The East Carolinian, October 11, 1983






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Vol.58 No JtS
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Tuesday, October 11,1983
Greenville, N.C.
12 Pages
Circulation 10,000
Signs Indicate Army
ROTC Will Continue
To Grow In Future
By DENNIS M. KILCOYNE
SUIT Writer
The Army Reserve Officers Training Corps began
operating last month at ECU. It already has 59 cadets
in the basic course (freshman and sophomores) and
32 in the advanced course (juniors and seniors), and
will exist alongside the already successful Air Force
ROTC.
The head of the Army program, Maj. Michael
Bishop, said that all signs indicate that his group's
program will grow substantially in the next few years.
Student enrollees can choose two tracks in ROTC.
In the four year program, interested freshmen and
sophomores can take the basic courses for six credit
hours of military science without committing
themselves to joining ROTC. Next comes the advanc-
ed courses of sixteen credit hours in which a student
formally joins AROTC.
In the two-year program, upperclassmen entered
AROTC with the immediate service obligation of
three years after graduation. The basic and advanced
courses are combined in two years. In addition, two
and three-year scholarships can be won by eligible
students who have at least a 2.5 grade point average.
The scholarships pay for books, tuition and fees in
addition to the $100 per month that all cadets receive
for the ten-month school year.
Cadets are civilian students who study whatever
major and minor fields they wish. On graduation,
they are commissioned as second lieutenants and can
enter active duty for three years. If they choose the
national guard or the reserves, the obligation is eight
years. Nurses, because they are in short supply, go in-
to active service.
See AROTC, Page 6
The East Carolinian
Elections Set For Wednesday;
Shore Foresees No Problems
ROB POOL - Ptwte Lab
So What Else Is New?
An ECU policeman gives yet another traffic ticket
to an illegally parked vehicle.
By PATRICK O'NEILL
Start Writer
The second round of the SGA
elections is set for Wednesday,
with 72 ECU students vying for
positions from graduate class
president to day representative.
Ten students are running unop-
posed, while six other positions,
including junior class vice presi-
dent, have no candidates on the
ballot. The election polls are
located throughout campus and
will be open 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.
Newly appointed elections com-
mittee chairman Walter Shore
said he is confident that the ad-
ministrative problems which
resulted in the cancellation of last
month's SGA election results have
been smoothed over. "I don't
foresee any problems on Wednes-
day Shore said Monday.
"Things will run smooth this
time; we've gotten a lot of sup-
port
In the previous election held on
Sept. 28, 20 candidates' names
were left off the ballot because
they had failed to file a financial
statement. But according to of-
ficial SGA election rules, failure
to file the financial expense report
is not grounds for disqualifica-
tion. As a result, the first election
was declared void and the entire
process was reconducted.
General Manager Leaves
B PATRICK. O' NE1LL
Staff Writer
East Carolinan General
Manager Fielding Miller resigned
his position Friday because he is
no longer a full-time student, a re-
quirement the Media Board set
for the heads of all campus media.
"As you are aware, the Media
Board constitution requires that
all media heads be full-time
students, thus I am ineligible to
continue in my present capacity as
general manager of The East
Carolinian Miller wrote in a let-
ter he sent to Vice Chancellor for
Student Life Elmer Meyer.
"In accordance with the univer-
sity and Media Board policy, I'm
giving official notice of the
change in my status I am
resigning my position effect this
date: October 7
Miller joined The But C�roU-
nian staff in 1981 when he was ap-
pointed business manager. He was
appointed to the position of
general manager in May of 1982
as part of administrative restruc-
turing effort which gave the
general manager complete respon-
sibility of the business aspects of
The East Carolinian, while
keeping the post of a managing
editor to oversee the editorial con-
tent of the paper. Both positions
replaced the role formerally con-
ducted by the editor-in-chief.
"I throughly enjoyed my time
and work with the staff of The
East Carolinian Miller said
Monday. "I've met a lot of good
people in the last two years
"I feel like it's been a successful
tenure Miller said. "I want to
thank all the business staff and
other people who have helped me
in my work
Miller said he tried and succeed-
ed in bringing "a business pro-
spective" to the newspaper which
will save money in the future.
Miller praised the efforts of the
editorial staff. "I've had a
capable editorial staff throughout
my years here he said.
"Fielding Miller was the first
general manager of The East
Carolinian under the changed
organizational structure Meyer
said Monday. "(He's) done a lot
to enhance the business side of
The East Carolinian
"During the terms of his office,
The East Carolinian has certainly
been an improved newspaper
said Associate Dean and Director
of University Unions S. Rudolph
Alexander. "The overall quality
of the paper has improved. I've
always found him a very
Former SGA elections commit-
tee chairman Danny White also
had difficulties getting people to
volunteer to supervise polls during
the last election. As a result some
polls had to be shut down early.
White resigned his post on Oct. 3.
"It's a total new election said
Shore, adding that the entire pro-
cess from filing to the ballot "had
to be done over from the beginn-
ing
Shore held a mandatory
meeting for all candidates to ex-
plain the election rules. "They all
received a schedule informing
them when the financial
statements were due Shore said.
The financial statements had to
be submitted by noon on Mon-
day. According to Shore, four
candidates were disqualified from
the second election after failing to
file the statement.
As of Monday Shore was still
short on volunteers to tend the
pollls. "As of yet they're (the
polls) not completely covered
he said. "But I don't feel it's go-
ing to be a problem Shore said
he still has individuals to call for
assistance.
"All the candidates were in-
formed correctly; there was no
room left for misunderstanding
Shore said.
Shore, who is paid $125 per
election for his position, said the
problems of the first election were
not the fault of the elections com-
mittee, but rather an error in the
intrepretation of the rules.
Voting Urged
By PATRICK O'NEILL
SUit Writer
Student Government
Association President Paul
Naso is urging students to "get
out and vote" in Wednesday's
SGA elections.
"I can't stress enough the
importance of your vote
Naso said Monday. "This is
your chance; these people will
be your representatives; your
vote will make the
difference
Naso said polls would be
set-up from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. at
the Belk building, the Student
Supply Store, the Croatan,
Mendanhall Student Center,
the bottom of College Hill,
and in the lobby of Jarvis
Residence Hall. Dorm
representative candidates can
be voted for in their respective
dorms.
Rebel '83 Wins A ward
Second Straight Year
By SUSAN JOHNSON
Chancellor Howell Undergoes Surgery
By MILLIE WHITE
A�ktiet Newi tAtor
ECU Chancellor John Howell
underwent surgery Monday, Oct.
3, to remove a polyp from his
intestinal track.
According to Howell, two mon-
ths ago he was hospitalized with
diverticulitis , an infection in the
colon. Six weeks later, while hav-
ing routine x-rays taken, the
polyp was found in his in-
testinal track.
Howell is currently carrying out
school business at his home on
Fifth Street. He says he is
Fielding Miller
cooperative person, and I'm sorry
to learn that he has found it
necessary to resign his position as
general manager
East Carolinian Business
Manager Hunter Fisher, will be
assuming the duties of general
manager until which time the
Media Board is able to appoint a
replacement for Miller.
Watt Resigns
ECU's Rebel '83, the universi-
ty's literary-art magazine, reciev-
ed the Columbia Scholastic Press
Association First Place Medalist
Award in the 60th annual contest.
This rating gives the Rebel a rank-
ing among the top five in the
country. Out of a possible score
of 1000 points in the judging, the
Rebel received 948.6.
In an interview Friday, Ellen
Moore, editor of the magazine,
said, "I was very surprised we
won it again The Rebel won the
same award in 1982.
Moore said she wasn't sure
Rebel '83 had what was needed to
win. "There were problems with
the staff last year that made pro-
duction later than scheduled, and
organization was almost nonexis-
tent Moore said. "It was fun to
put together, but it was also a lot
of hard work
In the judge's score and
workbook, a judge commented
that the Rebel is "more than a cut
above most other collegiate
literary-art magazines
The Rebel is having its annual
contest next month. The deadline
for entry in the literature contests
is Nov. 7; the art contest deadline
is Nov. 14. Prize money is provid-
ed by The Attic and Budweiser.
Winning entries will be published
in Rebel '�� and entered in the
61st annual Columbia Scholastic
Press Association Contest.
recuperating
nicely and
plans to return
to work soon.
"I'm up and
about, a little bit grouchy, but I'll
be back to work next week he
said.
HoweU
Sierra Club Questions Move
FAYETTEVILLE, N.C. (UPI)
� Interior Secretary James
Watt's resignation comes as a
relief to the national president of
the Sierra Club, but he questioned
whether the move would mean an
end to the Reagan
administration's environmental
policies.
"We have been trying for some
time to encourage the secretary's
resignation said Denny Shaffer,
leader of the 350,000-member en-
vironmental group. "The insults
to our intelligence will diminish
now, I think. I think the question
to be answered is whether the
assaults on our environment will.
"Watt's insensitive comments
and his outrageous behavior, un-
fortunately, obscured the policy
of this administration, which I
think are equally disgraceful and
unacceptable to the American
public he said Sunday.
Watt resigned Sunday, saying
he had accomplished the goals he
set when he joined the Reagan ad-
ministration. The resignation was
widely seen as forced because of
public outcry over Watt's remark
that he had an advisory panel
composed of a "black a
woman, two Jews and a cripple
Shaffer said it is ironic that
Watt's resignation came as the
result of his comments, rather
than his actions.
"I think it is ironic that his
speech and comments have been
so outrageous that they have
covered his deeds, which are
equally outrageous and are as in-
sensitive to the environment as his
comments are to human beings
Shaffer said.
He said the Sierra Club's con-
cern now is whether President
Reagan will replace Watt with
"some sort of glib salesman for
the same policies.
"I think for some time people
have been assuming some of these
more outrageous polices have
been policies of Jim Watt Shaf-
fer said.
Shaffer said he has no par-
ticular favorite among those nam-
ed as possible replacements for
Watt, but he would like the ad-
ministration to choose someone
who would fulfill "the charge of
being steward
Knudsen Challenges Eure's 46-Year Reign

