loans
because without them many could
not have made it financially
Drunk Driving Arrests
Down Due To New Law
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Staff Writer
Joe Calder, head of the ECU Depart-
ment of Public Safety, says it will take a
long time before his department will be
able to tell what, if any, impact the Safe
Roads Act will have on the number of
drunk drivers on North Carolina
highways. But N.C. Highway Patrol Capt.
Carl Gilchrist claims there has been a 25
percent reduction in drunken driving ar-
rests since the law's enactment Oct. 1.
Gilchrist didn't have exact figures, but
he said the area under his command has
had a 25 percent reduction in drunk driv-
ing arrests compared with the same period
in 1982.
Gilchrist attributes the reduction to the
psychological effects the new law is having
on people who drink and drive. "I think
we're gaining here from psychological ef-
fects Gilchrist said. "The reduction can
be attributed to some degree to the
psychological effect the new law is having
on persons who normally drink and
drive
Newly appointed Greenville Police
Chief Ted Holmes reported a decrease of
one arrest for drunk driving during the
first 10 days of October compared to the
same period in 1982. Greenville police
made 13 drunk driving-related arrests for
ECU College Bowl
the first 10 days of October, compared to
14 last year. Holmes said there were no
18-year-olds arrested among the 13.
"If the new law has any impact at all it
should reduce the number of 18-year-olds
we would arrest Holmes said. "It should
reduce our problem
Because Holmes assumed his new post
on Oct. 3 he said it would take him time
to familiarize himself with the new laws
created by the act. "The unfortunate thing
is you have a lot of 18-year-olds who are
perfectly capable of handling alcohol
Holmes said, adding there were also many
other 18-year-olds who could not. "It's
the same with 19-year-olds
"We have not in any way changed our
rules one way or another Calder said.
"There's no change in enforcement
Calder reported ECU police have made
only one drunk driving arrest on campus
since Oct. I. On Saturday night they ap-
prehended a 16-year-old non-student.
"In general, I favor the change in the
law Holmes added. Calder has been on
record in the past as not supporting the
change in the minimum drinking age
because it would be difficult to enforce.
The Safe Roads Act took effect Oct 1.
It received strong support from N.C. Gov.
James B. Hunt Jrwho called it the
toughest drunk driving law in the country.
LIILII TOOO � SCU M�w
Just when it looked like Wendy McManus would
have to hobble unprotected in the rain, along came
James CUnkdale to the rescue.
'Sport Of The Mind' Begins Oct. 22
By N. K. HOGGARD
Staff Writ
academia, sports, trivia and cur-
rent events. "It has been called
the intercollegiate sport of the
mind said L. E. Hough, a
political science professor and
coach of the college bowl all-star
team for the past four years.
In the competition, two teams
Bowl and assistant program direc- of four players each use buzzers to
tor at Mendenhall, said he "hopes signal their readiness to answer
The annual ECU College Bowl
competition will be held the
weekend of Oct. 22-24 at
Mendenhall Student Center. Jon
Curtis, coordinator of College
to get more involvement this year.
Last year we didn't have very
many teams competing
College Bowl, a collegiate ver-
sion of TV game shows, requires
participants to answer questions
from a variety of sources:
the "toss-up" question. If the
correct answer is given, the team
will be given a harder bonus ques-
tournament.
Jeffrey Jones, an ECU
undergraduate student and college
bowl all-star last year, said "My
team for this year did thumb exer-
cises all summer. We're hoping
for some good competition this
year Jones traveled to Knox-
ville, Tenn to compete in the
Region V division last year, but
declined comment on the out-
come.
"In
last year's competition
tion. The team accumulating the there were not enough teams for a
most correct answers wins and very good tournament said Cur-
then plays another team in a tis. "People participating have a
playoff style, double elimination real good time and there is a $25
prize for first place per team
member. I've been sending letters
to the departments on campus to
get more people involved
Jones' team is considered the
favorite going into the competi-
tion this year, but upsets in Col-
lege Bowl frequently occur. In
1979, for example, Davidson Col-
lege pulled a stunning upset over
the heavily favored Harvard
University team in the National
Competition.
Anyone with a team, or who
wants to join a team should con-
tact Jon Curtis at Mendenhall
before October 19.
SGA
Election Results
Freshman president
Staci Falkowitz
Sophomore president
Rob Poole
Junior president
David Brown
Senior president
Lisa Roberts
Freshman vice president
Don Come
Soph, vice president
Lisa (VDonnell
Junior vice president
Suzanne Starling
Senior vice president
Laura White
Senior sec.tres.
Wendy Taylor
Graduate president
Daniel Prevatte
Graduate vice president
Rick Morgan
Dorm Legislators
Garret
John P. Carver
Slay
Lou Ann Owens
Aycock
Tracy Buchanan
Fletcher
Lee Hardy, Sandra Sanders
Clement
Lori Svendsen,
Claretta Foye
Greene
Karen McGill,
Shannon Carraway
Jarvis
Jonathon Grief
Umstead
Coralie Patterson
Belk
Brad Hicks
White
Katherine Cannon
Jones
Angela Centanni,
Don Corne
Tyler
Sandi Thurman,
Melinda Davis
Scott
Tory Russo, Brian Wessler
Day Representatives
Joey Francis
Fran Dickens
Michael Dixon
Johnny Rainey
Terry Leamy
Dennis Kilcoyne
David Whiteside
Al Smith
Michael McPartland
Wesley Johnson
Kirk Shelley
Glenn Maughan
John Shannon
Anne Clayton
Jim Ensor
Rick Hamilton
Amy Merrell
Jim Boone
Al Maginnes
Kevin Winstead
Greg Shelnut
Melanie Bunch
David Futrelle
Chris Townsend
David Brannan
SGA
Vote Early And Often
Students Maed ap to
vote fari
of their
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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13,1983
Many Scholarships A vailable For Seniors
By ANDREA
MARKELLO
Graduating seniors
who wish to continue
their education have
the opportunity to do
so through the various
scholarships pro-
grams available
through ECU. Since
1965, John Ebbs, pro-
fessor of English, has
been in charge of the
NationalInterna-
tional Scholarships
and Fellowships p. v,
gram at ECU.
During 18 years of
service, Ebbs has
awarded six
prestigious scholar-
ships allowing en-
trance to universities
both in Europe and in
the United States. Ac-
cording to Ebbs,
two of the major
scholarships, the
Woodrow Wilson and
Danforth awards,
have been discon-
tinued, but a variety
of others are
available.
The Marshall
Scholarship is
England's way of
showing appreciation
for the Marshall Plan
proposed following
World War II. It
allows two years of
study in any field at a
college or university
in Great Britain. The
Fulbright Scholarship
allows one or more
years of study in a
foreign country where
the student carries out
an academic project
of some kind.
As of 1980, women
have been included as
part of the Rhodes
Scholarship. Ebbs
considers this the best
in the world as it pays
all expenses for three
years of study at Ox-
ford University in
England.
The Harry S.
Truman scholarship is
solely for
sophomores. The
award pays for the
student's junior and
senior years at a col-
lege anywhere in the
country, provided the
student is willing to
make a commitment
to a career in public
service. Also included
is graduate school
payment for one year.
"Though there hasn't
been a winner yet
from ECU, there are
always applicants.
There is none other
like it in the world
Ebbs said.
Requirements for
the scholarships vary.
With some there is an
age limitation and the
necessity for a high
gpa due to national
competition levels.
Seniors graudating in
May must apply in the
prior August or
September to allow
ample time to com-
plete scholarship re-
quirements.
"There has been a
problem in com-
municating with
students about the op-
portunities available.
Letters to deans with
information passed students to apply with individual scholarships. The stu-
on to students has Ebbs said there is departments for op- dent is the beginning
worked somewhat, something for portunities relating to factor and needs to
but there is still dif- everyone. Students fellowships, graduate make some initiating
ficulty in getting should also check assistantships and effort-
Honor Board Seeks Applicants
By JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
Writer
Because this year's
Honor Board was
established on an in-
terim basis, applica-
tions are now being
sought for positions
on the board. Ap-
plicants for the
Review Board are also
needed.
The Honor Board
consists of seven
students and three or
four alternates. The
Review Board also
has seven members.
Applicants are screen-
ed by the Student
Government Associa-
tion Executive Board
and appointed by the
legislature. According
to James Mai lory,
associate dean of
judiciary, applicants
need to be full-time
students.
Applications can be
obtained in the SGA
offices on the second
floor of Mendenhall
Student Center.
Members will be
chosen at the first ses
sion of this year's ex-
ecutive council.
"We're always
looking for good peo-
ple Mallory said.
Announcements
Student Opinion
Watt?
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an item
printed in the announcement
column, piease type it on an an
nouncement form and send II to
TV East Carolincan in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at me East Carolinian
office in the Publications
Building Flyers and handwnt
fen copy or odd sued paper can
"of be accepted
There is no charge tor an
nouncements. but space is often
1 mi ted Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
nent will run as long as you
wflnf and suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity.