Charlie Daniels Band To Appear
This year's Homecoming concert will feature tke Charlie Daniels Band. Tickets for tke show, which in-
cludes Marshall Tucker, will go on sale Oct. 14 at tke Central Ticket Office, MendenhaU Student Center.
Tickets cost $9 for students and $10 for tke general pukHc. There will be no reserved seating for tke event
which will be held in Minces Coliseum Oct. 28 at 8 p.m.
RALEIGH (UPI) � Wake County Commissioner
Betty Ann Knudsen says it's time to start a new tradi-
tion in the secretary of state's office by ending Thad
Eure's 46-year hold on the job.
Mrs. Knudsen announced Monday she will vie
against the 83-year-old Eure next year for the
Democratic nomination. No Republicans have an-
nounced their candidacy.
"I firmly believe North Carolinians deserve a
secretary of state who has a vision of the future, not
who is rooted in the past Mrs. Knudsen said in an
annoucement at the Capitol. I am asking the peo-
ple of North Carolina to give me a chance to update
and improve the office of secretary of state, to imple-
ment a new tradition
Mrs. Knudsen said Eure has done a good job car-
rying out the office's ceremonial functions, but has
fallen short in his other duties of promoting new state
policies and distributing information.
Her campaign goals are to computerize more state
records, return the state Board of Elections to the
secretary's control, update official publications, im-
prove monitoring of businesses by the Securities
Division and work to implement the recommenda-
tions of the North Carolina 2000 Committee.
Mrs. Knudsen, who turned 57 Monday, predicted
she will need to spend $150,000 on the primary and
general election. She is expected to garner support
from women's groups, and currently is the only
woman seeking any statewide elective office.
Eure won the secretary of state's office in 1936 and
has been a colorful part of state politics ever since.
He calls himself "the oldest rat in the Democratic
barn" and appears regularly at gatherings across
North Carolina.
He has won re-election easily every four years since
then, except in 1976 when George W. Breece of
Fayetteville came within 45,000 votes of him.
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?
THE EASTCAROUNIANpcrOBER 11. 1981
ANNOUNCEMENTS
If you or your organization
would like to have an .tern
printed in the announcement
column, please type it on an an
nouncement form and send if to
The East Carolinian in care of
the production manager
Announcement forms are
available at the East Carolinian
office m the Publications
8uilding Flyers and handwrit
ten copy on odd sued paper can
not be accepted
There is no charge for an
nouncements. but space is often
limited Therefore, we cannot
guarantee that your announce
menf will run as long as you
want ano suggest that you do not
rely solely on this column for
publicity
The deadline for an
nouncements is 3 p m Monday
tor the Tuesday paper and 3
o m Wednesoay tor the Thurs
day paper No announcements
received after 'hese deadline?
will be ponied
This space is available to all
campus organizations and
departments
Announcements
SPORTS MEDICINE
Alpha Epsilon Delta. ECU
pre medical honor society, will
have a meeting on Tuesday, Oct
11 In Flanagan 307 at 7 30 p m
Dr Ed Bartlett, an alumnus of
ECU. graduate of UNC CH
Medical School and a practicing
orthopedic surgeon, will speak
on Sports Medicine and aspects
of orthopedic surgery All
members and guests are en
.ouraged to attend!
INTERNATIONAL
LANGUAGE
ORGANIZATION
The international Language
Organization will be meeting on
October 12, 193 at 3 p.m. In
BC 301 The meeting will con
cern the upcoming Oktoberfest
All old members and officers
are encouraged to attend this
meeting. Any one interested in
learning more about the I L O is
welcome to come to our
meetings. You do not have to be
a Foreign Language malor or
minor to join the I.L.O.
PHI
BETA LAMBDA
The Omicorn Chapter of Phi
Beta Lambda Is selling Tom Wat
products from now until October
19. if s toys, chimes, calendars
toois. school supplies, and knick
knacks. It's everything from
first aid kits to candles. From
whimsical to practical, Tom
Wat makes great gifts, or stock
ing sfuffers, for people of all
ages
Phi Beta Lambda is the
Naitonai organization for
students maioring in business
education, marketing, manage
ment, finance, or accounting.
Sponsorship of Phi Beta Lamb-
da is in the Business Education
and Office Administration
Department Persons Interested
in purchasing Tom Wat products
should contact Mrs Betty Cor
bin (757-�9�3) or any member of
Phi Beta Lambda.
STRONG-CAMPBELL
INTEREST
INVENTORY
The Strong Campbell interest
Inventory Is offered every Tues
day In 305 Wright Annex at 4
p.m. when school Is In session
with the exceptions of examine
tlon period and registration day
This Is available to all students
at NO COST. No formal reglstra
tlon is required. For more Infor-
mation, call the Counseling
Center at 757-4M1
ASSERTIVENESS
TRAINING
WORKSHOP
A three part workshop offered
to students at NO COST by the
University Counseling Center
Thursday, Oct 20, 27 and Nov. 3.
All three sessions will be con
ducted from 34 pm In 306
Wright Annex (757 441)
LEARNING
EFFICIENCY
CLASSES
A program for Increasing
Learning Efficiency will be of
fered by the Counseling Center.
The first section will be on Mon
day and Wednesday at 3 p.m.
beginning Oct 24 and the second
section will be on Tuesday and
Thursday at 1 pm beginning
Oct 25. Both groups will meet In
305 Wright Annex The classes
are available to all students. At
lendance is voluntary No for
mal registration is required
ALPHA
OMICRON PI
The Big Brothers of Alpha
Omlcron Pi will have a meeting
on Wednesday October 12 at 4:30
p m. All old and new big
brothers are encouraged to at-
tend this meeting.
UNIVERSITY
ADMINISTRATIVE
APPLICATIONS
Applications are now being ac
cepted for students wishing to
serve on University Committees
for the 193 84 school year Sfu
dent positions are open on
University Administrative Com
mittees and Faculty
SenateAcademic Committees
Applicalton blanks have the
names of committees with
vacancies on them Applications
may be picked up at the follow
3 locations:
Office of the Vice Chancellor
for Student Life, 204 Whichard;
Mendenhall Student Ceter Infor
mafion Desk, SGA Office,
Mendenhall Student Center Of
flee of intramural Recreational
Services, Memorial Gym and
Residence Hall Directors Of
fices.
The University greatly ap
preciates the efforts of those
students who have served in the
past and hopes that students will
continue their interest and par
ticipation. Questions about
University committees and
memberships may be directed
to the Office of the Vice
Chancellor for Student Life
(757 4541)
CO-OP
A representative from the
US General Accounting Office,
Virginia Beach, VA, will be on
campus October 25 to interview
co-op students who would like to
work are a GAO Evaluator.
Business students who have
completed 75 semester hours
and have a 2 9 GPA or higher
should contact the Coop Office,
313 Rawl, to arrange an Inter
view Immediately.
NATIONAL HONOR
SOCIETY IN
PSYCHOLOGY
If you have 8 semester hours
in psychology, or will have at the
conclusion of the semester and If
you are In the top 35 percent of
your class, then you are eligible
for membership in the National
Honor Society In Psychology,
PSI CHI.Pick up your applies
ilons In the PSI CHI library
(Speight 202) during office
hours. Apply nowll Hurry, the
deadline for application is
November 11, 193. If you are a
member, new or old, and you
haven't filled out a locator card,
please come by PSI CHI office
and fill one our.
We all want PSI CHI to be the
best ever this semester, so all
you guys get involved In YOUR
organizaiton We're here for you
and WE ARE WHAT YOU
MAKE US, HELP MAKE US
GREAT
PREPROFESSIONAL
HEALTH ALLIANCE
The PreprofessJonel Health
Alliance will meet Thursday,
Oct. 13 at 5:30 p.m. in the
Culture Center. Dr. Linda Splno
from the Center for Student Op-
portunities will speak on Test
Taking Techniques. All
members and interested per
sons are urged to attend.
GAMMA
BETA PHI
The ECU GAMBET for the Oc
tober 4 meeting has been posted.
Please note one correction: an
additional prize of $25 gift cer
tlficate from the U.B.E. Art and
Camera Is also available as a
part of the giveaway.
f
TOB!
COMPUTERS
The October meeting of the
East Carolina Microcomputer
Users Group (ECMUG) will be
Wed , Oct. 12, at 7:30,
Mendenhall Student Center,
Room 221. Professor Chla Yu Li
will demonstrate an Introduc-
tion to assembly-language pro
gramming, using a 4S00
microprocessor. You do not
need to have a micro-computer
at attend
INTER-VARSITY
CHRISTIAN
FELLOWSHIP
Inter Varsity would like to in
vlte everyone out on Wednesday
nlte at 4:X to hear Paul Leary
speak on missions Too many
times we get caught up In our lit
tie world when there is so much
going on all over the world
Come to Jenkins Audltorum and
find out whats going on, and how
you can be involved
AEROBICS
REGISTRATION
Second Session Aerobics
Registration will begin just after
Fall Break on October 19 21.
Classes will be held at the same
times as first session with one
exception there will be more
classes Cost is 14students.
15faculty staff, and spouse for
classes meeting l time per week
and i students, SlOfaculty,
staff, and spouse for classes
meeting twice a week. Classes
run from Oct 24 Dec 5th. For
more information just come by
the im Rec Offices In 204
Memorial Gym
THANK YOU
The Sisters and Pledges of
Alpha XI Delta would like to
thank the Sisters and Pledges of
Alpha Phi and the Brothers and
Pledges of Kappa Alpha Order
and Kappa Sigma for all their
hard work in making the Block
Party a success. Also, we would
like to thank all those who at-
tended.
ADVANCEMENT
MANAGEMENT
SOCIETY
interested In Business? Come
to the meeting of the Society for
the Advancement of Manage-
ment on Tuesday, Oct 11 at 3
p.m. In Rawl 104. Our featured
speaker will be Mr. D.D. Bright
speaking on "Careers In In-
surance All interested parties
and persons are Invited to at-
tend.
PHILOSOPHY
Text: The Philosophy Club
will meet at Mendenhall Student
Center, Room 212, at t p.m
Tuesday Oct. 11. N.K. Hoggard
will present a paper titled "Can
Dualism be Supported By in
fallebilfty of Mental States?"
After the reading of the paper
there will be open discussion of
the topic. Copies of the paper
will be available upon request In
the Philosophy reading room In
Brewster A wing 3rd floor Tues
day morning The interested and
curious are invited and welcom-
ed to attend All Phi Sigma Tau
members are urged to par-
ticlpate
CLASSIFIED ADS
You may us me form of rtattf or
uw � separate shoot of popor If
you nood more linos. Thoro ere 33
units per lino. Each letter, punc
tuetion mark and word space
counts �s one unit. Capitalize and
hyphenate words properly. Leave
space at end of line if word
ooesnt fit. No ads will be ac-
cepted over the phone W
reserve the right to reject any ad.
AN ads must be prepaid. Enclose
75� per line or fraction of a tine.
Please print Irsibly! Use capital and
lower case letters.
Return to the Media Board
secretary by 3 p.m. the day btfore
publication.
Nut
Address-
CityState.
No lutes
.el 79
I
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E
GOODIES
You say you can't wait to taste
mom's homemade goodies?
Well, you don't have to. Come by
the Student Supply Store on
Wednesday October 12 and get
some of the AOll's homemade
goodies.
PHI SIGMA PI
Students receiving invitations
to pledge Phi Sigma National
Honor fraternity are urged to at
tend our smoker In Mendenhall
multi-purpose room Tuesday
night at 7:30 p.m. Refreshments
will be served. Come out and
meet the brothers I
i
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stand you Your safety, comfort ond prrvocy are
assured by the caring staff of th Reming Center
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GENERAL FOODS� INTERNATIONAL COFFEES.
AS MUCH A FEELING AS A FLAVOR
MARCH ON
RALEIGH
On Oct. IJ people from
throughout the state will par-
ticipate In the "March on
Raleigh The focous of the
march Is to "Stop first strike
weapons In Europe, Reverse the
arms race, Freeie nuclear
weapons (and) Fund human
needs Several speakers will
speak during a morning rally
behind the N.C. State
Legislature. For more Info Call
758 4906 or 753 3724.
THANKS
DELTAZETAS
The Brothers and Pledges of
Pi Kappa Phi fraternity would
like to thank the Delta Zeta
sorority for a great social. I
guess you girls can hang after
all.
Good luck to both the "A" and
"B" football teams In the
playoffs. We are looking to win it
all. That also Includes the
Chancellor's Cup. PI Kapps II
WORLD FOOD
DAY SKIT
Participets in next weeks
World Food Day skit are asked
to attend tonights meeting at
900 pm at the Catholic
Newman Center (9S3 E. 10th
St.) 752 4216.
CADP
There will be a meeting of the
Campus Alcohol Drug Program
on Tuesday the nth at 4 pm All
interested persons are invited to
attend
REBEL CONTESTS
The annual REBEL contests
are coming up soon Deadline
for prose and poetry submit
slons is Monday, November 7.
Bring your entries by the
REBEL or Media Board offices
from 9 - 5. All entries must be
typed and Include your name,
address, phone number, and
classification. Prize money Is
provided by the Attic and
Budwelser.
THANK'S AND
CONGRATULATIONS
The Brothes of Kappa Sigma
would like to thank all of the
ladies who came out for Little
Sister rush. We would also Ilka
to congratulate Richie Jackson,
Tim irwin, John Hamrlck and
David Fain on being Initiated.
"How 'bout those new pledges
Flownderl"
BAPTIST
STUDENT
UNION
Come to the Baptist Student
Union for supper on Tuesday
evenings at 5:30 p.m followed
by and enlightening program,
SPARK. The meal costs S2.00
but our love and fellowship is
free.
EPISCOPAL
WORSHIP
A service of Evening Prayer
will be read at St. Paul's
Episcopal Church (one block
north of Garret Hall at 406
Fourth st.) on Tuesday, Oct. II at
5:30 p.m.
SENIORS
The Career Planning and
Placement Service offers a cen-
tralized place to have three let-
ters of reference as you talk to
potential employers this year, if
you wish to use this sevlce, come
by the Bloxton House and pick
up a self-explanatory Reglstra
tlon packet. Everyone should
read the description of the office
In you UNIVERSITY
CATALOG. Some companies
send recruiters to interview
fhoe who have registered.
Those who are registered can
receive a list of the employers
who come starting October 11.
OFFICIALS
The training clinic for Soccer
Officials 6 p.m. Tues. Oct II.
Rm. 102, Mem. Gym.
BE A CLOWN
it's time to enter the fun and
exciting world of entertainment
The 19t3 Homecoming ParaHe is
iust around the corner Any
valid ECU student, faculty or
staff member is invited to dress
as a clown and walks in the
parade if you like helium
balloons, there will be lots of
purpte and gold ones to give to
people along the parade route if
interested, call Mendenhall Stu
dent Center at 757 6611. Ext 213
Everyone is welcome.
SLAP MAJORS
Students Interested in maior
Ing In Speech Language ana
Auditory Pathology will meet or,
Tuesday evening October 11 at 7
pm in Brewster D 113
CROSS
CAMPUS RACE
Two Cross Campus recn �
be held Homecoming Oa� $��.
day Oct 29 A 2 5 mite r�c
start at 9 am and a II m �
race will start af 9 30 a Ml Rot
races start neer me bleach,
the ECU varsity track B
Field The race course s � per
cent on grass ana traverse, .
and about me area surr-v.
Minges Coliseum, f c, ��
Stadium. Bunting Pieic Man
ington and the �romr� s jot's
field The races, whicf are ov
sored by trie Depertmr. v
intramural Rec reef on lew
vices, are open to parr oe'v
by all ECU stuoe�ts ��� a:
ECU alumni
The East Carolinian.
Samngj thecampu.i cnmmurftv
uncr 192!
Published every Tuesday
and Thursday during the
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BGLENN
MAL'GHAN
Staff �rtr
"People
Politics" is the sloj
Tom Gilmore uses!
describe his campj
for governor of No
Carolina in 191
Even more unique
Gilmore's appros
for winning votes
will work at 84
ferent jobs prior
election da
November.
"It's a wa
demonstrate
sincerity and le
first-hand about
problems facing
people of No
Carolina Mei
Reid, spokesom
for Gilmore's c
Raleii
B PATRICK
O'NEIII
�Mmft �r!ltr
Organizers
planning for
than 1,000 people
converge on the st
capita in Raleigh
22 to participate
North Carolina's : 1
anti-nuclear raih
march.
The gathering, b
ed as the "March
Raieigh is focusi
on several issu
primarily oppc I
to U.S. plans
deploy Pershing
and cruise missies
Western Europe laj
this year.
According
retired Air Force Q
James F. Berrv
Vote
LUNG
$2.50
CHECK
DINNE1
i
Try our
and Impi
i
2 Locations u
500 W. Greenv
2903 E. 10th Sj
If you are a)
"B " average
ju n i or a"C
(Nuclear Pi
qua
��� $3000.01
��� $22,00
��� FREE M�
If you'i
Oftlcor Progi
Student Cent
transcrIpts