The deadline for an
nouncements is 3 p m Monciay
for the Tuesday paper and 3
p m. WKJnesoay for the Thurs
dav paper No announcements
received after these deadlines
w i be printed
This space .s available to all
campus organizations and
departments
ECU MARAUDERS
Tha Department of Military
Scianca invitas you to par
ticlpate in tha ECU
MARAUDERS, an organization
or-entad towards leadership
development mrovgh adventure
training, military tactics and
other outdoor activities
All students are welcome The
third meeting will be held on
Monday IS October 1983 at 7
p m In Room 212. Mendenhall
Student Center For more Infor
matlon contact CPT Lilvak at
757 ���67
HELP WANTED
The Delta Zeta's are in search
of the most Eligible Bachelor)
Help them find him by voting tor
your favorite candidate. Can-
didate's pictures are on display
in the lobby of the Student Store
Proceeds go to the Gallaudet
School for the deaf.
SAB MEETING
There will be a Student
Athletic Board Meeting at 5
p.m October 19, 1983 at
Mendenhall Room Rm. 24S. The
meeting has been changed as a
result of Fall Break
KARATE CLUB
the East Carolina Karate Club
will have a registration night at
� p m. on Oct 13th This Is for
any East Carolina University
student who wants to learn the
martial artv There will be a
demo and explanation of the
course In Memorial Gym
downstairs on registration
night.
VOLLEYBALL
OFFICIALS
Interested in officiating in
tramural volleyball? The
Department of Intramural
Recreational Services will begin
training clinics for Inframual
volleyball officials Monday Oc
tober 24, 1963 at 6 p m in Room
102 of Memorial Gymnasium
Rules, Infepretatlons and
mechanics will be discussed Of
ficials will be hired based on
practical and written
tests Volleyball Officials
Clinic, Mon. Oct 24, 1983, 6 p.m
Rm 102, Mem Gym.
FREEDOM TO
LIVE LIFE
God wants us to live In
freedom, not the bondage of
legallsm (Read Galatlans
chapters 5 and 6) Then we can
be flexible to do what Is right to
help ourselves and others live
the best life. Then we will have
peace In our hearts and freedom
from fear In our minds so we can
really love people. (I John 4:17,
18) Stop by me booth at the Shi
dent Supply Store for more in-
formation about God's heart to
man, the Bible (Psalm 33:11,
John 831,32)
LIBERAL
STUDENTS
Their will be a meeting of the
Society of United Liberal
Students today at 7 p.m. In room
248 Mendenhall Std Center At
tendence is open to all minority
students
CROSS
CAMPUS RACE
Two Cross Campus races will
be held Homecoming Day Satur
day Oct 29 A 2.5 mile race will
start at 9 am. and a 5 0 mile
race will start at 9 30 am Both
races start near the bleachers at
the ECU varsity track. Bunting
Field The race course is 95 per
cent on grass and traverses in
and about the area surrounding
Minges Coliseum, Flcklen
Stadium, Bunting Field, Harr
mgton and the women's Softball
field. The races, which are spon
sored by the Department of
Intramural Recreational Ser
vices, are open to participation
by all ECU students, staff and
ECU alumni.
SPORT
CLUB COUNCIL
The second meeting for the
1983 84 Sport Club Council will
be held Wednesday October 19,
1983 at 400 p.m. In Room 105B of
Memorial Gymnasium Atten-
dance is required of represen
tatives of active sport clubs.
Persons or groups Interested In
forming a sport club are Invited
to attend. Representatives are
asked to prepare. If needed. Trip
Applications and Vehicle Re-
quests for the fall
semester Sport Club Council
Meeting, Weds. Oct. 19, 19t3, 4
p.m Rm. 103B, Mem. Gym.
CANOEING
Your can't keep 'em out of the
water The Pamllco-Ter River
Foundation is going to slip back
into the River October 15. This,
the second canoe trip for the
PTRF, will begin Saturday at 10
o'clock am at the Port Ter
mlnal near Cliff's Seafood House
(approx. 1 5 miles east of Green
villa) The canoeists will make
several exciting and infor-
mative stops along the Tar befor
ending at Yankee Hall where
transportation will be provided
back to the Port Terminal.
Members and persons in
terested in a fall trip on the Tar
are asked to bring a canoe,
lunch, life preservers, paddles
and other necessary equipment
if you would like to join the
PTRF Fall canoe excursion
please sign up with Mary Jo
Larkln in Greenville at 750103
or Keith Hackney In Washington
at 946-4197. it may be your last
chance on the River before
winter hits
KALTH
CAWEVOOCAN AMomtOHadmcnciBci-
MPflND ON. sion rhoff nvxto easier by
th womejn of m rlemtng Center Counselors are
ovoiaWe doy and night to support and under-
stand you Vour safety corntort and pnvocy are
assured by the caring ttarr of the Reming Center
�MCel: � Tuesday � Saturday Abortion Ap-
poswtrneritSBl 1st 2nd Trimester Abortions up to
18 Weeks � Ftee Pregnancy Tests � Very Early
Ptegnancy Tests � Ail tnctusJve Fees P Insurance
Accepted � CALi 7S44S50 DAY Of NKtfT �
MeSaalcam.ccunesSny rue a CMlkl
and education for wo- int fliMlflVr
c?sfrti
ABORTIONS UF
T012THWEEK
OF PREGNANCY
SI95.MI
Ceetref.
Pregnancy
CVT�
832-SS1S (TeM Free Massfear
sea mi in) Between 9 A as
an S P.M. Weekdays
RALEIGHS WOMEN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION 1
�17 Wee Merge. St.
Monday Night FOOTBALL
on our BIG-SCREEN TV $3.09
Tackle
A Pizza
AlGatti's
sTaSSCaVaaMe?
A great wiy to have �
great ttae. With all that
hottest to Gain's goods
art Ofjr Happy Hoar Sparta
yoa already kaow who
thearlaaeris.
Comer off Cotaache aad 10th
The beat ptaa In town. yf1
Yon, with
your favorite Gatti's
Pitts Diaaer buffet
�5 p.m. to 8 p.sa All the
pizza, spaghetti aad salad
you caa eat.
WRESTLING
The ECU Wrestling Sport club
is practicing Teusday and
Thursday evenings tor 9 p.m. to
11 p.m. in the Exercise Room
(Room lot) ot Memorial Gym.
All students Interested In work-
ing out with the wrestling Club
should attend these work-out
sessions.
INTER-VARSITY
FELLOWSHIP
What an exciting night we
have in store for you next week
on Wednesday at � Inter
Varsity Is having a faculty
testimony night. Yea. faculty
from ECU will be sharing with
us how the Lord Is working In
their life. This will be a night you
will not want to miss. Come loin
us in Jenkins Audltorum and br
I no a friend.
ECU LAW
SOCIETY
The ECU Law Society will be
meeting for the first time on
Thursday. October X at 7:30
p.m. in Mendenhall Room 31?.
The guest speaker, a local
lawyer, will be Mr. Stamey of
the law flrm-Dixon, Horne,
Ousses. and Ooub. For more in-
formation, contact: Mike Gard-
ner (7574141), or David Fgrrrel
(758 187)
ZBT LITTLE
SISTERS
Don't forget the "Get Ac-
quainted" cookout at Todd Ea
at 5 p.m. today. Please call
for directions.
UNIVERSITY
ADMINISTRATIVE
APPLICATIONS
Applications are now being ec
cepted tor students wishing to
servo en University Committees
(or ftst 1��3 84 school year. Stu
dent pesltlowa art open on
University Administrative Com
mittees and Faculty
SenateAcademic Committees
Applies I ton blanks have the
names of committees with
vacancies on them. Applications
may be picked up at the follow-
ing locations:
Office of the Vice Chancellor
for Student Life, 304 Whicherd;
Mendenhall Student Cater infor-
mation Desk, SGA Office.
Mendenhall Student Canter; Of
flee of intramural-Recreational
Services, Memorial Gym and
Residence Hail Directors Of
ficea.
The University greatly ap-
preciates the efforts of those
students who have served in the
past and hopes that students wilt
continue their interest and par-
ticipation. Questions about
University committees and
memberships may be directed
to the Office of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life
(757-4441)
PREPROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
The Preprofesslonal Health
Alliance will meet Thursday.
Oct. 13 at 5:30 p.m. in the
Culture Center. Dr. Linda Spino
from the Center for Student Op-
portunities will speak on Test
Taking Techniques. All
members end interested per-
sons are urged to attend.
REBEL CONTESTS
Tha annual REBEL contests
are coming up soon. Deadline
for prose and poetry submis-
sions is Monday, November 7.
Bring your entries by the
REBEL or Media Board offices
from 9 - 5. All entries must be
typed and include your name,
address, phone number, and
classification. Prize money is
provided by the Attic and
Budwelser.
ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING
WORKSHOP
A three part workshop offered
to students at NO COST by the
University Counseling Center
Thursday, Oct 30. 37 and Nov 3
All three sen lorn will be con
ducted from 3-4 p.m. in 308
Wright Annex (757ssM.
LEARNING
EFFICIENCY
CLASSES
A program tor increasing
Learning Efficiency win be of
fared by the Counseling Center
The first section will be on Mon
day and Wednesday at 3 p.m
beginning Oct 34 and the second
section will be on Tuesday and
Thursday at 1 p.m. beginning
Oct 35. Both groups will meet In
305 Wright Annex The classes
are available to all students. At
tendance is voluntary No for
mel registration Is required
INTEREST
The Strong Campbell Interest
Inventory Is offered every Tues-
day in 305 Wright Annex at 4
p.m.
CO-OP
A representative from the
U.S. General Accounting Office,
Virginia Beach, VA, will be on
campus October 25 to Interview
co-op students who would like to
work are a GAO Evaluator
Buslness students who have
completed 7S semester hours
and have a 2.9 GPA or higher
should contact the Co-op Office.
313 Rawi, to arrange an Inter
view Immediately.
PHI SIGMA IOTA
The foreign language honor
society will sponsor a lecture in
the Mendenhall coffee house on
Nov 4 at 7 30 p.m The event
will commemorate the 500th an
nlversary of the birth of Martin
Luther The public is invited
PHI
BETA LAMBDA
The Omlcom Chapter of Pni
Beta Lambda is selling Tom Wat
products from now until October
19 irs toys, chimes, calendars
tools, school supplies, and knick
knacks it's everything from
first aid kits to candles From
whimsical to practical, Tom
Wat makes great gifts, or stock
Ing stutters for people of all
ages
Phi Beta Lambda is the
Naitonal organization for
students maiorlng In business
educetion. marketing, manage
ment, finance, or accounting
Sponsorship of Phi Beta Lamb
da is In the Business Education
and Office Administration
Department Persons interested
in purchasing Tom Wat products
should contact Mrs Betty Cor
bin (7J7 �9S3' or any member of
PM Beta Lambda
NATIONAL HONOR
SOCIETY IN
PSYCHOLOGY
if you have 8 semester hours
in psychology, or will have at the
conclusion of the semester and it
you are in tha top 35 percent o�
your class, then you are eligible
for membership in the National
Honor Society In Psychotogv
PSl CHI Pick up your applica
tions In the PSl CHI librae
(Speight 203) during office
hours. Apply now Hurry, the
deadline for application is
November 11, ISO if you are a
member, new or old, end you
haven't filled out a locator card.
please come by PSl CHI office
and fill one our
We ail want PSl CHI to be m�
best ever this semester, so afl
you guys get involved in YOUR
organization We're here for you
and WE ARE WHAT YOU
MAKE US HELP MAKE US
GREAT
AEROBICS
REGISTRATION
Second Session Aerobics
Registration will begin iwst after
Fell Break on October 19-21
Classes will be held at the same
times es first session with one
exception there will be more
classes Cost is Wstudenrs.
SSfacuity staff, and spouse tor
classes meeting l time per week
and U students. 810faculty.
staff and spouse for classes
meeting twice a week Classes
run from Oct 24 Dec. 5th For
more information just come by
the IWRic Offices In 204
Memoriei Gym
Hamb
Sherman
For
tenor
on to
for M
congr
porterl
desert
origin
ment
speed
me-
coal I
bla
I
J
-
be. .1
Daj
gradi
to mu
as n(
Hr
Dull
tow;
judic
jum j
sec
he
P1- "
sh I
woul
J
�u.
They
grou
sa
rij
fresbl
necei
va l
the
lidn;
mux
ca
WITHTHI
raf V
I
STUDENT UNION MAJOR ATTRACTIONS
COMMITTEE
presents
A HOMECOMING SPECTACULAR
CHARLIE DANIELS BAND
AND
MARSHALL TUCKER
FRIDAY, OCTOBER 28,1983
8:00 P.M.
MINGES COLLISEUM
ECU STUDENTS: $9.00 NON-STUDENTS: $10.00
ALL TICKETS AT THE DOOR: $10.00
Tickets available Central Ticket Office, October 14, 1983
until sell out!
Tickets also available at Both
Record Bars In Greenville and Apple Records.
I
FILM.
24HOur
FILM SE
Sl.OOOFF
Exposur
50c OFF Dev
50C OFF An
$1.00 OFF Any 8xlC
or t i coeaerc
M 518 SOUTH CCTA�.
GREENVILLE H
75206M
Limit one coupon per
INTO
it .i nW- IU
Luoo
INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL WEEK
NOVEMBER 6-12,1983
Sponsored by the Student Union Minority Arts Committee
f THE EXOTIC DRUM BEAT OF AFRICA
II Sunday the 6th, 8:00p.m Mendenhall 244, Free
n LOX AND BAGELS
y) Monday the 7th, Multi-Purpose Room, Speaker: Georgi
Riabikoff, Admission: $2.00
GEORGI RIABIKOFF. Pianist
ncQ Tuesday the 8th, 8:00p.m Hendrix Theatre, ECU
& Students. $1.50. Faculty & Staff: $3.00. Public & at the
door: $5.00
AMBASSADOR ROBERT WHITE The Sources of the Crises
n in Central America
�jl Wednesday the 9th. Hendrix Theatre. $1.50 - ECU
Students. $2.50 - ECU Faculty and Staff, and $3.50
-Public and at the Door. 8:00p.m.
g GANDHI
5J Thursday the 10th. Hendrix Theatre. 5:00 & 8:30p.m.
I
GANDHI
Friday the llth. Hendrix Theatre. 5.00 A 8:30p.m.
GANDHI
Saturday the 12th. Hendrix Theatre. 5.00 & 8:30p.m.
It's Big Apple Time!
NEW YORK CITY
at Thanksgiving
Broadway Macy's Parade .Shopping. . Touring
NOVEMBER 23 thru NOVEMBER 27. 1983
Space for 135 persona
Single Occupancy - $170 00 per person
Double Occupancy - $115.00 per person
Triple Occupancy - $110.00 fm person
Quad Occupancy -99.00 per person
Price includes Roundtrip Bus transportation
and accomodations at the Hotel Edison
in the heart of Broadway!
SIGN UP BY NOVEMBER 1
AT THE CENTRAL TICKET OFFICE
MENDENHALL STUDENT CENTER
Call 757-6611, ext. 266 for information
tS
;
�sjssj aM
T$�
'
-�AawiAr �wM�aSj
�SM
��
4 �� m -� �- �





THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 13, 1983
ors
idual
for op-
aung to
raduate
rs and
scholarships. The stu-
dent is the beginning
factor and needs to
make some initiating
effort
pplicants
issocia-
Board
the
v ding
r) �
in of
nts
U-time
offices on the second
floor of Mendenhall
Student Center.
Members will be
chosen at the first ses-
sion of this year's ex-
ecutive council.
We're always
looking for good peo-
ple Mallory said.
(

nouse on
tv��tl
II A

e"W3 �
Bir� r;xr
a
or itock
M :? all
� r
: n For
IcOurf g
IT " r.
�� Zor
NATIONAL HONOR
SOCIETY IN
PSYCHOLOGY
too htvt tamaatar hours
o�vcology or will h�v� at trta
conciuaioo o m� Mmtar and M
you ara in ta top U parcant of
our ciaa man you ara eligible
tor memoar�Mp in ttia National
Honor Sociaty in Psychology,
Chi Ptck up your applies
?�ons ,n ma PSt CHI library
Spe.ght 701) during off lea
nours Apply now 11 Hurry, tha
3taa!n tor application is
November u, laaj if yoo are a
mambav n�w or old and you
aveo t � n�o out a locator card,
piaasa coma by PSI CHI office
arwj tin one our
an want PSI Chi to be me
bev ever mis lemeatar. so all
you guys get involved in YOUR
organiiaton We're hare for you
�M E ARE WHAT YOU
MAKE US HELP MAKE US
G8E4
AEROBICS
REGISTRATION
Second Session Aerobics
Registration win begin lust after
Pan Break on October 19 21
C asses win be held at ma same
mes as first session with one
exception there will be more
��� Cost is Wstudents.
15facuitv staff and spouse for
asses meeting l time per week
�nc 16 students. SlOfaculty.
'atf and spouse for classes
mee'ing twice a week Classes
run from Oct 24 Dec 5m For
-o�-e information fust come by
'�e M Rec Offices In 204
frnor a Gym
D
NTS: $10.00
00
y 1983
pple Time!
RK CITY
iksglvlny
Jade Shopping Touring
NOVEMBER 27, 1983
135 persons
$170 00 per person
$115 00 per person
$110 00 per person
y -99 00 per person
imp Bus transportation
)s at the Hotel Edison
of Broadway
NOVEMBER 1
at TICKET OFFICE
TUDENT CENTER
266 for information
Student Opinion
lilllllilllllilllllliiiimiiMii
Watt? He Resigned?
By THERESA DULSK1
Staff Wrilar
Ham by
Sherman
For 18 days Secretary of the In-
terior James Watt attempted to hold
on to his job, but one by one cries
for his resignation surfaced among
congressman, and many of his sup-
porters in the Republican party
deserted him. Watt's problems
originated as the result of a com-
ment he made during a Sept. 21
speech to a U.S. Chamber of Com-
merce. Watt referred to people on a
coal advisory commission as "A
blacka women, two Jews and a
cripple Students were asked if
they felt Watt's remarks were offen-
sive and if he should have resigned
because of them.
David Hamby, chemistry,
graduate student � "He is referring
to minority groups and depicts them
as not as up to par with his race.
He's been doing a good job, but he
shouldn't show some prejudice
towards minorities. He let his pre-
judiceness show too much
Lori Flowers, physical therapy,
junior � "It was offensive. He
seems like he's prejudice. Why can't
he just talk to people instead of
picking out certain groups. He
should of resigned because they
would have asked for his resigna-
tion
Joel Sherman, history, senior �
"What he said is pretty much true.