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IAJORS
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CROSS
CAMPUS RACE
Two Cow C�mpu� r�c�� will
- htW Homecoming Day Satyr
aav Of' � �li mil ract will
s'an in im �nj a s.o mile
-ace � ' ttBrf a' � 30 a m Both
-aces s'art riear me bleachers at
"e ECU varjify track. Bunting
1 r d TNe'ace covj� i �5 per
�M or g-av� ana 'rav�r�� in
�ro about me �re� surrounding
v -g� Coi;�eum. FickJen
STaaiT- Buing Field. Harr
eton anc 'h women j Softball
� - 1 "v -aces, which are soon
� ?, �he Department of
ntramural Recreational Ser
e-i a' open to participation
- a ECl students, staff and
ECu a umM
Karalmtan
ON FORM
Date lo End:
Individual
Date Paid
nts receive The
n above and drop
xond floor, Publica-
i entrance of Joyner
year and S15 for six
culation manager.
Reach Road
-5113
PA.D.I.
CATION
1MUM) ON
ICE ON
AIR
RDER EQUIPMENT
REQUEST AND
HEAD, N.C. 27929
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11, 1983
Gubernatorial Candidate Uses
Unique Approach To Win Votes
By GLENN
MAUGHAN
Staff Writar
"People not
Politics" is the slogan
Tom Gilmore uses to
describe his campaign
for governor of North
Carolina in 1984.
Even more unique is
Gilmore's approach
for winning votes. He
will work at 84 dif-
ferent jobs prior to
election day next
November.
"It's a way to
demonstrate his
sincerity and learn
first-hand about the
problems facing the
people of North
Carolina Melanie
Reid, spokeswomenn
for Gilmore's cam-
paign, said. "The day
he announced his can-
didacy, he worked in
a day-care center for
four and five year
olds; took a lunch
break to make the an-
nouncement and went
back to the center
Reid said.
News
Feature
Gilmore has
already worked as a
peanut farmer, tobac-
co farmer, turkey pro-
ducer, ham salter,
shrimp deheader, car
salesman, school
teacher, brick mason,
health care assistant,
produce farmer,
tobacco primer and
tagger, textile worker,
housewife and other
occupations.
His "housewife
job" brought him to
the home of Vince
and Malyn Pratt of
Charlotte, N.C, on
Monday, Oct. 3. Mrs.
Pratt said Gilmore
came early to meet
their children since he
would care for them
on Tuesday. "He got
our children ready for
bed, read them a story
and spent the night
with us. He fixed us
all breakfast in the
morning she said.
Gilmore then got
five-year-old Michael
ready for school, fix-
ed Michael's lunch
and drove Michael
and some other
children to school. He
came home and went
grocery shopping with
Marirose, the Pratt's
three-year-old
daughter. After shop-
ping, he made the
beds, vacuumed,
dusted, did three
loads of wash, made
lunch, played with the
children and baked a
cake.
"We had a
delicious meal for din-
ner that he fixed en-
tirely; he even did the
dishes later Pratt
said. She added she
was impressed with
Gilmore. "He took
his job very seriously
and the children really
fell in love with him
she said.
"I think he left our
house with a greater
understanding of
what it means to keep
house she said.
Gilmore's cam-
paign philosophy pro-
duced an unusual
twist while he worked
as a dairy farmer. He
delivered a bull on the
same day his grand-
son was born.
Gilmore's schedule
has him working as a
radio DJ, a waiter,
commercial fisherman
and student, among
others, during Oc-
tober. Monday,
Gilmore was in
Greenville to work as
a parking lot atten-
dant at Pitt County
Memorial Hospital.
Black Novelists Recognized
�OB fOOLE - PMi Lat
Raleigh Anti-Nuke Rally Planned
A window display titled "Contemporary Black Novelists" is currently on view in the Studen,
Supply Store. Dr. Joyce Pettis of the English Department initiated the display.
Genetic Makeup
Wear Best Genes For Lecture
By PATRICK
O'NEILL
SlaH Writer
Organizers are
planning for more
than 1,000 people to
converge on the state
capital in Raleigh Oct.
22 to participate in
North Carolina's first
anti-nuclear rally and
march.
The gathering, bill-
ed as the "March on
Raleigh is focusing
on several issues,
primarily opposition
to U.S. plans to
deploy Pershing II
and cruise missies ;n
Western Europe later
this year.
According to
retired Air Force Col.
James F. Berry, the
Raleigh event is a
"strong grass roots
statement" showing
the public is tired of
living in fear of
nuclear war.
Berry is one of the
organizers of the
event which is spon-
sored by more than 2C
organizations from
throughout the state.
Prominent among the
event's sponsors is the
N.C. Peace Network,
the Raleigh Catholic
Diocese and the War
Resister League.
The rally begins at
11:30 a.m. behind the
state legislature where
participants will
gather to listen to
several speakers.
Speakers include Kel-
ly Alexander Jr
president of the NC-
NAACP, Richmond,
Va Catholic Bishop
Walter Sullivan,
former U.S. attorney
Mickey Michaux,
labor leader Wilber
Hobby and former
N.C. State University
Chancellor John
Caldwell.
The March on
Raleigh organizers say
they have three goals
in addition to opposi-
tion to Euromissile
deployment: reversing
the arms race, freez-
ing nuclear weapons
and funding human
needs.
Berry spent 31 years
in the Air Force
before retiring in
1968. He opposes the
Euromissile deploy-
ment because he says
the placement of the
missiles increases the
risk of a nuclear acci-
dent.
"The key problem
is warning time
Berry said. "You've
got a flight time of
less than 10 minutes.
When the Soviets get
an indication (of a
possible nuclear at-
tack) they will have a
very short time to
react
Berry admits, that
because of their
SS-20's already in
place, the Soviets
have a "clear advan-
tage" in terms of their
capability to destroy
Western Europe, but
he sees the U.S.
deployment of cruise
and Pershing II 's as
increasing tension and
creating further in-
stability.
Berry believes
retired military of-
ficers should be at the
forefront of the
nuclear and military
debates. "It is a pro-
per thing for retired
military people to
enter into this
debate he said. "It
is the function of
military services to
implement policies
that are established by
the civilian govern-
ment. It is not the
function of the
military to make
policy
By JENNIFER
JENDRASLAK
Staff Writer
Does your genetic
makeup determine
your environment?
"How People Make
Their Environments"
is the title of a talk to
be presented Thurs-
day, Oct. 13 by Dr.
Sandra Scarr, a
developmental
behavior geneticist.
The talk is spon-
sored by the ECU
Psychology Depart-
ment. Dr. Scarr is cur-
rently on leave from
the University of
Virginia where she is a
professor of
psychology.
Prior to her ap-
pointment at UVA
Scarr spent five years
as a professor at Yale.
She has produced
over 100 publications
and is the editor of
Developmental
Psychology, a
psychological journal.
Scarr will discuss
how many effects
psychologists at-
tribute to the environ-
ment are in fact due to
genetic influences.
Scarr believes the en-
vironments in-
dividuals seek for
themselves and the en-
vironments they ex-
perience are determin-
ed by their genetic
makeup.
The talk will be at
9:30 a.m. in McGin-
nes Theatre. Scarr is
the first of a series of
speakers to be spon-
sored by the
Psychology Depart-
ment. All interested
persons are invited to
attend.
Vote in SGA elections tomorrow
l
i
STEAK HOUSE
1
I LUNCH SPECIALS I
$2.50 and Under j

i

CHECK OUT OUR
DINNER SPECIALS
Try our New Fruit Bar
and Improved Salad Bar
2 Locations to Better Serve You
500 W. Greenville Blvd 7564040
2903 E. 10th St. 7SM712
EVERYONE
IS PICKING UP
ON PILOT PENS
WATCH OUT FOR
THE STUDY HALL SNATCHERS
ite
They know (hot the 89c
extra fine Pilot Razor
Point marker pen writes
as smooth as silk And
the custom-fit meta
collar helps keep that
point extra fine page
after poge That's why
when it comes to a
Razor Pomt, it's love
at first write
News Writers Needed
apply at
The East Caroiininan
The East Carolinian offices are
located on the second floor of the
Publications building, across
from the entrance of Joyner
Library. Best times to stop by
are Monday and Wednesday
afternoons.
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�il �aHt (Earnlinian
Serving the East Carolina campus community since 1925
Darryl Brown,
WAVERLY MERRITT, Dutctor ofArtut,
Hunter Fisher, � mmmm
ALI AFRASHTEH. CnditMamvf
Geoff Hudson, amu� Mmtcr
Michael Mayo, r��M sptr
mam
Cindy Pleasants, &�
Greg Rideout, Eduon p, &
Gordon Ipock, em! mi,
Lizanne Jennings, swu
Todd Evans.
October II. 1983
Opinion
Page 4
Watt Goes
Leaving Won t Change Policies
Secretary of the Interior James
G. Watt stated it best when he said
in his resignation letter to Presi-
dent Reagan'the time has come
Never has Watt said anything bet-
ter. His and the administration's
pro-developmental policies have
angered many, and we, like many
others, are glad to see him go. On-
ly, unlike Watt, we thought the
time had come a long time ago.
Unfortunately, his leaving does
not mean the end to what he stood
for. Because, ultimately, the per-
son responsible for what the In-
terior Secretary did is still sitting in
the Oval Office. Both Reagan and
Watt symbolize the heart of true
capitalist Republicanism: the pro-
motion of individual enterprise
unhindered by regulations design-
ed to help the environment. The
man firing the gun may be gone,
but, regretfully, the gun is still
there � and loaded.
We are not against free enter-
prise. A system where the poorest
man can become rich because of
his ingenuity and hard work is, in
our eyes, the best system. Yet,
unregulated use of the environ-
ment for pure monetary gain is just
not possible in an era where
natural beauty has become an en-
dangered species. However, we,
like many others, realize the
secretary didn't leave because he
had been raping the land; he left
because he had incurable hoof-in-
mouth disease.
Environmentalists who have
been clamoring for Watt's resigna-
tion even before he was in office
should find little solace that the
outspoken secretary is gone. In
fact, they weren't the ones that
pushed him out of office. The
Sierra Club, which had a petition
calling for his resignation signed
by an astronomical amount of peo-
ple, wasn't able to budge him. The
American public, which con-
sistently gave Watt the lowest
rating of any member of Reagan's
Cabinet, didn't cause his leaving.
It was Watt and the press. In the
end he was a liability to the presi-
dent. But, the man that is gone will
soon be replaced with someone
who believes exactly the same
thing.
So, there is only one thing that
we can truly do if we want to
change the federal government's
environmental policy � keep
Reagan from winning a second
term. For those of you who care
enough about the environment to
want to save it, get out and vote �
for anybody but Reagan, but
especially for a candidate who
believes in protecting our precious
natural resources.
You Can't Gripe
Students do not deserve the right
to gripe about student govern-
ment. Sure, they pay the man-
datory fee, and sure they go to
school, but when fewer than 15
percent of the student body votes
in elections and seats in the
legislature go unfilled, its time to
reevaluate the accountability of the
legislators to their "constituency
Whenever there's a problem
with one of the school year's elec-
tions, students read about it in the
paper and say, "Those people
shouldn't be there. They shouldn't
be trusted with my money Well,
the majority of these people are
wrong. Of course, those entrusted
with running the SGA can't be
screwing up all the time. (And they
don't.) But, the average apathetic
student who doesn't get up off his
butt to go and vote or run for
(fill?) a seat in the legislature
doesn't deserve the right to ques-
tion what those on the second floor
of Mendenhall are doing.
What we are basically trying to
say is let's, as educated adults, par-
ticipate in our electoral process �
whether on a national or university
scale. If being harsh and saying
you don't rate representation will
do it, then we will write these
words from now till eternity.
Come on guys, let's vote.
S0RRV6E0RGE,
I'VE PECIPEP
NEED A FEMALE
OK THE TICKET
WITH ME �.
II
BUT WtfT WORRY,
THE OPERATION
ONW TAKES
AN HOUR.
Coke Is It In South Africa
By DARRYL BROWN
Last week, an East Carolinian staff
writer profiled the effort by some
students at UNC-Chapel Hill to get their
university to divest its financial in-
vestments from all companies operating
in South Africa. The country is run by a
white regime that makes up only 17 per-
cent of the population but controls the
nation's wealth and government and
keeps its citizens classified by apartheid,
a racial segregation system.
Every citizen, according to the
government, falls into one of four racial
groups: white, coloured, asian or (black)
African. The classification is important,
for it determines the entire route of the
rest of one's life in South Africa. The
area in which one can live, the education
one can receive, the jobs one can hold
and the wages one will earn are all defin-
ed by racial classification. No race may
mix with any other.
So, how can Americans, and
American companies, justify dealing
with this nation that blatantly practices
everything we have fought against for
years? Can the simple profit motive
justify American investment in a coun-
try that treats its black citizens no better
than the Soviet Union treats its citizens?
It is a moral question facing Americans
and particularly American investors, for
U.S. firms do business in South Africa
to the tune of $1.5 billion a year, making
the United States the third largest
trading partner of South Africa.
One American businessman, an ex-
ecutive with Coca-Cola who dealt much
with his company's South African
The Truth Of
Repercussions
By GLENN MAUGHAN
The shooting down of Korean Airlines
flight 007 by the Soviet Union happened
more than a month ago. At this point, is
is clear that neither Soviet or U.S.
leaders are going to budge from their
positions regarding the tragic incident.
News of the black box is now relegated
to the back pages; perhaps the full story,
dare I say "the truth will never be
known.
It is now time for the world to really
take a look at this incident and tke note
of the probable repercussions the event
will have on us all.
Shortly after the incident, Soviet
policy expert Andrew Cockburn was
asked what impact he thought the
shooting down of the jet would have on
Americans. He quickly responded the
incident would cost us $25 billion.
Cockburn figured $25 billion in addi-
tional defense expenditures could be
pushed through Congress by President
Reagan now that the Soviets have shown
their "true colors The "evil empire"
image of the Soviets is as stark as ever.
A recent headline in the The New
York Times, "Reagan Rides the Crest
Of An Anti-Soviet Wave suggests the
president is going to use this incident as
an excuse to justify events which could
result in the escalation of the nuclear
arms race and increased U.S. military
adventurism around the globe.
A case in point is Reagan's recent vic-
tory regarding the continued presence of
U.S. Marines in the Middle East. Some
analysts predict Reagan will begin
similar efforts to increase military ac-
tivities in Central America.
"When we came into office, one of
our primary missions was to get
Americans out of the 'Vietnam Syn-
drome' and get them accustomed again
to the idea that projecting power
overseas can help the cause of peace
an administration official said in the
Times story. "Well, it's worked. There's
a consensus on Capitol Hill in favor of
keeping American troops in a battle
operations, has come to justify his
business in the world's most racist coun-
try on more than just monetary terms.
He visited the Coca-Cola facilities as
recently as last March and was in Chapel
Hill last weekend attending a conference
on the history and policy of South
Africa.
He explained that his company began
its operations in South Africa in 1939, at
time when Americans saw nothing
wrong with the white minority govern-
ment, for U.S policy at home enforced
much less than liberty and justice for all.
Later, after the United States affected
slow changes in its policies toward
racism, and the South African govern-
ment seemed to mesh less easily with
U.S. ideals, Coca-Cola stopped putting
money into its South African operation.
They have not expanded their operation
since the early days, but neither have
they discontinued it altogether. Com-
panies cannot pull out of nations every
time policy changes or an unfavorable
government comes to power, the ex-
ecutive explained.
If U.S. companies pulled out of every
country that had human rights viola-
tions, he explained, there would be few
places for American business outside
Europe. He cited Argentina and the
Philippines as two examples of nations
with whom the United States probably
should not, on moral grounds, do
business.
Further, he explained, if his company
did divest, they would have to sell their
factory and operations in South Africa,
probably to the white South African
government. The white regime certainly
would not continue Coke's example of
employee business practices. They
would instead simply spread their racist
national policy to that work site as well.
You see, Coca-Cola considers itself a
good example in South Africa, a son oi
civilized exception doing benevolent
work among heathens. Not because of
the ineffective and largely cosmetic
Sullivan principles, in which American
companies promise non-segregation and
fair work practices, but because of its
personal employee policy. As the ex
ecutive said, "1 feel South Africa is a lit-
tle better place for us having been
there
Coca-Cola offers loans, including
home mortgages, to its employees, as
well as school scholarships lo
employees' children, skill training for
workers and promotions within the com-
pany that would not occur under South
Africa's regular "Job Reservation Act,1'
in which the best jobs are reserved for
whites. All this in a country where two-
thirds of black Africans live in sub-
standard housing below the poverty tine,
where the educational funds for blacks
are one-tenth that for whites and many
subjects or training are not offered in
black schools.
No, Coca-Cola does not, he said, sup-
port the South African government. It is
not expanding its operation there, but is
maintaining what it already established.
in hopes that it is helping the lives of its
employees more than the South African
government. He is not happy with the
racist white regime, but he has worked
out a personal justification for doing
business in South Africa.
Flight 007 Still Unknown;
Shouldn't Aid Arms Race
zone. There's been a significant at-
mospheric change in general
It's a fact the Korean incident makes
it harder for many Americans to trust
the Russians. Even though the plane
flew deep into Korean territory, the in-
itial Soviet cover-up of the incident has
left many of us with a lot of questions.
However, I don't think people should
view this incident as an excuse for the
United States to dump billions more
dollars into the arms race. In fact, the
response should be just the opposite.
Even more wierd is the fact we have
always viewed Russia with a wary eye; so
now, with all the bellicose rhetoric, one
might believe we thought they were once
the "good guys" in the first place.
Because most college students are of
draft-registering age, any power Reagan
is likely to project overseas will be done
with your bodies. It won't surprise me if
we see the draft reactivated in the near
future. History, drafts and wars have a
way of repeating themselves.
Before you get too excited about
fighting for your country, take the time
to find out what it is you're fighting for.
As many of us who went to Vietnam
found out, the reason for the fight was
never worth it. Many of us found out
too late.
Campus Forum
Tm Not Him'
In a recent letter to the editor, of the
Daily Reflector, William C. Byrd III
raised questions about the matter of
changes in deans of the various schools
at ECU. One might have supposed that
the author felt there was some
"scheme" afoot which was responsible
for many deans' leaving their posts.
I am not knowledgeable of all the
reasons for changes in deans. Some, I
believe, have simply retired. At least
one, I believe, simply was tired of the
administrative role and wanted to
return to teaching.
I write to you and our student body
for two reasons: first, I believe we have
a good administration at ECU which is
not in the business of dark and hurtful
schemes; secondly, my name is almost
the same as that of the author of the
letter to the Daily Reflector. To further
confuse people, the ECU telephone
book lists me, erroneously, as William
C. Byrd III.
For students and faculty alike, let it
be known I am "the sometimes in-
famous, William Carlton Byrd St
professor of community health, School
of Allied Health and Social Work. Be-
ing active in the American Civil Liber-
ties Union, the ECU Federation of
Teachers, the Carl Stewart for Lt.
Governor Campaign, etc I do write
letters to the editor from time to time.
But don't credit me with those written
by William C. Byrd III.
Thank you for your help.
William Carlton Byrd Sr.
Professor, Community Health
Forum Rules
The East Carolinian welcomes letters
expressing all points of view. Mail or
drop them by our office in the Old
South Building, across from Joyner
Library.
For purposes of verification, all let-
tersmust include the name, major and
ctasstfkation, address, phone number
and signature of the mtthorfs). Letters
are limited to two typewritten pages,
f�? or neatly printed. All
dJect to editing for brevi-
Z't2emSaPdUbei' a�d no personal
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Africa
iue Coke's example of
practices. They
cad their racis't
rk site as well,
nsiders itself a
plcinS irh Africa, a sort of
ng benevolent
Not because of
: rgely cosmetic
which American
-� -on-segregation and
but because of its
'� policy. As the ex-
Nouth Africa is a Iit-
ot us having been
fcrs loans, including
to its employees, as
scholarships to
en, skill training for
emotions within the corn-
not occur under South
Job Reservation Act
jobs are reserved for
n a country where two-
Africans hve in sub-
� below the poverty line,
onal funds for Hacks
hat for whites and many
ng are not offered in
cia does not, he said, sup-
Mrican government. It is
operation there, but is
il already established,
' is helping the lives of its
e :han the South African
He is not happy with the
cgime, but he has worked
Ficatkm for doing
th Africa.
known;
s Race
k e thought thev were once
p.vs" m the first place.
'lost college students are of
ring age. any power Reagan
koject overseas will be done
Odie It won't surprise me if
;d reactlvated in the near
drafts and wars have a
ig themselves.
get too excited about
your country, take the time
nat it is you're fighting for.
J us who went to Vietnam
he reason for the fight was
Many of us found out
m'
P�e ECU Federation of
Carl Stewart for Lt.
'Paign. etc I do write
"tor from time to time.
lit me with those written
Byrd III.
I for your help.
William Carlton Byrd Sr.
psor, Community Health
im Rules
rolmian welcomes letters
points of view. Mail or
' our office in the Old
across from Joyner
�f verification, all let-
rVe name maJ�r and
I address, phone number
of the authorfs). Utters
1 two typewritten pages
or neatly printed. All
�Hlibel, and no personal
permitted.
THE EAST CAROLINIAN orroR� 1983 5
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:





i
6
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER n, 1983

AROTC Enrollment Up; Outlook Good
Cont. From Page 1
Until it proves suc-
cessful, the ECU
AROTC will function
as an extension of the
same program at N.C.
State University in
Raleigh, which will
supply it with
teaching and logistical
support. If succesfi 1,
the ECU unit become
independent, com-
plete with its own ex-
tensions in other col-
leges in the eastern
part of the state.
"We want to give
students in eastern
North Carolina the
opportunity Bishop
said. "State and
Campbell are the
closest ROTCs, and
that's not close
enough He believes
an established ROTC
is "part of the coming
of age of a
university
In addition to
Bishop, the AROTC
cadre includes Capt.
Heldur Liivak and
Sgt. Terry Boyles.
Liivak is an eight-year
veteran artillery and
intelligence specialist.
Boyles, a Kinston
native whose wife is
an ECU alumna, is a
12-year veteran.
Bishop cited such
opportunites as
technical training and
job security as reasons
why cadets would join
ROTC. "The military
is much more highly
sophisticated and is
attracting more peo-
ple looking for hi-tech
training he said.
Cadets stress that
experience in leader-
ship is the main
reason for joining.
"ROTC brings out
the best in everyone,
and it develops a com-
petetive edge said
cadet company com-
mander Kris Cuello.
"Learning manage-
ment is not nearly as
important as learning
leadership said
cadet Kirk Shelly,
who is also a member
of the National
Guard. "Unlike other
fields, ROTC gives us
immediate leadership
opportunities
Another reason for
joining has to do with
patriotism and a
desire to serve the
country in a useful
way. AH cadets, said
Bishop, listed
patriotism as a reason
for joining. "We're
on a patriotic
incline he said.
"It's now okay to
wave the flag and sing
the national anthem
Cuello, who was
born in the
Dominican Republic,
sees his services as a
way of thankingj
America. "This coun-
try has give me somel
of my most satisfying
years, and I want to
give something!
back
The advent of a l
new program at ECU
is an example of the
resurgence of ROTC
acorss the nation.
Recruitment hasl
doubled since the
Vietnam conflict, and
ROTC is available at
1,373 colleges and 706
high schools.
A Vietnam veteran,
he belives that
Americans have learn-
ed the lessons of the
Vietnam conflict.
Cadet Shelley also
referred to the present
age as the "post-
Vietnam" era.
"Although we
remember Vietnam's
lessons siad Bishop,
"we've put the war
behind us
Bishop noted that
"the ROTC gives the
army a good cross-
sectional representa-
tion of society among
its officers ROTC is
expected to make the
military part of the
mainstream of
American life, he
said, with its officers
being like its civilian
leaders � participants
in the democratic
societal structure and
adherents to its
values.
Despite the advan-
tages ROTC has for
those students in-
terested in building
skills for life and civil
careers, cadets know
that they may some-
day enter active
military service and
fight to defend their
country. "We send
the cadets into the ar-
my with their eyes
open Bishop said.
"No one is so naive as
to think we'll train
them as officers and
not ask them to some-
day maybe risk their
lives
Cuello echoed these
feelings. "We are in
the business of defen-
ding American prin-
ciples he said, "and
we may have to take
life threatening risks
Nov. 8-18
Nov.l5-Dec. 9
Dec. 6-22, 29, 30,
after Jan.3
Dec. 8-22, 29,30,
after Jan.3
Dec. 8
Dec.9
Dec. 29
Jan. 5
Statements will be mailed to your
home address
Can pay fees at Cashier's Office
with statement received at home
address by Nov. 23
Can pay fees at Cashier's Office, 8
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Can pick up class schedule if fees
are paid
Financial aid checks will be
available for payment of fees
Do not mail fees after this date
Last time to pay fees without
penalty
Registration
Warning To Female Students
The ECU Department of Public Safety would like
to warn all female students of an obscene telephone
caller currently operating in the Greenville area. If a
male calls, posing as a graduate student in
psychology, and starts asking questions about sex,
hang up and report the incident to the police.
CONTACT LENSES
Bausxh & Lome
Soft Contacts
jl Extended Wear
1T
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Phone
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PALACE

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1804 Dickinsen A ve.
(across from Pepsi
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(24 Hours)
Complete
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FRESHMAN
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FILM SENT TOCOLORCRAFT
$1.00 OFF Developing Any 24 or 36
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MAKE TRACKSF0RTHE
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H 1 f :
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"frA alt you can eat soup and salad $4.99
beach and pay high prices
amily Restaurants for fresh shrimp
0
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99
also Open Fri. and
j nights mtdnighl-3
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Breakfast Bar open 6:00am
SHONEYS
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ALL YOU CAN EAT
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TUES WED THURS.
Banquet Facilities Available
758-0327 i
rfing
to the CSBfeANC4
and Otieen NORTH
Yes Ladies you remember the famous Happy Hour that
once was � well we're back. That's right � every Wednes-
day at 4:30 The King and Queen North brings to life
the largest social event in the south. All Ladies are admit-
ted FREE all night with our super specials from 4:30-7:00.
ITie best in live entertainment and heavy hot hors doeuvres
make this the event of the south. So ladies don't miss it �
WEDNESDAY is your night at the . . .
THEKing
C5 and
509 North Greene Street
Greenville, North Carolina 27834
Phona 756-9714
Oueen
NORTH
All Bands play from 7:00 to 11:00 &
Doors Open at 4:30 - Happy Hour until 7:00 &
COMING:
MS
Oct. 12th - Billy Scott ft the Prophets
Oct. 19th - Castaways rroP�t�
Oct. 26th - Special Halloween Party
n, � , Hour - North Tower
Don t forget our original location on Eastbrook Drive
THF EASTKR
Checka
By DOROTHY ULES
MT VMM
The young and the you
heart "shook, rattled and r(
Thursday night at the Cai
Opry House to the puH
vibrations of Chubby Che
the King of "The Twist.
with receding hairlines and e
ding waistlines and pudg
ing women gyrated, gnnm
groaned to the popular "5(
'60s tunes of "Do the Ti
"Tootie Frutie and ' Be
ba-lo Young jean-clad sti
and others twirled, turnec
twisted, clapped and screanj
frenzied excitement as the
king vibrated on stage
Checker, uhose real nai
James Evans, rocketed to
two decades ago with his o
novation of a ne danc
became the craze of the nail
"It hasn't changed mj
Checker said. "People asi
receptive. They are still pi
my music, but most of all th
still dancing my dance
Checker will star in
movie next year with Mia V;
entitled The Finishing Toucl
"It isn't about
though Checker laughe,
about jogging
Checker, who is rr.
former "Miss World"
children ages 16, 11. i
tours 200 nights out ol
and is still the same :hansi
energetic person he v,a
pampered restless generatij
teens with flying pony
bv socks and oxforc I
50s.
After a short intend
Thursday night. Checke j
to the stage with swing .
the background of cla
bals and beating drums. H
feel the pulse of his fa
youthful Checker mello
crowd with, "Run to Me
You Are Lonely and
females by pulling them oij
to dance with him. His jad
tialiy unzipped, a silver m
spaiWlmg m the muluc
lights. Checker twisted
best of 'em, and raised h
the rest of 'em. He told
felt as he sang. "Raising n
like I did still out havinj
And have fun he didas
500 that were there. His far
there. They loved him am
by Checker loved them bad
Chubby Checker's albunf
Change Has Come reles
1982. isn't really indicative
change in Chubby, and judf
the enthusiastic crowd
night none wants bin
for Chubby Checkci
twisting his a I .
Mullet
B PATRICK ON Hj
�waff Wrwrr
I must confess that
moved south from the B .
had never heard of fish j
mullets. So you ca: j
suspense when 1
Swansboro. N.C ho
festival in honor j
(the largest reach a,c . j
one to two feet) in the fai
Mullidae.
Where 1 come from we
hold any kind of outdoo
for security and safety r
Our entertainment in n
sists of subway car mus I
an occasional crime viewe
hand.
At 8:?0 am. ton a !
morning!) I rolled my h
out of bed and head
Highway 43 to hitchhike
"Friendly City by the Sea
On my fourth ride, somj
between Yanceboro an
Bern, 1 was picked up by a
viile couple on their wa
beach � that is. until 1 tolj
where I was going. "Tell uj
this Mullet Festival thel
Since this was my second
the all-day affair I felt
achieved ome expertise
mullet extravaganza
"Well, there's a parade
craft booths, exhibits, lots
pie and of course, a Mull
ner I told them "That
like fun they said, decic
change their plans and heac
Swansboro affair.
It must have been div"j
tervention, I thought
anyway, I was on my mer
to the Mullet Festival
chauffeur-driven limo.
The people in Swansbotj
their mullet and their
seriously. Swansboro's
weekly newspaper, the
News, calls itself "The
i vl