They try to gather up these types of
groups to form the commissions,
but he shouldn't have come out and
said it so blunt
Sherry Phillips, accounting,
freshman � "His remark was not
necessary although he did get a
variety of people. But referring to
the cripple would be humiliating. 1
didn't care for that comment too
much. I don't think he should have
resigned, but he should be more
careful. That's not the first time
he's made a remark that wasn't call-
ed for
�OBPooia
Flowers
I.D. Required To
Purchase Tickets,
See Football Game
Phillips
By JENNIFER
JENDRASIAK
Staff Witter
Increased atten-
dance at home foot-
ball games coupled
with stricter admis-
sion policies have
caused problems for
many ECU students.
The key ingredient
for attending an ECU
football game using
student tickets is a
student identification
card.
Students wishing to
obtain tickets are re-
quired to present both
their ID and activity
cards. They will also
have to bring ID cards
with them to Ficklen
Stadium in order to
get into the game.
The reason for the
double-check pro-
cedure is to help pre-
vent misuse of student
tickets by non-
students, according to
SGA President Paul
Naso.
At this year's home
games, crowded lines
have been created by
students waiting until
just before the game
to enter the stadium.
"Twenty minutes
before the game
everybody wanted to
get in Naso said.
Because of the ID
check this resulted in
long lines.
There are two solu-
tions to this problem.
The first is to get to
the game early. "This
will alleviate problems
for all of us Naso
said. The other solu-
tion is to use the gates
on the far side of the
stadium. According
to Assistant Athletic
Director John
Welborn, most
students use the gate
on the north side of
the stadium, near
Minges Coliseum.
They can also use stu-
dent gates on the
south side of the
stadium, therefore
cutting down on the
length of the lines.
Students needing
IDs may obtain them
at Mendenhall Stu-
dent Center. The
cards are made every
Wednesday afternoon
from 2:30 to 3:30
p.m. On Oct. 26, the
Wednesday before
Homecoming, cards
will be made from
2:30 to 4:30 p.m.
There is a charge of $2
for new cards and $5
for replacements.
i�
I
FRIOCT14
SCHIZO
pi. 50 ADMISSION
I BEFOR 9:30
SAT OCT 15
WSTINGRAYS
featuring.JIM HAKIM
ifffii
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KKr ,K( H I'AI'h K:
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BUYING -
LOANS
TVs, Air Conditioners,
Stereos, gum. gold 4 silver.
diamonds, cameras and
equipment, typewriters,
kerosene heaters,
refrigerators (dorm tut on-
ly), video games A car
fridges, power tools,
musical instruments,
microwave ovens, video
recorders, bicycles, and
anything else ot value.
Southern Pawn Shop,
located �s Evans Street,
downtown. 7SM4e4.
Remember
Tomorrow is the last
day to pre-register
f
WITH THIS COUPON
WELL
GIVE YOU
A DEAL!
Kodak film
24Hour Service on Kodacolor
FILM SENT TO COLORCRAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
Exposure roll Kodacolor Film
50c OFF Developing Any roll slide film
50c OFF Any Co'ar 5x7 Enlargement
S1.00OFF Any 8x10, 8x12, 11x14 Color Enlargement
Qft coieco hop
Sam's Lock
And Key Shoppe
757-0075
1804DickinsenAve.
(across from Pepsi
Plant)
(24 Hours)
Complete
Friendly Service
(she was formerly
with Forrest Lock
and key for 9 years)
items and Prices
Effective thru sat.
October 15,1983.
aga � - -
? or � i Job n �
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aoal �
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U.S. NA�T OfFICER ffJOCHAMS
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OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. - Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
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Eacn of tftese aover
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available for sate in
eacn Kroger sav-on
except as spectficai
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we do run out o an
�T�TT� W� WtM 0��r
you your crwMcc of a
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reflecting me same
savings or a rain
enec wnicn will en-
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the advertrsed item
at tne advertised
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limit one manufac
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Limit one coupon per order- coupon expires 6-1-84
INrRODUCING!
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1-Lb.
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Yubi
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Lowfat
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$159
HOLLY FARMS FRESH
CUT UP MIXED FRYER PARTS
OR GRADE A
whole
Fryers
Lb.
Limit 3 Pkgs.
IN STORE BAKED
French Bread
SLICED OR SHAVED
Boiled Ham
119 I329
� -
I





I
Uttfe liaat (EaroHnian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Darryl Brown, �� &�,
WAVERLY MERRITT. Wror MsWomf
Hunter Fisher, mm -
ALI AFRASHTEH, Cm l
Geoff Hudson, onMM m�mk�-
MlCHAEL MAYO, r�rfcun s�rviw
Cindy Pleasants, �, �'�
Greg Rideout, ott�w ahw �
Gordon Ipock. 00 Edu�
Lizanne Jennings, &���
Todd Evans, product� uanagr,
October 13, 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Commencement
Thanks For Changing The Day
Chancellor Howell earlier this
week officially changed this school
year's commencement from Fri-
day, May 4, to Saturday, May 5.
Thanks for your wisdom and
foresight. In light of last year's
tangle with the student body over
graduation, we believe you have
done a wise and beneficial thing.
Having commencement on a
Saturday, as you know, Dr.
Howell, is a convenience to friends
and family. It allows them to avoid
taking off from work for more
days than is necessary. The change
will allow students to have one day
of rest before taking the final
plunge into the real world; we all
thank you for that.
The most significant aspect of
the new plan is how it came into,
being. Obviously, we can never
know if this is true, but we believe
the campus outcry last year and the
beginnings of one this year were
the main factors contributing to
the administration's change of
heart. Once again, it shows that
with a little perserverance one can
'Tight city hall
We are proud of the students
last year who put enough time and
effort into changing a school event
that truly belonged to them. We
are proud of those students this
year who were about to begin the
same fight for students' rights, for
just the inkling of some
pugnacious spirit sparked the
forces-that-be into changing their
plans.
We are not saying that the whole
administration, or for that matter
individual members of it, is against
students' wishes. We are just
lamenting the simple fact of
bureaucratic life that procedures
are inherently inbred and slow to
accept changes from without. We
are proud to say our academic
leaders are willing to listen to the
leaders of the student body and
respond in the correct manner.
So, seniors, remember when you
stand in Ficklen Stadium on that
fateful Saturday in May that there
will appear to be many immovable
obstacles as you travel down the
proverbial road of life. But, if you
exert enough energy, they can be
moved � just like the day you got
your degree was changed. You will
be one mover and shaker in the
world who has already moved and
shook.
With the World Series tied at
one game a piece, it seems the ap-
propriate time to show our support
for one of the two battling nine. A
staff vote has been tallied, and we
have decided, unanymously, to
support the Baltimore Orioles.
Why the Orioles? Why not?
Baltimore is closer than Phily, and
Phily is in the National League; we
decided it's time for the American
League to bring home the cham-
pionship trophy. Plus,
Philadelphia is the residence of
Temple University, the opponent
of ECU in this Saturday's football
contest.
So, for all it's worth, we offer
our moral support, and thus,
through interpolation, the school's
support, to the Birds of Baltimore.
How To Win The Big One:
Taking The Nobel In Style
By DARRYL BROWN
The Nobel Prize isn't made for just
anybody. It takes a special breed, a cut
above the rest of humanity, to win, or
even accept the big one. Take what's been
going on lately with the announcements
of winners in various categories. Just by
keeping an eye on them you can learn
what it takes to get the big N.
Humility: You got to act like a regular
guy (or girl) who had no idea he was even
up for the prize. "Who, me?" you got to
say. "Just for that little ole experiment
with corn that practically pointed the way
to a cure for cancer?" That was about the
answer of Barbara McClintock, who won
the prize this year for medicine, and is the
first woman to win it alone.
Ignorance: This is the real catcher.
They expect us to believe the greatest
minds in the world today, the most
brilliant PhDs, the most insightful and ar-
ticulate writers, have no earthly idea the
Nobel Prize is big bucks. McClintock
claims she learned her prize was worth
$190,000 from reporters. "Oh, it is? I
didn't know Right. And literature win-
ner William Golding (Lord of the Flies)
thinks little kids are sugar and spice and
everything nice.
Nonchalance: For this one, you got to
act like the big N is just a bother, an in-
teresting side note that interrupted your
dinner. Nobelers are great at this. Where
was Lech Walesa when he was told he
won the peace prize? Picking mushrooms
in the woods. And what did he do when
he heard? Keep on picking.
And McClintock. When reporters
swamped her for an interview after the
announcement of her prize, and she
knows her picture is going around the
world, she picks up an ear of corn, throws
an old sweater over her shoulder and
looks into the camera. Now that's non-
chalance. Here she is, the first woman to
win the medicine prize alone, and she's
holding a corn cob. And to top it all off,
after enduring the reporters, she goes out
for her daily stroll to pick walnuts. It's
Walesa all over again.
WVWLTHWS THE MST TIME W Wl CONTINENTAL UNTIL
1HEV SETTLE THIS PILOTS STRIKE
Is Campus A War Zone?
By PATRICK O'NEILL
A front page news story in The East
Carolinian Tuesday gave an overview of
ECU's new Army ROTC program. The
head of the program, Maj. Michael
Bishop, said he believes an established
campus ROTC is "part of the coming of
age of a university The story also
pointed out that the post-Vietnam era
had ended and ROTC programs were
once again on the rise. "We've put the
war behind us Bishop said.
I can tell. ECU's campus is beginning
to look like a war zone. Everywhere I
look lately I see military uniforms. The
Air Force ROTC with about 175 cadets
and the Army with another 91 manage
to create quite a visual presence with
their forces. Army Cadets often walk
around in almost full combat gear. It's
an eirrie sight.
"ROTC brings out the best in
everyone, and it develops a competitive
edge said one cadet in the story.
Another said the ROTC experience pro-
vided him with "leadership oppor-
tunities
Fortunately, the story also brought
out another important fact: If you join
ROTC, you may have to fight in a war
someday � you might have to kill so-
meone or be killed yourself. "No one is
so naive as to think we'll train them as
officers and not ask them to someday
maybe risk their lives Bishop said.
If you're among the majority of
Americans who believe war is a
necessary evil, then the life and death
factor probably doesn't shock you. For
me, as a Christian, the act of war runs
contrary to my faith.
"We are defending American prin-
ciples echoed one Army ROTC cadet,
"and we may have to take life-
threatening risks
Whenever I hear words like "defen-
ding American principles I get very
nervous. What principles does he mean?
Take for example the situation in
Nicaragua.
At present, the United States is covert-
ly training insurgents in Honduras who
are attempting to destablize and over-
throw the legitimate government in
Nicaragua. Whether or not the United
States happens to like the new govern-
ment in Nicaragua is not the issue. The
country has a right to its own self-
determination free from outside in-
terference. Is that an "American princi-
ple?"
The most unfortunate thing about
military thinking is that it's based on
blind obedience to authority. This is my
primary objection to the presence of
ROTC on our campus.
ROTC is on our campus recruiting
students into an organization dedicated
to the erradication of free will. Most
ROTC students I talk to see the military
as "just another job They claim they
will kill without question if ordered to
by a superior, regardless of their own
moral interpretation of the conflict. In
other words, most ROTC cadets clearly
recognize the magnitude of their com-
mitment when they sign their name on
the dotted line, yet they are willing to
put aside moral principle � if necessary
� if instructed to do so.
Wars don't bring out the best in
anyone. Real security cannot be had
from continued preparation for war.
War preparation has no place on our
campus and should never be considered
part of "our coming of age
Millions of dollars are devoted to the
war option. Why doesn't the federal
government put its mon y in ventures
that will train our youth to achieve peace
through non-violent means? Every
branch of the armed services has an
academy. Since Reagan took office, lots
of funds have been cut from programs
such as the Peace Corps � programs
which do more to protect our national
security then anything the military can
offer.
The ROTC says it provides "leader-
ship" for its members. But their type of
leadership is void of moral guidance.
Cadets are brainwashed to see the world
through the extremely narrow eyes of
the the military-industrial complex. My
advice to ECU ROTC students is to get
out while you can. For the rest of you, I
advise a little studying be done before
you sell your soul for eiconomic security.
Invest instead in "real security There
is no way to peace. Peace is the way.
Campus Forum
Commencement Changed
I have approved the Faculty Senate
resolution requesting that commence-
ment be changed from May 4 to May 5,
1984. I would, therefore, appreciate it
if you would publicize as widely as
possible the fact that commencement
will be on Saturday, May S, 1984, at 10
a.m. Thank you for your help.
Dr. John M. Howell
Chancellor
GT-350: Nifty
I enjoyed Gordon Ipock's "GT-350:
The Legend Of An Ail-American
Sports Car" in the Oct. 11 issue of The
East Carolinian. I suspect many of the
readers had difficulty relating to the ar-
ticle, as most of them grew up in a time
when the first question considered dur-
ing the purchase of a car was "how
good is the gas mileage not "how
much fun is it to drive
The Shelby Mustang GT-350 was
truly a fun car, produced with a
singleness of purpose and few com-
promises, it represented tit in
automative engineering in the same
sense that Frank Lloyd Wright
buildings represent art in architecture.
Several cars from the era are or will
become classics. The GT-350,
however, would blow the doors off a
Porsche, and you could get this perfor-
mance for about the price of a Buick.
The price was perhaps the most
significant accomplishment, as produc-
ing an expensive performance machine
is no real feat. The GT-350 was in that
sense true Americana, as it was affor-
dable by the average American.
I agree with Ipock that it is a legend,
and I wanted to let him know that at
least one reader understood something
of what he felt as he watched it disap-
pear over the hill for the last time.
Paul Alston, Professor
Rehabilitation Studies
We're Sorry
I am writing to request a retraction
of part of a statement made in the Oct.
4 edition. In the front pate article titled
"ECU Student Found Guilty Of
Plagiarism an art student named
Keith Carter is referred to as a "com-
mercial art major Mr. Carter is not a
commercial art major. He is taking a
survey course called "Introduction to
Communication Arts" and is not an
accepted major at this point.
I would like to point out that there is
no program catted "commercial art"
here in the School of Art but there is a
program called Communication Arts
which encompasses graphic design and
illustration. Mr. Carter is simply an art
student. Thank you.
Joan L. Mansfield
Curricular Coordinator
Communication Arts Program.
(Editor's Note: We regret the error
and stand corrected.)
Hal Sensational
Freedom of expression is a basic
right fundamental to the vibrancy of
The East Carolinian or, for that mat-
ter, any university newspaper.
It seems to me quite sad when the
result of free expression is a statement
reflecting obvious sensationalism,
rather classic pseudointellectualism,
vulgarity and what my daddy used to
call "a smart man's sheer stupidity
For example, witness the letter writ-
ten by one Hal J. Daniel HI, which ap-
peared in the campus forum, Sept. 29.
Additionally, why identify professors
by their departmental affiliation? Isn't
just professor enough? The potential
for misinterpretation appears obvious.
R. DuaneLogue
Professor
THfc hA
Women's Fl:
Ti
By ELIZABETH JENNINGS
Style r
As the '83 season of intramurai a
flag football comes to an end, so th
does the joy of victory and the g'
agony of defeat. Some experience m'
the agony a little more than Ud
others.
The women's division of in-
tramural flag football has had
quite an eventful season. In-
tramurals are a great factor
among dormitory and sorority in-
volvement, and each team has put
forth a tremendous effort to beat
the opposition. These efforts have
left many girls standing on the ha
sidelines due to injuries in game an
participation. &
New De
Unique
Bv ROBIN AVERS
StafT�rita
A little bird told me some gooc
music was to be coming out of the
New Deli Restaurant last
weekend. I checked out his hmt
and discovered he was right.
PBS, a local R&B group,
played Friday and Saturday
nights. The band, together for
about two months, has its own
stylized versions of traditional
R&B, jazz and blues songs. In ad-
dition, there were original com-
positions performed.
The band with letters standing
in for an "unprintable" name
gave a zesty performance both
nights. Saturday night PBS
sounded tighter and more relaxed.
Tbc band consists of six
talented members. Landy Spain,
lead guitar, is the band's
songwriter. He shares vocal duties
with bassist James Shoe. Chic
Chamblee, apparently a man of
some mystery, was visible on elec-
tric piano and synthesizer. It is
known Chic has been with PBS
about a month. Keith Strand is
drummer, but a new job in New
Jersey will soon be taking him
away. Bell Powell plays alto and
soprano saxophone. Larry
Boyette, a guitarist, plays by
"absentee ballot Larry is in
graduate school in Rochester.
New York.
Ingredi
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'AL UNTIL
one?
xn has no place on our
should never be considered
Ir coming of age
dollars are devoted to the
Why doesn't the federaJ
ut its money in ventures
r u vouth to achieve peace
violent means? Every
armed services has an
ice Reagan took office, lots
been cut from programs
Peace Corps � programs
re to protect our national
anything the military can
says it provides " leader -
-nembers. But their type of
void of moral guidance.
painwashed to see the world
extremely narrow eyes of
ix-industrial complex. My
nj ROTC students is to get
u can. For the rest of you, I
M studying be done before
Hr oi fox economic scirtty
id in real security " There
peace. Pea is the way.
ARC0S�,
SHALL NQI
�TURN.
A
Vu
ed
:hool of Art but there is a
led Communication Arts
ipasses graphic design and
Ir. Carter is simply an art
tk you.
Joan L. Mansfield
Curricular Coordinator
lurucation Arts Program.
'ote: We regret the error
rrected.)
nsational
of expression is a basic
lenial to the vibrancy of
rolinian or, for that mat-
Jersity newspaper.
me quite sad when the
expression is a statement
bvious sensationalism,
pseudointellectualism,
what my daddy used to
man's sheer stupidity
le, witness the letter writ-
J. Daniel III, which ap-
campus forum, Sept. 29.
why identify professors
lental affiliation? Isn't
r enough? The potential
retation appears obvious.
R. Duane Logue
Professor
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Women's Flag Football
styje
OCTOBER 13. 19t3 Page 3
Tough Competition
By ELIZABETH JENNINGS
As the '83 season of intramural
flag football comes to an end, so
does the joy of victory and the
agony of defeat. Some experience
the agony a little more than
others.