1 youi
ffice
ome
1 HI 1 si t Rot INIAN
k
r

FOR THE
AROUND!
'SCOmAMD
VSf.29 I
I
MOWICH, KBULAfl
MIIIK $173
I iS
ardesi
JOP
lrns
ORTH
Street
Una 27834
4
he Prophets
l�meen Part)
�Her
rook Ojive
Entertainment
'x Thf-k
Checker Can Still Do Twist
Ha
B DOKOltn I II Fs
young and the young at
shook, rattled and rolled"
rsday night at the c arolina
House to the pulsating
ions oi Chubby Checker,
� oi The rwist Men
receding hairlines and expan-
vaistlines and pudgy, pranc
g women gyrated, grinned and
aned to the popular '50s and
� of "Do the rwist
c Frutie and "Bop ba
Young iean-clad students
Others I led, turned and
d, dapped and screamed in
:xcitement as the dance
red on stage.
� r, whose real name is
i van rocketed to success
cades ago with his own in-
' a new dance that
n the of the nation.
sn't changed much
kei said "People die still
rhe are still playing
but most of all the) are
mcing my dance "
ecker will star in his first
.ar with Mia Farrow,
rhe Finishing Touch
about twisting
hecker la .
U g �"
married to a
net "Miss World" has three
ages 16. 11, and 9. He
200 mghr- out of the year
is still the same charismatic,
� rson he was to a
rest t ss generation of
lying . bob-
� :he

: mission
� - returned
nging hip- to
d of clashing cym-
)uld
fans The still
cker mellowed the
h, "Run to Me When
An I onely and thrilled
fern . on stage
H a ket par
: a silver medalion
sparkling in the multicolored
grits. C heckei twisted with tne
m, and raised heil with
'em He told how he
. �. "Raising hell just
Ke 1 did . still out having fun
And have fun he didas did the
" ' tha A-ere there. His fans were
1 he loved him and Chub-
: them back
hubby Checker's album "The
. Ha- Come released in
really indicative of a
mge in Chubby, and nidging b
the enthusia I crowd Thursday
one wants him to change;
hubl Checker is still
g his w to gi eatness
Chuhb Checker led the young and the old on a livelv return to the
das of (he "Twist Over 500 fans filled the (arolina Oprey House
to hear Checker last lhursda evening.
Mullet Festival Draws Crowds
B PA IKK KONHI
1 n nfess that before I
ved south from the Big Apple 1
. never heard of fish known as
. lets. So you can imagine my
p e n s e when 1 learned
uisboro, N.C. holds an annual
tivaJ in honor of this small fish
largest reach a length of from
� w feet) in the family oi
lidae
Vv here 1 come from we don't
iny kind of outdoor festivals
security and safety reasons.
� entertainment in NYC con-
of subway car musicians and
nal crime viewed first
id.
30 a m. (on a Saturday
�� ng!) I rolled my lay butt
bed and headed for
. vay 4 to hitchhike to the
i nendly City by the Sea "
On my fourth ride, somewhere
xeen Vanceboro and New
rn, 1 was picked up by a Cireen
c couple on their way to the
I h that is, until 1 told them
a here f was going. "Tell us about
'his Mullet Festival they said
Since this was my second trip to
'he all day affair, I felt I had
eved some expertise on the
mullet extravagana
'Well, there's a parade, many
raft booths, exhibits, lots of peo
pie and of course, a Mullet din
ner I told them "That sounds
like fun they said, deciding to
-hange their plans and head to the
Swansboro affair
It must have been divine in-
tervention, 1 thought Well
anyway, I was on my merry way
to the Mullet Festival in a
-hauffeur-driven limo.
The people in Swansboro take
fheu mullet and their festival
seriously. Swansboro's major
weekly newspaper, the Tideland
Vhs, caus jtself "The finest
mullet wrapper you can buv "
A story in its Wednesday edi-
n quoted Mullei Festival spon-
sors predicting a crowd of 14,000
at this year's event. Since the
festival itself takes place
throughout the entire town, it's
actually hard to estimate the size
of the crowd
In their lead editorial, "Mullet
levei Tideland Slews' editors
a rote: You've noticed
something missing from your life.
Not anything critical, just
something that is not where it
should be. You can't tell if it's
food or activity, but the nagging
has been there for about a
yearWhat is it?"
Well, I guess you know the rest:
"It's Mullet Festival timeome
to Swansboro and enjoy the
festivities they wrote.
" I he Mullet 1-estival is to
Swansboro what the leaves are to
autumn stated one ad that ap-
peared in the paper's eight-page
special pull-out section devoted to
the Mullet Festival.
When we drove to within a cou-
ple of miles of Swansboro, the
traffic started to back up. It felt
just like home. We managed to
find a parking space in what ap-
peared to be someone's backyard,
and I shut the car door on the lit-
tle finger of the women whose
husband had just driven me to the
Mullet festival (Fortunate the
injury was not too bad � lots of
pain but no broken bones.) I
quickIv got lost in the crowd.
I'm a people watcher, despite
the accusations of some of my
friends that I'm a sexist woman
watcher, and for me the Mullet
Festival was a paradise.
Hundreds of kids of all ages
were everywhere Most busied
themselves throwing small ex-
plosive pellets at each other. You
could buy a box for about a buck.
Because the pellets were quite
harmful, many a concerned
mother would call out for a cease
fire as she strolled by with her lit-
tle ones. Of course, the boys en-
joyed the explosives more than the
girls who were usually the targets
ol their assaults.
Couples ot all ages walked
hand-in-hand stopping every few
paces to see what was for sale.
Men with short-hair abounded.
I ots ol I SMC T-shirts were pro-
of of Swansboro's nearness to
( amp 1 ejeune.
College students from
Swansboro come home tor the
mullet weekend. High-school pals
reunite for wild parties and
renewal of friendships. It was easy
to tell the freshmen in the crowd
They were the ones who went to
the face painting booth to get
UNC Tar Heels and NCSU logos
on their cheeks ECU students
were too sophisticated for such
nonsense.
"Patrick, what are you doing
here?" several ECU students ask-
ed me, sensing that I wasn't a
local "Isn't everybody here?" I
responded "Who'd want to miss
the Mullet Festival
The day's events kicked off
with an 8:00 am. "Mullet Run
and those who braved it were
wearing their Mullet Run T-shirts
to prove it A 10:00 a.m. parade
was held featuring local beauty
queens including the one and
only Conch Queen.
The parade included bato
twirlers, doggers, volunteer
firemen and local schools' sports
teams. Many kept their marching
duds on throughout the day ad
ding more color to the already col-
orful event.
I had several groups of people I
enjoyed watching the most. These
See FISH, Page 9
I
� .
k classic American sports car, 1965 and 66 Shelby GT-3S won two SCCA champions Im.
, I -350s were nearly as fast as the race versions. These can, set a standard of performance th
C
American cars have ever matched.
Mreet
at fev
GT-350: The Legend Of An
AH-American Sports Car
B CORDON IP(X k
y nlrruumvm Mll.x
Not so many years ago owning
a fast car was considered a rite of
passage into manhood. Every guy
in town was tooling down
boulevards and prowling around
burgtr-joints in a hopped-up mus-
cle car of some sort � or wanted
to be.
But the fast-car craze ran into a
roadblock about 1973. Soaring
gas prices and insurance rates put
an end to America's addiction to
high powered cars By the time I
was old enough to drive, the fun
was over. I felt cheated, forced in-
to a dull future of driving zit-bag
econo boxes with poodle-dog ex-
haust -
Then one day while looking
through the classified ads, I saw a
1966 Shelbs GT-350 for sale. I'd
heard of the car, but had never
seen one. Out of curiosity I drove
down to the sports car dealer who
was brokering the car.
The Shelby shined like a newlv-
cut ruby. It's bright new paint was
like a dazzling red sky that the two
bumper-to-bumper racing stripes
slashed across like giant bolts of
lightning flashing from horizon to
horizon. There was something
about those two wide, white
stripes running parallel over
hood, roof and rear deck that
made my heart race and my palms
sweat. Whoever first called such
markings racing stripes must have
felt the same excitement I did.
lust above the kickpanel from
front to rear wheelwall ran a nar-
row white stripe bordered by two
thinner ones. At the head of these
stripes in white three-inch letters
was "GT-350
The car sat lower than a normal
'f6 Mustang because of its low-
profile 60-series tires and altered
front suspension geometry. The
angular, masculine lines of the
fenders and body contrasted nice-
ly with the arc that began with the
windshield, crested through the
roof and tapered through the rear
glass into the trunk deck. Both
round and square, the overall ef-
fect was that of a giant, red and
white hockey puck. I wondered if
it would scoot like one.
When I looked inside, I was
startled to see the backseat miss-
ing. In its place as a black
fiberglass deck with the spare tire
snugged onto it. A four-point
padded roll bar erupted from the
floor behind the bucket seats and
stretched to the ceiling while its
two back legs slanted into the cor-
ners of the rear deck. 1 slid into
the driver's seat to check out the
cockpit.
A pod-mounted Sun tach stared
at me like some Cyclops' eye from
its angled position atop the center
of the dash. The rest of the
gauges. including the
speedometer, were all by Stewart
Warner. There was no radio.
With no backseat or jam box, this
obviously wasn't a Saturday night
date machine. When I raised the
hood, it was apparent that the
Shelby would be more at home on
the backstretch at Sebring than
tooling around some burger joint.
"She's a beauty isn't she said
the dealer, who was suddenly
standing at my shoulder. "Two
460 Holly fours, Ford dual-point
distributer, Le Mans 289 cam,
GT-40 valves, finned aluminum
racing pan, balanced and
blueprinted. Full race he said
with a sigh. "She'll turn eight
grand and pump out about 400
ponies
"How do you crank all this
with no battery I askc I g tur-
mg towards the engine bay.
"Battery's in the trunk for I
ter weight distribution through
the corners he said.
He, his last name was Stone
vited me to go for a test drive
with him driving. Stone was sell-
ing the Shelby on commission
some sap who was going
a nasty divorce, and. as he ex-
plained, he took every opportuni-
ty tc drive the car.
The instant Stone hit the
starter, the engine busted to
and sat there idling at 1500 rpm.
We rumbled up King Street in :
and second gears, the car jerk
low speeds. Whenever Stone pull-
ed away from the stoplight, it was
difficult for him not to chirp the
tires. Driving the car in town
like leading a mad bull with a nose
ring. Finally we came to the steep
entrance ramp to 1-26 Stone ;
ched the accelerator with the car
in first. As we shot up the ramp 1
felt like Eve! Knevel blasting
across the Snake River. Stone
wound the engine to seven grand,
and when he shifted we were do-
ing "0. The rear tires bit into the
pavement and the Shelbv jumped
forward, accelerating through se-
cond. At 95. Stone shifted to
third, backed off the gas and then
shifted to fourth. Our little red
rocket coasted back down to 65.
As we passed cars, heads turn-
ed. We went by a couple of
Citadel cadets in a red Alfa
Romeo spyder. They fell in
behind us pointing and talking
and then pulled along side to stare
some more. Stone downshiftec
second and the Shelby shot for-
ward as though hurled from a
catapult. We weaved through the
six-lane traffic for another mile
ducking around station wagons
and 18 wheelers at better than
100. Then he threw the Shelby on-
to an exit ramp that corkscrewed
down to an underpass. The car
growled through the tightening
spiral, its tail hanging slightly out.
without a trace of body lean.
I suddenly knew that I had to
have the car. I had to hae it We
got down to price dickering back
at the lot Stone started at six
grand. When he finally accepted
that I was about as poor as I was
young, he gave me the bottom
line: $4,000 for the owner plus his
$200 sales commission. I told him
to give me a couple of days to see
what I could dig up and gave him
$100 to hold the car.
��"���"������������B ��������
Banks won 7 finance a
classic car, not even
Hitler's Mercedes.
I soon found that banks won't
finance a classic car, not even if
it's Hitler's Mercedes One loan
officer after another declined the
opportunity to finance a 12-year-
old Mustang. Frantic, 1 eventually-
put together a string of personal
loans with a bank, a credit union
and a loan company The Shelby
was mine!
I learned all I could about mv
'66 GT-350. In 1965 and '66. Car
rol Shelby, a former sports car
racer from Texas who won Le
Mans in 1959, bought basic-
Mustangs from Ford. He had the
cars shipped to his Venice,
California facotry and transform-
ed them into road racers for the
street. His purpose was to build at
least 500 cars a year so he would
have a production car to challenge
the small-block Corvettes and
Jaguars for the B-Production
� e
His (
A-Prc 1