The women's division of in-
tramural flag football has had
quite an eventful season. In-
tramurals are a great factor
among dormitory and sorority in-
volvement, and each team has put
forth a tremendous effort to beat
the opposition. These efforts have
left many girls standing on the
sidelines due to injuries in game
participation.
These women take their foot-
ball seriously. A few broken nails,
a kick in the shin or an elbow in
the chest doesn't stop these ag-
gressive players. Who knows,
maybe next year these women will
take on the men's football divi-
sion.
Many sororities demand prac-
tices a few times a week. Secret
plays have been drawn up with a
little help from a few coaches,
usually the players' boyfriends.
But, according to the Student
Health Center and Sports
Medicine, a number of women
have been complaining of aches
and pains after a grueling football
game. Many of these women end
up with bandaged wrists, ankles
and fingers. Several women have
even had to use the burdening
crutches. "We don't have hardly
any crutches left said a recep-
tionist at the Student Health
Center.
Participants of the Delta Zeta
sorority football team have suf-
fered a broken wrist, three sprain-
ed ankles and one dislocated
shoulder. The majority of these
accidents occurred during just one
football game.
The Chi Omega sorority lost
several football players at the
beginning of the season. Torn
ligaments in the thigh left two top
players out of commission for a
few games. A broken finger and a
sprained back left two more par-
ticipants on the sidelines.
The Sigma Sigma Sigma sorori-
ty had one team member jam her
finger while participating. The
Alpha Xi Delta and Alpha Delta
Pi sororities have reported no
serious injuries. Although many
participants recieved bruises, the
women played till the finish.
The majority of women foot-
ball players agreed that this flag
football season has been the
toughest ever. Every game has
been played with a lot more drive
and desire to win. The word com-
petition keeps these women out on
the field and fighting for their
team.
New Deli Rocks Again With
Unique Local Band 'PBS'
By ROBIN AYERS
�MMMhf
A little bird told me some good
music was to be coming out of the
New Deli Restaurant last
weekend. I checked out his hint
and discovered he was right.
PBS, a local R&B group,
played Friday and Saturday
nights. The band, together for
about two months, has its own
stylized versions of traditional
R&B, jazz and blues songs. In ad-
dition, there were original com-
positions performed.
The band with letters standing
in for an "unprintable" name
gave a zesty performance both
nights. Saturday night PBS
sounded tighter and more relaxed.
TUc band consists of six
talented members. Landy Spain,
lead guitar, is the band's
songwriter. He shares vocal duties
with bassist James Shoe. Chic
Chamblee, apparently a man of
some mystery, was visible on elec-
tric piano and synthesizer. It is
known Chic has been with PBS
about a month. Keith Strand is
drummer, but a new job in New
Jersey will soon be taking him
away. Bell Powell plays alto and
soprano saxophone. Larry
Boyette, a guitarist, plays by
"absentee ballot Larry is in
graduate school in Rochester,
New York.
All the players have experience
with instruments and bands. Most
are self-taught. Bell has a master's
in music and he is music director
at North Pitt High School. He has
had the opportunity to play with
Wilson Pickett. Landy has been
playing guitar 17 years. He and
Bell have played together over the
last couple of years.
James started out playing
guitar. "I grew up listening to
rock music like any other white
kid he said. He has been playing
bass three years and played with
the drummer for the Stingrays
while in high school. When the
group is not making music, they
are listening to a wide variety of
music. "Speaking of the
Stingrays James said, "They're
hot He said the two bands swap
tunes back and forth, but each has
its own interpretation so they
sound different. "We're both uni-
que, he added
Landy said of Billy Price,
"That's the only real singer that
works in that place (the Attic). I
also love Tower of Power, they're
vastly underrated
Friday night I sat at a table near
the front (with the amplifiers).
Saturday night I sat further back
in a booth. I could not sec, but I
heard more. There is a difference
in splitting the senses and focusing
one on one. There is not a better
example than the experience of
live music; good R&B, jazz, blues,
and fusion. PBS has a clean
sound. Led by Landy and Bell,
guitar and sax takes the melody,
sometimes in combinations with
electric piano andor synthesizer.
Landy and Bell can be distinct or
mesh their sounds until there are
two saxophones in the room. Bass
and drums can come into their
own as well as providing strong
rhythmic support for harmony
and melody.
"Black Cadillac on Catfish
Hodges Eyewitness Blues lp was
done well by PBS. It is a blues
number with a sax that carries a
subtle harmony throughout. A
solo on synthesizer highlighted the
song.
PBS performed the B.B. King
version ("Close to it; same ar-
rangement") of "Caledonia by
Lewis Jordan. Written in the
1940's, this is a good dance tune
featuring guitar.
One of Spain's original songs,
an unnamed instrumental, had a
quick pace taken on by guitar and
saxophone. The two go hand in
hand with the latter gradually tak-
ing over.
There were rowdy renditions of
"Who Do You Love?" and
"Mustang Sally with a sensual
slowdown to take her home.
"Truckin a song by William F.
Cody is done by PBS. "Its shock
value. It's filther said Landy.
"Brown Shoes by Oman and
the Howlers made my feet dance
under the table. The electric piano
played a prominent part. It
sounded nicely clear.
PBS can go from laid-back
blues to hot jazz without a pause.
This is an energetic band who
pretty much play for fun. There is
a structure but it is not adhered
to. The band improvises well,
which is helping them to get more
of a feel for their own style.
"PAS would like to play more
weekends. Being on the road in
the past the band got very disillu-
sioned. But still anyone with a
dream is goint to keep after it,
James said
Landy said, "Making music is
like creating illusions You've
still gotta want to do it
James and Landy said it is
hardest to get financial backing at
home. PBS occiaionally gets
opening gigs at the Attic. The
band has played in front of Rob-
bin Thompson, Sea Level, and
Fire Fall.
James said there used to be a lot
of local bands, about eight or
nine. "I think everybody should
support their local bands. Thanks
to the Deli and the Rat, some of
these bands get to play said
James.
Attack!
�A�Y PATTMSOM - PIMM U
.SS ?� W defeMe pnte �� bUtz on Sim� Sigma Sigma's
qoaterback in women's intramural fla footh.il g a s
Seymour Reigns As
Queen OfPrimetime
HOLLYWOOD (UPI) �
English-born Jane Seymour is the
new queen of primetime TV
movies, first in line when quality
scripts with top female roles turn
up at the networks.
Jane- succeeds Elizabeth Mon-
tgomery who held sway for more
than a decade.
For years the scripts that
filtered down to other actresses
bore Elizabeth's fingerprints.
Elizabeth commanded the leads
in A Case of Rape, The Legend of
Lizzie Borden, Mrs. Sundance,
Dark Victory, The Victim, Act of
Violence, Belle Star, The Rules of
Marriage and others, winning
three Emmy nominations in the
process.
Now the No. 1 choice of TV
movie producers apparently is the
strikingly beautiful Miss Seymour
whose latest is NBC TV's The
Haunting Passion, airing Oct. 24.
She plays a wife who cheats on her
husband with a ghost.
"It's a hot, sexy movie with a
daring love-making scene in a
shower Jane said with a smile.
"No one can object because the
ghost I'm making love to can't be
seen
There is much, however, to be
seen of Jane who was bright
enough to foresee that if she
hoped to establish herself in
Hollywood she would have to
speak American English rather
than the cultured tones of Blighty.
Jane masks her English accent
so well that many of her roles are
American or ethnically uniden-
tifiable.
See JANE, p. 6
Ingredients For A Long Lasting Relationship
WASHINGTON (UPI) � Ac-
cording to a recent public opinion
survey, couples with "similar in-
terests" have the best shot at for-
ming lasting relationships.
In this poll, the majority ranked
similar interests ahead of "in-
telligence "sense of humor
"physical attractiveness" and
"good income
I don't necessarily quarrel with
that ordering of priorities. But
suppose you are primarily in-
Keepin'Dry
Tab coaple finds a comfortable, yet
, way to skate mi
Orb this
tneyeny.
Just Relaxing
dttgeatiy looking for a
terested in brainpower, comic
books, good looks and money,
whereas the main interests of your
lover are needlepoint, Bavarian
art, open heart surgery and
pretzels.
Does that mean your relation-
ship is inevitably transitory? Not
necessarily, I would say. It
depends on whether the two of
you are intellectually stimulated
by such things as open heart
surgery and pretzels.
Similiar interests
instead of phsical
atractiveness
If so, you can look forward to
many enchanted evenings before
an open fire, heads together
pondering such conundrums as
whatever happened to closed
heart surgery and how the origin
of hard pretzels got lost in the
mists of antiquity.
Nobody, we are told, knows
where or when hard pretzels, as
opposed to soft pretzels, first ap-
peared.
A true intellectual realizes that
many golden moments are missing
from history, probably because
someone neglected to write them
down. The test of durability is
whether both parties in a relation-
ship are romantic enough to
brood about it anyway.
I personally an intellectually
romantic enough to envision in
the smoke rings the image of Miss
Mable Upperfloss of Amen Cor-
ner, Vt who is in the kitchen
whipping up a batch of pretzels to
take to a church social.
Upon removing the twists from
the oven, she finds to her surprise
and dismay that they have ac-
quired a rigid, brittle texture. Her
assumpion is that she has messed
up the old family recipe for soft
pretzels.