� e the .
ship of Mai
or.
me
:
won the B-P
th years
a whole era
-
. All
-
ten
i out e GT : 5
i $
few every
- that was as
through a serie
was da
a
that didn't sacrifice an oun
performance for th
fort. In 196' Shelby
cars and sold the
names Cobra
Fore: Ford .
by GI
� re hea
-
a- automatic transmiss
power windows The spa
road-racer concept ol '( 66
was abandon.
By 1974 the muscle-car era
over, the victim
surance rates, governrnei
ns and soaring gas pr ces '
smoke from a a decade
burning rubber w
ing. and enthusiasts ai
could look back and s
potential . m the rabb
The earlv GT-350's
simplicity se: it a: the
decaled pony ttoed �
fake scoops that followed it B
the mid 70s, collectors were
scrambling for the rema . m
ly GT-350s Oi . y was
must. Flared fender wells
other modifications commoi
hot-rods lowered a .ar s value.
The car 1 bought was not
orginal. It had beer, tastefully
modified using Shelbv -a. .
parts to form a hybrid street race
version. The engine wa e
more powerful than the 360 hp
2SsJs ec: on :he ack during the
SCCA title quess
It has been said that speed ;s a
uniquely modern sensation For
five vears the Shelbv was m il-
legal high - an alternative to
drugs and booze I'd slip out to
the barn and pull back the old
blankets that served as dust
covers After the engine had
warmed. I'd take the car out for a
lunatic sprint through the
twisting, hilly, Carolina back
roads To hell with traffic laws!
These occasional bursts were
purges for the soul The Shelby
symbolized freedom and was a
source of unbridled jo in a world
filled with rules A Datsn Z-car
served for daily transportation
through the mire of reality
The Shelby was fast. It would
do 80 in first, 105 in second and
130 in third. I had the calibrated
speedometer needle nudging 150
once in fourth during a pre-dawn
speed run down a local four lane.
The car's poor aerodynamics
would allow no more, but at
speeds up to 120 the car was in-
credibly stable.
As 1980 approached, even hard
core gearheads sensed the futility
of their case. Married, ap-
See GEARHEADS, page 9
i





I
8 THE EAST CAROLINIANOCOTBER 11, 1083
Gearhea
Cont. from pajie "
pre
middle-age.
were compe
replace their tfc
GTOs. etc. with freak'
I'd heard about Mick LaSalle read about him on the bathroom walls. But I figured I a the girl that
could cut him down. So, it was one day after econ class in Rawl. I was looking good, and I see Mick check
ing me out. (Frame 1) So he's no wimp, right. He walks straight up and starts laying down his rap. (Framt
2) But I'm cool, see. So I'm giving him the come on. Then he touched me. not like some nerd, but like he
knowed what he was doing. (Frame 3) I went as limp as a plate of lasagne. But I regroup, see. I try and get
Mick to play my game tried to feed him some stupid questions. But Mick LaSalle don't play no woman's
game he don't answer no stupid questions. He tells me to get lost. (Frame 4) But let's face it: like all girK
I don't want a wimp; I don't want a whiner, and I don't want a nerd. 1 want a real man like Mick LaSalle
(Frame 5)
Mick LaSalle photo essa b Gordon Ipock

Read
The
Classifieds
&

F- SERVICE COPIES
AS LOW AS
21M each
self service 6'i
Open 12 Hours Daily
Monday - Thursday
Friday 9-7 Saturday 9-2
TWO LOCATIONS
The Georsetown Shops
Pitt Plaza (10-6)

W
GOOD,
100001
oooa
load
Baal
L
lOFf
NAPPY HOUR DAILY 4:00-7:00
'SUPER NAPPY HOUR'
Wed. and Fri. 400-800
Daily Specials:
Monday - Gregs $2 99
Tuesday - Any Vi Hero 50 off
Wednesday - Cockney $2 49
Thursday - Sprout Special $1.75
Friday - Tossed Salad 59
Saturday - Pastrami Plkup $2 59
MTW OtU M$TAUtAMT
il MC TOM I
JVi.
EWTTITAJMMIMT WIIKLY
CoUKTRVCoOKlMG
512 E. 14th Street
(2 blocks West of Mens Dorms)
3.85 & tax
ALL YOU CAN EAT
vegetables, Bread & Tea
and 1 meat
?

&i

TAKE OUT OIDEIS
7520476
Sammy
I about a
I meal plan!
kv
Daily Specials $1.99
rs
SJi
r-ii
Support businesses that support ECU
shop with The East Carolinian
For the best deals in town!
Say "1 do" to
Zales diamond
wedding specials!
Solitaires, bridal sets, wedding
bands, duos, trios � Zales has
them all. Many are even
marked at savings of 20 to
25 off their original prices.
And at Zales we offer conve-
nient credit and a 90-day
refund policy, so ask for details.
WIN AN
ENCHANTED
WEDDING!
All-expense-paid grand prize
includes:
� Wedding on the Queen Mary
or in your hometown, coor-
dinated by a "Brides Maga-
zine" consultant.
� Honeymoon trip on the
Orient Express.
� $10,000 Zales jewelry-
wardrobe.
14 additional prizes:
� 7-Day Caribbean cruise.
Ah transportation courtesy of
American Airlines. No purchase necessary,
void where prohibited. Swcstakes ends
Oct 31. Ask for details at any ZaJes.
Solitaire.
14 karat gold
$99
Solitaire brida sel
14 karat gi
$399
11 Diamond hnda s'
14 karat gold
$599
Save 20-25 on a special collection
of diamond wedding jewelry.
ZALES
The Diamond Store
is all you need to knowC
MAJOB
rCABDSACC0TID
inMm
(Cart-
rCartf VBA
- Cartel
Sbdbv GT-350 was best of the
UVEll
VERN GOSDII
Oct 9, 19831
At the
WAR'
I
CONCERTS
WE'RE
$iop in at Subway afie
great tasting foot long sa
ing aneties to top off y�
seven davs a week.
208 t.
Tue Oct. 11,1983
Happy Hour Prici
1st $100.00 ' jl
2nd $50.00 '
3rd $25.00
Entries can sign
Coi
!






Dance Audition Is Set
IHE EAST CAROUNlAN OCTOBER II, 1983 9
?������.���???�
Dance auditions for in the different styles.

Gearheads Bite The Dust
the East Carolina
Dance Theatre have
been scheduled for
Wednesday and
Thrusday, Oct. 12
and 13, in the Messick
Theatre Arts Center
on the campus of East
Carolina University.
The auditions will
begin at 7:30 p.m.
each evening in dance
studio 114. Each year
the East Carolina
Dance Theatre pro-
duces a concert
representing ballet,
modern and jazz
styles. The peices are
choreographed by
members of the dance and punks
faculty in the ECU Swansboro
residents are all in-
vited to audition. The
Dance Theatre con-
cert is scheduled for
Feb 24, 25, and 27-29
in McGinnis Theatre
and time on the ECU Campus
will be announced at in Greenville
the audition. ECU
students, faculty, For further infor
staff and local mation call 757-6390.
Those who are called
back will be asked to
show a short com-
bination in the style of
their choice. The call-
back date
�Vote For
Amy Merrell
Al Smith
Kevin Win stead
Fish Festival Adds
Zest To Swansboro
Cont. from page 7
included bikes,
cowboys, rednecks
Yes, even
has some
punkers. Several
bikers were on the
Cont. from page 7
proaching
middle-age, most
were compelled to
replace their thirsty
GTOs. etc. with
econo-box imports.
The holdouts were
forced to extremes.
When premium lead-
ed gasoline disap-
peared, a street
freak's last source of
alk But I figured 1 �as the girl that
ts looking good, and I see Mick check
�nd starts laing down his rap. (Frame
d me. not like some nerd, but like he
Mgae. But 1 regroup, see. I tr and get
ll Mick I aSalle don't pla no woman
rame 4) But lets face it: like all girls
I want a real man like Mick LaSalle.
essav b Gordon Ipock
support ECU
arolinian
Shdby GT-350 was best of the breed.
high-octane fuel was
the local airport.
Three semesters in-
to college it was my
turn to list the Shelby
in the classified ads. I
had driven the piss
out of an Ameican
classic, perhaps the
best of the muscle-car
era. The paint had
dulled and the engine
had lost its edge, but
the Shelby legend had
grown. Now a dentist
wanted to spend his
weekends restoring
the car.
With an empty
bank account and
three dollars in my
wallet, I let a beloved
friend and a battered
old warrior go.
Perhaps it would be
happier as a shiny
relic, a valuable
museum piece.
I stood on my front
porch with 60 one-
hundred dollar bills in
my hand as the dentist
fired the Shelby to
life. Watching him
rumble out the
driveway, I realized I
had never seen
another person drive
the car. It was
beautiful in motion.
As the evening sun
slanted across its
flanks, I watched the
Shelby grow small as
it accelerated into the
distance. The throaty
exhaust sang back for
a moment even after
the two bold stripes
had disappeared over
the hill. I stood in the
silence and let the
tears flow.
Department of Drama
and Speech. For the
past eight years the
concerts have played
to standing-room-
only audiences. Ac-
cording to Dance
Coordinator Patti
Weeks: "Because of
the tremendous
response the Dance
Theatre receives from
the area, we have add-
ed an extra perfor-
mance this year so
that hopefully we
won't have to turn
anyone away
Weeks went on to
say that those who
wish to audition
should wear leotards
and footless tights, I made it through the
and if they have them entire Mullet festival
was too high for my
meager budget. In-
stead, I opted for
lunch at a local greasy
spoon. I ordered the
$3.00 lunch special �
a flounder (of all
SGA .
Day Representative
1
Walking alone at night?
Call Pirate Walk
757-6616
mullet scene with both things) which
the men and women have been thrown
sporting a variety of
unusual tattoes. They
all wore black leather,
of course. Most of the
rednecks sported bill-
ed caps, "Born to
Raise Hell" T-shirts.
Except for a little
country, most of the
musical entertainment
consisted of groups
like the Living Way
Gospel Group, New
Vision Gospel Group
back. Well, I never
said it was a cheap
thrill at the Mullet
Festival.
Perhaps the neatest
thing about the Mullet
Festival was the mood
and excitment of the
people from this pret-
ty town complete with
a water-view from
many spots. ,
The spirit of the?
Mullet Festival
ACDC
Men at Work
Cheap Trick
Liada RonsUdi
ft
was j.
to bring ballet, pointe
andor jazz shoes.
Dancers should be
warmed up and ready
to dance at 7:30 p.m.
The choreographers
;n town!
will give combinations bad tasting, the price
j 0 r 7 w rcMivai was
rnH vi5!rC �f LlfC alway$ apparent. Peo-
band. Needless to say, pk greeted each other j I
their records weren't with hugs smiles
selling like hot cakes. The festival was a
t confess that time of togetherness;
and sharing. For 29"
years the event has
without sampling brought these small-M
town folks together
for a day of outdoor
fun. I'm not a small
town boy, but I know
I'll be back for the
Mullet Festival next
year.
Adrian Belew
Tommy Tutoot
Big Country
Pit EVnctar
Polk
Asia
Loerbo�
Bil Joel
Spandar BaJtet
Fall Sale
PaDer Moon T-shirts Reg 11.95 now 7.50
"Hurry they �oat last long
immimm
1500 pounds
fish fried up
Swansboro
Club.
Although it
of the
by the
Shrine
's not
1
1
JUNIORS
REMEMBER
DAVID BROWN
FOR
JUNIOR CLASS
PRESIDENT
LIVE IN CONCERT�
VERN GOSDIN and MEL McDANIEL
Oct. 19, 1983 7:00pm and 9:30pm
At the Moose Lodge.
Tickets A variable: Friendly Hairdesigners
�� 4th St. Sear Cox Florist
Hours 9-5 Daily 9-1 Sat
JVARWKK PROD. INC.
)nd
cials!
.

crH
$:m
�. �
Copyright 1985
Kroger Sav-on
&:v.
Ouanmv Wonts Reserved
Mooe sow To oe
Dealers
items and Prices
Effective thru Sat.
October 15,1983
CONCERTS TMlATiR A
�I LMOVIES
NIQHT
CLUBS
WE'RE OPEN LATE!
Stop in at Subway after your late night fun. Try one of our
great tasting foot long sandwiches. We have 17 mouth water-
ing xanet.es to top off your night! We're open til! 2 (X) a m
seven da. a wevk.
( -SUBM"
Amerlci't Famous
Foot Long Sandwich
208 E. 5th Street
&P.R.C.
present
OPEN 24 HOURS EVERYDAY
600 Greenville Blvd. � Greenville
ADVERTISED ITEM
POtlCY
Each of these adver
tisea items is re
quired to be readily
available for sale in
each Kroger sav-on
except as speciftcai
iy noted in this ad if
we do run out of an
item we will offer
you your choice of a
comparable item
when available
reflecting the same
savings or a ram
check which wnl en
title you to purchase
the advertised item
at the advertised
price within jo days
Limit one manufac
turers coupon per
item
KEEBLER
Saltines
�Jlfrrewi, PEPSI FREE,
SUGAR FREE PEPSI FREE OR
Pepsi
Cola
1-Lb.
Box
KROGER
2-LtT.
N.R.
Btl.
Hamburger Magic
ASSORTED VARIETY
TOTINOS
Party
1CK)2.
Pkg.
ASSORTED FLAVORS
Yubi
Yogurt
12-0Z.
N.R.
BtlS.
PREMIUM
Coors
Beer
$235
special collection
14 jewel rv.
LES
lamond Store
u need to know
Male Best Body;
ontest
Tue Oct. 11,1983 9:00 til 2:00 Adm: $1.00
Happy Hour Prices I8yrs $2.00
3rd $25.00 �"P�
Entries can sign up at the Elbo at 9:00p.m.
8-
OZ.
cups
KROGER V2
Lowfat
Milk
Jug �
HOUY FARMS FRESH
CUT UP MIXED FRYER PARTS
OR GRADE A
Whole
Fryers
i7
Lb.
Limit 3 Pkgs.
Come Early
IN STORE BAKED
French Bread
$419
LVS. g
SUCED OR SHAVED
Boiled Ham
Lb.
l�&l�i'��'






THE EASTC ARCH IN1AN
Sports
OCTOBER II, 1983
Page 10
Pirates Fight Past Ragin' Cajuns
By CINDY PLEASANTS
ECU Tailback Tony Baker
rushed for two touchdowns and
108 yards, including 86 yards in
the second half, to lead the Pirates
to a 21-18 escape over
Southwestern Louisiana Satur-
day.
"It wasn't pretty, but we'll take
it said ECU head coach Ed
Emory after the game. The
Pirates moved to a 4-1 record,
while the Cajuns suffered their
fourth defeat.
It took a 63-yard ECU drive in
the fourth quarter for the Pirates
to run back the Cajuns before
27,345 fans at Ficklen Stadium �
ECU's fifth largest crowd ever.
Baker capped the drive with a
one-yard touchdown run with
7:30 remaining.
"We didn't take this game
lightly, but we just didn't play
with as much intensity as we have
in our last several games Baker
said.
East Carolina led 14-3 at
halftime, but three second-half
fumbles resulted in two Cajun
touchdowns.
"Every game we've had to fight
for our lives in the fourth
quarter Emory said. "I don't
know if they brought fumblitis in
here or what.
"I didn't think it would be as
bad as 1980 when we set a recrod
for fumbles in a quarter with five
in the third quarter against this
team. Last time, we had five
fumbles against them. But we go
in the second half and try to beat
that damn record
ECU had a chance to build a
comfortable lead early in the se-
cond half, but the Pirates' Ernest
Byner fumbled on a first-and-goal
situation at the Cajuns' seven-
yard line.
The Cajuns recovered another
ECU fumble that launched a
57-yard drive ending in fullback
Thomas Jackson's 37-yard
touchdown run with 37 seconds
left in the third period. Backup
quarterback Donnie Schexnider
then passed to Jackson in the end-
zone for a two-point conversion.
The Pirates then fumbled at
their 36, setting up a five-yard
touchdown pass from Schexnider
to tight end Zachary Dennis that
gave USL an 18-14 lead.
ECU responded by taking the
ensuing kick-off 63 yards in 13
plays, capped by Baker's one-yard
scoring plunge.
After stopping the Cajun of-
fense and regaining the ball, ECU
gave SW Louisiana one more
chance when Baker fumbled. But
the Cajuns were unable to move
beyond their 44.
Emory, who credited ECU's
defense for last week's 13-6 vic-
tory over Missouri, was not as
complimentary after this game. "I
thought we looked sluggish on
defense Emory said. "We just
didn't tackle
ECU free safety Clint Harris
agreed. "Defensively, this was
our worst game of the year. We
didn't play like we're capable of,
but we stopped them when we had
to. I think this game could be con-
sidered our midseason slump
Emory, on the other hand, said
the Pirates don't have time for
midseason slumps. "We can't
taper off he said. "If we don't
get better, we don't have a
chance. There's just no reason to
have a midseason slump after four
weeks.
"It's the mark of a man to sus-
tain their intensity and motiva-
tion. I don't expect my staff,
players or anybody else to have a
dropoff. If there is a dropoff, it's
my fault
USL's Jackson led the Cajun
offense with 135 yards on 19 car-
ries as the SW Louisiana outgain-
ed ECU 468 yards to 393.
SW Louisiana coach Sam
Robertson said his defense played
well, but ECU's was better.
"We had some opportunities at
the goal line in the first half and
didn't cash in he said. "East
Carolina played tremendous goal-
line defense and I thought that
was a big key
Emory said he had been con-
cerned all week about his team
would play against the Cajuns. "I
hate playing a team that 0-3
because I know they're better than
that he said.
"I'm concerned because we
didn't play with the spring and en-
thusiasm we've had Emory add-
ed. "We just don't have a team
that can dominate the whole
game. But you've got to win those
kind to have a good record
SW Louisiana drove 89 yards
from the opening kickoff before
stalling at the one-yard line and
settling for an 18-yard Oscar
Speer field goal.
ECU stalled at the Cajun 39
and Jeff Bolch punted the ball out
of bounds at the 4.
ECU drove to the 49 in seven
plays and Kevin Ingram slipped
around the right side for a 51-yard
touchdown run.
The Cajuns drove into ECU ter-
ritory once more in the waning
minutes of the first half, but Rally
Caparas intercepted a pass to end
the threat.
OAKY �ATTHSOM � HM LM
Pirate quarterback Kevin Ingram calls the signals against SW Loui-
siana Saturday. Ingram kept for a 51-yard touchdown run in the
game.
LOU CLEMMONI �
LAB
ECU's Steve Hamilton(85) and P.J
day's game.
Jordan (63) make their move toward USL's Thomas Jackson in Satur-
Emory: Intensity Is A Must
Top Rusher Surprised At Early Start
By RANDY MEWS
I Sport. MMo.
When Tony Baker came to
ECU to play football last fall, he
had no idea he would become a
starting tailback during his first
year on the collegiate level.
At 5-10 and 170 pounds, Baker
was one of the smallest players on
the team. Needless to say, he was
intimidated. As he put it, "I
didn't think I'd get to play at all in
my first year
But Baker got an opportunity
that he made the most of. When
Jimmy Walden went down with
an injury, he was tried at the star-
ting spot and won it.
Baker went on to become
ECU's leading rusher in 1982 with
827 yards and a 6.6 average per
carry. He had games of 154 yards
against Richmond, and ended the
year romping for 165 yards at
Temple.
At the end of last season, Baker
was ranked as the fifth best
freshman in the nation for rushing
offense per game and was named
the outstanding offensive
freshman player at ECU.
"I didn't expect anything like
that to happen to me in my first
year Baker said. "I'm just glad
Toay
OARV -ATTIKSOM �
of ECU'S fastest running hacks, rushed for two
and 108 yards against USL.
I contributed and was able to help
out the team
Baker is helping out this year's
team too, and in Saturday's vic-
tory over Southwestern Lousiana,
he carried the ball 23 times for 109
yards.
Baker ususally splits time with
Walden in the backfield, but when
Walden was sidelined with a frac-
tured hand during the first half,
Baker was able to show his stuff
in front of the fifth largest crowd
in Ficklen stadium history.
"Tony had a great game against
SW Lousiana running back
coach Robert Barrow said. "He
works so hard in practice, I'm
glad he finally got a 100-yard
game this season
Baker was pleased with his per-
formance on Saturday, but knew
the team could have played a lot
better. "We weren't concen-
trating on offense he said, "and
that's what almost cost us the
game
Although the Pirates had a bad
game Saturday, Baker is aware of
the potential this year's team has.
Even with teams such as Florida,
Miami (Fla.) and Southern
Mississippi remaining on their
schedule, Baker believes ECU can
win the rest of their games.
"There's no doubt in my mind
that we can beat Florida and
teams like that he said. "All we
have to do is be ourselves and
eliminate some unnecessary
mistakes
Baker got his start in football at
Andrews High School in High
Point. "I started playing football
in the eighth grade he said,
"but I didn't start taking it
seriously until I was in the
eleventh
It was t. at year Baker joined
his school ti ick team to help him
develop his lootbail skills and to
keep in shape. In just his first year
of track, Baker anchored the mile
and 880 relay teams which placed
second in the state. He also set a
school long jump record at 23J�
and was named the team's MVP.
He went on to rush for over
1,600 yards in his senior year on
the football team, and was chosen
as a member of the North
Carolina Shrine Bowl team. He
was also named an all-state per-
former, and received honorable
mention All-America.
Upon graduating, Baker was
recruited by N.C. State and
See EXPLOSIVE, Page 12
The East Carolina Pirates got
their biggest scare of the season
Saturday, but managed to pull out
a 21-18 win over Southwestern
Louisiana.
"We just felt like Southwestern
Louisiana was a much better team
than the press had rated them
Head Coach Ed Emory said. "We
knew what kind of talent they had
because they had a 7-3-1 record in
1982.
"Their head coach said he
thought they were a two-or-three
touchdown team better this year
than last
Emory said he and the Pirates
knew the game was going to be a
tough one, but they still weren't as
ready as they would have like to
have been. "We didn't play real
good on defense, and anytime you
get 10 penalties and four fumbles,
you're gonna stop yourself. I
don't care how good you are
Although one player described
Saturday's game as a midseason
slump, Emory said the Pirates
have got to have intensity
throughout the season. "You've
only got 11 games a year Emory
said. "I could understand if we
played 25 to 30 games a year. You
can go out and lose everything
you've worked so hard for.
"You've got to be able to
remember August and practices
and all you've got invested in this
game. All at once you can throw it
away in just one afternoon if you
don't play very good
Although the Pirates lacked the
luster they've had all season,
.nory said he thought the team
showed their true character when
they marched right back and
scored after the Cajuns took the
lead, 18-14. "They played some
great football and reached down
and pulled up their straps when
they were in some tough situa-
tions he said.
Cindy Pleasants
A Look Inside
"We've got to fly around the
football everyday. We have to
make things happen. I just don't
believe that baloney about you
can't be up every Saturday. I
think 11 times you can be up
The Pirate defense also showed
strength when they held the Ca-
juns twice in the first half on the
one-yard line. According to
Emory, the Bucs like to defend at
the goalline.
"You have a different kind of
ballgame inside the five-yard
line he said. "They don't have
as much room to finesse you and
run all kinds of stuff at you.
"The field really gets narrow
and really closes in on the offense.
They come at you more, and our
kids love for a football team to
run at them. They're more
physical players, and the game is
more aggressive at the five-yard
line than in the middle of the
field
On offense, ECU quarterback
Kevin Ingram threw several
bombs. "Kevin threw deep on our
bootleg play Emory said. "He
was open all day long. We felt like
they would be open deep in the
middle.
"We trained Kevin to throw
deep last week when we should
have taught him to take what was
there. Offensively, nobody stop-
ped us. We just stopped ourselves
with those four fumbles
Emory would like to see the
Pirates posess the ball longer and
play good pass defense. In the
first half, SW Louisiana had the
ball 21:11 to ECU's 8:49. The Ca-
juns also racked up 99 yards pass-
ing at halftime, while the Pirates
had just 33.
"You're gonna get beat in the
big games if the other team has
the ball more Emory said. "It's
(ball possession) a great concern
to me with the ball games facing
us in the next six weeks.
"The defense has got to make
them turn the ball over. That's
why we beat Missouri. We've got
to make people punt the ball eight
or nine times to win
As far as pass defense, Emory
said the Pirates are bending but
not breaking. "We broke yester-
day (Saturday) for a pass in the
endzone and a two-point play.
"We giving too much cushion
on man-to-man coverage. We're
just not aggressive enough. I
don't know it they're afraid to
make a mistake oi not.
"The linebackers and defensive
secondary didn't play like they're
See BUCS, Page 12
,
r
ECU freshman PaJmu
Wilmington Wednesdi
Tennis
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU men's
tennis team raised
their record to 6-6 this
weekend by winning
three of four matches
at the Campbell tennis
tournament in Buies
Creek.
The Pirates' onl
loss was to tourna-
ment champion, the
Citadel. ECU finished
second overall with
victories against High
Point, Campbell and
Frances Marion.
"I was very pleased
with our team's play
this past weekend
Coach Pat Sherman
said. "Everybody
played up a position
due to the ankle in-
Jury to number one
seed Galen Treble. All
our players responded
well to the increased
challenge and played
a great tournament
BUI O'Donnell and
Greg Loyd both went
BUYING -
LOANS
TVi. Air Conditioners
Sterecv guns gold ft Silver
diamonds cameras and
equipment ype�r,terj
kerosene nea'ers
refrigerators dorm sie on
ly I video games ft car
tridges power tools
musical mstr,mes
microwave ovens � dec
recorders bicycles ��
anything else of value
Southern Pawn Shop
located �es Evans Street
downtown 7$2 144
throi
nami
nam
the
Creecl
the wJ
runnj
numt
Th
play
gam
at :
p
Caro
Pom: I
In
Maki
Paui
Dougj
def
6-0;
Ev
West
Cree;
Man
Greg
def
6-2.
(ECU
Bkx.nl
Ir
Mai
401 S. EVANS ST
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTh
YOUR PROFESSION
Rcci
Coffee
Pirate Eraaat Byaer straggles for every yart at the Cajaa
east caroli:
�����a mm