The appointed hour for the
social having already arrived,
Miss Upperfloss does not have
time to whip up another batch.
Neither will her sense of honor
permit her to show up with a
culinary mistake.
So she takes the hard pretzels to
the church and leaves them like a
foundling on the rear stoop,
knocking upon the door and then
beating a hasty retreat ere her
presence is discovered.
It hardly need be said that hard
pretzels provide a new taste thrill,
especially for male parishioners,
in whom they create a strong
thirst for beer.
A church being an inap-
propriate place to develop a crav-
ing for beer, male guests begin
betaking themselves to a nearby
tavern, long before the social
ends.
The barkeep, sensing this could
be the start of something big, has
the hard pretzels analyzed and
duplicated. Thereafter, he keeps a
bowl of them on the bar. Beer
sales triple overnight.
Miss Upperfloss, a teetotaler,
never shares in the fruits of her in-
vention, alas. Mortified by the
belief that she is a failure as a
pretzel baker, she goes to an early
grave.
If hard pretzels lack the ingre-
dients of a lasting relationship,
better take up with someone
whose chief interest is operating
on salt water taffy.
- - -
v





HE t ASi CAROl INIAN
OCTOBER 13, 1983
Jane Seymour No. 1 Choice M4JS?fHON
cont'd from p.5
In truth, her startling beauty
has been more a handicap than
her Mayfair accent, which is
naturally more high-toned even
than Julie Andrews whose
faultless diction severely limits her
choice of roles.
"I used to feel my looks had to
be overcome Jane said. "But
I'm woman enough and vain
enough to have been terribly nat-
tered when Harpers magazine
named me one of the 10 most
beautiful women.
"But when I see a photograph
self posed as a classic beau-
i see the woman as someone
not me
Beauty has not prevented Jane
ing an astonishing list
hour TV movies and
sries in the past few years:
Captain and the Kings, Seventh
Avenue, The Awakening land.
The Scarlet Pimpernel, Fast of
Eden, Phantom of the Opera,
Four Feathers, Dallas Cowboys
Cheerleaders, Frankenstein, The
True Story and Jamaica Inn.
In the near future she will be
seen in Dark Mirror and then in
the title role of Mata Hari.
It doesn't take a Rhodes
Scholar to perceive that much of
Jane's work consists of classic and
gothic stories.
Of her unique type-casting, she
says, "I believe I have a timeless
look. I can play historic roles or
women of the future as I did in
the pilot film of Battlestar Galac-
tica � with equal conviction.
"It isn't just a matter of
makeup and wardrobe. I think it
is an attitude. In several TV
movies I've aged to 50 years old
and in several others I've played
insanity.
"One reason I agreed to do The
Haunting Passion and The Dallas
Cowboy Cheerleaders was the op-
portunity to play contemporary
women
On the big screen, as in TV,
Jane is caught in a time warp. Her
most memorable film role was
Somewhere In Time, in which she
played a turn-of-the-century ac-
tress.
She returns to her own personal
time machine next spring co-
starring with Tom Selleck in
l.assiter, playing a 1939 dancer.
"Perhaps some actresses feel
constrained about playing period
roles she said. "They've
become second nature to me.
"When I step into a period
costume with corsets, wig, fan
and ribbons I feel as comfortable
as I do putting on modern war-
drobe. I'm never aware of my
costume once the scene begins
Jane is content to continue
working in period pieces now that
she and her husband, Hollywood
business manager David Flynn,
have purchased a genuine 10th
century monastary in Avon, con-
verted in the 15th century to an
Elizabethan house, on 14 ancient
acres.
"It is a listed property with
England's National Trust Jane
said. "We've put a fortune into
the place but I think of it as an in-
vestment in history
An appropriate sentiment from
a lady whose acting fortune was
accumulated playing period roles.
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Breaker Morant' Portrays Drama Of War
THURSDAY-OCT 13
LAMBDA CHI ALPHA
Perhap- the best of the new
ighly acclaimed Australian
nema, Breaker Morant is a
tnt drama of war, politics
Based on a true
. the film is set at the turn of
entury, when England was
- 5 the Boer War in Africa �
-rrilla war.
eep Germany from enter-
the war, England court-
ed three Australian
idiers for murdering
' war, and denied
. soldiers were acting
ler British orders.
a travesty of
the Pussies were eiven
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nates emotionally charged cour-
troom confrontations with scenes
of the events as they happened in
a marvelously cohesive style.
As the inexperienced lawyer.
Jack Thompson deservedly won
the Cannes Film Festival Award
as Best Suporting Actor, but the
quality of the rest of the cast mat-
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Morant is a powerful, intelligent
film which, like all great drama, is
also rousing entertainment
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If you re a musician who's serious
about performing, you should take a
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Army bands offer you an average
of 40 performances a month. In every-
thing from concerts to parades.
Army bands also offer you a
chance to travel.
m NO CIVILIAN BAND
CAN MAKE YOU THIS OFFER.
The Army has bands perfoi iing
in Japan, Hawaii, Europe and all
across America.
And Army bands offer you the
chance to play with good musicians. Just
to qualify, you have to be able to sight-
read music you've never seen before and
demonstrate several other musical skills
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mARMYBANDl
BEALLVOUCANBL
Owl
ByCINin PI EA!
�-x,
ECU head I
Emor said the f
to have to p ,
Saturda if tl
Temple
"If we dor
play defense
"we're in for a
"They (T
everything in
the option, the
'I (forrrid
everything - .
After la
Temple in
Emory is exp
little vengeful
in the ba I
they're gonna come
said.
"You km �
down thert
'Look, we
ty back We
they're riding
Emory doesn
will let that happen
team is r e a
the wa the
he said "We
could do a
got to PL'
"This is a bij
if we war
the line "
If the B
hopes of a be -
Qaarter-mile runner Keith Oa
to the relay team, said Track
Orioles
BALTIMORE (I PI) Roo
Mike Boddicker. a lifesaver
watery field, came
Baltimore Onoles' rescue I
second time in a week ecr :
night by tossing a three-hitter a
knocking in a run to spark a
truimph over the Philadelpr
ffiillies that evened the Wo-j
Si?ries at one victory apiece
cAfter a travel dav Thurs
the best-of-seven Series resumes!
Philadelphia Fnday night wi
Mike Flanagan pitching for tj
Orioles and Steve Carlton goa
for the Phillies.
Boddicker, who blanked
4
r





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THE EAST CAROLINIAN
Sports
Owls Won't Be Asleep
OCTOBER 13,1983
Pa�e7
By CINDY PLEASANTS
ECU head football coach Ed
Emory said the Pirates are going
to have to play better defense this
Saturday if they're going to beat
Temple.
"If we don't go to Temple and
play defense Emory said,
"we're in for a long night.
"They (Temple) throw
everything in the world at you �
the option, the split-draw, and the
'I (formation); they use
everything but the kitchen sink
After last year's 23-10 win over
Temple in Veterans' Stadium,
Emory is expecting Temple to be a
little vengeful. "They'll have that
in the back of their minds, and
they're gonna come after us he
said.
"You know what they're saying
down there. They're telling them,
'Look, we can gain some credibili-
ty back We can beat ECU, and
they're riding high right now
Emory doesn't think the Pirates
will let that happen. "I think the
team is really embarrassed with
the way they played Saturday
he said. "We showed what we
could do at Missouri. We've just
got to put it all together.
"This is a big, big game for us
if we want to do something down
the line
If the Bucs are going to keep the
hopes of a bowl bid alive, Emory
said they are going to have to play
every game with a high intensity
level.
"We have to play very inspired
football Emory said. "If you
can't be ready for 11 games a
year, you're not enough of a man
� enough of a player.
"You have 11 games a year and
44 in a career. I could understand
if we had 25 to 30 games a year.
You ought to be ready to play. If
you're not, that's a copout
Emory praised the Pirates for
having an excellent offensive
game, except for four fumbles in
the second half. Running backs
Tony Baker and Ernest Byner
each had two in the second half.
Emory said he hasn't been able
to break Byner of holding the ball
out when he runs. "He carries the
football away from his body he
said, "and four years later he's
still doing it, but he gives such a
great effort
The Pirates may be missing one
of their backs when they travel to
Temple on Saturday. Tailback
Jimmy Walden suffered a frac-
tured hand against SW Louisiana
and is questionable for the trip to
Philadelphia. Walden is the only
player on the serious injury list.
Although Emory may not have
been too thrilled about four
fumbles, he was happy over
ECU's offensive line. "We're just
real happy about the offensive
line at this point he said. "If
Terry Long isn't the finest offen-
sive lineman in the country, I'd
hate to see who is
However, upon mentioning the
Pirates' defense, Emory looked
worried. "We're really concerned
about the defensive secondary "
he said. "We played well in the
fourth quarter, but we're just not
playing with the aggressiveness we
need.
"When teams finesse you and
spread you out on the field, that
should be our cup of tea, but we
seem to do better against someone
like Missouri. It has to be a
physical dogfight for us.
"We need to have something
happen to our defensive secon-
dary. We were 94th in the nation
in pass defense last week, and our
athletes are much finer than
94th
The defense will have a chance
to make something happen
against Temple. And while the
Pirates are concerned about their
secondarv, Temple is confident.