T
1
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11, 1983
11
ns
stalled at the Cajun 39
It Bolch punted the ball out
i ds at the 4
drove to (he 49 in seven
d Kevin Ingram slipped
:he right ide for a 51-yard
cvvn run
ajuns drove into ECl ter-
k ce more in the waning
1 ' the first half, but Rally
rcepted a pass to end
OA�Y PATTIRSON - oH L�
I signals against SW Loui-
rd touchdown run in the
Must
"Kevin threw deep on our
play Emory sajd. "He
m all day long. We felt like
suld be open deep in the
trained Kevin to throw
tt week when we should
tght him to take what was
Offensively, nobody stop-
We just stopped ourselves
5se four fumbles
would like to see the
posess the ball longer and
3od pass defense. In the
If, SW Louisiana had the
111 to ECU's 8:49. The Ca-
o racked up 99 yards pass-
lalftime, while the Pirates
It 33.
re gonna get beat in the
es if the other team has
more Emory said. "It's
)ssession) a great concern
.ith the ball games facing
e next slx weeks.
defense has got to make
urn the ball over. That's
beat Missouri. We've got
people punt the ball eight
times to win
as pass defense, Emory
Pirates are bending but
iking. "We broke yester-
turday) for a pass in the
and a two-point play,
giving too much cushion
l-to-man coverage. We're
)t aggressive enough. I
jmow it they're afraid to
mistake or not.
linebackers and defensive
kry didn't play like they're
S�e BUCS, Page 12
V
LOU
, mftmmmmy
Women's
ECU freshman Palmier Gross! attempts to control the ball against an earlier opponent this season. The soccer team will play at UNC-
Wilmington Wednesday at 4 p.m.
Tennis Team Evens Record At Tourney
1. Kappa Alphas "A"s 1. Hearbreakers
By RANDY MEWS
The ECU men's
tennis team raised
their record to 6-6 this
weekend by winning
three of four matches
at the Campbell tennis
tournament in Buies
Creek.
The Pirates' only
loss was to tourna-
ment champion, the
Citadel. ECU finished
second overall with
victories against High
Point, Campbell and
Frances Marion.
"I was very pleased
with our team's play
this past weekend
Coach Pat Sherman
said. "Everybody
played up a position
due to the ankle in-
jury to number one
seed Galen Treble. All
our players responded
well to the increased
challenge and played
a great tournament
Bill O'Donnell and
Greg Loyd both went
undefeated
throughout the tour-
nament and were
named champions of
their flights. David
Creech went 3-1 for
the weekend, and was
runner-up at the
number four position.
The Pirates will
play their final home
game on Wednesday
at 3 p.m. against
powerful North
Carolina State.
Results: ECU 6, High
Point 3
In singles, Pakka
Makela (HP) def.
Paul Owen 7-6, 6-1;
Doug Otto (ECU)
def. Matt Lange 6-2,
6-0; Bill O'Donnell
(ECU) def. Kevin
West 6, 6-1; David
Creech (ECU) def.
Matt Ranck 6-2, 7-6;
Greg Loyd (ECU)
def. Steve Pappas 6-4,
6-2; Dan LaMont
(ECU) def. Francisco
Bloch 6-4, 6-4.
In doubles, Lange-
Makela (HP) def.
Owen-O'Donnell 6-2,
6-2; Otto-Creech
(ECU) def. Pappas-
West 6-1,6-4; Bloch-
Ranch (HP) def.
Loyd-Bagley 6-7, 7-6,
6-2.
Results: ECU 6,
Frances Marion 3
In singles, J. Demp-
sy (FM) def. Owen
6-3, 7-6; Otto (ECU)
def. T. Nichols 6-1,
4-6, 6-4; O'Donnell
(ECU) def. B.
Roycroft 6-3, 6-0;
Creech (ECU) def. J.
Todt 6-1, 6-4; Loyd
(ECU) def. C.
Leonard 6-4, 6-4; J.
Sessions (FM) def.
LaMont 6-4, 6-1.
In doubles, Owen-
O'Donnell def.
Dempsy-Roycroft
6-3, 6-0; Otto-Creech
def. Sessions-Todt
6-4, 7-6; Nichols-
Leanord def. Loyd-
Bagley 6-4, 6-3. �
Results: ECU 2,
Citadel 7
In singles, Charles
White (C) def. Owen
6-1, 6-3; Jim Sirecan-
sky (Q def. Otto 6-3,
6-3; O'Donnell (ECU)
def. Blake Harman
7-5, 6-4; Jim Potter
(Q def. Creech 7-6,
6-2; Loyd (ECU) def.
Colie Crosby 6-3, 6-0;
Bo Crouch (C) def.
LaMont 6-4, 7-5.
In doubles, White-
Crosby def.
Owen-O'Donnell 7-6,
6-2; Harman-Crouch
BUYING -
LOANS
TVs. Air Conditioner,
Stereo, guns, gold silver,
diamonds, cemeras and
equipment, typewriters,
kerosene heaters,
refrigerators (dorm siie on-
ly), video games & car-
tridges, power tools,
musical instruments
microwave ovens, video
recorders, bicycles, and
anything else of value.
Southern Pawn Shop,
located �C5 Evans Street,
downtown. 7S3-244.
ABORTIONS UP
T012THWEEK
OF PREGNANCY
Sits.oo Preplan-y Tea. Wr
Central. sM PrfaH�
Pregnancy Cavaaff P�r
tvrtaar intormatmn call
�J14S1S To Fre Maaafaer
�M-nt-lSM) between t .�
and S P.M. Weekdays.
RAUHGHS WOMIN'S
HEALTH
ORGANIZATION
�irWeetMnnjanS.
� PAY IMMEDIATE CASH FOR:
CLASS RINGS WEDDING BANDS
DIAMONDS
ALL GOLD & SILVER
SILVER COINS
Ch'NA&CRYSTAL
FINE WATCHES
cot ��&� JM4�
401 S. EVANS ST. open 9.30-5.30 mon.sat.
(HARMONY HOUSE SOUTH) PHON E 752-3866
TOUR PROFESSIONAL PERMANENT DEALER
Banquets
Luncheons
Receptions
Coffee Breaks
east Carolina dining services
def. Otto-Creech 4-6,
6-2, 6-4; Sirecansky-
Potter def. Loyd-
Bagley 5-7, 6-1, 6-3.
Results ECU 6,
Campbell 3
In singles, Owen
(ECU) def. Bruce
Eickoff 6-2, 6-0;
Delconte (Q def. Ot-
to 7-6, 0-6, 6-2;
Octavio Horcasitas
6-1,6-1; Loyd (ECU)
def. David Holland
6-7, 7-6, 6-0; LaMont
(ECU) def. Dennis
Hapes 6-0, 6-3.
In doubles, Owen-
O'Donnell def.
Eickoff-Holland 11-9;
Delconte-Ingram def.
Otto-Creech 10-8;
O'Donnell (ECU) def. Horcasitas-Maynor
Art Ingram 6-4, 6-2; def. Bagley-Loyd
Creech (ECU) def. 10-1.
2. Clement Cyclones
3. Alpha Phi's
4.T.A
5. Alpha Delta Pi
2.3rd Regiment 2
3. Untouchables
4. Pi Kappa Phi "B"
5. Love Brokers
6. Kappa Sigmas
7. Enforcers
8. Sigma Phi Epsilon "B
9. Wall Bangers
10. Corrupters
Co-sponsored by C.O.Tankard Co
Miller Brewing Co.
itn"
i ???????????i




:
I
ATTENTION
SENIORS
-VOTE
HHHHBHBBaHPnBBHHBBHB
UG
HAMILTON
CLASS PRESIDENT
HATlWq PROBLEMS
With
DftUGST- ALCOHOLf FAMILY?
Iff
4CM4UM(J
l4HMr�-Mr� �J
phone
752-3172
Located I mile pas
Hastings Ford on
10th St. Ext.
Monday thru Thursday
200WESTwrWE�l 200 WEST
THIS WEEKS LINEUP
TUESDAY NITE - OCT. 11
PI KAPPA PHI
WEDNESDAY - OCT. 12th
MASQUERADE PARTY
DRESS UP AND MINGLE
WITH US AT 200 WEST
FRIDAY - OCT. 14th
SUPER HAPPY HOUR
SATURDAY - OCT. 15th
S PENNY DRAFT NIGHT
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200 WEST 200 WEST 200 WEST 200
Popcorn Shrimp
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Ocean Perch $1.99
Seafood Cakes $1.99
French Fries or Baked Potato,
Tossed Smlmdmmy be substituted for slew 3-extrm
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r'tmmmmwfp

.





)
?
12
THE EAST CAROLINIAN
OCTOBER 11, 1983
Richards Leads
ECU Swimmer
By RANDY MEWS
A �kim Syotti BdEat
The ECU swim
team geared up for
the fall season Thurs-
day, when the men
and women swimmers
competed against
each other in the an-
nual pentathlon.
Each swimmer
competed in the
100-meter freestyle,
butterfly,
breaststroke and
backstroke, as well as
the 200 individual
medley event.
Senior Kevin
Richards won the
intra-squad meet for
the fourth straight
year with a total of
2,020 points. "Kevin
swam an excellent
meet Head Coach
Rick Kobe said. "This
was the first time in
ECU history that
anyone has won it
four years in a row
Freshman Kevin
Hidalgo placed se-
cond in the meet with
1,927 points, and
Stranton Smith took
third with a total of
1,853.
The pentathlon has
become somewhat of
a tradition Kobe
said. "It's an ex-
cellent way of deter-
mining the best all-
around swimmer on
the team, because
each person has to
swim every event
regardless of what
stroke they specialize
in
Richards, Hidalgo
and Smith are all in-
dividual medley swim-
mers, and Kobe said
they are the ones who
place the highest in
the pentathlon
because they usually
don't have any weak
strokes.
For the women,
Freshman Cacee
Paust ran away with
the meet totaling
3,165 points. She was
followed by Missy
Burt with 2,180, while
Cindy Newman
finished third with
1,904 points.
Kobe was very
pleased with the per-
formance of the
women, and thought
everyone involved in
the meet did an ex-
cellent job. "Our
times are much im-
proved over last
year he said, "and
it seems like
everybody is working
so much harder.
These prices good thru
Saturday, October IS, 1983
Fresh Daily - 5 Lb. Pack Or More
Ground
Explosive First Step
Puts Baker In Line
Lb.
4-8 lbs. Average
Smoked
Each
Sweet Western
Laroe
Picnics Honeydews
Cont'd From Page 12
several other area
schools, but said he
chose ECU because
they ran the
I-formation on of-
fense, and his major
was best satisfied
here.
Baker's illustrious
track career followed
him to ECL as he was
quickly tabbed as one
of the fastest players
on the team. Coach
Barrow cites Baker's
explosive first step as
the primary reason he
landed the starting
job in his freshman
year, but quickly adds
that Baker has many
other talents.
"Tony is such a
versatile back he can
do anything we ask of
him Barrow said.
"He's a good blocker
and receiver and has
excellent work habits.
In short, Tony Baker
is everything we have
ever looked for in a
running back
Milwaukee
2 Liter
Pk. of 6 12 Ox. Cim
Gallo
Wine
Bucs Phillie-Bound
To Meet Temple
Cont'd From Page 12
gonna have to play. It
wasn't a matter of ef-
fort. They just didn't
have spring and en-
thusiasm
Now 4-1, the
Pirates will head for
Temple this Saturday.
Last year, the Bucs
beat the Owls, 23-10.
Temple is now 1-4.
"They (Temple) beat
Syracuse, and lost to
Penn State, Pitt-
burgh, Boston Col-
lege and Cincinatti
Emory noted. "They
lost to four outstan-
ding teams, and any
team in the country
could be 1-4 with that
schedule
According to
Emory, the Owls have
a very capable
defense. "They're
very strong he said.
"Their defensive
secondary is probably
the best in the coun-
try.
"We're going to
have to play great
defense
Because the
Philadelphia Phillies
baseball team will be
playing in Veterans
Stadium on Saturday,
the ECU-Temple
game has been moved
to Penn State's
Franklin Field
Gametime is schedul
ed at 7:30 p.m.
1.S Liter - B.rta Hfy. B.r��y Ron.
Cmblit Blue fk. Cb.blit Vit Roto Rot Roto
Schlitz
Pk�. af 12 � 12 0: Cam
1 Lb. - Food Lion
Why Pay 47 Each
10 Ourtet
Why Ply M 29

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So-Dri m
Towels e0DRj
X
Why Pay 59
TASTY
�zza
CiaSSltiedS Macaroni & Cheese
Food Tt�n
Mm
SALE
FEMALE ROOMATE
WANTED: Georgetown Apt
171.75monttt Cell 70-45.
FOR SALE: Convection even
ecel cond. Oreat lor dorm
U! 96 Large tayley wefsult
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PERSONAL
SENIORS: Make Mr you take
the time to wot. Wednesday
Lite Rohorts tor your senior
elm President. Thank yew.
OAVIO HARRIS, you're a won-
nartvl porson Ok hill
ALL SINO IN THE SFRINO: all
tint Mi the spring, all ting In me
aacmfi
WANTED
FHARO RESTAURANT
amalaylm daytime Help from It
a.m. till S p.m. Come after 1
p.m MMRrl. Sit Cotanch No
call i
ROOMMATE WANTED: $100.0.
plus on third iitll. Jim or Tony
751-211.
SARYSITTER NEEDED
Various afternoons nights and
weekends. Experience with In
fant and � year M needed. Own
transportation. Call 754-U04.
WANTINO TO EUY: a Sony
walkmancasstt player tha
workos, at a reasonable price
Call 757 nil and ask tor Clay
MISC.
LEOAL HASSLES?
Howard J. Cummings. a'
at Law. No chars for initia
consultation tor ECU Students
Call
OOOO RAY FROCESSINO mall
frm Sam. N experience
Start immediately. Information,
send .alt Sdrd. stamped
awv.ltpo. W.I. DNtrlsstort. iox
1S07, Rahway. NJ. 0705.
FEMALE ROOMATI
WANTED: to �har nlefy tor-
All yo d Is
tomltvr fijo M a
mssth pto on ttwrd irNNttos.
Call 7S0-1RH af
LOWEST TYFINO RATES
c.m�i include experience,
prefesiional work Fro
ofroedln. I pel ling and gram
matlcal corrections 155 7
aftor ME,
FROFESSIONAL TYFINO
SEHEfj
ACADEMIC AND FROFES
SIONAL typing Call Jvll
EUdwrth at 7So-7i7.
TYFINO. TERM, THESIS
7SQ-O0M.
SLEEF TIGHT wMto w type
yssr tons paper or tSo.li. Call
fsa professionals at ward tor
Wr j Typing and wrd process
14 Oi. - Assort!
Pet Rite Cream Pies
4 Pack -1 Ply
Page Toilet Tissue
4.5 0z. - Lt. ehaak Tim, It Oil
Chicken Of The See
K
ftosr; call 7
r-r
I





Title
The East Carolinian, October 11, 1983
Description
East Carolina's student-run campus newspaper was first published in 1923 as the East Carolina Teachers College News (1923-1925). It has been re-named as The Teco Echo (1925, 1926-1952), East Carolinian (1952-1969), Fountainhead (1969-1979), and The East Carolinian (1969, 1979-present). It includes local, state, national, and international stories with a focus on campus events.
Date
October 11, 1983
Original Format
newspapers
Extent
Local Identifier
UA50.05.06.02.293
Location of Original
University Archives
Rights
This item has been made available for use in research, teaching, and private study. Researchers are responsible for using these materials in accordance with Title 17 of the United States Code and any other applicable statutes. If you are the creator or copyright holder of this item and would like it removed, please contact us at als_digitalcollections@ecu.edu.
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC-EDU/1.0/

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