"They have an outstanding defen-
sive secondary�possibly the best
we'll face all season Emory
said.
The Owls also have an outstan-
ding quarterback. "Tim Riordan
is simply one of the most outstan-
ding quarterbacks in the East and
in the nation Emory said. "He
can beat you with the dropback
pass or with the option. He can
beat any team on a given day and
our secondary had better be up to
the task on Saturday
For ECU quarterback Kevin In-
gram, the trip to Philadelphia will
be his homecoming. Ingram had
his finest game of the 1982 season
in his hometown last year. Ingram
threw for 101 yards and rushed
for 105 yards in front of the
homefolks.
But Ingram isn't the only Penn-
sylvanian making the trip. Strong
safety Keith Brown, center Tim
Mitchell and noseguard Gerry
Rogers will also get a chance to
visit their home state.
In fact, both Ingram and
Rogers came to ECU after
Villanova dropped its football
program.
The Pirates were originally
scheduled to play in Veterans
Stadium this year, but the game
was changed when the
Philadelphia Phillies made the
World Series in baseball.
The game, which will be played
now at Franklin Field, was also
changed from 1:30 p.m. to 7:30
p.m. Emory wasn't too happy
about that. "It's just gonna make
me wait that much longer " he
said. "It'll make me put on
another 10 pounds during that
period
fTAMLW LSA Y - I
By RANDY MEWS
Now in his 17th year as head
coach of the men's track team,
Bill Carson is looking forward to
what might be his most successful
season ever at ECU.
The Pirates didn't lose anyone
to graduation, and Carson has
managed to land one of the best
freshmen classes in the state.
a ECU's strongest event will be
� the mile-relay team of Eddie
Bradley, Rueben Pierce, Willie
Fuller and Chris Brooks. All four
are returning veterans, and Car-
son believes they can be one of the
top-twenty relay teams in the
country.
Tommy Adams and Herman
Morton are two freshmen that are
looking good to Carson, and he
expects them to add depth to the
mile relay.
"Tommy beat the lead-off man
on the relay team in trials, and
looked very good in doing it
Carson said. "There's a good
possibility that he will take over a
leg on the mile-relay team before
the season starts.
"We're also hoping that Her-
man comes around as a quarter-
miler Carson added. "In some
meets we might want to hold
Brooks out because he's our best
, long jumper
Keith Clarke is another quarter-
rawer Keith Clarke should also add tremendous depth E?? t$ sh�V!J ft ou' lrhc
relay team, said Track Coach BUI Carson. mmna�m mm �"� � year. "Keith was M for
quite some time with a blood
Orioles Fly By Philadelphia
disorder Carson explained.
"But if he can return to his old
form he will add tremendous
depth to the relay team
Vincent Epps is yet another
freshman that should help out the
relay team. "Vincent looked
awfully good in the time trials, so
I fed we have a total of eight ex-
cellent quarter-milers Carson
said.
"With Brooks and Bradley run-
ning healthy, our chances of runn-
ing a 3:05 in the mile relay are
very good Carson said. "The
school record is 3:06.15, and I
think we have a good chance of
breaking that this year
Six people are presently battling
to make the 4x100 relay team.
"As of right now, we're using
Nathan McCorkle leading off,
Phillip Epps, Joe Dingle and Er-
skine Evans anchoring, but things
could change before the start of
the season Carson explained.
Last year the team ran a 39.8,
with Terry Brown in place of
Epps. Brown isn't presently
enrolled in school, but is expected
back in January to battle Epps for
his old position.
Football star Henry Williams
will also join the team in the spr-
ing and is expected to be one of
the top Pirate sprinters.
Long-jumpers Maurice Monk
and Chris McGlawhorn have
good speed, according to Carson,
and are the two present team
members that are expected to
Pirate Head Coach Ed Emory talks with his former ECU coach, Jack
Boone. Boone, now Emory's specialty teams coach, has been with
East Carolina for 35 years.
In State;
History
Brown and Williams in the spring.
"My real hope is we can go to
the IC4A's this year and run three
people in the 100 and three people
in the 200 who can all make the
finals, while still having the best
4x100 relay team Carson said.
"Last year we bad to use
Evans, Dingle and McGorkic in
the 100, 200 and 4x100 relays. We
made it to the finals, but by the
time we got there everybody was
too tired to perform up to their
potential
The IC4A is the oldest track
conference in the country and is
made up of 115 teams from
throughout the East.
Last season, the Pirates finish-
ed 11th in their first year in the
conference, but Carson is
definitely looking for a top ten
finish this year.
The Pirates also had nine peo-
ple place in the top three, which
earned each individual All-East
honors. "To have nine All-East
athletes on one team is a great
tribute to the ECU program, but I
feel we'll have even more this
year Carson exclaimed.
ECU will compete in 10 indoor
and outdoor meets beginning in
January. Included on their
schedule are such prestigious
meets as the Wanamaker-Milrose
games, the indoor nationals and
the Domino Pizza Relays. Each
meet will attract athletes from
across the country and are
scheduled to be televised.
challenge for spots on the 4x100
relay team.
Individually, the best two
events should be Brooks in the
long jump, and Craig White in the
110-meter hurdles. Both were par-
ticipants in the NCAA Champion-
ships as freshmen and are ex-
pected to repeat this year.
"Chris has been working as
hard as anyone in practice and is
showing great leadership Car-
son said. "He's one of the best
long-jumpers in the country
With McGlawhon and Monk
also long-jumping, Carson feels
this will be the strongest field
event for the Pirates.
White, who was the number
two-ranked freshman hurdler in
the nation last year, will be joined
by Walter Southerland and Steve
Rash in the high hurdle events.
The intermediate hurdles will be
handled by Rueben Pierce,
another runner Carson feels con-
fident will qualify for the na-
tionals. "Rueben's been working
really hard in practice and on the
weights, and I'm expecting him to
have an outstanding year.
"Rueben is also a great asset in
that he's expanding the team
Carson added. "He's giving us a
national Contender in an event
that we didn't even have last
year
The 100 and 200-meter dashes
will be handled primarily by Mc-
Corkle, Evans and Phillip Estes,
with added help coming from
BALTIMORE (UPI) � Rookie
Mike Boddicker, a lifesaver on a
watery field, came to the
Baltimore Orioles' rescue for the
second time in a week Wednesday
night by tossing a three-hitter and
knocking in a run to spark a 4-1
truimph over the Philadelphia
fihiiiiftt that evened the World
Series at one victory apiece.
After a travel day Thursday,
the best-of-seven Series resumes in
Philadelphia Friday night with
Mike Flanagan pitching for the
Orioles and Steve Carlton going
for the Phillies.
Boddicker, who blanked the
Chicago White Sox with a five-
hit, 14-strikeout effort in the se-
cond game of the American
League Playoffs last Thursday
after Baltimore lost the opener,
wasn't quite as overpowering this
time.
But his assortment of off-speed
pitches kept the Phillies off stride
and had them beating the ball into
the ground. Only four of the 27
outs Boddicker recorded were
flies to the outfield, a good thing
since the outfield turf was soggy
from 20 hours of continual rain.
The 26-year-old right-hander,
who posted a 16-8 record with a
2.77 ERA during the season,
struck out six and did not walk a
batter in beating rookie Charles
Hudson. The only hits off Bod-
dicker were an infield single by
Joe Morgan in the fourth, a line
single to right by Gary Matthews
in the seventh and a bloop single
to right by Bo Diaz in the eighth.
Boddicker also drove in a run
with a sacrifice fly � only hit
third at-bat in professional
baseball � when the Orioles
scored three runs in the fifth and
knocked out Hudson.
It appeared for a while Wednes-
day morning that the game might
not be played because of over-
night rain that left Memorial
Stadium field a soggy mess.
However, the Orioles' grounds
crew, one of baseball's best,
worked diligently to get the field
in playing shape. And, except for
some unsure footing in the out-
field, there were no mishaps
because of the condition of the
field.
John Lowenstein also wore a
hero's mantle for the Orioles by
collecting three of Baltimore's
nine hits, including a long home
run in the fifth inning that tied the
score 1-1 and triggered a three-run
outburst.
���





8 THE EAST CAROLINIAN OCOTBER 13, 1983
�Fearless Football Forecast
ECU at Temple
UNC at N.C. State
Maryland at Wake Forest
Clemson at Duke
V MI at Virginia
Tennessee at Alabama
Nebraska at Missouri
Kentucky at I SI
Georgia at Vanderbilt
Cindy Pleaiantt
ECU
UNC
Maryland
Clemson
U.Va.
Alabama
Nebraska
Kentucky
Georgia
Rudy Mewi
ECU
UNC
Maryland
Clemson
U.Va.
Alabama
Nebraska
LSU
Georgia
Mart Barter
ECU
UNC
Maryland
Clemson
U.Va.
Alabama
Nebraska
Kentucky
Georgia
Dve Gordon
ECU
UNC
Maryland
Clemson
U.Va.
Tennessee
Nebraska
LSU
Georgia
MlkeHagbei
ECU
UNC
Maryland
Clemson
U.Va
Tennessee
Nebraska
LSU
Georgia
Greg Hideout
ECU
State
Wake
Clemson
U.Va.
Alabama
Nebraska
LSU
Vandy
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Title
The East Carolinian, October 13, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 13, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.294
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
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